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Sample records for rnas controlling outer

  1. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...

  2. Secretable Small RNAs via Outer Membrane Vesicles in Periodontal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-C; Hong, S-H; Lee, H-J

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to be major regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. However, bacterial RNAs comparable in size to eukaryotic miRNAs (18-22 nucleotides) have received little attention. Recently, a novel class of small RNAs similar in size to miRNAs (miRNA-size, small RNAs or msRNAs) have also been found in several bacteria. Like miRNAs, msRNAs are approximately 15 to 25 nucleotides in length, and their precursors are predicted to form a hairpin loop secondary structure. Here, we identified msRNAs in the periodontal pathogens Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Treponema denticola. We examined these msRNAs using a deep sequencing method and characterized dozens of msRNAs through bioinformatic analysis. Highly expressed msRNAs were selected for further validation. The findings suggest that this class of small RNAs is well conserved across the domains of life. Indeed, msRNAs secreted via bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) were detected. The ability of bacterial OMVs to deliver RNAs into eukaryotic cells was also observed. These msRNAs in OMVs allowed us to identify their potential human immune-related target genes. Furthermore, we found that exogenous msRNAs could suppress expression of certain cytokines in Jurkat T cells. We propose msRNAs may function as novel bacterial signaling molecules that mediate bacteria-to-human interactions. Furthermore, this study may provide fresh insight into bacterial pathogenic mechanisms of periodontal diseases.

  3. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  5. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eSchneeberger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  6. MicroRNAs: control and loss of control in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Marin-Muller, Christian; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Chow, Kwong-Hon; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of the human genome indicates that a large fraction of the genome sequences are RNAs that do not encode any proteins, also known as non-coding RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNA molecules 20-22 nucleotides (nt) in length that are predicted to control the activity of approximately 30% of all protein-coding genes in mammals. miRNAs play important roles in many diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and immune disorders. The expression of miRNAs can be regulated by epigenetic modification, DNA copy number change, and genetic mutations. miRNAs can serve as a valuable therapeutic target for a large number of diseases. For miRNAs with oncogenic capabilities, potential therapies include miRNA silencing, antisense blocking, and miRNA modifications. For miRNAs with tumor suppression functions, overexpression of those miRNAs might be a useful strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this review, we discuss the current progress of miRNA research, regulation of miRNA expression, prediction of miRNA targets, and regulatory role of miRNAs in human physiology and diseases, with a specific focus on miRNAs in pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease, the immune system, and infectious disease. This review provides valuable information for clinicians and researchers who want to recognize the newest advances in this new field and identify possible lines of investigation in miRNAs as important mediators in human physiology and diseases.

  7. Regulatory RNAs and control of epigenetic mechanisms: expectations for cognition and cognitive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Anderson A; Webb, William M; Lubin, Farah D

    2016-01-01

    The diverse functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can influence virtually every aspect of the transcriptional process including epigenetic regulation of genes. In the CNS, regulatory RNA networks and epigenetic mechanisms have broad relevance to gene transcription changes involved in long-term memory formation and cognition. Thus, it is becoming increasingly clear that multiple classes of ncRNAs impact neuronal development, neuroplasticity, and cognition. Currently, a large gap exists in our knowledge of how ncRNAs facilitate epigenetic processes, and how this phenomenon affects cognitive function. In this review, we discuss recent findings highlighting a provocative role for ncRNAs including lncRNAs and piRNAs in the control of epigenetic mechanisms involved in cognitive function. Furthermore, we discuss the putative roles for these ncRNAs in cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26366811

  8. Regulatory RNAs and control of epigenetic mechanisms: expectations for cognition and cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Anderson A; Webb, William M; Lubin, Farah D

    2016-01-01

    The diverse functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can influence virtually every aspect of the transcriptional process including epigenetic regulation of genes. In the CNS, regulatory RNA networks and epigenetic mechanisms have broad relevance to gene transcription changes involved in long-term memory formation and cognition. Thus, it is becoming increasingly clear that multiple classes of ncRNAs impact neuronal development, neuroplasticity, and cognition. Currently, a large gap exists in our knowledge of how ncRNAs facilitate epigenetic processes, and how this phenomenon affects cognitive function. In this review, we discuss recent findings highlighting a provocative role for ncRNAs including lncRNAs and piRNAs in the control of epigenetic mechanisms involved in cognitive function. Furthermore, we discuss the putative roles for these ncRNAs in cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Exploring the trans-acting short interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) technology for virus control in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small ribonucleic acid (RNAs) (~20-24nt) processed from double-stranded RNA in plants can trigger degradation of the target mRNAs in cytoplasm or de novo DNA methylation in nucleus leading to gene silencing. Trans-acting short-interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) have been shown to enhance the target mRNA d...

  10. Self-optimizing Uplink Outer Loop Power Control for WCDMA Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Markoc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demands for high data rates, drives the efforts for more efficient usage of the finite natural radio spectrum resources. Existing wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA uplink outer loop power control has difficulty to answer to the new load on air interface. The main reason is that the maximum allowed noise rise per single user is fixed value. In worst case uplink load can be so high that all services, including conversational service, could be blocked. In this paper investigation has been performed to present correlation of main system parameters, used by uplink outer loop power control, to uplink load. Simulation has been created and executed to present difference in current implementation of uplink outer loop power control against proposed changes. Proposed solution is self-optimizing uplink outer loop power control in a way that maximum allowed noise rise per single user would be dynamically changed based on current uplink load on cell.

  11. Control of competence by related non-coding csRNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae R6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke eLaux

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The two-component regulatory system CiaRH of Streptococcus pneumoniae is involved in ß-lactam resistance, maintenance of cell integrity, bacteriocin production, host colonization, virulence, and competence. The response regulator CiaR controls, among other genes, expression of five highly similar small non-coding RNAs, designated csRNAs. These csRNAs control competence development by targeting comC, encoding the precursor of the competence stimulating peptide CSP, which is essential to initiate the regulatory cascade leading to competence. In addition, another gene product of the CiaR regulon, the serine protease HtrA, is also involved in competence control. In the absence of HtrA, five csRNAs could suppress competence, but one csRNA alone was not effective. To determine if all csRNAs are needed, reporter gene fusions to competence genes were used to monitor competence gene expression in the presence of different csRNAs. These experiments showed that two csRNAs were not enough to prevent competence, but combinations of three csRNAs, csRNA1,2, 3, or csRNA1,2,4 were sufficient. In S. pneumoniae strains expressing only csRNA5, a surprising positive effect was detected on the level of early competence gene expression. Hence, the role of the csRNAs in competence regulation is more complex than anticipated. Mutations in comC (comC8 partially disrupting predicted complementarity to the csRNAs led to competence even in the presence of all csRNAs. Reconstitution of csRNA complementarity to comC8 restored competence suppression. Again, more than one csRNA was needed. In this case, even two mutated csRNAs complementary to comC8, csRNA1-8 and csRNA2-8, were suppressive. In conclusion, competence in S. pneumoniae is additively controlled by the csRNAs via post-transcriptional regulation of comC.

  12. Marine vehicle path following using inner-outer loop control.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maurya, P.K.; Agular, A.P.; Pascoal, A.M.

    practitioners a very convenient method to effectively implement path following controllers on a wide range of vehicles. The mathematical tools used for systems characterization and stability analysis borrow from Input to Output Stability (IOS) theory and small...

  13. Determining Associations between Human Diseases and non-coding RNAs with Critical Roles in Network Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Haruna; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Maegawa, Shingo; Hosokawa, Hiroshi; Nacher, Jose C.

    2015-10-01

    Deciphering the association between life molecules and human diseases is currently an important task in systems biology. Research over the past decade has unveiled that the human genome is almost entirely transcribed, producing a vast number of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) with potential regulatory functions. More recent findings suggest that many diseases may not be exclusively linked to mutations in protein-coding genes. The combination of these arguments poses the question of whether ncRNAs that play a critical role in network control are also enriched with disease-associated ncRNAs. To address this question, we mapped the available annotated information of more than 350 human disorders to the largest collection of human ncRNA-protein interactions, which define a bipartite network of almost 93,000 interactions. Using a novel algorithmic-based controllability framework applied to the constructed bipartite network, we found that ncRNAs engaged in critical network control are also statistically linked to human disorders (P-value of P = 9.8 × 10-109). Taken together, these findings suggest that the addition of those genes that encode optimized subsets of ncRNAs engaged in critical control within the pool of candidate genes could aid disease gene prioritization studies.

  14. MicroRNAs as controlled systems and controllers in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panera, Nadia; Gnani, Daniela; Crudele, Annalisa; Ceccarelli, Sara; Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna

    2014-11-07

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multi-faceted condition including simple steatosis alone or associated with inflammation and ballooning (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis) and eventually fibrosis. The NAFLD incidence has increased over the last twenty years becoming the most frequent chronic liver disease in industrialized countries. Obesity, visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, and many other disorders that characterize metabolic syndrome are the major predisposing risk factors for NAFLD. Furthermore, different factors, including genetic background, epigenetic mechanisms and environmental factors, such as diet and physical exercise, contribute to NAFLD development and progression. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that specific microRNAs expression profiles are strongly associated with several pathological conditions including NAFLD. In NAFLD, microRNA deregulation in response to intrinsic genetic or epigenetic factors or environmental factors contributes to metabolic dysfunction. In this review we focused on microRNAs role both as controlled and controllers molecules in NAFLD development and/or their eventual value as non-invasive biomarkers of disease.

  15. A Robust Inner and Outer Loop Control Method for Trajectory Tracking of a Quadrotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dunzhu; Cheng, Limei; Yao, Yanhong

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve the complicated trajectory tracking of quadrotor, a geometric inner and outer loop control scheme is presented. The outer loop generates the desired rotation matrix for the inner loop. To improve the response speed and robustness, a geometric SMC controller is designed for the inner loop. The outer loop is also designed via sliding mode control (SMC). By Lyapunov theory and cascade theory, the closed-loop system stability is guaranteed. Next, the tracking performance is validated by tracking three representative trajectories. Then, the robustness of the proposed control method is illustrated by trajectory tracking in presence of model uncertainty and disturbances. Subsequently, experiments are carried out to verify the method. In the experiment, ultra wideband (UWB) is used for indoor positioning. Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used for fusing inertial measurement unit (IMU) and UWB measurements. The experimental results show the feasibility of the designed controller in practice. The comparative experiments with PD and PD loop demonstrate the robustness of the proposed control method. PMID:28925984

  16. Lidocaine Administration Controls MicroRNAs Alterations Observed After Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancan, Lisa; Simón, Carlos; Marchal-Duval, Emmeline; Casanova, Javier; Paredes, Sergio Damian; Calvo, Alberto; García, Cruz; Rincón, David; Turrero, Agustín; Garutti, Ignacio; Vara, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is associated with morbidity and mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as regulators of IRI, and they are involved in the pathogenesis of organ rejection. Lidocaine has proven anti-inflammatory activity in several tissues but its modulation of miRNAs has not been investigated. This work aims to investigate the involvement of miRNAs in lung IRI in a lung auto-transplantation model and to investigate the effect of lidocaine. Three groups (sham, control, and Lidocaine), each comprising 6 pigs, underwent a lung autotransplantation. All groups received the same anesthesia. In addition, animals of lidocaine group received a continuous intravenous administration of lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg/h) during surgery. Lung biopsies were taken before pulmonary artery clamp, before reperfusion, 30 minutes postreperfusion (Rp-30), and 60 minutes postreperfusion (Rp-60). Samples were analyzed for different miRNAs (miR-122, miR-145, miR-146a, miR-182, miR-107, miR-192, miR-16, miR-21, miR-126, miR-127, miR142-5p, miR152, miR155, miR-223, and let7) via the use of reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results were normalized with miR-103. The expression of miR-127 and miR-16 did not increase after IRI. Let-7d, miR-21, miR-107, miR-126, miR-145, miR-146a, miR-182, and miR-192 significantly increased at the Rp-60 (control versus sham P lidocaine was able to attenuate these alterations in a significant way (control versus Lidocaine P lidocaine reduced significantly miRNAs alterations.

  17. Combinatorial Control of mRNA Fates by RNA-Binding Proteins and Non-Coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Iadevaia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is mediated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and small non-coding RNAs (e.g., microRNAs that bind to distinct elements in their mRNA targets. Here, we review recent examples describing the synergistic and/or antagonistic effects mediated by RBPs and miRNAs to determine the localisation, stability and translation of mRNAs in mammalian cells. From these studies, it is becoming increasingly apparent that dynamic rearrangements of RNA-protein complexes could have profound implications in human cancer, in synaptic plasticity, and in cellular differentiation.

  18. Autoimmune regulator (Aire) controls the expression of microRNAs in medullary thymic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Claudia; Evangelista, Adriane F; Marques, Márcia M; Octacílio-Silva, Shirlei; Donadi, Eduardo A; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Passos, Geraldo A

    2013-04-01

    The autoimmune regulator (Aire) is a transcription factor that controls the ectopic expression of a large set of peripheral tissue antigen (PTA) genes in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). Recent evidence has demonstrated that Aire releases stalled RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II) from blockage at the promoter region of its target genes. Given that, in addition to messenger RNAs (mRNA), RNA Pol II also transcribes microRNAs (miRNAs), we raised the hypothesis that Aire might play a role as an upstream controller of miRNA transcription. To test this, we initially analyzed the expression profiles of 662 miRNAs in control and Aire-silenced (siRNA) murine mTEC 3.10 cells using microarrays. The bioinformatics programs SAM and Cluster-TreeView were then used to identify the differentially expressed miRNAs and their profiles, respectively. Thirty Aire-dependent miRNAs were identified in the Aire-silenced mTECs, of which 18 were up- and 12 were down-regulated. The down-regulated miR-376 family was the focus of this study because its members (miR-376a, miR-376b and miR-376c) are located in the genome within the Gm2922 open-reading frame (ORF) gene segment on the chromosome 12F1. The T-boxes (TTATTA) and G-boxes (GATTGG), which represent putative RNA Pol II promoter motifs, were located in a portion spanning 10 kb upstream of the ATG codon of Gm2922. Moreover, we found that Gm2922 encodes an mRNA, which was also down-regulated in Aire-silenced mTECs. These results represent the first evidence that Aire can play a role as a controller of transcription of miRNAs located within genomic regions encompassing ORF and/or mRNA genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypothalamic stem cells control ageing speed partly through exosomal miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yalin; Kim, Min Soo; Jia, Baosen; Yan, Jingqi; Zuniga-Hertz, Juan Pablo; Han, Cheng; Cai, Dongsheng

    2017-08-03

    It has been proposed that the hypothalamus helps to control ageing, but the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Here we develop several mouse models in which hypothalamic stem/progenitor cells that co-express Sox2 and Bmi1 are ablated, as we observed that ageing in mice started with a substantial loss of these hypothalamic cells. Each mouse model consistently displayed acceleration of ageing-like physiological changes or a shortened lifespan. Conversely, ageing retardation and lifespan extension were achieved in mid-aged mice that were locally implanted with healthy hypothalamic stem/progenitor cells that had been genetically engineered to survive in the ageing-related hypothalamic inflammatory microenvironment. Mechanistically, hypothalamic stem/progenitor cells contributed greatly to exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, and these exosomal miRNAs declined during ageing, whereas central treatment with healthy hypothalamic stem/progenitor cell-secreted exosomes led to the slowing of ageing. In conclusion, ageing speed is substantially controlled by hypothalamic stem cells, partially through the release of exosomal miRNAs.

  20. Transcription of two long noncoding RNAs mediates mating-type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Werven, Folkert J; Neuert, Gregor; Hendrick, Natalie; Lardenois, Aurélie; Buratowski, Stephen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Primig, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2012-09-14

    The cell-fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/α but not haploid MATa or MATα cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating-type control of sporulation. In MATa or MATα haploids, expression of IME1, the central inducer of gametogenesis, is inhibited in cis by transcription of the lncRNA IRT1, located in the IME1 promoter. IRT1 transcription recruits the Set2 histone methyltransferase and the Set3 histone deacetylase complex to establish repressive chromatin at the IME1 promoter. Inhibiting expression of IRT1 and an antisense transcript that antagonizes the expression of the meiotic regulator IME4 allows cells expressing the haploid mating type to sporulate with kinetics that are indistinguishable from that of MATa/α diploids. Conversely, expression of the two lncRNAs abolishes sporulation in MATa/α diploids. Thus, transcription of two lncRNAs governs mating-type control of gametogenesis in yeast. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Taylor-Couette flow control using the outer cylinder cross-section variation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oualli, Hamid; Lalaoua, Adel; Hanchi, Samir; Bouabdallah, Ahcene

    2013-01-01

    A numerical study of a controlled flow evolving in a Taylor-Couette system is presented in this paper. The study is devoted to investigate the effect of the outer cylinder cross-section variation on the flow behavior. It is aimed to make assessment of the flow response in terms of the criticality of the early transitional flow regimes and the accompanying flow topology alterations. The numerical simulations are carried out on the Fluent software package for a three-dimensional incompressible flow. The basic system is characterized by a height H = 200 mm, a ratio of the inner to the outer cylinders radii η = 0.9, an aspect ratio corresponding to the cylinders height reported to the gap length Г = 40 and a ratio of the gap to the radius of the inner cylinder δ = 0.1. The numerical deformation of the outer cylinder is executed using the dynamic mesh program according to a predefined function implemented in a homemade program as an UDF (user defined function). It is established that the first instability mode of transition is retarded from Tac1 = 41.33, corresponding to the first Taylor number critical value, to Tac1 = 70 when the deforming amplitude is equal to 15% the external cylinder diameter value. This flow relaminarization process is accompanied by substantial modifications in the flow behavior and configuration.

  2. Controlling the Messenger: Regulated Translation of Maternal mRNAs in Xenopus laevis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Michael D; Fox, Catherine A; Dowdle, Megan E; Blaser, Susanne Imboden; Chung, Andy; Park, Sookhee

    2017-01-01

    The selective translation of maternal mRNAs encoding cell-fate determinants drives the earliest decisions of embryogenesis that establish the vertebrate body plan. This chapter will discuss studies in Xenopus laevis that provide insights into mechanisms underlying this translational control. Xenopus has been a powerful model organism for many discoveries relevant to the translational control of maternal mRNAs because of the large size of its oocytes and eggs that allow for microinjection of molecules and the relative ease of manipulating the oocyte to egg transition (maturation) and fertilization in culture. Consequently, many key studies have focused on the expression of maternal mRNAs during the oocyte to egg transition (the meiotic cell cycle) and the rapid cell divisions immediately following fertilization. This research has made seminal contributions to our understanding of translational regulatory mechanisms, but while some of the mRNAs under consideration at these stages encode cell-fate determinants, many encode cell cycle regulatory proteins that drive these early cell cycles. In contrast, while maternal mRNAs encoding key developmental (i.e., cell-fate) regulators that function after the first cleavage stages may exploit aspects of these foundational mechanisms, studies reveal that these mRNAs must also rely on distinct and, as of yet, incompletely understood mechanisms. These findings are logical because the functions of such developmental regulatory proteins have requirements distinct from cell cycle regulators, including becoming relevant only after fertilization and then only in specific cells of the embryo. Indeed, key maternal cell-fate determinants must be made available in exquisitely precise amounts (usually low), only at specific times and in specific cells during embryogenesis. To provide an appreciation for the regulation of maternal cell-fate determinant expression, an overview of the maternal phase of Xenopus embryogenesis will be presented

  3. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-Ong, Dennis; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are similar to 22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene r...

  4. Small regulatory RNAs control the multi-cellular adhesive lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Boysen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    and adhesive state that enables biofilm formation on surfaces. For this, the bacterium needs to reprogramme its gene expression, and in many E. coli and Salmonella strains the lifestyle shift relies on control cascades that inhibit flagellar expression and activate the synthesis of curli, extracellular...... adhesive fibres important for co-aggregation of cells and adhesion to biotic and abiotic surfaces. By combining bioinformatics, genetic and biochemical analysis we identified three small RNAs that act by an antisense mechanism to downregulate translation of CsgD, the master regulator of curli synthesis...

  5. MicroRNAs and Presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Wu, Junwu; Jiang, Wenjing; Tang, Jianguo

    2018-02-01

    Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is the most universal sensory degenerative disease in elderly people caused by the degeneration of cochlear cells. Non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) play a fundamental role in gene regulation in almost every multicellular organism, and control the aging processes. It has been identified that various miRNAs are up- or down-regulated during mammalian aging processes in tissue-specific manners. Most miRNAs bind to specific sites on their target messenger-RNAs (mRNAs) and decrease their expression. Germline mutation may lead to dysregulation of potential miRNAs expression, causing progressive hair cell degeneration and age-related hearing loss. Therapeutic innovations could emerge from a better understanding of diverse function of miRNAs in presbycusis. This review summarizes the relationship between miRNAs and presbycusis, and presents novel miRNAs-targeted strategies against presbycusis.

  6. Transcription of two long noncoding RNAs mediates mating-type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werven, F.J.; Neuert, G.; Hendrick, N.; Lardenois, A.; Buratowski, S.; van Oudenaarden, A.; Primig, M.; Amon, A.

    2012-01-01

    The cell-fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/alpha but not haploid MATa or MATalpha cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating-type

  7. Environmental Temperature Controls Accumulation of Transacting siRNAs Involved in Heterochromatin Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirritano, Marcello; Götz, Ulrike; Karunanithi, Sivarajan; Nordström, Karl; Schulz, Marcel H; Simon, Martin

    2018-02-21

    Genes or alleles can interact by small RNAs in a homology dependent manner meaning that short interfering (siRNAs) can act in trans at the chromatin level producing stable and heritable silencing phenotypes. Because of the puzzling data on endogenous paramutations, their impact contributing to adaptive evolution in a Lamarckian manner remains unknown. An increasing number of studies characterizes the underlying siRNA accumulation pathways using transgene experiments. Also in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia , we induce trans silencing on the chromatin level by injection of truncated transgenes. Here, we characterize the efficiency of this mechanism at different temperatures showing that silencing of the endogenous genes is temperature dependent. Analyzing different transgene constructs at different copy numbers, we dissected whether silencing efficiency is due to varying precursor RNAs or siRNA accumulation. Our data shows that silencing efficiency correlates with more efficient accumulation of primary siRNAs at higher temperatures rather than higher expression of precursor RNAs. Due to higher primary levels, secondary siRNAs also show temperature dependency and interestingly increase their relative proportion to primary siRNAs. Our data shows that efficient trans silencing on the chromatin level in P. tetraurelia depends on environmental parameters, thus being an important epigenetic factor limiting regulatory effects of siRNAs.

  8. Spatially Controlled Delivery of siRNAs to Stem Cells in Implants Generated by Multi-Component Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Chen, Muwan

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising technique in tissue engineering, as it enables truly individualized implants to be made to fit a particular defect. As previously shown, a feasible strategy to produce complex multicellular tissues is to deposit different small interfering RNA (siRNA) in porous...... implants that are subsequently sutured together. In this study, an additive manufacturing strategy to deposit carbohydrate hydrogels containing different siRNAs is applied into an implant, in a spatially controlled manner. When the obtained structures are seeded with mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells......, the selected siRNAs are delivered to the cells and induces specific and localized gene silencing. Here, it is demonstrated how to replicate part of a patient's spinal cord from a computed tomography scan, using an additive manufacturing technique to produce an implant with compartmentalized siRNAs...

  9. Antiviral activity of Small interfering RNAs: Specificity testing using heterologous virus reveals interferon-related effects overlooked by conventional mismatch controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is considered to be a highly specific method for knockdown of gene expression in eukaryotic cells via degradation of target mRNA. Mutated siRNA molecules with 1–4 mismatching nucleotides compared to the target mRNA are regularly used...... as specificity controls. Using siRNAs for inhibition of a fish-pathogenic rhabdovirus, we report that inclusion of a heterologous virus, as target control is essential for verification of the specificity of siRNA-induced interference with virus multiplication. Transfection with three different siRNAs specific...... to the viral glycoprotein gene of the target-virus efficiently inhibited viral multiplication in infected cell cultures, while two of three corresponding mismatched siRNAs did not have this effect. This suggested specific interference, but similar results were obtained when the same siRNAs were tested against...

  10. Densification control and analysis of outer shell of new high-temperature vacuum insulated composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Zhaofeng; Jiang, Yun; Yu, Shengjie; Xu, Tengzhou; Li, Binbin; Chen, Zhou

    2017-11-01

    A novel high temperature vacuum insulated composite with low thermal conductivity composed of SiC foam core material and sealing outer shell is discussed, which will have a great potential to be used as thermal protection system material. In this composite, the outer shell is the key to maintain its internal vacuum, which is consisted of 2.5D C/C and SiC coating. So the densification processes of outer shell, including 2.5D braiding process, chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) pyrolytic carbon (PyC) process, polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) glassy carbon (GC) process and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC process, are focused in this paper. The measuring result of the gas transmission quantity of outer shell is only 0.14 cm3/m2 · d · Pa after 5 times CVD processes, which is two order of magnitude lower than that sample deposited one time. After 10 times thermal shock cycles, the gas transmission quantity increases to 1.2 cm3/m2 · d · Pa. The effective thermal conductivity of high temperature vacuum insulated composite ranged from 0.19 W m‑1 K‑1 to 0.747 W m‑1 K‑1 within the temperature from 20 °C to 900 °C. Even after 10 thermal shock cycles, the variation of the effective thermal conductivity is still consistent with that without treatments.

  11. Epigenetic Control of Autophagy by MicroRNAs in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Titone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosomal-driven catabolic process that contributes to the preservation of cell homeostasis through the regular elimination of cellular damaged, aged, and redundant molecules and organelles. Autophagy plays dual opposite roles in cancer: on one hand it prevents carcinogenesis; on the other hand it confers an advantage to cancer cells to survive under prohibitive conditions. Autophagy has been implicated in ovarian cancer aggressiveness and in ovarian cancer cell chemoresistance and dormancy. Small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level, thus playing an important role in many aspects of cell pathophysiology, including cancerogenesis and cancer progression. Certain miRNAs have recently emerged as important epigenetic modulators of autophagy in cancer cells. The mRNA of several autophagy-related genes contains, in fact, the target sequence for miRNAs belonging to different families, with either oncosuppressive or oncogenic activities. MiRNA profiling studies have identified some miRNAs aberrantly expressed in ovarian cancer tissues that can impact autophagy. In addition, plasma and stroma cell-derived miRNAs in tumour-bearing patients can regulate the expression of relevant autophagy genes in cancer cells. The present review focuses on the potential implications of miRNAs regulating autophagy in ovarian cancer pathogenesis and progression.

  12. CLUH regulates mitochondrial metabolism by controlling translation and decay of target mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatton, Désirée; Pla-Martin, David; Marx, Marie-Charlotte; Hansen, Henriette; Mourier, Arnaud; Nemazanyy, Ivan; Pessia, Alberto; Zentis, Peter; Corona, Teresa; Kondylis, Vangelis; Barth, Esther; Schauss, Astrid C; Velagapudi, Vidya; Rugarli, Elena I

    2017-03-06

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that host crucial metabolic pathways and produce adenosine triphosphate. The mitochondrial proteome is heterogeneous among tissues and can dynamically change in response to different metabolic conditions. Although the transcriptional programs that govern mitochondrial biogenesis and respiratory function are well known, posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that the cytosolic RNA-binding protein clustered mitochondria homologue (CLUH) regulates the expression of a mitochondrial protein network supporting key metabolic programs required under nutrient deprivation. CLUH exerts its function by controlling the stability and translation of target messenger RNAs. In the absence of Cluh, mitochondria are severely depleted of crucial enzymes involved in catabolic energy-converting pathways. CLUH preserves oxidative mitochondrial function and glucose homeostasis, thus preventing death at the fetal-neonatal transition. In the adult liver, CLUH ensures maximal respiration capacity and the metabolic response to starvation. Our results shed new light on the posttranscriptional mechanisms controlling the expression of mitochondrial proteins and suggest novel strategies to tailor mitochondrial function to physiological and pathological conditions. © 2017 Schatton et al.

  13. Transcription of two long non-coding RNAs mediates mating type control of gametogenesis in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Werven, Folkert J.; Neuert, Gregor; Hendrick, Natalie; Lardenois, Aurélie; Buratowski, Stephen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Primig, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cell fate decision leading to gametogenesis is essential for sexual reproduction. In S. cerevisiae, only diploid MATa/α but not haploid MATa or MATα cells undergo gametogenesis, known as sporulation. We find that transcription of two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) mediates mating type control of sporulation. In MATa or MATα haploids expression of IME1, the central inducer of gametogenesis, is inhibited in cis by transcription of the lncRNA IRT1, located in the IME1 promoter. IRT1 transcription recruits the Set2 histone methyltransferase and the Set3 histone deacetylase complex to establish repressive chromatin at the IME1 promoter. Inhibiting expression of IRT1 and an antisense transcript that antagonizes the expression of the meiotic regulator IME4, allows cells expressing the haploid mating-type to sporulate with kinetics that are indistinguishable from that of MATa/α diploids. Conversely, expression of the two lncRNAs abolishes sporulation in MATa/α diploids. Thus, transcription of two lncRNAs governs mating type control of gametogenesis in yeast. PMID:22959267

  14. Down-regulation of microRNAs controlling tumourigenic factors in follicular thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Borup; Henao Giraldo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The molecular determinants of thyroid follicular nodules are incompletely understood and assessment of malignancy is a diagnostic challenge. Since microRNA (miRNA) analyses could provide new leads to malignant progression, we characterized the global miRNA expression in follicular adenoma (FA......) and follicular carcinoma (FC). Comparison of carcinoma and adenoma with normal thyroid revealed 150 and 107 differentially expressed miRNAs. Most miRNAs were down-regulated and especially miR-199b-5p and miR-144 which were essentially lost in the carcinomas. Integration of the changed miRNAs with differentially...... expressed mRNAs demonstrated an enrichment of seed-sites among up-regulated transcripts encoding proteins implicated in thyroid tumourigenesis. This was substantiated by the demonstration that pre-miR-199b reduced proliferation when added to cultured follicular thyroid carcinoma cells. The down-regulated mi...

  15. Bicaudal-C spatially controls translation of vertebrate maternal mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Cooke, Amy; Park, Sookhee; Dewey, Colin N; Wickens, Marvin; Sheets, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    The Xenopus Cripto-1 protein is confined to the cells of the animal hemisphere during early embryogenesis where it regulates the formation of anterior structures. Cripto-1 protein accumulates only in animal cells because cripto-1 mRNA in cells of the vegetal hemisphere is translationally repressed. Here, we show that the RNA binding protein, Bicaudal-C (Bic-C), functioned directly in this vegetal cell-specific repression. While Bic-C protein is normally confined to vegetal cells, ectopic expression of Bic-C in animal cells repressed a cripto-1 mRNA reporter and associated with endogenous cripto-1 mRNA. Repression by Bic-C required its N-terminal domain, comprised of multiple KH motifs, for specific binding to relevant control elements within the cripto-1 mRNA and a functionally separable C-terminal translation repression domain. Bic-C-mediated repression required the 5' CAP and translation initiation factors, but not a poly(A) tail or the conserved SAM domain within Bic-C. Bic-C-directed immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing of associated mRNAs identified multiple Bic-C-regulated mRNA targets, including cripto-1 mRNA, providing new insights and tools for understanding the role of Bic-C in vertebrate development.

  16. Novel lncRNAs in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    KAUST Repository

    Ballarino, Monica

    2014-12-15

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  17. Interaction between two timing microRNAs controls trichome distribution in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Yi Xue

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The miR156-targeted squamosa promoter binding protein like (SPL transcription factors function as an endogenous age cue in regulating plant phase transition and phase-dependent morphogenesis, but the control of SPL output remains poorly understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana the spatial pattern of trichome is a hallmark of phase transition and governed by SPLs. Here, by dissecting the regulatory network controlling trichome formation on stem, we show that the miR171-targeted lost meristems 1 (LOM1, LOM2 and LOM3, encoding GRAS family members previously known to maintain meristem cell polarity, are involved in regulating the SPL activity. Reduced LOM abundance by overexpression of miR171 led to decreased trichome density on stems and floral organs, and conversely, constitutive expression of the miR171-resistant LOM (rLOM genes promoted trichome production, indicating that LOMs enhance trichome initiation at reproductive stage. Genetic analysis demonstrated LOMs shaping trichome distribution is dependent on SPLs, which positively regulate trichome repressor genes TRICHOMELESS 1 (TCL1 and TRIPTYCHON (TRY. Physical interaction between the N-terminus of LOMs and SPLs underpins the repression of SPL activity. Importantly, other growth and developmental events, such as flowering, are also modulated by LOM-SPL interaction, indicating a broad effect of the LOM-SPL interplay. Furthermore, we provide evidence that MIR171 gene expression is regulated by its targeted LOMs, forming a homeostatic feedback loop. Our data uncover an antagonistic interplay between the two timing miRNAs in controlling plant growth, phase transition and morphogenesis through direct interaction of their targets.

  18. Rbfox3 Controls the Biogenesis of a Subset of MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee K.; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate numerous aspects of gene expression, thus identification of endogenous targets of RBPs is important for understanding their functions in cells. Here we identified transcriptome-wide targets of Rbfox3 in neuronally differentiated P19 cells and mouse brain using Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Crosslinking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP). Although Rbfox3 is known to regulate pre-mRNA splicing through binding to the UGCAUG motif, PAR-CLIP analysis revealed diverse Rbfox3 targets including primary-microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) which lack the UGCAUG motif. Induced expression and depletion of Rbfox3 led to changes in the expression levels of a subset of PAR-CLIP-detected miRNAs. In vitro analyses revealed that Rbfox3 functions as a positive and a negative regulator at the stage of pri-miRNA processing to precursor-miRNA. Rbfox3 binds directly to pri-miRNAs and regulates the recruitment of the microprocessor complex to pri-miRNAs. Our study proposes a novel function for Rbfox3 in miRNA biogenesis. PMID:25240799

  19. New neurons in aging brains: molecular control by small non-coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn eSchouten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a process that continues in the adult and also aging brain. It generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. This phenomenon is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, in the hippocampus. With age, the hippocampus and particularly the dentate gyrus are affected. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both the number of proliferating cells as well as their neuronal differentiation, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons appears unaffected by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, survival and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the dentate gyrus are closely related to each other, they appear differentially regulated with aging. In this review we discuss the crucial role of a novel class of recently discovered regulators of gene expression, i.e. the small non-coding RNAs, in the development of adult neurogenesis from neural stem cells to functionally integrated neurons. In particular, a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune many events during adult neurogenesis progression. Moreover, multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the aged hippocampus. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate, and possibly correct or prevent, the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we briefly summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis and subsequent vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a possible role of microRNAs in stress-associated alterations in adult neurogenesis during aging.

  20. Small RNAs and the control of transposons and viruses in Drosophila.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rij, R.P. van; Berezikov, E.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) - post-transcriptional gene silencing guided by small interfering RNA (siRNA) - is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects and plants. Several recent studies in Drosophila identified endogenous siRNAs corresponding to transposons, to structured cellular

  1. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ran; Rittenhouse, Danielle; Sweeney, Katelyn; Potluri, Prasanth; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs) which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs. PMID:26241038

  2. TSPO, a Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Protein, Controls Ethanol-Related Behaviors in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heavy consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol use disorders (AUDs which impact patients, their families, and societies. Yet the genetic and physiological factors that predispose humans to AUDs remain unclear. One hypothesis is that alterations in mitochondrial function modulate neuronal sensitivity to ethanol exposure. Using Drosophila genetics we report that inactivation of the mitochondrial outer membrane translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO, also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, affects ethanol sedation and tolerance in male flies. Knockdown of dTSPO in adult male neurons results in increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation, and this effect requires the dTSPO depletion-mediated increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production and inhibition of caspase activity in fly heads. Systemic loss of dTSPO in male flies blocks the development of tolerance to repeated ethanol exposures, an effect that is not seen when dTSPO is only inactivated in neurons. Female flies are naturally more sensitive to ethanol than males, and female fly heads have strikingly lower levels of dTSPO mRNA than males. Hence, mitochondrial TSPO function plays an important role in ethanol sensitivity and tolerance. Since a large array of benzodiazepine analogues have been developed that interact with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, the mitochondrial TSPO might provide an important new target for treating AUDs.

  3. Circular RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yi-Neng; Xia, Shengqiang; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    . Emerging evidence revealed the function of circRNAs in cancer and may potentially serve as a required novel biomarker and therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss about the origins, characteristics and functions of circRNA and how they work as miRNA sponges, gene transcription...... exhibiting tissue/developmental-stage-specific expression. CircRNAs are generated either from exons or introns by back splicing or lariat introns. CircRNAs play important roles as miRNA sponges, gene transcription and expression regulators, RNA-binding protein (RBP) sponges and protein/peptide translators...... and expression regulators, RBP sponges in cancer as well as current research methods of circRNAs, providing evidence for the significance of circRNAs in cancer diagnosis and clinical treatment....

