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Sample records for rnase mrp rna

  1. Conserved and variable domains of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is a eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of one RNA molecule and 7-10 protein subunits. One important function of MRP is to catalyze an endonucleolytic cleavage during processing of rRNA precursors. RNase MRP is evolutionary related to RNase P which is critical for tRNA processing. A large number of MRP RNA sequences that now are available have been used to identify conserved primary and secondary structure features of the molecule. MRP RNA has structural features in common with P RNA such as a conserved catalytic core, but it also has unique features and is characterized by a domain highly variable between species. Information regarding primary and secondary structure features is of interest not only in basic studies of the function of MRP RNA, but also because mutations in the RNA give rise to human genetic diseases such as cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

  2. RNase MRP and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattijssen, Sandy; Welting, Tim J M; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2010-01-01

    The human RNase MRP complex consists of a catalytic RNA and several protein components. RNase MRP is a ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic endoribonuclease that cleaves various RNAs, including ribosomal, messenger, and mitochondrial RNAs, in a highly specific fashion. In several autoimmune diseases autoantibodies targeting RNase MRP have been found. These so-called anti-Th/To autoantibodies, which most frequently can be detected in the sera of scleroderma patients, are directed to several protein components of the RNase MRP and the evolutionarily related RNase P complex. It is not yet known whether the anti-Th/To immune response is an epiphenomenon or whether these autoantibodies play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. The gene encoding the RNase MRP RNA was the first nuclear non-coding RNA gene demonstrated to be associated with a genetic disease. Mutations in this gene are causing the highly pleiotropic disease cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH). CHH patients are characterized by a short stature, hypoplastic hair, and short limbs. In addition, they show a predisposition to lymphomas and other cancers and suffer from defective T-cell immunity. Since the identification of the first CHH-associated mutations in 2001, many distinct mutations have been found in different patients. These mutations either affect the structure of the RNase MRP RNA or are located in the promoter region and reduce the expression levels. In this review article we will, after describing the biochemical aspects of RNase MRP, discuss the targeting of RNase MRP in autoimmunity and the role of mutations in the RNase MRP RNA gene in CHH.

  3. Global identification of new substrates for the yeast endoribonuclease, RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulds, Jason; Wierzbicki, Sara; McNairn, Adrian; Schmitt, Mark E

    2012-10-26

    RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP) is an essential, evolutionarily conserved endoribonuclease composed of 10 different protein subunits and a single RNA. RNase MRP has established roles in multiple pathways including ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle regulation, and mitochondrial DNA replication. Although each of these functions is important to cell growth, additional functions may exist given the essential nature of the complex. To identify novel RNase MRP substrates, we utilized RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray chip analysis to identify RNA that physically associates with RNase MRP. We identified several new potential substrates for RNase MRP including a cell cycle-regulated transcript, CTS1; the yeast homolog of the mammalian p27(Kip1), SIC1; and the U2 RNA component of the spliceosome. In addition, we found RNase MRP to be involved in the regulation of the Ty1 transposon RNA. These results reinforce and broaden the role of RNase MRP in cell cycle regulation and help to identify new roles of this endoribonuclease.

  4. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  5. Targeted CRISPR disruption reveals a role for RNase MRP RNA in human preribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2017-01-01

    MRP RNA is an abundant, essential noncoding RNA whose functions have been proposed in yeast but are incompletely understood in humans. Mutations in the genomic locus for MRP RNA cause pleiotropic human diseases, including cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH). Here we applied CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to disrupt the endogenous human MRP RNA locus, thereby attaining what has eluded RNAi and RNase H experiments: elimination of MRP RNA in the majority of cells. The resulting accumulation of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor-analyzed by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), Northern blots, and RNA sequencing-implicates MRP RNA in pre-rRNA processing. Amelioration of pre-rRNA imbalance is achieved through rescue of MRP RNA levels by ectopic expression. Furthermore, affinity-purified MRP ribonucleoprotein (RNP) from HeLa cells cleaves the human pre-rRNA in vitro at at least one site used in cells, while RNP isolated from cells with CRISPR-edited MRP loci loses this activity, and ectopic MRP RNA expression restores cleavage activity. Thus, a role for RNase MRP in human pre-rRNA processing is established. As demonstrated here, targeted CRISPR disruption is a valuable tool for functional studies of essential noncoding RNAs that are resistant to RNAi and RNase H-based degradation.

  6. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  7. Role of RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and RNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaag, Hannah M; Lu, Qiasheng; Schmitt, Mark E; Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA degradation, together with RNA synthesis, controls the steady-state level of viral RNAs in infected cells. The endoribonucleolytic cleavage of viral RNA is important not only for viral RNA degradation but for RNA recombination as well, due to the participation of some RNA degradation products in the RNA recombination process. To identify host endoribonucleases involved in degradation of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model host, we tested eight known endoribonucleases. Here we report that downregulation of SNM1, encoding a component of the RNase MRP, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in the NME1 gene, coding for the RNA component of RNase MRP, lead to reduced production of the endoribonucleolytically cleaved TBSV RNA in yeast. We also show that the highly purified yeast RNase MRP cleaves the TBSV RNA in vitro, resulting in TBSV RNA degradation products similar in size to those observed in yeast cells. Knocking down the NME1 homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana also led to decreased production of the cleaved TBSV RNA, suggesting that in plants, RNase MRP is involved in TBSV RNA degradation. Altogether, this work suggests a role for the host endoribonuclease RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and recombination.

  8. RNase MRP RNA and RNase P activity in plants are associated with a Pop1p containing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehan, Mario; Heubeck, Christian; Menzel, Nicolas; Seibel, Peter; Schön, Astrid

    2012-09-01

    RNase P processes the 5'-end of tRNAs. An essential catalytic RNA has been demonstrated in Bacteria, Archaea and the nuclei of most eukaryotes; an organism-specific number of proteins complement the holoenzyme. Nuclear RNase P from yeast and humans is well understood and contains an RNA, similar to the sister enzyme RNase MRP. In contrast, no protein subunits have yet been identified in the plant enzymes, and the presence of a nucleic acid in RNase P is still enigmatic. We have thus set out to identify and characterize the subunits of these enzymes in two plant model systems. Expression of the two known Arabidopsis MRP RNA genes in vivo was verified. The first wheat MRP RNA sequences are presented, leading to improved structure models for plant MRP RNAs. A novel mRNA encoding the central RNase P/MRP protein Pop1p was identified in Arabidopsis, suggesting the expression of distinct protein variants from this gene in vivo. Pop1p-specific antibodies precipitate RNase P activity and MRP RNAs from wheat extracts. Our results provide evidence that in plants, Pop1p is associated with MRP RNAs and with the catalytic subunit of RNase P, either separately or in a single large complex.

  9. Viperin mRNA is a novel target for the human RNase MRP/RNase P endoribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattijssen, Sandy; Hinson, Ella R; Onnekink, Carla; Hermanns, Pia; Zabel, Bernhard; Cresswell, Peter; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2011-07-01

    RNase MRP is a conserved endoribonuclease, in humans consisting of a 267-nucleotide RNA associated with 7-10 proteins. Mutations in its RNA component lead to several autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasias, including cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH). Because the known substrates of mammalian RNase MRP, pre-ribosomal RNA, and RNA involved in mitochondrial DNA replication are not likely involved in CHH, we analyzed the effects of RNase MRP (and the structurally related RNase P) depletion on mRNAs using DNA microarrays. We confirmed the upregulation of the interferon-inducible viperin mRNA by RNAi experiments and this appeared to be independent of the interferon response. We detected two cleavage sites for RNase MRP/RNase P in the coding sequence of viperin mRNA. This is the first study providing direct evidence for the cleavage of a mRNA by RNase MRP/RNase P in human cells. Implications for the involvement in the pathophysiology of CHH are discussed.

  10. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2015-09-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA-RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P.

  11. The P3 domain of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP: making a protein-rich RNA-based enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a universal essential RNA-based enzyme made of a catalytic RNA component and a protein part; eukaryotic RNase P is closely related to a universal eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein RNase MRP. The protein part of the eukaryotic RNases P/MRP is dramatically more complex than that in bacterial and archaeal RNases P. The increase in the complexity of the protein part in eukaryotic RNases P/MRP was accompanied by the appearance of a novel structural element in the RNA component: an essential and phylogenetically conserved helix-loop-helix P3 RNA domain. The crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain in a complex with protein components Pop6 and Pop7 has been recently solved. Here we discuss the most salient structural features of the P3 domain as well as its possible role in the evolutionary transition to the protein-rich eukaryotic RNases P/MRP.

  12. Comparison of mitochondrial and nucleolar RNase MRP reveals identical RNA components with distinct enzymatic activities and protein components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiaosheng; Wierzbicki, Sara; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Schmitt, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease found in three cellular locations where distinct substrates are processed: the mitochondria, the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic RNase MRP is the nucleolar enzyme that is transiently relocalized during mitosis. Nucleolar RNase MRP (NuMRP) was purified to homogeneity, and we extensively purified the mitochondrial RNase MRP (MtMRP) to a single RNA component identical to the NuMRP RNA. Although the protein components of the NuMRP were identified by mass spectrometry successfully, none of the known NuMRP proteins were found in the MtMRP preparation. Only trace amounts of the core NuMRP protein, Pop4, were detected in MtMRP by Western blot. In vitro activity of the two enzymes was compared. MtMRP cleaved only mitochondrial ORI5 substrate, while NuMRP cleaved all three substrates. However, the NuMRP enzyme cleaved the ORI5 substrate at sites different than the MtMRP enzyme. In addition, enzymatic differences in preferred ionic strength confirm these enzymes as distinct entities. Magnesium was found to be essential to both enzymes. We tested a number of reported inhibitors including puromycin, pentamidine, lithium, and pAp. Puromycin inhibition suggested that it binds directly to the MRP RNA, reaffirming the role of the RNA component in catalysis. In conclusion, our study confirms that the NuMRP and MtMRP enzymes are distinct entities with differing activities and protein components but a common RNA subunit, suggesting that the RNA must be playing a crucial role in catalytic activity.

  13. Heterodimerization of the human RNase P/MRP subunits Rpp20 and Rpp25 is a prerequisite for interaction with the P3 arm of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands-Taylor, Katherine L D; Martino, Luigi; Tata, Renée; Babon, Jeffrey J; Bui, Tam T; Drake, Alex F; Beavil, Rebecca L; Pruijn, Ger J M; Brown, Paul R; Conte, Maria R

    2010-07-01

    Rpp20 and Rpp25 are two key subunits of the human endoribonucleases RNase P and MRP. Formation of an Rpp20-Rpp25 complex is critical for enzyme function and sub-cellular localization. We present the first detailed in vitro analysis of their conformational properties, and a biochemical and biophysical characterization of their mutual interaction and RNA recognition. This study specifically examines the role of the Rpp20/Rpp25 association in the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. The interaction of the individual subunits with the P3 arm of the RNase MRP RNA is revealed to be negligible whereas the 1:1 Rpp20:Rpp25 complex binds to the same target with an affinity of the order of nM. These results unambiguously demonstrate that Rpp20 and Rpp25 interact with the P3 RNA as a heterodimer, which is formed prior to RNA binding. This creates a platform for the design of future experiments aimed at a better understanding of the function and organization of RNase P and MRP. Finally, analyses of interactions with deletion mutant proteins constructed with successively shorter N- and C-terminal sequences indicate that the Alba-type core domain of both Rpp20 and Rpp25 contains most of the determinants for mutual association and P3 RNA recognition.

  14. RNase MRP is required for entry of 35S precursor rRNA into the canonical processing pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Lasse; Bommankanti, Ananth; Li, Xing; Hayden, Lauren; Jones, Adrienne; Khan, Miriam; Oni, Tolulope; Zengel, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    RNase MRP is a nucleolar RNA-protein enzyme that participates in the processing of rRNA during ribosome biogenesis. Previous experiments suggested that RNase MRP makes a nonessential cleavage in the first internal transcribed spacer. Here we report experiments with new temperature-sensitive RNase MRP mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that show that the abundance of all early intermediates in the processing pathway is severely reduced upon inactivation of RNase MRP. Transcription of rRNA continues unabated as determined by RNA polymerase run-on transcription, but the precursor rRNA transcript does not accumulate, and appears to be unstable. Taken together, these observations suggest that inactivation of RNase MRP blocks cleavage at sites A0, A1, A2, and A3, which in turn, prevents precursor rRNA from entering the canonical processing pathway (35S > 20S + 27S > 18S + 25S + 5.8S rRNA). Nevertheless, at least some cleavage at the processing site in the second internal transcribed spacer takes place to form an unusual 24S intermediate, suggesting that cleavage at C2 is not blocked. Furthermore, the long form of 5.8S rRNA is made in the absence of RNase MRP activity, but only in the presence of Xrn1p (exonuclease 1), an enzyme not required for the canonical pathway. We conclude that RNase MRP is a key enzyme for initiating the canonical processing of precursor rRNA transcripts, but alternative pathway(s) might provide a backup for production of small amounts of rRNA.

  15. Modular architecture of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP revealed by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipp, Katharina; Galani, Kyriaki; Batisse, Claire; Prinz, Simone; Böttcher, Bettina

    2012-04-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein enzymes, which process RNA substrates including tRNA precursors for RNase P and 5.8 S rRNA precursors, as well as some mRNAs, for RNase MRP. The structures of RNase P and RNase MRP have not yet been solved, so it is unclear how the proteins contribute to the structure of the complexes and how substrate specificity is determined. Using electron microscopy and image processing we show that eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP have a modular architecture, where proteins stabilize the RNA fold and contribute to cavities, channels and chambers between the modules. Such features are located at strategic positions for substrate recognition by shape and coordination of the cleaved-off sequence. These are also the sites of greatest difference between RNase P and RNase MRP, highlighting the importance of the adaptation of this region to the different substrates.

  16. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  17. Characterization of RNase MRP RNA and novel snoRNAs from Giardia intestinalis and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaowei S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cells possess a complex network of RNA machineries which function in RNA-processing and cellular regulation which includes transcription, translation, silencing, editing and epigenetic control. Studies of model organisms have shown that many ncRNAs of the RNA-infrastructure are highly conserved, but little is known from non-model protists. In this study we have conducted a genome-scale survey of medium-length ncRNAs from the protozoan parasites Giardia intestinalis and Trichomonas vaginalis. Results We have identified the previously 'missing' Giardia RNase MRP RNA, which is a key ribozyme involved in pre-rRNA processing. We have also uncovered 18 new H/ACA box snoRNAs, expanding our knowledge of the H/ACA family of snoRNAs. Conclusions Results indicate that Giardia intestinalis and Trichomonas vaginalis, like their distant multicellular relatives, contain a rich infrastructure of RNA-based processing. From here we can investigate the evolution of RNA processing networks in eukaryotes.

  18. Differential association of protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welting, Tim J M; Kikkert, Bastiaan J; van Venrooij, Walther J; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2006-07-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in nucleolar and mitochondrial RNA processing events. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein particle, which is structurally related to RNase P, an endoribonuclease involved in pre-tRNA processing. Most of the protein components of RNase MRP have been reported to be associated with RNase P as well. In this study we determined the association of these protein subunits with the human RNase MRP and RNase P particles by glycerol gradient sedimentation and coimmunoprecipitation. In agreement with previous studies, RNase MRP sedimented at 12S and 60-80S. In contrast, only a single major peak was observed for RNase P at 12S. The analysis of individual protein subunits revealed that hPop4 (also known as Rpp29), Rpp21, Rpp20, and Rpp25 only sedimented in 12S fractions, whereas hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 were also found in 60-80S fractions. In agreement with their cosedimentation with RNase P RNA in the 12S peak, coimmunoprecipitation with VSV-epitope-tagged protein subunits revealed that hPop4, Rpp21, and in addition Rpp14 preferentially associate with RNase P. These data show that hPop4, Rpp21, and Rpp14 may not be associated with RNase MRP. Furthermore, Rpp20 and Rpp25 appear to be associated with only a subset of RNase MRP particles, in contrast to hPop1, Rpp40, Rpp38, and Rpp30 (and possibly also hPop5), which are probably associated with all RNase MRP complexes. Our data are consistent with a transient association of Rpp20 and Rpp25 with RNase MRP, which may be inversely correlated to its involvement in pre-rRNA processing.

  19. Interactions between subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP support a conserved eukaryotic RNase P/MRP architecture.

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    Aspinall, Tanya V; Gordon, James M B; Bennett, Hayley J; Karahalios, Panagiotis; Bukowski, John-Paul; Walker, Scott C; Engelke, David R; Avis, Johanna M

    2007-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is an endonuclease, related to RNase P, which functions in eukaryotic pre-rRNA processing. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, RNase MRP comprises an RNA subunit and ten proteins. To improve our understanding of subunit roles and enzyme architecture, we have examined protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions in vitro, complementing existing yeast two-hybrid data. In total, 31 direct protein-protein interactions were identified, each protein interacting with at least three others. Furthermore, seven proteins self-interact, four strongly, pointing to subunit multiplicity in the holoenzyme. Six protein subunits interact directly with MRP RNA and four with pre-rRNA. A comparative analysis with existing data for the yeast and human RNase P/MRP systems enables confident identification of Pop1p, Pop4p and Rpp1p as subunits that lie at the enzyme core, with probable addition of Pop5p and Pop3p. Rmp1p is confirmed as an integral subunit, presumably associating preferentially with RNase MRP, rather than RNase P, via interactions with Snm1p and MRP RNA. Snm1p and Rmp1p may act together to assist enzyme specificity, though roles in substrate binding are also indicated for Pop4p and Pop6p. The results provide further evidence of a conserved eukaryotic RNase P/MRP architecture and provide a strong basis for studies of enzyme assembly and subunit function.

  20. The rRNA methyltransferase Bud23 shows functional interaction with components of the SSU processome and RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Richa; White, Joshua P; Johnson, Arlen W

    2013-06-01

    Bud23 is responsible for the conserved methylation of G1575 of 18S rRNA, in the P-site of the small subunit of the ribosome. bud23Δ mutants have severely reduced small subunit levels and show a general failure in cleavage at site A2 during rRNA processing. Site A2 is the primary cleavage site for separating the precursors of 18S and 25S rRNAs. Here, we have taken a genetic approach to identify the functional environment of BUD23. We found mutations in UTP2 and UTP14, encoding components of the SSU processome, as spontaneous suppressors of a bud23Δ mutant. The suppressors improved growth and subunit balance and restored cleavage at site A2. In a directed screen of 50 ribosomal trans-acting factors, we identified strong positive and negative genetic interactions with components of the SSU processome and strong negative interactions with components of RNase MRP. RNase MRP is responsible for cleavage at site A3 in pre-rRNA, an alternative cleavage site for separating the precursor rRNAs. The strong negative genetic interaction between RNase MRP mutants and bud23Δ is likely due to the combined defects in cleavage at A2 and A3. Our results suggest that Bud23 plays a role at the time of A2 cleavage, earlier than previously thought. The genetic interaction with the SSU processome suggests that Bud23 could be involved in triggering disassembly of the SSU processome, or of particular subcomplexes of the processome.

  1. Small RNAs derived from lncRNA RNase MRP have gene-silencing activity relevant to human cartilage–hair hypoplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing of some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) reveals that they are a source of miRNAs. We show that the 268-nt non-coding RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, (RNase MRP), is the source of at least two short (∼20 nt) RNAs designated RMRP-S1 and RMRP-S2, which function as miRNAs. Point mutations in RNase MRP cause human cartilage–hair hypoplasia (CHH), and several disease-causing mutations map to RMRP-S1 and -S2. SHAPE chemical probing ident...

  2. Basic domains target protein subunits of the RNase MRP complex to the nucleolus independently of complex association.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, H. van; Heijden, A.G. van der; Janssen, R.J.T.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The RNase MRP and RNase P ribonucleoprotein particles both function as endoribonucleases, have a similar RNA component, and share several protein subunits. RNase MRP has been implicated in pre-rRNA processing and mitochondrial DNA replication, whereas RNase P functions in pre-tRNA processing. Both R

  3. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs.

  4. Small RNAs derived from lncRNA RNase MRP have gene-silencing activity relevant to human cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Leslie E; Kosmyna, Brian; Moskowitz, David; Bebawee, Remon; Rahimzadeh, Joseph; Kutchko, Katrina; Laederach, Alain; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Giliani, Silvia; Bouhassira, Eric; Frenette, Paul; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Rogler, Charles E

    2014-01-15

    Post-transcriptional processing of some long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) reveals that they are a source of miRNAs. We show that the 268-nt non-coding RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease, (RNase MRP), is the source of at least two short (∼20 nt) RNAs designated RMRP-S1 and RMRP-S2, which function as miRNAs. Point mutations in RNase MRP cause human cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH), and several disease-causing mutations map to RMRP-S1 and -S2. SHAPE chemical probing identified two alternative secondary structures altered by disease mutations. RMRP-S1 and -S2 are significantly reduced in two fibroblast cell lines and a B-cell line derived from CHH patients. Tests of gene regulatory activity of RMRP-S1 and -S2 identified over 900 genes that were significantly regulated, of which over 75% were down-regulated, and 90% contained target sites with seed complements of RMRP-S1 and -S2 predominantly in their 3' UTRs. Pathway analysis identified regulated genes that function in skeletal development, hair development and hematopoietic cell differentiation including PTCH2 and SOX4 among others, linked to major CHH phenotypes. Also, genes associated with alternative RNA splicing, cell proliferation and differentiation were highly targeted. Therefore, alterations RMRP-S1 and -S2, caused by point mutations in RMRP, are strongly implicated in the molecular mechanism of CHH.

  5. Specific binding of a Pop6/Pop7 heterodimer to the P3 stem of the yeast RNase MRP and RNase P RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Koc, Hasan; Schmitt, Mark E; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2007-10-01

    Pop6 and Pop7 are protein subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP and RNase P. Here we show that bacterially expressed Pop6 and Pop7 form a soluble heterodimer that binds the RNA components of both RNase MRP and RNase P. Footprint analysis of the interaction between the Pop6/7 heterodimer and the RNase MRP RNA, combined with gel mobility assays, demonstrates that the Pop6/7 complex binds to a conserved region of the P3 domain. Binding of these proteins to the MRP RNA leads to local rearrangement in the structure of the P3 loop and suggests that direct interaction of the Pop6/7 complex with the P3 domain of the RNA components of RNases MRP and P may mediate binding of other protein components. These results suggest a role for a key element in the RNase MRP and RNase P RNAs in protein binding, and demonstrate the feasibility of directly studying RNA-protein interactions in the eukaryotic RNases MRP and P complexes.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the P3 RNA domain of yeast ribonuclease MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP protein components Pop6 and Pop7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribonucleases P and MRP are closely related RNA-based enzymes which contain a catalytic RNA component and several protein subunits. The roles of the protein subunits in the structure and function of eukaryotic ribonucleases P and MRP are not clear. Crystals of a complex that included a circularly permuted 46-nucleotide-long P3 domain of the RNA component of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonuclease MRP and selenomethionine derivatives of the shared ribonuclease P/MRP protein components Pop6 (18.2 kDa) and Pop7 (15.8 kDa) were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P4(2)22 (unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.2, c = 76.8 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees ) and diffracted to 3.25 A resolution.

  7. Novel Mutation and Structural RNA Analysis of the Noncoding RNase MRP Gene in Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkaoui Jaouad, Imane; Laarabi, Fatima Z; Chafai Elalaoui, Siham; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2015-07-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH) is an autosomal recessive disorder which is characterized by bone metaphysis anomalies with manifestations that include short stature, defective cellular immunity, and predisposition to several cancers. It is caused by mutations in RMRP, which is transcribed as an RNA component of the mitochondrial RNA-processing ribonuclease. We report the clinical and molecular data of a Moroccan patient with CHH. Sequencing of RMRP identified 2 mutations in the patient: the known mutation g.97G>A and the variation g.27G>C, which has not been reported previously. Given the high mutational heterogeneity, the high frequency of variations in the region, and the fact that RMRP is a non-coding gene, assigning the pathogenicity to RMRP mutations remains a difficult task. Therefore, we compared the characteristics of the primary and secondary structures of mutated RMRP sequences. The location of our mutations within the secondary structure of the RMRP molecule revealed that the novel g.27G>C mutation causes a disruption in the Watson-Crick base pairing, which results in an impairment of a highly conserved P3 domain. Our work prompts considering the consequences of novel RMRP nucleotide variations on conserved RNA structures to gain insights into the pathogenicity of mutations.

  8. GAMETOPHYTE DEFECTIVE 1, a putative subunit of RNases P/MRP, is essential for female gametogenesis and male competence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Qi; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Long, Yan-Ping; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2012-01-01

    RNA biogenesis, including biosynthesis and maturation of rRNA, tRNA and mRNA, is a fundamental process that is critical for cell growth, division and differentiation. Previous studies showed that mutations in components involved in RNA biogenesis resulted in abnormalities in gametophyte and leaf development in Arabidopsis. In eukaryotes, RNases P/MRP (RNase mitochondrial RNA processing) are important ribonucleases that are responsible for processing of tRNA, and transcription of small non-coding RNAs. Here we report that Gametophyte Defective 1 (GAF1), a gene encoding a predicted protein subunit of RNases P/MRP, AtRPP30, plays a role in female gametophyte development and male competence. Embryo sacs were arrested at stages ranging from FG1 to FG7 in gaf1 mutant, suggesting that the progression of the gametophytic division during female gametogenesis was impaired in gaf1 mutant. In contrast, pollen development was not affected in gaf1. However, the fitness of the mutant pollen tube was weaker than that of the wild-type, leading to reduced transmission through the male gametes. GAF1 is featured as a typical RPP30 domain protein and interacts physically with AtPOP5, a homologue of RNases P/MRP subunit POP5 of yeast. Together, our data suggest that components of the RNases P/MRP family, such as RPP30, play important roles in gametophyte development and function in plants.

  9. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  10. Functional characterization of the Drosophila MRP (mitochondrial RNA processing) RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mary D; Bains, Anupinder K; Rajendra, T K; Dominski, Zbigniew; Matera, A Gregory; Simmonds, Andrew J

    2010-11-01

    MRP RNA is a noncoding RNA component of RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP), a multi-protein eukaryotic endoribonuclease reported to function in multiple cellular processes, including ribosomal RNA processing, mitochondrial DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. A recent study predicted a potential Drosophila ortholog of MRP RNA (CR33682) by computer-based genome analysis. We have confirmed the expression of this gene and characterized the phenotype associated with this locus. Flies with mutations that specifically affect MRP RNA show defects in growth and development that begin in the early larval period and end in larval death during the second instar stage. We present several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for Drosophila MRP RNA in rRNA processing. The nuclear fraction of Drosophila MRP RNA localizes to the nucleolus. Further, a mutant strain shows defects in rRNA processing that include a defect in 5.8S rRNA processing, typical of MRP RNA mutants in other species, as well as defects in early stages of rRNA processing.

  11. RNase-assisted RNA chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlewski, Gracjan; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2010-01-01

    RNA chromatography combined with mass spectrometry represents a widely used experimental approach to identify RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific RNA targets. An important drawback of most of these protocols is the high background due to direct or indirect nonspecific binding of cellular proteins to the beads. In many cases this can hamper the detection of individual proteins due to their low levels and/or comigration with contaminating proteins. Increasing the salt concentration during washing steps can reduce background, but at the cost of using less physiological salt concentrations and the likely loss of important RNA-binding proteins that are less stringently bound to a given RNA, as well as the disassembly of protein or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Here, we describe an improved RNA chromatography method that relies on the use of a cocktail of RNases in the elution step. This results in the release of proteins specifically associated with the RNA ligand and almost complete elimination of background noise, allowing a more sensitive and thorough detection of RNA-binding proteins recognizing a specific RNA transcript. PMID:20571124

  12. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  13. Modulation of RNase E activity by alternative RNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeyoung Kim

    Full Text Available Endoribonuclease E (RNase E affects the composition and balance of the RNA population in Escherichia coli via degradation and processing of RNAs. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of an RNA binding site between amino acid residues 25 and 36 (24LYDLDIESPGHEQK37 of RNase E. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E (N-Rne that was UV crosslinked with a 5'-32P-end-labeled, 13-nt oligoribonucleotide (p-BR13 containing the RNase E cleavage site of RNA I revealed that two amino acid residues, Y25 and Q36, were bound to the cytosine and adenine of BR13, respectively. Based on these results, the Y25A N-Rne mutant was constructed, and was found to be hypoactive in comparison to wild-type and hyperactive Q36R mutant proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Y25A and Q36R mutations abolished the RNA binding to the uncompetitive inhibition site of RNase E. The Y25A mutation increased the RNA binding to the multimer formation interface between amino acid residues 427 and 433 (427LIEEEALK433, whereas the Q36R mutation enhanced the RNA binding to the catalytic site of the enzyme (65HGFLPL*K71. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the stable RNA-protein complex formation was positively correlated with the extent of RNA binding to the catalytic site and ribonucleolytic activity of the N-Rne proteins. These mutations exerted similar effects on the ribonucleolytic activity of the full-length RNase E in vivo. Our findings indicate that RNase E has two alternative RNA binding sites for modulating RNA binding to the catalytic site and the formation of a functional catalytic unit.

  14. Bcheck: a wrapper tool for detecting RNase P RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Peter F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective bioinformatics solutions are needed to tackle challenges posed by industrial-scale genome annotation. We present Bcheck, a wrapper tool which predicts RNase P RNA genes by combining the speed of pattern matching and sensitivity of covariance models. The core of Bcheck is a library of subfamily specific descriptor models and covariance models. Results Scanning all microbial genomes in GenBank identifies RNase P RNA genes in 98% of 1024 microbial chromosomal sequences within just 4 hours on single CPU. Comparing to existing annotations found in 387 of the GenBank files, Bcheck predictions have more intact structure and are automatically classified by subfamily membership. For eukaryotic chromosomes Bcheck could identify the known RNase P RNA genes in 84 out of 85 metazoan genomes and 19 out of 21 fungi genomes. Bcheck predicted 37 novel eukaryotic RNase P RNA genes, 32 of which are from fungi. Gene duplication events are observed in at least 20 metazoan organisms. Scanning of meta-genomic data from the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition, comprising over 10 million sample sequences (18 Gigabases, predicted 2909 unique genes, 98% of which fall into ancestral bacteria A type of RNase P RNA and 66% of which have no close homolog to known prokaryotic RNase P RNA. Conclusions The combination of efficient filtering by means of a descriptor-based search and subsequent construction of a high-quality gene model by means of a covariance model provides an efficient method for the detection of RNase P RNA genes in large-scale sequencing data. Bcheck is implemented as webserver and can also be downloaded for local use from http://rna.tbi.univie.ac.at/bcheck

  15. Eukaryotic Ribonucleases P/MRP: the Crystal Structure of the P3 Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perederina, A.; Esakova, O; Quan, C; Khanova, E; Krasilnikov, A

    2010-01-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a site-specific endoribonuclease found in all kingdoms of life. Typical RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and a protein moiety. In the eukaryotes, the RNase P lineage has split into two, giving rise to a closely related enzyme, RNase MRP, which has similar components but has evolved to have different specificities. The eukaryotic RNases P/MRP have acquired an essential helix-loop-helix protein-binding RNA domain P3 that has an important function in eukaryotic enzymes and distinguishes them from bacterial and archaeal RNases P. Here, we present a crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP proteins Pop6 and Pop7 solved to 2.7 {angstrom}. The structure suggests similar structural organization of the P3 RNA domains in RNases P/MRP and possible functions of the P3 domains and proteins bound to them in the stabilization of the holoenzymes' structures as well as in interactions with substrates. It provides the first insight into the structural organization of the eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family.

  16. Eukaryotic ribonucleases P/MRP: the crystal structure of the P3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Esakova, Olga; Quan, Chao; Khanova, Elena; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2010-02-17

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is a site-specific endoribonuclease found in all kingdoms of life. Typical RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and a protein moiety. In the eukaryotes, the RNase P lineage has split into two, giving rise to a closely related enzyme, RNase MRP, which has similar components but has evolved to have different specificities. The eukaryotic RNases P/MRP have acquired an essential helix-loop-helix protein-binding RNA domain P3 that has an important function in eukaryotic enzymes and distinguishes them from bacterial and archaeal RNases P. Here, we present a crystal structure of the P3 RNA domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP in a complex with RNase P/MRP proteins Pop6 and Pop7 solved to 2.7 A. The structure suggests similar structural organization of the P3 RNA domains in RNases P/MRP and possible functions of the P3 domains and proteins bound to them in the stabilization of the holoenzymes' structures as well as in interactions with substrates. It provides the first insight into the structural organization of the eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family.

  17. Calprotectin mRNA (MRP8/MRP14 expression in neutrophils of periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Syaify

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calprotectin, a major cytosolic protein of leukocytes, is detected in neutrophils and monocytes/machrophages. This protein is known to be a marker for several inflammatory diseases including periodontitis. In type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, the severity of periodontitis was strongly thought to be caused by decreasing of leukocytes function such as neutrophils. Previous research found that the calprotectin level in serum of periodontitis patients with type 2 DM is higher than periodontits patients non DM. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine calprotectin mRNA (MRP8/MRP14 expression in human neutrophils of periodontitis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Neutrophils were isolated from the peripheral blood of periodontitis patients with uncontrolled type 2 DM, controlled type 2 DM, and non DM. The expression of calprotectin mRNA (MRP8 and MRP14 were detected by RTPCR. Result: The result showed that the value of mRNA calprotectin expression in DM patients were higher than non DM, and the highest expression was on the uncontrolled type 2 DM. Conclusion: The basal level of calprotectin mRNA MRP8/MRP14 expression increased in neutrophil of periodontitis patient with type 2 DM compared non diabetic subjects. It was suggested that high basal level of calprotectin mRNA has a role in the regulation of periodontitis severity with diabetes mellitus patients.

  18. The rnb gene of Synechocystis PCC6803 encodes a RNA hydrolase displaying RNase II and not RNase R enzymatic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute G Matos

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotic organisms that share characteristics with bacteria and chloroplasts regarding mRNA degradation. Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is a model organism for cyanobacteria, but not much is known about the mechanism of RNA degradation. Only one member of the RNase II-family is present in the genome of Synechocystis sp PCC6803. This protein was shown to be essential for its viability, which indicates that it may have a crucial role in the metabolism of Synechocystis RNA. The aim of this work was to characterize the activity of the RNase II/R homologue present in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. The results showed that as expected, it displayed hydrolytic activity and released nucleoside monophosphates. When compared to two E. coli counterparts, the activity assays showed that the Synechocystis protein displays RNase II, and not RNase R characteristics. This is the first reported case where when only one member of the RNase II/R family exists it displays RNase II and not RNase R characteristics.

  19. RNase III controls the degradation of corA mRNA in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Boram; Sim, Se-Hoon; Sim, Minji; Kim, Kyungsub; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Younghoon; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2012-05-01

    In Escherichia coli, the corA gene encodes a transporter that mediates the influx of Co(2+), Mg(2+), and Ni(2+) into the cell. During the course of experiments aimed at identifying RNase III-dependent genes in E. coli, we observed that steady-state levels of corA mRNA as well as the degree of cobalt influx into the cell were dependent on cellular concentrations of RNase III. In addition, changes in corA expression levels by different cellular concentrations of RNase III were closely correlated with degrees of resistance of E. coli cells to Co(2+) and Ni(2+). In vitro and in vivo cleavage analyses of corA mRNA identified RNase III cleavage sites in the 5'-untranslated region of the corA mRNA. The introduction of nucleotide substitutions at the identified RNase III cleavage sites abolished RNase III cleavage activity on corA mRNA and resulted in prolonged half-lives of the mRNA, which demonstrates that RNase III cleavage constitutes a rate-determining step for corA mRNA degradation. These findings reveal an RNase III-mediated regulatory pathway that functions to modulate corA expression and, in turn, the influx of metal ions transported by CorA in E. coli.

  20. RNase protection assays and RNA gel blots: a direct comparison of sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, D C; Colbert, J T

    1992-01-01

    RNase protection assays are commonly thought to be a more sensitive means of detecting and quantitating specific mRNAs than are RNA gel blots (Northern blots). We have directly compared the sensitivity of these two approaches by assaying for known amounts of in vitro synthesized beta-glucuronidase mRNA. With the probes and protocols employed here, the ability to detect a specific mRNA was similar whether RNase protection or RNA gel blot analyses were performed.

  1. Characterization of MRP RNA-protein interactions within the perinucleolar compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Callie; Daily, Kelly; Nguyen, Van Trung; Wang, Chen; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Bensaude, Olivier; Huang, Sui

    2011-03-15

    The perinucleolar compartment (PNC) forms in cancer cells and is highly enriched with a subset of polymerase III RNAs and RNA-binding proteins. Here we report that PNC components mitochondrial RNA-processing (MRP) RNA, pyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), and CUG-binding protein (CUGBP) interact in vivo, as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down experiments. Glycerol gradient analyses show that this complex is large and sediments at a different fraction from known MRP RNA-containing complexes, the MRP ribonucleoprotein ribozyme and human telomerase reverse transcriptase. Tethering PNC components to a LacO locus recruits other PNC components, further confirming the in vivo interactions. These interactions are present both in PNC-containing and -lacking cells. High-resolution localization analyses demonstrate that MRP RNA, CUGBP, and PTB colocalize at the PNC as a reticulated network, intertwining with newly synthesized RNA. Furthermore, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-PTB and GFP-CUGBP show a slower rate of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching at the PNC than in the nucleoplasm, illustrating the different molecular interaction of the complexes associated with the PNC. These findings support a working model in which the MRP RNA-protein complex becomes nucleated at the PNC in cancer cells and may play a role in gene expression regulation at the DNA locus that associates with the PNC.

  2. Elucidation of pathways of ribosomal RNA degradation: an essential role for RNase E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulthana, Shaheen; Basturea, Georgeta N.; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2016-01-01

    Although normally stable in growing cells, ribosomal RNAs are degraded under conditions of stress, such as starvation, and in response to misassembled or otherwise defective ribosomes in a process termed RNA quality control. Previously, our laboratory found that large fragments of 16S and 23S rRNA accumulate in strains lacking the processive exoribonucleases RNase II, RNase R, and PNPase, implicating these enzymes in the later steps of rRNA breakdown. Here, we define the pathways of rRNA degradation in the quality control process and during starvation, and show that the essential endoribonuclease, RNase E, is required to make the initial cleavages in both degradative processes. We also present evidence that explains why the exoribonuclease, RNase PH, is required to initiate the degradation of rRNA during starvation. The data presented here provide the first detailed description of rRNA degradation in bacterial cells. PMID:27298395

  3. Molecular recognition of RhlB and RNase D in the Caulobacter crescentus RNA degradosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Jarrod E; Luisi, Ben F; Hardwick, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase E is a key enzyme in RNA metabolism for many bacterial species. In Escherichia coli, RNase E contributes to the majority of RNA turnover and processing events, and the enzyme has been extensively characterized as the central component of the RNA degradosome assembly. A similar RNA degradosome assembly has been described in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, with the interacting partners of RNase E identified as the Kreb's cycle enzyme aconitase, a DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB and the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase. Here we report that an additional degradosome component is the essential exoribonuclease RNase D, and its recognition site within RNase E is identified. We show that, unlike its E. coli counterpart, C. crescentus RhlB interacts directly with a segment of the N-terminal catalytic domain of RNase E. The crystal structure of a portion of C. crescentus RNase E encompassing the helicase-binding region is reported. This structure reveals that an inserted segment in the S1 domain adopts an α-helical conformation, despite being predicted to be natively unstructured. We discuss the implications of these findings for the organization and mechanisms of the RNA degradosome.

  4. Nucleoside modifications in RNA limit activation of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and increase resistance to cleavage by RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Bart R; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Jha, Babal K; Silverman, Robert H; Weissman, Drew; Karikó, Katalin

    2011-11-01

    The interferon-induced enzymes 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) and RNase L are key components of innate immunity involved in sensory and effector functions following viral infections. Upon binding target RNA, OAS is activated to produce 2'-5'-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A) that activate RNase L, which then cleaves single-stranded self and non-self RNA. Modified nucleosides that are present in cellular transcripts have been shown to suppress activation of several RNA sensors. Here, we demonstrate that in vitro transcribed, unmodified RNA activates OAS, induces RNase L-mediated ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage and is rapidly cleaved by RNase L. In contrast, RNA containing modified nucleosides activates OAS less efficiently and induces limited rRNA cleavage. Nucleoside modifications also make RNA resistant to cleavage by RNase L. Examining translation in RNase L(-/-) cells and mice confirmed that RNase L activity reduces translation of unmodified mRNA, which is not observed with modified mRNA. Additionally, mRNA containing the nucleoside modification pseudouridine is translated longer and has an extended half-life. The observation that modified nucleosides in RNA reduce 2-5A pathway activation joins OAS and RNase L to the list of RNA sensors and effectors whose functions are limited when RNA is modified, confirming the role of nucleoside modifications in suppressing immune recognition of RNA.

  5. RNase III Controls the Degradation of corA mRNA in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Boram; Sim, Se-Hoon; Sim, Minji; Kim, Kyungsub; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Younghoon; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the corA gene encodes a transporter that mediates the influx of Co2+, Mg2+, and Ni2+ into the cell. During the course of experiments aimed at identifying RNase III-dependent genes in E. coli, we observed that steady-state levels of corA mRNA as well as the degree of cobalt influx into the cell were dependent on cellular concentrations of RNase III. In addition, changes in corA expression levels by different cellular concentrations of RNase III were closely correlated with...

  6. RNase J depletion leads to massive changes in mRNA abundance in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redko, Yulia; Galtier, Eloïse; Arnion, Hélène; Darfeuille, Fabien; Sismeiro, Odile; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Médigue, Claudine; Weiman, Marion; Cruveiller, Stéphane; De Reuse, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    Degradation of RNA as an intermediate message between genes and corresponding proteins is important for rapid attenuation of gene expression and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. This process is controlled by ribonucleases that have different target specificities. In the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori, an exo- and endoribonuclease RNase J is essential for growth. To explore the role of RNase J in H. pylori, we identified its putative targets at a global scale using next generation RNA sequencing. We found that strong depletion for RNase J led to a massive increase in the steady-state levels of non-rRNAs. mRNAs and RNAs antisense to open reading frames were most affected with over 80% increased more than 2-fold. Non-coding RNAs expressed in the intergenic regions were much less affected by RNase J depletion. Northern blotting of selected messenger and non-coding RNAs validated these results. Globally, our data suggest that RNase J of H. pylori is a major RNase involved in degradation of most cellular RNAs.

  7. RNase L controls terminal adipocyte differentiation, lipids storage and insulin sensitivity via CHOP10 mRNA regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Odile Martine Julie; Salehzada, T; Lambert, K

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue structure is altered during obesity, leading to deregulation of whole-body metabolism. Its function depends on its structure, in particular adipocytes number and differentiation stage. To better understand the mechanisms regulating adipogenesis, we have investigated the role...... is associated with CHOP10 mRNA and regulates its stability. CHOP10 expression is conserved in RNase L(-/-)-MEFs, maintaining preadipocyte state while impairing their terminal differentiation. RNase L(-/-)-MEFs have decreased lipids storage capacity, insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake. Expression of ectopic...... RNase L in RNase L(-/-)-MEFs triggers CHOP10 mRNA instability, allowing increased lipids storage, insulin response and glucose uptake. Similarly, downregulation of CHOP10 mRNA with CHOP10 siRNA in RNase L(-/-)-MEFs improves their differentiation in adipocyte. In vivo, aged RNase L(-)/(-) mice present...

  8. Two distinct RNase activities of CRISPR-C2c2 enable guide-RNA processing and RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East-Seletsky, Alexandra; O'Connell, Mitchell R; Knight, Spencer C; Burstein, David; Cate, Jamie H D; Tjian, Robert; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-10-13

    Bacterial adaptive immune systems use CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins for RNA-guided nucleic acid cleavage. Although most prokaryotic adaptive immune systems generally target DNA substrates, type III and VI CRISPR systems direct interference complexes against single-stranded RNA substrates. In type VI systems, the single-subunit C2c2 protein functions as an RNA-guided RNA endonuclease (RNase). How this enzyme acquires mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that are essential for immune surveillance and how it carries out crRNA-mediated RNA cleavage remain unclear. Here we show that bacterial C2c2 possesses a unique RNase activity responsible for CRISPR RNA maturation that is distinct from its RNA-activated single-stranded RNA degradation activity. These dual RNase functions are chemically and mechanistically different from each other and from the crRNA-processing behaviour of the evolutionarily unrelated CRISPR enzyme Cpf1 (ref. 11). The two RNase activities of C2c2 enable multiplexed processing and loading of guide RNAs that in turn allow sensitive detection of cellular transcripts.

  9. Expression of mRNA and protein-protein interaction of the antiviral endoribonuclease RNase L in mouse spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Rath, Pramod C

    2014-08-01

    The interferon-inducible, 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A)-dependent endoribonuclease, RNase L is a unique antiviral RNA-degrading enzyme involved in RNA-metabolism, translational regulation, stress-response besides its anticancer/tumor-suppressor and antibacterial functions. RNase L represents complex cellular RNA-regulations in mammalian cells but diverse functions of RNase L are not completely explained by its 2-5A-regulated endoribonuclease activity. We hypothesized that RNase L has housekeeping function(s) through interaction with cellular proteins. We investigated RNase L mRNA expression in mouse tissues by RT-PCR and its protein-protein interaction in spleen by GST-pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays followed by proteomic analysis. RNase L mRNA is constitutively and differentially expressed in nine different mouse tissues, its level is maximum in immunological tissues (spleen, thymus and lungs), moderate in reproductive tissues (testis and prostate) and low in metabolic tissues (kidney, brain, liver and heart). Cellular proteins from mouse spleen [fibronectin precursor, β-actin, troponin I, myosin heavy chain 9 (non-muscle), growth-arrest specific protein 11, clathrin light chain B, a putative uncharacterized protein (Ricken cDNA 8030451F13) isoform (CRA_d) and alanyl tRNA synthetase] were identified as cellular RNase L-interacting proteins. Thus our results suggest for more general cellular functions of RNase L through protein-protein interactions in the spleen for immune response in mammals.

  10. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis Polynucleotide Phosphorylase and RNase Y: STRUCTURAL MAPPING AND EFFECT ON mRNA TURNOVER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Elizabeth; Alabi, Shanique; Liu, Bo; Schlessinger, Avner; Bechhofer, David H

    2016-03-25

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3'-to-5' phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, is thought to be the primary enzyme responsible for turnover ofBacillus subtilismRNA. The role of PNPase inB. subtilismRNA decay has been analyzed previously by comparison of mRNA profiles in a wild-type strainversusa strain that is deleted forpnpA, the gene encoding PNPase. Recent studies have provided evidence for a degradosome-like complex inB. subtilisthat is built around the major decay-initiating endonuclease, RNase Y, and there is ample evidence for a strong interaction between PNPase and RNase Y. The role of the PNPase-RNase Y interaction in the exonucleolytic function of PNPase needs to be clarified. We sought to construct aB. subtilisstrain containing a catalytically active PNPase that could not interact with RNase Y. Mapping studies of the PNPase-RNase Y interaction were guided by a homology model ofB. subtilisPNPase based on the known structure of theEscherichia coliPNPase in complex with an RNase E peptide. Mutations inB. subtilisresidues predicted to be involved in RNase Y binding showed a loss of PNPase-RNase Y interaction. Two mRNAs whose decay is dependent on RNase Y and PNPase were examined in strains containing full-length PNPase that was either catalytically active but unable to interact with RNase Y, or catalytically inactive but able to interact with RNase Y. At least for these two mRNAs, disruption of the PNPase-RNase Y interaction did not appear to affect mRNA turnover.

  11. A View of Pre-mRNA Splicing from RNase R Resistant RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Suzuki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During pre-mRNA splicing, exons in the primary transcript are precisely connected to generate an mRNA. Intron lariat RNAs are formed as by-products of this process. In addition, some exonic circular RNAs (circRNAs may also result from exon skipping as by-products. Lariat RNAs and circRNAs are both RNase R resistant RNAs. RNase R is a strong 3' to 5' exoribonuclease, which efficiently degrades linear RNAs, such as mRNAs and rRNAs; therefore, the circular parts of lariat RNAs and the circRNAs can be segregated from eukaryotic total RNAs by their RNase R resistance. Thus, RNase R resistant RNAs could provide unexplored splicing information not available from mRNAs. Analyses of these RNAs identified repeating splicing phenomena, such as re-splicing of mature mRNAs and nested splicing. Moreover, circRNA might function as microRNA sponges. There is an enormous variety of endogenous circRNAs, which are generally synthesized in cells and tissues.

  12. Inhalable delivery of AAV-based MRP4/ABCC4 silencing RNA prevents monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension

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    Caroline Claude

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATP-binding cassette transporter MRP4 (encoded by ABCC4 regulates membrane cyclic nucleotides concentrations in arterial cells including smooth muscle cells. MRP4/ABCC4 deficient mice display a reduction in smooth muscle cells proliferation and a prevention of pulmonary hypertension in response to hypoxia. We aimed to study gene transfer of a MRP4/ABCC4 silencing RNA via intratracheal delivery of aerosolized adeno-associated virus 1 (AAV1.shMRP4 or AAV1.control in a monocrotaline-induced model of pulmonary hypertension in rats. Gene transfer was performed at the time of monocrotaline administration and the effect on the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling was assessed 35 days later. AAV1.shMRP4 dose-dependently reduced right ventricular systolic pressure and hypertrophy with a significant reduction with the higher doses (i.e., >1011 DRP/animal as compared to AAV1.control. The higher dose of AAV1.shMRP4 was also associated with a significant reduction in distal pulmonary arteries remodeling. AAV1.shMRP4 was finally associated with a reduction in the expression of ANF, a marker of cardiac hypertrophy. Collectively, these results support a therapeutic potential for downregulation of MRP4 for the treatment of pulmonary artery hypertension.

  13. Inhibition of Bacterial RNase P RNA by Phenothiazine Derivatives

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    Shiying Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to identify novel scaffolds and targets to develop new antibiotics. Methylene blue is a phenothiazine derivative, and it has been shown to possess anti-malarial and anti-trypanosomal activities. Here, we show that different phenothiazine derivatives and pyronine G inhibited the activities of three structurally different bacterial RNase P RNAs (RPRs, including that from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with Ki values in the lower μM range. Interestingly, three antipsychotic phenothiazines (chlorpromazine, thioridazine, and trifluoperazine, which are known to have antibacterial activities, also inhibited the activity of bacterial RPRs, albeit with higher Ki values than methylene blue. Phenothiazines also affected lead(II-induced cleavage of bacterial RPR and inhibited yeast tRNAPhe, indicating binding of these drugs to functionally important regions. Collectively, our findings provide the first experimental data showing that long, noncoding RNAs could be targeted by different phenothiazine derivatives.

  14. Identification and analysis of candidate fungal tRNA 3'-end processing endonucleases tRNase Zs, homologs of the putative prostate cancer susceptibility protein ELAC2

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    Zhao Wei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background tRNase Z is the endonuclease that is responsible for the 3'-end processing of tRNA precursors, a process essential for tRNA 3'-CCA addition and subsequent tRNA aminoacylation. Based on their sizes, tRNase Zs can be divided into the long (tRNase ZL and short (tRNase ZS forms. tRNase ZL is thought to have arisen from a tandem gene duplication of tRNase ZS with further sequence divergence. The species distribution of tRNase Z is complex. Fungi represent an evolutionarily diverse group of eukaryotes. The recent proliferation of fungal genome sequences provides an opportunity to explore the structural and functional diversity of eukaryotic tRNase Zs. Results We report a survey and analysis of candidate tRNase Zs in 84 completed fungal genomes, spanning a broad diversity of fungi. We find that tRNase ZL is present in all fungi we have examined, whereas tRNase ZS exists only in the fungal phyla Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Zygomycota. Furthermore, we find that unlike the Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina, which contain a single tRNase ZL, Schizosaccharomyces fission yeasts (Taphrinomycotina contain two tRNase ZLs encoded by two different tRNase ZL genes. These two tRNase ZLs are most likely localized to the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively, suggesting partitioning of tRNase Z function between two different tRNase ZLs in fission yeasts. The fungal tRNase Z phylogeny suggests that tRNase ZSs are ancestral to tRNase ZLs. Additionally, the evolutionary relationship of fungal tRNase ZLs is generally consistent with known phylogenetic relationships among the fungal species and supports tRNase ZL gene duplication in certain fungal taxa, including Schizosaccharomyces fission yeasts. Analysis of tRNase Z protein sequences reveals putative atypical substrate binding domains in most fungal tRNase ZSs and in a subset of fungal tRNase ZLs. Finally, we demonstrate the presence of pseudo-substrate recognition and catalytic motifs at

  15. RNA-Seq and RNA Immunoprecipitation Analyses of the Transcriptome of Streptomyces coelicolor Identify Substrates for RNase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatewood, Marcha L.; Bralley, Patricia; Weil, M. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    RNase III is a key enzyme in the pathways of RNA degradation and processing in bacteria and has been suggested as a global regulator of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. Using RNA-Seq, we have examined the transcriptomes of S. coelicolor M145 and an RNase III (rnc)-null mutant of that strain. RNA preparations with reduced levels of structural RNAs were prepared by subtractive hybridization prior to RNA-Seq analysis. We initially identified 7,800 transcripts of known and putative protein-coding genes in M145 and the null mutant, JSE1880, along with transcripts of 21 rRNA genes and 65 tRNA genes. Approximately 3,100 of the protein-coding transcripts were categorized as low-abundance transcripts. For further analysis, we selected those transcripts of known and putative protein-coding genes whose levels changed by ≥2-fold between the two S. coelicolor strains and organized those transcripts into 16 functional categories. We refined our analysis by performing RNA immunoprecipitation of the mRNA preparation from JSE1880 using a mutant RNase III protein that binds to transcripts but does not cleave them. This analysis identified ca. 800 transcripts that were enriched in the RNA immunoprecipitates, including 28 transcripts whose levels also changed by ≥2-fold in the RNA-Seq analysis. We compare our results with those obtained by microarray analysis of the S. coelicolor transcriptome and with studies describing the characterization of small noncoding RNAs. We have also used the RNA immunoprecipitation results to identify new substrates for RNase III cleavage. PMID:22389483

  16. Suppression of RNAi by dsRNA-degrading RNaseIII enzymes of viruses in animals and plants.

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    Isabel Weinheimer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain RNA and DNA viruses that infect plants, insects, fish or poikilothermic animals encode Class 1 RNaseIII endoribonuclease-like proteins. dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease activity of the RNaseIII of rock bream iridovirus infecting fish and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt crinivirus (SPCSV infecting plants has been shown. Suppression of the host antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway has been documented with the RNaseIII of SPCSV and Heliothis virescens ascovirus infecting insects. Suppression of RNAi by the viral RNaseIIIs in non-host organisms of different kingdoms is not known. Here we expressed PPR3, the RNaseIII of Pike-perch iridovirus, in the non-hosts Nicotiana benthamiana (plant and Caenorhabditis elegans (nematode and found that it cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNA (ds-siRNA molecules that are pivotal in the host RNA interference (RNAi pathway and thereby suppresses RNAi in non-host tissues. In N. benthamiana, PPR3 enhanced accumulation of Tobacco rattle tobravirus RNA1 replicon lacking the 16K RNAi suppressor. Furthermore, PPR3 suppressed single-stranded RNA (ssRNA--mediated RNAi and rescued replication of Flock House virus RNA1 replicon lacking the B2 RNAi suppressor in C. elegans. Suppression of RNAi was debilitated with the catalytically compromised mutant PPR3-Ala. However, the RNaseIII (CSR3 produced by SPCSV, which cleaves ds-siRNA and counteracts antiviral RNAi in plants, failed to suppress ssRNA-mediated RNAi in C. elegans. In leaves of N. benthamiana, PPR3 suppressed RNAi induced by ssRNA and dsRNA and reversed silencing; CSR3, however, suppressed only RNAi induced by ssRNA and was unable to reverse silencing. Neither PPR3 nor CSR3 suppressed antisense-mediated RNAi in Drosophila melanogaster. These results show that the RNaseIII enzymes of RNA and DNA viruses suppress RNAi, which requires catalytic activities of RNaseIII. In contrast to other viral silencing suppression proteins, the RNaseIII enzymes are

  17. Identification and sequence analysis of metazoan tRNA 3'-end processing enzymes tRNase Zs.

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    Zhikang Wang

    Full Text Available tRNase Z is the endonuclease responsible for removing the 3'-trailer sequences from precursor tRNAs, a prerequisite for the addition of the CCA sequence. It occurs in the short (tRNase Z(S and long (tRNase Z(L forms. Here we report the identification and sequence analysis of candidate tRNase Zs from 81 metazoan species. We found that the vast majority of deuterostomes, lophotrochozoans and lower metazoans have one tRNase Z(S and one tRNase Z(L genes, whereas ecdysozoans possess only a single tRNase Z(L gene. Sequence analysis revealed that in metazoans, a single nuclear tRNase Z(L gene is likely to encode both the nuclear and mitochondrial forms of tRNA 3'-end processing enzyme through mechanisms that include alternative translation initiation from two in-frame start codons and alternative splicing. Sequence conservation analysis revealed a variant PxKxRN motif, PxPxRG, which is located in the N-terminal region of tRNase Z(Ss. We also identified a previously unappreciated motif, AxDx, present in the C-terminal region of both tRNase Z(Ss and tRNase Z(Ls. The AxDx motif consisting mainly of a very short loop is potentially close enough to form hydrogen bonds with the loop containing the PxKxRN or PxPxRG motif. Through complementation analysis, we demonstrated the likely functional importance of the AxDx motif. In conclusion, our analysis supports the notion that in metazoans a single tRNase Z(L has evolved to participate in both nuclear and mitochondrial tRNA 3'-end processing, whereas tRNase Z(S may have evolved new functions. Our analysis also unveils new evolutionarily conserved motifs in tRNase Zs, including the C-terminal AxDx motif, which may have functional significance.

  18. RNase P RNA from the Recently Evolved Plastid of Paulinella and from Algae

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    Pilar Bernal-Bayard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The RNase P RNA catalytic subunit (RPR encoded in some plastids has been found to be functionally defective. The amoeba Paulinella chromatophora contains an organelle (chromatophore that is derived from the recent endosymbiotic acquisition of a cyanobacterium, and therefore represents a model of the early steps in the acquisition of plastids. In contrast with plastid RPRs the chromatophore RPR retains functionality similar to the cyanobacterial enzyme. The chromatophore RPR sequence deviates from consensus at some positions but those changes allow optimal activity compared with mutated chromatophore RPR with the consensus sequence. We have analyzed additional RPR sequences identifiable in plastids and have found that it is present in all red algae and in several prasinophyte green algae. We have assayed in vitro a subset of the plastid RPRs not previously analyzed and confirm that these organelle RPRs lack RNase P activity in vitro.

  19. Mapping of Mitochondrial RNA-Protein Interactions by Digital RNase Footprinting

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    Ganqiang Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial DNA is transcribed as long polycistronic transcripts that encompass each strand of the genome and are processed subsequently into mature mRNAs, tRNAs, and rRNAs, necessitating widespread posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we establish methods for massively parallel sequencing and analyses of RNase-accessible regions of human mitochondrial RNA and thereby identify specific regions within mitochondrial transcripts that are bound by proteins. This approach provides a range of insights into the contribution of RNA-binding proteins to the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

  20. Several RNase T2 enzymes function in induced tRNA and rRNA turnover in the ciliate Tetrahymena

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    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    RNase T2 enzymes are produced by a wide range of organisms and have been implicated to function in diverse cellular processes, including stress-induced anticodon loop cleavage of mature tRNAs to generate tRNA halves. Here we describe a family of eight RNase T2 genes (RNT2A-RNT2H) in the ciliate...... Tetrahymena thermophila. We constructed strains lacking individual or combinations of these RNT2 genes that were viable but had distinct cellular and molecular phenotypes. In strains lacking only one Rnt2 protein or lacking a subfamily of three catalytically inactive Rnt2 proteins, starvation-induced tRNA...... fragments continued to accumulate, with only a minor change in fragment profile in one strain. We therefore generated strains lacking pairwise combinations of the top three candidates for Rnt2 tRNases. Each of these strains showed a distinct starvation-specific profile of tRNA and rRNA fragment accumulation...

  1. In vitro RNase and nucleic acid binding activities implicate coilin in U snRNA processing.

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    Hanna J Broome

    Full Text Available Coilin is known as the marker protein for Cajal bodies (CBs, subnuclear domains important for the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs which function in pre-mRNA splicing. CBs associate non-randomly with U1 and U2 gene loci, which produce the small nuclear RNA (snRNA component of the respective snRNP. Despite recognition as the CB marker protein, coilin is primarily nucleoplasmic, and the function of this fraction is not fully characterized. Here we show that coilin binds double stranded DNA and has RNase activity in vitro. U1 and U2 snRNAs undergo a processing event of the primary transcript prior to incorporation in the snRNP. We find that coilin displays RNase activity within the CU region of the U2 snRNA primary transcript in vitro, and that coilin knockdown results in accumulation of the 3' pre-processed U1 and U2 snRNA. These findings present new characteristics of coilin in vitro, and suggest additional functions of the protein in vivo.

  2. Cleavage mediated by the catalytic domain of bacterial RNase P RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shiying; Kikovska, Ema; Lindell, Magnus; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2012-09-14

    Like other RNA molecules, RNase P RNA (RPR) is composed of domains, and these have different functions. Here, we provide data demonstrating that the catalytic (C) domain of Escherichia coli (Eco) RPR when separated from the specificity (S) domain mediates cleavage using various model RNA hairpin loop substrates. Compared to full-length Eco RPR, the rate constant, k(obs), of cleavage for the truncated RPR (CP RPR) was reduced 30- to 13,000-fold depending on substrate. Specifically, the structural architecture of the -1/+73 played a significant role where a C(-1)/G(+73) pair had the most dramatic effect on k(obs). Substitution of A(248) (E. coli numbering), positioned near the cleavage site in the RNase P-substrate complex, with G in the CP RPR resulted in 30-fold improvement in rate. In contrast, strengthening the interaction between the RPR and the 3' end of the substrate only had a modest effect. Interestingly, although deleting the S-domain gave a reduction in the rate, it resulted in a less erroneous RPR with respect to cleavage site selection. These data support and extend our understanding of the coupling between the distal interaction between the S-domain and events at the active site. Our findings will also be discussed with respect to the structure of RPR derived from different organisms.