  4. MicroRNAs and Autophagy: Fine Players in the Control of Chondrocyte Homeostatic Activities in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania D’Adamo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a debilitating degenerative disease of the articular cartilage with a multifactorial etiology. Aging, the main risk factor for OA development, is associated with a systemic oxidative and inflammatory phenotype. Autophagy is a central housekeeping system that plays an antiaging role by supporting the clearance of senescence-associated alterations of macromolecules and organelles. Autophagy deficiency has been related to OA pathogenesis because of the accumulation of cellular defects in chondrocytes. Microribonucleic acids (microRNAs or miRs are a well-established class of posttranscriptional modulators belonging to the family of noncoding RNAs that have been identified as key players in the regulation of cellular processes, such as autophagy, by targeting their own cognate mRNAs. Here, we present a state-of-the-art literature review on the role of miRs and autophagy in the scenario of OA pathogenesis. In addition, a comprehensive survey has been performed on the functional connections of the miR network and the autophagy pathway in OA by using “microRNA,” “autophagy,” and “osteoarthritis” as key words. Discussion of available evidence sheds light on some aspects that need further investigation in order to reach a more comprehensive view of the potential of this topic in OA.

  5. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-ong, Dennis Berbulla; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Lorenzen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster), described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating their involvement in fish-virus interactions. We searched for homologues of the two teleost miRNAs in other vertebrate species and investigated whether findings related to ours have been reported for these homologues. Gene synteny analysis along with gene sequence conservation suggested that the teleost fish miR-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster), respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic) in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein-coding gene (intragenic) in the human genome. Interferon (IFN)-inducible and immune-related promoter elements found upstream of the teleost miR-462 cluster locus suggested roles in immune responses to viral pathogens in fish, while in humans, the miR-191 cluster functionally associated with cell cycle regulation. Stimulation of fish cell cultures with the IFN inducer poly I:C accordingly upregulated the expression of miR-462 and miR-731, while no stimulatory effect on miR-191 and miR-425

  6. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-Ong, Dennis Berbulla; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Lorenzen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster), described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating their involvement in fish-virus interactions. We searched for homologues of the two teleost miRNAs in other vertebrate species and investigated whether findings related to ours have been reported for these homologues. Gene synteny analysis along with gene sequence conservation suggested that the teleost fish miR-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster), respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic) in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein-coding gene (intragenic) in the human genome. Interferon (IFN)-inducible and immune-related promoter elements found upstream of the teleost miR-462 cluster locus suggested roles in immune responses to viral pathogens in fish, while in humans, the miR-191 cluster functionally associated with cell cycle regulation. Stimulation of fish cell cultures with the IFN inducer poly I:C accordingly upregulated the expression of miR-462 and miR-731, while no stimulatory effect on miR-191 and miR-425

  7. L1 retrotransposon antisense RNA within ASAR lncRNAs controls chromosome-wide replication timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Smith, Leslie; Thayer, Mathew J

    2017-12-29

    Mammalian cells replicate their chromosomes via a temporal replication program. The ASAR6 and ASAR15 genes were identified as loci that when disrupted result in delayed replication and condensation of entire human chromosomes. ASAR6 and ASAR15 are monoallelically expressed long noncoding RNAs that remain associated with the chromosome from which they are transcribed. The chromosome-wide effects of ASAR6 map to the antisense strand of an L1 retrotransposon within ASAR6 RNA, deletion or inversion of which delayed replication of human chromosome 6. Furthermore, ectopic integration of ASAR6 or ASAR15 transgenes into mouse chromosomes resulted in delayed replication and condensation, an increase in H3K27me3, coating of the mouse chromosome with ASAR RNA, and a loss of mouse Cot-1 RNA expression in cis. Targeting the antisense strand of the L1 within ectopically expressed ASAR6 RNA restored normal replication timing. Our results provide direct evidence that L1 antisense RNA plays a functional role in chromosome-wide replication timing of mammalian chromosomes. © 2018 Platt et al.

  8. different outer cone angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyk Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the method of flow separation control is application of axisymmetric valve. It is composed of nozzle with core. Normally the main flow is attached to inner cone and flow by preferential collector to primary flow pipe. If through control nozzle starts flow jet (control jet the main flow is switched to annular secondary collector. In both situation the main flow is deflected to inner or outer cone (placed at the outlet of the valve’s nozzle by Coanda effect. The paper deals with the numerical simulation of this axisymetric annular nozzle with integrated synthetic jet actuator. The aim of the work is influence examination of outer cone angle on deflection on main stream.

  9. Evaluation of nanoparticle-encapsulated outer membrane proteins for the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, T; Pina-Mimbela, R; Kumar, A; Binjawadagi, B; Liu, Z; Renukaradhya, G J; Rajashekara, G

    2013-08-01

    Numerous vaccination strategies have been evaluated to develop effective vaccines against Campylobacter jejuni colonization in poultry but with limited success. The following experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of biodegradable and biocompatible poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticle (NP) encapsulated outer membrane proteins (OMP) of C. jejuni. Chickens were vaccinated with different routes [subcutaneous (s/c) or oral] and doses (25, 125, or 250 µg) of candidate nanoparticle vaccine with appropriate control groups. Serum and cloacal fecal samples were taken at regular intervals of time, and the birds were euthanized 7 d postchallenge with C. jejuni. The results were interpreted based on anti-OMP immunoglobulin response in chicken and intestinal colonization of C. jejuni. The C. jejuni colonization in cecal and cloacal contents at 7 d postchallenge was below the detection limit in the s/c vaccinated groups, but the other groups demonstrated varying degrees of colonization. The serum IgA was higher in the group vaccinated s/c with OMP only compared with the rest of the groups. The serum- and fecal-IgY titers were consistently higher in the s/c vaccinated groups (with or without NP) than the rest of the groups. Elevated levels of OMP specific serum antibodies correlated with below the limit of detection levels of Campylobacter colonization in broiler chickens receiving 125 μg of OMP alone and the OMP+NP vaccine s/c. In conclusion, the s/c route of vaccination with or without NP encapsulated OMP of C. jejuni may serve as a candidate vaccine for control of C. jejuni colonization in chickens.

  10. Compression forces and amount of outer coating layer affecting the time-controlled disintegration of the compression-coated tablets prepared by direct compression with micronized ethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K H; Lin, S Y; Li, M J

    2001-12-01

    The influence of compression force to inner core tablet or to outer coating layer of the compression-coated tablet on the function of time-controlled disintegration was investigated. The inner core tablet was directly compacted by sodium diclofenac (model drug) and ethylcellulose (EC) with 4.6-microm particle size was used as an outer coating layer. The immersion time of the compression-coated tablet previously soaked in pH 1.2 solution to simulate the residence time of the tablet in the GI tract affecting the dissolution behavior of the compression-coated tablet was also investigated. The effect of the amount of the outer coating layer used on the drug release was examined. The results indicate that sodium diclofenac released from these compression-coated tablets exhibited a longer lag of a period about 16.3 h in both distilled water and pH 6.8 buffer solution, followed by a different drug release behavior. The lag time was independent of the pH of dissolution medium, and the immersion time in pH 1.2 solution. After that lag time, the outer shell of the compression-coated tablets broke into two halves to make a rapid drug release. However, the drug release behavior of the soaked tablet in pH 6.8 buffer solution was dependent on the immersion time. The compression force tablet influenced the release behavior of drug less, but > 200 kg/cm(2) might delay the lag time. The lag time of the compression-coated tablets was linearly correlated with the compression force to the outer coating layer (r = 0.9896). We also found that the more the amount of outer coating layer added, the longer the lag time obtained. The study demonstrates that the time-controlled disintegration of the compression-coated tablet was effectively controlled by the compression force applied and the amount of outer coating layer added. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association

  11. Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2012-02-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved through a series of pathways. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences, resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNAs. siRNAs have a similar structure, function, and biogenesis as miRNAs but are derived from long double-stranded RNAs and can often direct DNA methylation at target sequences. Besides their roles in growth and development and maintenance of genome integrity, small RNAs are also important components in plant stress responses. One way in which plants respond to environmental stress is by modifying their gene expression through the activity of small RNAs. Thus, understanding how small RNAs regulate gene expression will enable researchers to explore the role of small RNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of plant small RNAs in the adaptive response to stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. MicroRNAs in the Hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meister, Björn; Herzer, Silke; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (∼22 nucleotides) non-coding ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules that negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding genes. Posttranscriptional silencing of target genes by miRNA is initiated by binding to the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, resulting in s...... of the hypothalamus and miRNAs have recently been shown to be important regulators of hypothalamic control functions. The aim of this review is to summarize some of the current knowledge regarding the expression and role of miRNAs in the hypothalamus....

  13. Differential control of Salmonella heat shock operons by structured mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimdins, Annika; Roßmanith, Johanna; Langklotz, Sina; Bandow, Julia E; Narberhaus, Franz

    2013-08-01

    DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE and GroES-GroEL are the major chaperone machineries in bacteria. In many species, dnaKJ and groESL are encoded in bicistronic operons. Quantitative proteomics revealed that DnaK and GroEL amounts in Salmonella dominate over DnaJ and GroES respectively. An imperfect transcriptional terminator in the intergenic region of dnaKJ is known to result in higher transcript levels of the first gene. Here, we examined the groESL operon and asked how the second gene in a heat shock operon can be preferentially expressed and found that an RNA structure in the 5'untranslated region of groES is responsible. The secondary structure masks the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence and AUG start codon and thereby modulates translation of groES mRNA. Reporter gene assays combined with structure probing and toeprinting analysis revealed a dynamic temperature-sensitive RNA structure. Following an increase in temperature, only the second of two RNA hairpins melts and partially liberates the SD sequence, thus facilitating translation. Translation of groEL is not temperature-regulated leading to an excess of the chaperonin in the cell at low temperature. Discussion in a broader context shows how structured RNA segments can differentially control expression of temperature-affected operons in various ways. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Modulating the bacterial surface with small RNAs: a new twist on PhoP/Q-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Kallipolitis, Birgitte; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Summary In recent years, small non-coding RNAs have emerged as important regulatory components in bacterial stress responses and in bacterial virulence. Many of these are conserved in related species and act on target mRNAs by sequence complementarity. They are tightly controlled...... at the transcription level, and are frequently elements of global regulatory systems. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, almost one-third of the functional characterized small RNAs participate in control of outer membrane protein production. A subset of these genes is under the control of the sigma......(E)-signalling system that monitors the folding status of the envelope and interacts with other regulatory systems to integrate multiple signals into a co-ordinated cellular response. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Moon and Gottesman describe a novel baseparing small RNA that participates in modulation...

  15. The effects of transfection reagent polyethyleneimine (PEI) and non-targeting control siRNAs on global gene expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raof, Nurazhani A; Rajamani, Deepa; Chu, Hsun-Chieh; Gurav, Aniket; Johnson, Joel M; LoGerfo, Frank W; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Bhasin, Manoj

    2016-01-05

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful platform utilized to target transcription of specific genes and downregulate the protein product. To achieve effective silencing, RNAi is usually applied to cells or tissue with a transfection reagent to enhance entry into cells. A commonly used control is the same transfection reagent plus a "noncoding RNAi". However, this does not control for the genomic response to the transfection reagent alone or in combination with the noncoding RNAi. These control effects while not directly targeting the gene in question may influence expression of other genes that in turn alter expression of the target. The current study was prompted by our work focused on prevention of vascular bypass graft failure and our experience with gene silencing in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs) where we suspected that off target effects through this mechanism might be substantial. We have used Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology and bioinformatics analysis to examine the genomic response of HAoSMCs to the transfection reagent alone (polyethyleneimine (PEI)) or in combination with commercially obtained control small interfering RNA (siRNAs) (Dharmacon and Invitrogen). Compared to untreated cells, global gene expression of HAoSMcs after transfection either with PEI or in combination with control siRNAs displayed significant alterations in gene transcriptome after 24 h. HAoSMCs transfected by PEI alone revealed alterations of 213 genes mainly involved in inflammatory and immune responses. HAoSMCs transfected by PEI complexed with siRNA from either Dharmacon or Invitrogen showed substantial gene variation of 113 and 85 genes respectively. Transfection of cells with only PEI or with PEI and control siRNAs resulted in identification of 20 set of overlapping altered genes. Further, systems biology analysis revealed key master regulators in cells transfected with control siRNAs including the cytokine, Interleukin (IL)-1, transcription factor GATA

  16. Translation of maternal histone mRNAs in sea urchin embryos: a test of control by 5' cap methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showman, R M; Leaf, D S; Anstrom, J A; Raff, R A

    1987-05-01

    Recent results have demonstrated the occurrence of mRNA cap methylation in the sea urchin embryo following fertilization. It has been suggested that this methylation event is responsible for the translational activation of maternal histone mRNAs in these embryos. We have used aphidicolin, an effective inhibitor of both DNA synthesis and cap methylation in cleavage stage sea urchin embryos, to examine the relationship between cap methylation and translation. At 5 micrograms/ml, a dose which rapidly abolishes DNA replication and blocks cleavage, we note no effect on recruitment or translation of maternal alpha-subtype histone mRNAs. This suggests that a postfertilization cap methylation event is not critical to the process of regulation of the translation of stored alpha-subtype histone mRNAs.

  17. The roles of microRNAs and siRNAs in mammalian spermatogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hilz, Stephanie; Modzelewski, Andrew J.; Cohen, Paula E.; Grimson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs and siRNAs, both of which are AGO-bound small RNAs, are essential for mammalian spermatogenesis. Although their precise germline roles remain largely uncharacterized, recent discoveries suggest that they function in mechanisms beyond microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional control, playing roles in DNA repair and transcriptional regulation within the nucleus. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding roles for AGO proteins and their associated small RNAs in the male germline. We...

  18. Quality control considerations for the development of the front end hybrid circuits for the CMS Outer Tracker upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gadek, Tomasz; Bonnaud, Julien Yves Robert; De Clercq, Jarne Theo; Honma, Alan; Koliatos, Alexandros; Kovacs, Mark Istvan; Luetic, Jelena

    2017-01-01

    The upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker for the HL-LHC requires the design of new double-sensor modules. They contain two high-density front end hybrid circuits, equipped with flip-chip ASICs, passives and mechanical structures. First prototype hybrids in a close-to-final form have been received from three manufacturers. To qualify these hybrids a test setup was built, which emulates future tracker temperature and humidity conditions, provides temporary interconnection, and implements testing features. The system was automated to minimize the testing time in view for the production phase. Failure modes, deliberately implemented in the produced hybrids, provided feedback on the system's effectiveness.

  19. ALKBH5-dependent m6A demethylation controls splicing and stability of long 3'-UTR mRNAs in male germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chong; Klukovich, Rachel; Peng, Hongying; Wang, Zhuqing; Yu, Tian; Zhang, Ying; Zheng, Huili; Klungland, Arne; Yan, Wei

    2018-01-09

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) represents one of the most common RNA modifications in eukaryotes. Specific m6A writer, eraser, and reader proteins have been identified. As an m6A eraser, ALKBH5 specifically removes m6A from target mRNAs and inactivation of Alkbh5 leads to male infertility in mice. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown. Here, we report that ALKBH5-mediated m6A erasure in the nuclei of spermatocytes and round spermatids is essential for correct splicing and the production of longer 3'-UTR mRNAs, and failure to do so leads to aberrant splicing and production of shorter transcripts with elevated levels of m6A that are rapidly degraded. Our study identified reversible m6A modification as a critical mechanism of posttranscriptional control of mRNA fate in late meiotic and haploid spermatogenic cells.

  20. Role of small RNAs in trypanosomatid infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandra eLinhares-Lacerda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatid parasites survive and replicate in the host by using mechanisms that aim to establish a successful infection and ensure parasite survival. Evidence points to microRNAs as new players in the host-parasite interplay. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that control proteins levels via post-transcriptional gene down-regulation, either within the cells where they were produced or in other cells via intercellular transfer. These microRNAs can be modulated in host cells during infection and are among the growing group of small regulatory RNAs, for which many classes have been described, including the transfer RNA-derived small RNAs. Parasites can either manipulate microRNAs to evade host-driven damage and/or transfer small RNAs to host cells. In this mini-review, we present evidence for the involvement of small RNAs, such as microRNAs, in trypanosomatid infections which lack RNA interference. We highlight both microRNA profile alterations in host cells during those infections and the horizontal transfer of small RNAs and proteins from parasites to the host by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles in a cell communication mechanism.

  1. MicroRNAs tend to synergistically control expression of genes encoding extensively-expressed proteins in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Considering complicated microRNA (miRNA biogenesis and action mechanisms, it was thought so high energy-consuming for a cell to afford simultaneous over-expression of many miRNAs. Thus it prompts that an alternative miRNA regulation pattern on protein-encoding genes must exist, which has characteristics of energy-saving and precise protein output. In this study, expression tendency of proteins encoded by miRNAs’ target genes was evaluated in human organ scale, followed by quantitative assessment of miRNA synergism. Expression tendency analysis suggests that universally expressed proteins (UEPs tend to physically interact in clusters and participate in fundamental biological activities whereas disorderly expressed proteins (DEPs are inclined to relatively independently execute organ-specific functions. Consistent with this, miRNAs that mainly target UEP-encoding mRNAs, such as miR-21, tend to collaboratively or even synergistically act with other miRNAs in fine-tuning protein output. Synergistic gene regulation may maximize miRNAs’ efficiency with less dependence on miRNAs’ abundance and overcome the deficiency that targeting plenty of genes by single miRNA makes miRNA-mediated regulation high-throughput but insufficient due to target gene dilution effect. Furthermore, our in vitro experiment verified that merely 25 nM transfection of miR-21 be sufficient to influence the overall state of various human cells. Thus miR-21 was identified as a hub in synergistic miRNA–miRNA interaction network. Our findings suggest that synergistic miRNA–miRNA interaction is an important endogenous miRNA regulation mode, which ensures adequate potency of miRNAs at low abundance, especially those implicated in fundamental biological regulation.

  2. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs to and from Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs). sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs.

  3. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs To and From Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eHan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs. sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing (HIGS system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs.

  4. Transcription Strategy in a Closterovirus: a Novel 5′-Proximal Controller Element of Citrus Tristeza Virus Produces 5′- and 3′-Terminal Subgenomic RNAs and Differs from 3′ Open Reading Frame Controller Elements†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Siddarame; Ayllón, María A.; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Dawson, William O.

    2003-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) produces more than thirty 3′- or 5′-terminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) that accumulate to various extents during replication in protoplasts and plants. Among the most unusual species are two abundant populations of small 5′-terminal sgRNAs of approximately 800 nucleotides (nt) termed low-molecular-weight tristeza (LMT1 and LMT2) RNAs. Remarkably, CTV replicons with all 10 3′ genes deleted produce only the larger LMT1 RNAs. These 5′-terminal positive-sense sgRNAs do not have corresponding negative strands and were hypothesized to be produced by premature termination during plus-strand genomic RNA synthesis. We characterized a cis-acting element that controls the production of the LMT1 RNAs. Since manipulation of this cis-acting element in its native position (the L-ProI region of replicase) was not possible because the mutations negatively affect replication, a region (5′TR) surrounding the putative termination sites (nt ∼550 to 1000) was duplicated in the 3′ end of a CTV replicon to allow characterization. The duplicated sequence continued to produce a 5′-terminal plus-strand sgRNA, here much larger (∼11 kb), apparently by termination. Surprisingly, a new 3′-terminal sgRNA was observed from the duplicated 5′TR. A large 3′-terminal sgRNA resulting from the putative promoter activity of the native 5′TR was not observed, possibly because of the down-regulation of a promoter ∼19 kb from the 3′ terminus. However, we were able to observe a sgRNA produced from the native 5′TR of a small defective RNA, which placed the native 5′TR closer to the 3′ terminus, demonstrating sgRNA promoter activity of the native 5′TR. Deletion mutagenesis mapped the promoter and the terminator activities of the 5′TR (in the 3′ position in the CTV replicon) to a 57-nt region, which was folded by the MFOLD computer program into two stem-loops. Mutations in the putative stem-loop structures equally reduced or prevented

  5. Translational control mediated by eucaryotic initiation factor-2 is restricted to specific mRNAs in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, R J; Murtha, P

    1987-01-01

    The translational efficiency of mRNA molecules transcribed from plasmid DNA transfected into COS-1 monkey cells can be increased 10- to 20-fold by the coexpression of the adenovirus virus-associated RNAs I and II. Experiments described here demonstrate a similar increase in translational efficiency by the addition of 2-aminopurine, an inhibitor of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, to the culture medium. Both virus-associated RNA and 2-aminopurine presumably exert their effect by alteration of the functional level of eucaryotic initiation factor-2. The translational stimulation mediated by both means is shown to be restricted to the plasmid-derived mRNAs because there is no qualitative or quantitative alteration in host protein synthesis. The results are consistent with models invoking a localized activation of double-stranded RNA-activated kinase leading to a translational block. Images PMID:3600637

  6. The Biogenesis of Nascent Circular RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state circular RNAs (circRNAs have been mapped to thousands of genomic loci in mammals. We studied circRNA processing using metabolic tagging of nascent RNAs with 4-thiouridine (4sU. Strikingly, the efficiency of circRNA processing from pre-mRNA is extremely low endogenously. Additional studies revealed that back-splicing outcomes correlate with fast RNA Polymerase II elongation rate and are tightly controlled by cis-elements in vivo. Additionally, prolonged 4sU labeling in cells shows that circRNAs are largely processed post-transcriptionally and that circRNAs are stable. Circular RNAs that are abundant at a steady-state level tend to accumulate. This is particularly true in cells, such as neurons, that have slow division rates. This study uncovers features of circRNA biogenesis by investigating the link between nascent circRNA processing and transcription.

  7. EBV Noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalsky, Rebecca L; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-01-01

    EBV expresses a number of viral noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) during latent infection, many of which have known regulatory functions and can post-transcriptionally regulate viral and/or cellular gene expression. With recent advances in RNA sequencing technologies, the list of identified EBV ncRNAs continues to grow. EBV-encoded RNAs (EBERs) , the BamHI-A rightward transcripts (BARTs) , a small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) , and viral microRNAs (miRNAs) are all expressed during EBV infection in a variety of cell types and tumors. Recently, additional novel EBV ncRNAs have been identified. Viral miRNAs, in particular, have been under extensive investigation since their initial identification over ten years ago. High-throughput studies to capture miRNA targets have revealed a number of miRNA-regulated viral and cellular transcripts that tie into important biological networks. Functions for many EBV ncRNAs are still unknown; however, roles for many EBV miRNAs in latency and in tumorigenesis have begun to emerge. Ongoing mechanistic studies to elucidate the functions of EBV ncRNAs should unravel additional roles for ncRNAs in the viral life cycle. In this chapter, we will discuss our current knowledge of the types of ncRNAs expressed by EBV, their potential roles in viral latency, and their potential involvement in viral pathogenesis.

  8. Efficacy of bacterin-, outer membrane protein- and fimbriae extract-based vaccines for the control of Salmonella Enteritidis experimental infection in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. Menão

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of three vaccines was evaluated in chickens for the control of experimental infection with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE phage type 4. The vaccines were produced with bacterin, outer membrane proteins (OMP and fimbriae crude extract (FE. The chickens were vaccinated intramuscularly with two doses of each vaccine at 12 and 15 weeks of age. The chickens were then orally challenged with 10(9 CFU/chicken Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 at 18 weeks of age. Fecal swabs were performed for the recovery of shedding SE, and SE was recovered from the liver and spleen. Additionally, antibody titers were measured in the serum by micro-agglutination test. The results indicated that the vaccine produced with bacterin yielded better results and resulted in reduction of fecal shedding and organ invasion by SE after oral challenge, although no vaccine was 100% effective for the control of SE experimental infection.

  9. Methanotroph outer membrane preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Odd A; Berven, Frode S; Jensen, Harald B; Fjellbirkeland, Anne

    2011-01-01

    All presently known methanotrophs are gram-negative bacteria suggesting that they are surrounded by a two-layered membrane: an inner or cytoplasmic membrane and an outer membrane. In the methanotroph Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), separation of the two membranes has allowed studies on protein and lipid composition of the outer membrane. Its outer membrane can be isolated from purified cell envelopes by selective solubilization of the inner membranes with the detergent Triton X-100. The proteins associated with the outer membrane can further be fractionated into integral and tightly associated proteins and peripheral loosely associated proteins. We present here protocols for this fractionation and show how the proteins associated with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane can be isolated and identified by whole-cell biotin surface labeling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of SiO2 Nanotubes with Controllable Inner/Outer Diameter and Length Using Hydrothermally Grown ZnO Nanowires as Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Der-Ming; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Uang, Kai-Ming; Chen, Tron-Min; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Wen-I.; Lee, Wei-Chi; Wang, Pei-Ren; Tseng, Chih-Ren

    2010-04-01

    Through the deposition of a thin SiO2 film to sheathe hydrothermally grown (HTG) ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs), unveiling their top portion, and then selectively removing ZnO-NWs by wet chemical etching, SiO2 nanotubes (SiO2-NTs) with controllable inner/outer diameters and lengths were fabricated. The prepared SiO2-NTs with average inner/outer diameters and lengths of approximately 200/300 nm and 1.5 µm, respectively, exhibited a superior transmittance of 92% in the visible light spectrum. The surface roughened process using SiO2-NTs on vertical-structure GaN light-emitting diodes (VLEDs) showed additional light output improvement of about 11.6% at 350 mA and 10% at 750 mA, compared with those of VLEDs with ZnO-NWs, suggesting the effectiveness and promising applications of the proposed SiO2-NTs in optics and optoelectronics devices.

  11. MicroRNAs in Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara; Geiger, Julian; Madsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    roles in cholesterol and lipid metabolism, whereas miR-103 and -107 regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity. In muscle tissue a defined number of miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, mir-206) control myofiber type switch and induce myogenic differentiation programs. Similarly, in adipose tissue a defined number of mi......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have within the past decade emerged as key regulators of metabolic homeostasis. Major tissues in intermediary metabolism important during development of the metabolic syndrome, such as β-cells, liver, skeletal and heart muscle as well as adipose tissue have all been shown...... to be affected by miRNAs. In the pancreatic β-cell a number of miRNAs are important in maintaining the balance between differentiation and proliferation (miR-200 and miR-29 families) and insulin exocytosis in the differentiated state is controlled by miR-7, miR-375 and miR-335. MiR-33a and -33b play crucial...

  12. The regulatory epicenter of miRNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    critical in miRNA transcription, processing, stability and formation and are important for therapeutic studies. ... been observed to regulate many miRNAs, controlling cell ..... Due to two distinct features, mirtrons become relevant for this study: (1) Unlike regular miRNAs, mirtrons are Drosha processing independent. The stem.

  13. Micromanagement of the immune system by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey F; Zhou, Beiyan; Liu, Gwen; Chen, Chang-Zheng

    2008-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNAs that are thought to control gene expression by targeting mRNAs for degradation or translational repression. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNA-mediated gene regulation represents a fundamental layer of genetic programmes at the post-transcriptional level and has diverse functional roles in animals. Here, we provide an overview of the mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, with specific focus on the role of miRNAs in regulating the development of immune cells and in modulating innate and adaptive immune responses.

  14. Regulation of hnRNPA1 by microRNAs controls the miR-18a–K-RAS axis in chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Monroig, Paloma del C; Redis, Roxana S; Bayraktar, Emine; Almeida, Maria I; Ivan, Cristina; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Rashed, Mohammed H; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ozpolat, Bulent; Mitra, Rahul; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, function and degradation involves a range of mechanisms, including interactions with RNA-binding proteins. The potential contribution of regulatory miRNAs to the expression of these RNA interactor proteins that could control other miRNAs expression is still unclear. Here we demonstrate a regulatory circuit involving oncogenic and tumor-suppressor miRNAs and an RNA-binding protein in a chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer model. We identified and characterized miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as negative regulators of hnRNPA1 expression, which is required for the processing of miR-18a-3p, an inhibitor of the K-RAS oncogene. The inhibition of miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p decreased the proliferation, motility, invasiveness and angiogenic potential and increased apoptosis when combined with docetaxel. Alteration of this regulatory circuit causes poor overall survival outcome in ovarian cancer patients. These results highlight miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as key regulators of miR-18a-3p expression and its downstream target K-RAS, through direct modulation of hnRNPA1 expression. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p and the use of miR-18a-3p/KRAS ratio as a prominent outcome prognostic factor. PMID:28904816

  15. Regulation of hnRNPA1 by microRNAs controls the miR-18a-K-RAS axis in chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Monroig, Paloma Del C; Redis, Roxana S; Bayraktar, Emine; Almeida, Maria I; Ivan, Cristina; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Rashed, Mohammed H; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Ozpolat, Bulent; Mitra, Rahul; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, function and degradation involves a range of mechanisms, including interactions with RNA-binding proteins. The potential contribution of regulatory miRNAs to the expression of these RNA interactor proteins that could control other miRNAs expression is still unclear. Here we demonstrate a regulatory circuit involving oncogenic and tumor-suppressor miRNAs and an RNA-binding protein in a chemotherapy-resistant ovarian cancer model. We identified and characterized miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as negative regulators of hnRNPA1 expression, which is required for the processing of miR-18a-3p, an inhibitor of the K-RAS oncogene. The inhibition of miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p decreased the proliferation, motility, invasiveness and angiogenic potential and increased apoptosis when combined with docetaxel. Alteration of this regulatory circuit causes poor overall survival outcome in ovarian cancer patients. These results highlight miR-15a-5p and miR-25-3p as key regulators of miR-18a-3p expression and its downstream target K-RAS, through direct modulation of hnRNPA1 expression. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting miR-25-3p and miR-15a-5p and the use of miR-18a-3p/KRAS ratio as a prominent outcome prognostic factor.

  16. Why should cancer biologists care about tRNAs? tRNA synthesis, mRNA translation and the control of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Savraj S

    2015-07-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are essential for mRNA translation. They are transcribed in the nucleus by RNA polymerase III and undergo many modifications before contributing to cytoplasmic protein synthesis. In this review I highlight our understanding of how tRNA biology may be linked to the regulation of mRNA translation, growth and tumorigenesis. First, I review how oncogenes and tumour suppressor signalling pathways, such as the PI3 kinase/TORC1, Ras/ERK, Myc, p53 and Rb pathways, regulate Pol III and tRNA synthesis. In several cases, this regulation contributes to cell, tissue and body growth, and has implications for our understanding of tumorigenesis. Second, I highlight some recent work, particularly in model organisms such as yeast and Drosophila, that shows how alterations in tRNA synthesis may be not only necessary, but also sufficient to drive changes in mRNA translation and growth. These effects may arise due to both absolute increases in total tRNA levels, but also changes in the relative levels of tRNAs in the overall pool. Finally, I review some recent studies that have revealed how tRNA modifications (amino acid acylation, base modifications, subcellular shuttling, and cleavage) can be regulated by growth and stress cues to selectively influence mRNA translation. Together these studies emphasize the importance of the regulation of tRNA synthesis and modification as critical control points in protein synthesis and growth. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MicroRNAs and Periodontal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, X; Zhou, X; Trombetta-eSilva, J; Francis, M; Gaharwar, A K; Atsawasuwan, P; Diekwisch, T G H

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small RNAs that control gene expression in all aspects of eukaryotic life, primarily through RNA silencing mechanisms. The purpose of the present review is to introduce key miRNAs involved in periodontal homeostasis, summarize the mechanisms by which they affect downstream genes and tissues, and provide an introduction into the therapeutic potential of periodontal miRNAs. In general, miRNAs function synergistically to fine-tune the regulation of biological processes and to remove expression noise rather than by causing drastic changes in expression levels. In the periodontium, miRNAs play key roles in development and periodontal homeostasis and during the loss of periodontal tissue integrity as a result of periodontal disease. As part of the anabolic phase of periodontal homeostasis and periodontal development, miRNAs direct periodontal fibroblasts toward alveolar bone lineage differentiation and new bone formation through WNT, bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch signaling pathways. miRNAs contribute equally to the catabolic aspect of periodontal homeostasis as they affect osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function, either by directly promoting osteoclast activity or by inhibiting osteoclast signaling intermediaries or through negative feedback loops. Their small size and ability to target multiple regulatory networks of related sets of genes have predisposed miRNAs to become ideal candidates for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. To address the immense therapeutic potential of miRNAs and their antagomirs, an ever growing number of delivery approaches toward clinical applications have been developed, including nanoparticle carriers and secondary structure interference inhibitor systems. However, only a fraction of the miRNAs involved in periodontal health and disease are known today. It is anticipated that continued research will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the periodontal miRNA world, and a systematic

  18. Bioinformatics Analysis of Small RNAs in Pima (Gossypium barbadense L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Yu, Dazhao; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are ~20 to 24 nucleotide single-stranded RNAs that play crucial roles in regulation of gene expression. In plants, sRNAs are classified into microRNAs (miRNAs), repeat-associated siRNAs (ra-siRNAs), phased siRNAs (pha-siRNAs), cis and trans natural antisense transcript siRNAs (cis- and trans-nat siRNAs). Pima (Gossypium barbadense L.) is one of the most economically important fiber crops, producing the best and longest spinnable fiber. Although some miRNAs are profiled in Pima, little is known about siRNAs, the largest subclass of plant sRNAs. In order to profile these gene regulators in Pima, a comprehensive analysis of sRNAs was conducted by mining publicly available sRNA data, leading to identification of 678 miRNAs, 3,559,126 ra-siRNAs, 627 pha-siRNAs, 136,600 cis-nat siRNAs and 79,994 trans-nat siRNAs. The 678 miRNAs, belonging to 98 conserved and 402 lineage-specific families, were produced from 2,138 precursors, of which 297 arose from introns, exons, or intron/UTR-exon junctions of protein-coding genes. Ra-siRNAs were produced from various repeat loci, while most (97%) were yielded from retrotransposons, especially LTRs (long terminal repeats). The genes encoding auxin-signaling-related proteins, NBS-LRRs and transcription factors were major sources of pha-siRNAs, while two conserved TAS3 homologs were found as well. Most cis-NATs in Pima overlapped in enclosed and convergent orientations, while a few hybridized in divergent and coincided orientations. Most cis- and trans-nat siRNAs were produced from overlapping regions. Additionally, characteristics of length and the 5’-first nucleotide of each sRNA class were analyzed as well. Results in this study created a valuable molecular resource that would facilitate studies on mechanism of controlling gene expression. PMID:25679373

  19. DAZL relieves miRNA-mediated repression of germline mRNAs by controlling poly(A tail length in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Takeda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During zebrafish embryogenesis, microRNA (miRNA miR-430 contributes to restrict Nanos1 and TDRD7 to primordial germ cells (PGCs by inducing mRNA deadenylation, mRNA degradation, and translational repression of nanos1 and tdrd7 mRNAs in somatic cells. The nanos1 and tdrd7 3'UTRs include cis-acting elements that allow activity in PGCs even in the presence of miRNA-mediated repression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a GFP reporter mRNA that was fused with tdrd7 3'UTR, we show that a germline-specific RNA-binding protein DAZ-like (DAZL can relieve the miR-430-mediated repression of tdrd7 mRNA by inducing poly(A tail elongation (polyadenylation in zebrafish. We also show that DAZL enhances protein synthesis via the 3'UTR of dazl mRNA, another germline mRNA targeted by miR-430. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our present study indicated that DAZL acts as an "anti-miRNA factor" during vertebrate germ cell development. Our data also suggested that miRNA-mediated regulation can be modulated on specific target mRNAs through the poly(A tail control.

  20. Circulating microRNAs as biomarkers of adult Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael D; Andersen, Rikke F; Christensen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have found a differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the blood of patients with Crohn's disease (CD) compared with healthy controls. The aim of this study was to identify circulating miRNAs expressed in CD and assess their performance as biomarkers in patients...

  1. A study of small RNAs from cerebral neocortex of pathology-verified Alzheimer's disease, dementia with lewy bodies, hippocampal sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar dementia, and non-demented human controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Sébastien S; Wang, Wang-Xia; Zhu, Qi; Nelson, Peter T

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (20-22 nucleotides) regulatory non-coding RNAs that strongly influence gene expression. Most prior studies addressing the role of miRNAs in neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have focused on individual diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), making disease-to-disease comparisons impossible. Using RNA deep sequencing, we sought to analyze in detail the small RNAs (including miRNAs) in the temporal neocortex gray matter from non-demented controls (n = 2), AD (n = 5), dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 4), hippocampal sclerosis of aging (n = 4), and frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD) (n = 5) cases, together accounting for the most prevalent ND subtypes. All cases had short postmortem intervals, relatively high-quality RNA, and state-of-the-art neuropathological diagnoses. The resulting data (over 113 million reads in total, averaging 5.6 million reads per sample) and secondary expression analyses constitute an unprecedented look into the human cerebral cortical miRNome at a nucleotide resolution. While we find no apparent changes in isomiR or miRNA editing patterns in correlation with ND pathology, our results validate and extend previous miRNA profiling studies with regard to quantitative changes in NDs. In agreement with this idea, we provide independent cohort validation for changes in miR-132 expression levels in AD (n = 8) and FTLD (n = 14) cases when compared to controls (n = 8). The identification of common and ND-specific putative novel brain miRNAs and/or short-hairpin molecules is also presented. The challenge now is to better understand the impact of these and other alterations on neuronal gene expression networks and neuropathologies.