  3. Decreased Expression of Stable RNA Can Alleviate the Lethality Associated with RNase E Deficiency in Escherichia coli.

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    Himabindu, P; Anupama, K

    2017-04-15

    The endoribonuclease RNase E participates in mRNA degradation, rRNA processing, and tRNA maturation in Escherichia coli, but the precise reasons for its essentiality are unclear and much debated. The enzyme is most active on RNA substrates with a 5'-terminal monophosphate, which is sensed by a domain in the enzyme that includes residue R169; E. coli also possesses a 5'-pyrophosphohydrolase, RppH, that catalyzes conversion of 5'-terminal triphosphate to 5'-terminal monophosphate on RNAs. Although the C-terminal half (CTH), beyond residue approximately 500, of RNase E is dispensable for viability, deletion of the CTH is lethal when combined with an R169Q mutation or with deletion of rppH In this work, we show that both these lethalities can be rescued in derivatives in which four or five of the seven rrn operons in the genome have been deleted. We hypothesize that the reduced stable RNA levels under these conditions minimize the need of RNase E to process them, thereby allowing for its diversion for mRNA degradation. In support of this hypothesis, we have found that other conditions that are known to reduce stable RNA levels also suppress one or both lethalities: (i) alterations in relA and spoT, which are expected to lead to increased basal ppGpp levels; (ii) stringent rpoB mutations, which mimic high intracellular ppGpp levels; and (iii) overexpression of DksA. Lethality suppression by these perturbations was RNase R dependent. Our work therefore suggests that its actions on the various substrates (mRNA, rRNA, and tRNA) jointly contribute to the essentiality of RNase E in E. coliIMPORTANCE The endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for viability in many Gram-negative bacteria, including Escherichia coli Different explanations have been offered for its essentiality, including its roles in global mRNA degradation or in the processing of several tRNA and rRNA species. Our work suggests that, rather than its role in the processing of any one particular substrate, its

  4. Two tandem RNase III cleavage sites determine betT mRNA stability in response to osmotic stress in Escherichia coli.

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    Minji Sim

    Full Text Available While identifying genes regulated by ribonuclease III (RNase III in Escherichia coli, we observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA, which encodes a transporter mediating the influx of choline, are dependent on cellular concentrations of RNase III. In the present study, we also observed that steady-state levels of betT mRNA are dependent on RNase III activity upon exposure to osmotic stress, indicating the presence of cis-acting elements controlled by RNase III in betT mRNA. Primer extension analyses of betT mRNA revealed two tandem RNase III cleavage sites in its stem-loop region, which were biochemically confirmed via in vitro cleavage assays. Analyses of cleavage sites suggested the stochastic selection of cleavage sites by RNase III, and mutational analyses indicated that RNase III cleavage at either site individually is insufficient for efficient betT mRNA degradation. In addition, both the half-life and abundance of betT mRNA were significantly increased in association with decreased RNase III activity under hyper-osmotic stress conditions. Our findings demonstrate that betT mRNA stability is controlled by RNase III at the post-transcriptional level under conditions of osmotic stress.

  5. Corynebacterium glutamicum RNase E/G-type endoribonuclease encoded by NCgl2281 is involved in the 5' maturation of 5S rRNA.

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    Maeda, Tomoya; Wachi, Masaaki

    2012-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum has one RNase E/G ortholog and one RNase J ortholog but no RNase Y. We previously reported that the C. glutamicum NCgl2281 gene encoding the RNase E/G ortholog complemented the rng::cat mutation in Escherichia coli but not the rne-1 mutation. In this study, we constructed an NCgl2281 knockout mutant and found that the mutant cells accumulated 5S rRNA precursor molecules. The processing of 16S and 23S rRNA, tRNA, and tmRNA was normal. Primer extension analysis revealed that the RNase E/G ortholog cleaved at the -1 site of the 5' end of 5S rRNA. However, 3' maturation was essentially unaffected. These findings showed that C. glutamicum NCgl2281 endoribonuclease is involved in the 5' maturation of 5S rRNA. This is the first report showing the physiological function of the RNase E/G ortholog in bacteria having one RNase E/G and one RNase J but no RNase Y.

  6. The RNase III enzyme DROSHA is essential for microRNA production and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuxia; Song, Rui; Ortogero, Nicole; Zheng, Huili; Evanoff, Ryan; Small, Chris L; Griswold, Michael D; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Royo, Helene; Turner, James M; Yan, Wei

    2012-07-20

    DROSHA is a nuclear RNase III enzyme responsible for cleaving primary microRNAs (miRNAs) into precursor miRNAs and thus is essential for the biogenesis of canonical miRNAs. DICER is a cytoplasmic RNase III enzyme that not only cleaves precursor miRNAs to produce mature miRNAs but also dissects naturally formed/synthetic double-stranded RNAs to generate small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). To investigate the role of canonical miRNA and/or endogenous siRNA production in spermatogenesis, we generated Drosha or Dicer conditional knock-out (cKO) mouse lines by inactivating Drosha or Dicer exclusively in spermatogenic cells in postnatal testes using the Cre-loxp strategy. Both Drosha and Dicer cKO males were infertile due to disrupted spermatogenesis characterized by depletion of spermatocytes and spermatids leading to oligoteratozoospermia or azoospermia. The developmental course of spermatogenic disruptions was similar at morphological levels between Drosha and Dicer cKO males, but Drosha cKO testes appeared to be more severe in spermatogenic disruptions than Dicer cKO testes. Microarray analyses revealed transcriptomic differences between Drosha- and Dicer-null pachytene spermatocytes or round spermatids. Although levels of sex-linked mRNAs were mildly elevated, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation appeared to have occurred normally. Our data demonstrate that unlike DICER, which is required for the biogenesis of several small RNA species, DROSHA is essential mainly for the canonical miRNA production, and DROSHA-mediated miRNA production is essential for normal spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  7. Multiple RNA processing defects and impaired chloroplast function in plants deficient in the organellar protein-only RNase P enzyme.

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    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA precursors undergo endoribonucleolytic processing of their 5' and 3' ends. 5' cleavage of the precursor transcript is performed by ribonuclease P (RNase P. While in most organisms RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein that harbors a catalytically active RNA component, human mitochondria and the chloroplasts (plastids and mitochondria of seed plants possess protein-only RNase P enzymes (PRORPs. The plant organellar PRORP (PRORP1 has been characterized to some extent in vitro and by transient gene silencing, but the molecular, phenotypic and physiological consequences of its down-regulation in stable transgenic plants have not been assessed. Here we have addressed the function of the dually targeted organellar PRORP enzyme in vivo by generating stably transformed Arabidopsis plants in which expression of the PRORP1 gene was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi. PRORP1 knock-down lines show defects in photosynthesis, while mitochondrial respiration is not appreciably affected. In both plastids and mitochondria, the effects of PRORP1 knock-down on the processing of individual tRNA species are highly variable. The drastic reduction in the levels of mature plastid tRNA-Phe(GAA and tRNA-Arg(ACG suggests that these two tRNA species limit plastid gene expression in the PRORP1 mutants and, hence, are causally responsible for the mutant phenotype.

  8. Trying on tRNA for Size: RNase P and the T-box Riboswitch as Molecular Rulers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwei; Ferré-DAmaré, Adrian R

    2016-04-01

    Length determination is a fundamental problem in biology and chemistry. Numerous proteins measure distances on linear biopolymers to exert effects with remarkable spatial precision. Recently, ruler-like devices made of noncoding RNAs have been structurally and biochemically characterized. Two prominent examples are the RNase P ribozyme and the T-box riboswitch. Both act as molecular calipers. The two RNAs clamp onto the elbow of tRNA (or pre-tRNA) and make distance measurements orthogonal to each other. Here, we compare and contrast the molecular ruler characteristics of these RNAs. RNase P appears pre-configured to measure a fixed distance on pre-tRNA to ensure the fidelity of its maturation. RNase P is a multiple-turnover ribozyme, and its rigid structure efficiently selects pre-tRNAs, cleaves, and releases them. In contrast, the T-box is flexible and segmented, an architecture that adapts to the intrinsically flexible tRNA. The tripartite T-box inspects the overall shape, anticodon sequence, and aminoacylation status of an incoming tRNA while it folds co-transcriptionally, leading to a singular, conditional genetic switching event. The elucidation of the structures and mechanisms of action of these two RNA molecular rulers may augur the discovery of new RNA measuring devices in noncoding and viral transcriptomes, and inform the design of artificial RNA rulers.

  9. Trying on tRNA for Size: RNase P and the T-box Riboswitch as Molecular Rulers

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    Jinwei Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Length determination is a fundamental problem in biology and chemistry. Numerous proteins measure distances on linear biopolymers to exert effects with remarkable spatial precision. Recently, ruler-like devices made of noncoding RNAs have been structurally and biochemically characterized. Two prominent examples are the RNase P ribozyme and the T-box riboswitch. Both act as molecular calipers. The two RNAs clamp onto the elbow of tRNA (or pre-tRNA and make distance measurements orthogonal to each other. Here, we compare and contrast the molecular ruler characteristics of these RNAs. RNase P appears pre-configured to measure a fixed distance on pre-tRNA to ensure the fidelity of its maturation. RNase P is a multiple-turnover ribozyme, and its rigid structure efficiently selects pre-tRNAs, cleaves, and releases them. In contrast, the T-box is flexible and segmented, an architecture that adapts to the intrinsically flexible tRNA. The tripartite T-box inspects the overall shape, anticodon sequence, and aminoacylation status of an incoming tRNA while it folds co-transcriptionally, leading to a singular, conditional genetic switching event. The elucidation of the structures and mechanisms of action of these two RNA molecular rulers may augur the discovery of new RNA measuring devices in noncoding and viral transcriptomes, and inform the design of artificial RNA rulers.

  10. Biophysical analysis of Arabidopsis protein-only RNase P alone and in complex with tRNA provides a refined model of tRNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Franziska; Schelcher, Cédric; Fernandez-Millan, Pablo; Gobert, Anthony; Birck, Catherine; Thureau, Aurélien; Roblin, Pierre; Giegé, Philippe; Sauter, Claude

    2017-08-25

    RNase P is a universal enzyme that removes 5' leader sequences from tRNA precursors. The enzyme is therefore essential for maturation of functional tRNAs and mRNA translation. RNase P represents a unique example of an enzyme that can occur either as ribonucleoprotein or as protein alone. The latter form of the enzyme, called protein-only RNase P (PRORP), is widespread in eukaryotes in which it can provide organellar or nuclear RNase P activities. Here, we have focused on Arabidopsis nuclear PRORP2 and its interaction with tRNA substrates. Affinity measurements helped assess the respective importance of individual pentatricopeptide repeat motifs in PRORP2 for RNA binding. We characterized the PRORP2 structure by X-ray crystallography and by small-angle X-ray scattering in solution as well as that of its complex with a tRNA precursor by small-angle X-ray scattering. Of note, our study reports the first structural data of a PRORP-tRNA complex. Combined with complementary biochemical and biophysical analyses, our structural data suggest that PRORP2 undergoes conformational changes to accommodate its substrate. In particular, the catalytic domain and the RNA-binding domain can move around a central hinge. Altogether, this work provides a refined model of the PRORP-tRNA complex that illustrates how protein-only RNase P enzymes specifically bind tRNA and highlights the contribution of protein dynamics to achieve this specific interaction. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Limits of RNA 2'-OH Mimicry by Fluorine: Crystal Structure of Bacillus halodurans RNase H Bound to a 2'-FRNA:DNA Hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallan, Pradeep S; Prakash, Thazha P; de Leon, Arnie R; Egli, Martin

    2016-09-27

    RNase H1 cleaves the RNA strand of RNA:DNA hybrids. Replacement of RNA 2'-hydroxyls by fluorine (FRNA) is commonly used to stabilize aptamers and siRNAs. However, FRNA:DNA hybrids fail to elicit RNase H activity. The underlying reasons are unclear, as 2'-OH groups are not directly involved in cleavage. We determined the crystal structure of Bacillus halodurans RNase H bound to a FRNA:DNA hybrid. The structure points to dynamic (slippage of the FRNA:DNA hybrid relative to the enzyme), geometric (different curvatures of FRNA:DNA and RNA:DNA hybrids), and electronic reasons (Mg(2+) absent from the active site of the FRNA:DNA complex) for the loss of RNaseH activity.

  12. Newly synthesized APOBEC3G is incorporated into HIV virions, inhibited by HIV RNA, and subsequently activated by RNase H.

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    Vanessa B Soros

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available APOBEC3G (A3G is a potent antiretroviral deoxycytidine deaminase that, when incorporated into HIV virions, hypermutates nascent viral DNA formed during reverse transcription. HIV Vif counters the effect of A3G by depleting intracellular stores of the enzyme, thereby blocking its virion incorporation. Through pulse-chase analyses, we demonstrate that virion A3G is mainly recruited from the cellular pool of newly synthesized enzyme compared to older "mature" A3G already residing in high-molecular-mass RNA-protein complexes. Virion-incorporated A3G forms a large complex with viral genomic RNA that is clearly distinct from cellular HMM A3G complexes, as revealed by both gel filtration and biochemical fractionation. Unexpectedly, the enzymatic activity of virion-incorporated A3G is lost upon its stable association with HIV RNA. The activity of the latent A3G enzyme is ultimately restored during reverse transcription by the action of HIV RNase H. Degradation of the viral genomic RNA by RNase H not only generates the minus-strand DNA substrate targeted by A3G for hypermutation but also removes the inhibitory RNA bound to A3G, thereby enabling its function as a deoxycytidine deaminase. These findings highlight an unexpected interplay between host and virus where initiation of antiviral enzymatic activity is dependent on the action of an essential viral enzyme.

  13. Role of herpes simplex virus ICP27 in the degradation of mRNA by virion host shutoff RNase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, Brunella; Zhang, Weiran; Roizman, Bernard

    2010-10-01

    The virion host shutoff (VHS) RNase tegument protein released into cells by infecting virus has two effects. Preexisting stable mRNAs (e.g., GAPDH [glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase]) are rapidly degraded. Stress response RNAs containing AU-rich elements (AREs) in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) are deadenylated and cleaved, but the cleavage products persist for hours, in contrast to the short half-lives of ARE-containing mRNAs in uninfected cells. At late times, the VHS RNase is neutralized by the viral structural proteins VP16 and VP22. A recent study (J. A. Corcoran, W. L. Hsu, and J. R. Smiley, J. Virol. 80:9720-9729, 2006) reported that, at relatively late times after infection, ARE RNAs are rapidly degraded in cells infected with DeltaICP27 mutant virus and concluded that ICP27 "stabilizes" ARE mRNAs. We report the following. (i) The rates of degradation of ARE mRNA at early times (3 h) after infection with the wild type or the DeltaICP27 mutant virus are virtually identical, and hence ICP27 plays no role in this process. (ii) In noncomplementing cells, VHS RNase or VP22 is not synthesized. Therefore, the only VHS that is active is brought into cells by the DeltaICP27 mutant. (ii) The VHS RNase brought into the cells by the DeltaICP27 virus is reduced in potency relative to that of wild-type virus. Hence the rapid degradation of ARE mRNAs noted in DeltaICP27 mutant-infected cells at late times is similar to that taking place in mock-infected or in DeltaVHS RNase mutant-virus-infected cells and does not by itself support the hypothesis that ICP27 stabilizes ARE mRNAs. (iii) Concurrently, we present the first evidence that VHS RNase interacts with ICP27 most likely when bound to cap- and poly(A)-binding proteins, respectively.

  14. Maturation of the 5S rRNA 5' end is catalyzed in vitro by the endonuclease tRNase Z in the archaeon H. volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzle, Annette; Fischer, Susan; Heyer, Ruth; Schütz, Stefanie; Zacharias, Martin; Walther, Paul; Allers, Thorsten; Marchfelder, Anita

    2008-05-01

    Ribosomal RNA molecules are synthesized as precursors that have to undergo several processing steps to generate the functional rRNA. The 5S rRNA in the archaeon Haloferax volcanii is transcribed as part of a multicistronic transcript containing both large rRNAs and one or two tRNAs. Release of the 5S rRNA from the precursor requires two endonucleolytic cleavages by enzymes as yet not identified. Here we report the first identification of an archaeal 5S rRNA processing endonuclease. The enzyme tRNase Z, which was initially identified as tRNA processing enzyme, generates not only tRNA 3' ends but also mature 5S rRNA 5' ends in vitro. Interestingly, the sequence upstream of the 5S rRNA can be folded into a mini-tRNA, which might explain the processing of this RNA by tRNase Z. The endonuclease is active only at low salt concentrations in vitro, which is in contrast to the 2-4 M KCl concentration present inside the cell in vivo. Electron microscopy studies show that there are no compartments inside the Haloferax cell that could provide lower salt environments. Processing of the 5S rRNA 5' end is not restricted to the haloarchaeal tRNase Z since tRNase Z enzymes from a thermophilic archaeon, a lower and a higher eukaryote, are as well able to cleave the tRNA-like structure 5' of the 5S rRNA. Knock out of the tRNase Z gene in Haloferax volcanii is lethal, showing that the protein is essential for the cell.

  15. Probing of tertiary interactions in RNA: 2'-hydroxyl-base contacts between the RNase P RNA and pre-tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T; Loria, A; Zhong, K

    1995-01-01

    A general method has been developed to analyze all 2' hydroxyl groups involved in tertiary interactions in RNA in a single experiment. This method involves comparing the activity of populations of circularly permuted RNAs that contain or lack potential hydrogen-bond donors at each position. The 2' hydroxyls of the pre-tRNA substrate identified as potential hydrogen bond donors in intermolecular interactions with the ribozyme from eubacterial RNase P (P RNA) are located in the T stem and T loop, acceptor stem, and 3' CCA regions. To locate the hydrogen-bond acceptors for one of those 2' hydroxyls in the P RNA, a phylogenetically conserved adenosine was mutated to a guanosine. When this mutant P RNA was used, increased cleavage activity of a single circularly permuted substrate within the population was observed. The cleavage efficiency (kcat/Km) of a singly 2'-deoxy-substituted substrate at this position in the T stem was also determined. For the wild-type P RNA, the catalytic efficiency was significantly decreased compared with that of the all-ribo substrate, consistent with the notion that this 2' hydroxyl plays an important role. For the P RNA mutant, no additional effect was found upon 2'-deoxy substitution. We propose that this particular 2' hydroxyl in the pre-tRNA interacts specifically with this adenosine in the P RNA. This method should be useful in examining the role of 2' hydroxyl groups in other RNA-RNA and RNA-protein complexes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618931

  16. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine M Pompey

    Full Text Available Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  17. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Justine M; Foda, Bardees; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  18. DETECTING EXPRESSION OF MRP-1/CD9 mRNA IN LUNG CANCERS USING TISSUE MICROARRAYS AND FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION METHODS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-yun; LIU Ting; LI Yan; ZHAO Feng-yun; SUN Cui-yun; WANG Ai-xiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the MRP-1/CD9mRNA expression in lung cancer and normal lung tissues and the relationship between its expression and pathologic grades, clinical stages, metastasis and prognosis.Methods: To observe MRP-1/C9mRNA expression, tissue microarray (TMA) containing 54 lung cancers and 10 normal lung tissues was prepared and Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used. Results: The positive rate of MRP-1/CD9 expression was 48.1% in lung cancer, lower than that of normal lung tissues. The statistical difference was significant (P<0.05). Its protein expression had no relationship with the patients' ages, sex and the macroscopic type of tumor, but had relationships with the histological type, clinical stage, differentiated degree and metastasis. The expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was higher than that in small cell lung cancer (SCLC); in well-moderately differentiated group was higher than that in poorly differentiated group; Earlier period group (Ⅰ+Ⅱ) was higher than in later period group (Ⅲ+Ⅳ); and in group without lymphoid metastasis was higher than in patients with lymphoid metastasis. Conclusion: The progression of the lung cancer maybe related with the descended MRP-1/Cd9 expression, which may be useful in evaluating the prognosis of cancer patients.

  19. The tRNA 30-end Processing Enzyme tRNase Z2 Contributes to Chloroplast Biogenesis in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuan Long; Dong Guo; Dong He; Wenjie Shen; Xianghua Li

    2013-01-01

    tRNase Z (TRZ) is a ubiquitous endonuclease that removes the 30-trailer from precursor tRNAs during maturation. In yeast and animals, TRZ regulates the cell cycle via its (t)RNA processing activity;however, its physiological function in higher plants has not been well characterized. This study describes the identification of a rice (Oryza sativa) TRZ2 mutant; plants homozygous for the osatrz2 mutation were albinos with deficient chlorophyll content. A microscopic analysis of the mutant plants revealed that the transition of proplastids to chloroplasts was arrested at an early stage, and the number and size of the plastids in callus cells was substantially decreased. A genetic complementation test and an RNA interference analysis confirmed that disruption of OsaTRZ2 was responsible for the mutant phenotype. OsaTRZ2 is expressed in all rice tissues, but is preferentially expressed in leaves, sheathes, and calli. OsaTRZ2 was subcellularly localized in chloroplasts, and displayed tRNA 30-end processing activity in both in vitro and in vivo assays. In the osatrz2 mutants, transcription of plastid-encoded and nucleus-encoded RNA polymerases was severely reduced and moderately increased, respectively. These results suggest that the tRNA 30 processing activity of OsaTRZ2 contributes to chloroplast biogenesis.

  20. Two genetic clusters in swine hemoplasmas revealed by analyses of the 16S rRNA and RNase P RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yusaku; Fujihara, Masatoshi; Obara, Hisato; Nagai, Kazuya; Harasawa, Ryô

    2011-12-01

    Only two hemoplasma species, Eperythrozoon parvum and Mycoplasma suis, have been recognized in pigs. Here we demonstrate the genetic variations among six hemoplasma strains detected from pigs, by analyzing the 16S rRNA and RNase P RNA (rnpB) genes, and propose a novel hemoplasma taxon that has not been described previously. Phylogenetic trees based on the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that these six hemoplasmas were divided into two clusters representing M. suis and a novel taxon. We further examined the primary and secondary structures of the nucleotide sequences of the rnpB gene of the novel taxon, and found it distinct from that of M. suis. In conclusion, we unveiled a genetic cluster distinct from M. suis, suggesting a new swine hemoplasma species or E. parvum. Our findings also suggest that this novel cluster should be included in the genus Mycoplasma.

  1. SKP2 siRNA inhibits the degradation of P27kip1 and down-regulates the expression of MRP in HL-60/A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jie; Yin, Songmei; Li, Yiqing; Xie, Shuangfeng; Nie, Danian; Ma, Liping; Wang, Xiuju; Wu, Yudan; Feng, Jianhong

    2009-08-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) gene is a tumor suppressor gene, and is involved in the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of P27kip1. SKP2 and P27kip1 affect the proceeding and prognosis of leukemia through regulating the proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells. In this study, we explored the mechanism of reversing of HL-60/A drug resistance through SKP2 down-regulation. HL-60/A cells were nucleofected by Amaxa Nucleofector System with SKP2 siRNA. The gene and protein expression levels of Skp2, P27kip1, and multi-drug resistance associated protein (MRP) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. The 50% inhibitory concentration value was calculated using cytotoxic analysis according to the death rate of these two kinds of cells under different concentrations of chemotherapeutics to compare the sensitivity of the cells. HL-60/A cells showed multi-drug resistance phenotype characteristic by cross-resistance to adriamycin, daunorubicin, and arabinosylcytosine, due to the expression of MRP. We found that the expression of SKP2 was higher in HL-60/A cells than in HL-60 cells, but the expression of P27kip1 was lower. The expression of SKP2 in HL-60/A cells nucleofected by SKP2 siRNA was down-regulated whereas the protein level of P27kip1 was up-regulated. Compared with the MRP expression level in the control group (nucleofected by control siRNA), the mRNA and protein expression levels of MRP in HL-60/A cells nucleofected by SKP2 siRNA were lower, and the latter cells were more sensitive to adriamycin, daunorubicin, and arabinosylcytosine. Down-regulating the SKP2 expression and arresting cells in the G0/G1 phase improve drug sensitivity of leukemia cells with down-regulated MRP expression.

  2. Novel RNA-binding properties of Pop3p support a role for eukaryotic RNase P protein subunits in substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, E M; True, H L; Celander, D W

    2001-11-09

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the 5'-end maturation of transfer RNA molecules. Recent evidence suggests that the eukaryotic protein subunits may provide substrate-binding functions (True, H. L., and Celander, D. W. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 7193-7196). We now report that Pop3p, an essential protein subunit of the holoenzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, displays novel RNA-binding properties. A recombinant form of Pop3p (H6Pop3p) displays a 3-fold greater affinity for binding pre-tRNA substrates relative to tRNA products. The recognition sequence for the H6Pop3p-substrate interaction in vitro was mapped to a 39-nucleotide long sequence that extends from position -21 to +18 surrounding the natural processing site in pre-tRNA substrates. H6Pop3p binds a variety of RNA molecules with high affinity (K(d) = 16-25 nm) and displays a preference for single-stranded RNAs. Removal or modification of basic C-terminal residues attenuates the RNA-binding properties displayed by the protein specifically for a pre-tRNA substrate. These studies support the model that eukaryotic RNase P proteins bind simultaneously to the RNA subunit and RNA substrate.

  3. Using RNase sequence specificity to refine the identification of RNA-protein binding regions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xinguo; Li Lang; Shen Changyu; Wang Guohua; Wang Xin; Mooney Sean D; Edenberg Howard J; Sanford Jeremy R; Liu Yunlong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Massively parallel pyrosequencing is a high-throughput technology that can sequence hundreds of thousands of DNA/RNA fragments in a single experiment. Combining it with immunoprecipitation-based biochemical assays, such as cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP), provides a genome-wide method to detect the sites at which proteins bind DNA or RNA. In a CLIP-pyrosequencing experiment, the resolutions of the detected protein binding regions are partially determined by the length of the...

  4. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  5. Mutation Scanning of D1705 and D1709 in the RNAse IIIb Domain of MicroRNA Processing Enzyme Dicer in Cutaneous Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G; Skrygan, Marina; Sand, Daniel; Gambichler, Thilo; Bromba, Michael; Stockfleth, Eggert; Hessam, Schapoor

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) there have been performed several studies showing perturbations in the expression of miRNAs and the miRNA expression machinery in cutaneous melanoma. Dicer, a pivotal cytosolic enzyme of miRNA maturation has shown to be affected by both somatic and germline mutations in a variety of cancers. Recent studies have shown that recurrent somatic mutations of Dicer frequently affect the metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of its RNase IIIb domain, therefore called hot spot mutations. The present study investigates metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of the Dicer RNase IIIb domain in cutaneous melanomas and melanoma metastasis by Sanger sequencing. All investigated samples showed wildtype sequence and no single mutation was detected. The miRNA processing enzyme Dicer of melanoma and melanoma metastasis does not appear to be affected by mutation in the metal-ion-binding sites D1709 and D1705 of its RNase IIIb domain.

  6. Coexpression of Escherichia coli RNase Ⅲ in silkworm cells improves the efficiency of RNA interference induced by long hairpin dsRNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae Man Lee; Yoshito Kojin; Tsuneyuki Tatsuke; Hiroaki Mon; Yoshitaka Miyagawa; Takahiro Kusakabe

    2013-01-01

    Long hairpin dsRNA transcribed from chromosomal DNA can induce RNA interference in Bombyx mori cells,although its gene silencing efficiency is lower than that of exogenously introduced double-stranded RNAs(dsRNAs).To solve this problem,we monitored the nuclear cytoplasmic translocation of the transcribed hairpin dsRNA and analyzed the processing efficiency into mature small interfering RNA(siRNA).Northern blot analysis revealed that the transcribed hairpin dsRNAs were spliced and transported into the cytoplasm,but were not effectively diced into siRNAs.Interestingly,RNAi with hairpin dsRNAs from genome-integrated IR transgene was stimulated by the coexpression of Escherichia coli RNase Ⅲ,although this exogenous enzyme seemed to bring about nonspecific cleavage of cellular mRNA.

  7. Hepatotoxicity of high affinity gapmer antisense oligonucleotides is mediated by RNase H1 dependent promiscuous reduction of very long pre-mRNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Sebastien A; Hart, Christopher E; Cauntay, Patrick; Hsiao, Jill; Machemer, Todd; Katz, Melanie; Watt, Andy; Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Younis, Husam; Sabripour, Mahyar; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Dan, Amy; Prakash, T P; Seth, Punit P; Swayze, Eric E; Bennett, C Frank; Crooke, Stanley T; Henry, Scott P

    2016-03-18

    High affinity antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) containing bicylic modifications (BNA) such as locked nucleic acid (LNA) designed to induce target RNA cleavage have been shown to have enhanced potency along with a higher propensity to cause hepatotoxicity. In order to understand the mechanism of this hepatotoxicity, transcriptional profiles were collected from the livers of mice treated with a panel of highly efficacious hepatotoxic or non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. We observed highly selective transcript knockdown in mice treated with non-hepatotoxic LNA ASOs, while the levels of many unintended transcripts were reduced in mice treated with hepatotoxic LNA ASOs. This transcriptional signature was concurrent with on-target RNA reduction and preceded transaminitis. Remarkably, the mRNA transcripts commonly reduced by toxic LNA ASOs were generally not strongly associated with any particular biological process, cellular component or functional group. However, they tended to have much longer pre-mRNA transcripts. We also demonstrate that the off-target RNA knockdown and hepatotoxicity is attenuated by RNase H1 knockdown, and that this effect can be generalized to high affinity modifications beyond LNA. This suggests that for a certain set of ASOs containing high affinity modifications such as LNA, hepatotoxicity can occur as a result of unintended off-target RNase H1 dependent RNA degradation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Polynucleotide Phosphorylase, RNase E/G, and YbeY Are Involved in the Maturation of 4.5S RNA in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tomoya; Tanaka, Yuya; Wachi, Masaaki; Inui, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum has been applied for the industrial production of various metabolites, such as amino acids. To understand the biosynthesis of the membrane protein in this bacterium, we investigated the process of signal recognition particle (SRP) assembly. SRP is found in all three domains of life and plays an important role in the membrane insertion of proteins. SRP RNA is initially transcribed as precursor molecules; however, relatively little is known about its maturation. In C. glutamicum, SRP consists of the Ffh protein and 4.5S RNA lacking an Alu domain. In this study, we found that 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), and two endo-type RNases, RNase E/G and YbeY, are involved in the 3' maturation of 4.5S RNA in C. glutamicum The mature form of 4.5S RNA was inefficiently formed in ΔrneG Δpnp mutant cells, suggesting the existence of an alternative pathway for the 3' maturation of 4.5S RNA. Primer extension analysis also revealed that the 5' mature end of 4.5S RNA corresponds to that of the transcriptional start site. Immunoprecipitated Ffh protein contained immature 4.5S RNA in Δpnp, ΔrneG, and ΔybeY mutants, suggesting that 4.5S RNA precursors can interact with Ffh. These results imply that the maturation of 4.5S RNA can be performed in the 4.5S RNA-Ffh complex.IMPORTANCE Overproduction of a membrane protein, such as a transporter, is useful for engineering of strains of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is a workhorse of amino acid production. To understand membrane protein biogenesis in this bacterium, we investigated the process of signal recognition particle (SRP) assembly. SRP contains the Ffh protein and SRP RNA and plays an important role in the membrane insertion of proteins. Although SRP RNA is highly conserved among the three domains of life, relatively little is known about its maturation. We show that PNPase, RNase E/G, and YbeY are involved in the 3' maturation of the SRP RNA (4.5S RNA) in this

  9. The Highly Conserved Bacterial RNase YbeY Is Essential in Vibrio cholerae, Playing a Critical Role in Virulence, Stress Regulation, and RNA Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W.; Arnold, Markus F. F.; Mekalanos, John J.; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Walker, Graham C.

    2014-01-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3′ end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3′ end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes. PMID:24901994

  10. The highly conserved bacterial RNase YbeY is essential in Vibrio cholerae, playing a critical role in virulence, stress regulation, and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Maarten; Köhrer, Caroline; Davies, Bryan W; Arnold, Markus F F; Mekalanos, John J; RajBhandary, Uttam L; Walker, Graham C

    2014-06-01

    YbeY, a highly conserved protein, is an RNase in E. coli and plays key roles in both processing of the critical 3' end of 16 S rRNA and in 70 S ribosome quality control under stress. These central roles account for YbeY's inclusion in the postulated minimal bacterial genome. However, YbeY is not essential in E. coli although loss of ybeY severely sensitizes it to multiple physiological stresses. Here, we show that YbeY is an essential endoribonuclease in Vibrio cholerae and is crucial for virulence, stress regulation, RNA processing and ribosome quality control, and is part of a core set of RNases essential in most representative pathogens. To understand its function, we analyzed the rRNA and ribosome profiles of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY and other RNase mutants associated with 16 S rRNA processing; our results demonstrate that YbeY is also crucial for 16 S rRNA 3' end maturation in V. cholerae and that its depletion impedes subunit assembly into 70 S ribosomes. YbeY's importance to V. cholerae pathogenesis was demonstrated by the complete loss of mice colonization and biofilm formation, reduced cholera toxin production, and altered expression levels of virulence-associated small RNAs of a V. cholerae strain partially depleted for YbeY. Notably, the ybeY genes of several distantly related pathogens can fully complement an E. coli ΔybeY strain under various stress conditions, demonstrating the high conservation of YbeY's activity in stress regulation. Taken together, this work provides the first comprehensive exploration of YbeY's physiological role in a human pathogen, showing its conserved function across species in essential cellular processes.

  11. RNase III is required for localization to the nucleoid of the 5' pre-rRNA leader and for optimal induction of rRNA synthesis in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that ribosomes are preferentially localized outside the nucleoid in Escherichia coli, but little is known about the spatial regulation of pre-rRNA processing. In this work, I investigate the cellular distribution of leader pre-rRNAs using RNA-FISH. In contrast to mature rRNA, the 5' proximal leader region associates with the nucleoid, and this association occurs in an RNase III-dependent manner. Moreover, RNase III plays a role in the rapid induction of ribosomal operons during outgrowth and is essential in the absence of the transcriptional regulator Fis, suggesting a linkage of transcription and RNA processing for ribosomal operons in E. coli.

  12. RNase III is required for localization to the nucleoid of the 5′ pre-rRNA leader and for optimal induction of rRNA synthesis in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagon, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that ribosomes are preferentially localized outside the nucleoid in Escherichia coli, but little is known about the spatial regulation of pre-rRNA processing. In this work, I investigate the cellular distribution of leader pre-rRNAs using RNA-FISH. In contrast to mature rRNA, the 5′ proximal leader region associates with the nucleoid, and this association occurs in an RNase III-dependent manner. Moreover, RNase III plays a role in the rapid induction of ribosomal operons during outgrowth and is essential in the absence of the transcriptional regulator Fis, suggesting a linkage of transcription and RNA processing for ribosomal operons in E. coli. PMID:23893733

  13. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  14. Regulated expression of the MRP8 and MRP14 genes during terminal differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner-Bartnicki, A.L.; Murao, S.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-02-14

    The calcium-binding proteins MRP8 and MRP14 are induced during monomyelocytic cell maturation and may mediate the growth arrest in differentiating HL-60 cells. We determined the levels of a protein complex (PC) containing MRP8 and MRP14 and investigated the mechanism by which the genes encoding these proteins are regulated in HL-60 cells treated with the differentiation-inducing agent mycophenolic acid. Elevated levels of the PC were found to directly parallel gains in the steady-state levels of MRP8 and MRP14 mRNA. Transcription studies with the use of nuclear run-on experiments revealed increased transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters after MPA treatment. 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, which induces HL-60 cell differentiation by another mechanism, was also found to increase transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters, suggesting that this initiation is the major control of MRP8 and MRP14 gene expression during terminal differentiation of human promyelocytic cells.

  15. The herpes simplex virus host shutoff RNase degrades cellular and viral mRNAs made before infection but not viral mRNA made after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddeo, Brunella; Zhang, Weiran; Roizman, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    A herpes simplex virus tegument protein brought into the cell during infection and designated the virion host shutoff protein (VHS) is an endoribonuclease that degrades mRNA. The prevailing view for many years has been that the VHS-RNase does not discriminate between cellular and viral RNAs and that the viruses prevail because the accumulation of viral transcripts outpaces their degradation. Here we report the following. (i) The degradation of viral mRNA made during infection of Vero or HEp-2 cells proceeds at a much-reduced rate compared to that of cellular mRNA. In effect, viral mRNAs are largely stable, whereas cellular mRNAs are rapidly degraded or, in the case of AU-rich mRNA, cleaved and rendered dysfunctional. (ii) In contrast to viral mRNAs made after infection, viral mRNAs expressed by plasmids transfected into cells prior to infection are degraded after infection at a rate comparable to that of cellular mRNAs. Moreover, the mRNA encoded by the transfected plasmid is hyperadenylated in the infected cell. Hyperadenylation but not degradation of mRNAs is blocked by actinomycin D. The results indicate that VHS-mRNA discriminates between viral and cellular mRNA but only in the context of infection and that discrimination is not based on the sequence of the mRNA but most likely on one or more viral factors expressed in the infected cell.

  16. Biological significance of 5S rRNA import into human mitochondria: role of ribosomal protein MRP-L18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Alexandre; Entelis, Nina; Martin, Robert P; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-06-15

    5S rRNA is an essential component of ribosomes of all living organisms, the only known exceptions being mitochondrial ribosomes of fungi, animals, and some protists. An intriguing situation distinguishes mammalian cells: Although the mitochondrial genome contains no 5S rRNA genes, abundant import of the nuclear DNA-encoded 5S rRNA into mitochondria was reported. Neither the detailed mechanism of this pathway nor its rationale was clarified to date. In this study, we describe an elegant molecular conveyor composed of a previously identified human 5S rRNA import factor, rhodanese, and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L18, thanks to which 5S rRNA molecules can be specifically withdrawn from the cytosolic pool and redirected to mitochondria, bypassing the classic nucleolar reimport pathway. Inside mitochondria, the cytosolic 5S rRNA is shown to be associated with mitochondrial ribosomes.

  17. Exploring the mechanisms of action of human secretory RNase 3 and RNase 7 against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Vivian A; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Navarro, Susanna; Blanco, Jose A; Sánchez, Daniel; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-10-01

    Human antimicrobial RNases, which belong to the vertebrate RNase A superfamily and are secreted upon infection, display a wide spectrum of antipathogen activities. In this work, we examined the antifungal activity of the eosinophil RNase 3 and the skin-derived RNase 7, two proteins expressed by innate cell types that are directly involved in the host defense against fungal infection. Candida albicans has been selected as a suitable working model for testing RNase activities toward a eukaryotic pathogen. We explored the distinct levels of action of both RNases on yeast by combining cell viability and membrane model assays together with protein labeling and confocal microscopy. Site-directed mutagenesis was applied to ablate either the protein active site or the key anchoring region for cell binding. This is the first integrated study that highlights the RNases' dual mechanism of action. Along with an overall membrane-destabilization process, the RNases could internalize and target cellular RNA. The data support the contribution of the enzymatic activity for the antipathogen action of both antimicrobial proteins, which can be envisaged as suitable templates for the development of novel antifungal drugs. We suggest that both human RNases work as multitasking antimicrobial proteins that provide a first line immune barrier.

  18. Tethered domains and flexible regions in tRNase Z(L, the long form of tRNase Z.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wilson

    Full Text Available tRNase Z, a member of the metallo-β-lactamase family, endonucleolytically removes the pre-tRNA 3' trailer in a step central to tRNA maturation. The short form (tRNase Z(S is the only one found in bacteria and archaebacteria and is also present in some eukaryotes. The homologous long form (tRNase Z(L, exclusively found in eukaryotes, consists of related amino- and carboxy-domains, suggesting that tRNase Z(L arose from a tandem duplication of tRNase Z(S followed by interdependent divergence of the domains. X-ray crystallographic structures of tRNase Z(S reveal a flexible arm (FA extruded from the body of tRNase Z remote from the active site that binds tRNA far from the scissile bond. No tRNase Z(L structures have been solved; alternative biophysical studies are therefore needed to illuminate its functional characteristics. Structural analyses of tRNase Z(L performed by limited proteolysis, two dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry establish stability of the amino and carboxy domains and flexibility of the FA and inter-domain tether, with implications for tRNase Z(L function.

  19. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

  20. tRNase Z核酸内切酶的研究进展%tRNase Z's Research Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩燕; 黄原; 叶海燕

    2012-01-01

    tRNase Z是一种核酸内切酶,许多细菌、大多数真核生物以及所有的古细菌的tRNA3'末端加工过程都是由核酸内切酶tRNase Z催化的.tRNase Z能催化缺乏CCA的tRNA前体生成末尾带有核苷酸识别的3’-OH和5’磷酸尾巴的成熟tRNA.这对于CCA序列的添加、tRNA的氨酰化和蛋白质的合成十分重要.tRNase Z属于metallo-β-lactamases(MBL)超家族,存在短(tRNase Zs)和长( tRNase ZL)两种形式,具有tRNA 3’末端加工、引导定位蛋白、加工rRNA、与Rex2P的相互作用、调节细胞分化与分裂等功能.预期对tRNaseZ的功能和属性不断深入研究将会对AIDS和前列腺癌的治疗具有潜在和实际的推动作用.%tRNase Z is an endonuolease that catalyzes tRNA 3'-end processing in many bacteria, most eukaryotcs and all archaea. tRNase Z generates a mature tRNA ending with the 3'-OH of the discriminator nucleotide and a trailer sequence with a 5'-phosphate from CCA-less tRNA precursors, which is absolutely essential for the addition of the CCA sequence, tRNA aminoacylation and protein synthesis. tRNase Z enzymes belong to the superfamily of metallo-(3-lactamases. tRNase Z exists the short (tRNase Z ) and long (tRNase ZL ) forms. tRNase Z has many functions, such as RNA 3'-end processing, guiding the positioning of protein, rRNA-processing, complementation with the REX2 gene, regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation etc. Further analysis of the function and properties of tRNase Z will play a potential and actual role in the treatment of AIDS and prostate cancer in the coming years.

  1. Chemically modified oligonucleotides with efficient RNase H response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Boel, Anne Marie; Lobedanz, Sune;

    2008-01-01

    Ten different chemically modified nucleosides were incorporated into short DNA strands (chimeric oligonucleotides ON3-ON12 and ON15-ON24) and then tested for their capacity to mediate RNAse H cleavage of the complementary RNA strand. The modifications were placed at two central positions directly...... in the RNase H cleaving region. The RNA strand of duplexes with ON3, ON5 and ON12 were cleaved more efficiently than the RNA strand of the DNA:RNA control duplex. There seems to be no correlation between the thermal stability between the duplexes and RNase H cleavage....

  2. RNase HI Is Essential for Survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina E Minias

    Full Text Available RNases H are involved in the removal of RNA from RNA/DNA hybrids. Type I RNases H are thought to recognize and cleave the RNA/DNA duplex when at least four ribonucleotides are present. Here we investigated the importance of RNase H type I encoding genes for model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. By performing gene replacement through homologous recombination, we demonstrate that each of the two presumable RNase H type I encoding genes, rnhA and MSMEG4305, can be removed from M. smegmatis genome without affecting the growth rate of the mutant. Further, we demonstrate that deletion of both RNases H type I encoding genes in M. smegmatis leads to synthetic lethality. Finally, we question the possibility of existence of RNase HI related alternative mode of initiation of DNA replication in M. smegmatis, the process initially discovered in Escherichia coli. We suspect that synthetic lethality of double mutant lacking RNases H type I is caused by formation of R-loops leading to collapse of replication forks. We report Mycobacterium smegmatis as the first bacterial species, where function of RNase H type I has been found essential.

  3. RNase III-Independent Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase via Translational Repression

    OpenAIRE

    Carzaniga, T.; Dehò, G; Briani, F.

    2015-01-01

    The complex posttranscriptional regulation mechanism of the Escherichia coli pnp gene, which encodes the phosphorolytic exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), involves two endoribonucleases, namely, RNase III and RNase E, and PNPase itself, which thus autoregulates its own expression. The models proposed for pnp autoregulation posit that the target of PNPase is a mature pnp mRNA previously processed at its 5′ end by RNase III, rather than the primary pnp transcript (RNase I...

  4. The role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Dos Santos, Ricardo F; Silva, Inês J; Pobre, Vânia; Domingues, Susana; Andrade, José M; Viegas, Sandra C; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2014-04-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are key factors in the control of biological processes, since they modulate the processing, degradation and quality control of RNAs. This review gives many illustrative examples of the role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs (sRNAs). RNase E and PNPase have been shown to degrade the free pool of sRNAs. RNase E can also be recruited to cleave mRNAs when they are interacting with sRNAs. RNase III cleaves double-stranded structures, and can cut both the sRNA and its RNA target when they are hybridized. Overall, ribonucleases act as conductors in the control of sRNAs. Therefore, it is very important to further understand their role in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression.

  5. Biochemical characterization of RNase HⅡ from Aeropyrum pernix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingli Hou; Yufen Liu; Zheng Lu; Xipeng Liu; Jianhua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Aeropyrum pernix contains one homolog of ribonuclease H (RNase H),A.pernix RNase HⅡ (Ape-RNase HⅡ).Activity characterization showed that Ape-RNase HⅡ exhibited the highest activity in the presence of 5 mM Mn2+, 1 mM Co2+, or 10mM Mg2+, respectively;however,its cleavage efficiencies at different cleavage sites for Mn2+ and Mg2+ were different.Ape-RNase HⅡ cleaved 12-bp RNA/DNA substrates at multiple sites and the optimum pH value was 11.0.Moreover,16-bp DNAr4-DNA/DNA and 13-bp DNA-r1-DNA/DNA chimeric substrates were cleaved at DNA-RNA junction.ApeRNase HⅡ was thermostable and the stabilization was enhanced with increased salt concentration.This work is believed to be the first in vitro functional study of ApeRNase HⅡ and the results should contribute to the analysis of RNase H of other archaeal species.

  6. Characterization of the biochemical properties of Campylobacter jejuni RNase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nabila; Saramago, Margarida; Matos, Rute G; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-11-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen, which is now considered as a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The information regarding ribonucleases in C. jejuni is very scarce but there are hints that they can be instrumental in virulence mechanisms. Namely, PNPase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) was shown to allow survival of C. jejuni in refrigerated conditions, to facilitate bacterial swimming, cell adhesion, colonization and invasion. In several microorganisms PNPase synthesis is auto-controlled in an RNase III (ribonuclease III)-dependent mechanism. Thereby, we have cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized Cj-RNase III (C. jejuni RNase III). We have demonstrated that Cj-RNase III is able to complement an Escherichia coli rnc-deficient strain in 30S rRNA processing and PNPase regulation. Cj-RNase III was shown to be active in an unexpectedly large range of conditions, and Mn2+ seems to be its preferred co-factor, contrarily to what was described for other RNase III orthologues. The results lead us to speculate that Cj-RNase III may have an important role under a Mn2+-rich environment. Mutational analysis strengthened the function of some residues in the catalytic mechanism of action of RNase III, which was shown to be conserved.

  7. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Lucy C.J., E-mail: Luc_ellis@yahoo.co.uk [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Hawksworth, Gabrielle M. [Section of Translational Medicine, Division of Applied Biology, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD (United Kingdom); Weaver, Richard J. [Biologie Servier, Drug Safety Research Centre, 905 Route de Saran, 45520 Gidy (France)

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD{sub 7.0}) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1 μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC{sub 50} values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein. - Highlights: • We characterised MRP2 (human)/Mrp2 (rat)-mediated transport of statins. • We show statins were transported by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. • Statins competed with a known substrate for transport by MRP2/Mrp2. • Competition involved more than one binding site on the MRP2/Mrp2 protein.

  8. Phylogenetic analyses and characterization of RNase X25 from Drosophila melanogaster suggest a conserved housekeeping role and additional functions for RNase T2 enzymes in protostomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Ambrosio

    Full Text Available Ribonucleases belonging to the RNase T2 family are enzymes associated with the secretory pathway that are almost absolutely conserved in all eukaryotes. Studies in plants and vertebrates suggest they have an important housekeeping function in rRNA recycling. However, little is known about this family of enzymes in protostomes. We characterized RNase X25, the only RNase T2 enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that RNase X25 is the major contributor of ribonuclease activity in flies as detected by in gel assays, and has an acidic pH preference. Gene expression analyses showed that the RNase X25 transcript is present in all adult tissues and developmental stages. RNase X25 expression is elevated in response to nutritional stresses; consistent with the hypothesis that this enzyme has a housekeeping role in recycling RNA. A correlation between induction of RNase X25 expression and autophagy was observed. Moreover, induction of gene expression was triggered by oxidative stress suggesting that RNase X25 may have additional roles in stress responses. Phylogenetic analyses of this family in protostomes showed that RNase T2 genes have undergone duplication events followed by divergence in several phyla, including the loss of catalytic residues, and suggest that RNase T2 proteins have acquired novel functions. Among those, it is likely that a role in host immunosuppression evolved independently in several groups, including parasitic Platyhelminthes and parasitoid wasps. The presence of only one RNase T2 gene in the D. melanogaster genome, without any other evident secretory RNase activity detected, makes this organism an ideal system to study the cellular functions of RNase T2 proteins associated with RNA recycling and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. On the other hand, the discovery of gene duplications in several protostome genomes also presents interesting new avenues to study additional biological functions of this ancient family of proteins.

  9. Phylogenetic analyses and characterization of RNase X25 from Drosophila melanogaster suggest a conserved housekeeping role and additional functions for RNase T2 enzymes in protostomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Linda; Morriss, Stephanie; Riaz, Ayesha; Bailey, Ryan; Ding, Jian; MacIntosh, Gustavo C

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleases belonging to the RNase T2 family are enzymes associated with the secretory pathway that are almost absolutely conserved in all eukaryotes. Studies in plants and vertebrates suggest they have an important housekeeping function in rRNA recycling. However, little is known about this family of enzymes in protostomes. We characterized RNase X25, the only RNase T2 enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that RNase X25 is the major contributor of ribonuclease activity in flies as detected by in gel assays, and has an acidic pH preference. Gene expression analyses showed that the RNase X25 transcript is present in all adult tissues and developmental stages. RNase X25 expression is elevated in response to nutritional stresses; consistent with the hypothesis that this enzyme has a housekeeping role in recycling RNA. A correlation between induction of RNase X25 expression and autophagy was observed. Moreover, induction of gene expression was triggered by oxidative stress suggesting that RNase X25 may have additional roles in stress responses. Phylogenetic analyses of this family in protostomes showed that RNase T2 genes have undergone duplication events followed by divergence in several phyla, including the loss of catalytic residues, and suggest that RNase T2 proteins have acquired novel functions. Among those, it is likely that a role in host immunosuppression evolved independently in several groups, including parasitic Platyhelminthes and parasitoid wasps. The presence of only one RNase T2 gene in the D. melanogaster genome, without any other evident secretory RNase activity detected, makes this organism an ideal system to study the cellular functions of RNase T2 proteins associated with RNA recycling and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. On the other hand, the discovery of gene duplications in several protostome genomes also presents interesting new avenues to study additional biological functions of this ancient family of proteins.

  10. ATP-dependent transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lucy C J; Hawksworth, Gabrielle M; Weaver, Richard J

    2013-06-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein-2, MRP2 (human), Mrp2 (rat) are an efflux transporter, responsible for the transport of numerous endogenous and xenobiotic compounds including taurocholate, methotrexate and carboxydichlorofluorescein (CDF). The present study aims to characterise transport of statins by human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 using membrane and vesicle preparations. All statins tested (simvastatin, pravastatin, pitavastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, lovastatin and rosuvastatin) stimulated vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in membranes expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2, suggesting that all statins are substrates of human and rat MRP2/Mrp2. The substrate affinity (Km) of all statins for MRP2/Mrp2 was comparable and no correlation between lipophilicity (logD7.0) and Km was seen. All statins also inhibited uptake of the fluorescent Mrp2 substrate, CDF (1μM) into vesicles expressing human or rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar IC50 values. Fitting of the inhibitory data to the hill slope equation, gave hill coefficients (h) of greater than one, suggesting that transport involved more than one binding site for inhibitors of MPR2 and Mrp2. We conclude that statins were transported by both human and rat MRP2/Mrp2 with similar affinity. Statins were also shown to compete with other substrates for transport by MRP2/Mrp2 and that this transport involved more than one binding site on the Mrp2/MRP2 protein.

  11. Activity and expression of the multidrug resistance proteins P-glycoprotein, MRP1, MRP2, MRP3 and MRP5 in de novo and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EGE; Noordhoek, L; van den Berg, E; van der Pol, MA; Muller, M; Vellenga, E

    2001-01-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) MRP1, MRP2, MRP3, MRP5 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) act in concert with each other to give a net resultant pump function in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of the present study was to analyze the activity of these proteins, which might be upregulated at

  12. Viral RNase3 Co-Localizes and Interacts with the Antiviral Defense Protein SGS3 in Plant Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Weinheimer

    Full Text Available Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV; family Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III endoribonuclease (RNase3 that suppresses post-transcriptional RNA interference (RNAi and eliminates antiviral defense in sweetpotato plants (Ipomoea batatas. For RNAi suppression, RNase3 cleaves double-stranded small interfering RNAs (ds-siRNA and long dsRNA to fragments that are too short to be utilized in RNAi. However, RNase3 can suppress only RNAi induced by sense RNA. Sense-mediated RNAi involves host suppressor of gene silencing 3 (SGS3 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6. In this study, subcellular localization and host interactions of RNase3 were studied in plant cells. RNase3 was found to interact with SGS3 of sweetpotato and Arabidopsis thaliana when expressed in leaves, and it localized to SGS3/RDR6 bodies in the cytoplasm of leaf cells and protoplasts. RNase3 was also detected in the nucleus. Co-expression of RNase3 and SGS3 in leaf tissue enhanced the suppression of RNAi, as compared with expression of RNase3 alone. These results suggest additional mechanisms needed for efficient RNase3-mediated suppression of RNAi and provide new information about the subcellular context and phase of the RNAi pathway in which RNase3 realizes RNAi suppression.

  13. Genetic and genomic analysis of RNases in model cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jeffrey C; Gordon, Gina C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are diverse photosynthetic microbes with the ability to convert CO2 into useful products. However, metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria remains challenging because of the limited resources for modifying the expression of endogenous and exogenous biochemical pathways. Fine-tuned control of protein production will be critical to optimize the biological conversion of CO2 into desirable molecules. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are labile intermediates that play critical roles in determining the translation rate and steady-state protein concentrations in the cell. The majority of studies on mRNA turnover have focused on the model heterotrophic bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. These studies have elucidated many RNA modifying and processing enzymes and have highlighted the differences between these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In contrast, much less is known about mRNA turnover in cyanobacteria. We generated a compendium of the major ribonucleases (RNases) and provide an in-depth analysis of RNase III-like enzymes in commonly studied and diverse cyanobacteria. Furthermore, using targeted gene deletion, we genetically dissected the RNases in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, one of the fastest growing and industrially attractive cyanobacterial strains. We found that all three cyanobacterial homologs of RNase III and a member of the RNase II/R family are not essential under standard laboratory conditions, while homologs of RNase E/G, RNase J1/J2, PNPase, and a different member of the RNase II/R family appear to be essential for growth. This work will enhance our understanding of native control of gene expression and will facilitate the development of an RNA-based toolkit for metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria.

  14. Functional Analysis of Vibrio vulnificus Orthologs of Escherichia coli RraA and RNase E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeyoung; Kim, Yong-Hak; Jang, Jinyang; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Jun, Jong Woo; Hyun, Seogang; Lee, Kangseok

    2016-06-01

    RNase E plays an important role in the degradation and processing of RNA in Escherichia coli. The enzymatic activity of RNase E is controlled by the protein inhibitors RraA and RraB. The marine pathogenic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus also contains homologs of RNase E and RraA, designated as RNase EV, RraAV1, and RraAV2. Here, we report that RraAV1 actively inhibits the enzymatic activity of RNase EV in vivo and in vitro by interacting with the C-terminal domain of RNase EV. Coexpression of RraAV1 reduced ribonucleolytic activity in the cells overproducing RNase EV and consequently restored normal growth of these cells. An in vitro cleavage assay further demonstrated that RraAV1 efficiently inhibits the ribonucleolytic activity of RNase EV on BR10 + hpT, a synthetic oligonucleotide containing the RNase E cleavage site of RNA I. Our findings suggest that RraAV1 plays an active role in RNase EV-mediated RNA cleavage in V. vulnificus.

  15. Single gene deletions of mrpA to mrpG and mrpE point mutations affect activity of the Mrp Na+/H+ antiporter of alkaliphilic Bacillus and formation of hetero-oligomeric Mrp complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-06-01

    Mrp antiporters catalyze secondary Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiport and/or K(+)/H(+) antiport that is physiologically important in diverse bacteria. An additional capacity for anion flux has been observed for a few systems. Mrp is unique among antiporters in that it requires all six or seven hydrophobic gene products (MrpA to MrpG) of the mrp operon for full antiporter activity, but MrpE has been reported to be dispensable. Here, the membrane complexes formed by Mrp proteins were examined using a cloned mrp operon from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4. The operon was engineered so that the seven Mrp proteins could be detected in single samples. Membrane extracts of an antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli strain expressing this construct were analyzed by blue native-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mrp complexes of two sizes were identified containing all seven Mrp proteins. Studies of the single nonpolar mrp gene deletions in the construct showed that a subcomplex of MrpA, MrpB, MrpC, and MrpD was formed in the absence of MrpE, MrpF, or MrpG. By contrast, MrpE, MrpF, and MrpG were not observed in membranes lacking MrpA, MrpB, MrpC, or MrpD. Although MrpA and MrpD have been hypothesized to be the antiporter proteins, the MrpA-to-D complex was inactive. Every Mrp protein was required for an activity level near that of the wild-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter, but a very low activity level was observed in the absence of MrpE. The introduction of an MrpE(P114G) mutation into the full Mrp complex led to antiport activity with a greatly increased apparent K(m) value for Na(+). The results suggested that interactions among the proteins of heterooligomeric Mrp complexes strongly impact antiporter properties.

  16. Discharge of lead contamination by natural compounds pectin and chitin:biochemical analysis of DNA, RNA, DNase, RNase and GOT in albino rat as an early bio-marker of lead-toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abd El-Moneim MR Afify; Hossam S El-Beltagi

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of different concentrations of lead in drinking water on nucleic acid contents, nuclease activities and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminease (GOT) in different tissues and reduce toxic effects of lead on environment especially human and rats by using pectin and chitin natural compounds in rat diets. Methods:Male albino rats were divided into eight groups. Groups 1, 4, 5 and 6 were fed on synthetic diet and given deionized water containing 0, 150, 250 and 1 500 μg lead/mL. Groups 2 and 3 were fed on synthetic diet containing 2%apple pectin or 2%grasp shell chitin and served as positive control. Groups 7 and 8 were fed on synthetic diet containing 2%pectin or 2%chitin and drinking water containing 250 μg lead/mL. At the end of the experimental period, animals (6 week) were killed by decapitation. All organs of each rat were dissected out and chilled for determination of DNA, RNA, DNase, RNase and GOT. Results:The data showed that higher lead concentration increased the activity of GOT in all organs. The concentrations of both DNA and RNA were increased with decreasing the activities of DNase and RNase. Adding 2%pectin or chitin with lead concentration 250 μg/mL showed discharge of lead, maintained the amount of nucleic acids and activated the related decomposition enzymes. Conclusions: Pectin or chitin natural compounds have the ability to chelate to lead and subsequently work as active natural compounds to discharge lead contamination.

  17. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (PMRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  18. The essential function of B. subtilis RNase III is to silence foreign toxin genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Durand

    Full Text Available RNase III-related enzymes play key roles in cleaving double-stranded RNA in many biological systems. Among the best-known are RNase III itself, involved in ribosomal RNA maturation and mRNA turnover in bacteria, and Drosha and Dicer, which play critical roles in the production of micro (mi-RNAs and small interfering (si-RNAs in eukaryotes. Although RNase III has important cellular functions in bacteria, its gene is generally not essential, with the remarkable exception of that of Bacillus subtilis. Here we show that the essential role of RNase III in this organism is to protect it from the expression of toxin genes borne by two prophages, Skin and SPβ, through antisense RNA. Thus, while a growing number of organisms that use RNase III or its homologs as part of a viral defense mechanism, B. subtilis requires RNase III for viral accommodation to the point where the presence of the enzyme is essential for cell survival. We identify txpA and yonT as the two toxin-encoding mRNAs of Skin and SPβ that are sensitive to RNase III. We further explore the mechanism of RNase III-mediated decay of the txpA mRNA when paired to its antisense RNA RatA, both in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Single Gene Deletions of mrpA to mrpG and mrpE Point Mutations Affect Activity of the Mrp Na+/H+ Antiporter of Alkaliphilic Bacillus and Formation of Hetero-Oligomeric Mrp Complexes▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Swartz, Talia H.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Ito, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    Mrp antiporters catalyze secondary Na+(Li+)/H+ antiport and/or K+/H+ antiport that is physiologically important in diverse bacteria. An additional capacity for anion flux has been observed for a few systems. Mrp is unique among antiporters in that it requires all six or seven hydrophobic gene products (MrpA to MrpG) of the mrp operon for full antiporter activity, but MrpE has been reported to be dispensable. Here, the membrane complexes formed by Mrp proteins were examined using a cloned mrp ...

  20. A Novel Strategy for Exploitation of Host RNase E Activity by a Marine Cyanophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazic, Damir; Pekarski, Irena; Kopf, Matthias; Lindell, Debbie; Steglich, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that infection of Prochlorococcus MED4 by the cyanophage P-SSP7 leads to increased transcript levels of host endoribonuclease (RNase) E. However, it has remained enigmatic whether this is part of a host defense mechanism to degrade phage messenger RNA (mRNA) or whether this single-strand RNA-specific RNase is utilized by the phage. Here we describe a hitherto unknown means through which this cyanophage increases expression of RNase E during phage infection and concomitantly protects its own RNA from degradation. We identified two functionally different RNase E mRNA variants, one of which is significantly induced during phage infection. This transcript lacks the 5' UTR, is considerably more stable than the other transcript, and is likely responsible for increased RNase E protein levels during infection. Furthermore, selective enrichment and in vivo analysis of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) during infection revealed that phage antisense RNAs (asRNAs) sequester complementary mRNAs to form dsRNAs, such that the phage protein-coding transcriptome is nearly completely covered by asRNAs. In contrast, the host protein-coding transcriptome is only partially covered by asRNAs. These data suggest that P-SSP7 orchestrates degradation of host RNA by increasing RNase E expression while masking its own transcriptome from RNase E degradation in dsRNA complexes. We propose that this combination of strategies contributes significantly to phage progeny production.

  1. Influence of Conformation of M. tuberculosis RNase P Protein Subunit on Its Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Singh

    Full Text Available RNase P is an essential enzyme that processes 5' end leader sequence of pre-tRNA to generate mature tRNA. The bacterial RNase Ps contain a RNA subunit and one protein subunit, where the RNA subunit contains the catalytic activity. The protein subunit which lacks any catalytic activity, relaxes the ionic requirements for holoenzyme reaction and is indispensable for pre-tRNA cleavage in vivo. In the current study, we reconstituted the M. tuberculosis RNase P holoenzyme in vitro. We prepared the RNase P protein through two different strategies that differ in the conditions under which the recombinant M. tuberculosis protein, expressed in E. coli was purified. The mycobacterial RNase P protein which was purified under native conditions subsequent to isolation from inclusion bodies and in vitro renaturation, was capable of cleaving pre-tRNA specifically without the requirement of RNase P RNA. However, the preparation that was purified under denaturing conditions and refolded subsequently lacked any inherent pre-tRNA processing activity and cleaved the substrate only as a component of the holoenzyme with the RNA subunit. We found that the two RNase P protein preparations attained alternative conformations and differed with respect to their stability as well.

  2. ABCC10/MRP7 is associated with vinorelbine resistance in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessho, Yuji; Oguri, Tetsuya; Ozasa, Hiroaki; Uemura, Takehiro; Sakamoto, Hideo; Miyazaki, Mikinori; Maeno, Ken; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2009-01-01

    The non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells SK-LC6 and NCI-H23 were continuously exposed to vinorelbine (VNB), and the VNB-resistant clones, SK-LC6/VNB and H23/VNB were selected. Since SK-LS6/VNB and H23/VNB cells showed cross-resistance to certain anticancer drugs, such as paclitaxel and docetaxel, we examined the gene expression levels of drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. We found that the gene expression of ABCB1/MDR1 and ABCC10/MRP7 in SK-LC6/VNB and H23/VNB cells was increased compared with that in SK-LS6 and NCI-H23 cells, whereas the expression of ABCC1/MRP1, ABCC2/MRP2, ABCC3/MRP3 and ABCG2/BCRP did not change among these cells. Treatment with ABCB1/MDR1 inhibitor verapamil and ABCC10/MRP7 inhibitor sulfin-pyrazone altered the sensitivity of SK-LC6/VNB cells to vinorelbine. To confirm the ABCC10/MRP7 activity, we transfected small interfering RNA against ABCC10/MRP7 to ABCC10/MRP7-expressing RERF-LC-AI cells resulting in the decrease of ABCC10/MRP7 expression concomitant with the alteration of VNB cytotoxicity. Moreover, we detected the expression of ABCC10/MRP7 in 12 of 17 NSCLC cells, whereas ABCB1/MDR1 was detected in only 3 of 17 NSCLC cells. These results indicate that ABCC10/MRP7 may confer VNB resistance in NSCLC.

  3. Bacillus subtilis RNase Y activity in vivo analysed by tiling microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Laalami

    Full Text Available RNase Y is a key endoribonuclease affecting global mRNA stability in Bacillus subtilis. Its characterization provided the first evidence that endonucleolytic cleavage plays a major role in the mRNA metabolism of this organism. RNase Y shares important functional features with the RNA decay initiating RNase E from Escherichia coli, notably a similar cleavage specificity and a preference for 5' monophosphorylated substrates. We used high-resolution tiling arrays to analyze the effect of RNase Y depletion on RNA abundance covering the entire genome. The data confirm that this endoribonuclease plays a key role in initiating the decay of a large number of mRNAs as well as non coding RNAs. The downstream cleavage products are likely to be degraded by the 5' exonucleolytic activity of RNases J1/J2 as we show for a specific case. Comparison of the data with that of two other recent studies revealed very significant differences. About two thirds of the mRNAs upregulated following RNase Y depletion were different when compared to either one of these studies and only about 10% were in common in all three studies. This highlights that experimental conditions and data analysis play an important role in identifying RNase Y substrates by global transcriptional profiling. Our data confirmed already known RNase Y substrates and due to the precision and reproducibility of the profiles allow an exceptionally detailed view of the turnover of hundreds of new RNA substrates.

  4. [Drug resistance reversal of HL-60/ADR cells by simultaneous suppression of XIAP and MRP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong

    2006-12-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanisms of drug resistance of HL-60/ADR cells and to compare the reversal drug-resistance effects of antisense oligonucleotides (AS ODN) of XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) and AS ODNs of MRP (multidrug resistance-associated protein) by use alone or in combination. Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot were applied to detect the expression of XIAP, BCL-2, MRP and MDR1 in mRNA and protein levels of HL-60 cells and HL-60/ADR cells, respectively. Fully phosphorothioated AS ODN of XIAP and MRP was delivered into HL-60/ADR cells with Lipofectamine 2000 in the form of liposome-ODN complexes alone or in combination. CCK-8 cell viability assay was used to determine the effect of AS ODN of XIAP and MRP used alone or in combination on the chemotherapy sensitivity of HL-60/ADR cells to daunorubicin (DNR). Reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot were applied to examine the changes of XIAP, MRP in mRNA and protein levels respectively. The results showed that MRP and XIAP were both significantly higher in HL-60/ADR cells than those in HL-60 cells. AS ODN of XIAP and MRP down-regulated the expression of XIAP and MRP in HL-60/ADR cells and increased the sensitivity of HL-60/ADR cells to DNR, respectively. AS ODN of XIAP + MRP did not enhance the inhibition expression of XIAP in HL-60/ADR cells but increased the sensitivity of HL-60/ADR cells to DNR significantly as compared with AS ODN of XIAP (P MRP did not increase the concentration of DNR nor enhanced the inhibition expression of MRP in HL-60/ADR cells but increased the sensitivity of HL-60/ADR cells to DNR significantly (P MRP. It is concluded that both XIAP and MRP may be involved in the drug resistance mechanisms of HL-60/ADR cells. Drug-resistance of HL-60/ADR cells can be reversed significantly when antisense oligonucleotides of XIAP and MRP were used in combination.

  5. Interplay between MRP-inhibition and metabolism of MRP-inhibitors: the case of curcumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer, H.M.; Usta, M.; Velde, van der A.E.; Boersma, M.G.; Spenkelink, A.; Zanden, van J.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 are efflux transporters with broad substrate specificity, including glutathione, glucuronide, and sulfate conjugates. In the present study, the interaction of the dietary polyphenol curcumin with MRP1 and MRP2 and the interplay between curcumin-depende

  6. Interplay between MRP Inhibition and Metabolism of MRP Inhibitors: The Case of Curcumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer, H.M.; Usta, M.; Velde, A.E. van der; Boersma, M.G.; Spenkelink, B.; Zanden, J.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 are efflux transporters with broad substrate specificity, including glutathione, glucuronide, and sulfate conjugates. In the present study, the interaction of the dietary polyphenol curcumin with MRP1 and MRP2 and the interplay between curcumin-depende

  7. Influence of RNase G on the regulation of non-coding RNA T3956 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi%伤寒沙门菌核糖核酸酶 G对胞内非编码RNA T3956水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王菲; 孟彦辰; 詹莉芳; 张晓磊; 张海方; 生秀梅; 徐顺高; 黄新祥

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To investigate the influence of Rnase G on the regulation of non-coding RNA ( ncRNA) T3956 in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi ( S. Typhi). Methods; The rng deleted mutant of S. Typhi was prepared by the homologous recombination mediated by suicide plasmid ; the rng complementary strain was generated by transferring the recombinant plasmid pBAD rng into the rng deleted mutant; qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the level of non -coding RNA T3956 in the wild strain, the rng mutant strain, the complementary strain and the control strain at different growth phases . Results; The rng deleted mutant of S. Typhi, the rng complementary strain and the control strain were constructed successfully . The results of qRT -PCR revealed that the cellular level of T3956 was increased in the rng mutant comparing to the wild type strain, especially at mid-log phase and stationary phase , and the level of T3956 was restored in the rng complementary strain. Conclusion; Rnase G was involved in the regulation of the ncRNA T 3956 levels in S. Typhi, and played a more important role in the regulation at mid -log and stationary phase.%目的:研究伤寒沙门菌核糖核酸酶G(RNase G)对非编码RNA(ncRNA)T3956胞内水平的影响.方法:利用自杀质粒介导的同源重组方法制备伤寒沙门菌RNase G基因(rng)缺陷变异株;利用重组质粒pBAD将rng导入rng缺陷变异株,构建rng缺陷回补株;通过实时定量PCR分别比较伤寒沙门菌野生株、rng缺陷变异株、回补株等在不同生长时期的ncRNA T3956水平.结果:成功制备伤寒沙门菌rng缺陷变异株、rng缺陷回补株和空质粒对照株;实时定量PCR结果表明,rng缺陷株中T3956的胞内水平较野生株有所升高,并且在对数中期和稳态期升高得更加明显,而回补株胞内T3956的水平又得到恢复.结论:伤寒沙门菌RNase G能够参与对胞内ncRNA T3956水平的调控,并且在细菌对数生长中期和稳态期作用更为明显.

  8. Suppression of the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of MARCKS-related protein (MRP) affects transmigration in activated RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kwang-Rok; Bae, Eun Mi; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Won-Ha

    2009-01-01

    The molecular action mechanism of MRP, one of the protein kinase C (PKC) substrates, has been under intense investigation, but reports on its role in macrophage function remain controversial. The treatment of macrophage cell lines with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced a high level of MRP expression suggesting that MRP plays a role in the function of activated macrophages. In order to investigate the role of MRP in activated RAW264.7 cells, we stably transfected MRP-specific shRNA expression constructs and tested for alterations in macrophage-related functions. The down-regulation of MRP expression resulted in a marked reduction in chemotaxis toward MCP-1 or extracellular matrix proteins. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibitors of PKC significantly inhibited the chemotaxis in RAW264.7 cells. These data reveals the pivotal role of MRP in the transmigration of activated RAW264.7 cells.

  9. Decreased expression of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, MRP2, in human livers with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoshita, E; Taguchi, K; Inokuchi, A; Uchiumi, T; Kinukawa, N; Shimada, M; Tsuneyoshi, M; Sugimachi, K; Kuwano, M

    2001-12-01

    To understand hepatic injury during the process of hepatitis viral infection, determination of liver-specific functions at molecular levels is critical. Because the transport of endogenous/exogenous toxic substances is an intrinsically important hepatic function, we examined whether expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene was affected in patients with hepatitis viral infection. To determine which ABC transporter was expressed differently in patients with hepatic viral infection, we assayed the expression of MDR1, MDR3, MRP1, MRP2, and MRP3 in non-cancerous regions in the liver of 42 patients with hepatic tumors using both quantitative RT-PCR and immunological staining analysis, and compared the hepatic expression levels between patients with hepatitis viral infection and non-infected controls. Of the five ABC transporter genes studied, the mRNAs of MRP2 and MRP3 were highly expressed in the human liver. There was a significant reduction in MRP2 expression to 29% in the virus-infected liver. Treatment of hepatic cells with inflammatory cytokines resulted in decreased mRNA levels of MRP2 and decreased MRP2 promoter activity. The down-regulation of MRP2 might induce a failure in the transport of various genotoxic substances in the liver with hepatitis virus infection.

  10. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  11. Insight into the role of histidine in RNR motif of protein component of RNase P of M. tuberculosis in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Alla; Ramteke, Anup K; Afroz, Tariq; Batra, Janendra K

    2016-03-01

    RNase P, a ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease, is involved in the 5' end processing of pre-tRNAs, with its RNA component being the catalytic subunit. It is an essential enzyme. All bacterial RNase Ps have one RNA and one protein component. A conserved RNR motif in bacterial RNase P protein components is involved in their interaction with the RNA component. In this work, we have reconstituted the RNase P of M. tuberculosis in vitro and investigated the role of a histidine in the RNR motif in its catalysis. We expressed the protein and RNA components of mycobacterial RNase P in E. coli, purified them, and reconstituted the holoenzyme in vitro. The histidine in RNR motif was mutated to alanine and asparagine by site-directed mutagenesis. The RNA component alone showed activity on pre-tRNA(ala) substrate at high magnesium concentrations. The RNA and protein components associated together to manifest catalytic activity at low magnesium concentrations. The histidine 67 in the RNR motif of M. tuberculosis RNase P protein component was found to be important for the catalytic activity and stability of the enzyme. Generally, the RNase P of M. tuberculosis functions like other bacterial enzymes. The histidine in the RNR motif of M. tuberculosis appears to be able to substitute optimally for asparagine found in the majority of the protein components of other bacterial RNase P enzymes.

  12. Expression of rat Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 (Mrp2) in male and female rats during normal and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-induced postnatal ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David R; Guo, Grace L; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2002-09-16

    The normal maturation of biliary organic anion excretion in newborn rats can be enhanced by microsomal enzyme-inducing chemical treatment, yet the mechanism for this phenomenon is not known. Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 (Mrp2) is a biliary efflux transporter that is inducible by select microsomal enzyme-inducing chemicals. Thus, the aims of this study were to compare the normal and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile (PCN)-induced postnatal ontogeny of Mrp2 in male and female rats. Mrp2 protein increased in an age-dependent manner in both sexes between 0 and 90 days of age. At birth, Mrp2 protein in both male and female rats was the same, approximately 70% of adult levels. Mrp2 protein in both sexes reached maximal expression levels that were higher than adult levels (male: days 25-40; female: day 45), then decreased to adult levels, at which age Mrp2 protein expression in male and female rats was the same. Second, male and female rats of various ages were treated with PCN (75 mg/kg, ip) or corn oil for 4 days, after which livers were removed and analyzed for Mrp2 protein and mRNA expression. PCN accelerated the expression of Mrp2 protein in male and female rats as early as 10 days of age, whereas, PCN did not affect male and female Mrp2 mRNA ontogeny. These data suggest that PCN increased Mrp2 protein by a sex-independent posttranscriptional mechanism.

  13. RNase III Is Required for Actinomycin Production in Streptomyces antibioticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Gatewood, Marcha L.

    2013-01-01

    Using insertional mutagenesis, we have disrupted the RNase III gene, rnc, of the actinomycin-producing streptomycete, Streptomyces antibioticus. Disruption was verified by Southern blotting. The resulting strain grows more vigorously than its parent on actinomycin production medium but produces significantly lower levels of actinomycin. Complementation of the rnc disruption with the wild-type rnc gene from S. antibioticus restored actinomycin production to nearly wild-type levels. Western blotting experiments demonstrated that the disruptant did not produce full-length or truncated forms of RNase III. Thus, as is the case in Streptomyces coelicolor, RNase III is required for antibiotic production in S. antibioticus. No differences in the chemical half-lives of bulk mRNA were observed in a comparison of the S. antibioticus rnc mutant and its parental strain. PMID:23956389

  14. Towards new antituberculotic targets: biochemical characterisation of mycobacterial RNase E/G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Csanadi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization estimates that each year 3 million people die from tuberculosis (TB and 8 million people become infected. No new anti-TB drugs have been introduced in the past 30 years, even though their development becomes increasingly important to face new challenges posed by multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant strains and by acute infection with M. tuberculosis of HIV positive patients. Owing to its apparently important role in RNA metabolism, the RNase E/G family of endoribonucleases can be considered as a promising target for antimicrobial drugs. This consideration promted us to characterise biochemical properties of the M. tuberculosis RNase E/G homologue. To learn more about specific properties of RNase E/G homologues a M. tuberculosis RNase E/G (MycRne was overexpressed in E. coli and purified as a 6His-tagged polypeptide. To characterise MycRne, we used in vitro cleavage assays and primer extension analysis of total RNA extracted from mycobacteria. We show that affinity purified MycRne has an endoribonucleolytic activity, which is dependent on the 5'-phosphorylation status of RNA. We could also show that RNase E/G has Mg2+ dependent activity and similar to E. coli RNase E, MycRne was able to cleave in an intercistronic region of the putative 9S precursor of 5S rRNA. Although, similar to E. coli RNase E, the mycobacterial RNase E/G homologue plays a role in rRNA processing, the substrate specificities of these enzymes show differences. This suggests that RNase E/G can be used as a promising target for antimicrobial drugs that can be optimized to specifically target pathogenic species.

  15. MRP1 knockdown down-regulates the deposition of collagen and leads to a reduced hypertrophic scar fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Longlong; Zheng, Zhao; Shi, Jihong; Wu, Xue; Guan, Hao; Jia, Yanhui; Tao, Ke; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Shichao; Gao, Jianxin; Zhao, Bin; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2015-10-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) belongs to ATP-binding cassette transporters family. The overexpression of MRP1 is predominantly related with the failure of chemo-radiotherapy in various tumors. However, its possible role in hypertrophic scar (HS) is hardly investigated. Here we showed that the mRNA level and protein expression of MRP1 were higher in HS and HS derived fibroblasts (HSFs) than that in normal skin (NS) and NS derived fibroblasts (NSFs). Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence showed that the percentage of positive cells was higher in HS and HSFs. Meanwhile, the co-localization of MRP1 and α-SMA was stronger in HS. MRP1 knockdown in HSFs provoked a significant reduction in the protein expressions of collagen 3 and α-SMA in vitro. Moreover, MRP1 siRNA transfection could decrease the deposition of collagen in cultured tissues ex vivo and inhibit the scar formation in rabbit ear scar model in vivo. H&E staining and Masson trichrome staining revealed thinner and more orderly arranged collagen fiber in the MRP1 siRNA transfection group. The appearance of scar was improved as well. All these results indicate that MRP1 plays an important role in the formation of HS, MRP1 knockdown could be a potential method to reduce the accumulation of collagen and to improve the abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix in HS, which indicates that down-regulation of MRP1 has the potential therapeutic effect in the treatment and prophylaxis of HS.

  16. Tühistada MRP! / Heino Otsmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Otsmaa, Heino

    1989-01-01

    Moskvas Rahvasaadikute kongressil moodustatud saadikute komisjonist MRP-le õigusliku ja poliitilise hinnangu andmiseks. Lev Bezõmenski artiklist "1939. aasta alternatiivid" ajakirjas "Novoje Vremja"

  17. Tühistada MRP! / Heino Otsmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Otsmaa, Heino

    1989-01-01

    Moskvas Rahvasaadikute kongressil moodustatud saadikute komisjonist MRP-le õigusliku ja poliitilise hinnangu andmiseks. Lev Bezõmenski artiklist "1939. aasta alternatiivid" ajakirjas "Novoje Vremja"

  18. An end-point method based on graphene oxide for RNase H analysis and inhibitors screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuan; Fan, Jialong; Peng, Lan; Zhao, Lijian; Tong, Chunyi; Wang, Wei; Liu, Bin

    2017-04-15

    As a highly conserved damage repair protein, RNase H can hydrolysis DNA-RNA heteroduplex endonucleolytically and cleave RNA-DNA junctions as well. In this study, we have developed an accurate and sensitive RNase H assay based on fluorophore-labeled chimeric substrate hydrolysis and the differential affinity of graphene oxide on RNA strand with different length. This end-point measurement method can detect RNase H in a range of 0.01 to 1 units /mL with a detection limit of 5.0×10(-3) units/ mL under optimal conditions. We demonstrate the utility of the assay by screening antibiotics, resulting in the identification of gentamycin, streptomycin and kanamycin as inhibitors with IC50 of 60±5µM, 70±8µM and 300±20µM, respectively. Furthermore, the assay was reliably used to detect RNase H in complicated biosamples and found that RNase H activity in tumor cells was inhibited by gentamycin and streptomycin sulfate in a concentration-dependent manner. The average level of RNase H in serums of HBV infection group was similar to that of control group. In summary, the assay provides an alternative tool for biochemical analysis for this enzyme and indicates the feasibility of high throughput screening inhibitors of RNase H in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. RNase III-Independent Autogenous Regulation of Escherichia coli Polynucleotide Phosphorylase via Translational Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica

    2015-06-01

    The complex posttranscriptional regulation mechanism of the Escherichia coli pnp gene, which encodes the phosphorolytic exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), involves two endoribonucleases, namely, RNase III and RNase E, and PNPase itself, which thus autoregulates its own expression. The models proposed for pnp autoregulation posit that the target of PNPase is a mature pnp mRNA previously processed at its 5' end by RNase III, rather than the primary pnp transcript (RNase III-dependent models), and that PNPase activity eventually leads to pnp mRNA degradation by RNase E. However, some published data suggest that pnp expression may also be regulated through a PNPase-dependent, RNase III-independent mechanism. To address this issue, we constructed isogenic Δpnp rnc(+) and Δpnp Δrnc strains with a chromosomal pnp-lacZ translational fusion and measured β-galactosidase activity in the absence and presence of PNPase expressed by a plasmid. Our results show that PNPase also regulates its own expression via a reversible RNase III-independent pathway acting upstream from the RNase III-dependent branch. This pathway requires the PNPase RNA binding domains KH and S1 but not its phosphorolytic activity. We suggest that the RNase III-independent autoregulation of PNPase occurs at the level of translational repression, possibly by competition for pnp primary transcript between PNPase and the ribosomal protein S1. In Escherichia coli, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) posttranscriptionally regulates its own expression. The two models proposed so far posit a two-step mechanism in which RNase III, by cutting the leader region of the pnp primary transcript, creates the substrate for PNPase regulatory activity, eventually leading to pnp mRNA degradation by RNase E. In this work, we provide evidence supporting an additional pathway for PNPase autogenous regulation in which PNPase acts as a translational repressor independently of RNase III

  20. Cytotoxicity of RNase Sa to the acute myeloid leukemia Kasumi-1 cells depends on the net charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Burnysheva, Ksenia M; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Pace, C Nick; Makarov, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The majority of known cytotoxic RNases are basic proteins which destroy intracellular RNA. Cationization of RNases is considered to be an effective strategy for strengthening their antitumor properties. We constructed a set of RNase Sa variants consisting of charge reversal mutants, charge neutralization mutants, and variants with positively charged cluster at the N-terminus. All constructs retain a high level of catalytic activity and differ in net charge. Using acute myeloid leukemia cells Kasumi-1 we have shown that (i) cytotoxicity of RNase Sa mutants is linearly enhanced by cationization, (ii) the ability of cytotoxic mutants to induce cell death is caused by induction of apoptosis and (iii) localization of positive charge on N-terminus does not contribute to RNase Sa cytotoxicity. Capacity to induce apoptosis in malignant cells and the absence of necrotic effects make the RNase Sa mutants with high positive charge a suitable anti-cancer agent.

  1. Nrf2 Regulates the Sensitivity of Mouse Keratinocytes to Nitrogen Mustard via Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 (Mrp1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udasin, Ronald G; Wen, Xia; Bircsak, Kristin M; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Shakarjian, Michael P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur mustard and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine, HN2) are potent vesicants developed as chemical warfare agents. These electrophilic, bifunctional alkylating agents cause skin injury, including inflammation, edema, and blistering. HN2 covalently modifies macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins or is scavenged by glutathione, forming adducts that can contribute to toxicity. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (Mrp1/MRP1) is a transmembrane ATPase known to efflux glutathione-conjugated electrophiles. In the present studies, we examined the effects of modulating Mrp1-mediated transport activity on the sensitivity of primary and PAM212 mouse keratinocytes to HN2. Primary keratinocytes, and to a lesser extent, PAM212 cells, express Mrp1 mRNA and protein and possess Mrp1 functional activity, as measured by calcein efflux. Sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2, increased Mrp1 mRNA, protein, and functional activity in primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells and decreased their sensitivity to HN2-induced growth inhibition (IC(50) = 1.4 and 4.8 µM in primary keratinocytes and 1 and 13 µM in PAM212 cells, in the absence and presence of sulforaphane, respectively). The Mrp1 inhibitor, MK-571, reversed the effects of sulforaphane on HN2-induced growth inhibition in both primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells. In primary keratinocytes from Nrf2(-/-) mice, sulforaphane had no impact on Mrp1 expression or activity, or on sensitivity to HN2, demonstrating that its effects depend on Nrf2. These data suggest that Mrp1-mediated efflux is important in regulating HN2-induced keratinocyte growth inhibition. Enhancing HN2 efflux from keratinocytes may represent a novel strategy for mitigating vesicant-induced cytotoxicity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  3. 在低温锻炼中毛白杨幼苗可溶性总蛋白、RNA、DNA、RNase及抗冻性的变化%Cold Acclimation-Induced Changes in Total Soluble Protein, RNA, DNA, Rnase and Freezing Resistance in Populus tomentosa Cuttings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林善枝; 张志毅

    2002-01-01

    The changes in the contents of total soluble protein and RNA, the activity of RNase in leaves and branches of Populus tomentosa cuttings at various periods (viz: cold acclimation, deacclimation, chilling stress and the recovery after chilling stress), and the survival rate and the freezing resistance of cuttings during cold acclimation at - 3℃ were investigated. Results showed that cold acclimation not only increased the contents of total soluble protein and RNA, the survival rates and the freezing resistance of cuttings, decreased the activity of RNase, but also reduced the declining degree of total soluble protein and RNA contents, and the increasing level of RNase caused by chilling stress as compared with the controls. In addition, cold acclimation augmented the increase in the level of total soluble protein and RNA, and facilitated the decrease of RNase during the recovery periods. Further analysis found that the DNA content of all treatments kept relative stability at various periods. The changes in total soluble protein, RNA and RNase were closely related to the freezing resistance of cuttings. It appears that the increase of RNA content caused by cold acclimation-induced decrease of RNase activity may be involved in the accumulation of total soluble protein and the induction of freezing resistance of cuttings.%低温锻炼不仅提高了毛白杨幼苗存活率和抗冻性以及RNA和可溶性总蛋白的含量,降低了RNase活性,而且能减轻低温胁迫引起的RNA和可溶性总蛋白含量的下降程度和RNase活性的提高,有利于幼苗在恢复过程中RNA和可溶性总蛋白水平的迅速回升以及RNase活性的降低.进一步研究发现,DNA含量无论在低温锻炼中还是在低温胁迫下或是在随后的恢复生长期均保持相对稳定;低温锻炼所引起的RNA含量的增加,与RNase活性的降低呈明显的负相关,与可溶性总蛋白含量的增加以及幼苗抗冻性的提高成正相关.这表明低温锻炼

  4. Relationship between Methylation Status of Multi-drug Resistance Protein(MRP) and Multi-drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-jun; ZHONG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the methylation status of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) gene and the expression of its mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Human embryo lung cell line WI-38, lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and its drug-resistant cells induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were treated with restriction endonuclease Eco47Ⅲ. The methylation status of MRP was examined by PCR, and the expressions of its mRNA and protein were evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: MRP gene promoter region of WI-38 cells was in hypermethylation status, but the promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 cells and their resistant derivatives induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were in hypomethylation status. There were significant differences in the expression of MRP mRNA among WI-38 cell line, SPCA-1 cells and their drug-resistant derivatives induced by different concentration of doxorubicin. Consistently, MRP immunostaining presented similar significant differences. Conclusion: The promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was in hypomethylation status. The hypomethylation status of 5' regulatory region of MRP promoter is an important structural basis that can increase the activity of transcription and results in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  5. Genetic diversity of human RNase 8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Calvin C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ribonuclease 8 is a member of the RNase A family of secretory ribonucleases; orthologs of this gene have been found only in primate genomes. RNase 8 is a divergent paralog of RNase 7, which is lysine-enriched, highly conserved, has prominent antimicrobial activity, and is expressed in both normal and diseased skin; in contrast, the physiologic function of RNase 8 remains uncertain. Here, we examine the genetic diversity of human RNase 8, a subject of significant interest given the existence of functional pseudogenes (coding sequences that are otherwise intact but with mutations in elements crucial for ribonucleolytic activity in non-human primate genomes. Results RNase 8 expression was detected in adult human lung, spleen and testis tissue by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Only two single-nucleotide polymorphisms and four unique alleles were identified within the RNase 8 coding sequence; nucleotide sequence diversity (π = 0.00122 ± 0.00009 per site was unremarkable for a human nuclear gene. We isolated transcripts encoding RNase 8 via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and RT-PCR which included a distal potential translational start site followed by sequence encoding an additional 30 amino acids that are conserved in the genomes of several higher primates. The distal translational start site is functional and promotes RNase 8 synthesis in transfected COS-7 cells. Conclusions These results suggest that RNase 8 may diverge considerably from typical RNase A family ribonucleases and may likewise exhibit unique function. This finding prompts a reconsideration of what we have previously termed functional pseudogenes, as RNase 8 may be responding to constraints that promote significant functional divergence from the canonical structure and enzymatic activity characteristic of the RNase A family.

  6. Characterization of Components of the Staphylococcus aureus mRNA Degradosome Holoenzyme-Like Complex▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Roux, Christelle M.; DeMuth, Jonathon P.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial two-hybrid analysis identified the Staphylococcus aureus RNA degradosome-like complex to include RNase J1, RNase J2, RNase Y, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), enolase, phosphofructokinase, and a DEAD box RNA helicase. Results also revealed that the recently recognized RNase RnpA interacts with the S. aureus degradosome and that this interaction is conserved in other Gram-positive organisms.

  7. Reversing multidrug resistance in Caco-2 by silencing MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, and BCL-2/BCL-xL using liposomal antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Li Lo

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is a major impediment to chemotherapy. In the present study, we designed antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs against MDR1, MDR-associated protein (MRP1, MRP2, and/or BCL-2/BCL-xL to reverse MDR transporters and induce apoptosis, respectively. The cationic liposomes (100 nm composed of N-[1-(2,3-dioleyloxypropyl]-n,n,n-trimethylammonium chloride and dioleoyl phosphotidylethanolamine core surrounded by a polyethylene glycol (PEG shell were prepared to carry ASOs and/or epirubicin, an antineoplastic agent. We aimed to simultaneously suppress efflux pumps, provoke apoptosis, and enhance the chemosensitivity of human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells to epirubicin. We evaluated encapsulation efficiency, particle size, cytotoxicity, intracellular accumulation, mRNA levels, cell cycle distribution, and caspase activity of these formulations. We found that PEGylated liposomal ASOs significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability and thus intensified epirubicin-mediated apoptosis. These formulations also decreased the MDR1 promoter activity levels and enhanced the intracellular retention of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells. Epirubicin and ASOs in PEGylated liposomes remarkably decreased mRNA expression levels of human MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, and BCL-2. The combined treatments all significantly increased the mRNA expressions of p53 and BAX, and activity levels of caspase-3, -8, and -9. The formulation of epirubicin and ASOs targeting both pump resistance of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2 and nonpump resistance of BCL-2/BCL-xL demonstrated more superior effect to all the other formulations used in this study. Our results provide a novel insight into the mechanisms by which PEGylated liposomal ASOs against both resistance types act as activators to epirubicin-induced apoptosis through suppressing MDR1, MRP1, and MRP2, as well as triggering intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. The complicated regulation of MDR highlights the necessity

  8. Reversal of in vitro cellular MRP1 and MRP2 mediated vincristine resistance by the flavonoid myricetin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van J.J.; Mul, de A.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of myricetin on either MRP1 or MRP2 mediated vincristine resistance in transfected MDCKII cells were examined. The results obtained show that myricetin can inhibit both MRP1 and MRP2 mediated vincristine efflux in a concentration dependent manner. The IC50 values fo

  9. MRP3, an organic anion transporter able to transport anti-cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Marcel; Marcel VAN DER LINDEN; Haas, Marcel; Scheffer, George L.; de Vree, J. Marleen L.; Smith, Alexander J.; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J.; Ponne, Nico; Scheper, Rik J.; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Baas, Frank; Borst, Piet

    1999-01-01

    The human multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) gene family contains at least six members: MRP1, encoding the multidrug-resistance protein; MRP2 or cMOAT, encoding the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter; and four homologs, called MRP3, MRP4, MRP5, and MRP6. In this report, we characterize MRP3, the closest homolog of MRP1. Cell lines were retrovirally transduced with MRP3 cDNA, and new monoclonal antibodies specific for MRP3 were generated. We show that MRP3 is an organic anion ...

  10. Evidence that the RNAseH activity of the duck hepatitis B virus is unable to act on exogenous substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavis John E

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase can synthesize DNA on its native RNA template within viral cores but it is usually unable to synthesize DNA employing exogenous nucleic acids as a template. The mechanism of this template commitment is unknown. Here we provide evidence that the RNAseH activity of duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase may also be unable to act on exogenous substrates. Results RNAseH assays were performed under a wide variety of conditions employing substrate RNAs of Duck Hepatitis B Virus sequence annealed to complementary DNA oligonucleotides and permeabilized intracellular viral core particles. Temperature, pH, cation type, salt concentration, substrate concentration, and the sequences of the cleavage sites were varied, and the effects of ATP and dNTPs on RNAseH activity were examined. duck hepatitis B virus RNAseH activity was not detected under any of these conditions, although E. coli or Avian Myeloblastosis Virus RNAseH activity could be detected under all conditions. Access of the RNA substrate to the enzyme within the viral cores was confirmed. Conclusions These results imply that the RNAseH activity of the DHBV reverse transcriptase may not be able to degrade exogenous RNA:DNA heteroduplexes, although it can degrade heteroduplexes of the same sequence generated during reverse transcription of the endogenous RNA template. Therefore, the RNAseH activity appears to be "substrate committed" in a manner similar to the template commitment observed for the DNA polymerase activity.

  11. Functions of Replication Protein A as a Sensor of R Loops and a Regulator of RNaseH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai Dang; Yadav, Tribhuwan; Giri, Sumanprava; Saez, Borja; Graubert, Timothy A; Zou, Lee

    2017-03-02

    R loop, a transcription intermediate containing RNA:DNA hybrids and displaced single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), has emerged as a major source of genomic instability. RNaseH1, which cleaves the RNA in RNA:DNA hybrids, plays an important role in R loop suppression. Here we show that replication protein A (RPA), an ssDNA-binding protein, interacts with RNaseH1 and colocalizes with both RNaseH1 and R loops in cells. In vitro, purified RPA directly enhances the association of RNaseH1 with RNA:DNA hybrids and stimulates the activity of RNaseH1 on R loops. An RPA binding-defective RNaseH1 mutant is not efficiently stimulated by RPA in vitro, fails to accumulate at R loops in cells, and loses the ability to suppress R loops and associated genomic instability. Thus, in addition to sensing DNA damage and replication stress, RPA is a sensor of R loops and a regulator of RNaseH1, extending the versatile role of RPA in suppression of genomic instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation into the mechanism regulating MRP localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bout, Iman; van Rheenen, Jacco; van Angelen, Annelies A; de Rooij, Johan; Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Jalink, Kees; Divecha, Nullin; Sonnenberg, Arnoud

    2008-01-15

    The major PKC substrates MARCKS and MacMARCKS (MRP) are membrane-binding proteins implicated in cell spreading, integrin activation and exocytosis. According to the myristoyl-electrostatic switch model the co-operation between the myristoyl moiety and the positively charged effector domain (ED) is an essential mechanism by which proteins bind to membranes. Loss of the electrostatic interaction between the ED and phospholipids, such as Ptdins(4,5)P2, results in the translocation of such proteins to the cytoplasm. While this model has been extensively tested for the binding of MARCKS far less is known about the mechanisms regulating MRP localization. We demonstrate that after phosphorylation, MRP is relocated to the intracellular membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes. MRP binds to all membranes via its myristoyl moiety, but for its localization at the plasma membrane the ED is also required. Although the ED of MRP can bind to Ptdins(4,5)P2 in vitro, this binding is not essential for its retention at or targeting to the plasma membrane. We conclude that the co-operation between the myristoyl moiety and the ED is not required for the binding to membranes in general but that it is essential for the targeting of MRP to the plasma membrane in a Ptdins(4,5)P2-independent manner.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a gibberellin-induced RNase expressed in barley aleurone cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.W.; Rogers, J.C. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry)

    1999-04-01

    The authors cloned a cDNA for a gibberellin-induced ribonuclease (RNase) expressed in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone and the gene for a second barley RNase expressed in leaf tissue. The protein encoded by the cDNA is unique among RNases described to date in that it contains a novel 23-amino acid insert between the C2 and C3 conserved sequences. Expression of the recombinant protein in tobacco (Ncotiana tabacum) suspension-cultured protoplasts gave an active RNase of the expected size, confirming the enzymatic activity of the protein. Analyses of hormone regulation of re-expression of mRNA for the aleurone RNase revealed that, like the pattern for [alpha]-amylase, mRNA levels increased in the presence of gibberellic acid, and its antagonist abscisic acid prevented this effect. Quantitative studies at early times demonstrated that cycloheximide treatment of aleurone layers increased mRNA levels 4-fold, whereas a combination of gibberellin plus cycloheximide treatment was required to increase [alpha]-amylase mRNA levels to the same extent. These results are consistent with loss of repression as an initial effect of gibberellic acid on transcription of those genes, although the regulatory pathways for the two genes may differ.

  14. A subtle alternative splicing event gives rise to a widely expressed human RNase k isoform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos D Karousis

    Full Text Available Subtle alternative splicing leads to the formation of RNA variants lacking or including a small number of nucleotides. To date, the impact of subtle alternative splicing phenomena on protein biosynthesis has been studied in frame-preserving incidents. On the contrary, mRNA isoforms derived from frame-shifting events were poorly studied and generally characterized as non-coding. This work provides evidence for a frame-shifting subtle alternative splicing event which results in the production of a novel protein isoform. We applied a combined molecular approach for the cloning and expression analysis of a human RNase κ transcript (RNase κ-02 which lacks four consecutive bases compared to the previously isolated RNase κ isoform. RNase κ-02 mRNA is expressed in all human cell lines tested end encodes the synthesis of a 134-amino-acid protein by utilizing an alternative initiation codon. The expression of RNase κ-02 in the cytoplasm of human cells was verified by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis using a specific polyclonal antibody developed on the basis of the amino-acid sequence difference between the two protein isoforms. The results presented here show that subtle changes during mRNA splicing can lead to the expression of significantly altered protein isoforms.

  15. The effect of quercetin phase II metabolism on its MRP1 and MRP2 inhibiting potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van J.J.; Woude, van der H.; Vaessen, J.; Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study characterises the effect of phase II metabolism, especially methylation and glucuronidation, of the model flavonoid quercetin on its capacity to inhibit human MRP1 and MRP2 activity in Sf9 inside-out vesicles. The results obtained reveal that 3¿-O-methylation does not affect the MR

  16. The effect of quercetin phase II metabolism on its MRP1 and MRP2 inhibiting potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, J.J. van; Woude, H. van der; Vaessen, J.; Usta, M.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study characterises the effect of phase II metabolism, especially methylation and glucuronidation, of the model flavonoid quercetin on its capacity to inhibit human MRP1 and MRP2 activity in Sf9 inside-out vesicles. The results obtained reveal that 3′-O-methylation does not affect the MR

  17. Transcriptional regulation, stabilization, and subcellular redistribution of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) by glycogen synthase kinase 3αβ: novel insights on modes of cadmium-induced cell death stimulated by MRP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Ryul; Lee, Kang-Yo; Lee, Kang-Yoo; Ahn, Sang-Gun; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Jung, Ki-Tae; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Yoon, Hyo-Eun; Oh, Seon-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) resistance is associated with the suppression of autophagy in H460 lung cancer cells, which is regulated by phospho(p)serine-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3αβ. However, the involvement of multidrug resistance (MDR) in this signaling pathway and its underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In this study, we used Cd-resistant cells (RH460), developed from H460 lung cancer cells, to demonstrate that the induction of MDR-associated protein (MRP1) in response to Cd is enhanced in H460 cells compared to RH460. Treating RH460 cells with Cd induced large cytoplasmic vacuoles, which was inhibited by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. MRP1 was detected in the nuclear-rich membrane fractions and redistributed from the perinuclear to the cytoplasmic compartment following exposure to Cd. Cd-induced MRP1, p-Ser/p-Tyr GSK3αβ, and LC3-II were all suppressed by the GSK3 inhibitor SB216763, but increased by lithium. Furthermore, MRP1 was upregulated by the Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid and downregulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate, suggesting that MRP1 protein was stabilized by p-Ser GSK3αβ. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization analyzes revealed a physical interaction between MRP1 and p-Ser GSK3αβ. Genetic knockdown of GSK3β decreased Cd-induced MRP1 mRNA and protein levels, whereas its overexpression upregulated MRP1 protein expression. MRP1 also co-localized with lysosomal membrane protein-2, which may cause lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the subsequent release of cathepsins into the cytosol. In mice chronically injected with Cd, MRP1 localized to the perinuclear region of bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. Collectively, these data suggest that Cd toxicity is regulated by the transcriptional regulation, stabilization, and subcellular redistribution of MRP1 via the posttranslational modification of GSK3αβ. Therefore, the serine phosphorylation of GSK3αβ plays a critical role in

  18. Basic RNases of wild almond (Prunus webbii): cloning and characterization of six new S-RNase and one "non-S RNase" genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banović, Bojana; Surbanovski, Nada; Konstantinović, Miroslav; Maksimović, Vesna

    2009-03-01

    In order to investigate the S-RNase allele structure of a Prunus webbii population from the Montenegrin region of the Balkans, we analyzed 10 Prunus webbii accessions. We detected 10 different S-RNase allelic variants and obtained the nucleotide sequences for six S-RNases. The BLAST analysis showed that these six sequences were new Prunus webbii S-RNase alleles. It also revealed that one of sequenced alleles, S(9)-RNase, coded for an amino acid sequence identical to that for Prunus dulcis S(14)-RNase, except for a single conservative amino acid replacement in the signal peptide region. Another, S(3)-RNase, was shown to differ by only three amino acid residues from Prunus salicina Se-RNase. The allele S(7)-RNase was found to be inactive by stylar protein isoelectric focusing followed by RNase-specific staining, but the reason for the inactivity was not at the coding sequence level. Further, in five of the 10 analyzed accessions, we detected the presence of one active basic RNase (marked PW(1)) that did not amplify with S-RNase-specific DNA primers. However, it was amplified with primers designed from the PA1 RNase nucleotide sequence (basic "non-S RNase" of Prunus avium) and the obtained sequence showed high homology (80%) with the PA1 allele. Although homologs of PA1 "non-S RNases" have been reported in four other Prunus species, this is the first recorded homolog in Prunus webbii. The evolutionary implications of the data are discussed.

  19. Single site mutations in the hetero-oligomeric Mrp antiporter from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 that affect Na+/H+ antiport activity, sodium exclusion, individual Mrp protein levels, or Mrp complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA-MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resistance, membrane levels of each Mrp protein, and presence of monomeric and dimeric Mrp complexes. Antiport did not depend on a VFF motif or a conserved tyrosine pair, but a role for a conserved histidine in a potential quinone binding site of MrpA was supported. The importance of several acidic residues for antiport was confirmed, and the importance of additional residues was demonstrated (e.g. three lysine residues conserved across MrpA, MrpD, and membrane-bound respiratory Complex I subunits (NuoL/M/N)). The results extended indications that MrpE is required for normal membrane levels of other Mrp proteins and for complex formation. Moreover, mutations in several other Mrp proteins lead to greatly reduced membrane levels of MrpE. Thus, changes in either of the two Mrp modules, MrpA-MrpD and MrpE-MrpG, influence the other. Two mutants, MrpB-P37G and MrpC-Q70A, showed a normal phenotype but lacked the MrpA-MrpG monomeric complex while retaining the dimeric hetero-oligomeric complex. Finally, MrpG-P81A and MrpG-P81G mutants exhibited no antiport activity but supported sodium resistance and a low [Na(+)](in). Such mutants could be used to screen hypothesized but uncharacterized sodium efflux functions of Mrp apart from Na(+) (Li(+))/H(+) antiport.

  20. A role of RnlA in the RNase LS activity from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Koga, Mitsunori; Iwamoto, Akira; Yonesaki, Tetsuro

    2007-08-01

    Escherichia coli ribonuclease LS is a potential antagonist of bacteriophage T4. When the T4 dmd gene is defective, RNase LS cleaves T4 mRNAs and antagonizes T4 reproduction. Our previous work demonstrated that E. coli rnlA is essential for RNase LS activity. Here we show that His-tagged RnlA cleaves T4 soc RNA at one of the sites also cleaved by RNase LS in a cell extract. The cleavage activities of His-tagged RnlA and the RNase LS activity in a cell extract were inhibited by Dmd encoded by T4 phage. Fractionation of the RNase LS activity in a cell extract showed that it sedimented through a sucrose density gradient as a 1000-kDa complex that included RnlA. Pull-down experiments revealed more than 10 proteins associated with His-tagged RnlA. Among these, triose phosphate isomerase exhibited a remarkable affinity to RnlA. These results suggest that RnlA plays a central role in RNase LS activity and that its activity is regulated by multiple components.

  1. The Amelioration of N-Acetyl-p-Benzoquinone Imine Toxicity by Ginsenoside Rg3: The Role of Nrf2-Mediated Detoxification and Mrp1/Mrp3 Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Il Gum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we found that Korean red ginseng suppressed acetaminophen (APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via alteration of its metabolic profile involving GSTA2 induction and that ginsenoside Rg3 was a major component of this gene induction. In the present study, therefore, we assessed the protective effect of Rg3 against N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI, a toxic metabolic intermediate of APAP. Excess NAPQI resulted in GSH depletion with increases in the ALT and AST activities in H4IIE cells. Rg3 pretreatment reversed GSH depletion by NAPQI. Rg3 resulted in increased mRNA levels of the catalytic and modulatory subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, the rate-limiting steps in GSH synthesis and subsequently increased GSH content. Rg3 increased levels of nuclear Nrf2, an essential transcriptional factor of these genes. The knockdown or knockout of the Nrf2 gene abrogated the inductions of mRNA and protein by Rg3. Abolishment of the reversal of GSH depletion by Rg3 against NAPQI was observed in Nrf2-deficient cells. Rg3 induced multidrug resistance-associated protein (Mrp 1 and Mrp3 mRNA levels, but not in Nrf2-deficient cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Rg3 is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against NAPQI insult, due to GSH repletion and coordinated gene regulations of GSH synthesis and Mrp family genes by Nrf2.

  2. IscR regulates RNase LS activity by repressing rnlA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Miki, Kumiko; Koga, Mitsunori; Katayama, Natsu; Morimoto, Wakako; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yonesaki, Tetsuro

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease LS was originally identified as a potential antagonist of bacteriophage T4. When the T4 dmd gene is defective, RNase LS cleaves T4 mRNAs and antagonizes T4 reproduction. This RNase also plays an important role in RNA metabolisms in E. coli. rnlA is an essential gene for RNase LS activity, but the transcriptional regulation of this gene remains to be elucidated. An Fe-S cluster protein, IscR, acts as a transcription factor and controls the expression of genes that are necessary for Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Here, we report that overexpression of IscR suppressed RNase LS activity, causing the loss of antagonist activity against phage T4. This suppressive effect did not require the ligation of Fe-S cluster into IscR. beta-Galactosidase reporter assays showed that transcription from an rnlA promoter increased in iscR-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells, and gel-mobility shift assays revealed specific binding of IscR to the rnlA promoter region. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that endogenous rnlA mRNA was reduced by overexpression of IscR and increased by deletion of iscR. From these results, we conclude that IscR negatively regulates transcription of rnlA and represses RNase LS activity.

  3. Species-Dependent Transport and Modulation Properties of Human and Mouse Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 (MRP2/Mrp2, ABCC2/Abcc2)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christian Zimmermann; Koen van de Wetering; Evita van de Steeg; Els Wagenaar; Conchita Vens; Alfred H. Schinkel

    2008-01-01

    .... To assess possible species-specific differences between human MRP2 and mouse Mrp2, we generated polarized cell lines expressing mouse Mrp2 and used these to investigate transport of clinically important agents...

  4. Lack of RNase L attenuates macrophage functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yi

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one of the major cell types in innate immunity against microbial infection. It is believed that the expression of proinflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 by macrophages is also crucial for activation of both innate and adaptive immunities. RNase L is an interferon (IFN inducible enzyme which is highly expressed in macrophages. It has been demonstrated that RNase L regulates the expression of certain inflammatory genes. However, its role in macrophage function is largely unknown.Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs were generated from RNase L(+/+and (-/- mice. The migration of BMMs was analyzed by using Transwell migration assays. Endocytosis and phagocytosis of macrophages were assessed by using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-Dextran 40,000 and FITC-E. coli bacteria, respectively. The expression of inflammatory genes was determined by Western Blot and ELISA. The promoter activity of Cox-2 was measured by luciferase reporter assays.Lack of RNase L significantly decreased the migration of BMMs induced by M-CSF, but at a less extent by GM-CSF and chemokine C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2. Interestingly, RNase L deficient BMMs showed a significant reduction of endocytic activity to FITC-Dextran 40,000, but no any obvious effect on their phagocytic activity to FITC-bacteria under the same condition. RNase L impacts the expression of certain genes related to cell migration and inflammation such as transforming growth factor (TGF-β, IL-1β, IL-10, CCL2 and Cox-2. Furthermore, the functional analysis of the Cox-2 promoter revealed that RNase L regulated the expression of Cox-2 in macrophages at its transcriptional level. Taken together, our findings provide direct evidence showing that RNase L contributes to innate immunity through regulating macrophage functions.

  5. Effective production control in an automotive industry: MRP vs. demand-driven MRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofa, Mohamad Jihan; Widyarto, Wahyu Oktri

    2017-06-01

    Material Requirements Planning (MRP) has deficiencies when dealing with current business environments, marked by a more complex network, a huge variety of products with longer lead time, and uncertain demands. This drives Demand-Driven MRP (DDMRP) approach to deal with those challenges. DDMRP is designed to connect the availability of materials and supplies directly from the actual condition using bills of materials (BOMs). Nevertheless, only few studies have scientifically proved the performance of DDMRP over MRP for controlling production and inventory control. Therefore, this research fills this gap by evaluating and comparing the performance of DDMRP and MRP in terms of level of effective inventory in the system. The evaluation was conducted through a simulation using data from an automotive company in Indonesia. The input parameters of scenarios were given for running the simulation. Based on the simulation, for the observed critical parts, DDMRP gave better results than MRP in terms of lead time and inventory level. DDMRP compressed the lead time part from 52 to 3 days (94% reduced) and, overall, the inventory level was in an effective condition. This suggests that DDMRP is more effective for controlling the production-inventory than MRP.

  6. MRP - mitte ainult ajalugu / Elle Puusaag

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Puusaag, Elle, 1945-2017

    2008-01-01

    mõtteid 23. augustist 1939, päevast, mil NSV Liit ja natsi-Saksamaa allkirjastasid kurikuulsa Molotov-Ribbentrop Pakti (MRP) ja selle salaprotokollid. Euroopa Parlamendi saadiku Marianne Mikko algatatud aktsioonist europarlamendis. Tunne Kelami kõnest 23. augustil toimunud Hirvepargi kõnekoosolekul

  7. Genomic structure and expression analysis of the RNase kappa family ortholog gene in the insect Ceratitis capitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampias, Theodoros N; Fragoulis, Emmanuel G; Sideris, Diamantis C

    2008-12-01

    Cc RNase is the founding member of the recently identified RNase kappa family, which is represented by a single ortholog in a wide range of animal taxonomic groups. Although the precise biological role of this protein is still unknown, it has been shown that the recombinant proteins isolated so far from the insect Ceratitis capitata and from human exhibit ribonucleolytic activity. In this work, we report the genomic organization and molecular evolution of the RNase kappa gene from various animal species, as well as expression analysis of the ortholog gene in C. capitata. The high degree of amino acid sequence similarity, in combination with the fact that exon sizes and intronic positions are extremely conserved among RNase kappa orthologs in 15 diverse genomes from sea anemone to human, imply a very significant biological function for this enzyme. In C. capitata, two forms of RNase kappa mRNA (0.9 and 1.5 kb) with various lengths of 3' UTR were identified as alternative products of a single gene, resulting from the use of different polyadenylation signals. Both transcripts are expressed in all insect tissues and developmental stages. Sequence analysis of the extended region of the longer transcript revealed the existence of three mRNA instability motifs (AUUUA) and five poly(U) tracts, whose functional importance in RNase kappa mRNA decay remains to be explored.

  8. The overexpression of MRP4 is related to multidrug resistance in osteosarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghui He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (Adriamycin, ADM is an antimitotic drug used in the treatment of a wide range of malignant tumors, including acute leukemia, lymphoma, osteosarcoma, breast cancer, and lung cancer. Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs are members of a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, which can transport various molecules across extra- and intra-cellular membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a correlation between MRP4 and primary ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells. In this paper, we chose the human osteosarcoma cell line MG63, ADM resistant cell line MG63/DOX, and the patient′s primary cell GSF-0686. We checked the ADM sensitivity and cytotoxicity of all the three cells by cell proliferation assay. The intracellular drug concentrations were measured by using LC-MS/MS. We also examined MRP4 gene expression by RT-PCR and Western Blot. We found that the intracellular ADM concentration of the parent osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was higher than the ADM resistant osteosarcoma MG63/DOX cell line or the GSF-0686 cell after ADM treatment (P < 0.05. In addition, MRP4 mRNA and protein levels in ADM resistant osteosarcoma cells were higher than in MG63 cell (P < 0.05. Taking together, this work suggests that overexpression of MRP4 may confer ADM resistance in osteosarcoma cells.

  9. Nickel affects Xlem Sap RNase A and converts RNase A to a Urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel (Ni) is an essential micronutrient; however, its metabolic or physiological functions in plants and animals are largely uncharacterized. The ribonucleases (RNase, e.g., RNase A) are a large family of hydrolases found in one form or many forms facilitating nitrogen (N) cycling. It is current...

  10. RNase and DNase activities of antiviral proteins from leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shikha; Lodha, M L

    2005-06-01

    Antiviral proteins (AVPs) purified from the leaves of Bougainvillea xbuttiana cv Mahara exhibited RNase activity against viral RNA of the tobamoviruses, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Sunnhemp rosette virus (SRV). They caused complete degradation of viral RNAs in a concentration-dependent manner. RNase activity gel assay ruled out the possibility of the presence of contaminating nucleases. AVPs also showed DNase activity, as indicated by conversion of supercoiled form of plasmid DNA into relaxed and linear forms. The implications of these activities in controlling plant viruses are discussed.

  11. Human RNase P ribonucleoprotein is required for formation of initiation complexes of RNA polymerase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruya, Raphael; Orlovetskie, Natalie; Reiner, Robert; Dehtiar-Zilber, Yana; Wesolowski, Donna; Altman, Sidney; Jarrous, Nayef

    2015-01-01

    Human RNase P is implicated in transcription of small non-coding RNA genes by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but the precise role of this ribonucleoprotein therein remains unknown. We here show that targeted destruction of HeLa nuclear RNase P inhibits transcription of 5S rRNA genes in whole cell extracts, if this precedes the stage of initiation complex formation. Biochemical purification analyses further reveal that this ribonucleoprotein is recruited to 5S rRNA genes as a part of proficient initiation complexes and the activity persists at reinitiation. Knockdown of RNase P abolishes the assembly of initiation complexes by preventing the formation of the initiation sub-complex of Pol III. Our results demonstrate that the structural intactness, but not the endoribonucleolytic activity per se, of RNase P is critical for the function of Pol III in cells and in extracts. PMID:25953854

  12. Two acid RNases from Dactylis glomerata seeds. Purification, properties and effect of polyamines and lectins on their activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Wiśniowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two glycoproteidic acid RNases (RNase I and RNase II were obtained and purified from the seeds of Dactylis glomerata by extraction with acetate buffer, fractionation with ammonium sulfate, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, DEAE-Sphadex, affinity chromatography on Con A-Sepharose and gel filtration on Bio-Gel P60. RNase I with a specific activity of 2582 U•mg-1 protein and an optimum pH of 4.9 and RNase II with a specific activity of 1928 U• mg-1 protein and optimum pH of 4.6, were isolated. They lacked nuclease, phosphodi- and monoesterase activities. Both forms of the enzyme hydrolyzed pyrimidine homopolymers with a preference for poly U and exhibited a low specificity for purine homopolymers (poly G and poly A. RNase I acted with a 3-fold higher hydrolytic activity on poly C homopolymer than RNase IL The hydrolytic activity of both enzymes was inhibited by Zn+2, Fe+2, Cu+2 ions when yeast RNA was the substrate. The amines spermine, spermidine and tyramine at a concentration of 0.1 mM increased the enzymatic activity of both RNases by 20 to 60% of the relative activity. The hydrolytic activity of RNases I and II was stimulated by the presence of lentil lectin (LL, soybean lectin (SBA and potato lectin (STA, and inhibited by the presence of concanavalin A. The 20-200% stimulation and 40-60% inhibition depended on the proportion, on a weight basis, of enzyme to lectin and were reversible in the presence of receptor sugars.

  13. Nickel affects xylem Sap RNase a and converts RNase A to a urease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Nickel (Ni) is an essential micronutrient; however, its metabolic or physiological functions in plants and animals are largely uncharacterized. The ribonucleases (RNase, e.g., RNase A) are a large family of hydrolases found in one form or many forms facilitating nitrogen (N) cycling. It is currently unknown how either a deficiency or excess of Ni influences the functionality of ribonucleases, like RNase A. This is especially true for perennial crops possessing relatively high Ni requirements. Results We report that the 'rising’ xylem sap of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch, a long-lived tree] at bud break contains a 14 kDa RNase A (aka, RNase 1), which amount has a 33% greater in Ni-deficient as in Ni-sufficient trees when exposed to Ni ions exhibits ureolytic activity. The homologous 13.4 kDa bovine pancreatic RNase A likewise exhibits ureolytic activity upon exposure to Ni ions. Ni therefore affects enzymatic function of a typically non-metalloenzyme, such as it transforms to an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing a linear amide; thus, converting an endonuclease esterase into a urease. Conclusions We conclude that Ni potentially affects the level and activity of RNase A present in the spring xylem sap of pecan trees, and probably in other crops, it has the same influence. The catalytic property of RNase A appears to shift from a nuclease to a urease relying on Ni exposure. This is suggestive that RNase A might possess novel metabolic functionality regarding N-metabolism in perennial plants. The ability of Ni to convert the activity of plant and animal RNase A from that of a ribonuclease to a urease indicates a possible unrecognized beneficial metabolic function of Ni in organisms, while also identifying a potential detrimental effect of excessive Ni on N related metabolic activity if there is sufficient disruption of Ni homeostasis. PMID:24320827

  14. Nickel affects xylem Sap RNase a and converts RNase A to a urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Cheng; Liu, Liping; Wood, Bruce W

    2013-12-09

    Nickel (Ni) is an essential micronutrient; however, its metabolic or physiological functions in plants and animals are largely uncharacterized. The ribonucleases (RNase, e.g., RNase A) are a large family of hydrolases found in one form or many forms facilitating nitrogen (N) cycling. It is currently unknown how either a deficiency or excess of Ni influences the functionality of ribonucleases, like RNase A. This is especially true for perennial crops possessing relatively high Ni requirements. We report that the 'rising' xylem sap of pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch, a long-lived tree] at bud break contains a 14 kDa RNase A (aka, RNase 1), which amount has a 33% greater in Ni-deficient as in Ni-sufficient trees when exposed to Ni ions exhibits ureolytic activity. The homologous 13.4 kDa bovine pancreatic RNase A likewise exhibits ureolytic activity upon exposure to Ni ions. Ni therefore affects enzymatic function of a typically non-metalloenzyme, such as it transforms to an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing a linear amide; thus, converting an endonuclease esterase into a urease. We conclude that Ni potentially affects the level and activity of RNase A present in the spring xylem sap of pecan trees, and probably in other crops, it has the same influence. The catalytic property of RNase A appears to shift from a nuclease to a urease relying on Ni exposure. This is suggestive that RNase A might possess novel metabolic functionality regarding N-metabolism in perennial plants. The ability of Ni to convert the activity of plant and animal RNase A from that of a ribonuclease to a urease indicates a possible unrecognized beneficial metabolic function of Ni in organisms, while also identifying a potential detrimental effect of excessive Ni on N related metabolic activity if there is sufficient disruption of Ni homeostasis.

  15. Single Site Mutations in the Hetero-oligomeric Mrp Antiporter from Alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 That Affect Na+/H+ Antiport Activity, Sodium Exclusion, Individual Mrp Protein Levels, or Mrp Complex Formation*

    OpenAIRE

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H.; Krulwich, Terry A.; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA–MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na+(Li+)/H+ antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resista...