  2. The role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Dos Santos, Ricardo F; Silva, Inês J; Pobre, Vânia; Domingues, Susana; Andrade, José M; Viegas, Sandra C; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2014-04-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are key factors in the control of biological processes, since they modulate the processing, degradation and quality control of RNAs. This review gives many illustrative examples of the role of RNases in the regulation of small RNAs (sRNAs). RNase E and PNPase have been shown to degrade the free pool of sRNAs. RNase E can also be recruited to cleave mRNAs when they are interacting with sRNAs. RNase III cleaves double-stranded structures, and can cut both the sRNA and its RNA target when they are hybridized. Overall, ribonucleases act as conductors in the control of sRNAs. Therefore, it is very important to further understand their role in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long noncoding RNAs(lncRNAs) and the molecular hallmarks of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Panda, Amaresh C; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2014-12-01

    During aging, progressive deleterious changes increase the risk of disease and death. Prominent molecular hallmarks of aging are genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in a wide range of biological processes, including age-related diseases like cancer, cardiovascular pathologies, and neurodegenerative disorders. Evidence is emerging that lncRNAs influence the molecular processes that underlie age-associated phenotypes. Here, we review our current understanding of lncRNAs that control the development of aging traits.

  4. Activity control of autodisplayed proteins on the same outer membrane layer of E. coli by using Z-domain/streptavidin/and lipase/foldase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Seo-Yoon; Bong, Ji-Hong; Yoo, Gu; Lee, Misu; Kang, Min-Jung; Jose, Joachim; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2017-01-01

    The autodisplay technology has been applied for expression of a desired protein on the outer membrane (OM) of Escherichia coli. In this work, the OM fractions of E. coli with two autodisplayed proteins were separately prepared and mixed to demonstrate the feasibility of control over the ratio of two autodisplayed proteins. As the first model, Z-domain and streptavidin were autodisplayed, and their activities were tested by means of the combined OM layer in a 96-well microplate and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. As the second model, lipase and foldase were autodisplayed which required an interaction between two proteins to obtain the activity of lipase. The OM fractions of E. coli with an autodisplayed lipase and foldase were separately prepared and mixed to demonstrate the feasibility of control over the ratio of two autodisplayed proteins when the interaction of two proteins is required within the same OM layer for the activity of the lipase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Micro RNAs in animal development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasterk, R.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 22 nucleotide single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules that bind to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and silence their expression. This Essay explores the importance of miRNAs in animal development and their possible roles in disease and evolution.

  6. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation.

  7. The outer solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encrenaz T.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The outer solar system extends beyond a heliocentric distance of 5 AU. It contains the giant planets and their systems (rings and satellites, the Kuiper belt, the comets (except those which approach episodically the inner solar system and, at its outer edge, the Oort cloud. The outer solar system physically corresponds to the region located outside the « snow line » which corresponded to the distance of ice condensation in the protodolar disk, and thus made the frontier between the terrestrial and the giant planets at the time of the planets’ formation. The outer solar system is charaterized by a very large variety of ob jects, even within a given class of ob jects. Each of the giant planet has its own properties, as well as each of the outer satellites and the ring systems ; all are the products of specific conditions which determined their formation and evolution processes. The existence of the Kuiper belt, suspected on theoretical bases since the 1940s, has been confirmed since 1992 with the observation of over 1200 trans-neptunian ob jects. Thanks to the the developments of more and more performing groundbased instrumentation and the use of large telescopes, these ob jects are now studies in a statistical way, both dynamically and physically, and these studies are precious for constraining the early formation models of the solar system.

  8. Common and divergent features in transcriptional control of the homologous small RNAs GlmY and GlmZ in Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpel, Yvonne; Lüttmann, Denise; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Reichenbach, Birte; Dersch, Petra; Görke, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Small RNAs GlmY and GlmZ compose a cascade that feedback-regulates synthesis of enzyme GlmS in Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of glmY/glmZ from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, as representatives for other enterobacterial species, which exhibit similar promoter architectures. The GlmY and GlmZ sRNAs of Y. pseudotuberculosis are transcribed from σ54-promoters that require activation by the response regulator GlrR through binding to three conserved sites located upstream of the promoters. This also applies to glmY/glmZ of S. typhimurium and glmY of E. coli, but as a difference additional σ70-promoters overlap the σ54-promoters and initiate transcription at the same site. In contrast, E. coli glmZ is transcribed from a single σ70-promoter. Thus, transcription of glmY and glmZ is controlled by σ54 and the two-component system GlrR/GlrK (QseF/QseE) in Y. pseudotuberculosis and presumably in many other Enterobacteria. However, in a subset of species such as E. coli this relationship is partially lost in favor of σ70-dependent transcription. In addition, we show that activity of the σ54-promoter of E. coli glmY requires binding of the integration host factor to sites upstream of the promoter. Finally, evidence is provided that phosphorylation of GlrR increases its activity and thereby sRNA expression. PMID:20965974

  9. Genome-wide profiling of p53-regulated enhancer RNAs uncovers a subset of enhancers controlled by a lncRNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Léveillé, Nicolas; Melo, Carlos A; Rooijers, Koos; Díaz-Lagares, Angel; Melo, Sonia A; Korkmaz, Gozde; Lopes, Rui; Akbari Moqadam, Farhad; Maia, Ana R; Wijchers, Patrick J; Geeven, Geert; den Boer, Monique L; Kalluri, Raghu; de Laat, Wouter; Esteller, Manel; Agami, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    p53 binds enhancers to regulate key target genes. Here, we globally mapped p53-regulated enhancers by looking at enhancer RNA (eRNA) production. Intriguingly, while many p53-induced enhancers contained p53-binding sites, most did not. As long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prominent regulators of

  10. Genome-wide profiling of p53-regulated enhancer RNAs uncovers a subset of enhancers controlled by a lncRNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Léveillé (Nicolas); C.A. Melo (Carlos); K. Rooijers (Koos); A. Díaz-Lagares (Angel); S.A. Melo (Sonia A.); G. Korkmaz (Gozde); R. Lopes (Rui); F.A. Moqadam; A.R.R. Maia (Ana); P.J. Wijchers (Patrick); G. Geeven (Geert); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Kalluri (Raghu); W.L. de Laat (Wouter); M. Esteller (Manel); R. Agami (Reuven)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractp53 binds enhancers to regulate key target genes. Here, we globally mapped p53-regulated enhancers by looking at enhancer RNA (eRNA) production. Intriguingly, while many p53-induced enhancers contained p53-binding sites, most did not. As long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prominent

  11. An La-related protein controls cell cycle arrest by nuclear retrograde transport of tRNAs during diapause formation in Artemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dian-Fu; Lin, Cheng; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Li; Dai, Li; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Zhou, Rong; Li, Ran; Yang, Jin-Shu; Yang, Fan; Clegg, James S; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2016-03-03

    In eukaryotes, tRNA trafficking between the nucleus and cytoplasm is a complex process connected with cell cycle regulation. Such trafficking is therefore of fundamental importance in cell biology, and disruption of this process has grave consequences for cell viability and survival. To cope with harsh habitats, Artemia has evolved a special reproductive mode to release encysted embryos in which cell division can be maintained in a dormancy state for a long period. Using Artemia as a peculiar model of the cell cycle, an La-related protein from Artemia, named Ar-Larp, was found to bind to tRNA and accumulate in the nucleus, leading to cell cycle arrest and controlling the onset of diapause formation in Artemia. Furthermore, exogenous gene expression of Ar-Larp could induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cells and suppress tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, similar to the results obtained in diapause embryos of Artemia. Our study of tRNA trafficking indicated that Ar-Larp controls cell cycle arrest by binding to tRNAs and influencing their retrograde movement from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which is connected to pathways involved in cell cycle checkpoints. These findings in Artemia offer new insights into the mechanism underlying cell cycle arrest regulation, as well as providing a potentially novel approach to study tRNA retrograde movement from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

  12. MicroRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devaux, Yvan; Stammet, Pascal; Friberg, Hans

    2015-01-01

    cardiac arrest would allow subsequent health care delivery to be tailored to individual patients. However, currently available predictive methods and biomarkers lack sufficient accuracy and therefore cannot be generally recommended in clinical practice. MicroRNAs have recently emerged as potential...... biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases. While the biomarker value of microRNAs for myocardial infarction or heart failure has been extensively studied, less attention has been devoted to their prognostic value after cardiac arrest. This review highlights the recent discoveries suggesting that microRNAs may...

  13. Long noncoding RNAs during normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Hu, Wenqian; Gromatzky, Austin A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized to contribute to cellular development via diverse mechanisms during both health and disease. Here, we highlight recent progress on the study of lncRNAs that function in the development of blood cells. We emphasize lncRNAs that regulate blood cell fates through epigenetic control of gene expression, an emerging theme among functional lncRNAs. Many of these noncoding genes and their targets become dysregulated during malignant hematopoiesis, directly implicating lncRNAs in blood cancers such as leukemia. In a few cases, dysregulation of an lncRNA alone leads to malignant hematopoiesis in a mouse model. Thus, lncRNAs may be not only useful as markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers of the blood, but also as potential targets for novel therapies.

  14. BvrR/BvrS-Controlled Outer Membrane Proteins Omp3a and Omp3b Are Not Essential for Brucella abortus Virulence▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Lorea; Guzmán-Verri, Caterina; Chaves-Olarte, Esteban; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; de Miguel, María-Jesús; Moriyón, Ignacio; Grilló, María-Jesús; López-Goñi, Ignacio; Moreno, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    The Brucella abortus two-component regulatory system BvrR/BvrS controls the expression of outer membrane proteins (Omp) Omp3a (Omp25) and Omp3b (Omp22). Disruption of bvrS or bvrR generates avirulent mutants with altered cell permeability, higher sensitivity to microbicidal peptides, and complement. Consequently, the role of Omp3a and Omp3b in virulence was examined. Similar to bvrS or bvrR mutants, omp3a and omp3b mutants displayed increased attachment to cells, indicating surface alterations. However, they showed unaltered permeability; normal expression of Omp10, Omp16, Omp19, Omp2b, and Omp1; native hapten polysaccharide; and lipopolysaccharide and were resistant to complement and polymyxin B at ranges similar to those of the wild-type (WT) counterpart. Likewise, omp3a and omp3b mutants were able to replicate in murine macrophages and in HeLa cells, were resistant to the killing action of human neutrophils, and persisted in mice, like the WT strain. Murine macrophages infected with the omp3a mutant generated slightly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha than the WT, whereas the bvrS mutant induced lower levels of this cytokine. Since the absence of Omp3a or Omp3b does not result in attenuation, it can be concluded that BvrR/BvrS influences additional Brucella properties involved in virulence. Our results are discussed in the light of previous works suggesting that disruption of omp3a generates attenuated Brucella strains, and we speculate on the role of group 3 Omps. PMID:17664262

  15. Interfering Satellite RNAs of Bamboo mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Yu Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are sub-viral agents that may interact with their cognate helper virus (HV and host plant synergistically and/or antagonistically. SatRNAs totally depend on the HV for replication, so satRNAs and HV usually evolve similar secondary or tertiary RNA structures that are recognized by a replication complex, although satRNAs and HV do not share an appreciable sequence homology. The satRNAs of Bamboo mosaic virus (satBaMV, the only satRNAs of the genus Potexvirus, have become one of the models of how satRNAs can modulate HV replication and virus-induced symptoms. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction of interfering satBaMV and BaMV. Like other satRNAs, satBaMV mimics the secondary structures of 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs of BaMV as a molecular pretender. However, a conserved apical hairpin stem loop (AHSL in the 5′-UTR of satBaMV was found as the key determinant for downregulating BaMV replication. In particular, two unique nucleotides (C60 and C83 in the AHSL of satBaMVs determine the satBaMV interference ability by competing for the replication machinery. Thus, transgenic plants expressing interfering satBaMV could confer resistance to BaMV, and interfering satBaMV could be used as biological-control agent. Unlike two major anti-viral mechanisms, RNA silencing and salicylic acid-mediated immunity, our findings in plants by in vivo competition assay and RNA deep sequencing suggested replication competition is involved in this transgenic satBaMV-mediated BaMV interference. We propose how a single nucleotide of satBaMV can make a great change in BaMV pathogenicity and the underlying mechanism.

  16. Expression Signatures of Long Noncoding RNAs in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS, the most common pediatric spinal deformity, is considered a complex genetic disease. Causing genes and pathogenesis of AIS are still unclear. This study was designed to identify differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs involving the pathogenesis of AIS. Methods. We first performed comprehensive screening of lncRNA and mRNA in AIS patients and healthy children using Agilent human lncRNA + mRNA Array V3.0 microarray. LncRNAs expression in different AIS patients was further evaluated using quantitative PCR. Results. A total of 139 lncRNAs and 546 mRNAs were differentially expressed between AIS patients and healthy control. GO and Pathway analysis showed that these mRNAs might be involved in bone mineralization, neuromuscular junction, skeletal system morphogenesis, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, and regulation of signal pathway. Four lncRNAs (ENST00000440778.1, ENST00000602322.1, ENST00000414894.1, and TCONS_00028768 were differentially expressed between different patients when grouped according to age, height, classification, severity of scoliosis, and Risser grade. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the abnormal expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in AIS, and the expression of some lncRNAs was related to clinical features. This study is helpful for further understanding of lncRNAs in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis of AIS.

  17. Rethinking the central dogma: noncoding RNAs are biologically relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a large class of functional molecules with over 100 unique classes described to date. ncRNAs are diverse in terms of their function and size. A relatively new class of small ncRNA, called microRNAs (miRNA), have received a great deal of attention in the literature in recent years. miRNAs are endogenously encoded gene families that demonstrate striking evolutionary conservation. miRNAs serve essential and diverse physiological functions such as differentiation and development, proliferation, maintaining cell type phenotypes, and many others. The discovery and ongoing investigation of miRNAs is part of a revolution in biology that is changing the basic concepts of gene expression and RNA functionality. A single miRNA can participate in controlling the expression of up to several hundred protein-coding genes by interacting with mRNAs, generally in 3' untranslated regions. Our new and developing understanding of miRNAs, and other ncRNAs, promises to lead to significant contributions to medicine. Specifically, miRNAs are likely to serve as the basis for novel therapies and diagnostic tools.

  18. Small RNAs in the animal gonad: Guarding genomes and guiding development

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Nelson C.

    2010-01-01

    Germ cells must safeguard, apportion, package, and deliver their genomes with exquisite precision to ensure proper reproduction and embryonic development. Classical genetic approaches have identified many genes controlling animal germ cell development, but only recently have some of these genes been linked to the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, a gene silencing mechanism centered on small regulatory RNAs. Germ cells contain microRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs), and Piwi-intera...

  19. MicroRNAs in neuronal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; de Sousa, Erica; Walter, Lais Takata; Kinjo, Erika Reime; Resende, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short nucleotides sequences that regulate the expression of genes in different eukaryotic cell types. A tremendous amount of knowledge on miRNAs has rapidly accumulated over the last few years, revealing the growing interest in this field of research. On the other hand, clarifying the physiological regulation of gene expression in the central nervous system is important for establishing a reference for comparison to the diseased state. It is well known that the fine tuning of neuronal networks relies on intricate molecular mechanisms, such as the adjustment of the synaptic transmission. As determined by recent studies, regulation of neuronal interactions by miRNAs has critical consequences in the development, adaptation to ambient demands, and degeneration of the nervous system. In contrast, activation of synaptic receptors triggers downstream signaling cascades that generate a vast array of effects, which includes the regulation of novel genes involved in the control of the miRNA life cycle. In this review, we have examined the hot topics on miRNA gene-regulatory activities in the broad field of neuronal communication-related processes. Furthermore, in addition to indicating the newly described effect of miRNAs on the regulation of specific neurotransmitter systems, we have pointed out how these systems affect the expression, transport, and stability of miRNAs. Moreover, we discuss newly described and under-investigation mechanisms involving the intercellular transfer of miRNAs, aided by exosomes and gap junctions. Thus, in the current review, we were able to highlight recent findings related to miRNAs that indisputably contributed towards the understanding of the nervous system in health and disease.

  20. Formulation design of double-layer in the outer shell of dry-coated tablet to modulate lag time and time-controlled dissolution function: studies on micronized ethylcellulose for dosage form design (VII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Kung-Hsu; Li, Mei-Jane

    2004-07-14

    The dry-coated tablet with optimal lag time was designed to simulate the dosing time of drug administration according to the physiological needs. Different compositions of ethylcellulose (EC) powder with a coarse particle (167.5 microm) and several fine particles (coated tablets. The formulations containing different weight ratios of coarse/fine particles of EC powders or 167.5 microm EC powder/excipient in the upper layer of the outer shell to influence the release behavior of sodium diclofenac from dry-coated tablet were also explored. The results indicate that sodium diclofenac released from all the dry-coated tablets exhibited an initial lag period, followed by a stage of rapid drug release. When the mixture of the coarse/fine particles of EC powders was incorporated into the whole layer, the lag time was almost the same. The outer shell broke into 2 halves to make a rapid drug release after the lag time, which belonged to the time-controlled disruption of release mechanism. When the lower layer in the outer shell was composed of 167.5 microm EC powder and the upper layer was formulated by mixing different weight ratios of 167.5 microm and 6 microm of EC powders, the drug release also exhibited a time-controlled disruption behavior. Its lag time might be freely modulated, depending on the amount of 6 microm EC powder added. Once different excipients were respectively incorporated into the upper layer of the outer shell, different release mechanisms were observed as follows: time-controlled explosion for Explotab, disruption for Avicel and spray-dried lactose, erosion for dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrate, and sigmoidal profile for hydroxypropyl methylcellulose.

  1. The Interplay between Noncoding RNAs and Insulin in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan; Xu, Jia; Du, Xiao; Fu, Xianghui

    2018-01-22

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs and circular RNAs, regulate various biological processes and are involved in the initiation and progression of human diseases. Insulin, a predominant hormone secreted from pancreatic β cells, is an essential factor in regulation of systemic metabolism through multifunctional insulin signaling. Insulin production and action are tightly controlled. Dysregulations of insulin production and action can impair metabolic homeostasis, and eventually lead to the development of multiple metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. Accumulating data indicates that ncRNAs modulate β cell mass, insulin synthesis, secretion and signaling, and their role in diabetes is dramatically emerging. This review summarizes our current knowledge of ncRNAs as regulators of insulin, with particular emphasis on the implications of this interplay in the development of diabetes. We outline the role of ncRNAs in pancreatic β cell mass and function, which is critical for insulin production and secretion. We also highlight the involvement of ncRNAs in insulin signaling in peripheral tissues including liver, muscle and adipose, and discuss ncRNA-mediated inter-organ crosstalk under diabetic conditions. A more in-depth understanding of the interplay between ncRNAs and insulin may afford valuable insights and novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of diabetes, as well as other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transposon defense by endo-siRNAs, piRNAs and somatic pilRNAs in Drosophila: contributions of Loqs-PD and R2D2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijana Mirkovic-Hösle

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are a serious threat for genome integrity and their control via small RNA mediated silencing pathways is an ancient strategy. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has two silencing activities that target transposons: endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs or endo-siRNAs and Piwi-interacting small RNAs (piRNAs. The biogenesis of endo-siRNAs involves the Dicer-2 co-factors Loqs-PD, which acts predominantly during processing of dsRNA by Dcr-2, and R2D2, which primarily helps to direct siRNAs into the RNA interference effector Ago2. Nonetheless, loss of either protein is not sufficient to produce a phenotype comparable with a dcr-2 mutation. We provide further deep sequencing evidence supporting the notion that R2D2 and Loqs-PD have partially overlapping function. Certain transposons display a preference for either dsRBD-protein during production or loading; this appeared to correlate neither with overall abundance, classification of the transposon or a specific site of genomic origin. The endo-siRNA biogenesis pathway in germline operates according to the same principles as the existing model for the soma, and its impairment does not significantly affect piRNAs. Expanding the analysis, we confirmed the occurrence of somatic piRNA-like RNAs (pilRNAs that show a ping-pong signature. We detected expression of the Piwi-family protein mRNAs only barely above background, indicating that the somatic pilRNAs may arise from a small sub-population of somatic cells that express a functional piRNA pathway.

  3. Integrated genomic analysis of triple-negative breast cancers reveals novel microRNAs associated with clinical and molecular phenotypes and sheds light on the pathways they control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rinaldis, Emanuele; Gazinska, Patrycja; Mera, Anca; Modrusan, Zora; Fedorowicz, Grazyna M; Burford, Brian; Gillett, Cheryl; Marra, Pierfrancesco; Grigoriadis, Anita; Dornan, David; Holmberg, Lars; Pinder, Sarah; Tutt, Andrew

    2013-09-23

    This study focuses on the analysis of miRNAs expression data in a cohort of 181 well characterised breast cancer samples composed primarily of triple-negative (ER/PR/HER2-negative) tumours with associated genome-wide DNA and mRNA data, extensive patient follow-up and pathological information. We identified 7 miRNAs associated with prognosis in the triple-negative tumours and an additional 7 when the analysis was extended to the set of all ER-negative cases. miRNAs linked to an unfavourable prognosis were associated with a broad spectrum of motility mechanisms involved in the invasion of stromal tissues, such as cell-adhesion, growth factor-mediated signalling pathways, interaction with the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton remodelling. When we compared different intrinsic molecular subtypes we found 46 miRNAs that were specifically expressed in one or more intrinsic subtypes. Integrated genomic analyses indicated these miRNAs to be influenced by DNA genomic aberrations and to have an overall influence on the expression levels of their predicted targets. Among others, our analyses highlighted the role of miR-17-92 and miR-106b-25, two polycistronic miRNA clusters with known oncogenic functions. We showed that their basal-like subtype specific up-regulation is influenced by increased DNA copy number and contributes to the transcriptional phenotype as well as the activation of oncogenic pathways in basal-like tumours. This study analyses previously unreported miRNA, mRNA and DNA data and integrates these with pathological and clinical information, from a well-annotated cohort of breast cancers enriched for triple-negative subtypes. It provides a conceptual framework, as well as integrative methods and system-level results and contributes to elucidate the role of miRNAs as biomarkers and modulators of oncogenic processes in these types of tumours.

  4. MicroRNAs in Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small regulatory RNAs that play important roles in development of diseases. Several studies have provided evidences showing that miRNAs affect pathways that are fundamental for metabolic control in adipocyte and skeletal muscle differentiations. Some miRNAs have been implicated in lipid, amino acid, and glucose homeostasis. This leads to the possibility that miRNAs may contribute to common metabolic diseases and point to novel therapeutic opportunities based on targeting of miRNAs. CONTENT: miRNAs have been recognized as a class of epigenetic regulators of metabolism and energy homeostasis, primarily because the simultaneous regulation of a large number of target genes can be accomplished by a single miRNA. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play a key role in the pathological development of obesity by affecting adipocyte differentiation. miRNAs have been implicated as novel protagonists in the pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus (DM, regulation of insulin production, secretion and action. They also appear to play a role in the development of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiac hypertrophy. SUMMARY: Involvement of miRNAs in glucose and lipid metabolism has provided strong evidences to confirm their roles as key players in regulation of complex metabolic pathways. Additionally, it indicates potential outlook for novel therapeutic strategies in the management of obesity, metabolic syndrome and DM. Further research in this field is needed to ascertain the full potential of miRNAs as novel metabolic biomarkers and potent therapeutic agents against obesity and its metabolic disorders. KEYWORDS: obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, miRNAs, adipogenesis, insulin, pancreatic cells.

  5. Overexpression of MicA induces production of OmpC-enriched outer membrane vesicles that protect against Salmonella challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Il; Kim, Moonjeong; Jeon, Jinseong; Han, Jin Kwan; Kim, Kwang-Sun

    2017-08-26

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from bacteria are promising candidates for subunit vaccines. Stresses that modulate the composition of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are important for OMV synthesis. Small RNAs (sRNAs) expressed in response to stress regulate OMPs, although the mechanism underlying sRNA-mediated OMV biogenesis and its utility for developing vaccine platforms remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterized the role of a sRNA, MicA, which regulates OmpA, a major OMP involved in both production of OMVs and reactive immunity against Salmonella challenge. A Salmonella strain overexpressing MicA generated more OMVs than a control strain. In addition, OmpC was the major component of MicA-derived OMV proteins. MicA-derived OMVs induced Th1- and Th17-type immune responses in vitro and reduced Salmonella-mediated lethality in a mouse model. Thus, OmpA-regulatory sRNA-derived OMVs may facilitate production of Salmonella-protective vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MicroRNAs in Metabolism and Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottiers, Veerle; Näär, Anders M.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of metabolism. For example, miR-33a and b play a crucial role in controlling cholesterol and lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes, the SREBP transcription factors. Metabolic miRNAs such as miR-103 and miR-107 regulate insulin and glucose homeostasis, while others, such as miR-34a, may be key regulators of hepatic lipid homeostasis. The discovery of circulating miRNAs has highlighted their potential as both endocrine signalling molecules and disease markers. Dysregulation of miRNAs may contribute to metabolic abnormalities, suggesting that miRNAs may potentially serve as therapeutic targets to ameliorate cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:22436747

  7. Identification of Bacterial Small RNAs by RNA Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren

    2014-01-01

    sequencing (RNA-seq) is described that involves the preparation and analysis of three different sequencing libraries. As a signifi cant number of unique sRNAs are identifi ed in each library, the libraries can be used either alone or in combination to increase the number of sRNAs identifi ed. The approach......Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria are known to modulate gene expression and control a variety of processes including metabolic reactions, stress responses, and pathogenesis in response to environmental signals. A method to identify bacterial sRNAs on a genome-wide scale based on RNA...... may be applied to identify sRNAs in any bacterium under different growth and stress conditions....

  8. Novel and Stress-Regulated MicroRNAs and Other Small RNAs from Arabidopsis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramanjulu Sunkar; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2004-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that have recently emerged as important regulators of mRNA degradation, translational repression, and chromatin modification...

  9. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  10. The DMD locus harbours multiple long non-coding RNAs which orchestrate and control transcription of muscle dystrophin mRNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Matteo; Erriquez, Daniela; Valli, Emanuele; Brioschi, Simona; Scotton, Chiara; Neri, Marcella; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Gherardi, Samuele; Fabris, Marina; Rimessi, Paola; Gualandi, Francesca; Perini, Giovanni; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The 2.2 Mb long dystrophin (DMD) gene, the largest gene in the human genome, corresponds to roughly 0.1% of the entire human DNA sequence. Mutations in this gene cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other milder X-linked, recessive dystrophinopathies. Using a custom-made tiling array, specifically designed for the DMD locus, we identified a variety of novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), both sense and antisense oriented, whose expression profiles mirror that of DMD gene. Importantly, these transcripts are intronic in origin and specifically localized to the nucleus and are transcribed contextually with dystrophin isoforms or primed by MyoD-induced myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, their forced ectopic expression in both human muscle and neuronal cells causes a specific and negative regulation of endogenous dystrophin full length isoforms and significantly down-regulate the activity of a luciferase reporter construct carrying the minimal promoter regions of the muscle dystrophin isoform. Consistent with this apparently repressive role, we found that, in muscle samples of dystrophinopathic female carriers, lncRNAs expression levels inversely correlate with those of muscle full length DMD isoforms. Overall these findings unveil an unprecedented complexity of the transcriptional pattern of the DMD locus and reveal that DMD lncRNAs may contribute to the orchestration and homeostasis of the muscle dystrophin expression pattern by either selective targeting and down-modulating the dystrophin promoter transcriptional activity.

  11. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  12. Micro-RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taipaleenmäki, H.; Hokland, L. B.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism and apoptosis. Also, preliminary data from animal disease models suggest that targeting miRNAs in bone can be a novel approach to increase bone mass. This review highlights the current knowledge of microRNA biology and their role in bone formation...... and discusses their potential use in future therapeutic applications for metabolic bone diseases....

  13. Expression Profiles of Long Noncoding RNAs and Messenger RNAs in Mn-Exposed Hippocampal Neurons of Sprague-Dawley Rats Ascertained by Microarray: Implications for Mn-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyan Ma

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn is an essential trace element, while excessive expose may induce neurotoxicity. Recently, lncRNAs have been extensively studied and it has been confirmed that lncRNAs participate in neural functions and aberrantly expressed lncRNAs are involved in neurological diseases. However, the pathological effects of lncRNAs on Mn-induced neurotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, the expression profiles of lncRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs were identified in Mn-treated hippocampal neurons and control neurons via microarray. Bioinformatic methods and intersection analysis were also employed. Results indicated that 566, 1161, and 1474 lncRNAs meanwhile 1848, 3228, and 4022 mRNAs were aberrantly expressed in low, intermediate, and high Mn-exposed groups compared with the control group, respectively. Go analysis determined that differentially expressed mRNAs were targeted to biological processes, cellular components, and molecular functions. Pathway analysis indicated that these mRNAs were enriched in insulin secretion, cell cycle, and DNA replication. Intersection analysis denominated that 135 lncRNAs and 373 mRNAs were consistently up-regulated while 150 lncRNAs and 560 mRNAs were consistently down-regulated. Meanwhile, lncRNA BC079195 was significantly up-regulated while lncRNAs uc.229- and BC089928 were significantly down-regulated in three comparison groups. The relative expression levels of 3 lncRNAs and 4 mRNAs were validated through qRT-PCR. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to identify the expression patterns of lncRNAs and mRNAs in hippocampal neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats. The results may provide evidence on underlying mechanisms of Mn-induced neurotoxicity, and aberrantly expressed lncRNAs/mRNAs may be useful in further investigations to detect early symptoms of Mn-induced neuropsychiatric disorders in the central nervous system.

  14. The long and short of non-coding RNAs during post-natal growth and differentiation of skeletal muscles: Focus on lncRNA and miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, Lauren C; Fox, Archa; Shavlakadze, Tea; Grounds, Miranda D

    2016-12-01

    Post-natal growth of skeletal muscle is a dynamic process involving proliferation and fusion of myoblasts with elongating myofibres (hyperplasia of myonuclei) until 3 weeks post-natally in mice, with ongoing differentiation and further increases in myofibre size mostly by hypertrophy until about 12 weeks of age. The expression of mRNAs that control these events are well described, but little is known about the in vivo roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including both microRNAs (miRNAs) and the lesser-studied long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). We analysed expression patterns for a broad range of lncRNAs (including Neat1, Malat1, Sra, Meg3, LncMyoD and linc-MD1), miRNAs and mRNAs in muscles of normal male C57Bl/6J mice at 2 days and 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks after birth. These post-natal patterns were compared with expression of these RNAs during classic C2C12 myogenesis and differentiation in tissue culture. This overview of RNAs during post-natal skeletal muscle growth provides a novel focus on ncRNAs during this often overlooked growth period, with many potential applications to normal muscle growth in humans and livestock, and to childhood muscle disorders. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MicroRNAs in Cardiometabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs with critical functions in multiple physiological and pathological processes. An explosion of reports on the discovery and characterization of different miRNA species and their involvement in almost every aspect of cardiac biology and diseases has established an exciting new dimension in gene regulation networks for cardiac development and pathogenesis. CONTENT: Alterations in the metabolic control of lipid and glucose homeostasis predispose an individual to develop cardiometabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Work over the last years has suggested that miRNAs play an important role in regulating these physiological processes. Besides a cell-specific transcription factor profile, cell-specific miRNA-regulated gene expression is integral to cell fate and activation decisions. Thus, the cell types involved in atherosclerosis, vascular disease, and its myocardial sequelae may be differentially regulated by distinct miRNAs, thereby controlling highly complex processes, for example, smooth muscle cell phenotype and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells or macrophages. The recent advancements in using miRNAs as circulating biomarkers or therapeutic modalities, will hopefully be able to provide a strong basis for future research to further expand our insights into miRNA function in cardiovascular biology. SUMMARY: MiRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. They are potent modulators of diverse biological processes and pathologies. Recent findings demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the vasculature and the orchestration of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. MiRNA networks represent an additional layer of regulation for gene expression that absorbs perturbations and ensures the robustness of biological systems. A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mi

  16. Grapevine microRNAs responsive to exogenous gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Fang, Jinggui; Wang, Chen; Yin, Yanlei; Sun, Xin; Leng, Xiangpeng; Song, Changnian

    2014-02-08

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), involving in various biological and metabolic processes, have been discovered and analyzed in quite a number of plants species, such as Arabidopsis, rice and other plants. However, there have been few reports about grapevine miRNAs in response to gibberelline (GA3). Solexa technology was used to sequence small RNA libraries constructed from grapevine berries treated with GA3 and the control. A total of 122 known and 90 novel grapevine miRNAs (Vvi-miRNAs) were identified. Totally, 137 ones were found to be clearly responsive to GA3, among which 58 were down-regulated, 51 were up-regulated, 21 could only be detected in the control, and seven were only detected in the treatment. Subsequently, we found that 28 of them were differentially regulated by GA3, with 12 conserved and 16 novel Vvi-miRNAs, based on the analysis of qRT-PCR essays. There existed some consistency in expression levels of GA3-responsive Vvi-miRNAs between high throughput sequencing and qRT-PCR essays. In addition, 117 target genes for 29 novel miRNAs were predicted. Deep sequencing of short RNAs from grapevine berries treated with GA3 and the control identified 137 GA3-responsive miRNAs, among which 28 exhibited different expression profiles of response to GA3 in the diverse developmental stages of grapevine berries. These identified Vvi-miRNAs might be involved in the grapevine berry development and response to environmental stresses.

  17. Long noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Ding, Jia-wang; Wang, Xin-an; Zheng, Xia-xia

    2016-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is universally recognized as a chronic lipid-induced inflammation of the vessel wall in response to dyslipidemia and haemodynamic stress involving dysfunction and activation of resident vascular cells as well as infiltration of leukocytes. As members of nonprotein-coding RNAs, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are implicated in various biological processes. Accumulating evidences suggest that lncRNAs regulate the function of vascular wall, activation of macrophages, lipid metabolism and immune response. Here, we review the effects of lncRNAs on the progress of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  19. Microarray profiling and co-expression network analysis of circulating lncRNAs and mRNAs associated with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifen Liu

    Full Text Available LncRNAs, which represent one of the most highly expressed classes of ncRNAs in the brain, are becoming increasingly interesting with regard to brain functions and disorders. However, changes in the expression of regulatory lncRNAs in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD have not yet been reported. Using microarrays, we profiled the expression of 34834 lncRNAs and 39224 mRNAs in peripheral blood sampled from MDD patients as well as demographically-matched controls. Among these, we found that 2007 lncRNAs and 1667 mRNAs were differentially expressed, 17 of which were documented as depression-related gene in previous studies. Gene Ontology (GO and pathway analyses indicated that the biological functions of differentially expressed mRNAs were related to fundamental metabolic processes and neurodevelopment diseases. To investigate the potential regulatory roles of the differentially expressed lncRNAs on the mRNAs, we also constructed co-expression networks composed of the lncRNAs and mRNAs, which shows significant correlated patterns of expression. In the MDD-derived network, there were a greater number of nodes and connections than that in the control-derived network. The lncRNAs located at chr10:874695-874794, chr10:75873456-75873642, and chr3:47048304-47048512 may be important factors regulating the expression of mRNAs as they have previously been reported associations with MDD. This study is the first to explore genome-wide lncRNA expression and co-expression with mRNA patterns in MDD using microarray technology. We identified circulating lncRNAs that are aberrantly expressed in MDD and the results suggest that lncRNAs may contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of MDD.