  16. Rho and RNase play a central role in FMN riboswitch regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Norihiko; Tanaka, Yuya; Inui, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that regulate gene expression in response to their ligand. Although these regulations are thought to be performed without any aid of other factors, recent studies suggested the participation of protein factors such as transcriptional termination factor Rho and RNase in some riboswitch regulations. However, to what extent these protein factors contribute to the regulation was unclear. Here, we studied the regulatory mechanism of the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) riboswitch of Corynebacterium glutamicum which controls the expression of downstream ribM gene. Our results showed that this riboswitch downregulates both ribM mRNA and RibM protein levels in FMN-rich cells. Analysis of mRNA stability and chromatin immunoprecipitation-real-time PCR analysis targeting RNA polymerase suggested the involvement of the mRNA degradation and premature transcriptional termination in this regulation, respectively. Simultaneous disruption of RNase E/G and Rho function completely abolished the regulation at the mRNA level. Also, the regulation at the protein level was largely diminished. However, some FMN-dependent regulation at the protein level remained, suggesting the presence of other minor regulatory mechanisms. Altogether, we demonstrated for the first time that two protein factors, Rho and RNase E/G, play a central role in the riboswitch-mediated gene expression control.

  17. Vinblastine and sulfinpyrazone export by the multidrug resistance protein MRP2 is associated with glutathione export

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, R.; Haas, M; Sparidans, R; Beijnen, J.; Wielinga, P R; Lankelma, J.; Borst, P

    2000-01-01

    The multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 are members of the same subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Besides organic molecules conjugated to negatively charged ligands, these proteins also transport cytotoxic drugs for which no negatively charged conjugates are known to exist. In polarized MDCKII cells, MRP1 routes to the lateral plasma membrane, and MRP2 to the apical plasma membrane. In these cells MRP1 transports daunorubicin, and MRP2 vinblastine; both transporters expo...

  18. Mitochondrial genome depletion dysregulates bile acid- and paracetamol-induced expression of the transporters Mdr1, Mrp1 and Mrp4 in liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, MJ; Gonzalez-Sanchez, E; Gonzalez-Loyola, A; Gonzalez-Buitrago, JM; Marin, JJG

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Mitochondria are involved in the toxicity of several compounds, retro-control of gene expression and apoptosis activation. The effect of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) depletion on changes in ABC transporter protein expression in response to bile acids and paracetamol was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Hepa 1-6 mouse hepatoma cells with 70% decrease in 16S/18S rRNA ratio (Rho cells) were obtained by long-term treatment with ethidium bromide. KEY RESULTS Spontaneous apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were decreased in Rho cells. Following glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) or paracetamol, Rho cells generated less ROS and were more resistant to cell death. Apoptosis induced by GCDCA and Fas was also reduced. The basal expression of Mdr1 was significantly enhanced, but this was not further stimulated by GCDCA or paracetamol, as observed in wild-type (WT) cells. Basal expression of Mrp1 and Mrp4 was similar in WT and Rho cells, whereas they were up-regulated only in WT cells after GCDCA or paracetamol, along with the transcription factors Shp and Nrf2, but not Fxr or Pxr. Increased expression of Nrf2 was accompanied by its enhanced nuclear translocation. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid failed to cause any of the effects observed for GCDCA or paracetamol. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The Nrf2-mediated pathway is partly independent of ROS production. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 is insufficient to up-regulate Mdr1, Mrp1 and Mrp4, which requires the participation of other regulatory element(s) whose activation in response to GCDCA and paracetamol is impaired in Rho cells and hence probably sensitive to ROS. PMID:21175587

  19. A dielectric barrier discharge terminally inactivates RNase A by oxidizing sulfur-containing amino acids and breaking structural disulfide bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackmann, J.-W.; Baldus, S.; Steinborn, E.; Edengeiser, E.; Kogelheide, F.; Langklotz, S.; Schneider, S.; Leichert, L. I. O.; Benedikt, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Bandow, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    RNases are among the most stable proteins in nature. They even refold spontaneously after heat inactivation, regaining full activity. Due to their stability and universal presence, they often pose a problem when experimenting with RNA. We investigated the capabilities of nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas to inactivate RNase A and studied the inactivation mechanism on a molecular level. While prolonged heating above 90 °C is required for heat inactivating RNase A, direct plasma treatment with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) source caused permanent inactivation within minutes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that DBD-treated RNase A unfolds rapidly. Raman spectroscopy indicated methionine modifications and formation of sulfonic acid. A mass spectrometry-based analysis of the protein modifications that occur during plasma treatment over time revealed that methionine sulfoxide formation coincides with protein inactivation. Chemical reduction of methionine sulfoxides partially restored RNase A activity confirming that sulfoxidation is causal and sufficient for RNase A inactivation. Continued plasma exposure led to over-oxidation of structural disulfide bonds. Using antibodies, disulfide bond over-oxidation was shown to be a general protein inactivation mechanism of the DBD. The antibody’s heavy and light chains linked by disulfide bonds dissociated after plasma exposure. Based on their ability to inactivate proteins by oxidation of sulfur-containing amino acids and over-oxidation of disulfide bonds, DBD devices present a viable option for inactivating undesired or hazardous proteins on heat or solvent-sensitive surfaces.

  20. RNase 7 contributes to the cutaneous defense against Enterococcus faecium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Köten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin is able to mount a fast response against invading microorganisms by the release of antimicrobial proteins such as the ribonuclease RNase 7. Because RNase 7 exhibits high activity against Enterococcus faecium the aim of this study was to further explore the role of RNase 7 in the cutaneous innate defense system against E. faecium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Absolute quantification using real-time PCR and ELISA revealed that primary keratinocytes expressed high levels of RNase 7. Immunohistochemistry showed RNase 7 expression in all epidermal layers of the skin with an intensification in the upper more differentiated layers. Furthermore, RNase 7 was secreted by keratinocytes in vitro and in vivo in a site-dependent way. RNase 7 was still active against E. faecium at low pH (5.5 or high NaCl (150 mM concentration and the bactericidal activity of RNase 7 against E. faecium required no ribonuclease activity as shown by recombinant RNase 7 lacking enzymatic activity. To further explore the role of RNase 7 in cutaneous defense against E. faecium, we investigated whether RNase 7 contributes to the E. faecium killing activity of skin extracts derived from stratum corneum. Treatment of the skin extract with an RNase 7 specific antibody, which neutralizes the antimicrobial activity of RNase 7, diminished its E. faecium killing activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that RNase 7 contributes to the E. faecium-killing activity of skin extracts and suggest an important role for RNase 7 in the protection of human skin against E. faecium colonization.

  1. Studies of the aggregation of RNase Sa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khasa, Harshit; Kramer, Ryan; Maddux, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-eight mutants of RNase Sa (ribonuclease from Streptomyces aureofaciens) were examined for their structure, thermal sensitivity, and tendency to aggregate. Although a biphasic correlation was seen between the effect of temperature on structure and the free energy of transfer changes in many...

  2. Membrane recognition and dynamics of the RNA degradosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Strahl; C. Turlan; S. Khalid; P.J. Bond; J.M. Kebalo; P. Peyron; L. Poljak; M. Bouvier; L. Hamoen; B.F. Luisi; A.J. Carpousis

    2015-01-01

    RNase E, which is the central component of the multienzyme RNA degradosome, serves as a scaffold for interaction with other enzymes involved in mRNA degradation including the DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB. Epifluorescence microscopy under live cell conditions shows that RNase E and RhlB are membrane as

  3. Interaction of dipeptide prodrugs of saquinavir with multidrug resistance protein-2 (MRP-2): evasion of MRP-2 mediated efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ritesh; Agarwal, Sheetal; Mandava, Nanda Kishore; Sheng, Ye; Mitra, Ashim K

    2008-10-01

    Saquinavir (SQV), the first protease inhibitor approved by FDA to treat HIV-1 infection. This drug is a well-known substrate for multidrug resistance protein-2 (MRP-2). The objective of this study was to investigate whether derivatization of SQV to dipeptide prodrugs, valine-valine-saquinavir (Val-Val-SQV) and glycine-valine-saquinavir (Gly-Val-SQV), targeting peptide transporter can circumvent MRP-2 mediated efflux. Uptake and transport studies were carried out across MDCKII-MRP2 cell monolayers to investigate the interaction of SQV and its prodrugs with MRP-2. In situ single pass intestinal perfusion experiments in rat jejunum were performed to calculate intestinal absorption rate constants and permeabilities of SQV, Val-Val-SQV and Gly-Val-SQV. Uptake studies demonstrated that the prodrugs have significantly lower interaction with MRP-2 relative to SQV. Transepithelial transport of Val-Val-SQV and Gly-Val-SQV across MDCKII-MRP2 cells exhibited an enhanced absorptive flux and reduced secretory flux as compared to SQV. Intestinal perfusion studies revealed that synthesized prodrugs have higher intestinal permeabilities relative to SQV. Enhanced absorption of Val-Val-SQV and Gly-Val-SQV relative to SQV can be attributed to their translocation by the peptide transporter in the jejunum. In the presence of MK-571, a MRP family inhibitor, there was a significant increase in the permeabilities of SQV and Gly-Val-SQV indicating that these compounds are probably substrates for MRP-2. However, there was no change in the permeability of Val-Val-SQV with MK-571 indicating lack of any interaction of Val-Val-SQV with MRP-2. In conclusion, peptide transporter targeted prodrug modification of MRP-2 substrates may lead to shielding of these drug molecules from MRP-2 efflux pumps.

  4. Alphavirus Minus-Strand Synthesis and Persistence in Mouse Embryo Fibroblasts Derived from Mice Lacking RNase L and Protein Kinase R

    OpenAIRE

    Sawicki, Dorothea L.; Silverman, Robert H.; Williams, Bryan R.; Stanley G Sawicki

    2003-01-01

    We report our studies to probe the possible role of the host response to double-stranded RNA in cessation of alphavirus minus-strand synthesis. Mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) from Mx1-deficient mice that also lack either the protein kinase R (PKR) or the latent RNase L or both PKR and RNase L were screened. In RNase L-deficient but not wild-type or PKR-deficient MEF, there was continuous synthesis of minus-strand templates and the formation of new replication complexes producing viral plus st...

  5. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (Mrp3/Abcc3/Moat-D) is expressed in the SAE Squalus acanthias shark embryo-derived cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Parton, Angela; Czechanski, Anne; Durkin, Christopher; Kong, Chi-Chon; Barnes, David

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3/Mrp3) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family of membrane transporters and related proteins that act on a variety of xenobiotic and anionic molecules to transfer these substrates in an ATP-dependent manner. In recent years, useful comparative information regarding evolutionarily conserved structure and transport functions of these proteins has accrued through the use of primitive marine animals such as cartilaginous fish. Until recently, one missing tool in comparative studies with cartilaginous fish was cell culture. We have derived from the embryo of Squalus acanthias, the spiny dogfish shark, the S. acanthias embryo (SAE) mesenchymal stem cell line. This is the first continuously proliferating cell line from a cartilaginous fish. We identified expression of Mrp3 in this cell line, cloned the molecule, and examined molecular and cellular physiological aspects of the protein. Shark Mrp3 is characterized by three membrane-spanning domains and two nucleotide-binding domains. Multiple alignments with other species showed that the shark Mrp3 amino acid sequence was well conserved. The shark sequence was overall 64% identical to human MRP3, 72% identical to chicken Mrp3, and 71% identical to frog and stickleback Mrp3. Highest identity between shark and human amino acid sequence (82%) was seen in the carboxyl-terminal nucleotide-binding domain of the proteins. Cell culture experiments showed that mRNA for the protein was induced as much as 25-fold by peptide growth factors, fetal bovine serum, and lipid nutritional components, with the largest effect mediated by a combination of lipids including unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and vitamin E.

  6. miR-297 modulates multidrug resistance in human colorectal carcinoma by down-regulating MRP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Liang, Xin; Shen, Ke; Cui, Daling; Zheng, Yuanhong; Xu, Jianhua; Fan, Zhongze; Qiu, Yanyan; Li, Qi; Ni, Lei; Liu, Jianwen

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal carcinoma is a frequent cause of cancer-related death in men and women. miRNAs (microRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression negatively at the post-transcriptional level. In the present study we investigated the possible role of microRNAs in the development of MDR (multidrug resistance) in colorectal carcinoma cells. We analysed miRNA expression levels between MDR colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT116/L-OHP cells and their parent cell line HCT116 using a miRNA microarray. miR-297 showed lower expression in HCT116/L-OHP cells compared with its parental cells. MRP-2 (MDR-associated protein 2) is an important MDR protein in platinum-drug-resistance cells and is a predicted target of miR-297. Additionally miR-297 was down-regulated in a panel of human colorectal carcinoma tissues and negatively correlated with expression levels of MRP-2. Furthermore, we found that ectopic expression of miR-297 in MDR colorectal carcinoma cells reduced MRP-2 protein level and sensitized these cells to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that miR-297 could play a role in the development of MDR in colorectal carcinoma cells, at least in part by modulation of MRP-2.

  7. XRN2 is required for the degradation of target RNAs by RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Shin-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Obika, Satoshi, E-mail: obika@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-21

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) can suppress the expression of a target gene by cleaving pre-mRNA and/or mature mRNA via RNase H1. Following the initial endonucleolytic cleavage by RNase H1, the target RNAs are degraded by a mechanism that is poorly understood. To better understand this degradation pathway, we depleted the expression of two major 5′ to 3′ exoribonucleases (XRNs), named XRN1 and XRN2, and analyzed the levels of 3′ fragments of the target RNAs in vitro. We found that the 3′ fragments of target pre-mRNA generated by ASO were almost completely degraded from their 5′ ends by nuclear XRN2 after RNase H1-mediated cleavage, whereas the 3′ fragments of mature mRNA were partially degraded by XRN2. In contrast to ASO, small interference RNA (siRNA) could reduce the expression level of only mature mRNA, and the 3′ fragment was degraded by cytoplasmic XRN1. Our findings indicate that the RNAs targeted by RNase H1-dependent ASO are rapidly degraded in the nucleus, contrary to the cytoplasmic degradation pathway mediated by siRNA. - Highlights: • We compared the degradation mechanism of the transcript targeted by ASO and siRNA. • We focused on two 5′ to 3′ exoribonucleases, cytoplasmic XRN1, and nuclear XRN2. • The 3′ fragment of target pre-mRNA generated by ASO was degraded by XRN2. • The 3′ fragment of target mRNA generated by ASO was partially degraded by XRN2. • XRN1 depletion promoted accumulation of the 3′ fragment of mRNA generated by siRNA.

  8. Glutathione-dependent interaction of heavy metal compounds with multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer, H.M.; Balvers, M.G.J.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of three heavy metal-containing compounds, cisplatin (CDDP), arsenic trioxide (As2O3), and mercury dichloride (HgCl2), with the multidrug resistance transporters MRP1 and MRP2 and the involvement of glutathione (GSH)-related processes herein were investigated. In Madin-Darby canine

  9. Glutathione-dependent interaction of heavy metal compounds with multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortelboer, H.M.; Balvers, M.G.J.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions of three heavy metal-containing compounds, cisplatin (CDDP), arsenic trioxide (AS(2)O(3)), and mercury dichloride (HgCl2), with the multidrug resistance transporters MRP1 and MRP2 and the involvement of glutathione (GSH)-related processes herein were investigated. In Madin-Darby can

  10. Cleavage of model substrates by archaeal RNase P: role of protein cofactors in cleavage-site selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinapah, Sylvie; Wu, Shiying; Chen, Yu; Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2011-02-01

    RNase P is a catalytic ribonucleoprotein primarily involved in tRNA biogenesis. Archaeal RNase P comprises a catalytic RNase P RNA (RPR) and at least four protein cofactors (RPPs), which function as two binary complexes (POP5•RPP30 and RPP21• RPP29). Exploiting the ability to assemble a functional Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) RNase P in vitro, we examined the role of RPPs in influencing substrate recognition by the RPR. We first demonstrate that Pfu RPR, like its bacterial and eukaryal counterparts, cleaves model hairpin loop substrates albeit at rates 90- to 200-fold lower when compared with cleavage by bacterial RPR, highlighting the functionally comparable catalytic cores in bacterial and archaeal RPRs. By investigating cleavage-site selection exhibited by Pfu RPR (±RPPs) with various model substrates missing consensus-recognition elements, we determined substrate features whose recognition is facilitated by either POP5•RPP30 or RPP21•RPP29 (directly or indirectly via the RPR). Our results also revealed that Pfu RPR + RPP21•RPP29 displays substrate-recognition properties coinciding with those of the bacterial RPR-alone reaction rather than the Pfu RPR, and that this behaviour is attributable to structural differences in the substrate-specificity domains of bacterial and archaeal RPRs. Moreover, our data reveal a hierarchy in recognition elements that dictates cleavage-site selection by archaeal RNase P.

  11. Cartilage hair hypoplasia mutations that lead to RMRP promoter inefficiency or RNA transcript instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Eiji; Tran, Joseph R; Welting, Tim J M; Pruijn, Ger J M; Hirose, Yuichiro; Nishimura, Gen; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Schurman, Shepherd H; Cheng, Jun; Candotti, Fabio; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Ikegawa, Shiro; Schlessinger, David

    2007-11-15

    Cartilage hair hypoplasia (CHH; MIM 250250) is an autosomal recessive disease with diverse clinical manifestations. It is caused by mutations in RMRP gene, the RNA component of the ribonucleoprotein complex RNase MRP. Mutations in RMRP have been found in patients in the core promoter region or in the transcribed region, but the pathogenetic effect of the mutations is unclear. Real-time PCR assays confirmed that both promoter (c.-16_-1 dup and c.-15_+2 dup) and transcribed mutations (c.168G > A and c.218A > G) lower the expression level of RMRP. Experiments with 5'RACE, showed that the reduced transcription in the promoter mutants was accompanied by shifting of the transcription initiation sites to nucleotides 5'-upstream of the authentic site. Low levels of RMRP expression levels with transcript mutations were also seen when constructs encoding the wild-type and mutant genes were transfected into cultured cells. The reduced transcription was correlated with greater instability of mutant RMRP transcripts compared to controls. A comparable reduction was seen when a mouse gene containing the c.70A > G mutation (the major mutation in humans with CHH) was introduced into ES cells in place of one of the wild-type alleles. The low expression level of the c.70A > G Rmrp RNA was confirmed by expression assays into cultured cells, and was again correlated with RNA instability. Our results indicate that a loss of mutant RNA transcripts is a critical feature of pathogenesis. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A sensitive RNase protection assay to detect transcripts from potentially functional human endogenous L1 retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, D M; Williamson, M R; Doherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    A high background of read-through transcripts from degenerate human L1 retrotransposons is present in almost all human cell types. This prevents the detection of RNA transcripts from potentially functional elements. To overcome this, we have developed an RNase protection assay based on the recons...... transcripts from divergent L1 families but are either discrete shorter transcripts or specifically processed products from longer initial transcripts....

  13. Division of labor among Mycobacterium smegmatis RNase H enzymes: RNase H1 activity of RnhA or RnhC is essential for growth whereas RnhB and RnhA guard against killing by hydrogen peroxide in stationary phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Chatterjee, Debashree; Glickman, Michael S.; Shuman, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    RNase H enzymes sense the presence of ribonucleotides in the genome and initiate their removal by incising the ribonucleotide-containing strand of an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mycobacterium smegmatis encodes four RNase H enzymes: RnhA, RnhB, RnhC and RnhD. Here, we interrogate the biochemical activity and nucleic acid substrate specificity of RnhA. We report that RnhA (like RnhC characterized previously) is an RNase H1-type magnesium-dependent endonuclease with stringent specificity for RNA:DNA hybrid duplexes. Whereas RnhA does not incise an embedded mono-ribonucleotide, it can efficiently cleave within tracts of four or more ribonucleotides in duplex DNA. We gained genetic insights to the division of labor among mycobacterial RNases H by deleting the rnhA, rnhB, rnhC and rnhD genes, individually and in various combinations. The salient conclusions are that: (i) RNase H1 activity is essential for mycobacterial growth and can be provided by either RnhC or RnhA; (ii) the RNase H2 enzymes RnhB and RnhD are dispensable for growth and (iii) RnhB and RnhA collaborate to protect M. smegmatis against oxidative damage in stationary phase. Our findings highlight RnhC, the sole RNase H1 in pathogenic mycobacteria, as a candidate drug discovery target for tuberculosis and leprosy. PMID:27899559

  14. Involvement of the interferon-regulated antiviral proteins PKR and RNase L in reovirus-induced shutoff of cellular translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Williams, Bryan R G; Silverman, Robert H; Schiff, Leslie A

    2005-02-01

    Cellular translation is inhibited following infection with most strains of reovirus, but the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain to be elucidated. The extent of host shutoff varies in a strain-dependent manner; infection with the majority of strains leads to strong host shutoff, while infection with strain Dearing results in minimal inhibition of cellular translation. A genetic study with reassortant viruses and subsequent biochemical analyses led to the hypothesis that the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, PKR, is responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff. To directly determine whether PKR is responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff, we used a panel of reovirus strains and mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from knockout mice. This approach revealed that PKR contributes to but is not wholly responsible for reovirus-induced host shutoff. Studies with cells lacking RNase L, the endoribonuclease component of the interferon-regulated 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-RNase L system, demonstrated that RNase L also down-regulates cellular protein synthesis in reovirus-infected cells. In many viral systems, PKR and RNase L have well-characterized antiviral functions. An analysis of reovirus replication in cells lacking these molecules indicated that, while they contributed to host shutoff, neither PKR nor RNase L exerted an antiviral effect on reovirus growth. In fact, some strains of reovirus replicated more efficiently in the presence of PKR and RNase L than in their absence. Data presented in this report illustrate that the inhibition of cellular translation following reovirus infection is complex and involves multiple interferon-regulated gene products. In addition, our results suggest that reovirus has evolved effective mechanisms to avoid the actions of the interferon-stimulated antiviral pathways that include PKR and RNase L and may even benefit from their expression.

  15. Differences in the phenotypic effects of mutations in homologous MrpA and MrpD subunits of the multi-subunit Mrp-type Na(+)/H(+) antiporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Ogoda, Shinichiro; Krulwich, Terry Ann; Ito, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Mrp antiporters are the sole antiporters in the Cation/Proton Antiporter 3 family of transporter databases because of their unusual structural complexity, 6-7 hydrophobic proteins that function as a hetero-oligomeric complex. The two largest and homologous subunits, MrpA and MrpD, are essential for antiport activity and have direct roles in ion transport. They also show striking homology with proton-conducting, membrane-embedded Nuo subunits of respiratory chain complex I of bacteria, e.g., Escherichia coli. MrpA has the closest homology to the complex I NuoL subunit and MrpD has the closest homology to the complex I NuoM and N subunits. Here, introduction of mutations in MrpD, in residues that are also present in MrpA, led to defects in antiport function and/or complex formation. No significant phenotypes were detected in strains with mutations in corresponding residues of MrpA, but site-directed changes in the C-terminal region of MrpA had profound effects, showing that the MrpA C-terminal region has indispensable roles in antiport function. The results are consistent with a divergence in adaptations that support the roles of MrpA and MrpD in secondary antiport, as compared to later adaptations supporting homologs in primary proton pumping by the respiratory chain complex I.

  16. Immunosuppression induced by expression of a viral RNase enhances susceptibility of Plutella xylostella to microbial pesticides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bokri Park; Yonggyun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Polydnaviruses are a group of insect DNA viruses and are characterized in their segmented genome that is located in the chromosome(s) of host wasps.A polydnavirus,Cotesia plutellae bracovirus (CpBV),encodes a viral ribonuclease (RNase) T2 in a specific segment #3 (CpBV-S3).This study tested its effect on gene expression associated with host immune responses in the diamondback moth,Plutella xylostella.Micro-injection of CpBV-S3 into nonparasitized larvae induced expression of its two encoded genes,CpBV-ORF301 (=CpBV-RNase T2) and CpBV-ORF302.In response to a bacterial challenge,four antimicrobial peptide genes (hemolin,gloverin,cecropin and lysozyme) and six phenoloxidase (PO)-associated genes (proPO-activating proteinase,PO,serine proteinase homolog and serpins 1-3) were up-regulated in their expressions.However,the transient expression of CpBV-S3 suppressed the expressions of cecropin,PO and serpin 1.Double-stranded RNA specific to the viral RNase T2 could specifically knockdown the viral gene expression and restored the three gene expressions suppressed in the larvae injected with CpBV-S3.The inhibitory activity of the viral RNase T2 on the target genes was further proven by the suppression of PO activation in response to bacterial challenge in the larvae injected with CpBV-S3.This immunosuppression by the expression of the viral RNase T2 resulted in significant increase of pathogen susceptibility ofP.xylostella against Bacillus thuringiensis or baculovirus infection.

  17. Cloning, expression and location of RNase9 in human epididymis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin YQ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian spermatozoa become fully motile and fertile during transit through the luminal fluid of the epididymis. At least 200 proteins are present in the epididymal lumen, but the potential roles of these luminal proteins in male fertility are unknown. Investigation of the function of these proteins will elucidate the mechanism of sperm maturation, and also provide new drug targets for male contraception. We cloned RNase9 from a human epididymis cDNA library for characterization and analysis of its functions. Findings It was predicted that human RNase9 gene was located on chromosome 14q11.2 and encoded a 205 amino acids protein with a signal peptide of 26 amino acids at the N-terminus. The protein had eight conserved cysteine residues characteristic of the RNase A family members and several potential post-translational modification sites. At the transcriptional level, RNase9 was expressed in a wide variety of tissues, and the expression was higher in men than in boys. RNase9 was localized to the post-equatorial region of the sperms' head. Immunofluorescence staining showed that RNase9 protein was present mostly in the epithelium of the epididymal tubule. Recombinant RNase9 had no ribonuclease activity. In addition, RNase9 had no detectable effect on sperm motility and fertilization as demonstrated by blocking spermatozoa with anti-RNase9 polyclonal serum. Conclusion RNase9 is expressed in a wide variety of tissues. It is located on the post-equatorial region of the sperm head and the epithelium of epididymal tubule. Although RNase9 belongs to the RNase A family, it has no ribonuclease activity.

  18. Modulation of MDR1 and MRP3 gene expression in lung cancer cells after paclitaxel and carboplatin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melguizo, Consolación; Prados, Jose; Luque, Raquel; Ortiz, Raúl; Caba, Octavio; Alvarez, Pablo J; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Aranega, Antonia

    2012-12-05

    Carboplatin-paclitaxel is a reference regimen in the treatment of locally advanced or disseminated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This paper discusses the multidrug resistance developed with this drug combination, which is one of the major obstacles to successful treatment. In order to understand and overcome the drug resistance pattern of NSCLC after carboplatin plus paclitaxel exposure, levels of mRNA expression of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3) were investigated in primary NSCLC cell lines (A-549 and A-427) and a metastasis-derived NSCLC cell line (NODO). Our results showed that exposure of the three NSCLC lines to plasma concentrations of paclitaxel (5 μM) produced an increase in MDR1 expression, while MRP3 showed no alteration in expression. By contrast, the same cells exposed to carboplatin plasma concentrations (30 μM) showed overexpression of MRP3. In these cells, MDR1 showed no expression changes. Interestingly, the combination of both paclitaxel and carboplatin caused increased expression of the MDR1 drug resistance gene rather than the individual treatments. These results suggest that carboplatin and paclitaxel may induce drug resistance mediated by MDR1 and MRP3, which may be enhanced by the simultaneous use of both drugs.

  19. Modulation of MDR1 and MRP3 Gene Expression in Lung Cancer Cells after Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consolación Melguizo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carboplatin-paclitaxel is a reference regimen in the treatment of locally advanced or disseminated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This paper discusses the multidrug resistance developed with this drug combination, which is one of the major obstacles to successful treatment. In order to understand and overcome the drug resistance pattern of NSCLC after carboplatin plus paclitaxel exposure, levels of mRNA expression of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 (MRP3 were investigated in primary NSCLC cell lines (A-549 and A-427 and a metastasis-derived NSCLC cell line (NODO. Our results showed that exposure of the three NSCLC lines to plasma concentrations of paclitaxel (5 μM produced an increase in MDR1 expression, while MRP3 showed no alteration in expression. By contrast, the same cells exposed to carboplatin plasma concentrations (30 μM showed overexpression of MRP3. In these cells, MDR1 showed no expression changes. Interestingly, the combination of both paclitaxel and carboplatin caused increased expression of the MDR1 drug resistance gene rather than the individual treatments. These results suggest that carboplatin and paclitaxel may induce drug resistance mediated by MDR1 and MRP3, which may be enhanced by the simultaneous use of both drugs.

  20. Interactions of mefloquine with ABC proteins, MRP1 (ABCC1) and MRP4 (ABCC4), that are present in human red cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chung-Pu; Klokouzas, Antonios; Hladky, Stephen B.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Barrand, Margery A.

    2005-01-01

    Human erythrocyte membranes express the multidrug resistance-associated proteins, MRP1, MRP4 and MRP5, that collectively can efflux oxidised glutathione, glutathione conjugates and cyclic nucleotides. It is already known that the quinoline derivative, MK-571, is a potent inhibitor of MRP-mediated transport. We here examine whether the quinoline-based antimalarial drugs, amodiaquine, chloroquine, mefloquine, primaquine, quinidine and quinine, also interact with erythrocyte MRPs with consequenc...

  1. Expression, purification and characterization of the interferon-inducible, antiviral and tumour-suppressor protein, human RNase L

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ankush Gupta; Pramod C Rath

    2012-03-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible, 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A)-dependent ribonuclease L (RNase L) plays key role in antiviral defense of mammalian cells. Induction by IFN and activation by double-stranded RNA lead to 2-5A cofactor synthesis, which activates RNase L by causing its dimerization. Active RNase L degrades single-stranded viral as well as cellular RNAs causing apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Earlier, we had reported that expression of recombinant human RNase L caused RNA-degradation and cell-growth inhibition in E. coli without the need for exogenous 2-5A. Expression of human RNase L in E. coli usually leads to problems of leaky expression, low yield and degradation of the recombinant protein, which demands number of chromatographic steps for its subsequent purification thereby, compromising its biochemical activity. Here, we report a convenient protocol for expression of full-length, soluble and biochemically active recombinant human RNase L as GST-R Nase L fusion protein from E. coli utilizing a single-step affinity purification with an appreciable yield of the highly purified protein. Recombinant R Nase L was characterized by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting and MALDI-TOF analysis. A semi-quantitative agarose-gel-based ribonuclease assay was developed for measuring its 2-5A-dependent R Nase L activity against cellular large rRNAs as substrates. The optimized expression conditions minimized degradation of the protein, making it a convenient method for purification of R Nase L, which can be utilized to study effects of various agents on the R Nase L activity and its protein–protein interactions.

  2. Process Diagnostics and Monitoring Using the Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harhausen, J.; Awakowicz, P.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Foest, R.; Lapke, M.; Musch, T.; Mussenbrock, T.; Oberrath, J.; Ohl, A.; Rolfes, I.; Schulz, Ch.; Storch, R.; Styrnoll, T.

    2011-10-01

    In this contribution we present the application of the MRP in an industrial plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD) chamber (Leybold optics SYRUS-pro). The MRP is a novel plasma diagnostic which is suitable for an industrial environment - which means that the proposed method is robust, calibration free, and economical, and can be used for ideal and reactive plasmas alike. In order to employ the MRP as process diagnostics we mounted the probe on a manipulator to obtain spatially resolved information on the electron density and temperature. As monitoring tool the MRP is installed at a fixed position. Even during the deposition process it provides stable measurement results while other diagnostic methods, e.g. the Langmuir probe, may suffer from dielectric coatings. In this contribution we present the application of the MRP in an industrial plasma ion assisted deposition (PIAD) chamber (Leybold optics SYRUS-pro). The MRP is a novel plasma diagnostic which is suitable for an industrial environment - which means that the proposed method is robust, calibration free, and economical, and can be used for ideal and reactive plasmas alike. In order to employ the MRP as process diagnostics we mounted the probe on a manipulator to obtain spatially resolved information on the electron density and temperature. As monitoring tool the MRP is installed at a fixed position. Even during the deposition process it provides stable measurement results while other diagnostic methods, e.g. the Langmuir probe, may suffer from dielectric coatings. Funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF, Fkz. 13N10462).

  3. Assembly of the Complex between Archaeal RNase P Proteins RPP30 and Pop5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L. Crowe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available RNase P is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein enzyme that represents a model complex for understanding macromolecular RNA-protein interactions. Archaeal RNase P consists of one RNA and up to five proteins (Pop5, RPP30, RPP21, RPP29, and RPP38/L7Ae. Four of these proteins function in pairs (Pop5-RPP30 and RPP21–RPP29. We have used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC to characterize the interaction between Pop5 and RPP30 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. NMR backbone resonance assignments of free RPP30 (25 kDa indicate that the protein is well structured in solution, with a secondary structure matching that observed in a closely related crystal structure. Chemical shift perturbations upon the addition of Pop5 (14 kDa reveal its binding surface on RPP30. ITC experiments confirm a net 1 : 1 stoichiometry for this tight protein-protein interaction and exhibit complex isotherms, indicative of higher-order binding. Indeed, light scattering and size exclusion chromatography data reveal the complex to exist as a 78 kDa heterotetramer with two copies each of Pop5 and RPP30. These results will inform future efforts to elucidate the functional role of the Pop5-RPP30 complex in RNase P assembly and catalysis.

  4. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML.

  5. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  6. The human core exosome interacts with differentially localized processive RNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    from the associated subunits Dis3p (Rrp44p) and Rrp6p. The former is a nuclear and cytoplasmic RNase II/R-like enzyme, which possesses both processive exo- and endonuclease activities, whereas the latter is a distributive RNase D-like nuclear exonuclease. Although the exosome core is highly conserved...

  7. The process behind the expression of mdr-1/P-gp and mrp/MRP in human leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Masao

    2009-04-01

    There is a controversy over the link between phenotypes of multidrug resistance (MDR) and clinical outcome in leukemia/lymphoma patients. This may be because the process behind the induction and loss of expression of genotypes and phenotypes by which MDR develops and the role of MDR in fresh cells of human leukemia/lymphoma are not clearly defined. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) increased and decreased along with mdr-1 expression in three cell lines out of five vincristine (VCR)-resistant cell lines. MRP appeared with increased mrp expression in the other two cell lines. After the drug was removed from the culture system, mdr-1/P-gp changed in parallel with the level of VCR resistance, although mrp and MRP did not. It was concluded that P-gp is directly derived from mdr-1 and that mdr-1/P-gp supports the VCR-resistance but mrp/MRP is not directly linked to the VCR-resistance. These results should contribute to a better understanding of MDR phenomenon in cancer.

  8. 内含中东呼吸综合征冠状病毒部分N基因病毒样颗粒构建和表达%Construction and expression of RNase-resistant virus-like particles containing N gene of MERS-CoV RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹; 聂凯; 关丽; 陆丽; 马学军

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construct and express ribonuclease-resistant virus-like particles containing the RNA fragmengts of MERS-CoV N gene.Methods The coat protein and maturase gene of E.coli bacteriophage MS2 was amplified by PCR,then the gene was cloned into pET32a to construct the intermediate vector pET32MS.The gene fragments harboring MERS-CoV N gene and beta-actin was cloned into the downstream of pET32MS to construct the prokaryotic expression vector p32MS-EMC-Beta.The recombinant plasmid p32MS-EMC-Beta was transformed into E.coli BL21 (DE) competent cells and induced with IPTG.The virus-like particles were obtained after purification.RNase digestion test and stability test were carried out to observe the stability of the particles.Results The RNase-resistant virus-like particles which was able to express the gene fragments containing MERS-CoV N gene and beta-actin were successfully produced and were shown to be stored stable for 30 days at 37℃.Conclusion The virus-like particles with high safety and stability can be used as positive standards and quality controls in the application of MERS-CoV detection.%目的 构建耐RNase酶内含中东呼吸综合征冠状病毒(middle east respiratory syndrome coronavirus,MERS-CoV)部分N基因的病毒样颗粒(virus-like particles,VLPs).方法 将MS2噬菌体包膜蛋白和成熟酶蛋白基因编码序列插入到表达载体pET32a,构建成pET32MS中间载体,再将MERS-CoV N基因和beta-actin基因片段连接到成熟酶蛋白基因的下游,获得的重组载体p32MS-EMC-Beta转化到E.coli BL21 (DE)感受态细胞中进行诱导表达,表达产物进行纯化,然后进行耐酶实验及稳定性实验.结果 获得含MERS-CoV N基因片段的颗粒,可抵抗RNase降解,在37℃保存30d.结论 成功构建了含MERS-CoV N基因VLPs且稳定良好,可作为MERS-CoV的标准品和质控品.

  9. Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1, 2, 4 and 5) expression in human corneal cell culture models and animal corneal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraelen, Jessica; Reichl, Stephan

    2014-07-07

    Preclinical studies addressing the transcorneal absorption of ophthalmic drugs are mainly performed using ex vivo animal corneas and in vitro corneal cell culture models, leaving open the question of transferability to humans in an in vivo situation. While passive drug absorption through corneal tissue is well understood, little is known about the expression of transporter proteins and active drug transport in human and animal corneas as well as corneal cell culture models. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct an expression analysis of four multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP1, 2, 4 and 5) in various in vitro and ex vivo corneal models, leading to a better understanding of the comparability of different corneal models regarding drug absorption and transferability to humans. Two well-established in vitro human corneal models, the HCE-T epithelial model and the more organotypic Hemicornea construct, both of which are based on the SV40 immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line HCE-T, were analyzed, as were excised rabbit and porcine cornea. Specimens of abraded epithelia from human donor corneas were also tested. MRP mRNA expression was determined via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression was examined using Western blot experiments and immunohistochemistry. The functional activity of the MRP efflux transporter was detected in transport assays using specific marker and inhibitor substances. The functional expression of all of the tested MRP transporters was detected in the HCE-T epithelial model. Hemicornea constructs displayed a similar expression pattern for MRP1, 4 and 5, whereas no MRP2 protein expression or activity was detected. However, excised animal corneas exhibited different expression profiles. In porcine cornea, no functional expression of MRP1, 2, or 5 was observed, and we failed to detect MRP4 expression in rabbit cornea. The results suggest that MRP1, 2, 4, and 5 are expressed in the human corneal

  10. RnlB Antitoxin of the Escherichia coli RnlA-RnlB Toxin-Antitoxin Module Requires RNase HI for Inhibition of RnlA Toxin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, Kenta; Qi, Dan; Yonesaki, Tetsuro; Otsuka, Yuichi

    2017-01-11

    The Escherichia coli RnlA-RnlB toxin-antitoxin system is related to the anti-phage mechanism. Under normal growth conditions, an RnlA toxin with endoribonuclease activity is inhibited by binding of its cognate RnlB antitoxin. After bacteriophage T4 infection, RnlA is activated by the disappearance of RnlB, resulting in the rapid degradation of T4 mRNAs and consequently no T4 propagation when T4 dmd encoding a phage antitoxin against RnlA is defective. Intriguingly, E. coli RNase HI, which plays a key role in DNA replication, is required for the activation of RnlA and stimulates the RNA cleavage activity of RnlA. Here, we report an additional role of RNase HI in the regulation of RnlA-RnlB system. Both RNase HI and RnlB are associated with NRD (one of three domains of RnlA). The interaction between RnlB and NRD depends on RNase HI. Exogenous expression of RnlA in wild-type cells has no effect on cell growth because of endogenous RnlB and this inhibition of RnlA toxicity requires RNase HI and NRD. These results suggest that RNase HI recruits RnlB to RnlA through NRD for inhibiting RnlA toxicity and thus plays two contrary roles in the regulation of RnlA-RnlB system.

  11. Suppression of BSEP and MRP2 in mouse liver by miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol isolated from Pueraria candollei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomsuk, Latiporn; Juengwatanatrakul, Thaweesak; Putalun, Waraporn; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2012-11-15

    Miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol are highly active phytoestrogens isolated from the tuberous root of Pueraria candollei var. mirifica (Leguminosae). Modulatory effects of miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol on the mRNAs of BSEP and MRP2 genes involved in bile salt transportation, in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. In contrast to estradiol, miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol suppressed the expression of BSEP and MRP2 mRNA in both male and female mice. The results suggest for the first time that the use of miroestrol and deoxymiroestrol-containing products as alternative medicines or health supplements should be concerned according to their effects on key genes that regulate the bile salt export pump, which could result in the risk of hepatotoxicity and intrahepatic cholestasis.

  12. A transcriptional signaling pathway in the IFN system mediated by 2′-5′-oligoadenylate activation of RNase L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malathi, Krishnamurthy; Paranjape, Jayashree M.; Bulanova, Elena; Shim, Minsub; Guenther-Johnson, Jeanna M.; Faber, Pieter W.; Eling, Thomas E.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    Virus replication in higher vertebrates is restrained by IFNs that cause cells to transcribe genes encoding antiviral proteins, such as 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetases. 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase is stimulated by dsRNA to produce 5′-phosphorylated, 2′-5′-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A), whose function is to activate RNase L. Although RNase L is required for a complete IFN antiviral response and mutations in the RNase L gene (RNASEL or HPC1) increase prostate cancer rates, it is unknown how 2-5A affects these biological endpoints through its receptor, RNase L. Presently, we show that 2-5A activation of RNase L produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription (≥20-fold) for genes that suppress virus replication and prostate cancer. Unexpectedly, exposure of DU145 prostate cancer cells to physiologic levels of 2-5A (0.1 μM) induced approximately twice as many RNA species as it down-regulated. Among the 2-5A-induced genes are several IFN-stimulated genes, including IFN-inducible transcript 1/P56, IFN-inducible transcript 2/P54, IL-8, and IFN-stimulated gene 15. 2-5A also potently elevated RNA for macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1, a TGF-β superfamily member implicated as an apoptotic suppressor of prostate cancer. Transcriptional signaling to the macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1 promoter by 2-5A was deficient in HeLa cells expressing a nuclease-dead mutant of RNase L and was dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, both of which were activated in response to 2-5A treatments. Because 2-5A and RNase L participate in defenses against viral infections and prostate cancer, our findings have implications for basic cellular mechanisms that control major pathogenic processes. PMID:16203993

  13. A transcriptional signaling pathway in the IFN system mediated by 2'-5'-oligoadenylate activation of RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malathi, Krishnamurthy; Paranjape, Jayashree M; Bulanova, Elena; Shim, Minsub; Guenther-Johnson, Jeanna M; Faber, Pieter W; Eling, Thomas E; Williams, Bryan R G; Silverman, Robert H

    2005-10-11

    Virus replication in higher vertebrates is restrained by IFNs that cause cells to transcribe genes encoding antiviral proteins, such as 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetases. 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase is stimulated by dsRNA to produce 5'-phosphorylated, 2'-5'-linked oligoadenylates (2-5A), whose function is to activate RNase L. Although RNase L is required for a complete IFN antiviral response and mutations in the RNase L gene (RNASEL or HPC1) increase prostate cancer rates, it is unknown how 2-5A affects these biological endpoints through its receptor, RNase L. Presently, we show that 2-5A activation of RNase L produces a remarkable stimulation of transcription (>/=20-fold) for genes that suppress virus replication and prostate cancer. Unexpectedly, exposure of DU145 prostate cancer cells to physiologic levels of 2-5A (0.1 muM) induced approximately twice as many RNA species as it down-regulated. Among the 2-5A-induced genes are several IFN-stimulated genes, including IFN-inducible transcript 1/P56, IFN-inducible transcript 2/P54, IL-8, and IFN-stimulated gene 15. 2-5A also potently elevated RNA for macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1, a TGF-beta superfamily member implicated as an apoptotic suppressor of prostate cancer. Transcriptional signaling to the macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1/nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug-activated gene-1 promoter by 2-5A was deficient in HeLa cells expressing a nuclease-dead mutant of RNase L and was dependent on the mitogen-activated protein kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, both of which were activated in response to 2-5A treatments. Because 2-5A and RNase L participate in defenses against viral infections and prostate cancer, our findings have implications for basic cellular mechanisms that control major pathogenic processes.

  14. The CDI toxin of Yersinia kristensenii is a novel bacterial member of the RNase A superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batot, Gaëlle; Michalska, Karolina; Ekberg, Greg; Irimpan, Ervin M.; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Hayes, Christopher S.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Goulding, Celia W.

    2017-04-10

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is an important mechanism of inter-bacterial competition found in many Gram-negative pathogens. CDI+ cells express cell-surface CdiA proteins that bind neighboring bacteria and deliver C-terminal toxin domains (CdiA-CT) to inhibit target-cell growth. CDI+ bacteria also produce CdiI immunity proteins, which specifically neutralize cognate CdiA-CT toxins to prevent self-inhibition. Here, we present the crystal structure of the CdiA-CT/CdiI(Ykris) complex from Yersinia kris-tensenii ATCC 33638. CdiA-CTYkris adopts the same fold as angiogenin and other RNase A paralogs, but the toxin does not share sequence similarity with these nucleases and lacks the characteristic disulfide bonds of the superfamily. Consistent with the structural homology, CdiA-CTYkris has potent RNase activity in vitro and in vivo. Structure-guided mutagenesis reveals that His175, Arg186, Thr276 and Tyr278 contribute to CdiA-CTYkris activity, suggesting that these residues participate in substrate binding and/or catalysis. CdiI(Ykris) binds directly over the putative active site and likely neutralizes toxicity by blocking access to RNA substrates. Significantly, CdiA-CTYkris is the first non-vertebrate protein found to possess the RNase A superfamily fold, and homologs of this toxin are associated with secretion systems in many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. These observations suggest that RNase Alike toxins are commonly deployed in inter-bacterial competition.

  15. Primary structure and properties of ribonuclease Bm2 (RNase Bm2) from Bryopsis maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Tadashi; Koyama, Hideki; Daigo, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Koyama, Takashi; Iwama, Masanori; Ohgi, Kazuko; Irie, Masachika; Inokuchi, Norio

    2006-05-01

    A base non-specific ribonuclease (RNase Bm2) was isolated from a green algae (Ulvophyceae, Bryopsis maxima) as a single band on SDS-PAGE, and its primary structure and enzymatic properties, including base specificity, were investigated. The amino acid sequence of RNase Bm2 was homologous to many RNase T2 family RNases, and their characteristic CAS sequences were also conserved. The molecular mass of RNase Bm2 was 24444 Da, and its optimal pH was 5.5. RNase Bm2 was a poly U preferential RNase, similar to RNase MC1 from bitter gourd. The base specificity of this RNase suggested that the base specificity of the B1- and B2-base binding sites of RNase Bm2 were G > or = U > C > A and U > G > C > A, respectively. The estimated active site of RNase Bm2 was very similar to that of RNase MC1 from bitter gourds; however, a tyrosine residue at the B1-base binding site that is conserved for all RNase T2 family RNases was replaced by a tryptophan residue. Here we discuss the effect of this replacement on the base specificity of RNase Bm2 and the phylogenetic relationship of RNase T2 family enzymes.

  16. Novel complex MAD phasing and RNase H structural insights using selenium oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdur, Rob; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Gan, Jianhua; Jiang, Jiansheng; Salon, Jozef; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Chumanevich, Alexander A.; Weber, Irene T.; Huang, Zhen, E-mail: huang@gsu.edu [Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Selenium-derivatized oligonucleotides may facilitate phase determination and high-resolution structure determination for protein–nucleic acid crystallography. The Se atom-specific mutagenesis (SAM) strategy may also enhance the study of nuclease catalysis. The crystal structures of protein–nucleic acid complexes are commonly determined using selenium-derivatized proteins via MAD or SAD phasing. Here, the first protein–nucleic acid complex structure determined using selenium-derivatized nucleic acids is reported. The RNase H–RNA/DNA complex is used as an example to demonstrate the proof of principle. The high-resolution crystal structure indicates that this selenium replacement results in a local subtle unwinding of the RNA/DNA substrate duplex, thereby shifting the RNA scissile phosphate closer to the transition state of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. It was also observed that the scissile phosphate forms a hydrogen bond to the water nucleophile and helps to position the water molecule in the structure. Consistently, it was discovered that the substitution of a single O atom by a Se atom in a guide DNA sequence can largely accelerate RNase H catalysis. These structural and catalytic studies shed new light on the guide-dependent RNA cleavage.

  17. Reversal of MRP7 (ABCC10-mediated multidrug resistance by tariquidar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Li Sun

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10 is a recently discovered member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family which are capable of conferring resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs, including taxanes and nucleoside analogs, in vivo. MRP7 is highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer cells, and Mrp7-KO mice are highly sensitive to paclitaxel, making MRP7 an attractive chemotherapeutic target of non-small cell lung cancer. However, only a few inhibitors of MRP7 are currently identified, with none of them having progressed to clinical trials. We used MRP7-expressing cells to investigate whether tariquidar, a third generation inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, could inhibit MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR. We found that tariquidar, at 0.1 and 0.3 µM, significantly potentiated the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to MRP7 substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel. We further demonstrated that tariquidar directly impaired paclitaxel efflux and could downregulate MRP7 protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner after prolonged treatment. Our findings suggest that tariquidar, at pharmacologically achievable concentrations, reverses MRP7-mediated MDR through inhibition of MRP7 protein expression and function, and thus represents a promising therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of chemoresistant cancer patients.

  18. Multidrug Resistance-Related Protein 1 (MRP1) Function and Localization Depend on Cortical Actin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, Ina; Klappe, Karin; Ercan, Cigdem; Kok, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    MRP1 (ABCC1) is known to be localized in lipid rafts. Here we show in two different cell lines that localization of Mrp1/MRP1 (Abcc1/ABCC1) in lipid rafts and its function as an efflux pump are dependent on cortical actin. Latrunculin B disrupts both cortical actin and actin stress fibers. This resu

  19. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A. M.; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent

  20. Mechanistic and Structural Studies of Protein-Only RNase P Compared to Ribonucleoproteins Reveal the Two Faces of the Same Enzymatic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Schelcher

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available RNase P, the essential activity that performs the 5′ maturation of tRNA precursors, can be achieved either by ribonucleoproteins containing a ribozyme present in the three domains of life or by protein-only enzymes called protein-only RNase P (PRORP that occur in eukaryote nuclei and organelles. A fast growing list of studies has investigated three-dimensional structures and mode of action of PRORP proteins. Results suggest that similar to ribozymes, PRORP proteins have two main domains. A clear functional analogy can be drawn between the specificity domain of the RNase P ribozyme and PRORP pentatricopeptide repeat domain, and between the ribozyme catalytic domain and PRORP N4BP1, YacP-like Nuclease domain. Moreover, both types of enzymes appear to dock with the acceptor arm of tRNA precursors and make specific contacts with the corner of pre-tRNAs. While some clear differences can still be delineated between PRORP and ribonucleoprotein (RNP RNase P, the two types of enzymes seem to use, fundamentally, the same catalytic mechanism involving two metal ions. The occurrence of PRORP and RNP RNase P represents a remarkable example of convergent evolution. It might be the unique witness of an ongoing replacement of catalytic RNAs by proteins for enzymatic activities.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of NifA expression by Hfq and RNase E complex in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghua Zhang; Guofan Hong

    2009-01-01

    NifA is the general transcriptional activator of nitrogen fixation genes in diazotrophic bacteria. In Rhizobium leguminosarum by. viciae strain 8401/pRL1JI, the NifA gene is part of a gene cluster (fixABCXNifAB). In this study, results showed that in R. leguminosarum by. viciae 8401/pRLI1I, host factor required (Hfq), and RNase E were involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of NifA expression. It was found that Hfq-dependent RNase E cleavage of NifA mRNA was essen-tial for NifA translation. The cleavage site is located at 32 nucleotides upstream of the NifA translational start codon. A possible explanation based on predicted RNA secondary structure of the NifA 5'-untranslated region was that the cleavage made ribosome-binding sites accessible for translation.

  2. MRP1 mediates folate transport and antifolate sensitivity in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van der Velden, Maarten; Bilos, Albert; Jansen, Robert S; Mahakena, Sunny; Russel, Frans G M; Sauerwein, Robert W; van de Wetering, Koen; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-02-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) of Plasmodium falciparum have been associated with altered drug sensitivity. Knowledge on MRP substrate specificity is indispensible for the characterization of resistance mechanisms and identifying its physiological roles. An untargeted metabolomics approach detected decreased folate concentrations in red blood cells infected with schizont stage parasites lacking expression of MRP1. Furthermore, a tenfold decrease in sensitivity toward the folate analog methotrexate was detected for parasites lacking MRP1. PfMRP1 is involved in the export of folate from parasites into red blood cells and is therefore a relevant factor for efficient malaria treatment through the folate pathway.

  3. Base non-specific acid ribonuclease from Irpex lacteus, primary structure and phylogenetic relationships in RNase T2 family enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Fauzi, H; Iwama, M; Onda, T; Ohgi, K; Irie, M

    1995-11-01

    Two base non-specific acid RNases (RNase Irp1 and RNase Irp2) were purified from a commercial enzyme, "Driselase" (Irpex lacteus) in a homogenous state on SDS-PAGE by several steps of chromatographic separations. RNAse Irp2 was a simple polypeptide with 235 amino acid residues and RNase Irp1 was a glycopeptide with 248 amino acid residues. The amino acid sequences of both RNases were identified by Edman degradation of the peptides derived from these RNAses. RNase Irp1 was composed of the RNase Irp2 and extra C-terminal 13 residues of peptide. The phylogenetic relation of these RNases with the other fungal RNases already known was discussed. The sequence of RNase Irp2 was very highly homologous (67.5%) with that of RNase Le2 from Lentinus edodes.

  4. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-02-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent biliary transport of DCF-acylglucuronide (DAG), leading to decreased intestinal exposure to DAG and DCF. However, it is not known to what extent adaptive changes in the Mrp2 intestine itself influence its sensitivity to DCF toxicity without the influence of liver metabolites. To investigate this, DCF toxicity and disposition were studied ex vivo by precision-cut intestinal slices and Ussing chamber using intestines from wild type(WT) and Mrp2 rats. The results show that adaptive changes due to Mrp2 deficiency concerning Mrp2, Mrp3 and BCRP gene expression, GSH content and DAG formation were different between liver and intestine. Furthermore, Mrp2 intestine was intrinsically more resistant to DCF toxicity than its WT counterpart ex vivo. This can at least partly be explained by a reduced DCF uptake by the Mrp2 intestine, but isnot related to the other adaptive changes in the intestine. The extrapolation of this data to humans with MRP2 deficiency is uncertain due to species differences in activity and regulation of transporters.

  5. Integrating MRP (materiel requirements planning) into modern business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, T

    1994-05-01

    Time is the commodity of the '90s. Therefore, we all must learn how to use our manufacturing systems to shorten lead time and increase customer satisfaction. The objective of this article is to discuss practical ways people integrate the techniques of materiel requirements planning (MRP) systems with just-in-time (JIT) execution systems to increase customer satisfaction. Included are examples of new ways people use MRP systems to exemplify the process of continuous improvement--multiple items on work orders, consolidated routings, flexing capacity, and other new developments. Ways that successful companies use MRP II for planning and JIT for execution are discussed. There are many examples of how to apply theory to real life situations and a discussion of techniques that work to keep companies in the mode of continuous improvement. Also included is a look at hands-on, practical methods people use to achieve lead time reduction and simplify bills of material. Total quality management concepts can be applied to the MRP process itself. This in turn helps people improve schedule adherence, which leads to customer satisfaction.

  6. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Prateek A.; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W.

    2010-01-01

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodopetra frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp c-DNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9MRP1)...

  7. Stereodifferentiation--the effect of P chirality of oligo(nucleoside phosphorothioates) on the activity of bacterial RNase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziolkiewicz, M; Krakowiak, A; Kwinkowski, M; Boczkowska, M; Stec, W J

    1995-01-01

    P stereoregular phosphorothioate analogs of pentadecamer 5'-d(AGATGTTTGAGCTCT)-3' were synthesized by the oxathiaphospholane method. Their diastereomeric purity was assigned by means of enzymatic degradation with nuclease P1 and, independently, with snake venom phosphodiesterase. DNA-RNA hybrids formed by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (PS-oligos) with the corresponding complementary pentadecaribonucleotide were treated with bacterial RNase H. The DNA-RNA complex containing the PS-oligo of [all-RP] configuration was found to be more susceptible to RNase H-dependent degradation of the pentadecaribonucleotide compared with hybrids containing either the [all-SP] counterpart or the so called 'random mixture of diastereomers' of the pentadeca(nucleoside phosphorothioate). This stereodependence of RNase H action was also observed for a polyribonucleotide (475 nt) hybridized with these phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. The results of melting studies of PS-oligo-RNA hybrids allowed a rationalization of the observed stereodifferentiation in terms of the higher stability of heterodimers formed between oligoribonucleotides and [all-RP]-oligo(nucleoside phosphorothioates), compared with the less stable heterodimers formed with [all-SP]-oligo(nucleoside phosphorothioates) or the random mixture of diastereomers. Images PMID:8559657

  8. Chiral and achiral phosphorothioate analogs of 2-5A: stereochemical course of RNase L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariko, K.; Beck, K.; Suhadolnik, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The trimer and tetramer phosphorothioate (thio) analogs of 2-5A have been enzymatically synthesized from (Sp)ATP..cap alpha..S, (Sp)ATP..beta..S, (Rp)ATP..beta..S and ATP..gamma..S by 2-5A synthetase from IFN-..beta..-treated L929 cell extracts and lysed rabbit reticulocytes. The structures of these compounds have been determined by HPLC, enzymatic digestions and TLC. The biological activity of these thio analogs of 2-5A was determined by binding and activation of RNase L. The thio analog from (Sp)ATP..cap alpha..S, with the Rp configuration in the 2-5-phosphorothiodiester linkages and the Sp configuration at the ..cap alpha..phosphate of the 5'-terminus, exhibits substantially increased biological effects compared to 2-5A; this thio analog displaces 2-5-p/sub 3/A/sub 4/(/sup 32/P)pCp from RNase L better than does naturally occurring 2-5A. Also, it activates RNase L to hydrolyze either polyU-3'-(/sup 32/P)Cp (core cellulose assay) or 28S and 18S RNAs (rRNA cleavage assay) at one log lower concentration (10/sup -10/ M) than does authentic 2-5A (10/sup -9/M). The thio-substituted analogs of 2-5A with either Sp- or Rp-chirality at the ..beta..-phosphate as well as achiral thio-substitution on the ..gamma..-phosphate were biologically active at concentrations as low as 10/sup -9/, 10/sup -8/, and 10/sup -9/ M, respectively, in rRNA cleavage assays using L929 and LMTK/sup -/ cell extracts.

  9. Changes in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in cisplatin-induced acute renal failure after treatment of JBP485 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tao, E-mail: liutaomedical@qq.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Meng, Qiang, E-mail: mengq531@yahoo.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Wang, Changyuan, E-mail: wangcyuan@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Liu, Qi, E-mail: llaqii@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Guo, Xinjin, E-mail: guo.xinjin@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Sun, Huijun, E-mail: sunhuijun@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Peng, Jinyong, E-mail: jinyongpeng2005@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); and others

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cyclo-trans-4-L-hydroxyprolyl-L-serine (JBP485) on acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cisplatin is related to change in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in rats. JBP485 reduced creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and indoxyl sulfate (IS) in plasma and malondialdehyde (MDA) in kidney, and recovered the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cisplatin-treated rats. The plasma concentration of PAH (para-aminohippurate) determined by LC–MS/MS was increased markedly after intravenous administration of cisplatin, whereas cumulative urinary excretion of PAH and the uptake of PAH in kidney slices were significantly decreased. qRT-PCR and Western-blot showed a decrease in mRNA and protein of Oat1 and Oat3, an increase in mRNA and protein of Mrp2 in cisplatin-treated rats, and an increase in IS (a uremic toxin) after co-treatment with JBP485. It indicated that JBP485 promoted urinary excretion of toxins by upregulating renal Mrp2. This therefore gives in part the explanation about the mechanism by which JBP485 improves ARF induced by cisplatin in rats. -- Highlights: ► Cisplatin induces acute renal failure (ARF). ► The expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 were changed during ARF. ► The regulated expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 is an adaptive protected response. ► JBP485 could facilitate the adaptive protective action.

  10. Chaetominine reduces MRP1-mediated drug resistance via inhibiting PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling pathway in K562/Adr human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingyun; Wei, Xing [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Lu, Yanhua, E-mail: luyanhua@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China)

    2016-05-13

    Drug resistance limits leukemia treatment and chaetominine, a cytotoxic alkaloid that promotes apoptosis in a K562 human leukemia cell line via the mitochondrial pathway was studied with respect to chemoresistance in a K562/Adr human resistant leukemia cell line. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that K562/Adr resistance to adriamycin (ADR) did not occur in the presence of chaetominine and that chaetominine increased chemosensitivity of K562/Adr to ADR. Data show that chaetominine enhanced ADR-induced apoptosis and intracellular ADR accumulation in K562/Adr cells. Accordingly, chaetominine induced apoptosis by upregulating ROS, pro-apoptotic Bax and downregulating anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. RT-PCR and western-blot confirmed that chaetominine suppressed highly expressed MRP1 at mRNA and protein levels. But little obvious alternation of another drug transporter MDR1 mRNA was observed. Furthermore, inhibition of MRP1 by chaetominine relied on inhibiting Akt phosphorylation and nuclear Nrf2. In summary, chaetominine strongly reverses drug resistance by interfering with the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling, resulting in reduction of MRP1-mediated drug efflux and induction of Bax/Bcl-2-dependent apoptosis in an ADR-resistant K562/Adr leukemia cell line. - Highlights: • Chaetominine enhanced chemosensitivity of ADR against K562/Adr cells. • Chaetominine increased intracellular ADR levels via inhibiting MRP1. • Chaetominine induced apoptosis of K562/Adr cells through upregulation of ROS and modulation of Bax/Bcl-2. • Inhibition of MRP1 and Nrf2 by chaetominine treatment was correlative with blockade of PI3K/Akt signaling.