  20. LncRNAs expression in preeclampsia placenta reveals the potential role of LncRNAs contributing to preeclampsia pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are an important class of pervasive genes involved in a variety of biological functions. They are aberrantly expressed in many types of diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the lncRNA profiles in preeclampsia. Preeclampsia has been observed in patients with molar pregnancy where a fetus is absent, which demonstrate that the placenta is sufficient to cause this condition. Thus, we analyzed the lncRNA profiles in preeclampsia placentas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we described the lncRNA profiles in six preeclampsia placentas (T and five normal pregnancy placentas (N using microarray. With abundant and varied probes accounting for 33,045 LncRNAs in our microarray, 28,443 lncRNAs that were expressed at a specific level were detected. From the data, we found 738 lncRNAs that were differentially expressed (≥ 1.5-fold-change among preeclampsia placentas compared with controls. Coding-non-coding gene co-expression networks (CNC network were constructed based on the correlation analysis between the differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs. According to the CNC network and GO analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs/mRNAs, we selected three lncRNAs to analyze the relationship between lncRNAs and preeclampsia. LOC391533, LOC284100, and CEACAMP8 were evaluated using qPCR in 40 preeclampsia placentas and 40 controls. These results revealed that three lncRNAs were aberrantly expressed in preeclampsia placentas compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first study to determine the genome-wide lncRNAs expression patterns in preeclampsia placenta using microarray. These results revealed that clusters of lncRNAs were aberrantly expressed in preeclampsia placenta compared with controls, which indicated that lncRNAs differentially expressed in preeclampsia placenta might play a partial or key role in preeclampsia development. Misregulation of LOC391533, LOC

  1. Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Voyager 2 took this photo of Saturn's outer satellite, Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles) away. The photo shows that Phoebe is about 200 kilometers (120 miles) in diameter, about twice the size of Earth-based measurements; and dark, with five percent reflectivity -- much darker than any other Saturnian satellite. That, and information from Earth-based observations, indicates Phoebe is almost certainly a captured asteroid, and did not form in the original Saturn nebula as Saturn's other satellites did. Phoebe is the only Saturnian satellite that does not always show the same face to Saturn: Its orbital period is 550 days. Its rotation period (length of day), determined from Voyager 2 observations, is nine to ten hours. Other ground-based observations that indicate that Phoebe is a captured asteroid: It orbits Saturn in the ecliptic plane (the plane in which Earth and most other planets orbit the Sun), rather than in Saturn's equatorial plane as the other Saturn satellites do. And Phoebe's orbit is retrograde -- in the direction opposite to that of the other satellites. Voyager is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  2. Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) - The dawning of a new treatment for cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong; Gao, Quansheng; Cao, Feng

    2017-08-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a category of noncoding RNAs with the potential for genetic and epigenetic regulations. As important regulators of gene expression, increasing evidence has proven that lncRNAs play a significant regulatory role in various cardiovascular pathologies. In particular, lncRNAs have been proved to be participating in gene regulatory mechanisms involved in heart growth and development that can be exploited to repair the injured adult heart. Furthermore, lncRNAs have been revealed as possible therapeutic targets for heart failure with different causes and in different stages. In the journey from a healthy heart to heart failure, lncRNAs have been shown to participate in almost every landmark of heart failure pathogenesis including ischemic injury, cardiac hypertrophy, and cardiac fibrosis. Furthermore, the manipulation of lncRNAs palliates the progression of heart failure by attenuating ischemic heart injury, cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis, as well as facilitating heart regeneration and therapeutic angiogenesis. This review will highlight recent updates regarding the involvement of lncRNAs in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure and their potential as novel therapeutic targets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Genetic and epigenetic control of heart failure - edited by Jun Ren & Megan Yingmei Zhang. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptomic landscape of lncRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    -coding genes and microRNAs in modulating the immune responses in IBD. METHODS: In the present study, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome profiling of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in 96 colon pinch biopsies (inflamed and non-inflamed) extracted from multiple colonic locations from 45 patients (CD = 13......, UC = 20, controls = 12) using an expression microarray platform. RESULTS: In our study, we identified widespread dysregulation of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in both inflamed and non-inflamed CD and UC compared to the healthy controls. In cases of inflamed CD and UC, we identified 438 and 745...... differentially expressed lncRNAs, respectively, while in cases of the non-inflamed CD and UC, we identified 12 and 19 differentially expressed lncRNAs, respectively. We also observed significant enrichment (P-value

  4. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  5. Suppression of mRNAs encoding tegument tetraspanins from Schistosoma mansoni results in impaired tegument turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai H Tran

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes express a family of integral membrane proteins, called tetraspanins (TSPs, in the outer surface membranes of the tegument. Two of these tetraspanins, Sm-TSP-1 and Sm-TSP-2, confer protection as vaccines in mice, and individuals who are naturally resistant to S. mansoni infection mount a strong IgG response to Sm-TSP-2. To determine their functions in the tegument of S. mansoni we used RNA interference to silence expression of Sm-tsp-1 and Sm-tsp-2 mRNAs. Soaking of parasites in Sm-tsp dsRNAs resulted in 61% (p = 0.009 and 74% (p = 0.009 reductions in Sm-tsp-1 and Sm-tsp-2 transcription levels, respectively, in adult worms, and 67%-75% (p = 0.011 and 69%-89% (p = 0.004 reductions in Sm-tsp-1 and Sm-tsp-2 transcription levels, respectively, in schistosomula compared to worms treated with irrelevant control (luciferase dsRNA. Ultrastructural morphology of adult worms treated in vitro with Sm-tsp-2 dsRNA displayed a distinctly vacuolated and thinner tegument compared with controls. Schistosomula exposed in vitro to Sm-tsp-2 dsRNA had a significantly thinner and more vacuolated tegument, and morphology consistent with a failure of tegumentary invaginations to close. Injection of mice with schistosomula that had been electroporated with Sm-tsp-1 and Sm-tsp-2 dsRNAs resulted in 61% (p = 0.005 and 83% (p = 0.002 reductions in the numbers of parasites recovered from the mesenteries four weeks later when compared to dsRNA-treated controls. These results imply that tetraspanins play important structural roles impacting tegument development, maturation or stability.

  6. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola ePiscopo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD includes a spectrum of disorders characterized by changes of personality and social behaviour and, often, a gradual and progressive language dysfunction. In the last years, several efforts have been fulfilled in identifying both genetic mutations and pathological proteins associated with FTLD. The molecular bases undergoing the onset and progression of the disease remain still unknown. Recent literature prompts an involvement of RNA metabolism in FTLD, particularly miRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNAs in several disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, and increasing importance of circulating miRNAs in different pathologies has suggested to implement the study of their possible application as biological markers and new therapeutic targets; moreover, miRNA-based therapy is becoming a powerful tool to deepen the function of a gene, the mechanism of a disease, and validate therapeutic targets. Regarding FTLD, different studies showed that miRNAs are playing an important role. For example, several reports have evaluated miRNA regulation of the progranulin gene suggesting that it is under their control, as described for miR-29b, miR-107 and miR-659. More recently, it has been demonstrated that TMEM106B gene, which protein is elevated in FTLD-TDP brains, is repressed by miR-132/212 cluster; this post-transcriptional mechanism increases intracellular levels of progranulin, affecting its pathways. These findings if confirmed could suggest that these microRNAs have a role as potential targets for some related-FTLD genes. In this review, we focus on the emerging roles of the miRNAs in the pathogenesis of FTLD.

  7. Prevention of the Outer Space Weaponization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Gennady P.

    2002-01-01

    9 states. The satellites of various functions (early warning, communication, data acquisition, reconnaissance and navigation) were actively used and continue to be used with the purposes of raising efficiency of ground armed forces, especially in fight against international terrorism. At the same time such satellites are not a weapon in the sense of that word since they do not create the threats of armed attack in outer space or from outer space. Moreover, they promote maintaining of stability in the international relations. For this reason the reconnaissance and data acquisition satellites used for the verification of observance by States of the arms limitation agreements are under international protection as national technical means of the control. Similar protection is enjoyed by the early warning satellites. With the help of space communication facilities the more reliable operative connection of the statesmen is organized in the strained situations. By this way the probability of making of the incorrect retaliatory decisions in critical political situations is reduced. At the same time it's necessary to take into consideration that the activities of such satellite systems are tightly connected with ground armed forces of the states. the earth, what from the point of view of international law may be qualified as establishing a partial demilitarization regime in outer space. After the prohibition of anti-satellite weapons (ASAT) and anti-satellite (ASAT) weapons it will be possible to speak about establishing of an international legal regime of complete demilitarization in outer space eliminating any kinds of weapon from outer space. in a peaceful time. weaponization.The main task of this paper is to analyze and to discuss the present binding regime of the outer space deweaponization and particular measures on consolidation and strengthening of this regime. agreements of the Russian Federation and the USA into multilateral Treaties. Such "immunity" would cover

  8. Transcriptome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Potato Circular RNAs in Response to Pectobacterium carotovorum Subspecies brasiliense Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ran; Zhu, Yongxing; Zhao, Jiao; Fang, Zhengwu; Wang, Shuping; Yin, Junliang; Chu, Zhaohui; Ma, Dongfang

    2017-12-27

    Little information about the roles of circular RNAs (circRNAs) during potato-Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense (Pcb) interaction is currently available. In this study, we conducted the systematic identification of circRNAs from time series samples of potato cultivars Valor (susceptible) and BP1 (disease tolerant) infected by Pcb. A total of 2098 circRNAs were detected and about half (931, 44.38%) were intergenic circRNAs. And differential expression analysis detected 429 significantly regulated circRNAs. circRNAs play roles by regulating parental genes and sponging miRNAs. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment of parental genes and miRNAs targeted mRNAs revealed that these differentially expressed (DE) circRNAs were involved in defense response (GO:0006952), cell wall (GO:0005199), ADP binding (GO:0043531), phosphorylation (GO:0016310), and kinase activity (GO:0016301), suggesting the roles of circRNAs in regulating potato immune response. Furthermore, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) found that circRNAs were closely related with coding-genes and long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). And together they were cultivar-specifically regulated to strengthen immune response of potato to Pcb infection, implying the roles of circRNAs in reprogramming disease responsive transcriptome. Our results will provide new insights into the potato-Pcb interaction and may lead to novel disease control strategy in the future.

  9. Transcriptome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Potato Circular RNAs in Response to Pectobacterium carotovorum Subspecies brasiliense Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information about the roles of circular RNAs (circRNAs during potato-Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense (Pcb interaction is currently available. In this study, we conducted the systematic identification of circRNAs from time series samples of potato cultivars Valor (susceptible and BP1 (disease tolerant infected by Pcb. A total of 2098 circRNAs were detected and about half (931, 44.38% were intergenic circRNAs. And differential expression analysis detected 429 significantly regulated circRNAs. circRNAs play roles by regulating parental genes and sponging miRNAs. Gene Ontology (GO enrichment of parental genes and miRNAs targeted mRNAs revealed that these differentially expressed (DE circRNAs were involved in defense response (GO:0006952, cell wall (GO:0005199, ADP binding (GO:0043531, phosphorylation (GO:0016310, and kinase activity (GO:0016301, suggesting the roles of circRNAs in regulating potato immune response. Furthermore, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA found that circRNAs were closely related with coding-genes and long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs. And together they were cultivar-specifically regulated to strengthen immune response of potato to Pcb infection, implying the roles of circRNAs in reprogramming disease responsive transcriptome. Our results will provide new insights into the potato-Pcb interaction and may lead to novel disease control strategy in the future.

  10. Searching for MIND: MicroRNAs in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Barbato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In few years our understanding of microRNA (miRNA biogenesis, molecular mechanisms by which miRNAs regulate gene expression, and the functional roles of miRNAs has been expanded. Interestingly, numerous miRNAs are expressed in a spatially and temporally controlled manner in the nervous system, suggesting that their posttrascriptional regulation may be particularly relevant in neural development and function. MiRNA studies in neurobiology showed their involvement in synaptic plasticity and brain diseases. In this review ,correlations between miRNA-mediated gene silencing and Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurodegenerative diseases will be discussed. Molecular and cellular neurobiological studies of the miRNAs in neurodegeneration represent the exploration of a new Frontier of miRNAs biology and the potential development of new diagnostic tests and genetic therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Noncoding RNAs in the regulation of skeletal muscle biology in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simionescu-Bankston, Adriana; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of multinucleated myofibers that arise from the fusion of myoblasts during development. Skeletal muscle is essential for various body functions such as maintaining posture, locomotion, breathing, and metabolism. Skeletal muscle undergoes remarkable adaptations in response to environmental stimuli leading to atrophy or hypertrophy. Moreover, degeneration of skeletal muscle is a common feature in a number of muscular disorders including muscular dystrophy. Emerging evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), are critical for skeletal muscle physiology. Several miRNAs and lncRNAs have now been found to control skeletal muscle development and regeneration. Noncoding RNAs also play an important role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass in adults. Furthermore, aberrant expression of miRNAs and lncRNAs has been observed in several muscular disorders. In this article, we discuss the mechanisms of action of miRNAs and lncRNAs in skeletal muscle formation, growth, regeneration, and disease. We further highlight potential therapeutic strategies for utilizing noncoding RNAs to improve skeletal muscle function.

  12. Characterization of miRNAs responsive to exogenous ethylene in grapevine berries at whole genome level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fanggui; Wang, Chen; Han, Jian; Zhu, Xudong; Li, Xiaopeng; Wang, Xicheng; Fang, Jinggui

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical regulators of various biological and metabolic processes of plants. Numerous miRNAs and their functions have been identified and analyzed in many plants. However, till now, the involvement of miRNAs in the response of grapevine berries to ethylene has not been reported yet. Here, Solexa technology was employed to deeply sequence small RNA libraries constructed from grapevine berries treated with and without ethylene. A total of 124 known and 78 novel miRNAs were identified. Among these miRNAs, 162 miRNAs were clearly responsive to ethylene, with 55 downregulated, 59 upregulated, and 14 unchanged miRNAs detected only in the control. The other 35 miRNAs responsive to ethylene were induced by ethylene and detected only in the ethylene-treated grapevine materials. Expression analysis of 27 conserved and 26 novel miRNAs revealed that 13 conserved and 18 novel ones were regulated by ethylene during the whole development of grapevine berries. High-throughput sequencing and qRT-PCR assays revealed consistent results on the expression results of ethylene-responsive miRNAs. Moreover, 90 target genes for 34 novel miRNAs were predicted, most of which were involved in responses to various stresses, especially like exogenous ethylene treatment. The identified miRNAs may be mainly involved in grapevine berry development and response to various environmental conditions.

  13. Long noncoding RNAs regulate adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Goff, Loyal A.; Trapnell, Cole; Alexander, Ryan; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Sauvageau, Martin; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Kelley, David R.; Hendrickson, David G.; Yuan, Bingbing; Kellis, Manolis; Lodish, Harvey F.; Rinn, John L.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has led to a surge of interest in understanding the detailed mechanisms underlying adipocyte development. Many protein-coding genes, mRNAs, and microRNAs have been implicated in adipocyte development, but the global expression patterns and functional contributions of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) during adipogenesis have not been explored. Here we profiled the transcriptome of primary brown and white adipocytes, preadipocytes, and cultured adipocytes and identified 175 lncRNAs that are specifically regulated during adipogenesis. Many lncRNAs are adipose-enriched, strongly induced during adipogenesis, and bound at their promoters by key transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα). RNAi-mediated loss of function screens identified functional lncRNAs with varying impact on adipogenesis. Collectively, we have identified numerous lncRNAs that are functionally required for proper adipogenesis. PMID:23401553

  14. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  15. Therapeutic Use of MicroRNAs in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Fortunato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Although the molecular pathways of lung cancer have been partly known, the high mortality rate is not markedly changed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that actively modulate cell physiological processes as apoptosis, cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, DNA repair, and metabolism. Several studies demonstrated that miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of lung diseases including lung cancer and they negatively regulate gene and protein expression by acting as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. In this review we summarize the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs and their target genes in lung tumorigenesis and evaluate their potential use as therapeutic agents in lung cancer. In particular, we describe methodological approaches such as inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs or replacement of tumor suppressor miRNAs, both in in vitro and in vivo assays. Furthermore we discuss new strategies to achieve in vivo tissue specific delivery, potential off-target effects, and safety of miRNAs systemic delivery.

  16. Circular RNAs in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L S; Hansen, T B; Venø, M T

    2018-01-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA) is a novel member of the noncoding cancer genome with distinct properties and diverse cellular functions, which is being explored at a steadily increasing pace. The list of endogenous circRNAs involved in cancer continues to grow; however, the functional relevance of the vast...... for circRNA cancer research and current caveats, which must be addressed to facilitate the translation of basic circRNA research into clinical use.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 October 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.361....

  17. MicroRNAs and potential targets in osteosarcoma: review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie B. Sampson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children and young adults. Surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy are the standard treatment regimens for this disease. New therapies are being investigated to improve overall survival in patients. Molecular targets that actively modulate cell processes such as cell-cycle control, cell proliferation, metabolism and apoptosis, have been studied, but it remains a challenge to develop novel, effective targeted therapies to treat this heterogeneous and complex disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in regulating cell processes including growth, development and disease. miRNAs function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors to regulate gene and protein expression. Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma with the potential for development in disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs and their target genes and evaluate their potential use as therapeutic agents in osteosarcoma. We also summarize the efficacy of inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs or expression of tumor suppressor miRNAs in preclinical models of osteosarcoma. Recent progress on systemic delivery as well as current applications for miRNAs as therapeutic agents has seen the advancement of miR-34a in clinical trials for adult patients with non-resectable primary liver cancer or metastatic cancer with liver involvement. We suggest a global approach to the understanding of the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma may identify candidate miRNAs as promising biomarkers for this rare disease.

  18. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  19. Functional Screening Identifies miRNAs Influencing Apoptosis and Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Holm, Anja; Rantala, Juha

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in many biological processes and are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. Particular miRNAs function either as tumor suppressors or oncogenes and appear to have diagnostic and prognostic significance. Although numerous miRNAs are dys-regulated in colorectal...... cancer (CRC) only a small fraction has been characterized functionally. Using high-throughput functional screening and miRNA profiling of clinical samples the present study aims at identifying miRNAs important for the control of cellular growth and/or apoptosis in CRC. The high-throughput functional...

  20. Performance, Stability, and Control Investigation at Mach Numbers from 0.4 to 0.9 of a Model of the "Swallow" with Outer Wing Panels Swept 25 degree with and without Power Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runckel, Jack F.; Schmeer, James W.; Cassetti, Marlowe D.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation of the performance, stability, and control characteristics of a variable-sweep arrow-wing model (the "Swallow") with the outer wing panels swept 25 deg has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. The wing was uncambered and untwisted and had RAE 102 airfoil sections with a thickness-to-chord ratio of 0.14 normal to the leading edge. Four outboard engines located above and below the wing provided propulsive thrust, and, by deflecting in the pitch direction and rotating in the lateral plane, also produced control forces. A pair of swept lateral fins and a single vertical fin were mounted on each engine nacelle to provide aerodynamic stability and control. Jets-off data were obtained with flow-through nacelles, stimulating the effects of inlet flow; jet thrust and hot-jet interference effects were obtained with faired-nose nacelles housing hydrogen peroxide gas generators. Six-component force and moment data were obtained through a Mach number range of 0.40 to 0.90 at angles of attack and angles of sideslip from 0 deg to 15 deg. Longitudinal, directional, and lateral control were obtained by deflecting the nacelle-fin combinations as elevators, rudders, and ailerons at several fixed angles for each control.

  1. Challenges and Opportunities of MicroRNAs in Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacoma De Tullio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that control the expression of many target messenger RNAs (mRNAs involved in normal cell functions (differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Consequently their aberrant expression and/or functions are related to pathogenesis of many human diseases including cancers. Haematopoiesis is a highly regulated process controlled by a complex network of molecular mechanisms that simultaneously regulate commitment, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Alterations on this network could affect the normal haematopoiesis, leading to the development of haematological malignancies such as lymphomas. The incidence of lymphomas is rising and a significant proportion of patients are refractory to standard therapies. Accurate diagnosis, prognosis and therapy still require additional markers to be used for diagnostic and prognostic purpose and evaluation of clinical outcome. The dysregulated expression or function of miRNAs in various types of lymphomas has been associated with lymphoma pathogenesis. Indeed, many recent findings suggest that almost all lymphomas seem to have a distinct and specific miRNA profile and some miRNAs are related to therapy resistance or have a distinct kinetics during therapy. MiRNAs are easily detectable in fresh or paraffin-embedded diagnostic tissue and serum where they are highly stable and quantifiable within the diagnostic laboratory at each consultation. Accordingly they could be specific biomarkers for lymphoma diagnosis, as well as useful for evaluating prognosis or disease response to the therapy, especially for evaluation of early relapse detection and for greatly assisting clinical decisions making. Here we summarize the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs in normal and aberrant lymphopoiesis in order to highlight their clinical value as specific diagnosis and prognosis markers of lymphoid malignancies or for prediction of therapy

  2. Circulating microRNAs as Biomarkers for Pediatric Astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Javier Enrique; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel A; Simón-Martínez, Luis A; Ávila-Miranda, Richard; Rodríguez-Florido, Marco A; Ruiz-Esparza Garrido, Ruth

    2017-05-01

    Since MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potent regulators of gene expression, their expression and function alterations are associated with different types of cancer, including pediatric astrocytoma. Since the secretion of miRNAs by tumors into corporal fluids has made it possible to identify biomarkers in cancer, their deter mination in pediatric astrocytoma is vital. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms controlled by miRNAs in these neoplasms, we tested the expression of miRNAs 130a, 145, 335, 1303, and let-7g-3p by qPCR in tumors and blood serum from pediatric patients with astrocytoma. The data was analyzed with the DIANA-miRPath v3.0 platform. The data represented expression changes of all mirRNAs tested in both tumors and blood serum, which strongly suggest their use as circulating biomarkers for astrocytic tumors. The bioinformatic analysis -with DIANA-miRPath v3.0- showed the involvement of these miRNAs in extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction and proteoglycans in cancer, which control many hallmarks of cancer. In fact, the expression of the proteoglycan syndecan 4 (SDC4) and that of its biosynthetic enzymes, Exostosin Glycosyltransferase 1 (EXT1) and Xylosyltransferase 1 (XYLT1), were altered in pediatric astrocytoma. Our results highlight the role of microRNAs in the biology of pediatric astrocytoma and demonstrated for the first time the potential use of some circulating microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers for this type of tumors, particularly miRs 130a, 145, and 335. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abundant and dynamically expressed miRNAs, piRNAs, and other small RNAs in the vertebrate Xenopus tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armisen, Javier; Gilchrist, Michael J; Wilczynska, Anna; Standart, Nancy; Miska, Eric A

    2009-10-01

    Small regulatory RNAs have recently emerged as key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. Here we used high-throughput sequencing to determine small RNA populations in the germline and soma of the African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis. We identified a number of miRNAs that were expressed in the female germline. miRNA expression profiling revealed that miR-202-5p is an oocyte-enriched miRNA. We identified two novel miRNAs that were expressed in the soma. In addition, we sequenced large numbers of Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs) and other endogenous small RNAs, likely representing endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs). Of these, only piRNAs were restricted to the germline, suggesting that endo-siRNAs are an abundant class of small RNAs in the vertebrate soma. In the germline, both endogenous small RNAs and piRNAs mapped to many high copy number loci. Furthermore, endogenous small RNAs mapped to the same specific subsets of repetitive elements in both the soma and the germline, suggesting that these RNAs might act to silence repetitive elements in both compartments. Data presented here suggest a conserved role for miRNAs in the vertebrate germline. Furthermore, this study provides a basis for the functional analysis of small regulatory RNAs in an important vertebrate model system.

  4. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  5. Long non-coding RNAs and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Lorna W

    2012-08-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that DNA is transcribed into RNA, which in turn is translated into proteins. We now know, however, that as much as 50% of the transcriptome has no protein-coding potential, but rather represents an important class of regulatory molecules responsible for the fine-tuning of gene expression. Although the role of small regulatory RNAs [microRNAs and siRNAs (small interfering RNA)] is well defined, another much less characterized category of non-coding transcripts exists, namely lncRNAs (long non-coding RNAs). Pervasively expressed by eukaryotic genomes, lncRNAs can be kilobases long and regulate their targets by influencing the epigenetic control, chromatin status, mRNA processing or translation capacity of their targets. In the present review, I outline the potential mechanisms of action of lncRNAs, the cellular processes that have been associated with them, and also explore some of the emerging evidence for their involvement in common human disease.

  6. Performance, Stability, and Control Investigation at Mach Numbers from 0.60 to 1.05 of a Model of the "Swallow" with Outer Wing Panels Swept 75 degree with and without Power Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, James W.; Cassetti, Marlowe D.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation of the performance, stability, and control characteristics of a variable-sweep arrow-wing model with the outer wing panels swept 75 deg. has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. Four outboard engines located above and below the wing provided propulsive thrust, and, by deflecting in the pitch direction and rotating in the lateral plane, also produced control forces. The engine nacelles incorporated swept lateral and vertical fins for aerodynamic stability and control. Jet-off data were obtained with flow-through nacelles, simulating inlet flow; jet thrust and hot-jet interference effects were obtained with faired-nose nacelles housing hydrogen peroxide gas generators. Six-component force and moment data were obtained at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.05 through a range of angles of attack and angles of side-slip. Control characteristics were obtained by deflecting the nacelle-fin combinations as elevators, rudders, and ailerons at several fixed angles for each control. The results indicate that the basic wing-body configuration becomes neutrally stable or unstable at a lift coefficient of 0.15; addition of nacelles with fins delayed instability to a lift coefficient of 0.30. Addition of nacelles to the wing-body configuration increased minimum drag from 0.0058 to 0.0100 at a Mach number of 0.60 and from 0.0080 to 0.0190 at a Mach number of 1.05 with corresponding reductions in maximum lift-drag ratio of 12 percent and 33 percent, respectively. The nacelle-fin combinations were ineffective as longitudinal controls but were adequate as directional and lateral controls. The model with nacelles and fins was directionally and laterally stable; the stability generally increased with increasing lift. Jet interference effects on stability and control characteristics were small but the adverse effects on drag were greater than would be expected for isolated nacelles.

  7. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing, E-mail: ydqahmu@gmail.com

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  8. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  9. The CMS tracker outer barrel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Final preparations are made to the CMS tracker outer barrel (TOB), ready for insertion in the tracker support tube. The TOB consists of 688 rods containing a total of 5208 silicon detector modules. The silicon tracker will measure the paths of particles produced in the proton-proton collisions at the CMS detector as they travel in the detector's magnetic field.

  10. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Getting Sloshed in Outer Space - Liquid Behavior in Microgravity. N Ananthkrishnan. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 40-45. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Three essential ribonucleases-RNase Y, J1, and III-control the abundance of a majority of Bacillus subtilis mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Durand

    Full Text Available Bacillus subtilis possesses three essential enzymes thought to be involved in mRNA decay to varying degrees, namely RNase Y, RNase J1, and RNase III. Using recently developed high-resolution tiling arrays, we examined the effect of depletion of each of these enzymes on RNA abundance over the whole genome. The data are consistent with a model in which the degradation of a significant number of transcripts is dependent on endonucleolytic cleavage by RNase Y, followed by degradation of the downstream fragment by the 5'-3' exoribonuclease RNase J1. However, many full-size transcripts also accumulate under conditions of RNase J1 insufficiency, compatible with a model whereby RNase J1 degrades transcripts either directly from the 5' end or very close to it. Although the abundance of a large number of transcripts was altered by depletion of RNase III, this appears to result primarily from indirect transcriptional effects. Lastly, RNase depletion led to the stabilization of many low-abundance potential regulatory RNAs, both in intergenic regions and in the antisense orientation to known transcripts.

  12. Role of long non-coding RNAs in gene regulation and oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yan-feng; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Xian-qiang; Song, Li-jie; Liang, Hong-xia; Li, Zhi-qin; Tao, Feng-bao

    2011-08-01

    This article aims to review recent studies on the biological characteristics of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), transcription regulation by lncRNAs, and the results of recent studies on the mechanism of action of lncRNAs in tumor development. The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles listed in PubMed and HighWire that were published from January 2002 to June 2010. The search terms were "long non-coding RNA", "gene regulation", and "tumor". The mechanism of lncRNAs in gene expression regulation, and tumors concerned with lncRNAs and the role of lncRNAs in oncogenesis. lncRNAs play an important role in transcription regulation by controlling chromatin remodeling, transcriptional control, and post-transcriptional controlling. lncRNAs are involved in many kinds of tumors and play key roles as both suppressing and promoting factors. lncRNAs could perfectly regulate the balance of gene expression system and play important roles in oncogenic cellular transformation.

  13. A Transgenic Transcription Factor (TaDREB3) in Barley Affects the Expression of MicroRNAs and Other Small Non-Coding RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Michael; Shi, Bu-Jun; Gustafson, Perry; Langridge, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and other functional non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) are important gene regulators. Comparison of sRNA expression profiles between transgenic barley over-expressing a drought tolerant TF (TaDREB3) and non-transgenic control barley revealed many group-specific sRNAs. In addition, 42% of the shared sRNAs were differentially expressed between the two groups (|log2| >1). Furthermore, TaDREB3-derived sRNAs were only detected in transgenic barley despite the existence of homologous genes in non-transgenic barley. These results demonstrate that the TF strongly affects the expression of sRNAs and siRNAs could in turn affect the TF stability. The TF also affects size distribution and abundance of sRNAs including miRNAs. About half of the sRNAs in each group were derived from chloroplast. A sRNA derived from tRNA-His(GUG) encoded by the chloroplast genome is the most abundant sRNA, accounting for 42.2% of the total sRNAs in transgenic barley and 28.9% in non-transgenic barley. This sRNA, which targets a gene (TC245676) involved in biological processes, was only present in barley leaves but not roots. 124 and 136 miRNAs were detected in transgenic and non-transgenic barley, respectively. miR156 was the most abundant miRNA and up-regulated in transgenic barley, while miR168 was the most abundant miRNA and up-regulated in non-transgenic barley. Eight out of 20 predicted novel miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two groups. All the predicted novel miRNA targets were validated using a degradome library. Our data provide an insight into the effect of TF on the expression of sRNAs in barley. PMID:22870277

  14. Retrotransposons and non-protein coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2009-01-01

    does not merely represent spurious transcription. We review examples of functional RNAs transcribed from retrotransposons, and address the collection of non-protein coding RNAs derived from transposable element sequences, including numerous human microRNAs and the neuronal BC RNAs. Finally, we review...

  15. Validating reference microRNAs for normalizing qRT-PCR data in bovine oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahdipour, Mahdi; van Tol, Helena T A; Stout, Tom A E; Roelen, Bernard A J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene targets. Accurate quantification of miRNA expression using validated internal controls should aid in the understanding of their role in epigenetic modification of genome function. To date,

  16. Hidden layers of human small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Mari; Takahashi, Yukari

    2008-01-01

    small RNA have focused on miRNA and/or siRNA rather than on the exploration of additional classes of RNAs. RESULTS: Here, we explored human small RNAs by unbiased sequencing of RNAs with sizes of 19-40 nt. We provide substantial evidences for the existence of independent classes of small RNAs. Our data...... directions by bidirectional promoters, indicating that the small RNAs are a product of dsRNA formation and their subsequent cleavage. Their partial similarity with ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) suggests unrevealed functions of ribosomal DNA or interstitial rRNA. Further examination revealed six novel mi...

  17. MicroRNAs, Regulatory Networks, and Comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, Francesco; Belling, Kirstine; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Each miRNA targets a specific set of mRNAs. Upon binding the miRNA inhibits mRNA translation or facilitate mRNA degradation. miRNAs are frequently deregulated in several pathologi...... on sequence complementarity and integration of expression data. In the last section of the chapter we discuss new opportunities in the study of miRNA regulatory networks in the context of temporal disease progression and comorbidities....

  18. Panning for Long Noncoding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of high-throughput approaches has revealed widespread transcription of the human genome, leading to a new appreciation of transcription regulation, especially from noncoding regions. Distinct from most coding and small noncoding RNAs, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, are less conserved and lack protein-coding capacity. These intrinsic features of lncRNAs have not only hampered their full annotation in the past several years, but have also generated controversy concerning whether many or most of these lncRNAs are simply the result of transcriptional noise. Here, we assess these intrinsic features that have challenged lncRNA discovery and further summarize recent progress in lncRNA discovery with integrated methodologies, from which new lessons and insights can be derived to achieve better characterization of lncRNA expression regulation. Full annotation of lncRNA repertoires and the implications of such annotation will provide a fundamental basis for comprehensive understanding of pervasive functions of lncRNAs in biological regulation.

  19. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  20. The Roles of Arabidopsis CDF2 in Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Primary MicroRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfei Sun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The precise regulation of microRNA (miRNA transcription and processing is important for eukaryotic development. Plant miRNAs are first transcribed as stem-loop primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs by RNA polymerase II,then cleaved in the nucleus into mature miRNAs by Dicer-like 1 (DCL1. We identified a cycling DOF transcription factor, CDF2, which interacts with DCL1 and regulates the accumulation of a population of miRNAs. CDF2 binds directly to the promoters of some miRNAs and works as a transcription activator or repressor for these miRNA genes. CDF2 binds preferentially to the pri-miRNAs regulated by itself and affects DCL1-mediated processing of these pri-miRNAs. Genetically, CDF2 works in the same pathway as miR156 or miR172 to control flowering. We conclude that CDF2 regulates a group of pri-miRNAs at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels to maintain proper levels of their mature miRNAs to control plant development.

  1. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  2. Describing the structural robustness landscape of bacterial small RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guillermo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential role of RNA molecules as gene expression regulators has led to a new perspective on the intracellular control and genome organization. Because secondary structures are crucial for their regulatory role, we sought to investigate their robustness to mutations and environmental changes. Results Here, we dissected the structural robustness landscape of the small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs encoded in the genome of the bacterium Escherichia coli. We found that bacterial sncRNAs are not significantly robust to both mutational and environmental perturbations when compared against artificial, unbiased sequences. However, we found that, on average, bacterial sncRNAs tend to be significantly plastic, and that mutational and environmental robustness strongly correlate. We further found that, on average, epistasis in bacterial sncRNAs is significantly antagonistic, and positively correlates with plasticity. Moreover, the evolution of robustness is likely dependent upon the environmental stability of the cell, with more fluctuating environments leading to the emergence and fixation of more robust molecules. Mutational robustness also appears to be correlated with structural functionality and complexity. Conclusion Our study provides a deep characterization of the structural robustness landscape of bacterial sncRNAs, suggesting that evolvability could be evolved as a consequence of selection for more plastic molecules. It also supports that environmental fluctuations could promote mutational robustness. As a result, plasticity emerges to link robustness, functionality and evolvability.

  3. Transposable-element associated small RNAs in Bombyx mori genome.

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    Yimei Cai

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are a group of regulatory RNA molecules that control gene expression at transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels among eukaryotes. The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., genome harbors abundant repetitive sequences derived from families of retrotransposons and transposons, which together constitute almost half of the genome space and provide ample resource for biogenesis of the three major small RNA families. We systematically discovered transposable-element (TE-associated small RNAs in B. mori genome based on a deep RNA-sequencing strategy and the effort yielded 182, 788 and 4,990 TE-associated small RNAs in the miRNA, siRNA and piRNA species, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the three small RNA species preferentially associate with different TEs to create sequence and functional diversity, and we also show evidence that a Bombyx non-LTR retrotransposon, bm1645, alone contributes to the generation of TE-associated small RNAs in a very significant way. The fact that bm1645-associated small RNAs partially overlap with each other implies a possibility that this element may be modulated by different mechanisms to generate different products with diverse functions. Taken together, these discoveries expand the small RNA pool in B. mori genome and lead to new knowledge on the diversity and functional significance of TE-associated small RNAs.

  4. Genome-wide analyses of small noncoding RNAs in streptococci

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    Nadja ePatenge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococci represent a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria, which colonize a wide range of hosts among animals and humans. Streptococcal species occur as commensal as well as pathogenic organisms. Many of the pathogenic species can cause severe, invasive infections in their hosts leading to a high morbidity and mortality. The consequence is a tremendous suffering on the part of men and livestock besides the significant financial burden in the agricultural and healthcare sectors. An environmentally stimulated and tightly controlled expression of virulence factor genes is of fundamental importance for streptococcal pathogenicity. Bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs modulate the expression of genes involved in stress response, sugar metabolism, surface composition, and other properties that are related to bacterial virulence. Even though the regulatory character is shared by this class of RNAs, variation on the molecular level results in a high diversity of functional mechanisms. The knowledge about the role of sRNAs in streptococci is still limited, but in recent years, genome-wide screens for sRNAs have been conducted in an increasing number of species. Bioinformatics prediction approaches have been employed as well as expression analyses by classical array techniques or next generation sequencing. This review will give an overview of whole genome screens for sRNAs in streptococci with a focus on describing the different methods and comparing their outcome considering sRNA conservation among species, functional similarities, and relevance for streptococcal infection.

  5. Global characterization of microRNAs in Trichomonas gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min-Jun; Qiu, Shen-Ben; Nisbet, Alasdair J; Fu, Jing-Hua; Shao, Chang-Chun; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2014-03-10

    Trichomonas gallinae is a protozoan parasite causing trichomonosis in many species of domestic poultry and birds world-wide. microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that play key roles in gene regulation. However, no miRNAs have been characterized from T. gallinae. Here, we investigated the global miRNA profile of this parasite by high throughput sequencing technology, bioinformatics platform analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. Three miRNA candidates, with typical precursor stem-loop structures, were identified from 11.13 million raw sequencing reads. Three miRNAs, Tga-miR-1, Tga-miR-2 and Tga-miR-3 had no homologues in publically available miRNA databases, suggesting that they may be T. gallinae-specific. Tga-miR-2 and Tga-miR-3 occupied only one location each on the reference genome, while Tga-miR-1 was found at 3 locations. The results of the present study provided a sound basis for the further understanding of gene regulation in this parasite of animal health significance, with the potential to inform the development of novel control reagents and strategies and also inform a more in-depth understanding of the evolution of miRNAs.

  6. Mobile small RNAs regulate genome-wide DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewsey, Mathew G; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Melnyk, Charles W; Molnar, Attila; Valli, Adrián; Urich, Mark A; Nery, Joseph R; Baulcombe, David C; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-02-09

    RNA silencing at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels regulates endogenous gene expression, controls invading transposable elements (TEs), and protects the cell against viruses. Key components of the mechanism are small RNAs (sRNAs) of 21-24 nt that guide the silencing machinery to their nucleic acid targets in a nucleotide sequence-specific manner. Transcriptional gene silencing is associated with 24-nt sRNAs and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at cytosine residues in three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH). We previously demonstrated that 24-nt sRNAs are mobile from shoot to root in Arabidopsis thaliana and confirmed that they mediate DNA methylation at three sites in recipient cells. In this study, we extend this finding by demonstrating that RdDM of thousands of loci in root tissues is dependent upon mobile sRNAs from the shoot and that mobile sRNA-dependent DNA methylation occurs predominantly in non-CG contexts. Mobile sRNA-dependent non-CG methylation is largely dependent on the DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASES 1/2 (DRM1/DRM2) RdDM pathway but is independent of the CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT)2/3 DNA methyltransferases. Specific superfamilies of TEs, including those typically found in gene-rich euchromatic regions, lose DNA methylation in a mutant lacking 22- to 24-nt sRNAs (dicer-like 2, 3, 4 triple mutant). Transcriptome analyses identified a small number of genes whose expression in roots is associated with mobile sRNAs and connected to DNA methylation directly or indirectly. Finally, we demonstrate that sRNAs from shoots of one accession move across a graft union and target DNA methylation de novo at normally unmethylated sites in the genomes of root cells from a different accession.