  11. The critical role of RNA processing and degradation in the control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraiano, Cecília M; Andrade, José M; Domingues, Susana; Guinote, Inês B; Malecki, Michal; Matos, Rute G; Moreira, Ricardo N; Pobre, Vânia; Reis, Filipa P; Saramago, Margarida; Silva, Inês J; Viegas, Sandra C

    2010-09-01

    The continuous degradation and synthesis of prokaryotic mRNAs not only give rise to the metabolic changes that are required as cells grow and divide but also rapid adaptation to new environmental conditions. In bacteria, RNAs can be degraded by mechanisms that act independently, but in parallel, and that target different sites with different efficiencies. The accessibility of sites for degradation depends on several factors, including RNA higher-order structure, protection by translating ribosomes and polyadenylation status. Furthermore, RNA degradation mechanisms have shown to be determinant for the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. RNases mediate the processing, decay and quality control of RNA. RNases can be divided into endonucleases that cleave the RNA internally or exonucleases that cleave the RNA from one of the extremities. Just in Escherichia coli there are >20 different RNases. RNase E is a single-strand-specific endonuclease critical for mRNA decay in E. coli. The enzyme interacts with the exonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), enolase and RNA helicase B (RhlB) to form the degradosome. However, in Bacillus subtilis, this enzyme is absent, but it has other main endonucleases such as RNase J1 and RNase III. RNase III cleaves double-stranded RNA and family members are involved in RNA interference in eukaryotes. RNase II family members are ubiquitous exonucleases, and in eukaryotes, they can act as the catalytic subunit of the exosome. RNases act in different pathways to execute the maturation of rRNAs and tRNAs, and intervene in the decay of many different mRNAs and small noncoding RNAs. In general, RNases act as a global regulatory network extremely important for the regulation of RNA levels.

  12. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  13. MECHANISMS OF MRP OVER-EXPRESSION IN 4 HUMAN LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINES AND ANALYSIS OF THE MRP AMPLICON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EIJDEMS, EWHM; DEHAAS, M; COCOMARTIN, JM; OTTENHEIM, CPE; ZAMAN, GJR; DAUWERSE, HG; BREUNING, MH; TWENTYMAN, PR; BORST, P; BAAS, F

    1995-01-01

    Some multidrug resistant cell lines over-express the gene encoding the multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP). In all cell lines reported thus far, over-expression is associated with gene amplification. We have studied the predominant mechanisms of MRP over-expression in 4 human lung-cancer c

  14. The effects of clobazam treatment in rats on the expression of genes and proteins encoding glucronosyltransferase 1A/2B (UGT1A/2B) and multidrug resistance‐associated protein-2 (MRP2), and development of thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaki, Izuru, E-mail: izuru-miyawaki@ds-pharma.co.jp; Tamura, Akitoshi; Matsumoto, Izumi; Inada, Hiroshi; Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2012-12-15

    Clobazam (CLB) is known to increase hepatobiliary thyroxine (T4) clearance in Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, which results in hypothyroidism followed by thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy. However, the mechanism of the acceleration of T4-clearance has not been fully investigated. In the present study, we tried to clarify the roles of hepatic UDP-glucronosyltransferase (UGT) isoenzymes (UGT1A and UGT2B) and efflux transporter (multidrug resistance–associated protein-2; MRP2) in the CLB-induced acceleration of T4-clearance using two mutant rat strains, UGT1A-deficient mutant (Gunn) and MRP2-deficient mutant (EHBR) rats, especially focusing on thyroid morphology, levels of circulating hormones (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3)) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and mRNA or protein expressions of UGTs (Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, and Ugt2b1/2) and MRP2 (Mrp). CLB induced thyroid morphological changes with increases in TSH in SD and Gunn rats, but not in EHBR rats. T4 was slightly decreased in SD and Gunn rats, and T3 was decreased in Gunn rats, whereas these hormones were maintained in EHBR rats. Hepatic Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt2b1/2, and Mrp2 mRNAs were upregulated in SD rats. In Gunn rats, UGT1A mRNAs (Ugt1a1/6) and protein levels were quite low, but UGT2B mRNAs (Ugt2b1/2) and protein were prominently upregulated. In SD and Gunn rats, MRP2 mRNA and protein were upregulated to the same degree. These results suggest that MRP2 is an important contributor in development of the thyroid cellular hypertrophy in CLB-treated rats, and that UGT1A and UGT2B work in concert with MRP2 in the presence of MRP2 function to enable the effective elimination of thyroid hormones. -- Highlights: ► Role of UGT and MRP2 in thyroid pathology was investigated in clobazam-treated rats. ► Clobazam induced thyroid cellular hypertrophy in SD and Gunn rats, but not EHBR rats. ► Hepatic Mrp2 gene and protein were upregulated in SD and Gunn rats, but not EHBR rats. ► Neither serum thyroid hormones (T3/T4

  15. Evasion of antiviral innate immunity by Theiler's virus L* protein through direct inhibition of RNase L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sorgeloos

    Full Text Available Theiler's virus is a neurotropic picornavirus responsible for chronic infections of the central nervous system. The establishment of a persistent infection and the subsequent demyelinating disease triggered by the virus depend on the expression of L*, a viral accessory protein encoded by an alternative open reading frame of the virus. We discovered that L* potently inhibits the interferon-inducible OAS/RNase L pathway. The antagonism of RNase L by L* was particularly prominent in macrophages where baseline oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS and RNase L expression levels are elevated, but was detectable in fibroblasts after IFN pretreatment. L* mutations significantly affected Theiler's virus replication in primary macrophages derived from wild-type but not from RNase L-deficient mice. L* counteracted the OAS/RNase L pathway through direct interaction with the ankyrin domain of RNase L, resulting in the inhibition of this enzyme. Interestingly, RNase L inhibition was species-specific as Theiler's virus L* protein blocked murine RNase L but not human RNase L or RNase L of other mammals or birds. Direct RNase L inhibition by L* and species specificity were confirmed in an in vitro assay performed with purified proteins. These results demonstrate a novel viral mechanism to elude the antiviral OAS/RNase L pathway. By targeting the effector enzyme of this antiviral pathway, L* potently inhibits RNase L, underscoring the importance of this enzyme in innate immunity against Theiler's virus.

  16. RNase E affects the expression of the acyl-homoserine lactone synthase gene sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Charoenpanich, Pornsri; McIntosh, Matthew; Schikora, Adam; Stein, Elke; Thalmann, Sebastian; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Klug, Gabriele; Becker, Anke; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing of Sinorhizobium meliloti relies on N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as autoinducers. AHL production increases at high population density, and this depends on the AHL synthase SinI and two transcriptional regulators, SinR and ExpR. Our study demonstrates that ectopic expression of the gene rne, coding for RNase E, an endoribonuclease that is probably essential for growth, prevents the accumulation of AHLs at detectable levels. The ectopic rne expression led to a higher level of rne mRNA and a lower level of sinI mRNA independently of the presence of ExpR, the AHL receptor, and AHLs. In line with this, IPTG (isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside)-induced overexpression of rne resulted in a shorter half-life of sinI mRNA and a strong reduction of AHL accumulation. Moreover, using translational sinI-egfp fusions, we found that sinI expression is specifically decreased upon induced overexpression of rne, independently of the presence of the global posttranscriptional regulator Hfq. The 28-nucleotide 5' untranslated region (UTR) of sinI mRNA was sufficient for this effect. Random amplification of 5' cDNA ends (5'-RACE) analyses revealed a potential RNase E cleavage site at position +24 between the Shine-Dalgarno site and the translation start site. We postulate therefore that RNase E-dependent degradation of sinI mRNA from the 5' end is one of the steps mediating a high turnover of sinI mRNA, which allows the Sin quorum-sensing system to respond rapidly to changes in transcriptional control of AHL production.

  17. Affinity chromatography with an immobilized RNA enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Vioque, A; Altman, S

    1986-01-01

    M1 RNA, the catalytic subunit of Escherichia coli RNase P, has been covalently linked at its 3' terminus to agarose beads. Unlike M1 RNA, which is active in solution in the absence of the protein component (C5) of RNase P, the RNA linked to the beads is active only in the presence of C5 protein. Affinity chromatography of crude extracts of E. coli on a column prepared from the beads to which the RNA has been crosslinked results in the purification of C5 protein in a single step. The protein h...

  18. Overexpression and rapid purification of the orfE/rph gene product, RNase PH of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Frank; Andersen, J T; Poulsen, Peter

    1992-01-01

    acid residue protein which was recently identified as the phosphorolytic ribonuclease, RNase PH, that removes nucleotides from the 3' ends of tRNA precursors. In this paper we report the construction of a plasmid, which overexpresses the orfE and pyrE gene products substantially, as well...... as the purification of the OrfE protein by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography on phosphocellulose. The highly purified protein catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of poly(A) at a rate of 1.6 mumol/min/mg and the formation of CDP from tRNA-CCA-Cn and orthophosphate at a rate equal to 0.14 mumol...

  19. Self-incompatibility RNases from three plant families: homology or convergence?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richman, AD; Broothaerts, W; Kohn, JR

    1997-01-01

    ...) we reconstructed the genealogy of angiosperm RNases using the neighbor joining method and two distance metrics in order to assess whether use of S-RNases in these families is the result of homology or convergence...

  20. Biochemical Models for S-Rnase-Based Self-Incompatibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hua Hua; Allison Fields; Teh-hui Kao

    2008-01-01

    S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetically determined self/non-self-recognition process employed by many flowering plant species to prevent inbreeding and promote outcrosses.For the Plantaginaceae,Rosa-ceae and Solanaceae,it is now known that S-RNase and S-Iocu F-box(two multiple allelic genes at the S-locus)determine the female and male specificity,respectively,during SI interactions.However,how allelic products of these two genes interact inside pollen tubes to result in specific growth inhibition of self-pollen tubes remains to be investigated.Here,we review all the previously proposed biochemical models and discuss whether their predictions are consistent with all SI phenomena,including competitive jnteraction where SI breaks down in pollen that carries two different pollen 5-alleles.We also discuss these models in Iight of the recent findings of compartmentalization of S-RNases in both incompatible and compatible pollen tubes.Lastly,we summarize the results from our recent biochemical studies of PiSLF(Petunia inflata SLF)and S-RNase.and present a new model for the biochemical mechanism of SI in the Solanaceae.The tenet of this model is that a PiSLF preferentially interacts with its non-self S-RNases in the cytoplasm of a pollen tube to result in the assembly of an E3-like complex,which then mediates ubiquitination and degradation of non-self S-RNases through the ubiquitin-26S proteasome pathway.This model can explain all SI phenomena and,at the same time,has raised new questions for further study.

  1. It takes two to flirt with a dimeric RNase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    In my long RNase-life-time I have had the fortune to entertain with Lelio Mazzarella what I have called special interactions, which not only advanced my knowledge of proteins but also gave pleasure, as one obtains by reading a beautiful book, an inspiring poem, or watching a very good movie. In this article, I recall the more than 30-year long story of these interactions in which "it took two," a structural biologist with his coworkers and a biochemist with his coworkers, to flirt with an unusual, dimeric RNase.

  2. RNase P-Associated External Guide Sequence Effectively Reduces the Expression of Human CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 and Inhibits the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available External guide sequences (EGSs represent a new class of RNA-based gene-targeting agents, consist of a sequence complementary to a target mRNA, and render the target RNA susceptible to degradation by ribonuclease P (RNase P. In this study, EGSs were constructed to target the mRNA encoding human CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5, one of the primary coreceptors for HIV. An EGS RNA, C1, efficiently directed human RNase P to cleave the CCR5 mRNA sequence in vitro. A reduction of about 70% in the expression level of both CCR5 mRNA and protein and an inhibition of more than 50-fold in HIV (R5 strain Ba-L p24 production were observed in cells that expressed C1. In comparison, a reduction of about 10% in the expression of CCR5 and viral growth was found in cells that either did not express the EGS or produced a “disabled” EGS which carried nucleotide mutations that precluded RNase P recognition. Furthermore, the same C1-expressing cells that were protected from R5 strain Ba-L retained susceptibility to X4 strain IIIB, which uses CXCR4 as the coreceptor instead of CCR5, suggesting that the RNase P-mediated cleavage induced by the EGS is specific for the target CCR5 but not the closely related CXCR4. Our results provide direct evidence that EGS RNAs against CCR5 are effective and specific in blocking HIV infection and growth. These results also demonstrate the feasibility to develop highly effective EGSs for anti-HIV therapy.

  3. ABCC4/MRP4: a MYCN-regulated transporter and potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony eHuynh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to cytotoxic drugs is thought to be a major cause of treatment failure in childhood neuroblastoma, and members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter superfamily may contribute to this phenomenon by active efflux of chemotherapeutic agents from cancer cells. As a member of the C subfamily of ABC transporters, multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP4/ABCC4 has the ability to export a variety of endogenous and exogenous substances across the plasma membrane. In light of its capacity for chemotherapeutic drug efflux, MRP4 has been studied in the context of drug resistance in a number of cancer cell types. However, MRP4 also influences cancer cell biology independently of chemotherapeutic drug exposure, which highlights the potential importance of endogenous MRP4 substrates in cancer biology. Furthermore, MRP4 is a direct transcriptional target of Myc family oncoproteins and expression of this transporter is a powerful independent predictor of clinical outcome in neuroblastoma. Together these features suggest that inhibition of MRP4 may be an attractive therapeutic approach for neuroblastoma and other cancers that rely on MRP4. In this respect, existing options for MRP4 inhibition are relatively non-selective and thus development of more specific anti-MRP4 compounds should be a major focus of future work in this area.

  4. Structure and function of the C-terminal domain of MrpA in the Bacillus subtilis Mrp-antiporter complex--the evolutionary progenitor of the long horizontal helix in complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virzintiene, Egle; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Al-Eryani, Yusra; Shumbe, Leonard; Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia

    2013-10-11

    MrpA and MrpD are homologous to NuoL, NuoM and NuoN in complex I over the first 14 transmembrane helices. In this work, the C-terminal domain of MrpA, outside this conserved area, was investigated. The transmembrane orientation was found to correspond to that of NuoJ in complex I. We have previously demonstrated that the subunit NuoK is homologous to MrpC. The function of the MrpA C-terminus was tested by expression in a previously used Bacillus subtilis model system. At neutral pH, the truncated MrpA still worked, but at pH 8.4, where Mrp-complex formation is needed for function, the C-terminal domain of MrpA was absolutely required.

  5. Diagnostic evaluation of the MRP-8/14 for the emergency assessment of chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Amit N; Bonaca, Marc P; Ruff, Christian T; Jarolim, Petr; Murphy, Sabina; Croce, Kevin; Sabatine, Marc S; Simon, Daniel I; Morrow, David A

    2012-08-01

    Elevated levels of myeloid-related protein (MRP)-8/14 (S100A8/A9) are associated with first cardiovascular events in healthy individuals and worse prognosis in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The diagnostic utility of MRP-8/14 in patients presenting to the emergency room with symptoms concerning for ACS is uncertain. MRP-8/14 was measured in serial serum and plasma samples in a single center prospective cohort-study of patients presenting to the emergency room with non-traumatic chest pain concerning for ACS. Final diagnosis was adjudicated by an endpoint committee. Of patients with baseline MRP-8/14 results (n = 411), the median concentration in serum was 1.57 μg/ml (25th, 75th: 0.87, 2.68) and in plasma was 0.41 μg/ml (MRP-8/14 was higher in patients presenting with MI (p MRP-8/14 was poor: sensitivity 28% (95% CI 20-38), specificity 82% (78-86), positive predictive value 36% (26-47), and negative predictive value 77% (72-81). The area under the ROC curve for diagnosis of MI with MRP-8/14 was 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.60) compared with 0.95 for cTnI. The diagnostic performance was not improved in early-presenters, patients with negative initial cTnI, or using later MRP-8/14 samples. Patients presenting with MI had elevated levels of serum MRP-8/14 compared to patients with non-cardiac chest pain. However, overall diagnostic performance of MRP-8/14 was poor and neither plasma nor serum MRP-8/14 offered diagnostic utility comparable to cardiac troponin.

  6. Small interfering RNA delivery by polyethylenimine-functionalised porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh Kafshgari, M; Alnakhli, M; Delalat, B; Apostolou, S; Harding, F J; Mäkilä, E; Salonen, J J; Kuss, B J; Voelcker, N H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon nanoparticles (THCpSiNPs) capped with polyethylenimine (PEI) were fabricated, and their potential for small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery was investigated in an in vitro glioblastoma model. PEI coating following siRNA loading enhanced the sustained release of siRNA, and suppressed burst release effects. The positively-charged surface improved the internalisation of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. THCpSiNP-mediated siRNA delivery reduced mRNA expression of the MRP1 gene, linked to the resistence of glioblastoma to chemotherapy, by 63% and reduced MRP1-protein levels by 70%. MRP1 siRNA loaded nanoparticles did not induce cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells, but markedly reduced cell proliferation. In summary, the results demonstrated that non-cytotoxic cationic THCpSiNPs are promising vehicles for therapeutic siRNA delivery.

  7. 简述MRP II,JIT,TQM实施过程中的相互关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明

    2009-01-01

    本文主要讨论JIT,MRP II和TQM之间的关系,包括JIT和TQM如何提高MRP II的效率;JIT和消除损耗的思想对于MRP II的影响以及客户是如何关注TQM并且提高流程管理是如何影响MRP II等内容。

  8. Seed-specific silencing of OsMRP5 reduces seed phytic acid and weight in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Xu; Zhao, Hai-Jun; Pang, Wei-Qin; Cui, Hai-Rui; Poirier, Yves; Shu, Qing-Yao

    2014-08-01

    Phytic acid (PA) is poorly digested by humans and monogastric animals and negatively affects human/animal nutrition and the environment. Rice mutants with reduced PA content have been developed but are often associated with reduced seed weight and viability, lacking breeding value. In the present study, a new approach was explored to reduce seed PA while attaining competitive yield. The OsMRP5 gene, of which mutations are known to reduce seed PA as well as seed yield and viability, was down-regulated specifically in rice seeds by using an artificial microRNA driven by the rice seed specific promoter Ole18. Seed PA contents were reduced by 35.8-71.9% in brown rice grains of transgenic plants compared to their respective null plants (non-transgenic plants derived from the same event). No consistent significant differences of plant height or number of tillers per plant were observed, but significantly lower seed weights (up to 17.8% reduction) were detected in all transgenic lines compared to null plants, accompanied by reductions of seed germination and seedling emergence. It was observed that the silencing of the OsMRP5 gene increased the inorganic P (Pi) levels (up to 7.5 times) in amounts more than the reduction of PA-P in brown rice. This indicates a reduction in P content in other cellular compounds, such as lipids and nucleic acids, which may affect overall seed development. Put together, the present study demonstrated that seed specific silencing of OsMRP5 could significantly reduce the PA content and increase Pi levels in seeds; however, it also significantly lowers seed weight in rice. Discussions were made regarding future directions towards producing agronomically competitive and nutritionally valuable low PA rice.

  9. Multi-Role Project (MRP): A New Project-Based Learning Method for STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warin, Bruno; Talbi, Omar; Kolski, Christophe; Hoogstoel, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the "Multi-Role Project" method (MRP), a broadly applicable project-based learning method, and describes its implementation and evaluation in the context of a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) course. The MRP method is designed around a meta-principle that considers the project learning activity…

  10. PD173074, a selective FGFR inhibitor, reverses MRP7 (ABCC10-mediated MDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju Anreddy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10 is a recently identified member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter family, which adequately confers resistance to a diverse group of antineoplastic agents, including taxanes, vinca alkaloids and nucleoside analogs among others. Clinical studies indicate an increased MRP7 expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC compared to a normal healthy lung tissue. Recent studies revealed increased paclitaxel sensitivity in the Mrp7−/− mouse model compared to their wild-type counterparts. This demonstrates that MRP7 is a key contributor in developing drug resistance. Recently our group reported that PD173074, a specific fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR inhibitor, could significantly reverse P-glycoprotein-mediated MDR. However, whether PD173074 can interact with and inhibit other MRP members is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the ability of PD173074 to reverse MRP7-mediated MDR. We found that PD173074, at non-toxic concentration, could significantly increase the cellular sensitivity to MRP7 substrates. Mechanistic studies indicated that PD173074 (1 μmol/L significantly increased the intracellular accumulation and in-turn decreased the efflux of paclitaxel by inhibiting the transport activity without altering expression levels of the MRP7 protein, thereby representing a promising therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of chemoresistant cancer patients.

  11. The Mrp system: a giant among monovalent cation/proton antiporters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Talia H; Ikewada, Sayuri; Ishikawa, Osamu; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2005-10-01

    Mrp systems are a novel and broadly distributed type of monovalent cation/proton antiporter of bacteria and archaea. Monovalent cation/proton antiporters are membrane transport proteins that catalyze efflux of cytoplasmic sodium, potassium or lithium ions in exchange for external hydrogen ions (protons). Other known monovalent cation antiporters are single gene products, whereas Mrp systems have been proposed to function as hetero-oligomers. A mrp operon typically has six or seven genes encoding hydrophobic proteins all of which are required for optimal Mrp-dependent sodium-resistance. There is little sequence similarity of Mrp proteins to other antiporters but three of these proteins have significant sequence similarity to membrane embedded subunits of ion-translocating electron transport complexes. Mrp antiporters have essential roles in the physiology of alkaliphilic and neutralophilic Bacillus species, nitrogen-fixing Sinorhizobium meliloti and in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, although these bacteria contain multiple monovalent cation/proton antiporters. The wide distribution of Mrp systems leads to the anticipation of important roles in an even wider variety of pathogens, extremophiles and environmentally important organisms. Here, the distribution, established physiological roles and catalytic activities of Mrp systems are reviewed, hypotheses regarding their complexity are discussed and major open questions about their function are highlighted.

  12. MRP transporters as membrane machinery in the bradykinin-inducible export of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sun, Jing; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays the role of an autocrine/paracrine signal molecule in a variety of cells. So far, however, the membrane machinery in the export of intracellular ATP remains poorly understood. Activation of B2-receptor with bradykinin-induced massive release of ATP from cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. The evoked release of ATP was unaffected by gap junction hemichannel blockers, such as 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and Gap 26. Furthermore, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) coupled Cl(-) channel blockers, CFTR(inh)172, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, Gd3(+) and glibenclamide, failed to suppress the export of ATP by bradykinin. On the other, the evoked release of ATP was greatly reduced by multidrug resistance protein (MRP) transporter inhibitors, MK-571, indomethacin, and benzbromarone. From western blotting analysis, blots of MRP 1 protein only, but not MRP 2 and MRP 3 protein, appeared at 190 kD. However, the MRP 1 protein expression was not enhanced after loading with 1 muM bradykinin for 5 min. Likewise, niflumic acid and fulfenamic acid, Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel blockers, largely abated the evoked release of ATP. The possibility that the MRP transporter system couples with Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel activities is discussed here. These findings suggest that MRP transporters, probably MRP 1, unlike CFTR-Cl(-) channels and gap junction hemichannels, may contribute as membrane machinery to the export of ATP induced by G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation.

  13. Role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) in glutathione S-conjugate transport in mammalian cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M; deVries, EGE; Jansen, PLM

    1996-01-01

    The human multidrug resistance protein (MRP), a 190-kDa member of the ABC-protein superfamily, is an ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier (GS-X pump) and is present in membranes of many, if not all, cells, Overexpression of MRP in tumor cells contributes to resistance to natural product dru

  14. Target organ specific activity of drosophila MRP (ABCC1) moderates developmental toxicity of methylmercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Lisa; Korbas, Malgorzata; Davidson, Philip; Broberg, Karin; Rand, Matthew Dearborn

    2014-08-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous and persistent neurotoxin that poses a risk to human health. Although the mechanisms of MeHg toxicity are not fully understood, factors that contribute to susceptibility are even less well known. Studies of human gene polymorphisms have identified a potential role for the multidrug resistance-like protein (MRP/ABCC) family, ATP-dependent transporters, in MeHg susceptibility. MRP transporters have been shown to be important for MeHg excretion in adult mouse models, but their role in moderating MeHg toxicity during development has not been explored. We therefore investigated effects of manipulating expression levels of MRP using a Drosophila development assay. Drosophila MRP (dMRP) is homologous to human MRP1-4 (ABCC1-4), sharing 50% identity and 67% similarity with MRP1. A greater susceptibility to MeHg is seen in dMRP mutant flies, demonstrated by reduced rates of eclosion on MeHg-containing food. Furthermore, targeted knockdown of dMRP expression using GAL4>UAS RNAi methods demonstrates a tissue-specific function for dMRP in gut, Malpighian tubules, and the nervous system in moderating developmental susceptibility to MeHg. Using X-ray synchrotron fluorescence imaging, these same tissues were also identified as the highest Hg-accumulating tissues in fly larvae. Moreover, higher levels of Hg are seen in dMRP mutant larvae compared with a control strain fed an equivalent dose of MeHg. In sum, these data demonstrate that dMRP expression, both globally and within Hg-targeted organs, has a profound effect on susceptibility to MeHg in developing flies. Our findings point to a potentially novel and specific role for dMRP in neurons in the protection against MeHg. Finally, this experimental system provides a tractable model to evaluate human polymorphic variants of MRP and other gene variants relevant to genetic studies of mercury-exposed populations.

  15. EFFECTS OF NEOADJUVANT CHEMOTHERAPY ON MDR1 AND MRP GENE EXPRESSION IN PRIMARY BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杏娥; 孙晓东; 吴金民

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the expression of drug resistance genes,multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), in patients with primary breast cancer. Methods: MDR1 and MRP expression were detected by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in 20 patients with primary breast cancer, before and after chemotherapy.Results: Before chemotherapy, MDR1 and MRP expression can be detected in 15 cases (75%) and 18 cases (90%)respectively. After chemotherapy, expression of MDR1 is not significantly different from that before chemotherapy, but expression of MRP is significantly different from that before chemotherapy. Conclusion: Expression of drug resistance gene MRP, but not MDR1, is enhanced in patients with primary breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  16. Sequence Classification: 889478 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t of both RNase MRP, which cleaves pre-rRNA, and nuclear RNase P, which cleaves tRNA precursors to generate mature 5' ends; Pop7p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319644 ...

  17. Sequence Classification: 892908 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t of both RNase MRP, which cleaves pre-rRNA, and nuclear RNase P, which cleaves tRNA precursors to generate mature 5' ends; Pop3p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6324047 ...

  18. Sequence Classification: 890800 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB TMB >gi|6321853|ref|NP_011929.1| Subunit of both RNase MRP, which cleaves... pre-rRNA, and nuclear RNase P, which cleaves tRNA precursors to generate mature 5' ends; Rpp1p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6321853 ...

  19. Increase of calcium levels in epithelial cells induces translocation of calcium-binding proteins migration inhibitory factor-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14 to keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebeler, M; Roth, J; van den Bos, C; Ader, G; Sorg, C

    1995-07-15

    Migration inhibitory factor-related protein 8 (MRP8) and MRP14, two S-100-like Ca(2+)-binding proteins, have been described in cells of the epithelial lineage where they are either expressed constitutively (e.g. by mucosal squamous epithelium) or induced during disease (e.g. in keratinocytes during the course of psoriasis). Their biological function, however, is not yet clear. Recent studies have provided evidence that S-100-like proteins may interact with cytoskeletal components; we have therefore studied the biochemical properties and subcellular distribution of MRP8 and MRP14 in epithelial cells. TR146 human squamous carcinoma cells, which were found to express MRP8 and MRP14 in Northern and Western blot studies, were chosen for analysis. Cross-linking experiments using bis(sulphosuccinimidyl)suberate followed by SDS/PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed formation of heteromeric MRP8-MRP14 complexes. On subjecting TR146 cell lysates to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, four distinct MRP14 isoforms could be identified resembling those described earlier in macrophages. A differential centrifugation technique revealed a Ca(2+)-dependent translocation of MRP8-MRP14 from the cytoplasm to the membrane and the Nonidet P40-insoluble cytoskeletal fraction. Double-label immunofluorescence microscopy of Ca2+ ionophore A23187-stimulated TR146 cells and cytochalasin B and demecolcine cytoskeleton disruption studies identified these structures as keratin intermediate filaments. Ca(2+)-dependent binding of MRP8-MRP14 to keratin filaments was additionally confirmed by an in vitro binding assay. In conclusion, our data suggest that MRP8 and MRP14 may be involved in Ca(2+)-dependent reorganization of cytoskeletal filaments in epithelial cells, which could be of importance for events associated with differentiation and inflammatory activation.

  20. The relationship between MRP1 activities and its NBD conformational changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    MIANS,a sulfhydryl-reactive fluorescence,was used to label the cysteines of MRP1(multidrug resistance protein),and the results indicated that an increase in fluorescence intensity and a large emission blue shift took place after two Cys residues of MRP1 reacted with MIANS,which demonstrated that labeled Cys residues in MRP1 reside in a relatively hydrophobic environment.The experimental results obtained from fluorescence resonance energy transfer further uncover that two Cys residues of MRP1 modified by MIANS located in the vicinity of its NBDs,of which one lies close to NBD1,and the other near NBD2.ATP,ADP and anticancer drugs can all reduce the rate of reaction of MRP1 with MIANS.The collisional quenchers,acrylamide,I-,and Cs+ were used to assess local environments of MIANS bound to MRP1 and the results showed that the region around the MIANS-labeled cysteine is positively charged.Both MIANS and NEM,which are sulfhydryl-reactive reagents,inhibited MRP1 ATPase activity,whereas anticancer drugs activated it.These results demonstrated that all nucleotides and drugs could induce changes in conformation of the NBDs in MRP1.Nucleotides can bind directly to NBDs,but drugs may react first with TMDs,which in turn alters the accessibility of the two Cys residues bound by MIANS and affects MRP1 ATPase activity,which is coupled with the transport of its substrates.Taken together,the above experimental results provide direct evidence for further study on the coupling of translocation of the transported species to hydrolysis of ATP in MRP1.

  1. Molecular evidence and functional expression of multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) in rabbit corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karla, Pradeep K; Pal, Dananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2007-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is a major family of efflux transporters involved in drug efflux leading to drug resistance. The objective of this study was to explore physical barriers for ocular drug absorption and to verify if the role of efflux transporters. MRP-2 is a major homologue of MRP family and found to express on the apical side of cell membrane. Cultured Rabbit Corneal Epithelial Cells (rCEC) were selected as an in vitro model for corneal epithelium. [14C]-erythromycin which is a proven substrate for MRP-2 was selected as a model drug for functional expression studies. MK-571, a known specific and potent inhibitor for MRP-2 was added to inhibit MRP mediated efflux. Membrane fraction of rCEC was used for western blot analysis. Polarized transport of [14C]-erythromycin was observed in rCEC and transport from B-->A was significantly high than from A-->B. Permeability's increased significantly from A-->B in the presence of MK-571 and ketoconozole. Uptake of [14C]-erythromycin in the presence of MK-571 was significantly higher than control in rCEC. RT-PCR analysis indicated a unique and distinct band at approximately 498 bp corresponding to MRP-2 in rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western Blot analysis indicated a specific band at approximately 190 kDa in membrane fraction of rCEC and MDCK11-MRP-2 cells. For the first time we have demonstrated high expression of MRP-2 in rabbit corneal epithelium and its functional activity causing drug efflux. RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis further confirms the result.

  2. Inhibition of expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pestis in Escherichia coli by external guide sequences and RNase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-hyeong; Izadjoo, Mina; Altman, Sidney

    2008-08-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) targeting virulence genes from Yersinia pestis were designed and tested in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. Linear EGSs and M1 RNA-linked EGSs were designed for the yscN and yscS genes that are involved in type III secretion in Y. pestis. RNase P from E. coli cleaves the messages of yscN and yscS in vitro with the cognate EGSs, and the expression of the EGSs resulted in the reduction of the levels of these messages of the virulence genes when those genes were expressed in E. coli.

  3. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  4. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  5. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  6. Probing the structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA from Bacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kop, J; Kopylov, A M; Magrum, L; Siegel, R; Gupta, R; Woese, C R; Noller, H F

    1984-12-25

    A majority (approximately 89%) of the nucleotide sequence of Bacillus brevis 16 S rRNA has been determined by a combination of RNA sequencing methods. Several experimental approaches have been used to probe its structure, including (a) partial RNase digestion of 30 S ribosomal subunits, followed by two-dimensional native/denatured gel electrophoresis, in which base-paired fragments were directly identified; (b) identification of positions susceptible to cleavage by RNase A and RNase T1 in 30 S subunits; (c) sites of attack by cobra venom RNase on naked 16 S rRNA; and (d) nucleotides susceptible to attack by bisulfite in 16 S rRNA. These data are discussed with respect to a secondary structure model for B. brevis 16 S rRNA derived by comparative sequence analysis.

  7. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence.

  8. Decreased LRIG1 in Human Ovarian Cancer Cell SKOV3 Upregulates MRP-1 and Contributes to the Chemoresistance of VP16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Yao, Jun; Yin, Jiangpin; Wei, Xuan

    2016-05-01

    The leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) are used as tumor suppressors in clinical applications. Although the LRIG has been identified to manipulate the cell proliferation via various oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases in diverse cancers, its role in multidrug resistance needs to be further elucidated, especially in human ovarian cancer. We herein established that the etoposide (VP16)-resistant SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cell clones (SKOV3/VP16 cells) and mRNA expression of LRIG1 were significantly reduced by the treatment of VP16 in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, downregulated LRIG1 in SKOV3 could enhance the colony formation and resist the inhibition of proliferation by VP16, leading to the elevated expression of Bcl-2 and decreased apoptosis of SKOV3. Interestingly, our results uncovered that the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) was upregulated for the chemoresistance of VP16. To overcome the chemoresistance of SKOV3, SKOV3/VP16 was ectopically expressed of LRIG1. We found that the inhibition of VP16 on colony formation and proliferation was remarkably enhanced with increased apoptosis in SKOV3/VP16. Furthermore, the expression of MRP-1 and Bcl-2 was also inhibited, suggesting that the LRIG1could negatively control MRP-1 and the apoptosis to improve the sensitivity of VP16-related chemotherapy.

  9. Perfluorooctane sulfonate increased hepatic expression of OAPT2 and MRP2 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Guang; Liu, Wei; Liu, Li; Jin, Yi-He

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a persistent organic compound, is of great concern. Several studies have reported that PFOS decreases circulating thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations. However, the mechanisms involved remain to be determined. Female rats were exposed to (1) vehicle; (2) PFOS (0.2, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg); (3) propylthiouracil (PTU, 10 mg/kg); or (4) PTU (10 mg/kg) + PFOS (3.0 mg/kg) by gavage once a day for 5 consecutive days. Parameters including contents of total T4 (TT4) and total T3 (TT3) in both serum and bile, serum concentrations of transthyretin and thyroglobulin, as well as transcripts of transporters involved in hepatic uptake and efflux of T4 were determined in control and PFOS-exposed groups. TT4 and TT3 were also analyzed in PTU and PTU + PFOS groups in order to reflect the different hormone effects between PFOS, PTU, and PFOS + PTU. Results showed that serum TT4 and TT3 decreased, while bile TT4 and TT3 remained stable following PFOS exposure. Exposure to 3.0 mg/kg of PFOS significantly enhanced hepatic organic anion transporter OATP2 mRNA expression (1.43 times of control). Treatment with PFOS increased hepatic expression of multidrug resistance--associated protein MRP2, approximately 1.80 and 1.69 times of control in 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg groups, respectively. Spearman's correlation coefficients revealed that MRP2 mRNA expression correlated well with serum TT4 level (r = -0.528, P = 0.012). Serum thyroglobulin and transthyretin levels remained stable. Serum TT3, bile TT4, and bile TT3 were significantly different between PFOS and PTU groups. No significant differences of TT4 and TT3 in both serum and bile were observed between PTU and PTU + PFOS (P > 0.05). In conclusion, PFOS increased hepatic expression of OAPT2, which could possibly enhance hepatic uptake and metabolism of T4 in rats. PFOS-induced TT4 deficiency is mainly due to the extrathyroidal metabolism of T4, which is probably different from the classic goitrogen

  10. Combining recombinant ribonuclease U2 and protein phosphatase for RNA modification mapping by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Whitney M; Butterer, Annika; Addepalli, Balasubrahmanym; Limbach, Patrick A

    2015-06-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) mapping of modified nucleosides onto RNA sequences is limited by RNase availability. A codon-optimized gene for RNase U2, a purine selective RNase with preference for adenosine, has been designed for overexpression using Escherichia coli as the host. Optimal expression conditions were identified enabling generation of milligram-scale quantities of active RNase U2. RNase U2 digestion products were found to terminate in both 2',3'-cyclic phosphates and 3'-linear phosphates. To generate a homogeneous 3'-linear phosphate set of products, an enzymatic approach was investigated. Bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase was identified as the optimal enzyme for hydrolyzing cyclic phosphates from RNase U2 products. The compatibility of this enzymatic approach with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) RNA modification mapping was then demonstrated. RNase U2 digestion followed by subsequent phosphatase treatment generated nearly 100% 3'-phosphate-containing products that could be characterized by LC-MS/MS. In addition, bacteriophage lambda protein phosphatase can be used to introduce (18)O labels within the 3'-phosphate of digestion products when incubated in the presence of H2(18)O, allowing prior isotope labeling methods for mass spectrometry to include digestion products from RNase U2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. miR-148a-mediated estrogen-induced cholestasis in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy: Role of PXR/MRP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhou-Zhou; Zhang, Xiao-Wen; Ding, Yi-Ling; Yang, Meng-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is an idiopathic liver disease while the biochemical characteristic is the elevated level of total bile acid (TBA). The present study investigated whether miR-148a mediates the induced effect of estrogen on the development of ICP and the proper mechanism: PXR/MRP3 signal pathway. mRNA expression was detected by qPCR, protein expression was detected by western blotting, the concentration of estrogen and TBA were detected by reagent kit respectively. In the cinical research, it was found that miR-148a expression was positive related with the concentration of TBA in the serum of ICP patients. In in vitro research, estradiol (500 nmol/L, 12 h) significantly upregulated miR-148a expression and LV-148a-siRNA inhibited the function of estradiol (500 nmol/L, 48 h) on TBA secretion. In addition, gene silence of miR-148a upregulated PXR expression which was inhibited by estradiol in LO2 cells. Pretreatment of rifampin (10 μmol/L), the agonist of PXR alleviated the TBA secretion induced by estradiol (500 nmol/L, 48 h). miR-148a-siRNA and PXR had a synergistic action on TBA secretion of LO2. Both of miR-148a-siRNA and rifampin (10 μmol/L) inhibited the upregulated effect of estradiol on MRP3 expression. This research has demonstrated that miR-148a may be involved in the induction of estrogen on ICP via PXR signal pathway, and MRP3 may be involved.

  12. Structural basis for activation of an archaeal ribonuclease P RNA by protein cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease that catalyzes the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) in all phylogenetic domains. We have found that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. Biochemical characterizations over the past 10 years have revealed that PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 fold into a heterotetramer and cooperate to activate a catalytic domain (C-domain) in PhopRNA, whereas PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 form a heterodimer and function together to activate a specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA. PhoRpp38 plays a role in elevation of the optimum temperature of RNase P activity, binding to kink-turn (K-turn) motifs in two stem-loops in PhopRNA. This review describes the structural and functional information on P. horikoshii RNase P, focusing on the structural basis for the PhopRNA activation by the five RNase P proteins.

  13. DOES THE MRP LOGIC WORK FOR FINITE CAPACITY PLANNING AND OPERATIONS SCHEDULING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K Turner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: During the past five years, MRP based systems have increasingly been criticized for their inability to reduce inventory levels, meet due dates and to plan at an operational level. This paper suggests that the actual reasons for these problems are some fundamental flaws in the MRP logic and its assumptions. The logic of the optimized Production Technology (OPT is suggested as an alternative approach that addresses the limitations of MRP based systems.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Gedurende die afgelope vyf jaar het kritiek teen MRP-gebaseerde sisteme toegeneem. Die kritiek is hoofsaaklik dat MRP-sisteme vooraadvlakke nie voldoende verminder nie; beplande datums nie haal nie en ook nie op In operasionele vlak beplan nie. Hierdie artikel wil voorstel dat die rede hiervoor fundamentele foute in die MRP logika en aannames is. Die logika van "optimized Production Technology" (OPT word as alternatief voorgestel, aangesien dit die probleemareas in die MRP-logika aanspreek.

  14. Toxicological relevance of the multidrug resistance protein 1, MRP1 (ABCC1) and related transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, E M; Deeley, R G; Cole, S P

    2001-10-05

    The 190 kDa multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) is a founding member of a subfamily of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transport proteins and was originally identified on the basis of its elevated expression in multidrug resistant lung cancer cells. In addition to its ability to confer resistance in tumour cells, MRP1 is ubiquitously expressed in normal tissues and is a primary active transporter of GSH, glucuronate and sulfate conjugated and unconjugated organic anions of toxicological relevance. Substrates include lipid peroxidation products, herbicides, tobacco specific nitrosamines, mycotoxins, heavy metals, and natural product and antifolate anti-cancer agents. MRP1 also transports unmodified xenobiotics but often requires GSH to do so. Active efflux is generally an important aspect of cellular detoxification since it prevents the accumulation of conjugated and unconjugated compounds that have the potential to be directly toxic. The related transporters MRP2 and MRP3 have overlapping substrate specificities with MRP1 but different tissue distributions, and evidence that they also have chemoprotective functions are discussed. Finally, MRP homologues have been described in other species including yeast and nematodes. Those isolated from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtMRPs) decrease the cytoplasmic concentration of conjugated toxins through sequestration in vacuoles and are implicated in providing herbicide resistance to plants.

  15. Neutrophil-derived MRP-14 is up-regulated in infectious osteomyelitis and stimulates osteoclast generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Giese, Thomas; Maurer, Susanne; Stegmaier, Sabine; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, G Maria; Gaida, Matthias M

    2015-10-01

    Bone infections of patients with joint replacement by endoprosthesis (so called "periprosthetic joint infection") pose a severe problem in the field of orthopedic surgery. The diagnosis is often difficult, and treatment is, in most cases, complicated and prolonged. Patients often require an implant exchange surgery, as the persistent infection and the accompanying inflammation lead to tissue damage with bone degradation and consequently, to a loosening of the implant. To gain insight into the local inflammatory process, expression of the proinflammatory cytokine MRP-14, a major content of neutrophils, and its link to subsequent bone degradation was evaluated. We found MRP-14 prominently expressed in the affected tissue of patients with implant-associated infection, in close association with the chemokine CXCL8 and a dense infiltrate of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, the number of MRP-14-positive cells correlated with the presence of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. MRP-14 plasma concentrations were significantly higher in patients with implant-associated infection compared with patients with sterile inflammation or healthy individuals, advocating MRP-14 as a novel diagnostic marker. A further biologic activity of MRP-14 was detected: rMRP-14 directly induced the differentiation of monocytes to osteoclasts, thus linking the inflammatory response in implant infections with osteoclast generation, bone degradation, and implant loosening.

  16. Role of the Caenorhabditis elegans multidrug resistance gene, mrp-4, in gut granule differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin; King, Brian; Lawrenson, Andrea L; Schroeder, Lena K; Kershner, Aaron M; Hermann, Greg J

    2007-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans gut granules are lysosome-related organelles with birefringent contents. mrp-4, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter homologous to mammalian multidrug resistance proteins, functions in the formation of gut granule birefringence. mrp-4(-) embryos show a delayed appearance of birefringent material in the gut granule but otherwise appear to form gut granules properly. mrp-4(+) activity is required for the extracellular mislocalization of birefringent material, body-length retraction, and NaCl sensitivity, phenotypes associated with defective gut granule biogenesis exhibited by embryos lacking the activity of GLO-1/Rab38, a putative GLO-1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor GLO-4, and the AP-3 complex. Multidrug resistance protein (MRP)-4 localizes to the gut granule membrane, consistent with it playing a direct role in the transport of molecules that compose and/or facilitate the formation of birefringent crystals within the gut granule. However, MRP-4 is also present in oocytes and early embryos, and our genetic analyses indicate that its site of action in the formation of birefringent material may not be limited to just the gut granule in embryos. In a search for genes that function similarly to mrp-4(+), we identified WHT-2, another ABC transporter that acts in parallel to MRP-4 for the formation of birefringent material in the gut granule.

  17. MITA/STING and Its Alternative Splicing Isoform MRP Restrict Hepatitis B Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuhui; Zhao, Kaitao; Su, Xi; Lu, Lu; Zhao, He; Zhang, Xianwen; Wang, Yun; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Jizheng; Zhou, Yuan; Hu, Xue; Wang, Yanyi; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen; Pei, Rongjuan

    2017-01-01

    An efficient clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) requires the coordinated work of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. MITA/STING, an adapter protein of the innate immune signaling pathways, plays a key role in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses to DNA virus infection. Previously, we identified an alternatively spliced isoform of MITA/STING, called MITA-related protein (MRP), and found that MRP could specifically block MITA-mediated interferon (IFN) induction while retaining the ability to activate NF-κB. Here, we asked whether MITA/STING and MRP were able to control the HBV replication. Both MITA/STING and MRP significantly inhibited HBV replication in vitro. MITA overexpression stimulated IRF3-IFN pathway; while MRP overexpression activated NF-κB pathway, suggesting these two isoforms may inhibit HBV replication through different ways. Using a hydrodynamic injection (HI) mouse model, we found that HBV replication was reduced following MITA/STING and MRP expression vectors in mice and was enhanced by the knockout of MITA/STING (MITA/STING-/-). The HBV specific humoral and CD8+ T cell responses were impaired in MITA/STING deficient mice, suggesting the participation of MITA/STING in the initiation of host adaptive immune responses. In summary, our data suggest that MITA/STING and MRP contribute to HBV control via modulation of the innate and adaptive responses.

  18. SCFSLF-mediated cytosolic degradation of S-RNase is required for cross-pollen compatibility in S-RNase-based self-incompatibility in Petunia hybrida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbiao eXue

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many flowering plants adopt self-incompatibility (SI to maintain their genetic diversity. In species of Solanaceae, Plantaginaceae and Rosaceae, SI is genetically controlled by a single S-locus with multiple haplotypes. The S-locus has been shown to encode S-RNases expressed in pistil and multiple SLF (S-locus F-box proteins in pollen controlling the female and male specificity of SI, respectively. S-RNases appear to function as a cytotoxin to reject self-pollen. In addition, SLFs have been shown to form SCF (SKP1/Cullin1/F-box complexes to serve as putative E3 ubiquitin ligase to interact with S-RNases. Previously, two different mechanisms, the S-RNase degradation and the S-RNase compartmentalization, have been proposed as the restriction mechanisms of S-RNase cytotoxicity allowing compatible pollination. In this study, we have provided several lines of evidence in support of the S-RNase degradation mechanism by a combination of cellular, biochemical and molecular biology approaches. First, both immunogold labeling and subcellular fractionation assays showed that two key pollen SI factors, PhSLF-S3L and PhSSK1 (SLF-interacting SKP1-like1 from Petunia hybrida, a Solanaceous species, are co-localized in cytosols of both pollen grains and tubes. Second, PhS3L-RNases are mainly detected in the cytosols of both self and non-self pollen tubes after pollination. Third, we found that both PhS3-RNases and PhS3L-RNases directly interact with PhSLF-S3L by yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Fourth, S-RNases are specifically degraded in compatible pollen tubes by non-self SLF action. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SCFSLF-mediated non-self S-RNase degradation occurs in the cytosol of pollen tube through the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system serving as the major mechanism to neutralize S-RNase cytotoxicity during compatible pollination in P. hybrida.

  19. Expression and trans-specific polymorphism of self-incompatibility RNases in coffea (Rubiaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Nowak

    Full Text Available Self-incompatibility (SI is widespread in the angiosperms, but identifying the biochemical components of SI mechanisms has proven to be difficult in most lineages. Coffea (coffee; Rubiaceae is a genus of old-world tropical understory trees in which the vast majority of diploid species utilize a mechanism of gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI. The S-RNase GSI system was one of the first SI mechanisms to be biochemically characterized, and likely represents the ancestral Eudicot condition as evidenced by its functional characterization in both asterid (Solanaceae, Plantaginaceae and rosid (Rosaceae lineages. The S-RNase GSI mechanism employs the activity of class III RNase T2 proteins to terminate the growth of "self" pollen tubes. Here, we investigate the mechanism of Coffea GSI and specifically examine the potential for homology to S-RNase GSI by sequencing class III RNase T2 genes in populations of 14 African and Madagascan Coffea species and the closely related self-compatible species Psilanthus ebracteolatus. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences aligned to a diverse sample of plant RNase T2 genes show that the Coffea genome contains at least three class III RNase T2 genes. Patterns of tissue-specific gene expression identify one of these RNase T2 genes as the putative Coffea S-RNase gene. We show that populations of SI Coffea are remarkably polymorphic for putative S-RNase alleles, and exhibit a persistent pattern of trans-specific polymorphism characteristic of all S-RNase genes previously isolated from GSI Eudicot lineages. We thus conclude that Coffea GSI is most likely homologous to the classic Eudicot S-RNase system, which was retained since the divergence of the Rubiaceae lineage from an ancient SI Eudicot ancestor, nearly 90 million years ago.

  20. Development and characterization of a recombinant madin-darby canine kidney cell line that expresses rat multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (rMRP1)

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ziping; Horn, Micha; Wang, Joanne; Shen, Danny D.; Ho, Rodney JY

    2004-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) is one of the major proteins shown to mediate efflux transport of a broad range of antitumor drugs, glucuronide conjugates, and glutathione, in addition to endogenous substrates. Significant differences in substrate selectivity were reported for murine and human MRP1. As preclinical drug disposition and pharmacokinetics studies are often conducted in rats, we have recently cloned the rat MRP1 (rMRP1) and demonstrated that rMRP1 expressed in tra...

  1. Effect of the termini of RNase Hs from Chlamydophila pneumoniae on enzymatic biochemical characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingli Hou; Zheng Lu; Xingliang Guo; Jianhua Liu

    2012-01-01

    A difference between prokaryotic RNase HⅡ and HⅢ,which both belong to type 2 RNase H,is a long N-terminal extension of HⅢ; however,the main-fold structures of HⅡ and HⅢ known as RNase H-fold are similar.To further understand the structure-function relationship of RNase HⅡ and RNase HⅢ,biochemical analyses were carried out using N-terminal truncations of RNase HⅢ (ⅢN56Δ,ⅢN81Δ,and ⅢN88Δ) and C-terminal truncation (ⅡC19Δ) of RNase HⅡ from Chlamydophila pneumoniae.Compared with wild-type CpRNase HⅡ/Ⅲ,IIIN56Δhad no obvious variation on the cleavage site and efficiency of DNA-rN1-DNA/DNA (DR1D) and DNA-rN4-DNA/DNA (DR4D) substrates.ⅡC19Δ and ⅢN81Δ both showed decreased activities,and ⅢN88Δ exhibited little cleavage on these substrates.However,ⅢN81Δ showed very different activities toward different substrates (20%for DR1D and 85% for DR4D).Moreover,ⅡC19ΔⅢN82-88 mutant,prepared through adding N-terminal 82nd to 88th residues locating at the bound region of N-and C-terminal domains of CpRNase HⅢ to N-terminus of ⅡC19Δ,cleaved DR4D substrate more efficiently and preferentially at the cleavage sites of CpRNase HⅢ but not those of CpRNase HⅡ.These results indicated that C-termini of CpRNase HⅡ,N-termini of CpRNase HⅢ,and bound region of N-and C-terminal domain are all important for enzymatic activities.Moreover,the 82nd to 88th residues of N-terminus of CpRNase HⅡ are related with enzyme cleavage site specificity.These results will help to understand the importance of C-termini of CpRNase HⅡ and N-termini of CpRNase HⅢ to the enzyme activities for DR1D and DR4D substrate.

  2. Regulated expression of the MRP8 and MRP14 genes in human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cell treated with the differentiation-inducing agents mycophenolic acid and 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner-Bartnicki, A.L.; Murao, S.; Collart, F.R.; Huberman, E.

    1992-12-31

    The calcium-binding proteins MRP8 and MEP14 are present in mature monomyelocytic cells and are induced during differentiation. Previous studies have demonstrated that the proteins may mediate the growth arrest in differentiating HL-60 cells. We determined the levels of a protein complex (PC) containing MRP8 and MRP14 and investigated the mechanism by which the genes encoding these proteins are regulated in HL-60 cells treated with the differentiation-inducing agent mycophenorc acid (MPA)While the PC was barely detectable in untreated cells, MPA treatment resulted in elevated levels of the PC which were maximal at 3-4 d, and were found to directly parallel gains in the steady-state levels of MRP8 and MRP14 MRNA. Transcription studies with the use of nuclear run-on experiments revealed increased transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters after MPA treatment. 1{alpha},25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, which induces HL-60 cell differentiation by another mechanism, was also found to increase transcription initiation at the MRP8 and MRP14 promoters. Our results suggest that this initiation is the major control of maturation agent-mediated increases in MRP8 and MRPl4 gene expression, and support a role for the PC in terminal differentiation of human monomyelocytic cells.

  3. RNase H-dependent PCR (rhPCR: improved specificity and single nucleotide polymorphism detection using blocked cleavable primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Powers Kristy M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polymerase chain reaction (PCR is commonly used to detect the presence of nucleic acid sequences both in research and diagnostic settings. While high specificity is often achieved, biological requirements sometimes necessitate that primers are placed in suboptimal locations which lead to problems with the formation of primer dimers and/or misamplification of homologous sequences. Results Pyrococcus abyssi (P.a. RNase H2 was used to enable PCR to be performed using blocked primers containing a single ribonucleotide residue which are activated via cleavage by the enzyme (rhPCR. Cleavage occurs 5'-to the RNA base following primer hybridization to the target DNA. The requirement of the primer to first hybridize with the target sequence to gain activity eliminates the formation of primer-dimers and greatly reduces misamplification of closely related sequences. Mismatches near the scissile linkage decrease the efficiency of cleavage by RNase H2, further increasing the specificity of the assay. When applied to the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rhPCR was found to be far more sensitive than standard allele-specific PCR. In general, the best discrimination occurs when the mismatch is placed at the RNA:DNA base pair. Conclusion rhPCR eliminates the formation of primer dimers and markedly improves the specificity of PCR with respect to off-target amplification. These advantages of the assay should find utility in challenging qPCR applications such as genotyping, high level multiplex assays and rare allele detection.

  4. Binding of Dumbbell Oligonucleotides to MoMuLV Reverse Transcriptase: Inhibitory Properties of RNase H Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dumbbell oligonucleotides with loops of various chemistry were synthesized. Incubation of dumbbell oligonucleotides containing phosphorothioate bonds or trimethylene phosphate linkages in loops with S1 nuclease did not result in significant cleavage under conditions which led to the degradation of dumbbell oligonucleotide containing phophodiester bonds in the loops. The binding of reverse transcriptase of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMuLV was evaluated with all the five oligonucleotides. The protein binds to all the dumbbell oligonucleotides with similar affinity. The dissociation constants evaluated using PAGE band mobility shift assays were of the order of 10-7. The inhibitory properties of the retroviral RNase H activity was evaluated using 3H –UTP-labeled RNA:RNA-DNA hybrid. It was found that the best dumbbell oligonucleotide, inhibitor contained phosphorothioate residues in both the loops. Our value studies demonstrated that this particularly designed oligonucleotide displays an IC50 of 18 nM in its inhibition on the reverse transcriptase RNase H activity, a magnitude lower than that of first nucleotide reverse transcriptase of HIV-1, tenofovir, introduced by Gilead Science in the market.

  5. RNA is required for enzymatic conversion of glutamate to delta-aminolevulinate by extracts of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, J D; Beale, S I

    1985-05-15

    Formation of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from glutamete catalyzed by a soluble extract from the unicellular green alga, Chlorella vulgaris, was abolished after incubation of the cell extract with bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase). Cell extract was prepared for the ALA formation assay by high-speed centrifugation and gel-filtration through Sephadex G-25 to remove insoluble and endogenous low-molecular-weight components. RNA hydrolysis products did not affect ALA formation, and RNase did not affect the ability of ATP and NADPH to serve as reaction substrates, indicating that the effect of RNase cannot be attributed to degradation of reaction substrates or transformation of a substrate or cofactor into an inhibitor. The effect of RNase was blocked by prior addition of placental RNase inhibitor (RNasin) to the cell extract, but RNasin did not reverse the effect of prior incubation of the cell extract with RNase, indicating that RNase does not act by degrading a component generated during the ALA-forming reaction, but instead degrades an essential component already present in active cell extract at the time the ALA-forming reaction is initiated. After inactivation of the cell extract by incubation with RNase, followed by administration of RNasin to block further RNase action, ALA-forming activity could be restored to a higher level than originally present by addition of a C. vulgaris tRNA-containing fraction isolated from an active ALA-forming preparation by phenol extraction and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Baker's yeast tRNA, wheat germ tRNA, Escherichia coli tRNA, and E. coli tRNAglu type II were unable to reconstitute ALA-forming activity in RNase-treated cell extract, even though the cell extract was capable of catalyzing the charging of some of these RNAs with glutamate.

  6. Expression of MDR1, HIF-1α and MRP1 in sacral chordoma and chordoma cell line CM-319

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Baoan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chordoma was a typically slow-growing tumor. The therapeutic approach to chordoma had traditionally relied mainly on surgical therapy. And the main reason for therapeutic failure was resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However the refractory mechanism was not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of three genes (MDR1, HIF-1α and MRP1 associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in chordoma and chordoma cell line CM-319. Materials and methods Using immunohistochemical techniques, the expression of MDR1, HIF-1α and MRP1 was investigated in 50 chordoma specimen. Using RT-PCR and Western blot, the expression of MDR1, HIF-1α and MRP1 was investigated in chordoma and chordoma cell line CM-319. Results Expression of MDR1, HIF-1α and MRP1 was observed in 10%, 80% and 74% of all cases, respectively. Expression of MRP1 was correlated with HIF-1α. On the other hand, expression of MDR1 was not correlated with the expression of HIF-1α or MRP1. The expression of HIF-1α and MRP1 was observed, but MDR1 was not observed in chordoma and CM-319. Conclusion Expression of HIF-1α and MRP1 was observed in most chordoma specimen and CM-319 cell line; expression of HIF-1α correlated with MRP1. HIF-1α and MRP1 may play a role in the multidrug resistance of chordoma to chemotherapy.

  7. The Vibrio cholerae Mrp system: cation/proton antiport properties and enhancement of bile salt resistance in a heterologous host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzioba-Winogrodzki, Judith; Winogrodzki, Olga; Krulwich, Terry A; Boin, Markus A; Häse, Claudia C; Dibrov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The mrp operon from Vibrio cholerae encoding a putative multisubunit Na(+)/H(+) antiporter was cloned and functionally expressed in the antiporter-deficient strain of Escherichia coli EP432. Cells of EP432 expressing Vc-Mrp exhibited resistance to Na(+) and Li(+) as well as to natural bile salts such as sodium cholate and taurocholate. When assayed in everted membrane vesicles of the E. coli EP432 host, Vc-Mrp had sufficiently high antiport activity to facilitate the first extensive analysis of Mrp system from a Gram-negative bacterium encoded by a group 2 mrp operon. Vc-Mrp was found to exchange protons for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) ions in pH-dependent manner with maximal activity at pH 9.0-9.5. Exchange was electrogenic (more than one H(+) translocated per cation moved in opposite direction). The apparent K(m) at pH 9.0 was 1.08, 1.30, and 68.5 mM for Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), respectively. Kinetic analyses suggested that Vc-Mrp operates in a binding exchange mode with all cations and protons competing for binding to the antiporter. The robust ion antiport activity of Vc-Mrp in sub-bacterial vesicles and its effect on bile resistance of the heterologous host make Vc-Mrp an attractive experimental model for the further studies of biochemistry and physiology of Mrp systems.

  8. Imatinib and nilotinib reverse multidrug resistance in cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux activity of the MRP7 (ABCC10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the major mechanisms that could produce resistance to antineoplastic drugs in cancer cells is the ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. The ABC transporters can significantly decrease the intracellular concentration of antineoplastic drugs by increasing their efflux, thereby lowering the cytotoxic activity of antineoplastic drugs. One of these transporters, the multiple resistant protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10, has recently been shown to produce resistance to antineoplastic drugs by increasing the efflux of paclitaxel. In this study, we examined the effects of BCR-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitors imatinib, nilotinib and dasatinib on the activity and expression of MRP7 in HEK293 cells transfected with MRP7, designated HEK-MRP7-2. METHODOLOGY AND/OR PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report for the first time that imatinib and nilotinib reversed MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance. Our MTT assay results indicated that MRP7 expression in HEK-MRP7-2 cells was not significantly altered by incubation with 5 microM of imatinib or nilotinib for up to 72 hours. In addition, imatinib and nilotinib (1-5 microM produced a significant concentration-dependent reversal of MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance by enhancing the sensitivity of HEK-MRP7-2 cells to paclitaxel and vincristine. Imatinib and nilotinib, at 5 microM, significantly increased the accumulation of [(3H]-paclitaxel in HEK-MRP7-2 cells. The incubation of the HEK-MRP7-2 cells with imatinib or nilotinib (5 microM also significantly inhibited the efflux of paclitaxel. CONCLUSIONS: Imatinib and nilotinib reverse MRP7-mediated paclitaxel resistance, most likely due to their inhibition of the efflux of paclitaxel via MRP7. These findings suggest that imatinib or nilotinib, in combination with other antineoplastic drugs, may be useful in the treatment of certain resistant cancers.