  7. Potential role of miRNAs in developmental haemostasis.

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    Raúl Teruel

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are an abundant class of small non-coding RNAs that are negative regulators in a crescent number of physiological and pathological processes. However, their role in haemostasis, a complex physiological process involving multitude of effectors, is just beginning to be characterized. We evaluated the changes of expression of miRNAs in livers of neonates (day one after birth and adult mice by microarray and qRT-PCR trying to identify miRNAs that potentially may also be involved in the control of the dramatic change of hepatic haemostatic protein levels associated with this transition. Twenty one out of 41 miRNAs overexpressed in neonate mice have hepatic haemostatic mRNA as potential targets. Six of them identified by two in silico algorithms potentially bind the 3'UTR regions of F7, F9, F12, FXIIIB, PLG and SERPINC1 mRNA. Interestingly, miR-18a and miR-19b, overexpressed 5.4 and 8.2-fold respectively in neonates, have antithrombin, a key anti-coagulant with strong anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory roles, as a potential target. The levels of these two miRNAs inversely correlated with antithrombin mRNA levels during development (miR-19b: R = 0.81; p = 0.03; miR-18a: R = 0.91; p<0.001. These data suggest that miRNAs could be potential modulators of the haemostatic system involved in developmental haemostasis.

  8. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in white and brown alpaca skin

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    Tian Xue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding 21–25 nt RNA molecules that play an important role in regulating gene expression. Little is known about the expression profiles and functions of miRNAs in skin and their role in pigmentation. Alpacas have more than 22 natural coat colors, more than any other fiber producing species. To better understand the role of miRNAs in control of coat color we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in skin of white versus brown alpacas. Results Two small RNA libraries from white alpaca (WA and brown alpaca (BA skin were sequenced with the aid of Illumina sequencing technology. 272 and 267 conserved miRNAs were obtained from the WA and BA skin libraries, respectively. Of these conserved miRNAs, 35 and 13 were more abundant in WA and BA skin, respectively. The targets of these miRNAs were predicted and grouped based on Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Many predicted target genes for these miRNAs are involved in the melanogenesis pathway controlling pigmentation. In addition to the conserved miRNAs, we also obtained 22 potentially novel miRNAs from the WA and BA skin libraries. Conclusion This study represents the first comprehensive survey of miRNAs expressed in skin of animals of different coat colors by deep sequencing analysis. We discovered a collection of miRNAs that are differentially expressed in WA and BA skin. The results suggest important potential functions of miRNAs in coat color regulation.

  9. Identification and characterization of microRNAs in white and brown alpaca skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding 21–25 nt RNA molecules that play an important role in regulating gene expression. Little is known about the expression profiles and functions of miRNAs in skin and their role in pigmentation. Alpacas have more than 22 natural coat colors, more than any other fiber producing species. To better understand the role of miRNAs in control of coat color we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression profiles in skin of white versus brown alpacas. Results Two small RNA libraries from white alpaca (WA) and brown alpaca (BA) skin were sequenced with the aid of Illumina sequencing technology. 272 and 267 conserved miRNAs were obtained from the WA and BA skin libraries, respectively. Of these conserved miRNAs, 35 and 13 were more abundant in WA and BA skin, respectively. The targets of these miRNAs were predicted and grouped based on Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis. Many predicted target genes for these miRNAs are involved in the melanogenesis pathway controlling pigmentation. In addition to the conserved miRNAs, we also obtained 22 potentially novel miRNAs from the WA and BA skin libraries. Conclusion This study represents the first comprehensive survey of miRNAs expressed in skin of animals of different coat colors by deep sequencing analysis. We discovered a collection of miRNAs that are differentially expressed in WA and BA skin. The results suggest important potential functions of miRNAs in coat color regulation. PMID:23067000

  10. Virus infection triggers widespread silencing of host genes by a distinct class of endogenous siRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mengji; Du, Peng; Wang, Xianbing; Yu, Yun-Qi; Qiu, Yan-Hong; Li, Wanxiang; Gal-On, Amit; Zhou, Changyong; Li, Yi; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2014-10-07

    Antiviral immunity controlled by RNA interference (RNAi) in plants and animals is thought to specifically target only viral RNAs by the virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Here we show that activation of antiviral RNAi in Arabidopsis plants is accompanied by the production of an abundant class of endogenous siRNAs mapped to the exon regions of more than 1,000 host genes and rRNA. These virus-activated siRNAs (vasiRNAs) are predominantly 21 nucleotides long with an approximately equal ratio of sense and antisense strands. Genetically, vasiRNAs are distinct from the known plant endogenous siRNAs characterized to date and instead resemble viral siRNAs by requiring Dicer-like 4 and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 (RDR1) for biogenesis. However, loss of exoribonuclease4/thylene-insensitive5 enhances vasiRNA biogenesis and virus resistance without altering the biogenesis of viral siRNAs. We show that vasiRNAs are active in directing widespread silencing of the target host genes and that Argonaute-2 binds to and is essential for the silencing activity of vasiRNAs. Production of vasiRNAs is readily detectable in Arabidopsis after infection by viruses from two distinct supergroups of plant RNA virus families and is targeted for inhibition by the silencing suppressor protein 2b of Cucumber mosaic virus. These findings reveal RDR1 production of Arabidopsis endogenous siRNAs and identify production of vasiRNAs to direct widespread silencing of host genes as a conserved response of plants to infection by diverse viruses. A possible function for vasiRNAs to confer broad-spectrum antiviral activity distinct to the virus-specific antiviral RNAi by viral siRNAs is discussed.

  11. Differentially expressed small RNAs in Arabidopsis galls formed by Meloidogyne javanica: a functional role for miR390 and its TAS3-derived tasiRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Javier; Barcala, Marta; García, Alejandra; Rio-Machín, Ana; Medina, Clémence; Jaubert-Possamai, Stephanie; Favery, Bruno; Maizel, Alexis; Ruiz-Ferrer, Virginia; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) induce inside the vascular cylinder the giant cells (GCs) embedded in the galls. The distinctive gene repression in early-developing GCs could be facilitated by small RNAs (sRNA) such as miRNAs, and/or epigenetic mechanisms mediated by 24nt-sRNAs, rasiRNAs and 21-22nt-sRNAs. Therefore, the sRNA-population together with the role of the miR390/TAS3/ARFs module were studied during early gall/GC formation. Three sRNA libraries from 3-d-post-inoculation (dpi) galls induced by Meloidogyne javanica in Arabidopsis and three from uninfected root segments were sequenced following Illumina-Solexa technology. pMIR390a::GUS and pTAS3::GUS lines were assayed for nematode-dependent promoter activation. A sensor line indicative of TAS3-derived tasiRNAs binding to the ARF3 sequence (pARF3:ARF3-GUS) together with a tasiRNA-resistant ARF3 line (pARF3:ARF3m-GUS) were used for functional analysis. The sRNA population showed significant differences between galls and controls, with high validation rate and correspondence with their target expression: 21-nt sRNAs corresponding mainly to miRNAs were downregulated, whilst 24-nt-sRNAs from the rasiRNA family were mostly upregulated in galls. The promoters of MIR390a and TAS3, active in galls, and the pARF3:ARF3-GUS line, indicated a role of TAS3-derived-tasiRNAs in galls. The regulatory module miR390/TAS3 is necessary for proper gall formation possibly through auxin-responsive factors, and the abundance of 24-nt sRNAs (mostly rasiRNAs) constitutes a gall hallmark. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Small non-coding RNAs in plant-pathogenic Xanthomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendroth, Ulrike; Schmidtke, Cornelius; Bonas, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    The genus Xanthomonas comprises a large group of plant-pathogenic bacteria. The infection and bacterial multiplication in the plant tissue depends on the type III secretion system and other virulence determinants. Recent studies revealed that bacterial virulence is also controlled at the post-transcriptional level by small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). In this review, we highlight our current knowledge about sRNAs and RNA-binding proteins in Xanthomonas species.

  13. Identification of CUG-BP1/EDEN-BP target mRNAs in Xenopus tropicalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Graindorge, Antoine; Le Tonquèze, Olivier; Thuret, Raphaël; Pollet, Nicolas; Osborne, Howard Beverley; Audic, Yann

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The early development of many animals relies on the posttranscriptional regulations of maternally stored mRNAs. In particular, the translation of maternal mRNAs is tightly controlled during oocyte maturation and early mitotic cycles in Xenopus. The Embryonic Deadenylation ElemeNt (EDEN) and its associated protein EDEN-BP are known to trigger deadenylation and translational silencing to several mRNAs bearing an EDEN. This Xenopus RNA-binding protein is an ortholog of th...

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...

  15. Long Noncoding RNAs as Novel Biomarkers Have a Promising Future in Cancer Diagnostics

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    Ting Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers have a high mortality rate due to lack of suitable specific early diagnosis tumor biomarkers. Emerging evidence is accumulating that lncRNAs (long noncoding RNAs are involved in tumorigenesis, tumor cells proliferation, invasion, migration, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Furthermore, extracellular lncRNAs can circulate in body fluids; they can be detected and strongly resist RNases. Many researchers have found that lncRNAs could be good candidates for tumor biomarkers and possessed high specificity, high sensitivity, and noninvasive characteristics. In this review, we summarize the detection methods and possible sources of circulating lncRNAs and outline the biological functions and expression level of the most significant lncRNAs in tissues, cell lines, and body fluids (whole blood, plasma, urine, gastric juice, and saliva of different kinds of tumors. We evaluate the diagnostic performance of lncRNAs as tumor biomarkers. However, the biological functions and the mechanisms of circulating lncRNAs secretion have not been fully understood. The uniform normalization protocol of sample collection, lncRNAs extraction, endogenous control selection, quality assessment, and quantitative data analysis has not been established. Therefore, we put forward some recommendations that might be investigated in the future if we want to adopt lncRNAs in clinical practice.

  16. Differential Expression of MicroRNAs in Leprosy Skin Lesions

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    Cleverson T. Soares

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy, a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, is a major public health problem in poor and developing countries of the Americas, Africa, and Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, which are small non-coding RNAs (18–24 nucleotides, play an important role in regulating cell and tissue homeostasis through translational downregulation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs. Deregulation of miRNA expression is important for the pathogenesis of various neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases and has been the focus of many publications; however, studies on the expression of miRNAs in leprosy are rare. Herein, an extensive evaluation of differentially expressed miRNAs was performed on leprosy skin lesions using microarrays. Leprosy patients, classified according to Ridley and Jopling’s classification or reactional states (R1 and R2, and healthy controls (HCs were included. Punch biopsies were collected from the borders of leprosy lesions (10 tuberculoid, 10 borderline tuberculoid, 10 borderline borderline, 10 borderline lepromatous, 4 lepromatous, 14 R1, and 9 R2 and from 9 HCs. miRNA expression profiles were obtained using the Agilent Microarray platform with miRBase, which consists of 1,368 Homo sapiens (hsa-miRNA candidates. TaqMan quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs. Sixty-four differentially expressed miRNAs, including 50 upregulated and 14 downregulated (fold change ≥2.0, p-value ≤ 0.05 were identified after comparing samples from patients to those of controls. Twenty differentially expressed miRNAs were identified exclusively in the reactional samples (14 type 1 and 6 type 2. Eight miRNAs were validated by RT-PCR, including seven upregulated (hsa-miR-142-3p, hsa-miR-142-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-342-3p, hsa-miR-361-3p, hsa-miR-3653, and hsa-miR-484 and one downregulated (hsa-miR-1290. These miRNAs were differentially expressed in leprosy and

  17. Identification and characterization of small RNAs in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

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    Ning Xu

    Full Text Available The term RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi describes a set of mechanisms that regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Small interfering RNAs (siRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs are two major types of RNAi-associated small RNAs (smRNAs found in most eukaryotic organisms. Despite the presence of a plethora of non-coding RNAs longer than 50-nucleotide (nt in length in various species of Archaea, little is known about smRNAs in archaea that resemble the 20-24-nt long smRNAs found in eukaryotes, which have been implicated in the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. Here, we report the finding of a large number of smRNAs approximatelly 20-nt in length, including phased smRNAs and potential miRNAs, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus p2 (Ssp2 based on deep sequencing. The expression of some of the miRNA candidates in Ssp2 was confirmed. Consistent with the Ssp2 hyperthermophilic properties, we found that higher temperatures more efficiently induced the production of the miRNA candidates in an in vitro system using the putative foldback precursor transcripts incubated with Ssp2 extract. Although we initially predicted putative target genes of some miRNA candidates, further analysis mapped the cleavage sites downstream of the miRNA candidate complementary regions, similar to those involved in plant miRNA-mediated TAS transcript cleavage. We also identified smRNAs from clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat (CRISPR loci, which play important roles in prokaryotic microbial defense systems. Archaea represent a unique life form next to Bacteria and Eukarya, and our results may provide a useful resource for further in-depth study on the regulation and evolution of smRNAs in this special organism.

  18. MicroRNAs as regulators in plant metal toxicity response

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    Ana Belen Mendoza-Soto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal toxicity is a major stress affecting crop production. This includes metals that are essential for plants (copper, iron, zinc, manganese, and non-essential metals (cadmium, aluminum, cobalt, mercury. A primary common effect of high concentrations of metals such as aluminum, cooper, cadmium or mercury, is root growth inhibition. Metal toxicity triggers the accumulation of reactive oxygen species leading to damage of lipids, proteins and DNA. The plants response to metal toxicity involves several biological processes that require fine and precise regulation at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are 21 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. A miRNA, incorporated into a RNA induced silencing complex, promotes cleavage of its target mRNA that is recognized by an almost perfect base complementarity. In plants miRNA regulation has been involved in development and also in biotic and abiotic stress responses. We review novel advances in identifying miRNAs related to metal toxicity responses and their potential role according to their targets. Most of the targets for plant metal-responsive miRNAs are transcription factors. Information about metal-responsive miRNAs in different plants points to important regulatory roles of miR319, miR390, miR393 and miR398. The target of miR319 is the TCP transcription factor, implicated in growth control. MiR390 exerts its action through the biogenesis of trans-acting small interference RNAs that, in turn, regulate auxin responsive factors. MiR393 targets the auxin receptors TIR1/AFBs and a bHLH transcription factor. Increasing evidence points to the crucial role of miR398 and its targets Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases in the control of the oxidative stress generated after high metal copper or iron exposure.

  19. The CDF Central Outer Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, K.T.; CDF Collaboration

    1997-01-01

    We describe the CDF Central Outer Tracker (COT), an open-cell drift chamber currently being constructed for the CDF detector to run at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron collider. This detector will provide central tracking with excellent momentum resolution in the high- density environment of a hadron collider. It will be able to resolve 132 ns beam crossings and provide tracking trigger information to the Level 1 trigger. The design is based upon the existing and successful CDF Central Tracking Chamber. The preliminary mechanical and electrical designs are presented. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Functional studies of microRNAs in neural stem cells: problems and perspectives.

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    Malin eÅkerblom

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In adult mammals, neural stem cells (NSCs are found in two niches of the brain; the subventricular zone at the lateral ventricle and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. Neurogenesis is a complex process that is tightly controlled on a molecular level. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated to play a central role in the regulation of NCSs. miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. However, functional studies of miRNAs are complicated due to current technical limitations. In this review we describe recent findings about miRNAs in NSCs looking closely at miR-124, miR-9 and let-7. We also highlight technical strategies used to investigate miRNA function, accentuating limitations and potentials.

  1. Genetic and epigenetic alterations of microRNAs and implications for human cancers and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Musaffe; Machado, Andreia S; Calin, George A

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a well-studied group of noncoding RNAs that control gene expression by interacting mainly with messenger RNA. It is known that miRNAs and their biogenesis regulatory machineries have crucial roles in multiple cell processes; thus, alterations in these genes often lead to disease, such as cancer. Disruption of these genes can occur through epigenetic and genetic alterations, resulting in aberrant expression of miRNAs and subsequently of their target genes. This review focuses on the disruption of miRNAs and their key regulatory machineries by genetic alterations, with emphasis on mutations and epigenetic changes in cancer and other diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. MicroRNAs: not ‘fine-tuners’ but key regulators of neuronal development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory eDavis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are a class of short non-coding RNAs that operate as prominent post-transcriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. miRNAs are abundantly expressed in the brain of most animals and exert diverse roles. The anatomical and functional complexity of brain requires the precise coordination of multi-layered gene regulatory networks. The flexibility, speed and reversibility of miRNA function provide precise temporal and spatial gene regulatory capabilities that are crucial for the correct functioning of the brain. Studies have shown that the underlying molecular mechanisms controlled by miRNAs in the nervous systems of invertebrate and vertebrate models are remarkably conserved in humans. We endeavour to provide insight into the roles of miRNAs in the nervous systems of these model organisms and discuss how such information may be used to inform regarding diseases of the human brain.

  3. Long Non-Coding RNAs Embedded in the Rb and p53 Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F.; Lal, Ashish, E-mail: ashish.lal@nih.gov [Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    In recent years, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have gained significant attention as a novel class of gene regulators. Although a small number of lncRNAs have been shown to regulate gene expression through diverse mechanisms including transcriptional regulation, mRNA splicing and translation, the physiological function and mechanism of action of the vast majority are not known. Profiling studies in cell lines and tumor samples have suggested a potential role of lncRNAs in cancer. Indeed, distinct lncRNAs have been shown to be embedded in the p53 and Rb networks, two of the major tumor suppressor pathways that control cell cycle progression and survival. Given the fact that inactivation of Rb and p53 is a hallmark of human cancer, in this review we discuss recent evidence on the function of lncRNAs in the Rb and p53 signaling pathways.

  4. The Role of MicroRNAs in Natural Tissue Development and Application in Regenerative Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Dillschneider, Philipp; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Many cellular functions rely on the coordinated expression and repression of a large number of messenger RNAs; these are tightly controlled in part by microRNAs (miRNAs) at the posttranscriptional level. The number of characterised miRNAs that are involved in tissue development and repair...... is steadily increasing, and our understanding of their functions is starting to merge. Modulating miRNA levels through externally applied stimuli enables us to control the translation of numerous mRNAs giving us unprecedented control over cellular events; therefore, we predict that such techniques...... will revolutionise regenerative medicine. This chapter will introduce miRNA biology and their role in controlling pluripotency, stem cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, survival, inflammation and angiogenesis. There are several strategies by which miRNA-modulating technologies can be used...

  5. miRNAs in melanoma: a defined role in tumor progression and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannavola, Francesco; Tucci, Marco; Felici, Claudia; Stucci, Stefania; Silvestris, Franco

    2016-01-01

    The crosstalk of melanoma cells with components of the microenvironment promotes malignant cell proliferation and spread to distant tissues. Although the major pathogenetic events have already been elucidated, the mechanisms that drive the metastatic behavior of tumor cells are still undefined. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that control post-transcriptional gene expression through interconnected kinases upstream of functional genes involved in tumor progression. Here, we review the biological relevance of melanoma-related miRNAs and focus on their potential role in propagating signals that may cause tumor microenvironment rearrangements, as well as disablement of the immune system and melanoma cell proliferation.

  6. The potential of microRNAs as biofluid markers of neurodegenerative diseases – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danborg, Pia B; Simonsen, Anja H; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are biological molecules transcribed from non-protein coding regions of the genome, participating in regulating cellular processes. MiRNAs in biofluids may possess neurodegenerative disease biomarker potential for screening tests, differential diagnosis and disease progression...... monitoring. This systematic review clarifies biomarker potential of miRNAs detected in biofluids of neurodegenerative disease patients. Thirty-three and ten miRNAs displayed significant expression between patients with multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, compared to healthy controls...

  7. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in normal and psoriatic human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jing; Joyce, Cailin E; Bowcock, Anne M; Zhang, Weixiong

    2013-02-15

    Noncanonical microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) are key gene regulators in eukaryotes. Noncanonical miRNAs, which bypass part of the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway, can originate from a variety of genomic loci, which include small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and introns, whereas endo-siRNAs can arise from repetitive elements, some of which are transposable. The roles of noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in complex diseases have yet to be characterized. To investigate their potential expression and function in psoriasis, we carried out a comprehensive, genome-wide search for noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in small RNA deep-sequencing data sets from normal and psoriatic human skin. By analyzing more than 670 million qualified reads from 67 small RNA libraries, we identified 21 novel, noncanonical miRNAs (3 snoRNA-derived and 2 tRNA-derived miRNAs and 16 miRtrons) and 39 novel endo-siRNAs that were expressed in skin. The expression of four novel small RNAs was validated by qRT-PCR in human skin, and their Argonaute association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of ectopic small RNAs in HEK293 cells. Fifteen noncanonical miRNAs or endo-siRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in psoriatic-involved versus normal skin, including an Alu-short interspersed element-derived siRNA which was 17-fold up-regulated in psoriatic-involved skin. These and other differentially expressed small noncoding RNAs may function as regulators of gene expression in skin and potentially play a role in psoriasis pathogenesis.

  8. Abundant primary piRNAs, endo-siRNAs, and microRNAs in a Drosophila ovary cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lau, N.C.; Robine, N.; Martin, R.; Chung, W.J.; Niki, Y.; Berezikov, E.; Lai, E.C

    2009-01-01

    Piwi proteins, a subclass of Argonaute-family proteins, carry approximately 24-30-nt Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that mediate gonadal defense against transposable elements (TEs). We analyzed the Drosophila ovary somatic sheet (OSS) cell line and found that it expresses miRNAs, endogenous small

  9. Screening and evaluating of long noncoding RNAs in the puberty of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoxiao; Ye, Jing; Yang, Chen; Zhang, Kaifa; Li, Xiumei; Luo, Lei; Ding, Jianping; Li, Yunsheng; Cao, Hongguo; Ling, Yinghui; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Ya; Fang, Fugui; Zhang, Yunhai

    2017-02-14

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in regulating animal development, however, their function in the onset of puberty in goats remain largely unexplored. To identify the genes controlling the regulation of puberty in goats, we measured lncRNA and mRNA expression levels from the hypothalamus. We applied RNA sequencing analysis to examine the hypothalamus of pubertal (case; n = 3) and prepubertal (control; n = 3) goats. Our results showed 2943 predicted lncRNAs, including 2012 differentially expressed lncRNAs, which corresponded to 5412 target genes. We also investigated the role of lncRNAs that act cis and trans to the target genes and found a number of lncRNAs involved in the regulation of puberty and reproduction, as well as several pathways related to these processes. For example, oxytocin signaling pathway, sterol biosynthetic process, and pheromone receptor activity signaling pathway were enriched as Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) or gene ontology (GO) analyses showed. Our results clearly demonstrate that lncRNAs play an important role in regulating puberty in goats. However, further research is needed to explore the functions of lncRNAs and their predicted targets to provide a detailed expression profile of lncRNAs on goat puberty.

  10. In silico identification and characterization of microRNAs and their putative target genes in Solanaceae plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Doil; Hur, Cheol-Goo

    2011-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, single-stranded, noncoding RNAs ranging from 19 to 25 nucleotides. The miRNA control various cellular functions by negatively regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. The miRNA regulation over their target genes has a central role in regulating plant growth and development; however, only a few reports have been published on the function of miRNAs in the family Solanaceae. We identified Solanaceae miRNAs and their target genes by analyzing expressed sequence tag (EST) data from five different Solanaceae species. A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of EST data of Solanaceae species revealed the presence of at least 11 miRNAs and 54 target genes in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), 22 miRNAs and 221 target genes in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), 12 miRNAs and 417 target genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), 46 miRNAs and 60 target genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), and 7 miRNAs and 28 target genes in Nicotiana benthamiana. The identified Solanaceae miRNAs and their target genes were deposited in the SolmiRNA database, which is freely available for academic research only at http://genepool.kribb.re.kr/SolmiRNA. Our data indicate that the Solanaceae family has both conserved and specific miRNAs and that their target genes may play important roles in growth and development of Solanaceae plants.

  11. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-06-04

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis.

  12. Microarray-based approach identifies microRNAs and their target functional patterns in polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehn Susanne NE

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play key roles in mammalian gene expression and several cellular processes, including differentiation, development, apoptosis and cancer pathomechanisms. Recently the biological importance of primary cilia has been recognized in a number of human genetic diseases. Numerous disorders are related to cilia dysfunction, including polycystic kidney disease (PKD. Although involvement of certain genes and transcriptional networks in PKD development has been shown, not much is known how they are regulated molecularly. Results Given the emerging role of miRNAs in gene expression, we explored the possibilities of miRNA-based regulations in PKD. Here, we analyzed the simultaneous expression changes of miRNAs and mRNAs by microarrays. 935 genes, classified into 24 functional categories, were differentially regulated between PKD and control animals. In parallel, 30 miRNAs were differentially regulated in PKD rats: our results suggest that several miRNAs might be involved in regulating genetic switches in PKD. Furthermore, we describe some newly detected miRNAs, miR-31 and miR-217, in the kidney which have not been reported previously. We determine functionally related gene sets, or pathways to reveal the functional correlation between differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs. Conclusion We find that the functional patterns of predicted miRNA targets and differentially expressed mRNAs are similar. Our results suggest an important role of miRNAs in specific pathways underlying PKD.

  13. Serum MicroRNAs as Diagnostic Biomarkers for Macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hua; Wen, Yang; Hu, Lingmin; Miao, Tingting; Zhang, Ming; Dong, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Macrosomia is defined as an infant's birth weight of more than 4000 g. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, the associations between serum miRNAs and macrosomia have been rarely reported. We used the Taqman Low Density Array followed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assays to screen for miRNAs associated with macrosomia using serum samples collected 1 week before delivery. Profiling results showed that 1 miRNA was significantly upregulated and 10 miRNAs were significantly downregulated in serum samples of macrosomia (ΔΔCt > 3-fold). The expression levels of miR-21 were significantly decreased in macrosomia as compared to the controls in the third trimester. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses showed that the area under the ROC curve for miR-21 was 67.7% (sensitivity = 66.7% and specificity = 70.0%). miR-21 in maternal serum is differentially expressed between macrosomia and controls, and miR-21 could be used as a candidate biomarker to predict macrosomia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. The defective RNAs of Closteroviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Joseph, Moshe; Mawassi, Munir

    2013-01-01

    The family Closteroviridae consists of two genera, Closterovirus and Ampelovirus with monopartite genomes transmitted respectively by aphids and mealybugs and the Crinivirus with bipartite genomes transmitted by whiteflies. The Closteroviridae consists of more than 30 virus species, which differ considerably in their phytopathological significance. Some, like beet yellows virus and citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were associated for many decades with their respective hosts, sugar beets and citrus. Others, like the grapevine leafroll-associated ampeloviruses 1, and 3 were also associated with their grapevine hosts for long periods; however, difficulties in virus isolation hampered their molecular characterization. The majority of the recently identified Closteroviridae were probably associated with their vegetative propagated host plants for long periods and only detected through the considerable advances in dsRNA isolation and sequencing of PCR amplified replicons. Molecular characterization of CTV and several other Closteroviridae revealed that, in addition to genomic and subgenomic RNAs, infected plants contain several different subviral defective RNAs (dRNAs). The roles and biological functions of dRNAs associated with Closteroviridae remain terra incognita. PMID:23734149

  15. The defective RNAs of Closteroviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir eMawassi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The family Closteroviridae consists of two genera, Closterovirus and Ampelovirus with monopartite genomes transmitted respectively by aphids and mealybugs and the Crinivirus with bipartite genomes transmitted by whiteflies. The Closteroviridae consists of more than thirty virus species, which differ considerably in their phytopathological significance. Some, like Beet yellows virus (BYV and Citrus tristeza virus (CTV were associated for many decades with their respective hosts, sugar beets and citrus. Others, like the grapevine leafroll-associated ampeloviruses 1, and 3 were also associated with their grapevine hosts for long periods; however difficulties in virus isolation hampered their molecular characterization. The majority of the recently identified Closteroviridae were probably associated with their vegetative propagated host plants for long periods and only detected through the considerable advances in dsRNA isolation and sequencing of PCR amplified replicons. Molecular characterization of CTV and several other Closteroviridae revealed that, in addition to genomic and subgenomic RNAs, infected plants contain several different subviral defective RNAs (dRNAs. The roles and biological functions of dRNAs associated with Closteroviridae remain terra incognita.

  16. Endogenous siRNAs and noncoding RNA-derived small RNAs are expressed in adult mouse hippocampus and are up-regulated in olfactory discrimination training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Lugli, Giovanni; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Cook, Edwin H; Larson, John

    2011-01-01

    We previously proposed that endogenous siRNAs may regulate synaptic plasticity and long-term gene expression in the mammalian brain. Here, a hippocampal-dependent task was employed in which adult mice were trained to execute a nose-poke in a port containing one of two simultaneously present odors in order to obtain a reward. Mice demonstrating olfactory discrimination training were compared to pseudo-training and nose-poke control groups; size-selected hippocampal RNA was subjected to Illumina deep sequencing. Sequences that aligned uniquely and exactly to the genome without uncertain nucleotide assignments, within exons or introns of MGI annotated genes, were examined further. The data confirm that small RNAs having features of endogenous siRNAs are expressed in brain; that many of them derive from genes that regulate synaptic plasticity (and have been implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases); and that hairpin-derived endo-siRNAs and the 20- to 23-nt size class of small RNAs show a significant increase during an early stage of training. The most abundant putative siRNAs arose from an intronic inverted repeat within the SynGAP1 locus; this inverted repeat was a substrate for dicer in vitro, and SynGAP1 siRNA was specifically associated with Argonaute proteins in vivo. Unexpectedly, a dramatic increase with training (more than 100-fold) was observed for a class of 25- to 30-nt small RNAs derived from specific sites within snoRNAs and abundant noncoding RNAs (Y1 RNA, RNA component of mitochondrial RNAse P, 28S rRNA, and 18S rRNA). Further studies are warranted to characterize the role(s) played by endogenous siRNAs and noncoding RNA-derived small RNAs in learning and memory.

  17. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals: The story so far | Wahid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are small RNA molecules of between 24 to 31 nucleotides (nts) sequence and interact with Piwi subfamily proteins. These piRNAs play important regulatory roles in germline stem cell maintenance, epigenetic regulation, and transposition. Although the biogenesis pathways of piRNAs are not ...

  18. Aberrant expression of long noncoding RNAs in autistic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M

    2013-03-01

    The autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have a significant hereditary component, but the implicated genetic loci are heterogeneous and complex. Consequently, there is a gap in understanding how diverse genomic aberrations all result in one clinical ASD phenotype. Gene expression studies from autism brain tissue have demonstrated that aberrantly expressed protein-coding genes may converge onto common molecular pathways, potentially reconciling the strong heritability and shared clinical phenotypes with the genomic heterogeneity of the disorder. However, the regulation of gene expression is extremely complex and governed by many mechanisms, including noncoding RNAs. Yet no study in ASD brain tissue has assessed for changes in regulatory long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which represent a large proportion of the human transcriptome, and actively modulate mRNA expression. To assess if aberrant expression of lncRNAs may play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of ASD, we profiled over 33,000 annotated lncRNAs and 30,000 mRNA transcripts from postmortem brain tissue of autistic and control prefrontal cortex and cerebellum by microarray. We detected over 200 differentially expressed lncRNAs in ASD, which were enriched for genomic regions containing genes related to neurodevelopment and psychiatric disease. Additionally, comparison of differences in expression of mRNAs between prefrontal cortex and cerebellum within individual donors showed ASD brains had more transcriptional homogeneity. Moreover, this was also true of the lncRNA transcriptome. Our results suggest that further investigation of lncRNA expression in autistic brain may further elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of this disorder.

  19. Implications of MicroRNAs in Oncolytic Virotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bofill-De Ros

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are an abundant class of small non-coding RNA molecules (~22 nt that can repress gene expression. Deregulation of certain miRNAs is widely recognized as a robust biomarker for many neoplasms, as well as an important player in tumorigenesis and the establishment of tumoral microenvironments. The downregulation of specific miRNAs in tumors has been exploited as a mechanism to provide selectivity to oncolytic viruses or gene-based therapies. miRNA response elements recognizing miRNAs expressed in specific tissues, but downregulated in tumors, have been inserted into the 3′UTR of viral genes to promote the degradation of these viral mRNAs in healthy tissue, but not in tumor cells. Consequently, oncolytic virotherapy-associated toxicities were diminished, while therapeutic activity in tumor cells was preserved. However, viral infections themselves can modulate the miRNome of the host cell, and such miRNA changes under infection impact the normal viral lifecycle. Thus, there is a miRNA-mediated interplay between virus and host cell, affecting both viral and cellular activities. Moreover, the outcome of such interactions may be cell type or condition specific, suggesting that the impact on normal and tumoral cells may differ. Here, we provide an insight into the latest developments in miRNA-based viral engineering for cancer therapy, following the most recent discoveries in miRNA biology. Furthermore, we report on the relevance of miRNAs in virus–host cell interaction, and how such knowledge can be exploited to improve the control of viral activity in tumor cells.

  20. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paydar Ima

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are small (~22 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate cell movement, specification, and development. Expression of miRNAs is highly regulated, both spatially and temporally. Based on direct cloning, sequence conservation, and predicted secondary structures, a large number of miRNAs have been identified in higher eukaryotic genomes but whether these RNAs are simply a subset of a much larger number of noncoding RNA families is unknown. This is especially true in zebrafish where genome sequencing and annotation is not yet complete. Results We analyzed the zebrafish genome to identify the number and location of proven and predicted miRNAs resulting in the identification of 35 new miRNAs. We then grouped all 415 zebrafish miRNAs into families based on seed sequence identity as a means to identify possible functional redundancy. Based on genomic location and expression analysis, we also identified those miRNAs that are likely to be encoded as part of polycistronic transcripts. Lastly, as a resource, we compiled existing zebrafish miRNA expression data and, where possible, listed all experimentally proven mRNA targets. Conclusion Current analysis indicates the zebrafish genome encodes 415 miRNAs which can be grouped into 44 families. The largest of these families (the miR-430 family contains 72 members largely clustered in two main locations along chromosome 4. Thus far, most zebrafish miRNAs exhibit tissue specific patterns of expression.

  1. Population genomic analysis of gibberellin-responsive long non-coding RNAs in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiaxing; Song, Yuepeng; Du, Qingzhang; Yang, Xiaohui; Ci, Dong; Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-04-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in a wide range of biological processes, but lncRNAs in plants remain largely unknown; in particular, we lack a systematic identification of plant lncRNAs involved in hormone responses. Moreover, allelic variation in lncRNAs remains poorly characterized at a large scale. Here, we conducted high-throughput RNA-sequencing of leaves from control and gibberellin (GA)-treated Populus tomentosa and identified 7655 reliably expressed lncRNAs. Among the 7655 lncRNAs, the levels of 410 lncRNAs changed in response to GA. Seven GA-responsive lncRNAs were predicted to be putative targets of 18 miRNAs, and one GA-responsive lncRNA (TCONS_00264314) was predicted to be a target mimic of ptc-miR6459b. Computational analysis predicted 939 potential cis-regulated target genes and 965 potential trans-regulated target genes for GA-responsive lncRNAs. Functional annotation of these potential target genes showed that they participate in many different biological processes, including auxin signal transduction and synthesis of cellulose and pectin, indicating that GA-responsive lncRNAs may influence growth and wood properties. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 112 SNPs from 52 GA-responsive lncRNAs and 1014 SNPs from 296 potential target genes were significantly associated with growth and wood properties. Epistasis analysis also provided evidence for interactions between lncRNAs and their potential target genes. Our study provides a comprehensive view of P. tomentosa lncRNAs and offers insights into the potential functions and regulatory interactions of GA-responsive lncRNAs, thus forming the foundation for future functional analysis of GA-responsive lncRNAs in P. tomentosa. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Signature of circulating microRNAs in patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Schmitter, Daniela; Vegter, Eline L.; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Valente, Mattia A. E.; Liu, Licette C. Y.; van der Harst, Pim; Pinto, Yigal M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Meyer, Sven; Teerlink, John R.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Metra, Marco; Davison, Beth A.; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Cotter, Gadi; Cleland, John G.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Laribi, Said; Givertz, Michael M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; van der Meer, Peter; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Berezikov, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with acute heart failure (AHF). Plasma miRNA profiling included 137 patients with AHF from 3 different cohorts, 20 with chronic heart failure (CHF), 8 with acute exacerbation of COPD, and 41 healthy controls. Levels of circulating

  3. Signature of circulating microRNAs in patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Schmitter, Daniela; Vegter, Eline L.; ter Maaten, Jozine M.; Valente, Mattia A. E.; Liu, Licette C. Y.; van der Harst, Pim; Pinto, Yigal M.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Meyer, Sven; Teerlink, John R.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Metra, Marco; Davison, Beth A.; Bloomfield, Daniel M.; Cotter, Gadi; Cleland, John G.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Laribi, Said; Givertz, Michael M.; Ponikowski, Piotr; van der Meer, Peter; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Berezikov, Eugene

    AimsOur aim was to identify circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with acute heart failure (AHF). Methods and resultsPlasma miRNA profiling included 137 patients with AHF from 3 different cohorts, 20 with chronic heart failure (CHF), 8 with acute exacerbation of COPD, and 41 healthy controls.

  4. Novel Strategy to Control Transgene Expression Mediated by a Sendai Virus-Based Vector Using a Nonstructural C Protein and Endogenous MicroRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Sano

    Full Text Available Tissue-specific control of gene expression is an invaluable tool for studying various biological processes and medical applications. Efficient regulatory systems have been utilized to control transgene expression in various types of DNA viral or integrating viral vectors. However, existing regulatory systems are difficult to transfer into negative-strand RNA virus vector platforms because of significant differences in their transcriptional machineries. In this study, we developed a novel strategy for regulating transgene expression mediated by a cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp. Because of the capacity of Sendai virus (SeV nonstructural C proteins to specifically inhibit viral RNA synthesis, overexpression of C protein significantly reduced transgene expression mediated by SeVdp vectors. We found that SeV C overexpression concomitantly reduced SeVdp mRNA levels and genomic RNA synthesis. To control C expression, target sequences for an endogenous microRNA were incorporated into the 3' untranslated region of the C genes. Incorporation of target sequences for miR-21 into the SeVdp vector restored transgene expression in HeLa cells by decreasing C expression. Furthermore, the SeVdp vector containing target sequences for let-7a enabled cell-specific control of transgene expression in human fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells. Our findings demonstrate that SeV C can be used as an effective regulator for controlling transgene expression. This strategy will contribute to efficient and less toxic SeVdp-mediated gene transfer in various biological applications.

  5. Post-transcriptional control of the Escherichia coli PhoQ-PhoP two-component system by multiple sRNAs involves a novel pairing region of GcvB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Coornaert

    Full Text Available PhoQ/PhoP is a central two-component system involved in magnesium homeostasis, pathogenicity, cell envelope composition, and acid resistance in several bacterial species. The small RNA GcvB is identified here as a novel direct regulator of the synthesis of PhoQ/PhoP in Escherichia coli, and this control relies on a novel pairing region of GcvB. After MicA, this is the second Hfq-dependent small RNA that represses expression of the phoPQ operon. Both MicA and GcvB bind phoPQ mRNA in vivo and in vitro around the translation initiation region of phoP. Binding of either small RNA is sufficient to inhibit ribosome binding and induce mRNA degradation. Surprisingly, however, MicA and GcvB have different effects on the levels of the PhoP protein and therefore on the expression of the PhoP regulon. These results highlight the complex connections between small RNAs and transcriptional regulation networks in bacteria.

  6. Primate-specific Long Non-coding RNAs and MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassaan Mehboob Awan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are critical regulators of gene expression in essentially all life forms. Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs are two important RNA classes possessing regulatory functions. Up to date, many primate-specific ncRNAs have been identified and investigated. Their expression specificity to primate lineage suggests primate-specific roles. It is thus critical to elucidate the biological significance of primate or even human-specific ncRNAs, and to develop potential ncRNA-based therapeutics. Here, we have summarized the studies regarding regulatory roles of some key primate-specific lncRNAs and miRNAs.

  7. Transfection of small RNAs globally perturbs gene regulation by endogenous microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Aly A; Betel, Doron; Miller, Martin L

    2009-01-01

    among the transfected small RNAs and the endogenous pool of miRNAs for the intracellular machinery that processes small RNAs. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed genome-wide transcript responses from 151 published transfection experiments in seven different human cell types. We show that targets......Transfection of small RNAs (such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs)) into cells typically lowers expression of many genes. Unexpectedly, increased expression of genes also occurs. We investigated whether this upregulation results from a saturation effect--that is, competition...... of endogenous miRNAs are expressed at significantly higher levels after transfection, consistent with impaired effectiveness of endogenous miRNA repression. This effect exhibited concentration and temporal dependence. Notably, the profile of endogenous miRNAs can be largely inferred by correlating miRNA sites...

  8. 76 FR 52006 - Information Collection Activity: Leasing of Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf, Extension of a Collection... Leasing of Minerals Other than Oil, Gas and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf (OMB No. 1010- 0082... Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur in the Outer Continental Shelf. OMB Control Number: 1010-0082. Abstract...

  9. KINETIC ASSESSMENT OF GOLF SHOE OUTER SOLE DESIGN FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary J. Dyson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed human kinetics in relation to golf shoe outer sole design features during the golf swing using a driver club by measuring both within the shoe, and beneath the shoe at the natural grass interface. Three different shoes were assessed: metal 7- spike shoe, alternative 7-spike shoe, and a flat soled shoe. In-shoe plantar pressure data were recorded using Footscan RS International pressure insoles and sampling at 500 Hz. Simultaneously ground reaction force at the shoe outer sole was measured using 2 natural grass covered Kistler force platforms and 1000 Hz data acquisition. Video recording of the 18 right-handed golfers at 200 Hz was undertaken while the golfer performed 5 golf shots with his own driver in each type of shoe. Front foot (nearest to shot direction maximum vertical force and torque were greater than at the back foot, and there was no significant difference related to the shoe type. Wearing the metal spike shoe when using a driver was associated with more torque generation at the back foot (p < 0. 05 than when the flat soled shoe was worn. Within shoe regional pressures differed significantly with golf shoe outer sole design features (p < 0.05. Comparison of the metal spike and alternative spike shoe results provided indications of the quality of regional traction on the outer sole. Potential golf shoe outer sole design features and traction were presented in relation to phases of the golf swing movement. Application of two kinetic measurement methods identified that moderated (adapted muscular control of foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole design features. Ground reaction force measures inform comparisons of overall shoe functional performance, and insole pressure measurements inform comparisons of the underfoot conditions induced by specific regions of the golf shoe outer sole

  10. Aft outer rim seal arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J; Campbell, Christian X

    2015-04-28

    An outer rim seal arrangement (10), including: an annular rim (70) centered about a longitudinal axis (30) of a rotor disc (31), extending fore and having a fore-end (72), an outward-facing surface (74), and an inward-facing surface (76); a lower angel wing (62) extending aft from a base of a turbine blade (22) and having an aft end (64) disposed radially inward of the rim inward-facing surface to define a lower angel wing seal gap (80); an upper angel wing (66) extending aft from the turbine blade base and having an aft end (68) disposed radially outward of the rim outward-facing surface to define a upper angel wing seal gap (80, 82); and guide vanes (100) disposed on the rim inward-facing surface in the lower angel wing seal gap. Pumping fins (102) may be disposed on the upper angel wing seal aft end in the upper angel wing seal gap.

  11. Shaping the Genome with Non-Coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue Q D; Crutchley, Jennifer L; Dostie, Josée

    2011-08-01

    The human genome must be tightly packaged in order to fit inside the nucleus of a cell. Genome organization is functional rather than random, which allows for the proper execution of gene expression programs and other biological processes. Recently, three-dimensional chromatin organization has emerged as an important transcriptional control mechanism. For example, enhancers were shown to regulate target genes by physically interacting with them regardless of their linear distance and even if located on different chromosomes. These chromatin contacts can be measured with the "chromosome conformation capture" (3C) technology and other 3C-related techniques. Given the recent innovation of 3C-derived approaches, it is not surprising that we still know very little about the structure of our genome at high-resolution. Even less well understood is whether there exist distinct types of chromatin contacts and importantly, what regulates them. A new form of regulation involving the expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) was recently identified. lncRNAs are a very abundant class of non-coding RNAs that are often expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although their different subcellular localizations point to their involvement in numerous cellular processes, it is clear that lncRNAs play an important role in regulating gene expression. How they control transcription however is mostly unknown. In this review, we provide an overview of known lncRNA transcription regulation activities. We also discuss potential mechanisms by which ncRNAs might exert three-dimensional transcriptional control and what recent studies have revealed about their role in shaping our genome.

  12. microRNAs: Implications for air pollution research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardim, Melanie J., E-mail: melaniejardim@gmail.com [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the current understanding on the role of microRNAs in mediating genetic responses to air pollutants and to contemplate on how these responses ultimately control susceptibility to ambient air pollution. Morbidity and mortality attributable to air pollution continues to be a growing public health concern worldwide. Despite several studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain elusive. In the last several years, special attention has been given to the role of epigenetics in mediating, not only genetic and physiological responses to certain environmental insults, but also in regulating underlying susceptibility to environmental stressors. Epigenetic mechanisms control the expression of gene products, both basally and as a response to a perturbation, without affecting the sequence of DNA itself. These mechanisms include structural regulation of the chromatin structure, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, and post-transcriptional gene regulation, such as microRNA mediated repression of gene expression. microRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that have been quickly established as key regulators of gene expression. As such, miRNAs have been found to control several cellular processes including apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation. More recently, research has emerged suggesting that changes in the expression of some miRNAs may be critical for mediating biological, and ultimately physiological, responses to air pollutants. Although the study of microRNAs, and epigenetics as a whole, has come quite far in the field of cancer, the understanding of how these mechanisms regulate gene-environment interactions to environmental exposures in everyday life is unclear. This article does not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the US EPA.

  13. Chemistry of the outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-05-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  14. Identification of miRNAs and their target genes in developing soybean seeds by deep sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shou-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression by mediating gene silencing at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in higher plants. miRNAs and related target genes have been widely studied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice; however, the number of identified miRNAs in soybean (Glycine max is limited, and global identification of the related miRNA targets has not been reported in previous research. Results In our study, a small RNA library and a degradome library were constructed from developing soybean seeds for deep sequencing. We identified 26 new miRNAs in soybean by bioinformatic analysis and further confirmed their expression by stem-loop RT-PCR. The miRNA star sequences of 38 known miRNAs and 8 new miRNAs were also discovered, providing additional evidence for the existence of miRNAs. Through degradome sequencing, 145 and 25 genes were identified as targets of annotated miRNAs and new miRNAs, respectively. GO analysis indicated that many of the identified miRNA targets may function in soybean seed development. Additionally, a soybean homolog of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SLIENCING 3 (AtSGS3 was detected as a target of the newly identified miRNA Soy_25, suggesting the presence of feedback control of miRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We have identified large numbers of miRNAs and their related target genes through deep sequencing of a small RNA library and a degradome library. Our study provides more information about the regulatory network of miRNAs in soybean and advances our understanding of miRNA functions during seed development.

  15. LncRNAs expression in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats reveals the potential role of LncRNAs contributing to rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Qin, Xiu-Juan; Li, Wei-Ping; Ma, Rong; Wang, Ting; Li, Zhu-Qing

    2016-11-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) are an important class of widespread molecules involved in diverse biological functions, which are exceptionally expressed in numerous types of diseases. Currently, limited study on LncRNA in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is available. In this study, we aimed to identify the specifically expressed LncRNA that are relevant to adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats, and to explore the possible molecular mechanisms of RA pathogenesis. To identify LncRNAs specifically expressed in rheumatoid arthritis, the expression of LncRNAs in synoviums of rats from the model group (n=3) was compared with that in the control group (n=3) using Arraystar Rat LncRNA/mRNA microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Up to 260 LncRNAs were found to be differentially expressed (≥1.5-fold-change) in the synoviums between AA model and the normal rats (170 up-regulated and 90 down-regulated LncRNAs in AA rats compared with normal rats). Coding-non-coding gene co-expression networks (CNC network) were drawn based on the correlation analysis between the differentially expressed LncRNAs and mRNAs. Six LncRNAs, XR_008357, U75927, MRAK046251, XR_006457, DQ266363 and MRAK003448, were selected to analyze the relationship between LncRNAs and RA via the CNC network and GO analysis. Real-time PCR result confirmed that the six LncRNAs were specifically expressed in the AA rats. These results revealed that clusters of LncRNAs were uniquely expressed in AA rats compared with controls, which manifests that these differentially expressed LncRNAs in AA rats might play a vital role in RA development. Up-regulation or down-regulation of the six LncRNAs might contribute to the molecular mechanism underlying RA. To sum up, our study provides potential targets for treatment of RA and novel profound understanding of the pathogenesis of RA. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Identification and developmental profiling of microRNAs in diamondback moth, Plutellaxylostella (L..

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    Pei Liang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a group of small RNAs involved in various biological processes through negative regulation of mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Although miRNA profiles have been documented in over two dozen insect species, few are agricultural pests. In this study, both conserved and novel miRNAs in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L., a devastating insect pest of cruciferous crops worldwide, were documented. High-throughput sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from a mixed life stages of P. xylostella, including eggs, 1st to 4th (last instar larvae, pupae and adults, identified 384 miRNAs, of which 174 were P. xylostella specific. In addition, temporal expressions of 234 miRNAs at various developmental stages were investigated using a customized microarray analysis. Among the 91 differentially expressed miRNAs, qRT-PCR analysis was used to validate highly expressed miRNAs at each stage. The combined results not only systematically document miRNA profiles in an agriculturally important insect pest, but also provide molecular targets for future functional analysis and, ultimately, genetic-based pest control practice.

  17. microRNAs in nociceptive circuits as predictors of future clinical applications

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    Michaela eKress

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-immune alterations in the peripheral and central nervous system play a role in the pathophysiology of chronic pain, and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs – and microRNAs (miRNAs in particular - regulate both immune and neuronal processes. Specifically, miRNAs control macromolecular complexes in neurons, glia and immune cells and regulate signals used for neuro-immune communication in the pain pathway. Therefore, miRNAs may be hypothesised as critically important master switches modulating chronic pain. In particular, understanding the concerted function of miRNA in the regulation of nociception and endogenous analgesia and defining the importance of miRNAs in the circuitries and cognitive, emotional and behavioural components involved in pain is expected to shed new light on the enigmatic pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, migraine and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS. Specific miRNAs may evolve as new druggable molecular targets for pain prevention and relief. Furthermore, predisposing miRNA expression patterns and inter-individual variations and polymorphisms in miRNAs and/or their binding sites may serve as biomarkers for pain and help to predict individual risks for certain types of pain and responsiveness to analgesic drugs. miRNA-based diagnostics are expected to develop into hands-on tools that allow better patient stratification, improved mechanism-based treatment, and targeted prevention strategies for high risk individuals.

  18. Gene function analysis by artificial microRNAs in Physcomitrella patens.

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~21 nt long small RNAs transcribed from endogenous MIR genes which form precursor RNAs with a characteristic hairpin structure. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNA. Artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) can be generated by exchanging the miRNA/miRNA sequence of endogenous MIR precursor genes, while maintaining the general pattern of matches and mismatches in the foldback. Thus, for functional gene analysis amiRNAs can be designed to target any gene of interest. During the last decade the moss Physcomitrella patens emerged as a model plant for functional gene analysis based on its unique ability to integrate DNA into the nuclear genome by homologous recombination which allows for the generation of targeted gene knockout mutants. In addition to this, we developed a protocol to express amiRNAs in P. patens that has particular advantages over the generation of knockout mutants and might be used to speed up reverse genetics approaches in this model species.

  19. The ACE2/Apelin Signaling, MicroRNAs, and Hypertension

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    Lai-Jiang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS plays a pivotal role in the development of hypertension. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2, which primarily metabolises angiotensin (Ang II to generate the beneficial heptapeptide Ang-(1-7, serves as a negative regulator of the RAAS. Apelin is a second catalytic substrate for ACE2 and functions as an inotropic and cardiovascular protective peptide. The physiological effects of Apelin are exerted through binding to its receptor APJ, a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor that shares significant homology with the Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R. The deregulation of microRNAs, a class of short and small noncoding RNAs, has been shown to involve cardiovascular remodeling and pathogenesis of hypertension via the activation of the Ang II/AT1R pathway. MicroRNAs are linked with modulation of the ACE2/Apelin signaling, which exhibits beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system and hypertension. The ACE2-coupled crosstalk among the RAAS, the Apelin system, and microRNAs provides an important mechanistic insight into hypertension. This paper focuses on what is known about the ACE2/Apelin signaling and its biological roles, paying particular attention to interactions and crosstalk among the ACE2/Apelin signaling, microRNAs, and hypertension, aiming to facilitate the exploitation of new therapeutic medicine to control hypertension.

  20. MicroRNAs in sensorineural diseases of the ear

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    Kathy eUshakov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding microRNAs have a fundamental role in gene regulation and expression in almost every multicellular organism. Only discovered in the last decade, microRNAs are already known to play a leading role in many aspects of disease. In the vertebrate inner ear, microRNAs are essential for controlling development and survival of hair cells. Moreover, dysregulation of microRNAs has been implicated in sensorineural hearing impairment, as well as in other ear diseases such as cholesteatomas, vestibular schwannomas and otitis media. Due to the inaccessibility of the ear in humans, animal models have provided the optimal tools to study microRNA expression and function, in particular mice and zebrafish. A major focus of current research has been to discover the targets of the microRNAs expressed in the inner ear, in order to determine the regulatory pathways of the auditory and vestibular systems. The potential for microRNA manipulation in development of therapeutic tools for hearing impairment is as yet unexplored, paving the way for future work in the field.

  1. The Tumor Cytosol miRNAs, Fluid miRNAs and Exosome miRNAs in Lung Cancer

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    Xin eQin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is to provide an update on the progress of microRNAs (miRNAs as potential biomarkers for lung cancer. miRNAs are single-stranded, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression and show tissue-specific signatures. Accumulating evidence indicates that miRNA expression patterns represent the in vivo status in physiology and disease. Moreover, miRNAs are stable in serum and other clinically convenient and available tissue sources, so they are being developed as biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. Cancer is currently the primary driver of the field, but miRNA biomarkers are being developed for many other diseases such as cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. Here we examine the framework and scope of the miRNA landscape as it specifically relates to the translation of miRNA expression patterns/signatures into biomarkers for developing diagnostics for lung cancer. We focus on examining tumor cytosol miRNAs, fluid miRNAs, and exosome miRNAs in lung cancer, the connections among these miRNAs, and the potential of miRNA biomarkers for the development of diagnostics. In lung cancer, miRNAs have been studied in both cell populations and in the circulation. However, a major challenge is to develop biomarkers to monitor cancer development and to identify circulating miRNAs that are linked to cancer stage. Importantly, the fact that miRNAs can be successfully harvested from biological fluids allows for the development of biofluid biopsies, in which miRNAs as circulating biomarkers can be captured and analyzed ex vivo. Our hope is that these minimally invasive entities provide a window to the in vivo milieu of the patients without the need for costly, complex invasive procedures, rapidly moving miRNAs from research to the clinic.

  2. siRNAs targeted to Smad4 prevent renal fibrosis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshizawa, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Minami; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-09-19

    Renal fibrosis is the final common pathway leading to decreased renal function. No therapy has been established to prevent it. In order to establish a therapeutic approach and target molecule for renal fibrosis, we investigated the effects of Smad4 knockdown by siRNAs on renal fibrosis in vivo. Renal fibrosis mice were produced by single intraperitoneal injection of folic acid. siRNAs targeted to Smad4 (Smad4-siRNAs) (5 nmol) were injected into each mouse by systemic tail vein injection three times per week. Non-targeted siRNAs (control-siRNAs) were injected in the same way for a control group. The siRNAs were delivered to the interstitial fibrous area and tubules. Smad4-siRNAs significantly knocked down Smad4 expression and inhibited renal fibrosis. They also inhibited α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts. Control-siRNAs did not show these effects. The results of this study suggest that Smad4 knockdown is one of the crucial therapeutic options for the prevention of renal fibrosis in vivo.

  3. Recombinant expression of Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein in E. Coli outer membrane as a substrate for vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhiyun; Boddicker, Melissa A; Kaufhold, Robin M; Khandelwal, Puneet; Durr, Eberhard; Qiu, Ping; Lucas, Bob J; Nahas, Debbie D; Cook, James C; Touch, Sinoeun; Skinner, Julie M; Espeseth, Amy S; Przysiecki, Craig T; Zhang, Lan

    2016-07-27

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a human pathogen which causes a number of pathologies, including genital tract infections in women that can result in tubal infertility. Prevention of infection and disease control might be achieved through vaccination; however, a safe, efficacious and cost-effective vaccine against C. trachomatis infection remains an unmet medical need. C. trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP), a β-barrel integral outer membrane protein, is the most abundant antigen in the outer membrane of the bacterium and has been evaluated as a subunit vaccine candidate. Recombinant MOMP (rMOMP) expressed in E. coli cytoplasm forms inclusion bodies and rMOMP extracted from inclusion bodies results in a reduced level of protection compared to the native MOMP in a mouse challenge model. We sought to target the recombinant expression of MOMP to the E. coli outer membrane (OM). Successful surface expression was achieved with codon harmonization, utilization of low copy number vectors and promoters with moderate strength, suitable leader sequences and optimization of cell culture conditions. rMOMP was extracted from E. coli outer membrane, purified, and characterized biophysically. The OM expressed and purified rMOMP is immunogenic in mice and elicits antibodies that react to the native antigen, Chlamydia elementary body (EB). C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli outer membrane. The OM expressed and purified rMOMP elicits antibodies that react to the native antigen, Chlamydia EB, in a mouse immunogenicity model. Surface expression of MOMP could provide useful reagents for vaccine research, and the methodology could serve as a platform to produce other outer membrane proteins recombinantly.

  4. MicroRNAs and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes Mellitus

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    Yue Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the major macrovascular complication of diabetes mellitus. Recently, although CVD morbidity and mortality have decreased as a result of comprehensive control of CVD risk factors, CVD remains the leading cause of death of patients with diabetes in many countries, indicating the potential underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. MicroRNAs are a class of noncoding, single-stranded RNA molecules that are involved in β-cell function, insulin secretion, insulin resistance, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue and which play an important role in glucose homeostasis and the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Here, we review recent progress in research on microRNAs in endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction, macrophage and platelet activation, lipid metabolism abnormality, and cardiomyocyte repolarization in diabetes mellitus. We also review the progress of microRNAs as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets of CVD in patients with diabetes.

  5. microRNAs in parasites and parasite infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong; Cai, Xuepeng; Bradley, Janette E

    2013-03-01

    miRNAs, a subclass of small regulatory RNAs, are present from ancient unicellular protozoans to parasitic helminths and parasitic arthropods. The miRNA-silencing mechanism appears, however, to be absent in a number of protozoan parasites. Protozoan miRNAs and components of their silencing machinery possess features different from other eukaryotes, providing some clues on the evolution of the RNA-induced silencing machinery. miRNA functions possibly associate with neoblast biology, development, physiology, infection and immunity of parasites. Parasite infection can alter host miRNA expression that can favor both parasite clearance and infection. miRNA pathways are, thus, a potential target for the therapeutic control of parasitic diseases.

  6. A conserved small RNA promotes silencing of the outer membrane protein YbfM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Aamann; Johansen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jesper S

    2009-01-01

    , designated MicM (also known as RybC/SroB). The regulation is strictly dependent on the RNA chaperone Hfq, and mutational analysis indicates that MicM sequesters the ribosome binding site of ybfM mRNA by an antisense mechanism. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hfq strongly enhances the on-rate of duplex......In the past few years an increasing number of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) in enterobacteria have been found to negatively regulate the expression of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) at the post-transcriptional level. These RNAs act under various growth and stress conditions, suggesting that one...... important physiological role of regulatory RNA molecules in Gram-negative bacteria is to modulate the cell surface and/or to prevent accumulation of OMPs in the envelope. Here, we extend the OMP-sRNA network by showing that the expression of the outer membrane protein YbfM is silenced by a conserved sRNA...

  7. Micro RNAs: an arguable appraisal in medicine

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    Voglova K.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro RNAs (miRNAs represent a newly discovered class of regulatory molecules in the human body. miRNA is a short double stranded RNA sequence interfering with mRNA, causing in most cases, inhibition of translation. Synthesis of miRNAs shows an increasing developmental pattern and postnatally miRNAs are synthesized in all cells possessing transcriptional machinery. miRNAs usually target several mRNAs and therefore conclusive evidences proving their functions are not always ease to be acquired. In spite of this difficulty, functions of miRNAs were firmly established in the development, the cardiovascular and neural diseases, and cancer. Many miRNAs have been reported to be associated with physiological state of cells and/or tissues. This finding becomes fundamental, especially when consider that these miRNAs can be released from cell into intracellular space or circulation. Correlation between miRNA production in tissues and its contribution to multisource miRNA pool in the circulation is in a focus of biomarker-oriented researchers. Recently, circulating miRNAs have been suggested to be applicable as biomarkers in several types of cancer, cardiovascular injury, and diabetes. Role of miRNAs in the organism intercellular signaling is still under the broad investigation. Several miRNA mimics, intended for treatment of disease, are being currently tested in the clinical trials.

  8. Association of RNAs with Bacillus subtilis Hfq.

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    Michael Dambach

    Full Text Available The prevalence and characteristics of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs have not been well characterized for Bacillus subtilis, an important model system for Gram-positive bacteria. However, B. subtilis was recently found to synthesize many candidate sRNAs during stationary phase. In the current study, we performed deep sequencing on Hfq-associated RNAs and found that a small subset of sRNAs associates with Hfq, an enigmatic RNA-binding protein that stabilizes sRNAs in Gram-negatives, but whose role is largely unknown in Gram-positive bacteria. We also found that Hfq associated with antisense RNAs, antitoxin transcripts, and many mRNA leaders. Several new candidate sRNAs and mRNA leader regions were also discovered by this analysis. Additionally, mRNA fragments overlapping with start or stop codons associated with Hfq, while, in contrast, relatively few full-length mRNAs were recovered. Deletion of hfq reduced the intracellular abundance of several representative sRNAs, suggesting that B. subtilis Hfq-sRNA interactions may be functionally significant in vivo. In general, we anticipate this catalog of Hfq-associated RNAs to serve as a resource in the functional characterization of Hfq in B. subtilis.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana outer ovule integument morphogenesis: Ectopic expression of KNAT1 reveals a compensation mechanism

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    Truernit Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis outer ovule integument is a simple two-cell layered structure that grows around the developing embryo and develops into the outer layer of the seed coat. As one of the functions of the seed coat is the protection of the plant embryo, the outer ovule integument is an example for a plant organ whose morphogenesis has to be precisely regulated. Results To better characterise outer ovule integument morphogenesis, we have isolated some marker lines that show GFP expression in this organ. We have used those lines to identify distinct cell types in the outer integument and to demonstrate similarities between leaves and the outer integument. Using confocal microscopy, we showed that cell sizes and shapes differ between the two cell layers of the outer integument. Expression of KNAT1 in the integuments leads to extra cell divisions specifically in the outer layer of the outer integument. This is being compensated for by a decrease of cell volume in this layer, thus showing that mechanisms exist to control proper ovule integument morphogenesis. Conclusion The Arabidopsis outer ovule integument can be used as a good model system to study the basic principles of plant organ morphogenesis. This work provides new insights into its development and opens new possibilities for the identification of factors involved in the regulation of cell division and elongation during plant organ growth.

  10. Genome‐wide identification of novel small RNAs in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) function in post‐transcriptional control of gene expression and control a variety of processes including metabolic reactions, stress responses and pathogenesis in response to environmental signals. A variety of approaches have been used previously to identify...... 44 sRNAs in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, RNA sequencing (RNA‐seq) is used to identify novel transcripts in P. aeruginosa involving a combination of three different sequencing libraries. Almost all known sRNAs and over 500 novel intergenic sRNAs are identified...... with this approach. Although the use of three libraries increased the number of novel transcripts identified, there were significant differences in the subset of transcripts detected in each library, underscoring the importance of library preparation strategy and relative sRNA abundance for successful sRNA detection...

  11. Analysis of novel NEFL mRNA targeting microRNAs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Muhammad Ishtiaq

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal disease characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration and neurofilament aggregate formation. Spinal motor neurons in ALS also show a selective suppression in the levels of low molecular weight neurofilament (NEFL mRNA. We have been interested in investigating the role of microRNAs (miRNAs in NEFL transcript stability. MiRNAs are small, 20-25 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional gene regulators by targeting the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR of mRNA resulting in mRNA decay or translational silencing. In this study, we characterized putative novel miRNAs from a small RNA library derived from control and sporadic ALS (sALS spinal cords. We detected 80 putative novel miRNAs, 24 of which have miRNA response elements (MREs within the NEFL mRNA 3'UTR. From this group, we determined by real-time PCR that 10 miRNAs were differentially expressed in sALS compared to controls. Functional analysis by reporter gene assay and relative quantitative RT-PCR showed that two novel miRNAs, miR-b1336 and miR-b2403, were downregulated in ALS spinal cord and that both stabilize NEFL mRNA. We confirmed the direct effect of these latter miRNAs using anit-miR-b1336 and anti-miR-b2403. These results demonstrate that the expression of two miRNAs (miRNAs miR-b1336 and miR-b2403 whose effect is to stabilize NEFL mRNA are down regulated in ALS, the net effect of which is predicted to contribute directly to the loss of NEFL steady state mRNA which is pathognomic of spinal motor neurons in ALS.

  12. Genome-wide identification of microRNAs responsive to Ectropis oblique feeding in tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaraj, Anburaj; Liu, Shengrui; Zhang, Xiao; Zhang, Ran; Shangguan, Mingzhu; Wei, Chaoling

    2017-10-19

    The tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) is vulnerable to the geometrid Ectropis oblique; although microRNAs (miRNAs) are important for plant growth, development and stress response, the function of miRNAs in the response of C. sinensis to stress from E. oblique is unclear. To identify E. oblique stress-responsive miRNAs and their target genes in tea plant, three small RNA libraries were constructed from leaves subjected to mechanical wounding (MW), geometrid attack (GA) and from healthy control (CK) leaves. Using high-throughput sequencing, 130 known miRNAs and 512 novel miRNAs were identified; of these, differential expression under GA stress was observed for 36 known and 139 novel miRNAs. Furthermore, 169 GA-responsive and 173 MW-responsive miRNAs were detected by miRNA microarray. The expression patterns of six GA-responsive miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Several target genes for these miRNAs encode various transcription factors, including ethylene-responsive transcription factors and squamosa promoter-binding-like proteins, which suggests that these miRNAs may regulate stress-responsive transcriptional processes in tea plant. The present findings provide novel insights into miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to GA stress, and also offer valuable information for development of pest resistance using RNA interference-based strategies in tea plants.

  13. Identification of MicroRNAs and target genes involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma with microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dadong; Tan, Jingwang; Xu, Yong; Tan, Xianglong; Han, Mingming; Tu, Yuliang; Zhu, Ziman; Zen, Jianping; Dou, Chunqing; Cai, Shouwang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to identify the differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples and controls and provide new diagnostic potential miRNAs for HCC. The miRNAs expression profile data GSE20077 included 7 HCC samples, 1 HeLa sample and 3 controls. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) were identified by t-test and wilcox test. The miRNA with significantly differential expression was chosen for further analysis. Target genes for this miRNA were selected using TargetScan and miRbase database. STRING software was applied to construct the target genes interaction network and topology analysis was carried out to identify the hub gene in the network. And we identified the mechanism for affecting miRNA function. A total of 54 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, in which there were 13 miRNAs published to be related to HCC. The differentially expressed hsa-miR-106b was chosen for further analysis and PTPRT (Receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase T) was its potential target gene. The target genes interaction network was constructed among 33 genes, in which PTPRT was the hub gene. We got the conclusion that the differentially expressed hsa-miR-106b may play an important role in the development of HCC by regulating the expression of its potential target gene PT-PRT.

  14. MicroRNAs as Important Players in Host–Adenovirus Interactions

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    Diogo Piedade

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are powerful regulators of gene expression and fine-tuning genes in all tissues. Cellular miRNAs can control 100s of biologic processes (e.g., morphogenesis of embryonic structures, differentiation of tissue-specific cells, and metabolic control in specific cell types and have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways. Inherently to their involvement in different physiologic processes, miRNAs deregulation has been associated with several diseases. Moreover, several viruses have been described as either, avoid and block cellular miRNAs or synthesize their own miRNA to facilitate infection and pathogenesis. Adenoviruses genome encodes two non-coding RNAs, known as viral-associated (VA RNAI and VA RNAII, which seem to play an important role either by blocking important proteins from miRNA pathway, such as Exportin-5 and Dicer, or by targeting relevant cellular factors. Drastic changes in cellular miRNA expression profile are also noticeable and several cellular functions are affected by these changes. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and molecular interactions of miRNAs providing basic concepts of their functions as well as in the interplay between miRNAs and human adenoviruses.

  15. Circulating mRNAs and miRNAs as candidate markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marilesia Ferreira de; Kuasne, Hellen; Barros-Filho, Mateus de Camargo; Cilião, Heloísa Lizotti; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Fuganti, Paulo Emilio; Paschoal, Alexandre Rossi; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Cólus, Ilce Mara de Syllos

    2017-01-01

    Circulating nucleic acids are found in free form in body fluids and may serve as minimally invasive tools for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Only a few studies have investigated the potential application of circulating mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) in prostate cancer (PCa). The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database was used for an in silico analysis to identify circulating mRNA and miRNA as potential markers of PCa. A total of 2,267 genes and 49 miRNAs were differentially expressed between normal and tumor samples. The prediction analyses of target genes and integrative analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression revealed eleven genes and eight miRNAs which were validated by RT-qPCR in plasma samples from 102 untreated PCa patients and 50 cancer-free individuals. Two genes, OR51E2 and SIM2, and two miRNAs, miR-200c and miR-200b, showed significant association with PCa. Expression levels of these transcripts distinguished PCa patients from controls (67% sensitivity and 75% specificity). PCa patients and controls with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 4.0 ng/mL were discriminated based on OR51E2 and SIM2 expression levels. The miR-200c expression showed association with Gleason score and miR-200b, with bone metastasis, bilateral tumor, and PSA > 10.0 ng/mL. The combination of circulating mRNA and miRNA was useful for the diagnosis and prognosis of PCa.

  16. Do microRNAs induced by Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) possess anti-viral activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Microribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are small (18-22 nucleotides) endogenous RNAs that potently regulate the deadenylation, translation, and decay of a wide spectrum of target mRNAs. Their discovery adds a new layer to the mechanisms of control of gene expression, impacting a broad range of biologica...

  17. Identification and functional analysis of flowering related microRNAs in common wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff..

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    Zongxiang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs is a class of non-coding RNAs involved in post- transcriptional control of gene expression, via degradation and/or translational inhibition. Six-hundred sixty-one rice miRNAs are known that are important in plant development. However, flowering-related miRNAs have not been characterized in Oryza rufipogon Griff. It was approved by supervision department of Guangdong wild rice protection. We analyzed flowering-related miRNAs in O. rufipogon using high-throughput sequencing (deep sequencing to understand the changes that occurred during rice domestication, and to elucidate their functions in flowering. RESULTS: Three O. rufipogon sRNA libraries, two vegetative stage (CWR-V1 and CWR-V2 and one flowering stage (CWR-F2 were sequenced using Illumina deep sequencing. A total of 20,156,098, 21,531,511 and 20,995,942 high quality sRNA reads were obtained from CWR-V1, CWR-V2 and CWR-F2, respectively, of which 3,448,185, 4,265,048 and 2,833,527 reads matched known miRNAs. We identified 512 known rice miRNAs in 214 miRNA families and predicted 290 new miRNAs. Targeted functional annotation, GO and KEGG pathway analyses predicted that 187 miRNAs regulate expression of flowering-related genes. Differential expression analysis of flowering-related miRNAs showed that: expression of 95 miRNAs varied significantly between the libraries, 66 are flowering-related miRNAs, such as oru-miR97, oru-miR117, oru-miR135, oru-miR137, et al. 17 are early-flowering -related miRNAs, including osa-miR160f, osa-miR164d, osa-miR167d, osa-miR169a, osa-miR172b, oru-miR4, et al., induced during the floral transition. Real-time PCR revealed the same expression patterns as deep sequencing. miRNAs targets were confirmed for cleavage by 5'-RACE in vivo, and were negatively regulated by miRNAs. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first investigation of flowering miRNAs in wild rice. The result indicates that variation in miRNAs occurred during rice domestication and

  18. Annotation of mammalian primary microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Anton J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in development, differentiation and pathogenesis. Hundreds of miRNAs have been discovered in mammalian genomes. Approximately 50% of mammalian miRNAs are expressed from introns of protein-coding genes; the primary transcript (pri-miRNA is therefore assumed to be the host transcript. However, very little is known about the structure of pri-miRNAs expressed from intergenic regions. Here we annotate transcript boundaries of miRNAs in human, mouse and rat genomes using various transcription features. The 5' end of the pri-miRNA is predicted from transcription start sites, CpG islands and 5' CAGE tags mapped in the upstream flanking region surrounding the precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA. The 3' end of the pri-miRNA is predicted based on the mapping of polyA signals, and supported by cDNA/EST and ditags data. The predicted pri-miRNAs are also analyzed for promoter and insulator-associated regulatory regions. Results We define sets of conserved and non-conserved human, mouse and rat pre-miRNAs using bidirectional BLAST and synteny analysis. Transcription features in their flanking regions are used to demarcate the 5' and 3' boundaries of the pri-miRNAs. The lengths and boundaries of primary transcripts are highly conserved between orthologous miRNAs. A significant fraction of pri-miRNAs have lengths between 1 and 10 kb, with very few introns. We annotate a total of 59 pri-miRNA structures, which include 82 pre-miRNAs. 36 pri-miRNAs are conserved in all 3 species. In total, 18 of the confidently annotated transcripts express more than one pre-miRNA. The upstream regions of 54% of the predicted pri-miRNAs are found to be associated with promoter and insulator regulatory sequences. Conclusion Little is known about the primary transcripts of intergenic miRNAs. Using comparative data, we are able to identify the boundaries of a significant proportion of

  19. MicroRNAs in renal fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Chi-Kong Chung

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous short noncoding RNAs that regulate most of important cellular processes by inhibiting gene expression through the post-transcriptional repression of their target mRNAs. . In kidneys, miRNAs have been associated in renal development, homeostasis, and physiological functions. Results from clinical and experimental animal studies demonstrate that miRNAs play essential roles in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases. Chronic kidney diseases (CKD is characterized by renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β is recognized as a major mediator of renal fibrosis because it is able to stimulate the accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins to impair normal kidney function. Recently, emerging evidence demonstrate the relationship between TGF-β signaling and miRNAs expression during renal diseases. TGF-β regulates expression of several microRNAs, such as miR-21, miR-192, miR-200, miR-433, and miR-29. MiR-21, miR-192, and miR-433 which are positively induced by TGF-β signaling play a pathological role in kidney diseases. In contrast, members in both miR-29 and miR-200 families which are inhibited by TGF-β signaling protect kidneys from renal fibrosis by suppressing the deposition of extracellular matrix and preventing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, respectively. Clinically, the presence of miRNAs in blood and urine has been examined to be early biomarkers for detecting renal diseases. From experimental animal studies of CKD, targeting microRNAs also provides evidence about therapeutic potential of miRNAs during renal diseases. Now, it comes to the stage to examine the exact mechanisms of miRNAs during the initiation and progression of renal diseases. Therefore, determining the function of miRNAs in renal fibrosis may facilitate the development of both early diagnosis and treatment of renal diseases.