  9. Küsimus pole MRP-s, vaid agressioonis / Enn Soovik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soovik, Enn, 1933-2010

    2005-01-01

    Autor leiab, et on vajalik esitada Venemaale pretensioon Nõukogude Liidu poolt Eesti vastu 1939/40 toime pandud agressiooni ja selle järelmite suhtes ning mitte laskuda MRP-ga seotud viljatusse vaidlusse

  10. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  11. Küsimus pole MRP-s, vaid agressioonis / Enn Soovik

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soovik, Enn, 1933-2010

    2005-01-01

    Autor leiab, et on vajalik esitada Venemaale pretensioon Nõukogude Liidu poolt Eesti vastu 1939/40 toime pandud agressiooni ja selle järelmite suhtes ning mitte laskuda MRP-ga seotud viljatusse vaidlusse

  12. RNase L Interacts with Filamin A To Regulate Actin Dynamics and Barrier Function for Viral Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Dayal, Shubham; Naji, Merna; Ezelle, Heather J.; Zeng, Chun; Zhou, Aimin; Hassel, Bret A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The actin cytoskeleton and its network of associated proteins constitute a physical barrier that viruses must circumvent to gain entry into cells for productive infection. The mechanisms by which the physical signals of infection are sensed by the host to activate an innate immune response are not well understood. The antiviral endoribonuclease RNase L is ubiquitously expressed in a latent form and activated upon binding 2-5A, a unique oligoadenylate produced during viral infections. We provide evidence that RNase L in its inactive form interacts with the actin-binding protein Filamin A to modulate the actin cytoskeleton and inhibit virus entry. Cells lacking either RNase L or Filamin A displayed increased virus entry which was exacerbated in cells lacking both proteins. RNase L deletion mutants that reduced Filamin A interaction displayed a compromised ability to restrict virus entry, supporting the idea of an important role for the RNase L-Filamin A complex in barrier function. Remarkably, both the wild type and a catalytically inactive RNase L mutant were competent to reduce virus entry when transfected into RNase L-deficient cells, indicating that this novel function of RNase L is independent of its enzymatic activity. Virus infection and RNase L activation disrupt its association with Filamin A and release RNase L to mediate its canonical nuclease-dependent antiviral activities. The dual functions of RNase L as a constitutive component of the actin cytoskeleton and as an induced mediator of antiviral signaling and effector functions provide insights into its mechanisms of antiviral activity and opportunities for the development of novel antiviral agents. PMID:25352621

  13. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors : comparison of MR pancreatography(MRP) and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Ki Suh; Seo, Jung Hoon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Bok; Chung, Jae Joon; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    Magnetic resonance pancreatography(MRP) is a non-invasive imaging technique for visualization of the pancreatic duct system, and is similar to those obtained by means of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography(ERP). To determine the role of MRP in the diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, the diagnostic confidence and imaginal difference of MRP and ERP were compared. Twenty patients(13 male and 7 female, mean age 59 years) with pancreatic tumors underwent MRP and ERP. The former involved the use of a single shot fast spin-echo sequence on a 1.5T system. All images were retrospectively reviewed by a radiologist and a gastroenterologist, working together. Both MRP and ERP were compared for separate visualization of the head, body and tail portion of the pancreatic duct, and scored as excellent (4), good (3), fair (2), poor (1), or no visualization (0). In addition, the overall diagnostic confidence of both modalities was graded subjectively from non-diagnoses (0) to definite information (4). The final diagnoses derived from surgical findings (n=9) or imaging findings and clinical follow-up (n=7) were as follows : pancreatic cancer (n=12), mucin-producing pancreatic cancer (n=2), mucinous ductectatic tumor (n=4), serous cystadenoma (n=2). To assess the statistical significance of difference, the paired t-test was used. Mean scores of visualization of the pancreatic duct by MRP and ERP were 2.91 and 3.15 in the pancreatic head (p=NS), 3.11 and 2.18 in the pancreatic body (p=NS), and 3.07 and 1.09 in the pancreatic tail (p<0.01). The mean score of diagnostic confidence was 4.03 for MRP and 2.51 for ERP, a statistically significant difference (p<0.05). In 11 patients with obstruction of the pancreatic duct due to malignant lesions, MRP visualized the duct both proximally and distally to the site of obstruction, while ERP visualized only the distal duct to the site of obstruction. MRP was also better at defining the extent of tumor by visualization of surrounding pancreatic

  14. Modulation of multidrug resistance by flavonoids. Inhibitors of glutathione conjugation and MRP-mediated transport

    OpenAIRE

    Zanden, van, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the use of flavonoids for inhibition of two important players in the glutathione related biotransformation system involved in multidrug resistance was investigated using several in vitro model systems. The enzymes of interest included the phase II glutathione S-transferase enzyme GSTP1-1, able to detoxify anticancer agents through conjugation with glutathione and the two multidrug resistance proteins MRP1 and MRP2 involved in glutathione mediated cellular efflux of, amongst ot...

  15. The effects of clobazam treatment in rats on the expression of genes and proteins encoding glucronosyltransferase 1A/2B (UGT1A/2B) and multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (MRP2), and development of thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Izuru; Tamura, Akitoshi; Matsumoto, Izumi; Inada, Hiroshi; Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2012-12-15

    Clobazam (CLB) is known to increase hepatobiliary thyroxine (T4) clearance in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, which results in hypothyroidism followed by thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy. However, the mechanism of the acceleration of T4-clearance has not been fully investigated. In the present study, we tried to clarify the roles of hepatic UDP-glucronosyltransferase (UGT) isoenzymes (UGT1A and UGT2B) and efflux transporter (multidrug resistance-associated protein-2; MRP2) in the CLB-induced acceleration of T4-clearance using two mutant rat strains, UGT1A-deficient mutant (Gunn) and MRP2-deficient mutant (EHBR) rats, especially focusing on thyroid morphology, levels of circulating hormones (T4 and triiodothyronine (T3)) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and mRNA or protein expressions of UGTs (Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, and Ugt2b1/2) and MRP2 (Mrp). CLB induced thyroid morphological changes with increases in TSH in SD and Gunn rats, but not in EHBR rats. T4 was slightly decreased in SD and Gunn rats, and T3 was decreased in Gunn rats, whereas these hormones were maintained in EHBR rats. Hepatic Ugt1a1, Ugt1a6, Ugt2b1/2, and Mrp2 mRNAs were upregulated in SD rats. In Gunn rats, UGT1A mRNAs (Ugt1a1/6) and protein levels were quite low, but UGT2B mRNAs (Ugt2b1/2) and protein were prominently upregulated. In SD and Gunn rats, MRP2 mRNA and protein were upregulated to the same degree. These results suggest that MRP2 is an important contributor in development of the thyroid cellular hypertrophy in CLB-treated rats, and that UGT1A and UGT2B work in concert with MRP2 in the presence of MRP2 function to enable the effective elimination of thyroid hormones.

  16. A role for multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4; ABCC4) in human dendritic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Scheffer, George L; Reurs, Anneke W; Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oerlemans, Ruud; Jansen, Gerrit; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Glasgow, Joel N; Pereboev, Alexander; Curiel, David T; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2008-09-15

    The capacity of dendritic cells (DCs) to migrate from peripheral organs to lymph nodes (LNs) is important in the initiation of a T cell-mediated immune response. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) and the multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1; ABCC1) have been shown to play a role in both human and murine DC migration. Here we show that a more recently discovered family member, MRP4 (ABCC4), is expressed on both epidermal and dermal human skin DCs and contributes to the migratory capacity of DCs. Pharmacological inhibition of MRP4 activity or down-regulation through RNAi in DCs resulted in reduced migration of DCs from human skin explants and of in vitro generated Langerhans cells. The responsible MRP4 substrate remains to be identified as exogenous addition of MRP4's known substrates prostaglandin E(2), leukotriene B(4) and D(4), or cyclic nucleotides (all previously implicated in DC migration) could not restore migration. This notwithstanding, our data show that MRP4 is an important protein, significantly contributing to human DC migration toward the draining lymph nodes, and therefore relevant for the initiation of an immune response and a possible target for immunotherapy.

  17. Analysis of Historical Materiel Return Program (MRP) Credits at the 1st Marine Logistics Group Reparable Issue Point (RIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    MATERIEL RETURN PROGRAM ( MRP ) CREDITS AT THE 1ST MARINE LOGISTICS GROUP REPARABLE ISSUE POINT (RIP) by Edward M. Caricato John D. Draper...Materiel Return Program ( MRP ) Credits at the 1st Marine Logistics Group Reparable Issue Point (RIP) 6. AUTHOR(S) Edward M. Caricato and John D. Draper...unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Materiel Returns Program ( MRP ) credits have increased 1st Marine

  18. Expression and significance of bFGF and MRP-1 in gastric cancer%bFGF和MRP-1在胃癌中的表达及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢家泰; 曾志荣

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor ( bFGF ) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP-1) in gastric cancer (GC) tissue and their relationship.Methods immunohistochemical staining (SP method) detecting the patients on chronic superficial gastritis(CSG) 25 cases,Intestinal metaplasia(IM) 45 cases,50 cases of dysplasia (dys) and positive expression of 65 cases GC tissue specimens in bFGF and MRP-1.RT-PCR technology to detect the expression of MRP-1mRNA.The mean compared with t-test,the sample was compared with χ2-test,linear correlation analysis with correlation analysis of two factors . Results In the process of CSG ,IM,Dys,GC,bFGF,MRP-1 expression was gradually increasing ,bFGF,MRP-1 positive expression rate of GC group to Dys,IM group,the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).MRP-1 expression intensity was positively correlated with MRP-1mRNA (r =0.598,P <0.05).Conclusions bFGF,MRP-1,MRP-1mRNA expression was gradually in-creased during the formation of gastric cancer .%目的:研究胃癌(GC)组织中碱性成纤维细胞生长因子(bFGF)和多重耐药蛋白1(MRP-1)的表达规律及其相互关系。方法用免疫组织化学染色( SP法)检测慢性浅表性胃炎( CSG )25例、胃黏膜肠上皮化生( IM )45例、异型增生( Dys)50例和GC 65例组织标本中bFGF、MRP-1阳性表达情况。 RT-PCR技术检测MRP-1mRNA的表达情况。均数的比较采用t检验,两样本率的比较用χ2检验,两因素的相关分析用直线相关分析。结果在CSG→IM→Dys→GC的过程中,bF-GF,MRP-1的表达呈逐步递增趋势,bFGF,MRP-1的阳性表达率GC组与Dys组、IM组,差异均具有统计学意义( P<0.05)。MRP-1与MRP-1mRNA表达强度呈正相关(r=0.598,P<0.05)。结论胃癌形成过程中,bFGF,MRP-1,MRP-1mRNA表达逐渐上调。

  19. Characterization of TRZ1, a yeast homolog of the human candidate prostate cancer susceptibility gene ELAC2 encoding tRNase Z

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yuan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, mutation of ELAC2 is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. ELAC2 has been shown to have tRNase Z activity and is associated with the γ-tubulin complex. Results In this work, we show that the yeast homolog of ELAC2, encoded by TRZ1 (tRNase Z 1, is involved genetically in RNA processing. The temperature sensitivity of a trz1 mutant can be rescued by multiple copies of REX2, which encodes a protein with RNA 3' processing activity, suggesting a role of Trz1p in RNA processing in vivo. Trz1p has two putative nucleotide triphosphate-binding motifs (P-loop and a conserved histidine motif. The histidine motif and the putative nucleotide binding motif at the C-domain are important for Trz1p function because mutant proteins bearing changes to the critical residues in these motifs are unable to rescue deletion of TRZ1. The growth defect exhibited by trz1 yeast is not complemented by the heterologous ELAC2, suggesting that Trz1p may have additional functions in yeast. Conclusion Our results provide genetic evidence that prostate cancer susceptibility gene ELAC2 may be involved in RNA processing, especially rRNA processing and mitochondrial function.

  20. Inhibitory Effect of 2,3,5,6-Tetrafluoro-4-[4-(aryl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamide Derivatives on HIV Reverse Transcriptase Associated RNase H Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Nicolino; Esposito, Francesca; Rogolino, Dominga; Carcelli, Mauro; Sanna, Vanna; Palomba, Michele; Naesens, Lieve; Corona, Angela; Grandi, Nicole; Tramontano, Enzo; Sechi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 ribonuclease H (RNase H) function of the reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme catalyzes the selective hydrolysis of the RNA strand of the RNA:DNA heteroduplex replication intermediate, and represents a suitable target for drug development. A particularly attractive approach is constituted by the interference with the RNase H metal-dependent catalytic activity, which resides in the active site located at the C-terminus p66 subunit of RT. Herein, we report results of an in-house screening campaign that allowed us to identify 4-[4-(aryl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl]benzenesulfonamides, prepared by the “click chemistry” approach, as novel potential HIV-1 RNase H inhibitors. Three compounds (9d, 10c, and 10d) demonstrated a selective inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 RNase H enzyme at micromolar concentrations. Drug-likeness, predicted by the calculation of a panel of physicochemical and ADME properties, putative binding modes for the active compounds, assessed by computational molecular docking, as well as a mechanistic hypothesis for this novel chemotype are reported. PMID:27556447

  1. Regulation of the small regulatory RNA MicA by ribonuclease III: a target-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Sandra C; Silva, Inês J; Saramago, Margarida; Domingues, Susana; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2011-04-01

    MicA is a trans-encoded small non-coding RNA, which downregulates porin-expression in stationary-phase. In this work, we focus on the role of endoribonucleases III and E on Salmonella typhimurium sRNA MicA regulation. RNase III is shown to regulate MicA in a target-coupled way, while RNase E is responsible for the control of free MicA levels in the cell. We purified both Salmonella enzymes and demonstrated that in vitro RNase III is only active over MicA when in complex with its targets (whether ompA or lamB mRNAs). In vivo, MicA is demonstrated to be cleaved by RNase III in a coupled way with ompA mRNA. On the other hand, RNase E is able to cleave unpaired MicA and does not show a marked dependence on its 5' phosphorylation state. The main conclusion of this work is the existence of two independent pathways for MicA turnover. Each pathway involves a distinct endoribonuclease, having a different role in the context of the fine-tuned regulation of porin levels. Cleavage of MicA by RNase III in a target-dependent fashion, with the concomitant decay of the mRNA target, strongly resembles the eukaryotic RNAi system, where RNase III-like enzymes play a pivotal role.

  2. The RNase R from Campylobacter jejuni has unique features and is involved in the first steps of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nabila; Matos, Rute G; Pinto, Teresa; Rannou, Pauline; Cappelier, Jean-Michel; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2014-10-03

    Bacterial pathogens must adapt/respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Ribonucleases (RNases) can be crucial factors contributing to the fast adaptation of RNA levels to different environmental demands. It has been demonstrated that the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) facilitates survival of Campylobacter jejuni in low temperatures and favors swimming, chick colonization, and cell adhesion/invasion. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of other ribonucleases in this microorganism. Members of the RNB family of enzymes have been shown to be involved in virulence of several pathogens. We have searched C. jejuni genome for homologues and found one candidate that displayed properties more similar to RNase R (Cj-RNR). We show here that Cj-RNR is important for the first steps of infection, the adhesion and invasion of C. jejuni to eukaryotic cells. Moreover, Cj-RNR proved to be active in a wide range of conditions. The results obtained lead us to conclude that Cj-RNR has an important role in the biology of this foodborne pathogen.

  3. MRP- and BCL-2-mediated drug resistance in human SCLC: effects of apoptotic sphingolipids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadian, M; Leroux, M E; Auzenne, E; Ghosh, S C; Farquhar, D; Evans, R; Spohn, W; Zou, Y; Klostergaard, J

    2009-10-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) and BCL-2 contribute to drug resistance expressed in SCLC. To establish whether MRP-mediated drug resistance affects sphingolipid (SL)-induced apoptosis in SCLC, we first examined the human SCLC cell line, UMCC-1, and its MRP over-expressing, drug-resistant subline, UMCC-1/VP. Despite significantly decreased sensitivity to doxorubicin (Dox) and to the etoposide, VP-16, the drug-selected line was essentially equally as sensitive to treatment with exogenous ceramide (Cer), sphingosine (Sp) or dimethyl-sphingosine (DMSP) as the parental line. Next, we observed that high BCL-2-expressing human H69 SCLC cells, that were approximately 160-fold more sensitive to Dox than their combined BCL-2 and MRP-over-expressing (H69AR) counterparts, were only approximately 5-fold more resistant to DMSP. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of either UMCC cell line treated with DMSP-Coumarin revealed comparable extents and kinetics of SL uptake, further ruling out MRP-mediated effects on drug uptake. DMSP potentiated the cytotoxic activity of VP-16 and Taxol, but not Dox, in drug-resistant UMCC-1/VP cells. However, this sensitization did not appear to involve DMSP-mediated effects on the function of MRP in drug export; nor did DMSP strongly shift the balance of pro-apoptotic Sps and anti-apoptotic Sp-1-Ps in these cells. We conclude that SL-induced apoptosis markedly overcomes or bypasses MRP-mediated drug resistance relevant to SCLC and may suggest a novel therapeutic approach to chemotherapy for these tumors.

  4. A higher-level MRP supertree of placental mammals

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    Bininda-Emonds Olaf RP

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The higher-level phylogeny of placental mammals has long been a phylogenetic Gordian knot, with disagreement about both the precise contents of, and relationships between, the extant orders. A recent MRP supertree that favoured 'outdated' hypotheses (notably, monophyly of both Artiodactyla and Lipotyphla has been heavily criticised for including low-quality and redundant data. We apply a stringent data selection protocol designed to minimise these problems to a much-expanded data set of morphological, molecular and combined source trees, to produce a supertree that includes every family of extant placental mammals. Results The supertree is well-resolved and supports both polyphyly of Lipotyphla and paraphyly of Artiodactyla with respect to Cetacea. The existence of four 'superorders' – Afrotheria, Xenarthra, Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires – is also supported. The topology is highly congruent with recent (molecular phylogenetic analyses of placental mammals, but is considerably more comprehensive, being the first phylogeny to include all 113 extant families without making a priori assumptions of suprafamilial monophyly. Subsidiary analyses reveal that the data selection protocol played a key role in the major changes relative to a previously published higher-level supertree of placentals. Conclusion The supertree should provide a useful framework for hypothesis testing in phylogenetic comparative biology, and supports the idea that biogeography has played a crucial role in the evolution of placental mammals. Our results demonstrate the importance of minimising poor and redundant data when constructing supertrees.

  5. The synthesis and characterization of cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns for the study of human multidrug resistant proteins MRP1, MRP2 and human breast cancer resistant protein BCRP using membranes obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Prateek A; Moaddel, Ruin; Wainer, Irving W

    2010-06-15

    CMAC (cellular membrane affinity chromatography columns) have been developed for the study of the human multidrug transporters MRP1, MRP2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). The columns were constructed using the immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) stationary phase and cellular membrane fragments obtained from Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells that had been stably transfected with human Mrp1, Mrp2 or Bcrp cDNA, using a baculovirus expression system. The resulting CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)), CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) and CMAC(Sf9(BCRP)) columns and a control column produced using membrane fragments from non-transfected Sf9 cells, CMAC(Sf9), were characterized using frontal affinity chromatography using [(3)H]-etoposide as the marker ligand and etoposide, benzbromarone and MK571 as the displacers on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)) column, etoposide and furosemide on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) column and etoposide and fumitremorgin C on the CMAC(Sf9(BCPR)) column. The binding affinities (K(i) values) obtained from the chromatographic studies were consistent with the data obtained using non-chromatographic techniques and the results indicate that the immobilized MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters retained their ability to selectively bind known ligands. (S)-verapamil displaced [(3)H]-etoposide on the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)) column to a greater extent than (R)-verapamil and the relative IC(50) values of the enantiomers were calculated using the changes in the retention times of the marker. The observed enantioselectivity and calculated IC(50) values were consistent with previously reported data. The results indicated that the CMAC(Sf9(MRP1)), CMAC(Sf9(MRP2)) and CMAC(Sf9(BCRP)) columns can be used for the study of binding to the MRP1, MRP2 and BCRP transporters and that membranes from the Sf9 cell line can be used to prepare CMAC columns. This is the first example of the use of membranes from a non-mammalian cell line in an affinity chromatographic system.

  6. EXPRESSION OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN (MRP) AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL FACTORS IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝军; 王辉; 王恩华; 邱雪杉; 李庆昌; 刘云鹏

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and clinicopathological factors and prognosis.Methods: The expression of MRP in 62 cases with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was detected using immunohistochemistry method. The expression of MRP in 30 cases of NSCLC and corresponding normal lung tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Results: this study of tumor tissues confirmed the plasma membrane and/or cytoplasm locations of MRP.There was apparent difference between normal lung tissues and NSCLC in MRP. The survival analysis of 62 NSCLC showed that the mean survival time of the patients with negative MRP expression was 69.81+17.41 months and that of patients with positive MRP expression, 25.38+4.46months. Log-rank test suggested that the difference between them was significant (P=0.0156). It was also found that in squanous cell lung cancer the statistically significant difference between the mean survival time of patients with positive MRP expression and those with negative MRP expression (P=0.0153). Multivariate Cox model analysis suggested that the survival time was significantly related to expression of MRP (P=0.035) and lymphatic metastasis (P=0.038). Conclusion: MRP expression in NSCLC is significantly higher compared with normal lung tissues. The mean survival time of patients with negative MRP was relative longer and expression of MRP was an independent factor for prognosis.

  7. Functional Differentiation of Antiporter-Like Polypeptides in Complex I; a Site-Directed Mutagenesis Study of Residues Conserved in MrpA and NuoL but Not in MrpD, NuoM, and NuoN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Sperling

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the three largest subunits in the membrane domain (NuoL, NuoM and NuoN of complex I are homologous to each other, as well as to two subunits (MrpA and MrpD from a Na+/H+ antiporter, Mrp. MrpA and NuoL are more similar to each other and the same is true for MrpD and NuoN. This suggests a functional differentiation which was proven experimentally in a deletion strain model system, where NuoL could restore the loss of MrpA, but not that of MrpD and vice versa. The simplest explanation for these observations was that the MrpA and MrpD proteins are not antiporters, but rather single subunit ion channels that together form an antiporter. In this work our focus was on a set of amino acid residues in helix VIII, which are only conserved in NuoL and MrpA (but not in any of the other antiporter-like subunits. and to compare their effect on the function of these two proteins. By combining complementation studies in B. subtilis and 23Na-NMR, response of mutants to high sodium levels were tested. All of the mutants were able to cope with high salt levels; however, all but one mutation (M258I/M225I showed differences in the efficiency of cell growth and sodium efflux. Our findings showed that, although very similar in sequence, NuoL and MrpA seem to differ on the functional level. Nonetheless the studied mutations gave rise to interesting phenotypes which are of interest in complex I research.

  8. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev (Merck)

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  9. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  10. Insight into S-RNase-based self-incompatibility in Petunia: recent findings and future directions

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    Justin S Williams

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available S-RNase-based self-incompatibility in Petunia is a self/non-self recognition system that allows the pistil to reject self-pollen to prevent inbreeding and to accept non-self pollen for outcrossing. Cloning of S-RNase in 1986 marked the beginning of nearly three decades of intensive research into the mechanism of this complex system. S-RNase was shown to be the sole female determinant in 1994, and the first male determinant, S-locus F-box protein1 (SLF1, was identified in 2004. It was discovered in 2010 that additional SLF proteins are involved in pollen specificity, and recently two S-haplotypes of P. inflata were found to possess 17 SLF genes based on pollen transcriptome analysis, further increasing the complexity of the system. Here, we first summarize the current understanding of how the interplay between SLF proteins and S-RNase in the pollen tube allows cross-compatible pollination, but results in self-incompatible pollination. We then discuss some of the aspects that are not yet elucidated, including uptake of S-RNase into the pollen tube, nature and assembly of SLF-containing complexes, the biochemical basis for differential interactions between SLF proteins and S-RNase, and fate of non-self S-RNases in the pollen tube.

  11. A M-MLV reverse transcriptase with reduced RNaseH activity allows greater sensitivity of gene expression detection in formalin fixed and paraffin embedded prostate cancer samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Rachel M; Rhodes, Anthony; Oxley, Jon; Ladomery, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) human tissue collections are an invaluable resource for retrospective gene expression studies. However formalin fixation results in chemical modification of RNA and increased RNA degradation. This can affect RNA yield and quality. A critical step when analysing gene expression is the conversion of RNA to complementary DNA (cDNA) using a reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. FFPE derived RNA may affect the performance and efficiency of the RT enzyme and cDNA synthesis. We directly compared three commonly used FFPE RNA isolation methods and measured RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also assessed the effectiveness of three commercially available Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (M-MLV) RTs on cDNA synthesis and gene expression sensitivity when using FFPE RNA as a template. Our results show that gene detection sensitivity is dependent on the isolation method, RT and length of the PCR amplicon (<200bp) when using FFPE RNA. The use of an M-MLV RT enzyme with reduced RNaseH activity gave significantly increased qRT-PCR sensitivity when using FFPE RNA derived from prostate tissue. The choice of RT can also affect perceived changes in target gene expression and thus the same RT should be used when attempting to reproduce results from different studies. This study highlights the need to optimise and evaluate RNA isolation methods and RTs when using FFPE RNA as a template in order to maximise a successful outcome in PCR applications.

  12. MRP proteins as potential mediators of heavy metal resistance in zebrafish cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Wang, Youhui; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-04-01

    Acquired resistance of mammalian cells to heavy metals is closely relevant to enhanced expression of several multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP), but it remains unclear whether MRP proteins confer resistance to heavy metals in zebrafish. In this study, we obtained zebrafish (Danio rerio) fibroblast-like ZF4 cells with resistance to toxic heavy metals after chronic cadmium exposure and selection for 6months. These cadmium-resistant cells (ZF4-Cd) were maintained in 5μM cadmium and displayed cross-resistance to cadmium, mercury, arsenite and arsenate. ZF4-Cd cells remained the resistance to heavy metals after protracted culture in cadmium-free medium. In comparison with ZF4-WT cells, ZF4-Cd cells exhibited accelerated rate of cadmium excretion, enhanced activity of MRP-like transport, elevated expression of abcc2, abcc4 and mt2 genes, and increased content of cellular GSH. Inhibition of MRP-like transport activity, GSH biosynthesis and GST activity significantly attenuated the resistance of ZF4-Cd cells to heavy metals. The results indicate that some of MRP transporters are involved in the efflux of heavy metals conjugated with cellular GSH and thus play crucial roles in heavy metal detoxification of zebrafish cells.

  13. Structural and functional basis for RNA cleavage by Ire1

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    Stroud Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR controls the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Central to this signaling pathway is the ER-resident bifunctional transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1. The endoribonuclease (RNase domain of Ire1 initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, leading to the production of a transcription factor that controls UPR target genes. The mRNA splicing reaction is an obligatory step of Ire1 signaling, yet its mechanism has remained poorly understood due to the absence of substrate-bound crystal structures of Ire1, the lack of structural similarity between Ire1 and other RNases, and a scarcity of quantitative enzymological data. Here, we experimentally define the active site of Ire1 RNase and quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the key active site residues to catalysis. Results This analysis and two new crystal structures suggest that Ire1 RNase uses histidine H1061 and tyrosine Y1043 as the general acid-general base pair contributing ≥ 7.6 kcal/mol and 1.4 kcal/mol to transition state stabilization, respectively, and asparagine N1057 and arginine R1056 for coordination of the scissile phosphate. Investigation of the stem-loop recognition revealed that additionally to the stem-loops derived from the classic Ire1 substrates HAC1 and Xbp1 mRNA, Ire1 can site-specifically and rapidly cleave anticodon stem-loop (ASL of unmodified tRNAPhe, extending known substrate specificity of Ire1 RNase. Conclusions Our data define the catalytic center of Ire1 RNase and suggest a mechanism of RNA cleavage: each RNase monomer apparently contains a separate catalytic apparatus for RNA cleavage, whereas two RNase subunits contribute to RNA stem-loop docking. Conservation of the key residues among Ire1 homologues suggests that the mechanism elucidated here for yeast Ire1 applies to Ire1 in metazoan cells, and to the only known Ire1 homologue RNase L.

  14. Detection of Balamuthia mandrillaris DNA by real-time PCR targeting the RNase P gene

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    Lewin Astrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The free-living amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris may cause fatal encephalitis both in immunocompromised and in – apparently – immunocompetent humans and other mammalian species. Rapid, specific, sensitive, and reliable detection requiring little pathogen-specific expertise is an absolute prerequisite for a successful therapy and a welcome tool for both experimental and epidemiological research. Results A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan® probes (real-time PCR was established specifically targeting the RNase P gene of B. mandrillaris amoebae. The assay detected at least 2 (down to 0.5 genomes of B. mandrillaris grown in axenic culture. It did not react with DNA from closely related Acanthamoeba (3 species, nor with DNA from Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania major, Pneumocystis murina, Mycobacterium bovis (BCG, human brain, various mouse organs, or from human and murine cell lines. The assay efficiently detected B. mandrillaris DNA in spiked cell cultures, spiked murine organ homogenates, B. mandrillaris-infected mice, and CNS tissue-DNA preparations from 2 patients with proven cerebral balamuthiasis. This novel primer set was successfully combined with a published set that targets the B. mandrillaris 18S rRNA gene in a duplex real-time PCR assay to ensure maximum specificity and as a precaution against false negative results. Conclusion A real-time PCR assay for B. mandrillaris amoebae is presented, that is highly specific, sensitive, and reliable and thus suited both for diagnosis and for research.

  15. Sequence Characterization and Spatiotemporal Expression Patterns of PbS26-RNase Gene in Chinese White Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri

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    Lin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many flowering plants exhibit an important intraspecific reproductive barrier phenomenon, that is, self-incompatibility (SI, in which S-RNase genes play a significant role. To clarify the specific function of S-RNase genes in Chinese pears, the full length cDNA of PbS26-RNase was isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE technology from Chinese white pear (Pyrus bretschneideri cultivar “Hongpisu.” The cDNA sequence for PbS26-RNase was deposited in GenBank under accession number EU081888. At the amino acid level, the PbS26-RNase displayed the highest similarity (96.9% with PcSa-RNase of P. communis, and only seven amino acid differences were present in the two S-RNases. Phylogenetic analysis of rosaceous S-RNases indicated that the PbS26-RNase clustered with maloideous S-RNases, forming a subfamily-specific not a species-specific group. The PbS26-RNase gene was specifically expressed in the style but not other tissues/organs. The expression level of the PbS26-RNase gene rapidly increased at bell balloon stage (BBS, and then it dropped after pollination. However, the abundance of the PbS26-RNase gene transcript in the style was greater after cross-pollination than after self-pollination. In addition, a method for rapidly detecting the PbS26-RNase gene was developed via allele-specific primers design. The present study could provide a scientific basis for fully clarifying the mechanism of pear SI at the molecular level.

  16. Multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP and lung resistance protein (LRP gene expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Elvis Terci Valera

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Despite the advances in the cure rate for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, approximately 25% of affected children suffer relapses. Expression of genes for the multiple drug resistance protein (MDR-1, multidrug resistance-related protein (MRP, and lung resistance protein (LRP may confer the phenotype of resistance to the treatment of neoplasias. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the expression of the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes in children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia via the semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and to determine the correlation between expression and event-free survival and clinical and laboratory variables. DESIGN: A retrospective clinical study. SETTING: Laboratory of Pediatric Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Bone marrow aspirates from 30 children with a diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia were assessed for the expression of messenger RNA for the MDR-1, MRP and LRP genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: In the three groups studied, only the increased expression of LRP was related to worsened event-free survival (p = 0.005. The presence of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA was correlated with increased LRP expression (p = 0.009 and increased risk of relapse or death (p = 0.05. The relative risk of relapse or death was six times higher among children with high LRP expression upon diagnosis (p = 0.05, as confirmed by multivariate analysis of the three genes studied (p = 0.035. DISCUSSION: Cell resistance to drugs is a determinant of the response to chemotherapy and its detection via RT-PCR may be of clinical importance. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the expression of genes for resistance to antineoplastic drugs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia upon diagnosis, and particularly the expression of the LRP gene, may be of clinical relevance, and should be the

  17. Function of MRP1/ABCC1 is not dependent on cholesterol or cholesterol-stabilized lipid rafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meszaros, Peter; Klappe, Karin; Hummel, Ina; Hoekstra, Dick; Kok, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    MRP1 (multidrug-resistance-related protein 1)/ABCC1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter C1) has been localized in cholesterol-enriched lipid rafts, which suggests a role for these lipid rafts and/or cholesterol in MRP1 function. In the present study, we have shown for the first time that nearly comple

  18. Cholesterol but not association with detergent resistant membranes is necessary for the transport function of MRP2/ABCC2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ito, Kousei; Hoekstra, Dick; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2008-01-01

    MRP2(/ABCC2) excretes amphiphilic organic anions into bile, and associates with detergent-resistant bile canalicular membrane domains (DRM). Here, we have evaluated sensitivities of MRP2 transport function and DRM association by titrating the cellular cholesterol content. We demonstrate that the rol

  19. Structural plasticity and Mg2+ binding properties of RNase P P4 from combined analysis of NMR residual dipolar couplings and motionally decoupled spin relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Melissa M; Andrews, Andy J; Fierke, Carol A; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2007-02-01

    The P4 helix is an essential element of ribonuclease P (RNase P) that is believed to bind catalytically important metals. Here, we applied a combination of NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and a recently introduced domain-elongation strategy for measuring "motionally decoupled" relaxation data to characterize the structural dynamics of the P4 helix from Bacillus subtilis RNase P. In the absence of divalent ions, the two P4 helical domains undergo small amplitude (approximately 13 degrees) collective motions about an average interhelical angle of 10 degrees. The highly conserved U7 bulge and helical residue C8, which are proposed to be important for substrate recognition and metal binding, are locally mobile at pico- to nanosecond timescales and together form the pivot point for the collective domain motions. Chemical shift mapping reveals significant association of Mg2+ ions at the P4 major groove near the flexible pivot point at residues (A5, G22, G23) previously identified to bind catalytically important metals. The Mg2+ ions do not, however, significantly alter the structure or dynamics of P4. Analysis of results in the context of available X-ray structures of the RNA component of RNase P and structural models that include the pre-tRNA substrate suggest that the internal motions observed in P4 likely facilitate adaptive changes in conformation that take place during folding and substrate recognition, possibly aided by interactions with Mg2+ ions. Our results add to a growing view supporting the existence of functionally important internal motions in RNA occurring at nanosecond timescales.

  20. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  1. Distribution dynamics and functional importance of NHERF1 in regulation of Mrp-2 trafficking in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvar, Serhan; Suda, Jo; Zhu, Lixin; Rockey, Don C

    2014-10-15

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein that interacts with receptors and ion transporters in its PDZ domains and with the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of proteins in its COOH terminus. The role of NHERF1 in hepatocyte function remains largely unknown. We examine the distribution and physiological significance of NHERF1 and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp-2) in hepatocytes. A WT radixin binding site mutant (F355R) and NHERF1 PDZ1 and PDZ2 domain adenoviral mutant constructs were tagged with yellow fluorescent protein and expressed in polarized hepatocytes to study localization and function of NHERF1. Cellular distribution of NHERF1 and radixin was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. A 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) assay was used to characterize Mrp-2 function. Similar to Mrp-2, WT NHERF1 and the NHERF1 PDZ2 deletion mutant were localized to the canalicular membrane. In contrast, the radixin binding site mutant (F355R) and the NHERF1 PDZ1 deletion mutant, which interacts poorly with Mrp-2, were rarely associated with the canalicular membrane. Knockdown of NHERF1 led to dramatically impaired CMFDA secretory response. Use of CMFDA showed that the NHERF1 PDZ1 and F355R mutants were devoid of a secretory response, while WT NHERF1-infected cells exhibited increased secretion of glutathione-methylfluorescein. The data indicate that NHERF1 interacts with Mrp-2 via the PDZ1 domain of NHERF1 and, furthermore, that NHERF1 is essential for maintaining the localization and function of Mrp-2.

  2. MRP1 expression in bronchoalveolar lavage cells in subjects with lung cancer who were chronically exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Dena-Cazares, Jose Angel; Ramirez-de la Peña, Jorge Luis; Jacobo-Ávila, Antonio; Portales-Castanedo, Arnulfo; Gallegos-Arreola, Martha Patricia; Ocampo-Gomez, Guadalupe; Michel-Ramirez, Gladis

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1) expression has been associated with certain lung diseases, and this protein may be pivotal in protecting the lungs against endogenous or exogenous toxic compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of MRP1 in bronchoalveolar cells from subjects with and without lung cancer who had been chronically exposed to arsenic through drinking water. MRP1 expression was assessed in bronchoalveolar cells in a total of 102 participants. MRP1 expression was significantly decreased in those with arsenic urinary levels >50 μg/L when compared with the controls. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure negatively correlates with the expression of MRP1 in BAL cells in patients with lung cancer.

  3. The Ribonuclease A Superfamily in Humans: Canonical RNases as the Buttress of Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Koczera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In humans, the ribonuclease A (RNase A superfamily contains eight different members that have RNase activities, and all of these members are encoded on chromosome 14. The proteins are secreted by a large variety of different tissues and cells; however, a comprehensive understanding of these proteins’ physiological roles is lacking. Different biological effects can be attributed to each protein, including antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as cytotoxic effects against host cells and parasites. Different immunomodulatory effects have also been demonstrated. This review summarizes the available data on the human RNase A superfamily and illustrates the significant role of the eight canonical RNases in inflammation and the host defence system against infections.

  4. Cell Lines Expressing Nuclear and/or Mitochondrial RNAse H1 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD), Program in Genomics of Differentiation, seeks interested parties to further co-develop small molecule inhibitors of RNase H1, especially in regards to genome instability, transcription, and translation.

  5. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  6. Evolution and function of leukocyte RNase A ribonucleases of the avian species, Gallus gallus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Dyer, Kimberly D; Czapiga, Meggan; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2006-09-01

    In this study, we explore the evolution and function of two closely related RNase A ribonucleases from the chicken, Gallus gallus. Separated by approximately 10 kb on chromosome 6, the coding sequences of RNases A-1 and A-2 are diverging under positive selection pressure (dN > dS) but remain similar to one another (81% amino acid identity) and to the mammalian angiogenins. Immunoreactive RNases A-1 and A-2 (both approximately 16 kDa) were detected in peripheral blood granulocytes and bone marrow. Recombinant proteins are ribonucleolytically active (kcat = 2.6 and 0.056 s(-1), respectively), and surprisingly, both interact with human placental ribonuclease inhibitor. RNase A-2, the more cationic (pI 11.0), is both angiogenic and bactericidal; RNase A-1 (pI 10.2) has neither activity. We demonstrated via point mutation of the catalytic His110 that ablation of ribonuclease activity has no impact on the bactericidal activity of RNase A-2. We determined that the divergent domains II (amino acids 71-76) and III (amino acids 89-104) of RNase A-2 are both important for bactericidal activity. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these cationic domains can function as independent bactericidal peptides without the tertiary structure imposed by the RNase A backbone. These results suggest that ribonucleolytic activity may not be a crucial constraint limiting the ongoing evolution of this gene family and that the ribonuclease backbone may be merely serving as a scaffold to support the evolution of novel, nonribonucleolytic proteins.

  7. Influence of C-terminal tail deletion on structure and stability of hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Chu, Wen-Ting; Xue, Qiao; Zhang, Hong-Xing; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-06-01

    The C-terminus tail (G144-T149) of the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI) plays an important role in this protein's hyperstabilization and may therefore be a good protein stability tag. Detailed understanding of the structural and dynamic effects of C-terminus tail deletion is required for gaining insights into the thermal stability mechanism of Sto-RNase HI. Focused on Sulfolobus tokodaii RNase HI (Sto-RNase HI) and its derivative lacking the C-terminal tail (ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI) (PDB codes: 2EHG and 3ALY), we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at four different temperatures (300, 375, 475, and 500 K) to examine the effect of the C-terminal tail on the hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and to investigate the unfolding process of Sto-RNase HI and ΔC6 Sto-RNase HI. The simulations suggest that the C-terminal tail has significant impact in hyperstabilization of Sto-RNase HI and the unfolding of these two proteins evolves along dissimilar pathways. Essential dynamics analysis indicates that the essential subspaces of the two proteins at different temperatures are non-overlapping within the trajectories and they exhibit different directions of motion. Our work can give important information to understand the three-state folding mechanism of Sto-RNase HI and to offer alternative strategies to improve the protein stability.

  8. Structure of a bacterial ribonuclease P holoenzyme in complex with tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Nicholas J; Osterman, Amy; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K; Pan, Tao; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-12-09

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is the universal ribozyme responsible for 5'-end tRNA processing. We report the crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima RNase P holoenzyme in complex with tRNA(Phe). The 154 kDa complex consists of a large catalytic RNA (P RNA), a small protein cofactor and a mature tRNA. The structure shows that RNA-RNA recognition occurs through shape complementarity, specific intermolecular contacts and base-pairing interactions. Soaks with a pre-tRNA 5' leader sequence with and without metal help to identify the 5' substrate path and potential catalytic metal ions. The protein binds on top of a universally conserved structural module in P RNA and interacts with the leader, but not with the mature tRNA. The active site is composed of phosphate backbone moieties, a universally conserved uridine nucleobase, and at least two catalytically important metal ions. The active site structure and conserved RNase P-tRNA contacts suggest a universal mechanism of catalysis by RNase P.

  9. RNA polymerase activity of Ustilago maydis virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yie, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    Ustilago maydis virus has an RNA polymerase enzyme which is associated with virion capsids. In the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ion and ribonucleotide triphosphate, the enzyme catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of mRNA by using dsRNA as a template. The products of the UmV RNA polymerase were both ssRNA and dsRNA. The dsRNA was determined by characteristic mobilities in gel electrophoresis, lack of sensitivity to RNase, and specific hybridization tests. The ssRNAs were identified by elution from a CF-11 column and by their RNase sensitivity. On the basis of the size of ssRNAs, it was concluded that partial transcripts were produced from H dsRNA segments, and full length transcripts were produced from M and L dsRNA segments. The following observations indicates that transcription occurs by strand displacement; (1) Only the positive strand of M2 dsRNA was labeled by the in vitro reaction. (2) The M2 dsRNA which had been labeled with /sup 32/''P-UTP in vitro could be chased from dsRNA with unlabeled UTP. The transcription products of three UmV strains were compared, and the overall pattern of transcription was very similar among them.

  10. Determination of the Specificity Landscape for Ribonuclease P Processing of Precursor tRNA 5' Leader Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niland, Courtney N; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Anderson, David R; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E

    2016-08-19

    Maturation of tRNA depends on a single endonuclease, ribonuclease P (RNase P), to remove highly variable 5' leader sequences from precursor tRNA transcripts. Here, we use high-throughput enzymology to report multiple-turnover and single-turnover kinetics for Escherichia coli RNase P processing of all possible 5' leader sequences, including nucleotides contacting both the RNA and protein subunits of RNase P. The results reveal that the identity of N(-2) and N(-3) relative to the cleavage site at N(1) primarily control alternative substrate selection and act at the level of association not the cleavage step. As a consequence, the specificity for N(-1), which contacts the active site and contributes to catalysis, is suppressed. This study demonstrates high-throughput RNA enzymology as a means to globally determine RNA specificity landscapes and reveals the mechanism of substrate discrimination by a widespread and essential RNA-processing enzyme.

  11. Project scheduling method with time using MRP system – A case study: Construction project in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Ali Imetieg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Materials Requirements and Planning (MRP is a system of production planning and inventory control, which is used to manage manufacturing processes. Most MRP systems are software-based and are used to ensure that the materials are available for production, that the products are available for delivery to customers, that the lowest possible material and product level is maintained in store, as well as to plan delivery schedules and purchasing activities. Upon completion of scheduling, begins the process of follow-up, which includes the achievement of the project goals in terms of quantity, quality and costs in accordance with deadlines. MRP system was applied to project of 5000 housing units in Solug area, which is close to Benghazi city, Libya, with the aim to provide necessary cash flow to pay dues on time without delay to all involved project sub-contractors and material suppliers, to ensure the smooth flow of operations, as well as to diminish costs by reduction of temporary storages and rented areas. There is a correlation between time and cost of each activity. If the required time is shorter than the scheduled time of the certain activity, it would demand more resources, which further leads to the increase in direct costs of the given activity. Therefore, the output of MRP is important since commands are issued through planning in order to launch the suggested orders with the required quantities and within the limited time period.

  12. Purification and functional reconstitution of a seven-subunit mrp-type na+/h+ antiporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Masato; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Ito, Masahiro; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2014-01-01

    Mrp antiporters and their homologues in the cation/proton antiporter 3 family of the Membrane Transporter Database are widely distributed in bacteria. They have major roles in supporting cation and cytoplasmic pH homeostasis in many environmental, extremophilic, and pathogenic bacteria. These antiporters require six or seven hydrophobic proteins that form hetero-oligomeric complexes, while most other cation/proton antiporters require only one membrane protein for their activity. The resemblance of three Mrp subunits to membrane-embedded subunits of the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase of respiratory chains and to subunits of several hydrogenases has raised interest in the evolutionary path and commonalities of their proton-translocating domains. In order to move toward a greater mechanistic understanding of these unusual antiporters and to rigorously demonstrate that they function as secondary antiporters, powered by an imposed proton motive force, we established a method for purification and functional reconstitution of the seven-subunit Mrp antiporter from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4. Na(+)/H(+) antiporter activity was demonstrated by a fluorescence-based assay with proteoliposomes in which the Mrp complex was coreconstituted with a bacterial FoF1-ATPase. Proton pumping by the ATPase upon addition of ATP generated a proton motive force across the membranes that powered antiporter activity upon subsequent addition of Na(+).

  13. Reduced inflammatory response in cigarette smoke exposed MrpI/MdrIa/Ib deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, Margaretha; Timens, Wim; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; van der Strate, Barry W.; Scheper, Rik J.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Kerstjens, Huib A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Tobacco smoke is the principal risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), though the mechanisms of its toxicity are still unclear. The ABC transporters multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1) extrude a wide variety of toxic subst

  14. The alarmin Mrp8/14 as regulator of the adaptive immune response during allergic contact dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Beatrix; Wolf, Marc; Austermann, Judith; van Lent, Peter; Foell, Dirk; Ahlmann, Martina; Kupas, Verena; Loser, Karin; Sorg, Clemens; Roth, Johannes; Vogl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mrp8 and Mrp14 are endogenous alarmins amplifying inflammation via Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) activation. Due to their pro-inflammatory properties, alarmins are supposed to enhance adaptive immunity via activation of dendritic cells (DCs). In contrast, analysing a model of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) we observed a more severe disease outcome in Mrp8/14-deficient compared to wild-type mice. This unexpected phenotype was associated with an enhanced T-cell response due to an accelerated maturation of DCs in Mrp8/14-deficient mice. Accordingly, Mrp8, the active component of the heterocomplex, inhibits early DC maturation and antigen presentation in a TLR-4-dependent manner. Transfer of DCs purified from the local lymph nodes of sensitized Mrp8/14-deficient to wild-type mice determined the outcome of ACD. Our results link a pro-inflammatory role of the endogenous TLR-4 ligand Mrp8/14 to a regulatory function in adaptive immunity, which shows some similarities with the ‘hygiene hypothesis' regarding continuous TLR-4 stimulation and decreased risk of allergy. PMID:23188082

  15. MRP4 and CFTR in the regulation of cAMP and β-adrenergic contraction in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Zachary M; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Xiang, Yang; Best, Philip M

    2012-04-15

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP in cardiac myocytes is integral to regulating the diverse functions downstream of β-adrenergic stimulation. The activities of cAMP phosphodiesterases modulate critical and well-studied cellular processes. Recently, in epithelial and smooth muscle cells, it was found that the multi-drug resistant protein 4 (MRP4) acts as a cAMP efflux pump to regulate intracellular cAMP levels and alter effector function, including activation of the cAMP-stimulated Cl(-) channel, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). In the current study we investigated the potential role of MRP4 in regulating intracellular cAMP and β-adrenergic stimulated contraction rate in cardiac myocytes. Cultured neonatal ventricular myocytes were used for all experiments. In addition to wildtype mice, β(1)-, β(2)-, and β(1)/β(2)-adrenoceptor, and CFTR knockout mice were used. MRP4 expression was probed via Western blot, intracellular cAMP was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, while the functional role of MRP4 was assayed via monitoring of isoproterenol-stimulated contraction rate. We found that MRP4 is expressed in mouse neonatal ventricular myocytes. A pharmacological inhibitor of MRP4, MK571, potentiated submaximal isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation and cardiomyocyte contraction rate via β(1)-adrenoceptors. CFTR expression was critical for submaximal isoproterenol-stimulated contraction rate. Interestingly, MRP4-dependent changes in contraction rate were CFTR-dependent, however, PDE4-dependent potentiation of contraction rate was CFTR-independent. We have shown, for the first time, a role for MRP4 in the regulation of cAMP in cardiac myocytes and involvement of CFTR in β-adrenergic stimulated contraction. Together with phosphodiesterases, MRP4 must be considered when examining cAMP regulation in cardiac myocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Synergistic Interactions between Hepatitis B Virus RNase H Antagonists and Other Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonosova, Elena; Zlotnick, Adam; Tavis, John E

    2017-03-01

    Combination therapies are standard for management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections; however, no such therapies are established for human hepatitis B virus (HBV). Recently, we identified several promising inhibitors of HBV RNase H (here simply RNase H) activity that have significant activity against viral replication in vitro Here, we investigated the in vitro antiviral efficacy of combinations of two RNase H inhibitors with the current anti-HBV drug nucleoside analog lamivudine, with HAP12, an experimental core protein allosteric modulator, and with each other. Anti-HBV activities of the compounds were tested in a HepG2-derived cell line by monitoring intracellular core particle DNA levels, and cytotoxicity was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. The antiviral efficiencies of the drug combinations were evaluated using the median-effect equation derived from the mass-action law principle and combination index theorem of Chou and Talalay. We found that combinations of two RNase H inhibitors from different chemical classes were synergistic with lamivudine against HBV DNA synthesis. Significant synergism was also observed for the combination of the two RNase H inhibitors. Combinations of RNase H inhibitors with HAP12 had additive antiviral effects. Enhanced cytotoxicity was not observed in the combination experiments. Because of these synergistic and additive effects, the antiviral activity of combinations of RNase H inhibitors with drugs that act by two different mechanisms and with each other can be achieved by administering the compounds in combination at doses below the respective single drug doses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Reduced inflammatory response in cigarette smoke exposed Mrp1/Mdr1a/1b deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postma Dirkje S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoke is the principal risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, though the mechanisms of its toxicity are still unclear. The ABC transporters multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1 extrude a wide variety of toxic substances across cellular membranes and are highly expressed in bronchial epithelium. Their impaired function may contribute to COPD development by diminished detoxification of noxious compounds in cigarette smoke. Methods We examined whether triple knock-out (TKO mice lacking the genes for Mrp1 and Mdr1a/1b are more susceptible to develop COPD features than their wild-type (WT littermates. TKO and WT mice (six per group were exposed to 2 cigarettes twice daily by nose-only exposure or room air for 6 months. Inflammatory infiltrates were analyzed in lung sections, cytokines and chemokines in whole lung homogenates, emphysema by mean linear intercept. Multiple linear regression analysis with an interaction term was used to establish the statistical significances of differences. Results TKO mice had lower levels of interleukin (IL-7, KC (mouse IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-17, TNF-alpha, G-CSF, GM-CSF and MIP-1-alpha than WT mice independent of smoke exposure (P P P Conclusion Mrp1/Mdr1a/1b knock-out mice have a reduced inflammatory response to cigarette smoke. In addition, the expression levels of several cytokines and chemokines were also lower in lungs of Mrp1/Mdr1a/1b knock-out mice independent of smoke exposure. Further studies are required to determine whether dysfunction of MRP1 and/or P-gp contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD.

  18. The use of knowledge-based Genetic Algorithm for starting time optimisation in a lot-bucket MRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwan, Muhammad; Purnomo, Andi

    2016-01-01

    In production planning, Material Requirement Planning (MRP) is usually developed based on time-bucket system, a period in the MRP is representing the time and usually weekly. MRP has been successfully implemented in Make To Stock (MTS) manufacturing, where production activity must be started before customer demand is received. However, to be implemented successfully in Make To Order (MTO) manufacturing, a modification is required on the conventional MRP in order to make it in line with the real situation. In MTO manufacturing, delivery schedule to the customers is defined strictly and must be fulfilled in order to increase customer satisfaction. On the other hand, company prefers to keep constant number of workers, hence production lot size should be constant as well. Since a bucket in conventional MRP system is representing time and usually weekly, hence, strict delivery schedule could not be accommodated. Fortunately, there is a modified time-bucket MRP system, called as lot-bucket MRP system that proposed by Casimir in 1999. In the lot-bucket MRP system, a bucket is representing a lot, and the lot size is preferably constant. The time to finish every lot could be varying depends on due date of lot. Starting time of a lot must be determined so that every lot has reasonable production time. So far there is no formal method to determine optimum starting time in the lot-bucket MRP system. Trial and error process usually used for it but some time, it causes several lots have very short production time and the lot-bucket MRP would be infeasible to be executed. This paper presents the use of Genetic Algorithm (GA) for optimisation of starting time in a lot-bucket MRP system. Even though GA is well known as powerful searching algorithm, however, improvement is still required in order to increase possibility of GA in finding optimum solution in shorter time. A knowledge-based system has been embedded in the proposed GA as the improvement effort, and it is proven that the

  19. Lineage A Betacoronavirus NS2 Proteins and the Homologous Torovirus Berne pp1a Carboxy-Terminal Domain Are Phosphodiesterases That Antagonize Activation of RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Stephen A; Thornbrough, Joshua M; Zhang, Rong; Jha, Babal K; Li, Yize; Elliott, Ruth; Quiroz-Figueroa, Katherine; Chen, Annie I; Silverman, Robert H; Weiss, Susan R

    2017-03-01

    Viruses in the family Coronaviridae, within the order Nidovirales, are etiologic agents of a range of human and animal diseases, including both mild and severe respiratory diseases in humans. These viruses encode conserved replicase and structural proteins as well as more diverse accessory proteins, encoded in the 3' ends of their genomes, that often act as host cell antagonists. We previously showed that 2',5'-phosphodiesterases (2',5'-PDEs) encoded by the prototypical Betacoronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), and by Middle East respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus antagonize the oligoadenylate-RNase L (OAS-RNase L) pathway. Here we report that additional coronavirus superfamily members, including lineage A betacoronaviruses and toroviruses infecting both humans and animals, encode 2',5'-PDEs capable of antagonizing RNase L. We used a chimeric MHV system (MHV(Mut)) in which exogenous PDEs were expressed from an MHV backbone lacking the gene for a functional NS2 protein, the endogenous RNase L antagonist. With this system, we found that 2',5'-PDEs encoded by the human coronavirus HCoV-OC43 (OC43; an agent of the common cold), human enteric coronavirus (HECoV), equine coronavirus (ECoV), and equine torovirus Berne (BEV) are enzymatically active, rescue replication of MHV(Mut) in bone marrow-derived macrophages, and inhibit RNase L-mediated rRNA degradation in these cells. Additionally, PDEs encoded by OC43 and BEV rescue MHV(Mut) replication and restore pathogenesis in wild-type (WT) B6 mice. This finding expands the range of viruses known to encode antagonists of the potent OAS-RNase L antiviral pathway, highlighting its importance in a range of species as well as the selective pressures exerted on viruses to antagonize it.IMPORTANCE Viruses in the family Coronaviridae include important human and animal pathogens, including the recently emerged viruses severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory

  20. Messenger RNA Turnover Processes in Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Emerging Studies in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsi L. Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mRNA turnover is a recently appreciated phenomenon by which bacteria modulate gene expression. This review outlines the mechanisms by which three major classes of bacterial trans-acting factors, ribonucleases (RNases, RNA binding proteins, and small noncoding RNAs (sRNA, regulate the transcript stability and protein production of target genes. Because the mechanisms of RNA decay and maturation are best characterized in Escherichia coli, the majority of this review will focus on how these factors modulate mRNA stability in this organism. However, we also address the effects of RNases, RNA binding proteins, sRNAs on mRNA turnover, and gene expression in Bacillus subtilis, which has served as a model for studying RNA processing in gram-positive organisms. We conclude by discussing emerging studies on the role modulating mRNA stability has on gene expression in the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of 2 full-length S-RNase genes in Amygdalus ledebouriana Schlecht.%2个野扁桃自交不亲和S-RNase基因全长的克隆与序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关鹏; 曾斌; 李疆; 罗淑萍; 王建友; 李伟阳; 田嘉; 李鹏

    2016-01-01

    protein lose its ribonuclease activity,therefore couldn't degrade self-RNA.Means,such as site-directed mutagenesis,could also be used to modify the corresponding gene region of hypervariable region to make S-RNase protein unable to specifically bind with pollen self-incompatibility determinant factors,therefore couldn' t initiate self-incompatibility response.Moreover,RNAi could be used to silence the target gene.It was predicted that both the PtS16-RNase protein and the PtS17-RNase protein were hydrophilic instable secretory protein.The 1-28 amino acid residues of the PtS16-RNase protein and the 1-26 amino acid residues of the PtS17-RNase protein were predicted to be signal peptide.Means,such as site-directed mutagenesis,could be used to modify corresponding gene region of signal peptide,so that S-RNase protein couldn't arrive its action site to arrest the growth of self-pollen tube.It was predicted that secondary structures of both the PtS16-RNase protein and the PtS17-RNase protein mainly presented as α-helix,extended strand and random coil.According to the prediction,evolutionary relationships of the PtS16-RNase protein and the PtS17-RNase protein were close to some other S-RNase proteins of Prunus,and homology of cross-species was higher than that of intra-species,which might suggest that S-RNase differentiation had completed before species differentiation in Rosaceae.It was predicted that main functions of the PtS16-RNase protein and the PtS17-RNase protein were hydrolase and hormone.The former was consistent with the research results that style self-incompatibility gene products are ribonucleases.The latter was consistent with the research results that S-RNase still had some other functions except ribonucleases,which could be a new research angle after proved.Ribonucleases of the T2 family played a vital role in both plant and human.A broad range of biological roles for these ribonucleases had been suggested,including scavenging of nucleic acids,degradation of

  2. Interaction of hesperetin glucuronide conjugates with human BCRP, MRP2 and MRP3 as detected in membrane vesicles of overexpressing baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Walter; Oosterhuis, Berend; Krajcsi, Peter; Barron, Denis; Dionisi, Fabiola; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Williamson, Gary

    2011-12-01

    The citrus flavonoid hesperetin (4'-methoxy-3',5,7-trihydroxyflavanone) is the aglycone of hesperidin, the major flavonoid present in sweet oranges. Hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide (H7G) and hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide (H3'G) are the two most abundant metabolites of hesperetin in vivo. In this study, their interaction with specific ABC transporters, believed to play a role in the disposition and bioavailability of hesperetin, was studied using Sf9 membranes from cells overexpressing human BCRP (ABCG2), MRP2 (ABCC2) and MRP3 (ABCC3). Both H7G and H3'G were tested for their potential to activate and inhibit ATPase activity, and to inhibit vesicular transport by these transporters. Both H7G and H3'G demonstrated interaction with all tested ABC transporters, especially with BCRP and MRP3. An interesting difference between H7G and H3'G was seen with respect to the interaction with BCRP: H7G stimulated the ATPase activity of BCRP up to 76% of the maximal effect generated by the reference activator sulfasalazine, with an EC(50) of 0.45 µM, suggesting that H7G is a high affinity substrate of BCRP, whereas H3'G did not stimulate BCRP ATPase activity. Only moderate inhibition of BCRP ATPase activity at high H3'G concentrations was observed. This study provides information on the potential of hesperetin glucuronide conjugates to act as specific ABC transporter substrates or inhibitors and indicates that regio-specific glucuronidation could affect the disposition of hesperetin.

  3. Redução da instabilidade e melhoria de desempenho do sistema MRP MRP system: nervousness reduction and performance improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir Godinho Filho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O artigo propõe um método para melhorar o desempenho do sistema MRP em um estudo de caso, uma grande empresa que produz materiais para escrita. O método é conseqüência de um levantamento bibliográfico e de características particulares do estudo de caso. Este método parte do princípio de que a melhoria de desempenho dos sistemas MRP é viabilizada pela redução no grau de instabilidade de tais sistemas e esta por sua vez só pode ser conseguida por meio de dois fatores-chave: i uma correta parametrização do sistema e ii um planejamento e programação da produção integrados voltados para a elaboração de um Plano Mestre de Produção (MPS factível, respeitando as limitações de cálculo de capacidade do sistema. O método foi implementado e os resultados foram: uma redução drástica na instabilidade do sistema, com conseqüente redução nos custos dos estoques, melhoria no nível de serviço e aumento da satisfação e confiança das pessoas com relação ao sistema.The paper presents a method designed to get an improvement of the system performance in a case study, a large company that produces materials for writing. The method arises from a literature survey and from the particular characteristics of the case study. The method argues that the improvement on MRP performance is attained by system nervousness reduction which is supported by two main factors: i system parameters must be determined in a precise way; ii integrated production planning and scheduling focused on development of a realistic Master Production Schedule (MPS, which takes account the system capacity. The method was applied and the results were: reduction of system nervousness, reduction of inventory costs, improvement of service level, increase of the workers satisfaction and increase the reliance on the MRP system.

  4. An Efficient Catalytic DNA that Cleaves L-RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kha Tram

    Full Text Available Many DNAzymes have been isolated from synthetic DNA pools to cleave natural RNA (D-RNA substrates and some have been utilized for the design of aptazyme biosensors for bioanalytical applications. Even though these biosensors perform well in simple sample matrices, they do not function effectively in complex biological samples due to ubiquitous RNases that can efficiently cleave D-RNA substrates. To overcome this issue, we set out to develop DNAzymes that cleave L-RNA, the enantiomer of D-RNA, which is known to be completely resistant to RNases. Through in vitro selection we isolated three L-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes from a random-sequence DNA pool. The most active DNAzyme exhibits a catalytic rate constant ~3 min-1 and has a structure that contains a kissing loop, a structural motif that has never been observed with D-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes. Furthermore we have used this DNAzyme and a well-known ATP-binding DNA aptamer to construct an aptazyme sensor and demonstrated that this biosensor can achieve ATP detection in biological samples that contain RNases. The current work lays the foundation for exploring RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for engineering biosensors that are compatible with complex biological samples.

  5. 一个大豆质子转运体 GmMRP5的克隆与表达分析%Cloning and Expression Pattern Analysis of a Proton Transp orter GmMRP5 in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许玲; 张大勇; 何晓兰; 徐照龙; 刘晓庆; 黄益洪; 马鸿翔; 易金鑫

    2013-01-01

    为探明大豆中MRP蛋白基因的作用机理,从大豆材料中克隆到GmMRP5基因完整的编码序列,GmMRP5基因的开放阅读框( ORF)全长4479 bp,编码1492个氨基酸。序列比对与进化树分析表明:GmMRP5拥有13个推断的跨膜结构域( TMD)和典型的ABC转运蛋白保守结构域,系统进化树分析表明,GmMRP5与AtMRP5同缘关系最近,同属于ABC转运蛋白家族C亚家族;该基因是组成型表达基因,在大豆的根、茎、叶及荚中均有表达;经不同浓度脯氨酸和柠檬酸处理后,该基因在大豆根中的表达被强烈诱导并高效表达。 Real-Time PCR结果表明,该基因在酸性缓冲液处理后表达量上调,推测其作为质子转运体参与大豆阴阳离子交换反应。%In order to investigate the mechanism of the MRP protein genes in soybean ,a novel soybean gene GmMRP5 was identified in soybean cultivar.GmMRP5 containing an open reading frame ( ORF) of 4 479 bp nucleo-tides.The ORF encoded a protein of 1 492 amino acids.Sequence alignment and evolutionary tree clustering analy-sis showed that GmMRP5 contains 13 putative transmembrane-spanning domains(TMDs)and ABC transport protein conserved domain .Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that Gm MRP5 was closely related to AtMRP5 and both be-longed to ABCC subfamily .GmMRP5 was a constitutive expression gene and expressed in root ,stem and leaves by using Real-Time PCR analysis in soybean .GmMRP5 was strongly induced and highly expressed in root after treat-ment by proline and citrate solution .Real-Time PCR showed the expression level of GmMRP5 was increaced by dif-ferent pH buffer solution treatment ,suggesting that GmMRP5 gene may be as a proton transporter to participate in the stress response in soybean .

  6. Correlation between PFGE Groups and mrp/epf/sly Genotypes of Human Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharavichitkul, Prasit; Wongsawan, Kanreuthai; Takenami, Naoki; Pruksakorn, Sumalee; Fongcom, Achara; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Khanthawa, Banyong; Supajatura, Volaluk; Takai, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis infection is a severe zoonotic disease commonly found in Northern Thailand where people often consume raw pork and/or pig's blood. The most frequent clinical presentations are meningitis, sepsis, and endocarditis with higher rate of mortality and hearing loss sequelae. To clarify the correlation between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of S. suis serotype 2, 62 patient and 4 healthy pig isolates from Northern Thailand were studied. By PFGE analysis, at 66% homology, most human isolates (69.4%) and 1 pig isolate were in group A, whereas 14.5% of human isolates and 3 out of 4 pig isolates were in group D. According to mrp/epf/sly genotypes, 80.6% of human isolates were identified in mrp (+) epf (-) sly (-) and only 12.9% were in mrp (-) epf (-) sly (+) genotypes; in contrast, 1 and 3 pig isolates were detected in these two genotypes, respectively. Interestingly, all isolates of S. suis serotype 2 classified in PFGE groups A, B, and E were set in mrp (+) epf (-) sly (-) genotypes. These data show a close correlation between PFGE groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of human S. suis serotype 2.

  7. Expression of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Xing; Zhang, Xu; Wu, Zhun; Ma, Xin; Ju, Zhenghua; Wang, Baojun; Shi, Taoping

    2007-02-01

    The expression of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder (TCCB) and its clinical significance were investigated. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 protein expression in 52 TCCB specimens. Correlation between the expression of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 to clinicopathologic factors was statistically analyzed. The results showed that the positive rate of KAI1/CD82 and MRP-1/CD9 in TCCB was 50% and 61.5%, respectively. The MRP-1/CD9 and KAI1/CD82 expression was significantly associated with grade of TCCB (PMRP-1/CD9 or KAI1/CD82 expression and clinical stage of TCCB (P>0.05). The expression level of MRP-1/CD9 and KAI1/CD82 in recurrent TCCB samples was lower than that in non-recurrent samples (PMRP-1/CD9 expression was statistically significant (r=0.316, PMRP-1/CD9 expression may be important prognostic indicators and potentially useful for assessing the biological behavior of TCCB.

  8. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

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    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  9. Recognition of a wide-range of S-RNases by S locus F-box like 2, a general-inhibitor candidate in the Prunus-specific S-RNase-based self-incompatibility system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Daiki; Tao, Ryutaro

    2016-07-01

    Many species in the Rosaceae, the Solanaceae, and the Plantaginaceae exhibit S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI). This system comprises S-ribonucleases (S-RNases) as the pistil S determinant and a single or multiple F-box proteins as the pollen S determinants. In Prunus, pollen specificity is determined by a single S haplotype-specific F-box protein (SFB). The results of several studies suggested that SFB exerts cognate S-RNase cytotoxicity, and a hypothetical general inhibitor (GI) is assumed to detoxify S-RNases in non-specific manner unless it is affected by SFB. Although the identity of the GI is unknown, phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses have indicated that S locus F-box like 1-3 (or S locus F-box with low allelic sequence polymorphism 1-3; SLFL1-3), which are encoded by a region of the Prunus genome linked to the S locus, are good GI candidates. Here, we examined the biochemical characteristics of SLFL1-3 to determine whether they have appropriate GI characteristics. Pull-down assays and quantitative expression analyses indicated that Prunus avium SLFL1-3 mainly formed a canonical SCF complex with PavSSK1 and PavCul1A. Binding assays with PavS(1,3,4,6)-RNases showed that PavSLFL1, PavSLFL2, and PavSLFL3 bound to PavS(3)-RNase, all PavS-RNases tested, and none of the PavS-RNases tested, respectively. Together, these results suggested that SLFL2 has the appropriate characteristics to be the GI in sweet cherry pollen, while SLFL1 may redundantly work with SLFL2 to detoxify all S-RNases. We discuss the possible roles of SLFL1-3 as the GI in the Prunus-specific S-RNase-based GSI mechanism.

  10. Sequence Classification: 889296 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available both RNase MRP, which cleaves pre-rRNA, and nuclear RNase P, which cleaves tRNA precursors to generate mature 5' ends; Pop8p || http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/protein/6319453 ... ...Non-TMB Non-TMH Non-TMB Non-TMB TMB Non-TMB >gi|6319453|ref|NP_009535.1| Subunit of

  11. Two Dictyostelium ribosomal proteins act as RNases for specific classes of mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 leads to the stabilization of pre-spore specific mRNAs during development of Dictyostelium discoideum. The purification of S6 kinase has allowed the identification of protein S11 as the mRNase specific for pre-spore mRNAs. Methylation of ribosomal protein S31 leads to the destabilization of ribosomal protein mRNAs. The purification of S31 methyltransferase has allowed the identification of protein S29 as the mRNAse specific for ribosomal protein mRNAs.

  12. Alba-domain proteins of Trypanosoma brucei are cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins that interact with the translation machinery.

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    Jan Mani

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei and related pathogens transcribe most genes as polycistronic arrays that are subsequently processed into monocistronic mRNAs. Expression is frequently regulated post-transcriptionally by cis-acting elements in the untranslated regions (UTRs. GPEET and EP procyclins are the major surface proteins of procyclic (insect midgut forms of T. brucei. Three regulatory elements common to the 3' UTRs of both mRNAs regulate mRNA turnover and translation. The glycerol-responsive element (GRE is unique to the GPEET 3' UTR and regulates its expression independently from EP. A synthetic RNA encompassing the GRE showed robust sequence-specific interactions with cytoplasmic proteins in electromobility shift assays. This, combined with column chromatography, led to the identification of 3 Alba-domain proteins. RNAi against Alba3 caused a growth phenotype and reduced the levels of Alba1 and Alba2 proteins, indicative of interactions between family members. Tandem-affinity purification and co-immunoprecipitation verified these interactions and also identified Alba4 in sub-stoichiometric amounts. Alba proteins are cytoplasmic and are recruited to starvation granules together with poly(A RNA. Concomitant depletion of all four Alba proteins by RNAi specifically reduced translation of a reporter transcript flanked by the GPEET 3' UTR. Pulldown of tagged Alba proteins confirmed interactions with poly(A binding proteins, ribosomal protein P0 and, in the case of Alba3, the cap-binding protein eIF4E4. In addition, Alba2 and Alba3 partially cosediment with polyribosomes in sucrose gradients. Alba-domain proteins seem to have exhibited great functional plasticity in the course of evolution. First identified as DNA-binding proteins in Archaea, then in association with nuclear RNase MRP/P in yeast and mammalian cells, they were recently described as components of a translationally silent complex containing stage-regulated mRNAs in Plasmodium. Our results are

  13. 5'S implementation in warehouse and improving stock management using MRP

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Pedro Miguel Menino

    2016-01-01

    A presente dissertação, intitulada “Implementação dos 5’S no armazém de peças e do MRP na gestão de stocks”, decorreu no âmbito do estágio curricular do 5º ano do Mestrado em Engenharia e Gestão Industrial da Universidade de Coimbra. O projeto, proposto pela Sociedade da Água de Luso (SAL), consiste na implementação da metodologia dos 5’S, no armazém de peças de apoio à manutenção das linhas de enchimento e, posteriormente, na implementação do Material Requirement Planning (MRP), na ajuda ...

  14. APPLICATION OF THE EXTENDED MRP THEORY TO A BABY FOOD COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Kovačić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Actual markets require companies to think about new ways to improve their business or to get additional advantages from their existing competences. Such improvements should not be limited to optimisation of individual activity cells but should be the result of broader analyses. Companies should consider their whole supply chains and make deep observation of dependencies between individual activity cells. Material requirements planning (MRP Theory has proved to be a successful tool for describing and evaluating multistage, multilevel production systems with the use of Net Present Value (NPV calculation. Recently, this theory has been extended in a way that it also deals with other vital parts of global supply chains, such as distribution, consumption and the reverse logistics. We call this approach the Extended MRP Theory (EMRP Theory. This paper shows how EMRP Theory can be used in analysing business processes for a Spanish company dedicated to baby food production.

  15. MRP (materiel requirements planning) II education: a team-building experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iemmolo, G R

    1994-05-01

    Conestoga Wood Specialties, a leader in the woodworking industry, is constantly striving for continuous improvement in manufacturing and service. Recently, the company embarked on a major MRP II education effort that served as a framework for team building. This team building concept has carried over into other aspects related to the business, such as the formalization of the sales and operations planning meeting. At Conestoga Wood, it is recognized that successful team building is necessary to achieve and maintain world-class performance.

  16. Robustness and Actuator Bandwidth of MRP-Based Sliding Mode Control for Spacecraft Attitude Control Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Jung-Hoon; Ra, Sung-Woong

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear sliding surface design in variable structure systems for spacecraft attitude control problems is studied. A robustness analysis is performed for regular form of system, and calculation of actuator bandwidth is presented by reviewing sliding surface dynamics. To achieve non-singular attitude description and minimal parameterization, spacecraft attitude control problems are considered based on modified Rodrigues parameters (MRP). It is shown that the derived controller ensures the sliding motion in pre-determined region irrespective of unmodeled effects and disturbances.

  17. SaaS – direction of technology development in ERP/MRP systems

    OpenAIRE

    W. Torbacki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The main issue of this paper is present modern SaaS technology (Software as a Service) used in ERP/MRP class systems designated for production companies from different SME lines.Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents assumptions and aims of implementation of SaaSsystems on a background of classic computing system licences designated for company management.Findings: A present state of SaaS software development produced for manufacturing and enterprise resourceplanning as well...

  18. Cloning and identification of Group 1 mrp operon encoding a novel monovalent cation/proton antiporter system from the moderate halophile Halomonas zhaodongensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lin; Hong, Shan; Liu, Henan; Huang, Haipeng; Sun, Hao; Xu, Tong; Jiang, Juquan

    2014-11-01

    The novel species Halomonas zhaodongensis NEAU-ST10-25(T) recently identified by our group is a moderate halophile which can grow at the range of 0-2.5 M NaCl (optimum 0.5 M) and pH 6-12 (optimum pH 9). To explore its halo-alkaline tolerant mechanism, genomic DNA was screened from NEAU-ST10-25(T) in this study for Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter genes by selection in Escherichia coli KNabc lacking three major Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporters. One mrp operon could confer tolerance of E. coli KNabc to 0.8 M NaCl and 100 mM LiCl, and an alkaline pH. This operon was previously mainly designated mrp (also mnh, pha or sha) due to its multiple resistance and pH-related activity. Here, we will also use mrp to designate the homolog from H. zhaodongensis (Hz_mrp). Sequence analysis and protein alignment showed that Hz_mrp should belong to Group 1 mrp operons. Further phylogenetic analysis reveals that Hz_Mrp system should represent a novel sub-class of Group 1 Mrp systems. This was confirmed by a significant difference in pH-dependent activity profile or the specificity and affinity for the transported monovalent cations between Hz_Mrp system and all the known Mrp systems. Therefore, we propose that Hz_Mrp should be categorized as a novel Group 1 Mrp system.

  19. Mechanism of RPE cell death in α-crystallin deficient mice: a novel and critical role for MRP1-mediated GSH efflux.

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    Parameswaran G Sreekumar

    Full Text Available Absence of α-crystallins (αA and αB in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells renders them susceptible to oxidant-induced cell death. We tested the hypothesis that the protective effect of α-crystallin is mediated by changes in cellular glutathione (GSH and elucidated the mechanism of GSH efflux. In α-crystallin overexpressing cells resistant to cell death, cellular GSH was >2 fold higher than vector control cells and this increase was seen particularly in mitochondria. The high GSH levels associated with α-crystallin overexpression were due to increased GSH biosynthesis. On the other hand, cellular GSH was decreased by 50% in murine retina lacking αA or αB crystallin. Multiple multidrug resistance protein (MRP family isoforms were expressed in RPE, among which MRP1 was the most abundant. MRP1 was localized to the plasma membrane and inhibition of MRP1 markedly decreased GSH efflux. MRP1-suppressed cells were resistant to cell death and contained elevated intracellular GSH and GSSG. Increased GSH in MRP1-supressed cells resulted from a higher conversion of GSSG to GSH by glutathione reductase. In contrast, GSH efflux was significantly higher in MRP1 overexpressing RPE cells which also contained lower levels of cellular GSH and GSSG. Oxidative stress further increased GSH efflux with a decrease in cellular GSH and rendered cells apoptosis-prone. In conclusion, our data reveal for the first time that 1 MRP1 mediates GSH and GSSG efflux in RPE cells; 2 MRP1 inhibition renders RPE cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced cell death while MRP1 overexpression makes them susceptible and 3 the antiapoptotic function of α-crystallin in oxidatively stressed cells is mediated in part by GSH and MRP1. Our findings suggest that MRP1 and α crystallin are potential therapeutic targets in pathological retinal degenerative disorders linked to oxidative stress.

  20. Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 (MRP2) Mediated Transport of Oxaliplatin-Derived Platinum in Membrane Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khine; Li, Yan; Paxton, James; McKeage, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The platinum-based anticancer drug oxaliplatin is important clinically in cancer treatment. However, the role of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) in controlling oxaliplatin membrane transport, in vivo handling, toxicity and therapeutic responses is unclear. In the current study, preparations of MRP2-expressing and control membrane vesicles, containing inside-out orientated vesicles, were used to directly characterise the membrane transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Oxaliplatin inhibited the ATP-dependent accumulation of the model MRP2 fluorescent probe, 5(6)-carboxy-2,'7'-dichlorofluorescein, in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles. MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles accumulated up to 19-fold more platinum during their incubation with oxaliplatin and ATP as compared to control membrane vesicles and in the absence of ATP. The rate of ATP-dependent MRP2-mediated active transport of oxaliplatin-derived platinum increased non-linearly with increasing oxaliplatin exposure concentration, approaching a plateau value (Vmax) of 2680 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes (95%CI, 2010 to 3360 pmol Pt/mg protein/10 minutes), with the half-maximal platinum accumulation rate (Km) at an oxaliplatin exposure concentration of 301 μM (95% CI, 163 to 438 μM), in accordance with Michaelis-Menten kinetics (r2 = 0.954). MRP2 inhibitors (myricetin and MK571) reduced the ATP-dependent accumulation of oxaliplatin-derived platinum in MRP2-expressing membrane vesicles in a concentration-dependent manner. To identify whether oxaliplatin, or perhaps a degradation product, was the likely substrate for this active transport, HPLC studies were undertaken showing that oxaliplatin degraded slowly in membrane vesicle incubation buffer containing chloride ions and glutathione, with approximately 95% remaining intact after a 10 minute incubation time and a degradation half-life of 2.24 hours (95%CI, 2.08 to 2.43 hours). In

  1. Analysis of Mitochondrial RNA-Processing Defects in Patient-Derived Tissues by qRT-PCR and RNAseq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopajtich, Robert; Mayr, Johannes A; Prokisch, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Transcription of the mitochondrial genome yields three large polycistronic transcripts that undergo multiple endonucleolytic processing steps, before resulting in functional mRNAs, tRNAs, and rRNAs. Cleavage of the large precursor transcripts is mainly performed by the RNase P complex and RNase Z that cleave mitochondrial pre-tRNAs at their 5' and 3' ends respectively. Most likely there are additional enzymes involved that still await identification and characterization. Defects in mitochondrial RNA processing have been associated with human disease. There are published cases of patients carrying mutations in either HSD17B10/MRPP2 (encoding a subunit of RNase P complex) or ELAC2 (coding for RNase Z). In addition, several mtDNA mutations within tRNA genes have been shown to affect RNA processing. Here, we describe detailed protocols for analyzing RNA processing of mitochondrial tRNAs, in particular their 3'-ends that are processed by RNase Z. These protocols should serve as a guide to extract RNA for quantitative real-time PCR and RNAseq analysis.

  2. Importance and key events of prokaryotic RNA decay: the ultimate fate of an RNA molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Inês Jesus; Saramago, Margarida; Dressaire, Clémentine; Domingues, Susana; Viegas, Sandra Cristina; Arraiano, Cecília Maria

    2011-01-01

    RNAs are important effectors in the process of gene expression. In bacteria, constant adaptation to environmental demands is accompanied by a continual adjustment of transcripts' levels. The cellular concentration of a given RNA is the result of the balance between its synthesis and degradation. RNA degradation is a complex process encompassing multiple pathways. Ribonucleases (RNases) are the enzymes that directly process and degrade the transcripts, regulating their amounts. They are also important in quality control of RNAs by detecting and destroying defective molecules. The rate at which RNA decay occurs depends on the availability of ribonucleases and their specificities according to the sequence and/or the structural elements of the RNA molecule. Ribosome loading and the 5'-phosphorylation status can also modulate the stability of transcripts. The wide diversity of RNases present in different microorganisms is another factor that conditions the pathways and mechanisms of RNA degradation. RNases are themselves carefully regulated by distinct mechanisms. Several other factors modulate RNA degradation, namely polyadenylation, which plays a multifunctional role in RNA metabolism. Additionally, small non-coding RNAs are crucial regulators of gene expression, and can directly modulate the stability of their mRNA targets. In many cases this regulation is dependent on Hfq, an RNA binding protein which can act in concert with polyadenylation enzymes and is often necessary for the activity of sRNAs. All of the above-mentioned aspects are discussed in the present review, which also highlights the principal differences between the RNA degradation pathways for the two main Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial models.

  3. Studies on the role of the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase-RNase L pathway in beta interferon-mediated inhibition of encephalomyocarditis virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R; Choubey, D; Lengyel, P; Sen, G C

    1988-01-01

    Interferons inhibit the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), but not of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), in mouse JLSV-11 cells. We report the isolation of clonal derivatives from this cell line in which the replication of both viruses is impaired by interferons. These clones were selected from the parental line by virtue of their rescue by interferon treatment from the cytopathic effects of EMCV infection. In one such clone, RK8, the replication of VSV and EMCV and the production of resident murine leukemia virus were inhibited by interferon. On the other hand, in clone RK6, which was isolated without any selection, the replication of VSV, but not of EMCV, was impaired by interferons. The levels of 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase mRNA and enzyme activity were similarly elevated upon interferon treatment in the two clones. However, the level of RNase L, as determined by binding and cross-linking of a radiolabeled 2'-5'-oligoadenylate derivative, was much lower in RK6 cells than in RK8 cells. In accord with this observation, the introduction of 2'-5'-oligoadenylates into cells inhibited protein synthesis much less strongly in RK6 cells than in RK8 cells. These results are consistent with the notion that the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate-dependent RNase L may be a mediator of the inhibition of EMCV replication by interferons. Images PMID:2841470

  4. RNA Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens for Gene Expression Quantification and Data Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proper rRNA depletion is crucial for the successful utilization of FFPE specimens when studying gene expression. We performed a study to evaluate two major rRNA depletion methods: Ribo-Zero and RNase H. RNAs extracted from 4 samples were treated with the two rRNA depletion methods in duplicate and sequenced (N=16. We evaluated their reducibility, ability to detect RNA, and ability to molecularly subtype these triple negative breast cancer specimens. Results. Both rRNA depletion methods produced consistent data between the technical replicates. We found that the RNase H method produced higher quality RNAseq data as compared to the Ribo-Zero method. In addition, we evaluated the RNAseq data generated from the FFPE tissue samples for noncoding RNA, including lncRNA, enhancer/super enhancer RNA, and single nucleotide variation (SNV. We found that the RNase H is more suitable for detecting high-quality, noncoding RNAs as compared to the Ribo-Zero and provided more consistent molecular subtype identification between replicates. Unfortunately, neither method produced reliable SNV data. Conclusions. In conclusion, for FFPE specimens, the RNase H rRNA depletion method performed better than the Ribo-Zero. Neither method generates data sufficient for SNV detection.

  5. RNA Sequencing of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens for Gene Expression Quantification and Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Ye, Fei; Su, Yinghao; Clark, Travis; Shu, Xiao-ou

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proper rRNA depletion is crucial for the successful utilization of FFPE specimens when studying gene expression. We performed a study to evaluate two major rRNA depletion methods: Ribo-Zero and RNase H. RNAs extracted from 4 samples were treated with the two rRNA depletion methods in duplicate and sequenced (N = 16). We evaluated their reducibility, ability to detect RNA, and ability to molecularly subtype these triple negative breast cancer specimens. Results. Both rRNA depletion methods produced consistent data between the technical replicates. We found that the RNase H method produced higher quality RNAseq data as compared to the Ribo-Zero method. In addition, we evaluated the RNAseq data generated from the FFPE tissue samples for noncoding RNA, including lncRNA, enhancer/super enhancer RNA, and single nucleotide variation (SNV). We found that the RNase H is more suitable for detecting high-quality, noncoding RNAs as compared to the Ribo-Zero and provided more consistent molecular subtype identification between replicates. Unfortunately, neither method produced reliable SNV data. Conclusions. In conclusion, for FFPE specimens, the RNase H rRNA depletion method performed better than the Ribo-Zero. Neither method generates data sufficient for SNV detection. PMID:27774452

  6. Molecular modelling of S-RNases involved in almond self-incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eFernandez i Marti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI is a mechanism in flowering plants, to prevent inbreeding and promote outcrossing. GSI is under the control of a specific locus, known as the S-locus, which contains at least two genes, the RNase and the SFB. Active S-RNases in the style are essential for rejection of haploid pollen, when the pollen S-allele matches one of two S-alleles of the diploid pistil. However, the nature of their mutual interactions at genetic and biochemical levels remain unclear. Thus, detailed understanding of the protein structure involved in GSI may help in discovering how the proteins involved in GSI may function and how they fulfil their biological roles. To this end, 3D models of the SC (Sf and two SI (S8 and S23 S-RNases of almond were constructed, using comparative modelling tools. The modelled structures consisted of mixed α and β folds, with six helices and six beta-strands. However, the self-compatible (Sf RNase contained an additional extended loop between the conserved domains RC4 and C5, which may be involved in the manifestation of self-compatibility in almond.

  7. Evolution of Digestive Enzymes and RNASE1 Provides Insights into Dietary Switch of Cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengfei; Xu, Shixia; Du, Kexing; Huang, Fang; Chen, Zhuo; Zhou, Kaiya; Ren, Wenhua; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Although cetaceans (whales, porpoises, and dolphins) have multi-chambered stomachs, feeding habits of modern cetaceans have dramatically changed from herbivorous to carnivorous. However, the genetic basis underlying this dietary switch remains unexplored. Here, we present the first systematic investigation of 10 digestive enzymes genes (i.e., CYP7A1, CTRC, LIPC, LIPF, PNLIP, PGC, PRSS1, SI, SLC5A1, and TMPRSS15) of representative cetaceans, and the evolutionary trajectory of RNASE1 in cetartiodactylans. Positive selections were detected with proteinases (i.e., CTRC, PRSS1, and TMPRSS15) and lipases (i.e., CYP7A1, LIPF, and PNLIP) suggesting that cetaceans have evolved an enhanced digestion capacity for proteins and lipids, the major nutritional components of their prey (fishes and invertebrates). In addition, it was found that RNASE1 gene duplicated after the cetartiodactylan speciation and two independent gene duplication events took place in Camelidae and Ruminantia. Positive selection was detected with RNASE1 of Camelidae and Bovidae, suggesting enhanced digestive efficiency in the ruminants. Remarkably, even though the ancestors of cetaceans were terrestrial artiodactyls that are herbivorous, modern cetaceans lost the pancreatic RNASE1 copy with digestive function, which is in accordance with the dietary change from herbivorous to carnivorous. In sum, this is the first study that provides new insights into the evolutionary mechanism of dietary switch in cetaceans. PMID:27651393

  8. Pyrrolopyrimidine derivatives and purine analogs as novel activators of Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Sven Marcel; Stefan, Katja; Wiese, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main cause of diminished success in cancer chemotherapy. ABC transport proteins are considered to be one important factor of MDR. Besides P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP, ABCG2), Multidrug Resistance-associated Protein 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) is associated with non-response to chemotherapy in different cancers. While considerable effort was spent in overcoming MDR during the last two decades, almost nothing is known with respect to activators of transport proteins. In this work we present certain pyrrolo[3,2-d]pyrimidine derivatives with variations at positions 4 and 5 and purine analogs with variations at position 6 as novel activators of MRP1-mediated transport of the MRP1 substrate calcein AM and the anticancer drug daunorubicin in low nanomolar concentration range. Two different MRP1 overexpressing cell lines were used, the doxorubicin-selected human lung cancer cell line H69 AR and the transfected Madin-Darby Canine Kidney cell line MDCK II MRP1. No effect was observed in the sensitive counterparts H69 and MDCK II wild type (wt). Derivatives with higher molecular weight possessed also inhibitory properties at low micromolar concentrations, although most compounds were rather poor MRP1 inhibitors. Purine analogs derived from potent MRP1 inhibitors of the pyrrolopyrimidine class showed equal activating, but no inhibiting effects at all. All tested compounds were non-toxic and had only minor impact on P-gp or BCRP, showing no inhibition or activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combinatorial regulation of the dev operon by MrpC2 and FruA during Myxococcus xanthus development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ashleigh; Viswanathan, Poorna; Barrett, Terry; Son, Bongjun; Saha, Shreya; Kroos, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Proper expression of the dev operon is important for normal development of Myxococcus xanthus. When starved, these bacteria coordinate their gliding movements to build mounds that become fruiting bodies as some cells differentiate into spores. Mutations in the devTRS genes impair sporulation. Expression of the operon occurs within nascent fruiting bodies and depends in part on C signaling. Here, we report that expression of the dev operon, like that of several other C-signal-dependent genes, is subject to combinatorial control by the transcription factors MrpC2 and FruA. A DNA fragment upstream of the dev promoter was bound by a protein in an extract containing MrpC2, protecting the region spanning positions -77 to -54. Mutations in this region impaired binding of purified MrpC2 and abolished developmental expression of reporter fusions. The association of MrpC2 and/or its longer form, MrpC, with the dev promoter region depended on FruA in vivo, based on chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, and purified FruA appeared to bind cooperatively with MrpC2 to DNA just upstream of the dev promoter in vitro. We conclude that cooperative binding of the two proteins to this promoter-proximal site is crucial for dev expression. 5' deletion analysis implied a second upstream positive regulatory site, which corresponded to a site of weak cooperative binding of MrpC2 and FruA and boosted dev expression 24 h into development. This site is unique among the C-signal-dependent genes studied so far. Deletion of this site in the M. xanthus chromosome did not impair sporulation under laboratory conditions.

  10. Gender-specific reduction of hepatic Mrp2 expression by high-fat diet protects female mice from ANIT toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Bo; Csanaky, Iván L. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Aleksunes, Lauren M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy and Environmental and Occupational Health Institute, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Patni, Meghan; Chen, Qi; Ma, Xiaochao; Jaeschke, Hartmut [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Weir, Scott; Broward, Melinda; Klaassen, Curtis D. [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Guo, Grace L., E-mail: lguo@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) to rodents affects the expression of genes involved in drug transport. However, gender-specific effects of HFD on drug transport are not known. The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2, Abcc2) is a transporter highly expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and is important for biliary excretion of glutathione-conjugated chemicals. The current study showed that hepatic Mrp2 expression was reduced by HFD feeding only in female, but not male, C57BL/6J mice. In order to determine whether down-regulation of Mrp2 in female mice altered chemical disposition and toxicity, the biliary excretion and hepatotoxicity of the Mrp2 substrate, α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), were assessed in male and female mice fed control diet or HFD for 4 weeks. ANIT-induced biliary injury is a commonly used model of experimental cholestasis and has been shown to be dependent upon Mrp2-mediated efflux of an ANIT glutathione conjugate that selectively injures biliary epithelial cells. Interestingly, HFD feeding significantly reduced early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice and largely protected against ANIT-induced liver injury. In summary, the current study showed that, at least in mice, HFD feeding can differentially regulate Mrp2 expression and function and depending upon the chemical exposure may enhance or reduce susceptibility to toxicity. Taken together, these data provide a novel interaction between diet and gender in regulating hepatobiliary excretion and susceptibility to injury. -- Highlights: ► High-fat diet decreases hepatic Mrp2 expression only in female but not in male mice. ► HFD significantly reduces early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice. ► HFD protects female mice against ANIT-induced liver injury.

  11. Temporal Translational Control by a Metastable RNA Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Franch, Thomas; Gerdes, Kenn

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death by the hok/sok locus of plasmid R1 relies on a complex translational control mechanism. The highly stable hok mRNA is activated by 3'-end exonucleolytical processing. Removal of the mRNA 3' end releases a 5'-end sequence that triggers refolding of the mRNA. The refolded hok m......RNA is translatable but can also bind the inhibitory Sok antisense RNA. Binding of Sok RNA leads to irreversible mRNA inactivation by an RNase III-dependent mechanism. A coherent model predicts that during transcription hok mRNA must be refractory to translation and antisense RNA binding. Here we provide genetic...... evidence for the existence of a 5' metastable structure in hok mRNA that locks the nascent transcript in an inactive configuration in vivo. Consistently, the metastable structure reduces the rate of Sok RNA binding and completely blocks hok translation in vitro. Structural analyses of native RNAs strongly...

  12. Reduction of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin uptake in MRP-expressing breast cancer cells under hypoxic conditions is independent of MRP function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Li, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Biotracer Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8640 (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioisotope Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Watanabe, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama (Japan); Shuke, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa (Japan); Bunko, Hisashi [Medical Informatics, Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2003-11-01

    Hypoxia reduces the uptake of technetium-99m sestamibi (MIBI) in human cancer cell lines. In the current investigation, we attempted to identify the relationship between hypoxia-induced alteration of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI accumulation and expression of multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP) in the MCF7/WT breast cancer cell line and its subclonal cell line, MCF7/VP, which expresses high levels of MRP1. A second cationic compound, {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (TF), was also examined. Cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI and {sup 99m}Tc-TF was significantly higher in parental MCF7/WT cells than in MCF7/VP cells. Hypoxic conditions generated with a mixture of 95% N{sub 2} and 5% CO{sub 2} reduced cellular uptake of the two tracers in both parental MCF7/WT cells and MRP1-expressing MCF7/VP cells. Cell binding assay with iodine-125-labelled anti-MRP1 antibody demonstrated its specific binding to MCF7/VP cells. Hypoxia did not affect the amount of antibody bound to MCF7/VP cells. These results indicate that hypoxia-induced reduction of tracer uptake in tumour cells is a phenomenon independent of MRP function. (orig.)

  13. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribo-nuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase-3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase-3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA-MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase-3/7. PMID:27513956

  14. RNase activity of sialic acid-binding lectin from bullfrog eggs drives antitumor effect via the activation of p38 MAPK to caspase-3/7 signaling pathway in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Yukiko; Tatsuta, Takeo; Sugawara, Shigeki; Kariya, Yoshinobu; Nitta, Kazuo; Hosono, Masahiro

    2016-10-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin obtained from bullfrog eggs (SBL) induces cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This antitumor effect is mediated through its ribonuclease (RNase) activity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We found that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated when SBL induced cell death in three human breast cancer cell lines: SK-BR-3, MCF-7, and MDA‑MB231. The suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by a p38 MAPK inhibitor as well as short interference RNA knockdown of p38 MAPK expression significantly decreased cell death and increased the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA‑MB231 cells. H103A, an SBL mutant lacking in RNase activity, showed decreased SBL-induced cell death compared with native SBL. However, the loss of RNase activity of SBL had no effect on its internalization into cells. The H103A mutant also displayed decreased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Moreover, SBL promoted caspase‑3/7 activation followed by a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose)-polymerase, whereas the SBL mutant, H103A, lost this ability. The SBL-induced caspase‑3/7 activation was suppressed by the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, as well as pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk. In the presence of zVAD-fmk, the SBL-induced cell death was decreased. In addition, the cell viability of SBL-treated MDA‑MB231 cells recovered by zVAD-fmk treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of SBL leads to breast cancer cell death through the activation of p38 MAPK followed by the activation of caspase‑3/7.

  15. Both PDI and PDIp can attack the native disulfide bonds in thermally-unfolded RNase and form stable disulfide-linked complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin-Miao; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2011-04-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and its pancreatic homolog (PDIp) are folding catalysts for the formation, reduction, and/or isomerization of disulfide bonds in substrate proteins. However, the question as to whether PDI and PDIp can directly attack the native disulfide bonds in substrate proteins is still not answered, which is the subject of the present study. We found that RNase can be thermally unfolded at 65°C under non-reductive conditions while its native disulfide bonds remain intact, and the unfolded RNase can refold and reactivate during cooling. Co-incubation of RNase with PDI or PDIp during thermal unfolding can inactivate RNase in a PDI/PDIp concentration-dependent manner. The alkylated PDI and PDIp, which are devoid of enzymatic activities, cannot inactivate RNase, suggesting that the inactivation of RNase results from the disruption of its native disulfide bonds catalyzed by the enzymatic activities of PDI/PDIp. In support of this suggestion, we show that both PDI and PDIp form stable disulfide-linked complexes only with thermally-unfolded RNase, and RNase in the complexes can be released and reactivated dependently of the redox conditions used. The N-terminal active site of PDIp is essential for the inactivation of RNase. These data indicate that PDI and PDIp can perform thiol-disulfide exchange reactions with native disulfide bonds in unfolded RNase via formation of stable disulfide-linked complexes, and from these complexes RNase is further released.

  16. [Changes in the trophic organization of mitotic cycle of Candida utilis after exposure to RNAse from Bacillus intermedius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriianova-Ashina, F G; Kolpakov, A I

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the RNase from Bacillus intermedius on the growth and trophic cycle of Candida utilis was studied. The RNase at concentrations of 0.001-0.01 microgram/ml stimulated yeast growth by 30-40% as compared to the control, reduced the mitotic cycle of the yeast by shortening its G1 phase, and decreased the number of exotrophic cells in the G1 phase to a minimum. It was suggested that RNase is involved in the regulation of the transition of cells from the exo- to endotrophic state.

  17. Correlation between PFGE Groups and mrp/epf/sly Genotypes of Human Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasit Tharavichitkul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis infection is a severe zoonotic disease commonly found in Northern Thailand where people often consume raw pork and/or pig’s blood. The most frequent clinical presentations are meningitis, sepsis, and endocarditis with higher rate of mortality and hearing loss sequelae. To clarify the correlation between pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of S. suis serotype 2, 62 patient and 4 healthy pig isolates from Northern Thailand were studied. By PFGE analysis, at 66% homology, most human isolates (69.4% and 1 pig isolate were in group A, whereas 14.5% of human isolates and 3 out of 4 pig isolates were in group D. According to mrp/epf/sly genotypes, 80.6% of human isolates were identified in mrp+epf−sly− and only 12.9% were in mrp−epf−sly+ genotypes; in contrast, 1 and 3 pig isolates were detected in these two genotypes, respectively. Interestingly, all isolates of S. suis serotype 2 classified in PFGE groups A, B, and E were set in mrp+epf−sly− genotypes. These data show a close correlation between PFGE groups and mrp/epf/sly genotypes of human S. suis serotype 2.

  18. The role of multidrug resistance protein (MRP-1) as an active efflux transporter on blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingineni, Karthik; Belekar, Vilas; Tangadpalliwar, Sujit R; Garg, Prabha

    2017-01-03

    Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) may take longer duration to reach the market as these compounds have a higher attrition rate in clinical trials due to the complexity of the brain, side effects, and poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability compared to non-CNS-acting compounds. The roles of active efflux transporters with BBB are still unclear. The aim of the present work was to develop a predictive model for BBB permeability that includes the MRP-1 transporter, which is considered as an active efflux transporter. A support vector machine model was developed for the classification of MRP-1 substrates and non-substrates, which was validated with an external data set and Y-randomization method. An artificial neural network model has been developed to evaluate the role of MRP-1 on BBB permeation. A total of nine descriptors were selected, which included molecular weight, topological polar surface area, ClogP, number of hydrogen bond donors, number of hydrogen bond acceptors, number of rotatable bonds, P-gp, BCRP, and MRP-1 substrate probabilities for model development. We identified 5 molecules that fulfilled all criteria required for passive permeation of BBB, but they all have a low logBB value, which suggested that the molecules were effluxed by the MRP-1 transporter.

  19. The putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 inhibits methylmercury-associated animal toxicity and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDuyn, Natalia; Nass, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative motor disorder worldwide, and results in the progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Gene-environment interactions are believed to play a significant role in the vast majority of PD cases, yet the toxicants and the associated genes involved in the neuropathology are largely ill-defined. Recent epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that methylmercury (MeHg) may be an environmental toxicant that contributes to the development of PD. Here, we report that a gene coding for the putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans modulates whole animal and DA neuron sensitivity to MeHg. In this study, we demonstrate that genetic knockdown of MRP-7 results in a twofold increase in Hg levels and a dramatic increase in stress response proteins associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, and mitochondria, as well as an increase in MeHg-associated animal death. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of MeHg induces MRP-7 gene expression, while exposures in MRP-7 genetic knockdown animals results in a loss of DA neuron integrity without affecting whole animal viability. Furthermore, transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter behind the endogenous MRP-7 promoter indicate that the transporter is expressed in DA neurons. These studies show for the first time that a multidrug resistance protein is expressed in DA neurons, and its expression inhibits MeHg-associated DA neuron pathology.

  20. Genistein and Glyceollin Effects on ABCC2 (MRP2 and ABCG2 (BCRP in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandler Schexnayder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of glyceollins on intestinal ABCC2 (ATP Binding Cassette C2, multidrug resistance protein 2, MRP2 and ABCG2 (ATP Binding Cassette G2, breast cancer resistance protein, BCRP function using the Caco-2 cell intestinal epithelial cell model. Glyceollins are soy-derived phytoestrogens that demonstrate anti-proliferative activity in several sources of cancer cells. 5 (and 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichloroflourescein (CDF was used as a prototypical MRP2 substrate; whereas BODIPY-prazosin provided an indication of BCRP function. Comparison studies were conducted with genistein. Glyceollins were shown to inhibit MRP2-mediated CDF transport, with activity similar to the MRP2 inhibitor, MK-571. They also demonstrated concentration-dependent inhibition BCRP-mediated efflux of BODIPY-prazosin, with a potency similar to that of the recognized BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. In contrast, genistein did not appear to alter MRP2 activity and even provided a modest increase in BCRP efflux of BODIPY-prazosin. In particular, glyceollin inhibition of these two important intestinal efflux transporters suggests the potential for glyceollin to alter the absorption of other phytochemicals with which it might be co-administered as a dietary supplement, as well as alteration of the absorption of pharmaceuticals that may be administered concomitantly.

  1. Flavonol Activation Defines an Unanticipated Ligand-Binding Site in the Kinase-RNase Domain of IRE1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiseman, R. Luke; Zhang, Yuhong; Lee, Kenneth P.K.; Harding, Heather P.; Haynes, Cole M.; Price, Joshua; Sicheri, Frank; Ron, David (Scripps); (Toronto); (NYUSM)

    2010-08-18

    Signaling in the most conserved branch of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is initiated by sequence-specific cleavage of the HAC1/XBP1 mRNA by the ER stress-induced kinase-endonuclease IRE1. We have discovered that the flavonol quercetin activates yeast IRE1's RNase and potentiates activation by ADP, a natural activating ligand that engages the IRE1 nucleotide-binding cleft. Enzyme kinetics and the structure of a cocrystal of IRE1 complexed with ADP and quercetin reveal engagement by quercetin of an unanticipated ligand-binding pocket at the dimer interface of IRE1's kinase extension nuclease (KEN) domain. Analytical ultracentrifugation and crosslinking studies support the preeminence of enhanced dimer formation in quercetin's mechanism of action. These findings hint at the existence of endogenous cytoplasmic ligands that may function alongside stress signals from the ER lumen to modulate IRE1 activity and at the potential for the development of drugs that modify UPR signaling from this unanticipated site.

  2. Reversal of P-gp and MRP1-mediated multidrug resistance by H6, a gypenoside aglycon from Gynostemma pentaphyllum, in vincristine-resistant human oral cancer (KB/VCR) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hengrui; Liu, Zulong; Tang, Lisha; Liu, Junhua; Zhou, Mei; Xie, Fang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Yuqi; Shen, Sida; Hu, Lihong; Yu, Long

    2012-12-05

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy in the treatment of cancers. Identification of natural compounds capable of circumventing MDR with minimal adverse side effects is an attractive goal. Here, we found that H6, a gypenoside aglycon from Gynostemma pentaphyllum, displayed potent anti-MDR activity. Average resistant fold (RF) of H6 is 1.03 and 1.04 in KB/VCR and MCF-7/ADR cells compared to their parental cells. H6 alone ranging from 2 μmol/l to 40 μmol/l (μM) did not display a significant anti-proliferative effect on KB/VCR cells and other cells, while the compound at these concentrations enhanced the cytotoxicity of vincristine (VCR) to KB/VCR cells. H6 showed a significant synergistic effect in combination with VCR. By quantification of sub-G(1) fraction cells, H6 also enhanced the VCR-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The short time treatment with H6 increased the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rho123) and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) in KB/VCR cells. Further studies showed that H6 treatment resulted in the decrease of the RNA transcript level of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). H6 inhibited the function of P-gp by stimulating P-gp ATPase activity and decreased MRP1 expression with a blockade of STAT3 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that H6, a multi-targets reversal agent with no significant toxic effect, may be a potential candidate to circumvent the P-gp and MRP1-mediated MDR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Glycyrrhetinic Acid on GSH Synthesis Induced by Realgar in the Mouse Hippocampus: Involvement of System [Formula: see text], System [Formula: see text], MRP-1, and Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Lei; Chen, Mo; Huo, Tao-Guang; Zhang, Ying-Hua; Fang, Ying; Feng, Cong; Wang, Shou-Yun; Jiang, Hong

    2016-04-02

    Realgar, a type of mineral drug-containing arsenic, exhibits neurotoxicity. Brain glutathione (GSH) is crucial to protect the nervous system and to resist arsenic toxicity. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to explore the neurotoxic mechanisms of realgar and the protective effects of glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) by observing the effects of GA on the hippocampal GSH biosynthetic pathway after exposure to realgar. Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice were randomly divided into five groups: a control group, a GA control group, a realgar alone group, a low-dose GA intervention group, and a high-dose GA intervention group. Cognitive ability was tested using an object recognition task (ORT). The ultrastructures of the hippocampal neurons and synapses were observed. mRNA and protein levels of EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, xCT, Nrf2, HO-1, γ-GCS (GCLC, GCLM), and MRP-1 were measured, as was the cellular localization of EAAT3, xCT, MRP-1, and Nrf2. The levels of GSH in the hippocampus, the levels of glutamate (Glu) and cysteine (Cys) in the extracellular fluid of hippocampal CA1 region, and the levels of active sulfur in the brain were also investigated. The results indicate that realgar lowered hippocampal GSH levels, resulting in ultrastructural changes in hippocampal neurons and synapses and deficiencies in cognitive ability, ultimately inducing neurotoxicity. GA could trigger the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3, xCT, MRP-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Additionally, the expression of γ-GT and the supply levels of Glu and Cys increased, ultimately causing a significant increase in hippocampal GSH to alleviate realgar-induced neurotoxicity. In conclusion, the findings from our study indicate that GA can antagonize decreased brain GSH levels induced by realgar and can lessen the neurotoxicity of realgar.

  4. Rapid RNA analysis of individual Caenorhabditis elegans☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kien; Reid, Suzanne J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional RNA extraction methods rely on the use of hazardous chemicals such as phenol, chloroform, guanidinium thiocyanate to disrupt cells and inactivate RNAse simultaneously. RNA isolation from Caenorhabditis elegans presents another challenge due to its tough cuticle, therefore several repeated freeze–thaw cycles may be needed to disrupt the cuticle before the cell contents are released. In addition, a large number of animals are required for successful RNA isolation. To overcome these issues, we have developed a simple and efficient method using proteinase K and a brief heat treatment to release RNA of quality suitable for quantitative PCR analysis.The benefits of the method are: • Faster and safer compared to conventional RNA extraction methods • Released RNA can be used directly for cDNA synthesis without purification • As little as a single worm is sufficient PMID:26150972

  5. Structural Basis for 2′-5′-Oligoadenylate Binding and Enzyme Activity of a Viral RNase L Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Kristen M.; Hu, Liya; Jha, Babal K.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.; Patton, John T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthesis of 2′-5′-oligoadenylates (2-5A) by oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) is an important innate cellular response that limits viral replication by activating the latent cellular RNase, RNase L, to degrade single-stranded RNA. Some rotaviruses and coronaviruses antagonize the OAS/RNase L pathway through the activity of an encoded 2H phosphoesterase domain that cleaves 2-5A. These viral 2H phosphoesterases are phylogenetically related to the cellular A kinase anchoring protein 7 (AKAP7) and share a core structure and an active site that contains two well-defined HΦ(S/T)Φ (where Φ is a hydrophobic residue) motifs, but their mechanism of substrate binding is unknown. Here, we report the structures of a viral 2H phosphoesterase, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the group A rotavirus (RVA) VP3 protein, both alone and in complex with 2-5A. The domain forms a compact fold, with a concave β-sheet that contains the catalytic cleft, but it lacks two α-helical regions and two β-strands observed in AKAP7 and other 2H phosphoesterases. The cocrystal structure shows significant conformational changes in the R loop upon ligand binding. Bioinformatics and biochemical analyses reveal that conserved residues and residues required for catalytic activity and substrate binding comprise the catalytic motifs and a region on one side of the binding cleft. We demonstrate that the VP3 CTD of group B rotavirus, but not that of group G, cleaves 2-5A. These findings suggest that the VP3 CTD is a streamlined version of a 2H phosphoesterase with a ligand-binding mechanism that is shared among 2H phosphodiesterases that cleave 2-5A. IMPORTANCE The C-terminal domain (CTD) of rotavirus VP3 is a 2H phosphoesterase that cleaves 2′-5′-oligoadenylates (2-5A), potent activators of an important innate cellular antiviral pathway. 2H phosphoesterase superfamily proteins contain two conserved catalytic motifs and a proposed core structure. Here, we present structures of a viral 2H

  6. Multiple drug resistance-associated protein (MRP4) exports prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and contributes to metastasis in basal/triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochel, Tyler J; Reader, Jocelyn C; Ma, Xinrong; Kundu, Namita; Fulton, Amy M

    2017-01-24

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its primary enzymatic product, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), are associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. In order to elucidate the factors contributing to intratumoral PGE2 levels, we evaluated the expression of COX-2/PGE2 pathway members MRP4, the prostaglandin transporter PGT, 15-PGDH (PGE2 metabolism), the prostaglandin E receptor EP4, COX-1, and COX-2 in normal, luminal, and basal breast cancer cell lines. The pattern of protein expression varied by cell line reflecting breast cancer heterogeneity. Overall, basal cell lines expressed higher COX-2, higher MRP4, lower PGT, and lower 15-PGDH than luminal cell lines resulting in higher PGE2 in the extracellular environment. Genetic or pharmacologic suppression of MRP4 expression or activity in basal cell lines led to less extracellular PGE2. The key finding is that xenografts derived from a basal breast cancer cell line with stably suppressed MRP4 expression showed a marked decrease in spontaneous metastasis compared to cells with unaltered MRP4 expression. Growth properties of primary tumors were not altered by MRP4 manipulation. In addition to the well-established role of high COX-2 in promoting metastasis, these data identify an additional mechanism to achieve high PGE2 in the tumor microenvironment; high MRP4, low PGT, and low 15-PGDH. MRP4 should be examined further as a potential therapeutic target in basal breast cancer.

  7. Phenylalanine 368 of multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4/ABCC4) plays a crucial role in substrate-specific transport activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittgen, H.G.M.; Heuvel, J.M.W. van den; Krieger, E.; Schaftenaar, G.; Russel, F.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) is a membrane transporter that mediates the cellular efflux of a wide range of anionic drugs and endogenous molecules. MRP4 transport can influence the pharmacokinetics of drugs and their metabolites, therefore more knowledge about the molecular

  8. Expression of multidrug resistance proteins, P-gp, MRP1 and LRP, in soft tissue sarcomas analysed according to their histological type and grade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, R; Plaat, BE; Graaf, van der WT; Hoekstra, H.J.; Hollema, H; Berg, van den E; Zwart, N; Scheper, R.J.; Molenaar, W.M.

    2003-01-01

    0.0001). P-gp expression was most pronounced in malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), but was low in leiomyosarcomas. MRP1 was expressed in most malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST). LRP was strongly expressed in MFH and unspecified sarcomas, but was low in liposarcomas. MRP1 and LRP ex

  9. P-gp and MRP1 Expression in Parathyroid Tumors Related to Histology, Weight and Tc-99m-Sestamibi Imaging Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorna, F. H.; Hollema, H.; Hendrikse, H. N.; Bart, J.; Brouwers, A. H.; Plukker, J. T. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) are membrane efflux pumps that may have a role in the kinetics of Tc-99m-sestamibi (MIBI) in parathyroid tumors. P-gp and MRP1 expression in parathyroid tumors was studied and related to histology, weight and pre- and

  10. First insights into the protective effects of a recombinant swinepox virus expressing truncated MRP of Streptococcus suis type 2 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyan; Zhu, Haodan; Lin, Huixing; Xu, Jiarong; Lu, Chengping

    2012-01-01

    To explore the potential of the swinepox virus (SPV) as vector for Streptococcus suis vaccines, a vector system was developed for the construction of a recombinant SPV carrying bacterial genes. Using this system, a recombinant virus expressing truncated muramidase-released protein (MRP) of S. suis type 2 (SS2), designated rSPV-MRP, was produced and identified by PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. The rSPV-MRP was found to be only slightly attenuated in PK-15 cells, when compared with the wild-type virus. After immunization intramuscularly with rSPV-MRP, SS2 inactive vaccine (positive control), wild-type SPV (negative control) and PBS (blank control) respectively, all CD1 mice were challenged with a lethal dose or a sublethal dose of SS2 highly virulent strain ZY05719. While SS2 inactive vaccine protected all mice, immunization with rSPV-MRP resulted in 60% survival and protected mice against a lethal dose of the highly virulent SS2 strain, compared with the negative control (P MRP had a significantly reduced bacterial burden in all organs examined, compared to negative controls and blank controls (P MRP-vaccinated group were significantly higher (P MRP provided mice with protection from systemic SS2 infection. If SPV recombinants have the potential as S. suis vaccines for the use in pigs has to be evaluated in further studies.

  11. Expression and function of RNase9 protein in male reproductive system%RNase9蛋白在男性生殖系统中的表达及功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘杰; 张守信; 张成林; 孙隽; 孙成铭

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究核糖核酸酶9(RNase9)在男性生殖系统中的表达、定位及功能,为其异常所引起的不育症诊断和治疗提供理论基础。方法采用生物信息学分析人RNase9的结构,预测其功能;利用基因重组技术构建了原核表达载体制备重组RNase9蛋白。通过RT-PCR检测RNase9蛋白在不同组织中的表达,比较老年人(76.3±8.1岁)、成年人(31.2±5.6岁)和胎儿(0.8±0.2岁)附睾组织RNase9蛋白表达量的差异。应用免疫荧光实验观察RNase9蛋白在睾丸、附睾、精子上的定位。应用酵母tRNA底物实验检测RNase9核糖核酸酶活性。分别向精子悬液中加入免疫前血清(A组)和鼠抗RNase9多抗血清(B组),应用抗体封闭精子运动实验检测RNase9蛋白对精子运动能力[平均曲线运动速度(VCL)、平均直线运动速度(VSL)、平均路径速度(VAP)]的影响。8~12周龄金黄地鼠肌注孕激素和人绒毛膜促性腺激素,取卵子与两组精子孵育后(A组精子用免疫前血清,B组精子用RNase9抗血清封闭5 h;实验中所用卵子的数目分别是A组60个和B组62个),应用抗体封闭精子穿卵实验检测RNase9蛋白对精子穿卵能力的影响。结果经过生物信息学分析,RNase9基因属于核糖核酸酶A超家族一新成员,N末端含23个氨基酸的信号肽序列,相对分子质量约为20000,等电点PI 5.92;含5个N⁃糖基化位点、2个酪蛋白激酶Ⅱ磷酸化位点、1个酪氨酸激酶磷酸化位点、1个NDUFC2位点和2个胰⁃核糖核酸酶功能域标签位点。RNase9蛋白在人附睾、睾丸、心脏,肺脏、肝脏、脾脏、肾脏、胃多种组织广泛表达,在附睾组织中表达量较高;在成年人附睾组织中的表达量明显高于胎儿和老年人附睾组织(均P0.05)。结论 RNase9蛋白在附睾及精子上的表达及定位表明该蛋白可能在男性精子成熟及发育过程

  12. Genome-wide identification and expression characterization of ABCC-MRP transporters in hexaploid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Kumar Bhati

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ABCC multidrug resistance associated proteins (ABCC-MRP, a subclass of ABC transporters are involved in multiple physiological processes that include cellular homeostasis, metal detoxification and transport of glutathione-conjugates. Although they are well studied in humans, yeast and Arabidopsis, limited efforts have been made to address their possible role in crop like wheat. In the present work, eighteen wheat ABCC-MRP proteins were identified that showed the uniform distribution with families of rice and Arabidopsis. Organ specific quantitative expression analysis of wheat ABCC genes indicated significantly higher accumulation in roots (TaABCC2, TaABCC3, and TaABCC11 and TaABCC12, stem (TaABCC1, leaves (TaABCC16 and TaABCC17, flag leaf (TaABCC14 and TaABCC15 and seeds (TaABCC6, TaABCC8, TaABCC12, TaABCC13 and TaABCC17 implicating their role in the respective tissues. Differential transcript expression patterns were observed for TaABCC genes during grain maturation speculating their role during seed development. Hormone treatment experiments indicated that some of the ABCC genes could be transcriptionally regulated during seed development. In the presence of Cd or hydrogen peroxide, distinct molecular expression of wheat ABCC genes was observed in the wheat seedlings, suggesting their possible role during heavy metal generated oxidative stress. Functional characterization of the wheat transporter, TaABCC13 a homolog of maize LPA1 confirms its role in glutathione-mediated detoxification pathway and is able to utilize adenine biosynthetic intermediates as a substrate. This is the first comprehensive inventory of wheat ABCC-MRP gene subfamily.

  13. Genome-wide identification and expression characterization of ABCC-MRP transporters in hexaploid wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, Kaushal K; Sharma, Shivani; Aggarwal, Sipla; Kaur, Mandeep; Shukla, Vishnu; Kaur, Jagdeep; Mantri, Shrikant; Pandey, Ajay K

    2015-01-01

    The ABCC multidrug resistance associated proteins (ABCC-MRP), a subclass of ABC transporters are involved in multiple physiological processes that include cellular homeostasis, metal detoxification, and transport of glutathione-conjugates. Although they are well-studied in humans, yeast, and Arabidopsis, limited efforts have been made to address their possible role in crop like wheat. In the present work, 18 wheat ABCC-MRP proteins were identified that showed the uniform distribution with sub-families from rice and Arabidopsis. Organ-specific quantitative expression analysis of wheat ABCC genes indicated significantly higher accumulation in roots (TaABCC2, TaABCC3, and TaABCC11 and TaABCC12), stem (TaABCC1), leaves (TaABCC16 and TaABCC17), flag leaf (TaABCC14 and TaABCC15), and seeds (TaABCC6, TaABCC8, TaABCC12, TaABCC13, and TaABCC17) implicating their role in the respective tissues. Differential transcript expression patterns were observed for TaABCC genes during grain maturation speculating their role during seed development. Hormone treatment experiments indicated that some of the ABCC genes could be transcriptionally regulated during seed development. In the presence of Cd or hydrogen peroxide, distinct molecular expression of wheat ABCC genes was observed in the wheat seedlings, suggesting their possible role during heavy metal generated oxidative stress. Functional characterization of the wheat transporter, TaABCC13 a homolog of maize LPA1 confirms its role in glutathione-mediated detoxification pathway and is able to utilize adenine biosynthetic intermediates as a substrate. This is the first comprehensive inventory of wheat ABCC-MRP gene subfamily.

  14. Análisis e implantacion de MRP I en empresa del sector del mueble

    OpenAIRE

    BELMONTE TERRES, ALBERTO

    2015-01-01

    [ES] Para una empresa real ubicada en Poligono Fuente del Jarro (Paterna), dedicada al diseño y fabricacion de muebles, analisis del sistema de produccion actual, implantacion de un MRP I y explotación de sus capacidades: analisis de flujos de información, revisión de la estructura de costes, lista de materiales de un producto, hoja de ruta, definición y gestion de almacén, generación de órdenes de compra agrupadas, metodologia de generación y trabajo con órdenes de fabricación, optimización ...

  15. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  16. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosković, Radovan I; Sargent, Daniel J; Tobutt, Kenneth R

    2010-03-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria.

  17. Selective degradation of mRNAs by the HSV host shutoff RNase is regulated by the UL47 tegument protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Minfeng; Taddeo, Brunella; Zhang, Weiran; Roizman, Bernard

    2013-04-30

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) encodes an endoribonuclease that is responsible for the shutoff of host protein synthesis [virion host shutoff (VHS)-RNase]. The VHS-RNase released into cells during infection targets differentially four classes of mRNAs. Thus, (a) VHS-RNase degrades stable cellular mRNAs and α (immediate early) viral mRNAs; (b) it stabilizes host stress response mRNAs after deadenylation and subsequent cleavage near the adenylate-uridylate (AU)-rich elements; (c) it does not effectively degrade viral β or γ mRNAs; and (d) it selectively spares from degradation a small number of cellular mRNAs. Current evidence suggests that several viral and at least one host protein (tristetraprolin) regulate its activity. Thus, virion protein (VP) 16 and VP22 neutralize the RNase activity at late times after infection. By binding to AU-rich elements via its interaction with tristetraprolin, the RNase deadenylates and cleaves the mRNAs in proximity to the AU-rich elements. In this report we show that another virion protein, UL47, brought into the cell during infection, attenuates the VHS-RNase activity with respect to stable host and viral α mRNAs and effectively blocks the degradation of β and γ mRNAs, but it has no effect on the processing of AU-rich mRNAs. The properties of UL47 suggest that it, along with the α protein infected cell protein 27, attenuates degradation of mRNAs by the VHS-RNase through interaction with the enzyme in polyribosomes. Mutants lacking both VHS-RNase and UL47 overexpress α genes and delay the expression of β and γ genes, suggesting that overexpression of α genes inhibits the downstream expression of early and late genes.

  18. Expressing foreign genes in the pistil: a comparison of S-RNase constructs in different Nicotiana backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murfett, J; McClure, B A

    1998-06-01

    Transgenic plant experiments have great potential for extending our understanding of the role of specific genes in controlling pollination. Often, the intent of such experiments is to over-express a gene and test for effects on pollination. We have examined the efficiency of six different S-RNase constructs in Nicotiana species and hybrids. Each construct contained the coding region, intron, and downstream sequences from the Nicotiana alata S(A2)-RNase gene. Among the six expression constructs, two utilized the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter with duplicated enhancer, and four utilized promoters from genes expressed primarily in pistils. The latter included promoters from the tomato Chi2;1 and 9612 genes, a promoter from the N. alata S(A2)-RNase gene, and a promoter from the Brassica SLG-13 gene. Some or all of the constructs were tested in N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. plumbaginifolia x SI N. alata S(C10)S(c10) hybrids, N. langsdorffii, and N. langsdorffii x SC N. alata hybrids. Stylar specific RNase activities and S(A2)-RNase transcript levels were determined in transformed plants. Constructs including the tomato Chi2;1 gene promoter or the Brassica SLG-13 promoter provided the highest levels of S(A2)-RNase expression. Transgene expression patterns were tightly regulated, the highest level of expression was observed in post-anthesis styles. Expression levels of the S(A2)-RNase transgenes was dependent on the genetic background of the host. Higher levels of S(A2)-RNase expression were observed in N. plumbaginifolia x SC N. alata hybrids than in N. plumbaginifolia.