  20. Rapid analysis of inner and outer bark composition of southern yellow pine bark from industrial sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi-Leung So; Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2006-01-01

    Differences in bark chemistry between inner and outer bark are well known and may affect the suitability of various bark supplies for a particular application. Accordingly, there is a need for quality control protocols to assess variability and predict product yields. Southern yellow pine bark samples from two industrial sources were separated into inner and outer bark...

  1. Role of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Role of Outer Membrance Vesicles of Bacteria. M V Jagannadham M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 20 Issue 8 ... Keywords. Outer membrane ves ic les (OMVs); secretion; communication; virulence; antibiotic resistance; vaccines.

  2. Phloem-mobile messenger RNAs and root development

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    David J. Hannapel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous signal molecules move through the phloem to regulate development, including proteins, secondary metabolites, small RNAs and full-length transcripts. Several full-length mRNAs have been identified that move long distances in a shootward or rootward direction through the plant vasculature to modulate both floral and vegetative processes of growth. Here we discuss two recently discovered examples of long-distance transport of full-length mRNAs into roots and the potential target genes and pathways for these mobile signals. In both cases, the mobile RNAs regulate root growth. Previously, RNA movement assays demonstrated that transcripts of StBEL5, a transcription factor from the three-amino-loop-extension superclass, move through the phloem to stolon tips to enhance tuber formation in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.. StBEL5 mRNA originates in the leaf and its movement to stolons is induced by a short-day photoperiod. Movement of StBEL5 RNA to roots correlated with increased growth and the accumulation of several transcripts associated with hormone metabolism, including GA2-oxidase1, YUCCA1a and -c, several Aux/IAA types, and PIN1, -2, and -4 was observed. In another example, heterografting techniques were used to identify phloem-mobile Aux/IAA transcripts in Arabidopsis. Movement assays confirmed that these Aux/IAA transcripts are transported into the root system where they suppress lateral root formation. Phloem transport of both StBEL5 and Aux/IAA RNAs are linked to hormone metabolism and both target auxin synthesis genes or auxin signaling processes. The mechanisms of transport for these mobile RNAs, the impact they have on controlling root growth, and a potential transcriptional connection between the BEL1/KNOX complex and Aux/IAA genes are discussed.

  3. Expression Profiling and Structural Characterization of MicroRNAs in Adipose Tissues of Hibernating Ground Squirrels

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    Cheng-Wei Wu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that are important in regulating metabolic stress. In this study, we determined the expression and structural characteristics of 20 miRNAs in brown (BAT and white adipose tissue (WAT during torpor in thirteen-lined ground squirrels. Using a modified stem-loop technique, we found that during torpor, expression of six miRNAs including let-7a, let-7b, miR-107, miR-150, miR-222 and miR-31 was significantly downregulated in WAT (P < 0.05, which was 16%–54% of euthermic non-torpid control squirrels, whereas expression of three miRNAs including miR-143, miR-200a and miR-519d was found to be upregulated by 1.32–2.34-fold. Similarly, expression of more miRNAs was downregulated in BAT during torpor. We detected reduced expression of 6 miRNAs including miR-103a, miR-107, miR-125b, miR-21, miR-221 and miR-31 (48%–70% of control, while only expression of miR-138 was significantly upregulated (2.91 ± 0.8-fold of the control, P < 0.05. Interestingly, miRNAs found to be downregulated in WAT during torpor were similar to those dysregulated in obese humans for increased adipogenesis, whereas miRNAs with altered expression in BAT during torpor were linked to mitochondrial β-oxidation. miRPath target prediction analysis showed that miRNAs downregulated in both WAT and BAT were associated with the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, while the miRNAs upregulated in WAT were linked to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ signaling. Compared to mouse sequences, no unique nucleotide substitutions within the stem-loop region were discovered for the associated pre-miRNAs for the miRNAs used in this study, suggesting no structure-influenced changes in pre-miRNA processing efficiency in the squirrel. As well, the expression of miRNA processing enzyme Dicer remained unchanged in both tissues during torpor. Overall, our findings suggest that changes of miRNA expression in adipose tissues may

  4. The Role of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

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    Martin Pichler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the existence of a subset of cancer cells with stem cell-like properties, which are thought to play a significant role in tumor formation, metastasis, resistance to anticancer therapies and cancer recurrence, has gained tremendous attraction within the last decade. These cancer stem cells (CSCs are relatively rare and have been described by different molecular markers and cellular features in different types of cancers. Ten years ago, a novel class of molecules, small non-protein-coding RNAs, was found to be involved in carcinogenesis. These small RNAs, which are called microRNAs (miRNAs, act as endogenous suppressors of gene expression that exert their effect by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR of large target messenger RNAs (mRNAs. MicroRNAs trigger either translational repression or mRNA cleavage of target mRNAs. Some studies have shown that putative breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs exhibit a distinct miRNA expression profile compared to non-tumorigenic breast cancer cells. The deregulated miRNAs may contribute to carcinogenesis and self-renewal of BCSCs via several different pathways and can act either as oncomirs or as tumor suppressive miRNAs. It has also been demonstrated that certain miRNAs play an essential role in regulating the stem cell-like phenotype of BCSCs. Some miRNAs control clonal expansion or maintain the self-renewal and anti-apoptotic features of BCSCs. Others are targeting the specific mRNA of their target genes and thereby contribute to the formation and self-renewal process of BCSCs. Several miRNAs are involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which is often implicated in the process of formation of CSCs. Other miRNAs were shown to be involved in the increased chemotherapeutic resistance of BCSCs. This review highlights the recent findings and crucial role of miRNAs in the maintenance, growth and behavior of BCSCs, thus indicating the potential for novel diagnostic, prognostic and

  5. MicroRNAs in brain cholesterol metabolism and their implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyejin; Flores, Luis F; Kim, Jungsu

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol is important for various neuronal functions in the brain. Brain has elaborate regulatory mechanisms to control cholesterol metabolism that are distinct from the mechanisms in periphery. Interestingly, dysregulation of the cholesterol metabolism is strongly associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases. MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs acting as post-transcriptional gene regulators. Recently, several microRNAs are demonstrated to be involved in regulating cholesterol metabolism in the brain. This article reviews the regulatory mechanisms of cellular cholesterol homeostasis in the brain. In addition, we discuss the role of microRNAs in brain cholesterol metabolism and their potential implications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This article is part of a special issue entitled: MicroRNAs and lipid/energy metabolism and related diseases edited by Carlos Fernández-Hernando and Yajaira Suárez. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bistability and oscillations in gene regulation mediated by small noncoding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengyu Liu

    Full Text Available The interplay of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs, mRNAs, and proteins has been shown to play crucial roles in almost all cellular processes. As key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, the mechanisms and roles of sRNAs in various cellular processes still need to be fully understood. When participating in cellular processes, sRNAs mainly mediate mRNA degradation or translational repression. Here, we show how the dynamics of two minimal architectures is drastically affected by these two mechanisms. A comparison is also given to reveal the implication of the fundamental differences. This study may help us to analyze complex networks assembled by simple modules more easily. A better knowledge of the sRNA-mediated motifs is also of interest for bio-engineering and artificial control.

  7. Plant-generated artificial small RNAs mediated aphid resistance.

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    Hongyan Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA silencing is an important mechanism for regulation of endogenous gene expression and defense against genomic intruders in plants. This natural defense system was adopted to generate virus-resistant plants even before the mechanism of RNA silencing was unveiled. With the clarification of that mechanism, transgenic antiviral plants were developed that expressed artificial virus-specific hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs or microRNAs (amiRNAs in host plants. Previous works also showed that plant-mediated RNA silencing technology could be a practical method for constructing insect-resistant plants by expressing hpRNAs targeting essential genes of insects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we chose aphid Myzus persicae of order Hemiptera as a target insect. To screen for aphid genes vulnerable to attack by plant-mediated RNA silencing to establish plant aphid resistance, we selected nine genes of M. persicae as silencing targets, and constructed their hpRNA-expressing vectors. For the acetylcholinesterase 2 coding gene (MpAChE2, two amiRNA-expressing vectors were also constructed. The vectors were transformed into tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanti. Insect challenge assays showed that most of the transgenic plants gained aphid resistance, among which those expressing hpRNAs targeting V-type proton ATPase subunit E-like (V-ATPaseE or tubulin folding cofactor D (TBCD genes displayed stronger aphicidal activity. The transgenic plants expressing amiRNAs targeting two different sites in the MpAChE2 gene exhibited better aphid resistance than the plants expressing MpAChE2-specific hpRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicated that plant-mediated insect-RNA silencing might be an effective way to develop plants resistant to insects with piercing-sucking mouthparts, and both the selection of vulnerable target genes and the biogenetic type of the small RNAs were crucial for the effectiveness of aphid control. The expression of

  8. Aberrantly expressed microRNAs in the context of bladder tumorigenesis

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    Jong-Young Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs 19–22 nucleotides in length, play a major role in negative regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Several miRNAs act as tumor suppressors or oncogenes that control cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, or angiogenesis during tumorigenesis. To date, 19 research groups have published large-scale expression profiles that identified 261 miRNAs differentially expressed in bladder cancer, of which 76 were confirmed to have consistent expression patterns by two or more groups. These consistently expressed miRNAs participated in regulation of multiple biological processes and factors, including axon guidance, cancer-associated proteoglycans, and the ErbB and transforming growth factorbeta signaling pathways. Because miRNAs can be released from cancer cells into urine via secreted particles, we propose that miRNAs differentially expressed between tissue and urine could serve as predictors of bladder cancer, and could thus be exploited for noninvasive diagnosis.

  9. Human Milk and Matched Serum Demonstrate Concentration of Select miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wenyi; Dasgupta, Santanu; Corradi, John; Sauter, Edward R

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancers (PABCs), especially those diagnosed after childbirth, are often aggressive, with a poor prognosis. Factors influencing PABC are largely unknown. Micro(mi)RNAs are present in many human body fluids and shown to influence cancer development and/or growth. In six nursing mothers, we determined if breast cancer-associated miRNAs were (1) detectable in human breast milk and (2) if detectable, their relative expression in milk fractions compared to matched serum. We evaluated by quantitative PCR the expression of 11 cancer-associated miRNAs (10a-5p, 16, 21, 100, 140, 145, 155, 181, 199, 205, 212) in breast milk cells, fat and supernatant (skim milk), and matched serum. miRNA expression was detectable in all samples. For 10/11 miRNAs, mean relative expression compared to control (ΔCt) values was lowest in milk cells, the exception being miR205. Relative concentration was highest in the skim fraction of milk for all miRNAs. Expression was higher in skim milk than matched serum for 7/11 miRNAs and in serum for 4/11 miRNAs. miR205 expression was higher in all milk fractions than in matched serum. In conclusion, the expression of breast cancer-associated miRNAs is detectable in human breast milk and serum samples. The concentration is highest in skim milk, but is also detectable in milk fat and milk cells.

  10. Microprocessor Recruitment to Elongating RNA Polymerase II Is Required for Differential Expression of MicroRNAs

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    Victoria A. Church

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The cellular abundance of mature microRNAs (miRNAs is dictated by the efficiency of nuclear processing of primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs into pre-miRNA intermediates. The Microprocessor complex of Drosha and DGCR8 carries this out, but it has been unclear what controls Microprocessor’s differential processing of various pri-miRNAs. Here, we show that Drosophila DGCR8 (Pasha directly associates with the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II elongation complex when it is phosphorylated by the Cdk9 kinase (pTEFb. When association is blocked by loss of Cdk9 activity, a global change in pri-miRNA processing is detected. Processing of pri-miRNAs with a UGU sequence motif in their apical junction domain increases, while processing of pri-miRNAs lacking this motif decreases. Therefore, phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II recruits Microprocessor for co-transcriptional processing of non-UGU pri-miRNAs that would otherwise be poorly processed. In contrast, UGU-positive pri-miRNAs are robustly processed by Microprocessor independent of RNA polymerase association.

  11. The Mechanisms of Virulence Regulation by Small Noncoding RNAs in Low GC Gram-Positive Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Pitman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of small noncoding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs in bacteria has grown tremendously recently, giving new insights into gene regulation. The implementation of computational analysis and RNA sequencing has provided new tools to discover and analyze potential sRNAs. Small regulatory RNAs that act by base-pairing to target mRNAs have been found to be ubiquitous and are the most abundant class of post-transcriptional regulators in bacteria. The majority of sRNA studies has been limited to E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria. However, examples of sRNAs in gram-positive bacteria are still plentiful although the detailed gene regulation mechanisms behind them are not as well understood. Strict virulence control is critical for a pathogen’s survival and many sRNAs have been found to be involved in that process. This review outlines the targets and currently known mechanisms of trans-acting sRNAs involved in virulence regulation in various gram-positive pathogens. In addition, their shared characteristics such as CU interaction motifs, the role of Hfq, and involvement in two-component regulators, riboswitches, quorum sensing, or toxin/antitoxin systems are described.

  12. Differential expression of microRNAs in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus in response to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Zhi; Sun, Bao-Zhen

    2016-02-01

    Till date numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered from various organisms, including mammals, plants, insects, nematodes and viruses. They are known to have antiviral functions in crustaceans such as shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicas. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs against bacterial infection in this shrimp caused by Vibrio alginolyticus. We performed small RNA sequencing to characterize the differentially expressed microRNAs in V. alginolyticus challenged shrimp, in comparison to that in control uninfected shrimp, at 24 h and 48 h. In total, 55 host miRNAs were differentially expressed in response to the infection and most of these were downregulated at both the time-points. TargetScan and miRanda algorithms showed that the target genes of these down-regulated miRNAs were related to innate immune functions such as production of phenoloxidase enzyme, apoptosis and phagocytosis. Further, gene ontology analysis revealed that many immune signaling pathways were mediated by these miRNAs. This study is one of the earliest attempts at characterizing shrimp miRNAs that respond to V. alginolyticus infection, and will help unravel the miRNA pathways involved in antibacterial action in shrimp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Small yet mighty - microRNAs in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Dirk; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs of 20-24nt in length mediating RNA silencing, a eukaryotic, sequence-specific repressive gene regulation mechanism. In plants, miRNAs have a pivotal role during fundamental processes such as development, maintenance of genome integrity and abiotic stress responses. They originate from MIRNA genes that are transcribed by RNA polymerase II; MIRNA transcripts form imperfect fold-back structures that are further processed to miRNA duplexes. In Arabidopsis, over 180 MIRNA loci have been identified. Recent evidence shows that miRNAs are substantially implicated in regulating plant immunity. Pathogen attack triggers massive changes in the miRNA transcriptome; many of the altered miRNAs participate in controlling plant hormone pathways. Moreover, microorganisms are known to manipulate silencing pathways to counteract miRNA-mediated defenses. Thus far, miRNAs are believed to likely function as cardinal players in the concert of broad-spectrum disease resistance. Here, we summarize the highlights and latest findings of miRNAs as molecular regulators during plant-microbe interactions.

  14. Serum microRNAs as novel biomarkers for primary sclerosing cholangitis and cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernuzzi, F; Marabita, F; Lleo, A; Carbone, M; Mirolo, M; Marzioni, M; Alpini, G; Alvaro, D; Boberg, K M; Locati, M; Torzilli, G; Rimassa, L; Piscaglia, F; He, X-S; Bowlus, C L; Yang, G-X; Gershwin, M E; Invernizzi, P

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is difficult due to the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers, as is the early diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CC), a complication of PSC. The aim of this study was to identify specific serum miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers for PSC and CC. The levels of 667 miRNAs were evaluated in 90 human serum samples (30 PSC, 30 CC and 30 control subjects) to identify disease-associated candidate miRNAs (discovery phase). The deregulated miRNAs were validated in an independent cohort of 140 samples [40 PSC, 40 CC, 20 primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 40 controls]. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were established and only miRNAs with an area under the curve (AUC) > 0·70 were considered useful as biomarkers. In the discovery phase we identified the following: 21 miRNAs expressed differentially in PSC, 33 in CC and 26 in both in comparison to control subjects as well as 24 miRNAs expressed differentially between PSC and CC. After the validation phase, miR-200c was found to be expressed differentially in PSC versus controls, whereas miR-483-5p and miR-194 showed deregulated expression in CC compared with controls. We also demonstrate a difference in the expression of miR-222 and miR-483-5p in CC versus PSC. Combination of these specific miRNAs further improved the specificity and accuracy of diagnosis. This study provides a basis for the use of miRNAs as biomarkers for the diagnosis of PSC and CC. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  15. MicroRNAs: new players in cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xin; Zheng, Heyi; Chan, Matthew TV; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2017-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness worldwide. Multiple factors such as aging, eye injury, diabetes mellitus, ultraviolet exposure, drug use and other ocular diseases are etiologically linked to cataractogenesis. Due to a rapid increase in aging population, age-related cataract has become the leading cause of blindness. Therefore, it is urgent to understand the molecular mechanism underlying cataractogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of endogenous, small noncoding RNAs that r...

  16. Salivary microRNAs as promising biomarkers for detection of esophageal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijun Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tissue microRNAs (miRNAs can detect cancers and predict prognosis. Several recent studies reported that tissue, plasma, and saliva miRNAs share similar expression profiles. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory power of salivary miRNAs (including whole saliva and saliva supernatant for detection of esophageal cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: By Agilent microarray, six deregulated miRNAs from whole saliva samples from seven patients with esophageal cancer and three healthy controls were selected. The six selected miRNAs were subjected to validation of their expression levels by RT-qPCR using both whole saliva and saliva supernatant samples from an independent set of 39 patients with esophageal cancer and 19 healthy controls. RESULTS: Six miRNAs (miR-10b*, miR-144, miR-21, miR-451, miR-486-5p, and miR-634 were identified as targets by Agilent microarray. After validation by RT-qPCR, miR-10b*, miR-144, and miR-451 in whole saliva and miR-10b*, miR-144, miR-21, and miR-451 in saliva supernatant were significantly upregulated in patients, with sensitivities of 89.7, 92.3, 84.6, 79.5, 43.6, 89.7, and 51.3% and specificities of 57.9, 47.4, 57.9%, 57.9, 89.5, 47.4, and 84.2%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We found distinctive miRNAs for esophageal cancer in both whole saliva and saliva supernatant. These miRNAs possess discriminatory power for detection of esophageal cancer. Because saliva collection is noninvasive and convenient, salivary miRNAs show great promise as biomarkers for detection of esophageal cancer in areas at high risk.

  17. Genome-wide identification of regulatory RNAs in the human pathogen Clostridium difficile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A Soutourina

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is an emergent pathogen, and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In an effort to understand the role of small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs in C. difficile physiology and pathogenesis, we used an in silico approach to identify 511 sRNA candidates in both intergenic and coding regions. In parallel, RNA-seq and differential 5'-end RNA-seq were used for global identification of C. difficile sRNAs and their transcriptional start sites at three different growth conditions (exponential growth phase, stationary phase, and starvation. This global experimental approach identified 251 putative regulatory sRNAs including 94 potential trans riboregulators located in intergenic regions, 91 cis-antisense RNAs, and 66 riboswitches. Expression of 35 sRNAs was confirmed by gene-specific experimental approaches. Some sRNAs, including an antisense RNA that may be involved in control of C. difficile autolytic activity, showed growth phase-dependent expression profiles. Expression of each of 16 predicted c-di-GMP-responsive riboswitches was observed, and experimental evidence for their regulatory role in coordinated control of motility and biofilm formation was obtained. Finally, we detected abundant sRNAs encoded by multiple C. difficile CRISPR loci. These RNAs may be important for C. difficile survival in bacteriophage-rich gut communities. Altogether, this first experimental genome-wide identification of C. difficile sRNAs provides a firm basis for future RNome characterization and identification of molecular mechanisms of sRNA-based regulation of gene expression in this emergent enteropathogen.

  18. Non-coding RNAs: an emerging player in DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunzhi; Peng, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs play a crucial role in maintaining genomic stability which is essential for cell survival and preventing tumorigenesis. Through an extensive crosstalk between non-coding RNAs and the canonical DNA damage response (DDR) signaling pathway, DDR-induced expression of non-coding RNAs can provide a regulatory mechanism to accurately control the expression of DNA damage responsive genes in a spatio-temporal manner. Mechanistically, DNA damage alters expression of a variety of non-coding RNAs at multiple levels including transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation, and RNA degradation. In parallel, non-coding RNAs can directly regulate cellular processes involved in DDR by altering expression of their targeting genes, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. MiRNAs are required for almost every aspect of cellular responses to DNA damage, including sensing DNA damage, transducing damage signals, repairing damaged DNA, activating cell cycle checkpoints, and inducing apoptosis. As for lncRNAs, they control transcription of DDR relevant gene by four different regulatory models, including signal, decoy, guide, and scaffold. In addition, we also highlight potential clinical applications of non-coding RNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for anti-cancer treatments using DNA-damaging agents including radiation and chemotherapy. Although tremendous advances have been made to elucidate the role of non-coding RANs in genome maintenance, many key questions remain to be answered including mechanistically how non-coding RNA pathway and DNA damage response pathway is coordinated in response to genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential expression of circulating miRNAs in maternal plasma in pregnancies with fetal macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qinyu; Zhu, Yanan; Li, Hailing; Tian, Fei; Xie, Xueying; Bai, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Macrosomia is associated with problems at birth and has life-long health implications for the infant. The aim of this study was to profile the plasma microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) and evaluate the potential of circulating miRNAs to predict fetal macrosomia. The expression levels of miRNAs in plasma samples obtained from pregnant women with fetal macrosomia and from women with normal pregnancies (controls) were analyzed using TaqMan Low-Density Arrays (TLDAs) followed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) validation and analysis. The TLDA data revealed that 143 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the plasma samples from pregnant women with fetal macrosomia compared with the controls (43 upregulated and 100 downregulated miRNAs). Twelve of these miRNAs were selected for RT-qPCR analysis. Receiver operational characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that several miRNAs (e.g., miR‑141-3p and miR-200c-3p) were clearly distinguished between pregnancies with fetal macrosomia and other types of abnormal pregnancy and healthy pregnancies with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC >0.9). The expression of miRNA clusters also showed a similar trend in pregnancies with fetal macrosomia. This study provides a platform for profiling circulating miRNAs in maternal plasma. Our data also suggest that altered levels of maternal plasma miRNAs have great potential to serve as non-invasive biomarkers and as a mechanistic indicator of abnormal pregnancies.

  20. Small RNA Profiling in Dengue Virus 2-Infected Aedes Mosquito Cells Reveals Viral piRNAs and Novel Host miRNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miesen, P.; Ivens, A.; Buck, A.H.; Rij, R.P. van

    2016-01-01

    In Aedes mosquitoes, infections with arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) trigger or modulate the expression of various classes of viral and host-derived small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs). Viral siRNAs are at the core of

  1. Differential expression of exosomal microRNAs in prefrontal cortices of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith G Banigan

    Full Text Available Exosomes are cellular secretory vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs. Once secreted, exosomes are able to attach to recipient cells and release miRNAs potentially modulating the function of the recipient cell. We hypothesized that exosomal miRNA expression in brains of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD might differ from controls, reflecting either disease-specific or common aberrations in SZ and BD patients. The sources of the analyzed samples included McLean 66 Cohort Collection (Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, BrainNet Europe II (BNE, a consortium of 18 brain banks across Europe and Boston Medical Center (BMC. Exosomal miRNAs from frozen postmortem prefrontal cortices with well-preserved RNA were isolated and submitted to profiling by Luminex FLEXMAP 3D microfluidic device. Multiple statistical analyses of microarray data suggested that certain exosomal miRNAs were differentially expressed in SZ and BD subjects in comparison to controls. RT-PCR validation confirmed that two miRNAs, miR-497 in SZ samples and miR-29c in BD samples, have significantly increased expression when compared to control samples. These results warrant future studies to evaluate the potential of exosome-derived miRNAs to serve as biomarkers of SZ and BD.

  2. Design of extended short hairpin RNAs for HIV-1 inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Haasnoot, Joost; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) targeted towards viral mRNAs is widely used to block virus replication in mammalian cells. The specific antiviral RNAi response can be induced via transfection of synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or via intracellular expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). For

  3. Role of Viral miRNAs and Epigenetic Modifications in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Aldo; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Rotondo, Emanuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Scrima, Mario; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Capunzo, Mario; Franci, Gianluigi; Barbieri, Antonio; Bimonte, Sabrina; Montella, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short (21-23 nucleotides), noncoding RNAs that typically silence posttranscriptional gene expression through interaction with target messenger RNAs. Currently, miRNAs have been identified in almost all studied multicellular eukaryotes in the plant and animal kingdoms. Additionally, recent studies reported that miRNAs can also be encoded by certain single-cell eukaryotes and by viruses. The vast majority of viral miRNAs are encoded by the herpesviruses family. These DNA viruses including Epstein-Barr virus encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to facilitate respective infection cycles. Modulation of the control pathways of miRNAs expression is often involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis through a specific cascade of transduction signals. Notably, latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus is considered liable of causing several types of malignancies, including the majority of gastric carcinoma cases detected worldwide. In this review, we describe the role of the Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinogenesis, summarizing the functions of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded viral proteins and related epigenetic alterations as well as the roles of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded and virally modulated cellular miRNAs.

  4. Novel meiotic miRNAs and indications for a role of phasiRNAs in meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs (sRNA) add additional layers to the regulation of gene expression, with siRNAs directing gene silencing at the DNA level by RdDM (RNA-directed DNA methylation), and miRNAs directing post-transcriptional regulation of specific target genes, mostly by mRNA cleavage. We used manually isolate...

  5. Optical coherence tomography identifies outer retina thinning in frontotemporal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Benjamin J; Irwin, David J; Song, Delu; Daniel, Ebenezer; Leveque, Jennifer D; Raquib, Aaishah R; Pan, Wei; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Aleman, Tomas S; Dunaief, Joshua L; Grossman, Murray

    2017-10-10

    Whereas Alzheimer disease (AD) is associated with inner retina thinning visualized by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), we sought to determine if the retina has a distinguishing biomarker for frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). Using a cross-sectional design, we examined retinal structure in 38 consecutively enrolled patients with FTD and 44 controls using a standard SD-OCT protocol. Retinal layers were segmented with the Iowa Reference Algorithm. Subgroups of highly predictive molecular pathology (tauopathy, TAR DNA-binding protein 43, unknown) were determined by clinical criteria, genetic markers, and a CSF biomarker (total tau: β-amyloid) to exclude presumed AD. We excluded eyes with poor image quality or confounding diseases. SD-OCT measures of patients (n = 46 eyes) and controls (n = 69 eyes) were compared using a generalized linear model accounting for intereye correlation, and correlations between retinal layer thicknesses and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were evaluated. Adjusting for age, sex, and race, patients with FTD had a thinner outer retina than controls (132 vs 142 μm, p = 0.004). Patients with FTD also had a thinner outer nuclear layer (ONL) (88.5 vs 97.9 μm, p = 0.003) and ellipsoid zone (EZ) (14.5 vs 15.1 μm, p = 0.009) than controls, but had similar thicknesses for inner retinal layers. The outer retina thickness of patients correlated with MMSE (Spearman r = 0.44, p = 0.03). The highly predictive tauopathy subgroup (n = 31 eyes) also had a thinner ONL (88.7 vs 97.4 μm, p = 0.01) and EZ (14.4 vs 15.1 μm, p = 0.01) than controls. FTD is associated with outer retina thinning, and this thinning correlates with disease severity. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Brain expressed microRNAs implicated in schizophrenia etiology.

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    Thomas Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein encoding genes have long been the major targets for research in schizophrenia genetics. However, with the identification of regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs as important in brain development and function, miRNAs genes have emerged as candidates for schizophrenia-associated genetic factors. Indeed, the growing understanding of the regulatory properties and pleiotropic effects that miRNA have on molecular and cellular mechanisms, suggests that alterations in the interactions between miRNAs and their mRNA targets may contribute to phenotypic variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have studied the association between schizophrenia and genetic variants of miRNA genes associated with brain-expression using a case-control study design on three Scandinavian samples. Eighteen known SNPs within or near brain-expressed miRNAs in three samples (Danish, Swedish and Norwegian: 420/163/257 schizophrenia patients and 1006/177/293 control subjects, were analyzed. Subsequently, joint analysis of the three samples was performed on SNPs showing marginal association. Two SNPs rs17578796 and rs1700 in hsa-mir-206 (mir-206 and hsa-mit-198 (mir-198 showed nominal significant allelic association to schizophrenia in the Danish and Norwegian sample respectively (P = 0.0021 & p = 0.038, of which only rs17578796 was significant in the joint sample. In-silico analysis revealed that 8 of the 15 genes predicted to be regulated by both mir-206 and mir-198, are transcriptional targets or interaction partners of the JUN, ATF2 and TAF1 connected in a tight network. JUN and two of the miRNA targets (CCND2 and PTPN1 in the network have previously been associated with schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found nominal association between brain-expressed miRNAs and schizophrenia for rs17578796 and rs1700 located in mir-206 and mir-198 respectively. These two miRNAs have a surprising large number (15 of targets in common, eight of which are also connected

  7. Characterization of microRNAs in Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain under Vibrio parahaemolyticus Infection

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    Li, Chuanbiao; Zhang, Zhao; Zhou, Lizhen; Wang, Shijia; Wang, Shuqi; Zhang, Yueling; Wen, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    Background Infection of bacterial Vibrio parahaemolyticus is common in mud crab farms. However, the mechanisms of the crab’s response to pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus infection are not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that function as regulators of gene expression and play essential roles in various biological processes. To understand the underlying mechanisms of the molecular immune response of the crab to the pathogens, high-throughput Illumina/Solexa deep sequencing technology was used to investigate the expression profiles of miRNAs in S. paramamosain under V. parahaemolyticus infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Two mixed RNA pools of 7 tissues (intestine, heart, liver, gill, brain, muscle and blood) were obtained from V. parahaemolyticus infected crabs and the control groups, respectively. By aligning the sequencing data with known miRNAs, we characterized 421 miRNA families, and 133 conserved miRNA families in mud crab S. paramamosain were either identical or very similar to existing miRNAs in miRBase. Stem-loop qRT-PCRs were used to scan the expression levels of four randomly chosen differentially expressed miRNAs and tissue distribution. Eight novel potential miRNAs were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis and the precursors of these novel miRNAs were verified by PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing in S. paramamosain. 161 miRNAs (106 of which up-regulated and 55 down-regulated) were significantly differentially expressed during the challenge and the potential targets of these differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted. Furthermore, we demonstrated evolutionary conservation of mud crab miRNAs in the animal evolution process. Conclusions/Significance In this study, a large number of miRNAs were identified in S. paramamosain when challenged with V. parahaemolyticus, some of which were differentially expressed. The results show that miRNAs might play some important roles in regulating gene expression in mud

  8. The miRNAome of globe artichoke: conserved and novel micro RNAs and target analysis

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    De Paola Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant microRNAs (miRNAs are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of several processes, including the response to biotic and abiotic stress, often contributing to the adaptive response of the plant to adverse conditions. In addition to conserved miRNAs, found in a wide range of plant species a number of novel species-specific miRNAs, displaying lower levels of expression can be found. Due to low abundance, non conserved miRNAs are difficult to identify and isolate using conventional approaches. Conversely, deep-sequencing of small RNA (sRNA libraries can detect even poorly expressed miRNAs. No miRNAs from globe artichoke have been described to date. We analyzed the miRNAome from artichoke by deep sequencing four sRNA libraries obtained from NaCl stressed and control leaves and roots. Results Conserved and novel miRNAs were discovered using accepted criteria. The expression level of selected miRNAs was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. Targets were predicted and validated for their cleavage site. A total of 122 artichoke miRNAs were identified, 98 (25 families of which were conserved with other plant species, and 24 were novel. Some miRNAs were differentially expressed according to tissue or condition, magnitude of variation after salt stress being more pronounced in roots. Target function was predicted by comparison to Arabidopsis proteins; the 43 targets (23 for novel miRNAs identified included transcription factors and other genes, most of which involved in the response to various stresses. An unusual cleaved transcript was detected for miR393 target, transport inhibitor response 1. Conclusions The miRNAome from artichoke, including novel miRNAs, was unveiled, providing useful information on the expression in different organs and conditions. New target genes were identified. We suggest that the generation of secondary short-interfering RNAs from miR393 target can be a general rule in the plant

  9. Small RNA deep sequencing reveals the important role of microRNAs in the halophyte Halostachys caspica.

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    Yang, Ruirui; Zeng, Youling; Yi, Xiaoya; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Yufang

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), an extensive class of small regulatory RNAs, play versatile roles in plant growth and development as well as stress responses. However, the regulatory mechanism is unclear on miRNA-mediated response to abiotic stress in plants. Halostachys caspica is a halophytic plant species and a great model for investigating plant response to salinity stress. However, no research has been performed on miRNAs in H. caspica. In this study, we employed deep sequencing to identify both conserved and novel miRNAs from salinity-exposed H. caspica and its untreated control. Among the 13-19 million sequences generated from both treatments, a total of 170 conserved miRNAs, belonging to 151 miRNA families, were identified; among these miRNAs, 31 were significantly up-regulated and 48 were significantly down-regulated by salinity stress. We also identified 102 novel miRNAs from H. caspica; among them, 12 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated and 13 were significantly down-regulated by salinity. qRT-PCR expression analysis validated the deep sequencing results and also demonstrated that miRNAs and their targeted genes were responsive to high salt stress and existed a negative expression correlation between miRNAs and their targets. miRNA-target prediction, GO and KEGG analysis showed that miRNAs were involved in salt stress-related biological pathway, including calcium signalling pathway, MAPK signalling pathway, plant hormone signal transduction and flavonoid biosynthesis, etc. This suggests that miRNAs play an important role in plant salt stress tolerance in H. caspica. This result could be used to improve salt tolerance in crops and woods. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Profilings of MicroRNAs in the Liver of Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) Infected with Flavobacterium columnare

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    Zhao, Lijuan; Lu, Hong; Meng, Qinglei; Wang, Jinfu; Wang, Weimin; Yang, Ling; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulation of many biological processes in eukaryotes, including pathogen infection and host interactions. Flavobacterium columnare (FC) infection can cause great economic loss of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) which is one of the most important cultured fish in the world. However, miRNAs in response to FC infection in common carp has not been characterized. To identify specific miRNAs involved in common carp infected with FC, we performed microRNA sequencing using livers of common carp infected with and without FC. A total of 698 miRNAs were identified, including 142 which were identified and deposited in the miRbase database (Available online: http://www.mirbase.org/) and 556 had only predicted miRNAs. Among the deposited miRNAs, eight miRNAs were first identified in common carp. Thirty of the 698 miRNAs were differentially expressed miRNAs (DIE-miRNAs) between the FC infected and control samples. From the DIE-miRNAs, seven were selected randomly and their expression profiles were confirmed to be consistent with the microRNA sequencing results using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. In addition, a total of 27,363 target genes of the 30 DIE-miRNAs were predicted. The target genes were enriched in five Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways, including focal adhesion, extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog (ErbB) signaling pathway, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and adherent junction. The miRNA expression profile of the liver of common carp infected with FC will pave the way for the development of effective strategies to fight against FC infection. PMID:27092486

  11. Predicting associations between microRNAs and target genes in breast cancer by bioinformatics analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianying; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Yonggang; Yu, Xiucui

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of cancer among females. However, the association between microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes in breast tumorigenesis is poorly studied. The original data set GSE26659 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and then the differentially expressed miRNAs among 77 breast cancer patients and 17 controls were identified using the Limma package in R software. Furthermore, breast cancer-related differentially expressed miRNAs were selected from a human miRNA disease database and their target genes were selected from five miRNA databases. Then, functional analysis was performed for the target genes followed by construction of a miRNA-target gene network. A total of 34 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, including 13 breast cancer-related miRNAs. Moreover, the target genes of the 13 miRNAs were significantly enriched in regulation of transcription (P=7.43E-09) and pathways related to cancer (P=3.33E-11). Finally, eight upregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-425) and five downregulated miRNAs (including hsa-miR-143, hsa-miR-145 and hsa-miR-125b) were identified in the miRNA-target gene network. In conclusion, using bioinformatics approaches, we demonstrate that the changes in regulation of transcription and cancer pathways may play significant roles in the process of breast cancerogenesis. Differentially expressed miRNAs and their target genes may be new targets for breast cancer therapy.