  19. Mammalian antimicrobial proteins and peptides: overview on the RNase A superfamily members involved in innate host defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Ester; Nogués, M Victòria

    2007-05-01

    The review starts with a general outlook of the main mechanisms of action of antimicrobial proteins and peptides, with the final aim of understanding the biological function of antimicrobial RNases, and identifying the key events that account for their selective properties. Although most antibacterial proteins and peptides do display a wide-range spectrum of action, with a cytotoxic activity against bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses, we have only focused on their bactericidal activity. We start with a detailed description of the main distinctive structural features of the bacteria target and on the polypeptides, which act as selective host defence weapons.Following, we include an overview of all the current available information on the mammalian RNases which display an antimicrobial activity. There is a wealth of information on the structural, catalytic mechanism and evolutionary relationships of the RNase A superfamily. The bovine pancreatic RNase A (RNase A), the reference member of the mammalian RNase family, has been the main research object of several Nobel laureates in the 60s, 70s and 80s. A potential antimicrobial function was only recently suggested for several members of this family. In fact, the recent evolutionary studies indicate that this protein family may have started off with a host defence function. Antimicrobial RNases constitute an interesting example of proteins involved in the mammalian innate immune defence system. Besides, there is wealth of available information on the mechanism of action of short antimicrobial peptides, but little is known on larger polypeptides, that is, on proteins. Therefore, the identification of the mechanisms of action of antimicrobial RNases would contribute to the understanding of the proteins involved in the innate immunity.

  20. Identification of multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1) as a molecular gate for cellular export of cobalamin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beedholm-Ebsen, Rasmus; van de Wetering, Koen; Hardlei, Tore;

    2010-01-01

    transporters by cellular gene silencing showed a role in cellular Cbl efflux of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-drug transporter, ABCC1, alias multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), which is present in the basolateral membrane of intestinal epithelium and in other cells. The ability of MRP1 to mediate ATP...... and kidney. In contrast, Cbl accumulates in the terminal part of the intestine of these mice, suggesting a functional malabsorption because of a lower epithelial basolateral Cbl efflux. The identification of this Cbl export mechanism now allows the delineation of a coherent pathway for Cbl trafficking from...

  1. Extracellular Ribonuclease from Bacillus licheniformis (Balifase, a New Member of the N1/T1 RNase Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sokurenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The N1/T1 RNase superfamily comprises enzymes with well-established antitumor effects, such as ribotoxins secreted by fungi, primarily by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, and bacterial RNase secreted by B. pumilus (binase and B. amyloliquefaciens (barnase. RNase is regarded as an alternative to classical chemotherapeutic agents due to its selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells. New RNase with a high degree of structural similarity with binase (73% and barnase (74% was isolated and purified from Bacillus licheniformis (balifase, calculated molecular weight 12421.9 Da, pI 8.91. The protein sample with enzymatic activity of 1.5 × 106 units/A280 was obtained. The physicochemical properties of balifase are similar to those of barnase. However, in terms of its gene organization and promoter activity, balifase is closer to binase. The unique feature of balifase gene organization consists in the fact that genes of RNase and its inhibitor are located in one operon. Similarly to biosynthesis of binase, balifase synthesis is induced under phosphate starvation; however, in contrast to binase, balifase does not form dimers under natural conditions. We propose that the highest stability of balifase among analyzed RNase types allows the protein to retain its structure without oligomerization.

  2. Recombinant T2 RNase protein of Schistosoma japonicum inhibits expression of α-SMA in LX-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianxin; Peng, Wenxia; Feng, Jinrong; Zhu, Dandan; Chen, Jinling; Sun, Xiaolei; Lyu, Lei; Ju, Shaoqing; Duan, Yinong

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant T2 RNase glycoprotein, which showed a certain degree of homology to Omega-1 from Schistosoma mansoni eggs, was expressed in adult worms of Schistosoma japonicum, but not in eggs of S. japonicum. The direct biological role of the recombinant T2 RNase protein in activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains unknown. In the present study, the immortalized human HSC line (LX-2 cells) was treated with the recombinant T2 RNase protein at indicated concentrations for various time points in vitro. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Smad4 were detected by Western blot. The results showed that the recombinant T2 RNase protein significantly diminished the expression levels of α-SMA and Smad4 in LX-2 cells. The upregulated expression levels of α-SMA and Smad4 by TGF-β1 in LX-2 cells were both suppressed by the recombinant T2 RNase protein. These data suggest that the recombinant T2 RNase protein may be a potential target of therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hepatic fibrosis.

  3. Extracellular Ribonuclease from Bacillus licheniformis (Balifase), a New Member of the N1/T1 RNase Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadyrova, Alsu; Ulyanova, Vera; Ilinskaya, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The N1/T1 RNase superfamily comprises enzymes with well-established antitumor effects, such as ribotoxins secreted by fungi, primarily by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, and bacterial RNase secreted by B. pumilus (binase) and B. amyloliquefaciens (barnase). RNase is regarded as an alternative to classical chemotherapeutic agents due to its selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells. New RNase with a high degree of structural similarity with binase (73%) and barnase (74%) was isolated and purified from Bacillus licheniformis (balifase, calculated molecular weight 12421.9 Da, pI 8.91). The protein sample with enzymatic activity of 1.5 × 106 units/A280 was obtained. The physicochemical properties of balifase are similar to those of barnase. However, in terms of its gene organization and promoter activity, balifase is closer to binase. The unique feature of balifase gene organization consists in the fact that genes of RNase and its inhibitor are located in one operon. Similarly to biosynthesis of binase, balifase synthesis is induced under phosphate starvation; however, in contrast to binase, balifase does not form dimers under natural conditions. We propose that the highest stability of balifase among analyzed RNase types allows the protein to retain its structure without oligomerization. PMID:27656652

  4. Impact of folic acid supplementation on single- and double-stranded RNA degradation in human colostrum and mature milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocic, Gordana; Bjelakovic, Ljiljana; Bjelakovic, Bojko; Jevtoci-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Langerholc, Tomaz; Jonovic, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Sufficient intake of folic acid is necessary for normal embryogenesis, fetal, and neonatal development. Folic acid facilitates nucleic acid internalization, and protects cellular DNA from nuclease degradation. Human milk contains enzymes, antimicrobial proteins, and antibodies, along with macrophages, that protect against infections and allergies. However, little to no information is available on the effects of folic acid supplementation on degradation of nucleic acids in human milk. In the present study, we aimed to determine the RNase activity (free and inhibitor-bound) in colostrum and mature milk, following folic acid supplementation. The study design included a total of 59 women, 27 of whom received 400 μg of folic acid daily periconceptionally and after. Folic acid supplementation increased the free RNase and polyadenylase activity following lactation. However, the increased RNase activity was not due to de novo enzyme synthesis, as the inhibitor-bound (latent) RNase activity was significantly lower and disappeared after one month. Folic acid reduced RNase activity by using double-stranded RNA as substrate. Data suggests that folic acid supplementation may improve viral RNAs degradation and mRNA degradation, but not dsRNA degradation, preserving in this way the antiviral defense.

  5. Petunia Germinating Pollen S/D3 Interacts with S-RNases in Petunia hybrida Vilm.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xia Guo; Yan-Sheng Zhang; Yong-Biao Xue

    2006-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetic mechanism of self/non-self pollen recognition to prevent self-fertilization in many flowering plants and, in most cases, this is controlled by a multi-allelic S-locus. S-RNase and S-locus F box (SLF) proteins have been shown to be the female and male determinants of gametophytic selfincompatibility (GSI), respectively, in the Solanaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Rosaceae. Nevertheless, it is thought that additional factors are required for the SI response. Herein, we constructed a mature anther cDNA library from a self-incompatible Petunia hybrida Vilm. line of the S3S3 haplotype. Using AhS2-RNase from Antirrhinun hispanicum as a bait for yeast two-hybrid screening, we found that petunia germinating pollen (PGP) S/D3 was capable of interacting physically with the bait. However, the interaction lacked haplotype specificity. The PGPS/D3 gene is a single copy gene that is expressed in tissues such as the style, ovary,pollen, and leaf. The PGPS/D3::GFP (green fluorescence protein) construct was detected in both the membrane and cytoplasm. The implications of these findings in the operation of S-RNase-based SI are discussed.

  6. Inhibitor Ranking Through QM based Chelation Calculations for Virtual Screening of HIV-1 RNase H inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH). The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function. Furt....... Thus, the computational models tested in this study could be useful as high throughput filters for searching HIV-1 RNase H active-site molecules in the virtual screening process.......Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH). The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function...... of the methods based on the use of a training set of molecules, QM based chelation calculations were used as filter in virtual screening of compounds in the ZINC database. By this, we find, compared to regular docking, QM based chelation calculations to significantly reduce the large number of false positives...

  7. P-glycoprotein- and mrp2-mediated octreotide transport in renal proximal tubule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Heike; Miller, David S; Droulle, Agathe; Drewe, Jürgen; Fahr, Alfred; Fricker, Gert

    2000-01-01

    Transepithelial transport of a fluorescent derivative of octreotide (NBD-octreotide) was studied in freshly isolated, functionally intact renal proximal tubules from killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Drug accumulation in the tubular lumen was visualized by means of confocal microscopy and was measured by image analysis. Secretion of NBD-octreotide into the tubular lumen was demonstrated and exhibited the all characteristics of specific and energy-dependent transport. Steady state luminal fluorescence averaged about five times cellular fluorescence and was reduced to cellular levels when metabolism was inhibited by NaCN. NBD-octreotide secretion was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by unlabelled octreotide, verapamil and leukotriene C4 (LTC4). Conversely, unlabelled octreotide reduced in a concentration dependent manner the p-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated secretion of a fluorescent cyclosporin A derivative (NBDL-CS) and the mrp2-mediated secretion of fluorescein methotrexate (FL-MTX). This inhibition was not due to impaired metabolism or toxicity since octreotide had no influence on the active transport of fluorescein (FL), a substrate for the classical renal organic anion transport system. The data are consistent with octreotide being transported across the brush border membrane of proximal kidney tubules by both Pgp and mrp2. PMID:10694230

  8. The absence of mrp4 has no effect on the recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils into the lung after LPS, cigarette smoke or allergen challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Schymeinsky

    Full Text Available The multidrug resistance protein 4 (Mrp4 is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that is capable of exporting the second messenger cAMP from cells, a process that might regulate cAMP-mediated anti-inflammatory processes. However, using LPS- or cigarette smoke (CS-inflammation models, we found that neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were similar in Mrp4(-/- and Mrp4(+/+ mice treated with LPS or CS. Similarly, neutrophil numbers were not reduced in the BALF of LPS-challenged wt mice after treatment with 10 or 30 mg/kg of the Mrp1/4 inhibitor MK571. The absence of Mrp4 also had no impact on the influx of eosinophils or IL-4 and IL-5 levels in the BALF after OVA airway challenge in mice sensitized with OVA/alum. LPS-induced cytokine release in whole blood ex vivo was also not affected by the absence of Mrp4. These data clearly suggest that Mrp4 deficiency alone is not sufficient to reduce inflammatory processes in vivo. We hypothesized that in combination with PDE4 inhibitors, used at suboptimal concentrations, the anti-inflammatory effect would be more pronounced. However, LPS-induced neutrophil recruitment into the lung was no different between Mrp4(-/- and Mrp4(+/+ mice treated with 3 mg/kg Roflumilast. Finally, the single and combined administration of 10 and 30 mg/kg MK571 and the specific breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP inhibitor KO143 showed no reduction of LPS-induced TNFα release into the BALF compared to vehicle treated control animals. Similarly, LPS-induced TNFα release in murine whole blood of Mrp4(+/+ or Mrp4(-/- mice was not reduced by KO143 (1, 10 µM. Thus, BCRP seems not to be able to compensate for the absence or inhibition of Mrp4 in the used models. Taken together, our data suggest that Mrp4 is not essential for the recruitment of neutrophils into the lung after LPS or CS exposure or of eosinophils after allergen exposure.

  9. Recommendations of the MRP-139: Inspection of Welds dissimilar in Nozzles PWR reactor vessel in Spain; Recomendaciones del MRP-139: Inspeccion de soldaduras disimilares en Vasijas de Reactor en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadea, J. R.; Willke, A.; Regidor, J. J.; Tecnatom, S. A.

    2010-07-01

    The guide EPRI MRP-139, which provides the way forward for the inspection and evaluation of dissimilar butt welds, the primary system of PWR reactors, indicating the type of nondestructive testing to be done in these areas, based on discovered several cases of default in lnconel alloys 600 and 182 in American and European plants. The phenomenon of cracking.

  10. How Severely Is DNA Quantification Hampered by RNA Co-extraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ignacio; Remm, Matthieu; Frasquilho, Sonia; Betsou, Fay; Mathieson, William

    2015-10-01

    The optional RNase digest that is part of many DNA extraction protocols is often omitted, either because RNase is not provided in the kit or because users do not want to risk contaminating their laboratory. Consequently, co-eluting RNA can become a "contaminant" of unknown magnitude in a DNA extraction. We extracted DNA from liver, lung, kidney, and heart tissues and established that 28-52% of the "DNA" as assessed by spectrophotometry is actually RNA (depending on tissue type). Including an RNase digest in the extraction protocol reduced 260:280 purity ratios. Co-eluting RNA drives an overestimation of DNA yield when quantification is carried out using OD 260 nm spectrophotometry, or becomes an unquantified contaminant when spectrofluorometry is used for DNA quantification. This situation is potentially incompatible with the best practice guidelines for biobanks issued by organizations such as the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories, which state that biospecimens should be accurately characterized in terms of their identity, purity, concentration, and integrity. Consequently, we conclude that an RNase digest must be included in DNA extractions if pure DNA is required. We also discuss the implications of unquantified RNA contamination in DNA samples in the context of laboratory accreditation schemes.

  11. Expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 in bronchial epithelium of models rat with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the reversal effects of Huatanjiangqi Capsule on it%慢性阻塞性肺疾病大鼠支气管上皮MRP1mRNA及蛋白水平变化及化痰降气方逆转的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪电雷; 张弦; 陶秀华; 曹银; 彭波; 李泽庚

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Huatanjiangqi Capsule on the expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 in the lung tissues of models rat with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: COPD rat model was established by using smoke exposure composite papain aerosol inhalation. COPD rats were randomly divided into model group and Huatanjiangqi treatment group, and normal rats were as controls. Fifteen days after administration Huatanjiangqi 1 lung tissues were taken and expressions of MRP1 were determined by RT-PCR and Western blot. RESULTS: Huatanjiangqi Capsule could improve the lung function of COPD models rat. The MRP1 mRNA and pro- tein expression in COPD model group was significantly lower than those in control group (P< 0.01). Huatanjiangqi could up-regulate the MRP1 mRNA and protein expression compared with COPD model group (F<0. 01). CONCLUSION: Huatanjiangqi Capsule could up-regulate the expression of MRP1 in the lung tissues of COPD models rat. This is probably the mechanism of Huatanjiangqi Capsule in treatment COPD.%目的:研究慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)大鼠支气管上皮MRP1 mRNA及蛋白水平变化及化痰降气方逆转的作用.方法:采用烟熏复合木瓜蛋白酶雾化吸入法制备COPD大鼠模型,将造模后的大鼠随机分为治疗组和模型组,另以正常大鼠作为对照组.治疗组予以化痰降气方(生药5.8 g/kg)i.g.治疗给药,2次/d,连续15d后,分别采用RT-PCR、Western blot技术检测各组大鼠肺支气管上皮MRP1 mRNA及蛋白水平的表达.结果:化痰降气方治疗能明显改善COPD模型大鼠的肺功能;COPD模型组MRP1 mRNA及蛋白水平较正常对照组显著降低(P<0.01);与COPD模型组比较,化痰降气方治疗组MRP1mRNA及蛋白水平显著升高(P<0.01).结论:化痰降气方能逆转COPD状态下MRP1 mRNA 及蛋白水平表达的降低,这可能是其治疗COPD作用机制之一.

  12. Reversal of multidrug resistance by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, Yaprak; Gündüz, Ufuk

    2011-03-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs is a serious obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. A common form of multidrug resistance (MDR) is caused by the overexpression of transmembrane transporter proteins P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), encoded by MDR1 and MRP1 genes, respectively. These proteins lead to reduced intracellular drug concentration and decreased cytotoxicity by means of their ability to pump the drugs out of the cells. Breast cancer tumor resistance is mainly associated with overexpression of P-gp/MDR1. Although some chemical MDR modulators aim to overcome MDR by interfering functioning of P-gp, their toxicities limit their usage in clinics. Consequently, RNA interference mediated sequence specific inhibition of the expression of P-gp/MDR1 mRNA may be an efficient tool to reverse MDR phenotype and increase the success of chemotherapy. Aim of this study was resensitizing doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells to anticancer agent doxorubicin by selective downregulation of P-gp/MDR1 mRNA. The effect of the selected MDR1 siRNA, and MRP1 expression after MDR1 silencing was determined by qPCR analysis. Intracellular drug accumulation and localization was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy after treatment with MDR1 siRNA. XTT cell proliferation assay was performed to determine the effect of MDR1 silencing on doxorubicin sensitivity. The results demonstrated that approximately 90% gene silencing occurred by the selected siRNA targeting MDR1 mRNA. However, the level of MRP1 mRNA did not change after MDR1 downregulation. Silencing of P-gp encoding MDR1 gene resulted in almost complete restoration of the intracellular doxorubicin accumulation and relocalization of the drug in the nuclei. Introduction of siRNA resulted in about 70% resensitization to doxorubicin. Selected siRNA duplex was shown to effectively inhibit MDR1 gene expression, restore doxorubicin accumulation and localization, and enhance

  13. Stochastic induction of persister cells by HipA through (p)ppGpp-mediated activation of mRNA endonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germain-Maisonneuve, Elsa; Roghanian, Mohammad; Gerdes, Kenn

    2015-01-01

    The model organism Escherichia coli codes for at least 11 type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules, all implicated in bacterial persistence (multidrug tolerance). Ten of these encode messenger RNA endonucleases (mRNases) inhibiting translation by catalytic degradation of mRNA, and the 11th module, hi...

  14. Synthesis of 2',4'-propylene-bridged (carba-ENA) thymidine and its analogues: the engineering of electrostatic and steric effects at the bottom of the minor groove for nuclease and thermodynamic stabilities and elicitation of RNase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Xu, Jianfeng; Karimiahmadabadi, Mansoureh; Zhou, Chuanzheng; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti

    2010-11-01

    2',4'-Propylene-bridged thymidine (carba-ENA-T) and five 8'-Me/NH(2)/OH modified carba-ENA-T analogues have been prepared through intramolecular radical addition to C═N of the tethered oxime-ether. These carba-ENA nucleosides have been subsequently incorporated into 15mer oligodeoxynucleotides (AON), and their affinity toward cDNA and RNA, nuclease resistance, and RNase H recruitment capability have been investigated in comparison with those of the native and ENA counterparts. These carba-ENAs modified AONs are highly RNA-selective since all of them led to slight thermal stabilization effect for the AON:RNA duplex, but quite large destabilization effect for the AON:DNA duplex. It was found that different C8' substituents (at the bottom of the minor groove) on carba-ENA-T only led to rather small variation of thermal stability of the AON:RNA duplexes. We, however, observed that the parent carba-ENA-T modified AONs exhibited higher nucleolytic stability than those of the ENA-T modified counterparts. The nucleolytic stability of carba-ENA-T modified AONs can be further modulated by C8' substituent to variable extents depending on not only the chemical nature but also the stereochemical orientation of the C8' substituents: Thus, (1) 8'S-Me on carba-ENA increases the nucleolytic stability but 8'R-Me leads to a decreased effect; (2) 8'R-OH on carba-ENA had little, if any, effect on nuclease resistance but 8'S-OH resulted in significantly decreased nucleolytic stability; and (3) 8'-NH(2) substituted carba-ENA leads to obvious loss in the nuclease resistance. The RNA strand in all of the carba-ENA derivatives modified AON:RNA hybrid duplexes can be digested by RNase H1 with high efficiency, even at twice the rate of those of the native and ENA modified counterpart.

  15. Excretion of fluorescent substrates of mammalian multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) in the Schistosoma mansoni excretory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Kusel, J R; Thornhill, J

    2004-01-01

    The protonephridium of platyhelminths including Schistosoma mansoni plays a pivotal role in their survival by excretion of metabolic wastes as well as xenobiotics, and can be revealed in the living adult parasite by certain fluorescent compounds which are concentrated in excretory tubules and collecting ducts. To determine the presence of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) as a possible transporter in protonephridial epithelium, adult schistosomes were exposed to a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3 acetyloxymethyl ester, which is a potential substrate of mammalian MRP. Specific fluorescence related to fluo-3/Ca2+ chelate delineated the whole length of the protonephridial system. Simultaneously, a fluorescent substance was accumulated in the posterior part of collecting ducts and the excretory bladder. Similarly, when other fluorogenic substrates for mammalian MRP such as monoclorobimane, fluorescein diacetate, and 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate were applied to adult schistosomes, these fluorescent markers were observed in the excretory tubules through to the excretory bladder. The excretory system of mechanically-transformed schistosomula was not labelled with any of these 4 fluorescent markers. These findings suggest that the protonephridial epithelium of adult schistosomes, but not schistosomula, might express the homologue of the mammalian MRP transporting organic anionic conjugates with glutathione, glucuronate or sulphate as well as unconjugated amphiphilic organic anions.

  16. Diminished expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in bronchial epithelium of COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Deen, Margaretha; Marks, Hendrik; Willemse, Brigitte W. M.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Muller, Michael; Smit, Egbert F.; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Timens, Wim

    2006-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is the principal risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multidrug resistance proteins, such as multidrug resistance-associated protein-1 (MRP1), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and lung resistance-related protein (LRP), may protect against oxidative stress and toxic com

  17. Impact of neutrophil-secreted myeloid related proteins 8 and 14 (MRP 8/14) on leishmaniasis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Irazú; Shio, Marina T; Cesaro, Annabelle; Tessier, Philippe A; Olivier, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The myeloid-related proteins (MRPs) 8/14 are small proteins mainly produced by neutrophils, which have been reported to induce NO production in macrophages. On the other hand, Leishmania survives and multiplies within phagocytes by inactivating several of their microbicidal functions. Whereas MRPs are rapidly released during the innate immune response, their role in the regulation of Leishmaniasis is still unknown. In vitro experiments revealed that Leishmania infection alters MRP-induced signaling, leading to inhibition of macrophage functions (NO, TNF-α). In contrast, MRP-primed cells showed normal signaling activation and NO production in response to Leishmania infection. Using a murine air-pouch model, we observed that infection with L. major induced leukocyte recruitment and MRP secretion comparable to LPS-treated mice. Depletion of MRPs significantly reduced these inflammatory events and augmented both parasite load and footpad swelling during the first 8 weeks post-infection, as also observed in MRP KO mice. On the contrary, mouse treatment with recombinant MRPs (rMRPs) had the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that rapid secretion of MRPs by neutrophils at the site of infection may protect uninfected macrophages and favor a more efficient innate inflammatory response against Leishmania infection. In summary, our study reveals the critical role played by MRPs in the regulation of Leishmania infection and how this pathogen can subvert its action.

  18. Purification and characterisation of dsRNA using ion pair reverse phase chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokeoji, Alison O; Kung, An-Wen; Kilby, Peter M; Portwood, David E; Dickman, Mark J

    2017-02-10

    RNA interference has provided valuable insight into a wide range of biological systems and is a powerful tool for the analysis of gene function. The exploitation of this pathway to block the expression of specific gene targets holds considerable promise for the development of novel RNAi-based insect management strategies. In addition, there are a wide number of future potential applications of RNAi to control agricultural insect pests as well as its use for prevention of diseases in beneficial insects. The potential to synthesise large quantities of dsRNA by in-vitro transcription or in bacterial systems for RNA interference applications has generated significant demand for the development and application of high throughput analytical tools for the rapid extraction, purification and analysis of dsRNA. Here we have developed analytical methods that enable the rapid purification of dsRNA from associated impurities from bacterial cells in conjunction with downstream analyses. We have optimised TRIzol extractions in conjunction with a single step protocol to remove contaminating DNA and ssRNA, using RNase T1/DNase I digestion under high-salt conditions in combination with solid phase extraction to purify the dsRNA. In addition, we have utilised and developed IP RP HPLC for the rapid, high resolution analysis of the dsRNA. Furthermore, we have optimised base-specific cleavage of dsRNA by RNase A and developed a novel method utilising RNase T1 for RNase mass mapping approaches to further characterise the dsRNA using liquid chromatography interfaced with mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. MRP2, a human conjugate export pump, is present and transports fluo 3 into apical vacuoles of Hep G2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantz, T; Nies, A T; Brom, M; Hofmann, A F; Keppler, D

    2000-04-01

    The multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2, symbol ABCC2) transports anionic conjugates and certain amphiphilic anions across the apical membrane of polarized cells. Human hepatoma Hep G2 cells retain hepatic polarity and form apical vacuoles into which cholephilic substances are secreted. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that human MRP2 was expressed in the apical vacuole membrane of polarized Hep G2 cells, whereas the isoform MRP3 was localized to the lateral membrane. Expression of both MRP2 and MRP3 was confirmed by immunoblotting and reverse transcription PCR. Fluo 3 secretion into the apical vacuoles was inhibited by cyclosporin A but not by selective inhibitors of multidrug resistance 1 P-glycoprotein. In addition, carboxyfluorescein, rhodamine 123, and the fluorescent bile salt derivatives ursodeoxycholyl-(Nepsilon-nitrobenzoxadiazolyl)-lysine and cholylglycylamido-fluorescein were secreted into the apical vacuoles; the latter two probably via the bile salt export pump. We conclude that MRP2 mediates fluo 3 secretion into the apical vacuoles of polarized Hep G2 cells. Thus the function of human MRP2 and the action of inhibitors can be analyzed by the secretion of fluorescent anions such as fluo 3.

  20. Absence of YbeY RNase compromises the growth and enhances the virulence plasmid gene expression of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskinen, Katarzyna; Varjosalo, Markku; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-02-01

    YbeY was recently recognized as an endoribonuclease playing a role in ribosome biosynthesis. In Escherichia coli it functions as a single-strand-specific RNase that processes the 3' end of the 16S rRNA and is crucial for the late-stage 70S ribosome quality control system. Here we report that YbeY is not essential in Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3, yet its absence strongly compromised the bacterium. The lack of YbeY resulted in misprocessing of 16S rRNA and a severe decrease of growth rate with complete growth arrest observed at elevated temperatures. Moreover, a ybeY mutation severely disturbed regulation of the Yersinia virulence plasmid (pYV) genes and affected the expression of regulatory small RNA species. Transcription of the pYV genes was upregulated in the ybeY mutant at 22 °C; the same genes were repressed in the wild-type bacterium. Furthermore, ybeY inactivation impaired many virulence-related features, such as resistance to elevated temperature and acid, and hindered utilization of different carbohydrates. In addition, the ybeY mutant strain showed decreased infectivity in a tissue culture infection model, especially at the stage of cell adhesion. Taken together, this study demonstrates the crucial role of YbeY in Y. enterocolitica O:3 physiology and pathogenicity.

  1. Disease: H00518 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00518 RMRP related disorders, including: Anauxetic dysplasia (AD); Cartilage-hair hypoplasia...ns on RNase MRP RNA gene (RMRP) cause a recessively inherited developmental disorder, cartilage-hair hypop...lasia (CHH). CHH is a skeletal dysplasia inherited as an autosomal recessive trait.

  2. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Rackham

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5′ tRNA cleavage precedes 3′ tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome.

  3. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  4. Effect of the increased stability of the penicillin amidase mRNA on the protein expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Sandra C; Schmidt, Dorothea; Kasche, Volker; Arraiano, Cecília M; Ignatova, Zoya

    2005-09-12

    Several factors at transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational level determine the fate of a target protein and can severely restrict its yield. Here, we focus on the post-transcriptional regulation of the biosynthesis of the periplasmic protein, penicillin amidase (PA). The PA mRNA stability was determined under depleted RNase conditions in strains carrying single or multiple RNase deletions. Single deletion of the endonuclease RNase E yielded, as the highest, a fourfold stabilization of the PA mRNA. This effect, however, was reduced twice at post-translational level. The RNase II, generating secondary exonucleolytic cleavages in the mRNA, although not significantly influencing the PA mRNA decay, led also to an increase of the amount of mature PA. The non-proportional correlation between increased mRNA longevity and amount of active enzyme propose that the rational strategies for yield improvement must be based on a simultaneous tuning of more than one yield restricting factor.

  5. Estrogen Regulation of Messenger RNA Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-17

    ribonuclease inhibitor, inhibits activity of RNase A-type enzymes. RNP-CS- ribonucleoprotein consensus sequence (K/R)G(F/Y)(G/A)FVX(F/Y) rRNA - ribosomal...CJ r i ɡ a 5S ^ S i C9 3 3 *» • - M 19 > • h- O C9 ^ h- 5 C9 > l - « < • - U f t - o CJ k u a u Q. < 2 C9 S C9 3 3 "ai t- 41 (9...mRNA molecules will need to be examined. Which of these factors degrade mRNAs? Which factors degrade other types of RNA molecules such as rRNA and

  6. Symbiont-mediated RNA interference in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Miranda M A; Facey, Paul D; Del Sol, Ricardo; Fernández-Martínez, Lorena T; Evans, Meirwyn C; Mitchell, Jacob J; Bodger, Owen G; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-24

    RNA interference (RNAi) methods for insects are often limited by problems with double-stranded (ds) RNA delivery, which restricts reverse genetics studies and the development of RNAi-based biocides. We therefore delegated to insect symbiotic bacteria the task of: (i) constitutive dsRNA synthesis and (ii) trauma-free delivery. RNaseIII-deficient, dsRNA-expressing bacterial strains were created from the symbionts of two very diverse pest species: a long-lived blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus, and a short-lived globally invasive polyphagous agricultural pest, western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). When ingested, the manipulated bacteria colonized the insects, successfully competed with the wild-type microflora, and sustainably mediated systemic knockdown phenotypes that were horizontally transmissible. This represents a significant advance in the ability to deliver RNAi, potentially to a large range of non-model insects.

  7. RNA interference: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Tessa N; Choy, Francis Y M

    2005-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the sequence-specific gene silencing induced by double-stranded RNA. RNAi is mediated by 21-23 nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which are produced from long double-stranded RNAs by RNAse II-like enzyme Dicer. The resulting siRNAs are incorporated into a RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that targets and cleaves mRNA complementary to the siRNAs. Since its inception in 1998, RNAi has been demonstrated in organisms ranging from trypanosomes to nematodes to vertebrates. Potential uses already in progress include the examination of specific gene function in living systems, the development of anti-viral and anti-cancer therapies, and genome-wide screens. In this review, we discuss the landmark discoveries that established the contextual framework leading up to our current understanding of RNAi. We also provide an overview of current developments and future applications.

  8. The N-terminal hybrid binding domain of RNase HI from Thermotoga maritima is important for substrate binding and Mg2+-dependent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongruja, Nujarin; You, Dong-Ju; Kanaya, Eiko; Koga, Yuichi; Takano, Kazufumi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2010-11-01

    Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease H (RNase H) I (Tma-RNase HI) contains a hybrid binding domain (HBD) at the N-terminal region. To analyze the role of this HBD, Tma-RNase HI, Tma-W22A with the single mutation at the HBD, the C-terminal RNase H domain (Tma-CD) and the N-terminal domain containing the HBD (Tma-ND) were overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and biochemically characterized. Tma-RNase HI prefers Mg(2+) to Mn(2+) for activity, and specifically loses most of the Mg(2+)-dependent activity on removal of the HBD and 87% of it by the mutation at the HBD. Tma-CD lost the ability to suppress the RNase H deficiency of an E. coli rnhA mutant, indicating that the HBD is responsible for in vivo RNase H activity. The cleavage-site specificities of Tma-RNase HI are not significantly changed on removal of the HBD, regardless of the metal cofactor. Binding analyses of the proteins to the substrate using surface plasmon resonance indicate that the binding affinity of Tma-RNase HI is greatly reduced on removal of the HBD or the mutation. These results indicate that there is a correlation between Mg(2+)-dependent activity and substrate binding affinity. Tma-CD was as stable as Tma-RNase HI, indicating that the HBD is not important for stability. The HBD of Tma-RNase HI is important not only for substrate binding, but also for Mg(2+)-dependent activity, probably because the HBD affects the interaction between the substrate and enzyme at the active site, such that the scissile phosphate group of the substrate and the Mg(2+) ion are arranged ideally.

  9. Covalent crosslinking of tRNA1Val to 16S RNA at the ribosomal P site: identification of crosslinked residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J B; Taylor, B H; Thurlow, D L; Ofengand, J; Zimmermann, R A

    1982-09-01

    N-Acetylvalyl-tRNA1Val (AcVal-tRNA1Val) was bound to the P site of uniformly 32P-labeled 70S ribosomes from Escherichia coli and crosslinked to 16S RNA in the 30S ribosomal subunit by irradiation with light of 300-400 nm. To identify the crosslinked nucleotide in 16S RNA. AcVal-tRNA1Val-16S [32P]RNA was digested completely with RNase T1 and the band containing the covalently attached oligonucleotides from tRNA and rRNA was isolated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The crosslinked oligonucleotide, and the 32P-labeled rRNA moiety released from it by photoreversal of the crosslink at 254 nm, were then analyzed by secondary hydrolysis with pancreatic RNase A and RNase U2. The oligonucleotide derived from 16S RNA was found to be the evolutionarily conserved sequence, U-A-C-A-C-A-C-C-G1401, and the nucleotide crosslinked to tRNA1Val, C1400. The identity of the covalently attached residue in the tRNA was established by using AcVal-tRNA1Val-16S RNA prepared from unlabeled ribosomes. This complex was digested to completion with RNase T1 and the resulting RNA fragments were labeled at the 3' end with [5'-32P]pCp. The crosslinked T1 oligonucleotide isolated from the mixture yielded one major end-labeled component upon photoreversal. Chemical sequence analysis demonstrated that this product was derived from the anticodon-containing pentadecanucleotide of tRNA1Val, C-A-C-C-U-C-C-C-U-cmo5U-A-C-m6A-A-G39(cmo5U, 5-carboxymethoxyuridine). A similar study of the crosslinked oligonucleotide revealed that the residue covalently bound to 16S was cmo5U34, the 5' or wobble base of the anticodon. The adduct is believed to result from formation of a cyclobutane dimer between cmo5U34 of tRNA1Val and C1400 of the 16S RNA.

  10. Differential strengths of selection on S-RNases from Physalis and Solanum (Solanaceae

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    Kohn Joshua R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The S-RNases of the Solanaceae are highly polymorphic self-incompatibility (S- alleles subject to strong balancing selection. Relatively recent diversification of S-alleles has occurred in the genus Physalis following a historical restriction of S-allele diversity. In contrast, the genus Solanum did not undergo a restriction of S-locus diversity and its S-alleles are generally much older. Because recovery from reduced S-locus diversity should involve increased selection, we employ a statistical framework to ask whether S-locus selection intensities are higher in Physalis than Solanum. Because different S-RNase lineages diversify in Physalis and Solanum, we also ask whether different sites are under selection in different lineages. Results Maximum-likelihood and Bayesian coalescent methods found higher intensities of selection and more sites under significant positive selection in the 48 Physalis S-RNase alleles than the 49 from Solanum. Highest posterior densities of dN/dS (ω estimates show that the strength of selection is greater for Physalis at 36 codons. A nested maximum likelihood method was more conservative, but still found 16 sites with greater selection in Physalis. Neither method found any codons under significantly greater selection in Solanum. A random effects likelihood method that examines data from both taxa jointly confirmed higher selection intensities in Physalis, but did not find different proportions of sites under selection in the two datasets. The greatest differences in strengths of selection were found in the most variable regions of the S-RNases, as expected if these regions encode self-recognition specificities. Clade-specific likelihood models indicated some codons were under greater selection in background Solanum lineages than in specific lineages of Physalis implying that selection on sites may differ among lineages. Conclusions Likelihood and Bayesian methods provide a statistical approach to

  11. Rapid Curtailing of the Stringent Response by Toxin-Antitoxin Encoded mRNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Chengzhe; Roghanian, Mohammad; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli regulates its metabolism to adapt to changes in the environment, in particular to stressful downshifts in nutrient quality. Such shifts elicit the so-called stringent response coordinated by the alarmone guanosine tetra- and pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp]. At sudden amino-acid (aa...... %. IMPORTANCE: The early stringent response elicited by amino-acid starvation is controlled by a sharp increase of the cellular (p)ppGpp level. Toxin-antitoxin encoded mRNases are activated by (p)ppGpp through enhanced degradation of antitoxins. The present work shows that this activation happens at a very...

  12. Polymorphisms in the RNASE3 gene are associated with susceptibility to cerebral malaria in Ghanaian children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adu, Bright; Dodoo, Daniel; Adukpo, Selorme

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is the most severe outcome of Plasmodium falciparum infection and a major cause of death in children from 2 to 4 years of age. A hospital based study in Ghana showed that P. falciparum induces eosinophilia and found a significantly higher serum level of eosinophil cationic...... protein (ECP) in CM patients than in uncomplicated malaria (UM) and severe malaria anemia (SA) patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been described in the ECP encoding-gene (RNASE3) of which the c.371G>C polymorphism (rs2073342) results in an arginine to threonine amino acid substitution p...

  13. Modification of human U4 RNA requires U6 RNA and multiple pseudouridine synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerby, D B; Patton, J R

    1997-12-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNA), cofactors in the splicing of pre-mRNA, are highly modified. In this report the modification of human U4 RNA was studied using cell extracts and in vitro synthesized, and therefore unmodified, U4 RNA. The formation of pseudouridine (Psi) at positions 4, 72 and 79 in U4 RNA was dependent on an RNA-containing cofactor, since the activities in the extracts were micrococcal nuclease (MN) sensitive. Extracts were fractionated on glycerol gradients and there was a broad peak of reconstitution activity centered at 14 S. Reconstitution was not due to additional enzymatic activity, since the peak fraction was MN sensitive. Oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated RNase H digestion of U6 RNA in the extracts inhibited formation of Psi in U4 RNA. From glycerol gradient analysis we determined that exogenously added U4 RNA that is associated with U6 RNA (sedimentation velocity 16 S) was significantly higher in Psi content than U4 RNA not associated with U6 RNA (8 S). Competitive inhibitors of Psi synthases, 5-fluorouridine-containing (5-FU) wild-type and mutant U4 RNAs, were used to investigate formation of Psi in U4 RNA. Deletions and point mutations in these 5-FU-containing U4 RNAs affected their ability to inhibit Psi synthase in vitro. With the aid of these potent inhibitors it was determined that at least two separate activities modify the uridines at these positions.

  14. Early commitment of yeast pre-mRNA to the spliceosome pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Legrain, P; Seraphin, B; Rosbash, M

    1988-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing in vitro is preceded by complex formation (spliceosome assembly). U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is found in the earliest form of the spliceosome detected by native gel electrophoresis, both in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in metazoan extracts. To examine the requirements for the formation of this early complex (band III) in yeast extracts, we cleaved the U2 snRNA by oligonucleotide-directed RNase H digestion. U2 snRNA depletion by this means inhibits both splicing and band II...

  15. Dimensionamento do lote no MRP com sequenciamento de itens: aplicação em uma empresa de fabricação de PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Oliveira Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the many challenges faced by any organization is how to plan production, which, if done incorrectly, can result in machines lying idle during the production process. Previous studies that have investigated the effect of sizing in MRP batches did not consider the sequencing of items. This study investigates the effects of variations in the lot size on MRP and its effect on machine idle time during the production process of a company in the PVC industry. With the change of batch rule from lot-for-lot (L4L to fixed quantity (EOQ, the company achieved a significant reduction in machine idle time. The results show the importance of considering the sequencing of the components on the study of the MRP and its impact on machine idle time. We concluded that the sequence of items in the production process should be considered when lot-sizing decisions for MRP are made.

  16. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  17. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  18. Selenium-dependent and -independent transport of arsenic by the human multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2): implications for the mutual detoxification of arsenic and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Michael W; Leslie, Elaine M

    2010-08-01

    Simultaneous exposure of lab animals to toxic doses of the human carcinogen arsenic (As) and the essential trace element selenium (Se) results in a remarkable mutual detoxification. A likely basis for this is the in vivo formation and biliary excretion of seleno-bis(S-glutathionyl) arsinium ion [(GS)(2)AsSe](-); however, the transport protein responsible for the biliary efflux of [(GS)(2)AsSe](-) has not been identified. The multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2) is an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Rat Mrp2 is known to excrete the As glutathione (GSH/GS-) conjugates arsenic triglutathione [As(GS)(3)] and monomethyl arsenic diglutathione [CH(3)As(GS)(2)] into bile, and in vitro studies have established As(GS)(3) as a substrate for human MRP2. In the present study, membrane vesicles prepared from human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells transfected with human MRP2 were used to demonstrate that MRP2 transports [(GS)(2)AsSe](-). In addition, the characteristics of MRP2 transport of As(GS)(3) and [(GS)(2)AsSe](-) were investigated. As(GS)(3) and [(GS)(2)AsSe](-) are chemically labile and have the potential to dissociate. However, arsenite (As(III)) +/- selenite (Se(IV)) transport was not detected in the absence of GSH or in the presence of the non-reducing GSH analog, ophthalmic acid, suggesting that the conjugates are the transported forms. The apparent K(m) values for [(GS)(2)AsSe](-) and As(GS)(3) were 1.7 and 4.2 microM, respectively, signifying high relative affinities. Membrane vesicles prepared from human erythrocytes, which express the MRP2-related MRP1/ABCC1, MRP4/ABCC4 and MRP5/ABCC5, transported As(GS)(3) in an MRP1- and ATP-dependent manner but did not transport [(GS)(2)AsSe](-). These results have important implications for the Se-dependent and -independent disposition of As.

  19. Structure-activity relationships for interaction with multidrug resistance protein 2 (ABCC2/MRP2): the role of torsion angle for a series of biphenyl-substituted heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yurong; Xing, Li; Poda, Gennadiy I; Hu, Yiding

    2007-06-01

    Multidrug resistance protein 2 (ABCC2/MRP2) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter involved in the absorption, distribution, and excretion of drugs and xenobiotics. Identifying compounds that are ABCC2/MRP2 substrates and/or inhibitors and understanding their structure-activity relationships (SARs) are important considerations in the selection and optimization of drug candidates. In the present study, the interactions between ABCC2/MRP2 and a series of biphenyl-substituted heterocycles were evaluated using Caco-2 cells and human ABCC2/MRP2 gene-transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. It was observed that ABCC2/MRP2 transport and/or inhibition profile, both in nature and in magnitude, depends strongly on the substitution patterns of the biphenyl system. In particular, different ortho-substitutions cause various degrees of twisting between the two-phenyl rings, resulting in changing interactions between the ligands and ABCC2/MRP2. The compounds with small ortho functions (hydrogen, fluorine, and oxygen) and, thus, the ones displaying the smallest torsion angles of biphenyl (37-45 degrees) are neither substrates nor inhibitors of human ABCC2/MRP2. The transporter interactions increase as the steric bulkiness of the ortho-substitutions increase. When the tested compounds are 2-methyl substituted biphenyls, they exhibit moderate torsion angles (54-65 degrees) and behave as ABCC2/MRP2 substrates as well as mild inhibitors [10-40% compared with 3-[[3-[2-(7-chloroquinolin-2-yl)vinyl]phenyl]-(2-dimethylcarbamoylethyl-sulfanyl)methylsulfanyl] propionic acid (MK571)]. For the 2,2'-dimethyl substituted biphenyls, the torsions are enhanced (78-87 degrees) and so is the inhibition of ABCC2/MRP2. This class of compounds behaves as strong inhibitors of ABCC2/MRP2. These results can be used to define the three-dimensional structural requirements of ABCC2/MRP2 interaction with their substrates and inhibitors, as well as to provide SAR guidance to support drug discovery.

  20. Dual-acting riboswitch control of translation initiation and mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Marie-Pier; Bastet, Laurène; Lussier, Antony; Simoneau-Roy, Maxime; Massé, Eric; Lafontaine, Daniel A

    2012-12-11

    Riboswitches are mRNA regulatory elements that control gene expression by altering their structure in response to specific metabolite binding. In bacteria, riboswitches consist of an aptamer that performs ligand recognition and an expression platform that regulates either transcription termination or translation initiation. Here, we describe a dual-acting riboswitch from Escherichia coli that, in addition to modulating translation initiation, also is directly involved in the control of initial mRNA decay. Upon lysine binding, the lysC riboswitch adopts a conformation that not only inhibits translation initiation but also exposes RNase E cleavage sites located in the riboswitch expression platform. However, in the absence of lysine, the riboswitch folds into an alternative conformation that simultaneously allows translation initiation and sequesters RNase E cleavage sites. Both regulatory activities can be individually inhibited, indicating that translation initiation and mRNA decay can be modulated independently using the same conformational switch. Because RNase E cleavage sites are located in the riboswitch sequence, this riboswitch provides a unique means for the riboswitch to modulate RNase E cleavage activity directly as a function of lysine. This dual inhibition is in contrast to other riboswitches, such as the thiamin pyrophosphate-sensing thiM riboswitch, which triggers mRNA decay only as a consequence of translation inhibition. The riboswitch control of RNase E cleavage activity is an example of a mechanism by which metabolite sensing is used to regulate gene expression of single genes or even large polycistronic mRNAs as a function of environmental changes.

  1. Transport of antimony salts by Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts over-expressing the human multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Landry; Picault, Nathalie; Cazalé, Anne-Claire; Beyly, Audrey; Lucas, Philippe; Jacquet, Hélène; Suso, Henri-Pierre; Vavasseur, Alain; Peltier, Gilles; Forestier, Cyrille

    2006-12-22

    ABC transporters from the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily are glutathione S-conjugate pumps exhibiting a broad substrate specificity illustrated by numerous xenobiotics, such as anticancer drugs, herbicides, pesticides and heavy metals. The engineering of MRP transporters into plants might be interesting either to reduce the quantity of xenobiotics taken up by the plant in the context of "safe-food" strategies or, conversely, in the development of phytoremediation strategies in which xenobiotics are sequestered in the vacuolar compartment. In this report, we obtained Arabidopsis transgenic plants overexpressing human MRP1. In these plants, expression of MRP1 did not increase plant resistance to antimony salts (Sb(III)), a classical glutathione-conjugate substrate of MRP1. However, the transporter was fully translated in roots and shoots, and targeted to the plasma membrane. In order to investigate the functionality of MRP1 in Arabidopsis, mesophyll cell protoplasts (MCPs) were isolated from transgenic plants and transport activities were measured by using calcein or Sb(III) as substrates. Expression of MRP1 at the plasma membrane was correlated with an increase in the MCPs resistance to Sb(III) and a limitation of the metalloid content in the protoplasts due to an improvement in Sb(III) efflux. Moreover, Sb(III) transport was sensitive to classical inhibitors of the human MRP1, such as MK571 or glibenclamide. These results demonstrate that a human ABC transporter can be functionally introduced in Arabidopsis, which might be useful, with the help of stronger promoters, to reduce the accumulation of xenobiotics in plants, such as heavy metals from multi-contaminated soils.

  2. Role of MRP transporters in regulating antimicrobial drug inefficacy and oxidative stress-induced pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Upal; Barber, Paul; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Batrakova, Elena V; Mondal, Debasis; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs) are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB) therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH) conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9) have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function, and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  3. Role of MRP Transporters in Regulating Antimicrobial Drug Inefficacy and Oxidative Stress-induced Pathogenesis during HIV-1 and TB Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upal eRoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Drug Resistance Proteins (MRPs are members of the ATP binding cassette (ABC drug-efflux transporter superfamily. MRPs are known to regulate the efficacy of a broad range of anti-retroviral drugs (ARV used in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and antibacterial agents used in Tuberculus Bacilli (TB therapy. Due to their role in efflux of glutathione (GSH conjugated drugs, MRPs can also regulate cellular oxidative stress, which may contribute to both HIV and/or TB pathogenesis. This review focuses on the characteristics, functional expression, and modulation of known members of the MRP family in HIV infected cells exposed to ARV drugs and discusses their known role in drug-inefficacy in HIV/TB-induced dysfunctions. Currently, nine members of the MRP family (MRP1-MRP9 have been identified, with MRP1 and MRP2 being the most extensively studied. Details of the other members of this family have not been known until recently, but differential expression has been documented in inflammatory tissues. Researchers have found that the distribution, function and reactivity of members of MRP family vary in different types of lymphocytes and macrophages, and are differentially expressed at the basal and apical surfaces of both endothelial and epithelial cells. Therefore, the prime objective of this review is to delineate the role of MRP transporters in HAART and TB therapy and their potential in precipitating cellular dysfunctions manifested in these chronic infectious diseases. We also provide an overview of different available options and novel experimental strategies that are being utilized to overcome the drug resistance and disease pathogenesis mediated by these membrane transporters.

  4. Evaluation of multiple-turnover capability of locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides in cell-free RNase H-mediated antisense reaction and in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Fujii, Naoko; Yasuhara, Hidenori; Wada, Shunsuke; Wada, Fumito; Shigesada, Naoya; Harada-Shiba, Mariko; Obika, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    The multiple-turnover ability of a series of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) in the RNase H-mediated scission reaction was estimated using a newly developed cell-free reaction system. We determined the initial reaction rates of AONs under multiple-turnover conditions and found that among 24 AONs tested, AONs with melting temperatures (Tm) of 40°C-60°C efficiently elicit multiple rounds of RNA scission. On the other hand, by measuring Tm with two 10-mer RNAs partially complementary to AONs as models of cleaved 5' and 3' fragments of mRNA, we found that AONs require adequate binding affinity for efficient turnover activities. We further demonstrated that the efficacy of a set of 13-mer AONs in mice correlated with their turnover efficiency, indicating that the intracellular situation where AONs function is similar to multiple-turnover conditions. Our methodology and findings may provide an opportunity to shed light on a previously unknown antisense mechanism, leading to further improvement of the activity and safety profiles of AONs.

  5. Biallelic mutations in the 3' exonuclease TOE1 cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia and uncover a role in snRNA processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lardelli, Rea M.; Schaffer, Ashleigh E.; Eggens, Veerle R C

    2017-01-01

    Deadenylases are best known for degrading the poly(A) tail during mRNA decay. The deadenylase family has expanded throughout evolution and, in mammals, consists of 12 Mg 2+ -dependent 3'-end RNases with substrate specificity that is mostly unknown. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 7 (PCH7) is a un...

  6. Oral Morphine Pharmacokinetic in Obesity: The Role of P-Glycoprotein, MRP2, MRP3, UGT2B7, and CYP3A4 Jejunal Contents and Obesity-Associated Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret-Linares, Célia; Miyauchi, Eisuke; Luo, Huilong; Labat, Laurence; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Mouly, Stéphane; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Bergmann, Jean-François; Declèves, Xavier

    2016-03-07

    The objective of our work was to study the association between the jejunal expression levels of P-gp, MRP2, MRP3, UGT2B7, CYP3A4, the ABCB1 c.3435C > T polymorphism, and several obesity-associated biomarkers, as well as oral morphine and glucuronides pharmacokinetics in a population of morbidly obese subjects. The pharmacokinetics of oral morphine (30 mg) and its glucuronides was performed in obese patients candidate to bariatric surgery. A fragment of jejunal mucosa was preserved during surgery. Subjects were genotyped for the ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.3435C > T. The subjects were 6 males and 23 females, with a mean body mass index of 44.8 (35.4-61.9) kg/m(2). The metabolic ratios AUC0-inf M3G/morphine and AUC0-inf M6G/morphine were highly correlated (rs = 0.8, p morphine and its glucuronides were not associated with the jejunal contents of P-gp, CYP3A4, MRP2, and MRP3. The jejunal content of UGT2B7 was positively associated with morphine AUC0-inf (rs = 0.4, p = 0.03). Adiponectin was inversely correlated with morphine Cmax (rs = -0.44, p = 0.03). None of the factors studied was associated with morphine metabolic ratios. The interindividual variability in the jejunal content of drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, the ABCB1 gene polymorphism, and the low-grade inflammation did not explain the variability in morphine and glucuronide exposure. High morphine metabolic ratio argued for an increased morphine glucuronidation in morbidly obese patients.

  7. Localization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC transport proteins PfMRP1, PfMRP2, and PfMDR5 at the Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luty Adrian JF

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance has been a major obstacle to the control of malaria. The mechanisms underlying drug resistance in malaria seem to be complex and multigenic. The current literature on multiple drug resistance against anti-malarials has documented PfMDR1, an ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein, as an important determinant of resistance. In the Plasmodium falciparum genome, there are several ABC transporters some of which could be putative drug transporting proteins. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying drug resistance, characterization of these transporters is essential. The aim of this study was to characterize and localize putative ABC transporters. Methods In the plasmoDB database, 16 members of the P. falciparum ABC family can be identified, 11 of which are putative transport proteins. A phylogenetic analysis of the aligned NBDs of the PfABC genes was performed. Antibodies against PfMRP1 (PfABCC1, PfMRP2 (PfABCC2, and PfMDR5 (PfABCB5 were generated, affinity purified and used in immunocytochemistry to localize the proteins in the asexual stages of the parasite. Results The ABC family members of P. falciparum were categorized into subfamilies. The ABC B subfamily was the largest and contained seven members. Other family members that could be involved in drug transport are PfABCC1, PfABCC2, PfABCG1, and PfABCI3. The expression and localization of three ABC transport proteins was determined. PfMRP1, PfMRP2, and PfMDR5 are localized to the plasma membrane in all asexual stages of the parasite. Conclusion In conclusion, 11 of the 16 ABC proteins in the P. falciparum genome are putative transport proteins, some of which might be involved in drug resistance. Moreover, it was demonstrated that three of these proteins are expressed on the parasite's plasma membrane.

  8. bba, a synthetic derivative of 23-hydroxybutulinic acid, reverses multidrug resistance by inhibiting the efflux activity of MRP7 (ABCC10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jiang Chen

    Full Text Available Natural products are frequently used for adjuvant chemotherapy in cancer treatment. 23-O-(1,4'-bipiperidine-1-carbonyl betulinic acid (BBA is a synthetic derivative of 23-hydroxybutulinic acid (23-HBA, which is a natural pentacyclic triterpene and the major active constituent of the root of Pulsatillachinensis. We previously reported that BBA could reverse P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR. In the present study, we investigated whether BBA has the potential to reverse multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7/ABCC10-mediated MDR. We found that BBA concentration-dependently enhanced the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to paclitaxel, docetaxel and vinblastine. Accumulation and efflux experiments demonstrated that BBA increased the intracellular accumulation of [(3H]-paclitaxel by inhibiting the efflux of [(3H]-paclitaxel from HEK293/MRP7 cells. In addition, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses indicated no significant alteration of MRP7 protein expression and localization in plasma membranes after treatment with BBA. These results demonstrate that BBA reverses MRP7-mediated MDR through blocking the drug efflux function of MRP7 without affecting the intracellular ATP levels. Our findings suggest that BBA has the potential to be used in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to augment the response to chemotherapy.

  9. Meloxicam increases intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin via downregulation of multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S F; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, J L

    2015-11-19

    It has been suggested that selected COX inhibitors can overcome multidrug resistance through the inhibition of ATP‑binding cassette-transporter proteins thereby enhancing the inhibitory effect of doxorubicin on human tumor growth and promoting the actions of cytostatics. However, their effect on lung cancer and the molecular mechanisms involved in the overcoming of multidrug resistance are unclear. In the present study, the ability of meloxicam, a COX-2-specific inhibitor to enhance doxorubicin‑mediated inhibition was investigated in human A549 lung cancer in vivo and in vitro. In order to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved in doxorubicin accumulation, we measured the levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-transporter protein activity and expression by western blotting, since this has been implicated in meloxicam action as well as in chemoresistance. We found that, in A549 cells, meloxicam could increase intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, a substrate for MRP, through inhibition of cellular export. Western blot analysis indicated that meloxicam reduced the expression of MRP1 and MRP4. The results reported in the present study demonstrate for the first time that the specific COX-2 inhibitor meloxicam can increase the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and enhance doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in A549 cancer cells by reducing the expression of MRP1 and MRP4.

  10. Intranasal immunization with fusion protein MrpH·FimH and MPL adjuvant confers protection against urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mehri; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Oloomi, Mana; Jafari, Anis; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and Proteus mirabilis are among the most common infections in the world. Currently there are no vaccines available to confer protection against UTI in humans. In this study, the immune responses and protection of FimH of UPEC with MrpH antigen of P. mirabilis in different vaccine formulations with and without MPL adjuvant were assessed. Mice intranasally immunized with the novel fusion protein MrpH·FimH induced a significant increase in IgG and IgA in serum, nasal wash, vaginal wash, and urine samples. Mice immunized with fusion MrpH·FimH also showed a significant boost in cellular immunity. Addition of MPL as the adjuvant enhanced FimH and MrpH specific humoral and cellular responses in both systemic and mucosal samples. Vaccination with MrpH·FimH alone or in combination with MPL showed the highest efficiency in clearing bladder and kidney infections in mice challenged with UPEC and P. mirabilis. These findings may indicate that the protection observed correlates with the systemic, mucosal and cellular immune responses induced by vaccination with these preparations. Our data suggest MrpH·FimH fusion protein with or without MPL as adjuvant could be potential vaccine candidates for elimination of UPEC and P. mirabilis. These data altogether are promising and these formulations are good candidates for elimination of UPEC and P. mirabilis.

  11. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils.

  12. Inhibitor ranking through QM based chelation calculations for virtual screening of HIV-1 RNase H inhibition.

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    Vasanthanathan Poongavanam

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanical (QM calculations have been used to predict the binding affinity of a set of ligands towards HIV-1 RT associated RNase H (RNH. The QM based chelation calculations show improved binding affinity prediction for the inhibitors compared to using an empirical scoring function. Furthermore, full protein fragment molecular orbital (FMO calculations were conducted and subsequently analysed for individual residue stabilization/destabilization energy contributions to the overall binding affinity in order to better understand the true and false predictions. After a successful assessment of the methods based on the use of a training set of molecules, QM based chelation calculations were used as filter in virtual screening of compounds in the ZINC database. By this, we find, compared to regular docking, QM based chelation calculations to significantly reduce the large number of false positives. Thus, the computational models tested in this study could be useful as high throughput filters for searching HIV-1 RNase H active-site molecules in the virtual screening process.

  13. Synergistic Effect of ZnO on Property of Halogen-free Flame Retardant ABS by MRP/NE%ZnO对MRP/NE阻燃ABS体系的协同作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯才敏; 刘洪波; 黄健光; 彭建兵

    2010-01-01

    采用微胶囊化红磷(MRP)和酚醛环氧树脂(NE)复配阻燃荆,以ZnO为阻燃增效剂,制备了具有良好阻燃性能的无卤阻燃ABS.研究了ZnO用量对ABS阻燃性能的影响及其协同作用机理.结果表明:添加ZnO即可显著提高材料的阻燃性能.当MRP/NE/ZnO添加量分别为9%、21%和4%时,阻燃PP的氧指数达34%.TGA、FTIR和体视显微镜分析结果表明:添加ZnO可以催化MRP/NE间的酯化交联反应,促进材料成炭,增加残炭含量,提高阻燃性能.

  14. Major satellite repeat RNA stabilize heterochromatin retention of Suv39h enzymes by RNA-nucleosome association and RNA:DNA hybrid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez Camacho, Oscar; Galan, Carmen; Swist-Rosowska, Kalina; Ching, Reagan; Gamalinda, Michael; Karabiber, Fethullah; De La Rosa-Velazquez, Inti; Engist, Bettina; Koschorz, Birgit; Shukeir, Nicholas; Onishi-Seebacher, Megumi; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Jenuwein, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    The Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 histone lysine methyltransferases are hallmark enzymes at mammalian heterochromatin. We show here that the mouse Suv39h2 enzyme differs from Suv39h1 by containing an N-terminal basic domain that facilitates retention at mitotic chromatin and provides an additional affinity for major satellite repeat RNA. To analyze an RNA-dependent interaction with chromatin, we purified native nucleosomes from mouse ES cells and detect that Suv39h1 and Suv39h2 exclusively associate with poly-nucleosomes. This association was attenuated upon RNaseH incubation and entirely lost upon RNaseA digestion of native chromatin. Major satellite repeat transcripts remain chromatin-associated and have a secondary structure that favors RNA:DNA hybrid formation. Together, these data reveal an RNA-mediated mechanism for the stable chromatin interaction of the Suv39h KMT and suggest a function for major satellite non-coding RNA in the organization of an RNA-nucleosome scaffold as the underlying structure of mouse heterochromatin.

  15. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the MRP1 gene in four populations suggest negative selection on its coding region

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    Ryan Stephen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MRP1 gene encodes the 190 kDa multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1 and effluxes diverse drugs and xenobiotics. Sequence variations within this gene might account for differences in drug response in different individuals. To facilitate association studies of this gene with diseases and/or drug response, exons and flanking introns of MRP1 were screened for polymorphisms in 142 DNA samples from four different populations. Results Seventy-one polymorphisms, including 60 biallelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, ten insertions/deletions (indel and one short tandem repeat (STR were identified. Thirty-four of these polymorphisms have not been previously reported. Interestingly, the STR polymorphism at the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR occurs at high but different frequencies in the different populations. Frequencies of common polymorphisms in our populations were comparable to those of similar populations in HAPMAP or Perlegen. Nucleotide diversity indices indicated that the coding region of MRP1 may have undergone negative selection or recent population expansion. SNPs E10/1299 G>T (R433S and E16/2012 G>T (G671V which occur at low frequency in only one or two of four populations examined were predicted to be functionally deleterious and hence are likely to be under negative selection. Conclusion Through in silico approaches, we identified two rare SNPs that are potentially negatively selected. These SNPs may be useful for studies associating this gene with rare events including adverse drug reactions.

  16. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.