  12. A study of neural-related microRNAs in the developing amphioxus

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    Candiani Simona

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs regulating expression of protein coding genes at post-transcriptional level and controlling several biological processes. At present microRNAs have been identified in various metazoans and seem also to be involved in brain development, neuronal differentiation and subtypes specification. An approach to better understand the role of microRNAs in animal gene expression is to determine temporal and tissue-specific expression patterns of microRNAs in different model organisms. Therefore, we have investigated the expression of six neural related microRNAs in amphioxus, an organism having an important phylogenetic position in terms of understanding the origin and evolution of chordates. Results In amphioxus, all the microRNAs we examined are expressed in specific regions of the CNS, and some of them are correlated with specific cell types. In addition, miR-7, miR-137 and miR-184 are also expressed in endodermal and mesodermal tissues. Several potential targets expressed in the nervous system of amphioxus have been identified by computational prediction and some of them are coexpressed with one or more miRNAs. Conclusion We identified six miRNAs that are expressed in the nervous system of amphioxus in a variety of patterns. miR-124 is found in both differentiating and mature neurons, miR-9 in differentiated neurons, miR-7, miR-137 and miR-184 in restricted CNS regions, and miR-183 in cells of sensory organs. Therefore, such amphioxus miRNAs may play important roles in regional patterning and/or specification of neuronal cell types.

  13. Stress-induced endogenous siRNAs targeting regulatory intron sequences in Brachypodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lin V; Dinwiddie, Brandon L; Lee, Herman; Chekanova, Julia A

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to abiotic stresses triggers global changes in the expression of thousands of eukaryotic genes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Small RNA (smRNA) pathways and splicing both function as crucial mechanisms regulating stress-responsive gene expression. However, examples of smRNAs regulating gene expression remain largely limited to effects on mRNA stability, translation, and epigenetic regulation. Also, our understanding of the networks controlling plant gene expression in response to environmental changes, and examples of these regulatory pathways intersecting, remains limited. Here, to investigate the role of smRNAs in stress responses we examined smRNA transcriptomes of Brachypodium distachyon plants subjected to various abiotic stresses. We found that exposure to different abiotic stresses specifically induced a group of novel, endogenous small interfering RNAs (stress-induced, UTR-derived siRNAs, or sutr-siRNAs) that originate from the 3' UTRs of a subset of coding genes. Our bioinformatics analyses predicted that sutr-siRNAs have potential regulatory functions and that over 90% of sutr-siRNAs target intronic regions of many mRNAs in trans. Importantly, a subgroup of these sutr-siRNAs target the important intron regulatory regions, such as branch point sequences, that could affect splicing. Our study indicates that in Brachypodium, sutr-siRNAs may affect splicing by masking or changing accessibility of specific cis-elements through base-pairing interactions to mediate gene expression in response to stresses. We hypothesize that this mode of regulation of gene expression may also serve as a general mechanism for regulation of gene expression in plants and potentially in other eukaryotes. © 2015 Wang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Research progress on the roles of microRNAs in governing synaptic plasticity, learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chang-Wei; Luo, Ting; Zou, Shan-Shan; Wu, An-Shi

    2017-11-01

    The importance of non-coding RNA involved in biological processes has become apparent in recent years and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation has also been identified. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small regulatory non-coding RNAs of 22bp in length that mediate gene silencing by identifying specific sequences in the target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the central nervous system in a spatially and temporally controlled manner in normal physiology, as well as in certain pathological conditions. There is growing evidence that a considerable number of specific miRNAs play important roles in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory function. In addition, the dysfunction of these molecules may also contribute to the etiology of several neurodegenerative diseases. Here we provide an overview of the current literatures, which support non-coding RNA-mediated gene function regulation represents an important but underappreciated, layer of epigenetic control that facilitates learning and memory functions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. microRNAs and Fragile X Syndrome.

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    Lin, Shi-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is one of the major causes for autism and mental retardation in humans. The etiology of FXS is linked to the expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeats, r(CGG), suppressing the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene on the X chromosome, resulting in a loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression, which is required for regulating normal neuronal connectivity and plasticity. Recent studies have further identified that microRNAs are involved in the mechanisms underlying FXS pathogenesis at three different developmental stages. During early embryogenesis before the blastocyst stage, an embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific microRNA, miR-302, interferes with FMR1 mRNA translation to maintain the stem cell status and inhibit neural development. After blastocyst, the downregulation of miR-302 releases FMRP synthesis and subsequently leads to neuronal development; yet, in FXS, certain r(CGG)-derived microRNAs, such as miR-fmr1s, are expressed and accumulated and then induce DNA hypermethylation on the FMR1 gene promoter regions, resulting in transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene and the loss of FMRP. In normal neuronal development, FMRP is an RNA-binding protein responsible for interacting with miR-125 and miR-132 to regulate the signaling of Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), respectively, and consequently affecting synaptic plasticity. As a result, the loss of FMRP impairs these signaling controls and eventually causes FXS-associated disorders, such as autism and mental retardation. Based on these current findings, this chapter will summarize the etiological causes of FXS and further provides significant insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying microRNA-mediated FXS pathogenesis and the related therapy development.

  16. Long 3'UTR of Nurr1 mRNAs is targeted by miRNAs in mesencephalic dopamine neurons.

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    Luis Alberto Pereira

    Full Text Available The development of mesencephalic dopamine neurons and their survival later in life requires the continuous presence of the transcription factor Nurr1 (NR4A2. Nurr1 belongs to the nuclear receptors superfamily. However, it is an orphan member that does not require a ligand to regulate the transcription of its target genes. Therefore, controlling the expression of Nurr1 is an important manner to control its function. Several reports have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs regulate Nurr1 expression. However, Nurr1 has several splicing variants, posing the question what variants are subjected to miRNA regulation. In this work, we identified a long 3'UTR variant of rat Nurr1 mRNA. We used bioinformatics analysis to identify miRNAs with the potential to regulate Nurr1 expression. Reporter assays performed with the luciferase gene fused to the short (658 bp or long (1,339 bp 3'UTR of rat Nurr1 mRNAs, showed that miR-93, miR-204 and miR-302d selectively regulate the mRNA with the longest 3'UTR. We found that the longest variant of Nurr1 mRNA expresses in the rat mesencephalon as assessed by PCR. The transfection of rat mesencephalic neurons with mixed miR-93, miR-204 and miR-302d resulted in a significant reduction of Nurr1 protein levels. In conclusion, Nurr1 mRNA variant with the longest 3'UTR undergoes a specific regulation by miRNAs. It is discussed the importance of fine-tuning Nurr1 protein levels in mesencephalic dopamine neurons.

  17. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, Paul A.; Haake, David A.; Adler, Ben

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning bi...

  18. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

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    Suki Albers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification.

  19. Design of lentivirally expressed siRNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely used as a tool for gene knockdown in fundamental research and for the development of new RNA-based therapeutics. The RNAi pathway is typically induced by expression of ∼22 base pair (bp) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can be transfected into cells. For

  20. Genome-wide identification of non-coding RNAs interacted with microRNAs in soybean

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    Chuyu eYe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of RNA species interacting with microRNAs (miRNAs form a complex gene regulation network and play vital roles in diverse biological processes. In this study, we performed a genome-wide identification of endogenous target mimics (eTMs for miRNAs and phased-siRNA-producing loci (PHAS in soybean with a focus on those involved in lipid metabolism. The results showed that a large number of eTMs and PHAS genes could be found in soybean. Additionally, we found that lipid metabolism related genes were potentially regulated by 28 miRNAs, and nine of them were potentially further regulated by a number of eTMs with expression evidence. Thirty-three miRNAs were found to trigger production of phasiRNAs from 49 PHAS genes, which were able to target lipid metabolism related genes. Degradome data supported miRNA- and/or phasiRNA-mediated cleavage of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Most eTMs for miRNAs involved in lipid metabolism and phasiRNAs targeting lipid metabolism related genes showed a tissue-specific expression pattern. Our bioinformatical evidences suggested that lipid metabolism in soybean is potentially regulated by a complex non-coding network, including miRNAs, eTMs and phasiRNAs, and the results extended our knowledge on functions of non-coding RNAs.

  1. Targeting microRNAs in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huangming; Sun, Lei; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-10-01

    Obesity is a serious health problem worldwide associated with an increased risk of life-threatening diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and certain types of cancer. Fundamental for the development of novel therapeutics for obesity and its associated metabolic syndromes is an understanding of the regulation of fat cell development. Recent computational and experimental studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in metabolic tissue development, lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. In addition, many miRNAs are dysregulated in metabolic tissues from obese animals and humans, which potentially contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated complications. In this review we summarize the current state of understanding of the roles of miRNAs in metabolic tissues under normal development and obese conditions, and discuss the potential use of miRNAs as therapeutic targets.

  2. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-06

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  3. RNA systems biology: uniting functional discoveries and structural tools to understand global roles of RNAs.

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    Strobel, Eric J; Watters, Kyle E; Loughrey, David; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    RNAs assume sophisticated structures that are active in myriad cellular processes. In this review, we highlight newly identified ribozymes, riboswitches, and small RNAs, some of which control the function of cellular metabolic and gene expression networks. We then examine recent developments in genome-wide RNA structure probing technologies that are yielding new insights into the structural landscape of the transcriptome. Finally, we discuss how these RNA 'structomic' methods can address emerging questions in RNA systems biology, from the mechanisms behind long non-coding RNAs to new bases for human diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of microRNAs and Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer Chemoresistance

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    Duncan Ayers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Innate and acquired chemoresistance exhibited by most tumours exposed to conventional chemotherapeutic agents account for the majority of relapse cases in cancer patients. Such chemoresistance phenotypes are of a multi-factorial nature from multiple key molecular players. The discovery of the RNA interference pathway in 1998 and the widespread gene regulatory influences exerted by microRNAs (miRNAs and other non-coding RNAs have certainly expanded the level of intricacy present for the development of any single physiological phenotype, including cancer chemoresistance. This review article focuses on the latest research efforts in identifying and validating specific key molecular players from the two main families of non-coding RNAs, namely miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, having direct or indirect influences in the development of cancer drug resistance properties and how such knowledge can be utilised for novel theranostics in oncology.

  5. Fitness Landscapes of Functional RNAs

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    Ádám Kun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of fitness landscapes, a map between genotype and fitness, was proposed more than 80 years ago. For most of this time data was only available for a few alleles, and thus we had only a restricted view of the whole fitness landscape. Recently, advances in genetics and molecular biology allow a more detailed view of them. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies of fitness landscapes of functional RNAs, especially aptamers and ribozymes. We find that RNA structures can be divided into critical structures, connecting structures, neutral structures and forbidden structures. Such characterisation, coupled with theoretical sequence-to-structure predictions, allows us to construct the whole fitness landscape. Fitness landscapes then can be used to study evolution, and in our case the development of the RNA world.

  6. Lost in translation? microRNAs at the rough ER.

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    Axtell, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function to post-transcriptionally regulate target RNAs, including long non-coding RNAs and mRNAs. A recent study demonstrates that Arabidopsis miRNAs are enriched at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This enrichment is a surprise, given that most known miRNA targets are not expected to be translated at the rough ER. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biocomputational prediction of non-coding RNAs in model cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Björn; Georg, Jens; Schön, Verena; Ude, Susanne; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2009-03-23

    In bacteria, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) are crucial regulators of gene expression, controlling various stress responses, virulence, and motility. Previous work revealed a relatively high number of ncRNAs in some marine cyanobacteria. However, for efficient genetic and biochemical analysis it would be desirable to identify a set of ncRNA candidate genes in model cyanobacteria that are easy to manipulate and for which extended mutant, transcriptomic and proteomic data sets are available. Here we have used comparative genome analysis for the biocomputational prediction of ncRNA genes and other sequence/structure-conserved elements in intergenic regions of the three unicellular model cyanobacteria Synechocystis PCC6803, Synechococcus elongatus PCC6301 and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP1 plus the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa NIES843. The unfiltered numbers of predicted elements in these strains is 383, 168, 168, and 809, respectively, combined into 443 sequence clusters, whereas the numbers of individual elements with high support are 94, 56, 64, and 406, respectively. Removing also transposon-associated repeats, finally 78, 53, 42 and 168 sequences, respectively, are left belonging to 109 different clusters in the data set. Experimental analysis of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 validated new ncRNAs originating from the fabF-hoxH and apcC-prmA intergenic spacers and three highly expressed ncRNAs belonging to the Yfr2 family of ncRNAs. Yfr2a promoter-luxAB fusions confirmed a very strong activity of this promoter and indicated a stimulation of expression if the cultures were exposed to elevated light intensities. Comparison to entries in Rfam and experimental testing of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 indicate a high reliability of the current prediction, despite some contamination by the high number of repetitive sequences in some of these species. In particular, we identified in the four species altogether 8 new ncRNA homologs

  8. Biocomputational prediction of non-coding RNAs in model cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ude Susanne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA are crucial regulators of gene expression, controlling various stress responses, virulence, and motility. Previous work revealed a relatively high number of ncRNAs in some marine cyanobacteria. However, for efficient genetic and biochemical analysis it would be desirable to identify a set of ncRNA candidate genes in model cyanobacteria that are easy to manipulate and for which extended mutant, transcriptomic and proteomic data sets are available. Results Here we have used comparative genome analysis for the biocomputational prediction of ncRNA genes and other sequence/structure-conserved elements in intergenic regions of the three unicellular model cyanobacteria Synechocystis PCC6803, Synechococcus elongatus PCC6301 and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP1 plus the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa NIES843. The unfiltered numbers of predicted elements in these strains is 383, 168, 168, and 809, respectively, combined into 443 sequence clusters, whereas the numbers of individual elements with high support are 94, 56, 64, and 406, respectively. Removing also transposon-associated repeats, finally 78, 53, 42 and 168 sequences, respectively, are left belonging to 109 different clusters in the data set. Experimental analysis of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 validated new ncRNAs originating from the fabF-hoxH and apcC-prmA intergenic spacers and three highly expressed ncRNAs belonging to the Yfr2 family of ncRNAs. Yfr2a promoter-luxAB fusions confirmed a very strong activity of this promoter and indicated a stimulation of expression if the cultures were exposed to elevated light intensities. Conclusion Comparison to entries in Rfam and experimental testing of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 indicate a high reliability of the current prediction, despite some contamination by the high number of repetitive sequences in some of these species. In particular, we

  9. Detection of microRNAs in archival cytology urine smears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonato, Francesca; Ventura, Laura; Sartori, Nicola; Cappellesso, Rocco; Fassan, Matteo; Busund, Lill-Tove; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs' dysregulation and profiling have been demonstrated to be clinically relevant in urothelial carcinoma (UC). Urine cytology is commonly used as the mainstay non-invasive test for secondary prevention and follow-up of UC patients. Ancillary tools are needed to support cytopathologists in the diagnosis of low-grade UC. The feasibility and reliability of microRNAs profiling by qRT-PCR analysis (miR-145 and miR-205) in archival routine urine cytology smears (affected by fixation/staining [Papanicolau] and room temperature storage) was tested in a series of 15 non-neoplastic and 10 UC urine specimens. Only samples with >5,000 urothelial cells and with <50% of inflammatory cells/red blood cells clusters were considered. Overall, a satisfactory amount of total RNA was obtained from all the considered samples (mean 1.27±1.43 µg, range 0.06-4.60 µg). Twenty nanograms of total RNA have been calculated to be the minimal total RNA concentration for reliable and reproducible miRNAs expression profiling analysis of archival cytological smears (slope= -3.4084; R-squared=0.99; efficiency=1.94). miR-145 and miR-205 were significantly downregulated in UC samples in comparison to non-tumor controls. These findings demonstrate that urine archival cytology smears are suitable for obtaining high-quality RNA to be used in microRNAs expression profiling. Further studies should investigate if miRNAs profiling can be successfully translated into clinical practice as diagnostic or prognostic markers.

  10. Detection of microRNAs in archival cytology urine smears.

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    Francesca Simonato

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs' dysregulation and profiling have been demonstrated to be clinically relevant in urothelial carcinoma (UC. Urine cytology is commonly used as the mainstay non-invasive test for secondary prevention and follow-up of UC patients. Ancillary tools are needed to support cytopathologists in the diagnosis of low-grade UC. The feasibility and reliability of microRNAs profiling by qRT-PCR analysis (miR-145 and miR-205 in archival routine urine cytology smears (affected by fixation/staining [Papanicolau] and room temperature storage was tested in a series of 15 non-neoplastic and 10 UC urine specimens. Only samples with >5,000 urothelial cells and with <50% of inflammatory cells/red blood cells clusters were considered. Overall, a satisfactory amount of total RNA was obtained from all the considered samples (mean 1.27±1.43 µg, range 0.06-4.60 µg. Twenty nanograms of total RNA have been calculated to be the minimal total RNA concentration for reliable and reproducible miRNAs expression profiling analysis of archival cytological smears (slope= -3.4084; R-squared=0.99; efficiency=1.94. miR-145 and miR-205 were significantly downregulated in UC samples in comparison to non-tumor controls. These findings demonstrate that urine archival cytology smears are suitable for obtaining high-quality RNA to be used in microRNAs expression profiling. Further studies should investigate if miRNAs profiling can be successfully translated into clinical practice as diagnostic or prognostic markers.

  11. Plasma specific miRNAs as predictive biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of glioma

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    Wang Qiong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a highly malignant brain tumor with a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs, approximately 21–25 nucleotides in length. Recently, some researchers have demonstrated that plasma miRNAs are sensitive and specific biomarkers of various cancers. The primary aim of the study is to investigate whether miRNAs present in the plasma of GBM patients can be used as diagnostic biomarkers and are associated with glioma classification and clinical treatment. Materials and Methods Plasma samples were attained by venipuncture from 50 patients and 10 healthy donors. Plasma levels of miRNAs were determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The plasma levels of miR-21, miR-128 and miR-342-3p were significantly altered in GBM patients compared to normal controls and could discriminate glioma from healthy controls with high specificity and sensitivity. However, these three miRNAs were not significantly changed in patients with other brain tumors such as meningioma or pituitary adenoma. Furthermore, the plasma levels of these three miRNAs in GBM patients treated by operation and chemo-radiation almost revived to normal levels. Finally, we also demonstrated that miR-128 and miR-342-3p were positively correlated with histopathological grades of glioma. Conclusions These findings suggest that plasma specific miRNAs have potential use as novel biomarkers of glioma and may be useful in clinical management for glioma patients.

  12. [Screening of bone-related microRNAs in serum of patients with osteogenesis imperfect].

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    Wang, Ziqiang; Lu, Yanqin; Ren, Xiuzhi; Wang, Yanzhou; Li, Zhiliang; Xu, Chao; Han, Jinxiang

    2012-10-01

    We screened differential expression bone-related microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum of patients with osteogenesis imperfect (OI). First, we selected the reference gene (s) fit for quantitative detection of serum miRNAs by using geNorm and several other programmes. Then real-time fluorescent quntitative PCR was used to detect the expression level of bone-related miRNAs gained by means of miRanda, Targetscan and Pictar softwares caculation and reading literature. Then, the results were analyzed with the matched t test. All 6 candidate reference genes had a stable expression level in serum of healthy controls and patients with different characters, and the optimal number of reference genes is 4 (miR-16, let-7a, snRNAU6, miR-92a) after Pairwise Variations analysis (V4/5 = 0.133 < 0.15). For validating the universality of expression stability, we detected the relative expression value of miR-16, let-7a, snRNAU6 and miR-92a in another 8 healthy controls and 16 patients with OI and the result revealed that the expression of 4 genes remained stable (M < 1.5). After measuring serum levels of more than 100 bone-related miRNAs in patients with real-time qPCR, 11 miRNAs showed differential expression, and bioinformatic analysis suggested these altered expressional mioRNAs had possibilities to participate in the process of OI. So the experiment indicated that there existed many differential expression bone-related miRNAs in serum of patients with OI, and these miRNAs had potentials to be promising biomarkers for serologic tests and diagnosis of OI.

  13. Detection of small RNAs in Bordetella pertussis and identification of a novel repeated genetic element

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    Wulbrecht Bérénice

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small bacterial RNAs (sRNAs have been shown to participate in the regulation of gene expression and have been identified in numerous prokaryotic species. Some of them are involved in the regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. So far, little is known about sRNAs in Bordetella, and only very few sRNAs have been identified in the genome of Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. Results An in silico approach was used to predict sRNAs genes in intergenic regions of the B. pertussis genome. The genome sequences of B. pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella avium were compared using a Blast, and significant hits were analyzed using RNAz. Twenty-three candidate regions were obtained, including regions encoding the already documented 6S RNA, and the GCVT and FMN riboswitches. The existence of sRNAs was verified by Northern blot analyses, and transcripts were detected for 13 out of the 20 additional candidates. These new sRNAs were named Bordetella pertussis RNAs, bpr. The expression of 4 of them differed between the early, exponential and late growth phases, and one of them, bprJ2, was found to be under the control of BvgA/BvgS two-component regulatory system of Bordetella virulence. A phylogenetic study of the bprJ sequence revealed a novel, so far undocumented repeat of ~90 bp, found in numerous copies in the Bordetella genomes and in that of other Betaproteobacteria. This repeat exhibits certain features of mobile elements. Conclusion We shown here that B. pertussis, like other pathogens, expresses sRNAs, and that the expression of one of them is controlled by the BvgA/BvgS system, similarly to most virulence genes, suggesting that it is involved in virulence of B. pertussis.

  14. Oscillations of the Outer Boundary of the Outer Radiation Belt During Sawtooth Oscillations

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    Jae-Hun Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three sawtooth oscillation events observed at geosynchronous orbit where we find quasi-periodic (every 2-3 hours sudden flux increases followed by slow flux decreases at the energy levels of ˜50-400 keV. For these three sawtooth events, we have examined variations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt. In order to determine L values of the outer boundary, we have used data of relativistic electron flux observed by the SAMPEX satellite. We find that the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt oscillates periodically being consistent with sawtooth oscillation phases. Specifically, the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt expands (namely, the boundary L value increases following the sawtooth particle flux enhancement of each tooth, and then contracts (namely, the boundary L value decreases while the sawtooth flux decreases gradually until the next flux enhancement. On the other hand, it is repeatedly seen that the asymmetry of the magnetic field intensity between dayside and nightside decreases (increases due to the dipolarization (the stretching on the nightside as the sawtooth flux increases (decreases. This implies that the periodic magnetic field variations during the sawtooth oscillations are likely responsible for the expansion-contraction oscillations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt.

  15. MicroRNA assassins: factors that regulate the disappearance of miRNAs.

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    Kai, Zoya S; Pasquinelli, Amy E

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control essential gene regulatory pathways in plants and animals. Serving as guides in silencing complexes, miRNAs direct Argonaute proteins to specific target messenger RNAs to repress protein expression. The mature, 22-nucleotide (nt) miRNA is the product of multiple processing steps, and recent studies have uncovered factors that directly control the stability of the functional RNA form. Although alteration of miRNA levels has been linked to numerous disease states, the mechanisms responsible for stabilized or reduced miRNA expression have been largely elusive. The discovery of specific cis-acting modifications and trans-acting proteins that affect miRNA half-life reveals new elements that contribute to the homeostasis of these vital regulatory molecules.

  16. Multiple miRNAs jointly regulate the biosynthesis of ecdysteroid in the holometabolous insects, Chilo suppressalis.

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    He, Kang; Sun, Yang; Xiao, Huamei; Ge, Chang; Li, Fei; Han, Zhaojun

    2017-12-01

    The accurate rise and fall of active hormones is important for insect development. The ecdysteroids must be cleared in a timely manner. However, the mechanism of suppressing the ecdysteroid biosynthesis at the right time remains unclear. Here, we sequenced a small RNA library of Chilo suppressalis and identified 300 miRNAs in this notorious rice insect pest. Microarray analysis yielded 54 differentially expressed miRNAs during metamorphosis development. Target prediction and in vitro dual-luciferase assays confirmed that seven miRNAs (two conserved and five novel miRNAs) jointly targeted three Halloween genes in the ecdysteroid biosynthesis pathway. Overexpression of these seven miRNAs reduced the titer of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), induced mortality, and retarded development, which could be rescued by treatment with 20E. Comparative analysis indicated that the miRNA regulation of metamorphosis development is a conserved process but that the miRNAs involved are highly divergent. In all, we present evidence that both conserved and lineage-specific miRNAs have crucial roles in regulating development in insects by controlling ecdysteroid biosynthesis, which is important for ensuring developmental convergence and evolutionary diversity. © 2017 He et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. Expression patterns of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

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    Yiş, Uluç; Tüfekçi, Uğur Kemal; Genç, Şermin; Çarman, Kürşat Bora; Bayram, Erhan; Topçu, Yasemin; Kurul, Semra Hız

    2015-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is caused by persistent brain infection of mutated virus, showing inflammation, neurodegeneration, and demyelination. Although many factors are emphasized in the pathogenesis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, the exact mechanism of neurodegeneration remains unknown. Micro-RNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional levels. Micro-RNAs are essential for normal immune system development; besides they are also implicated in the pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory disorders. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression patterns of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. We enrolled 39 patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and 41 healthy controls. Quantitative analysis of micro-RNAs 146a, 181a, and 155 were performed using specific stem-loop primers followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. All of 3 micro-RNAs were upregulated in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients. In addition, the level of micro-RNA 155 expression was higher in stage 3 patients. But, micro-RNA 146a and 181a expression levels showed no association or correlation with clinically relevant data. Alteration of peripheral blood mononuclear cell micro-RNAs in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may shed new light on the pathogenesis of disease and may contribute to the aberrant systemic rise in mRNA levels in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Noncoding RNAs in liver cancer stem cells: The big impact of little things.

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    Lv, Hongwei; Lv, Guishuai; Han, Qin; Yang, Wen; Wang, Hongyang

    2018-04-01

    The high rate of recurrence and heterogeneity make hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as one of the most prevalent malignancy worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are responsible for cancer initiation, metastasis, drug resistance and relapse, accounting for the heterogeneous and hierarchical organizations of HCC. Therefore, CSCs are novel targets for more efficient liver cancer therapies. New data continues to mount on the functions of noncoding RNAs in multiple processes of liver CSCs, including malignant proliferation, self-renewal, tumorigenicity, and survival. Thus, it is highly critical to develop improved understanding of the mechanisms by which noncoding RNAs control CSCs functions for developing better diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Herein, we will shed light on the regulatory roles of noncoding RNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), in liver CSCs acquisition and maintenance after presenting an overview about the characteristics of liver CSCs and their origins. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Regulatory Roles of MicroRNAs in Bone Remodeling and Perspectives as Biomarkers in Osteoporosis

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    Mengge Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are involved in many cellular and molecular activities and played important roles in many biological and pathological processes, such as tissue formation, cancer development, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been reported that microRNAs can modulate the differentiation and activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the key cells that are involved in bone remodeling process. Meanwhile, the results from our and other research groups showed that the expression profiles of microRNAs in the serum and bone tissues are significantly different in postmenopausal women with or without fractures compared to the control. Therefore, it can be postulated that microRNAs might play important roles in bone remodeling and that they are very likely to be involved in the pathological process of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this review, we will present the updated research on the regulatory roles of microRNAs in osteoblasts and osteoclasts and the expression profiles of microRNAs in osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture patients. The perspective of serum microRNAs as novel biomarkers in bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis has also been discussed.

  20. miRNAs: Major modulators for crop growth and development under abiotic stresses.

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    Noman, Ali; Fahad, Shah; Aqeel, Muhammad; Ali, Usman; Amanullah; Anwar, Sumera; Baloch, Shahbaz Khan; Zainab, Madiha

    2017-05-01

    Cumulatively, biotic and abiotic stresses of various magnitudes can decrease the production of crops by 70%. miRNAs have emerged as a genetic tool with enormous potential that can be exploited to understand stress tolerance at the molecular level and eventually regulate stress in crops. Plant miRNA targets frequently fit into diverse families of TFs that control the expression of genes related to a certain trait. As key machinery in gene regulatory networks, it is agreed that a broad understanding of miRNAs will greatly increase our understanding of plant responses to environmental stresses. miRNA-led stress regulatory networks are being considered as novel tools for the development of abiotic stress tolerance in crops. At this time, we need to expand our knowledge about the modulatory role of miRNAs during environmental fluctuations. It has become exceedingly clear that with increased understanding of the role of miRNAs during stress, the techniques for using miRNA-mediated gene regulation to enhance plant stress tolerance will become more effective and reliable. In this review we present: (1) miRNAs as a potential avenue for the modulation of abiotic stresses, and (2) summarize the research progress regarding plant responses to stress. Current progress is explained through discussion of the identification and validation of several miRNAs that enhance crop tolerance of salinity, drought, etc., while missing links on different aspects of miRNAs related to abiotic stress tolerance are noted.

  1. Sweating the small stuff: microRNAs and genetic changes define pancreatic cancer.

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    Tang, Siuwah; Bonaroti, Jillian; Unlu, Sebnem; Liang, Xiaoyan; Tang, Daolin; Zeh, Herbert J; Lotze, Michael T

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 18- to 22-nucleotide-long, single-stranded, noncoding RNAs that regulate important biological processes including differentiation, proliferation, and response to cellular stressors such as hypoxia, nutrient depletion, and traversion of the cell cycle by controlling protein expression within the cell. Many investigators have profiled cancer tissue and serum miRNAs to identify potential therapeutic targets, understand the pathways involved in tumorigenesis, and identify diagnostic tumor signatures. In the setting of pancreatic cancer, obtaining pancreatic tissue is invasive and impractical for early diagnosis. Several groups have profiled miRNAs that are present in the blood as a means to diagnose tumor progression and predict prognosis/survival or drug resistance. Several miRNA signatures found in pancreatic tissue and the peripheral blood, as well as the pathways that are associated with pancreatic cancer, are reviewed here in detail. Three miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, miR-155, and miR-200) have been repetitively identified in both pancreatic cancer tissue and patients' blood. Those miRNAs regulate and are regulated by the central genetic and epigenetic changes observed in pancreatic cancer including p53, transforming growth factor β, p16(INK4A), BRCA1/2, and Kras. These miRNAs are involved in DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell invasion and also play important roles in promoting metastases.

  2. MicroRNAs regulate neuronal plasticity and are involved in pain mechanisms.

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    Sara eElramah

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs(miRNAs are emerging as master regulators of gene expression in the nervous system where they contribute not only to brain development but also to neuronal network homeostasis and plasticity. Their function is the result of a cascade of events including miRNA biogenesis, target recognition and translation inhibition. It has been suggested that miRNAs are major switches of the genome owing to their ability to regulate multiple genes at the same time. This regulation is essential for normal neuronal activity and, when affected, can lead to drastic pathological conditions. As an example, we illustrate how deregulation of miRNAs can affect neuronal plasticity leading to chronic pain.The origin of pain and its dual role as a key physiological function and a debilitating disease has been highly debated until now. The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20-25% worldwide, thus making it a public health problem. Chronic pain can be considered as a form of maladaptive plasticity. Long-lasting modifications develop as a result of global changes in gene expression, and are thus likely to be controlled by miRNAs. Here, we review the literature on miRNAs and their targets responsible for maladaptive plasticity in chronic pain conditions. In addition, we conduct a retrospective analysis of miRNA expression data published for different pain models, taking into account recent progress in our understanding of the role of miRNAs in neuronal plasticity.

  3. Ancestral vinclozolin exposure alters the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of sperm small noncoding RNAs.

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    Schuster, Andrew; Skinner, Michael K; Yan, Wei

    Exposure to the agricultural fungicide vinclozolin during gestation promotes a higher incidence of various diseases in the subsequent unexposed F3 and F4 generations. This phenomenon is termed epigenetic transgenerational inheritance and has been shown to in part involve alterations in DNA methylation, but the role of other epigenetic mechanisms remains unknown. The current study investigated the alterations in small noncoding RNA (sncRNA) in the sperm from F3 generation control and vinclozolin lineage rats. Over 200 differentially expressed sncRNAs were identified and the tRNA-derived sncRNAs, namely 5' halves of mature tRNAs (5' halves), displayed the most dramatic changes. Gene targets of the altered miRNAs and tRNA 5' halves revealed associations between the altered sncRNAs and differentially DNA methylated regions. Dysregulated sncRNAs appear to correlate with mRNA profiles associated with the previously observed vinclozolin-induced disease phenotypes. Data suggest potential connections between sperm-borne RNAs and the vinclozolin-induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance phenomenon.

  4. Artificial Analogues of Circulating Box C/D RNAs Induce Strong Innate Immune Response and MicroRNA Activation in Human Adenocarcinoma Cells.

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    Stepanov, Grigory A; Filippova, Julia A; Nushtaeva, Anna A; Kuligina, Elena V; Koval, Olga A; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitriy V

    2016-01-01

    Fragments of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) were found among various non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) circulating in human blood. Currently, the function of such cell-free sno-derived-RNAs is not clearly defined. This work is aimed at identifying regulatory pathways controlled by extracellular snoRNAs. In order to determine the molecular targets and pathways affected by artificial snoRNAs, we performed Illumina array analysis of MCF-7 human adenocarcinoma cells transfected with box C/D RNAs. The genes related to the innate immune response and apoptotic cascades were found to be activated in transfected cells compared with control cells. Intriguingly, the transfection of MCF-7 cells with artificial box C/D snoRNAs also increased the transcription of several microRNAs, such as mir-574, mir-599 and mir-21. Our data demonstrated that extracellular snoRNAs introduced into human cells may function as gene expression modulators, with activation of microRNA genes being one of the regulatory mechanisms.

  5. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

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    Gang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases. Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG on cholesterol metabolism. Methods: Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(--epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2 hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships. RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism. Results: The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment. Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA. In particular, the lncRNA AT102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR were identified. Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique, we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression of AT102202. After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2, we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells. LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism.

  6. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

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    Liu, Gang; Zheng, Xinxin; Xu, Yanlu; Lu, Jie; Chen, Jingzhou; Huang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases. Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on cholesterol metabolism. Methods: Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(-)-epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2) hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships. RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism. Results: The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment. Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA. In particular, the lncRNA AT102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) were identified. Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique, we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression of AT102202. After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2, we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells. LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25563320

  7. Long noncoding RNAs and Alzheimer's disease

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    Luo Q

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Qiong Luo,1,2 Yinghui Chen1,2 1Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are typically defined as transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. lncRNAs can regulate gene expression at epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional levels. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs are involved in many neurological diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions, and genetic disorders. Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease, which accounts for >80% of dementia in elderly subjects. In this review, we will highlight recent studies investigating the role of lncRNAs in Alzheimer’s disease and focus on some specific lncRNAs that may underlie Alzheimer’s disease pathophysiology and therefore could be potential therapeutic targets. Keywords: lncRNA, Alzheimer’s disease, ncRNAs, amyloid β peptide, BACE1, BC200, BACE1-AS

  8. Novel Regulatory Small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes

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    Tesorero, Rafael A.; Yu, Ning; Wright, Jordan O.; Svencionis, Juan P.; Cheng, Qiang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus or GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that has shown complex modes of regulation of its virulence factors to cause diverse diseases. Bacterial small RNAs are regarded as novel widespread regulators of gene expression in response to environmental signals. Recent studies have revealed that several small RNAs (sRNAs) have an important role in S. pyogenes physiology and pathogenesis by regulating gene expression at the translational level. To search for new sRNAs in S. pyogenes, we performed a genomewide analysis through computational prediction followed by experimental verification. To overcome the limitation of low accuracy in computational prediction, we employed a combination of three different computational algorithms (sRNAPredict, eQRNA and RNAz). A total of 45 candidates were chosen based on the computational analysis, and their transcription was analyzed by reverse-transcriptase PCR and Northern blot. Through this process, we discovered 7 putative novel trans-acting sRNAs. Their abundance varied between different growth phases, suggesting that their expression is influenced by environmental or internal signals. Further, to screen target mRNAs of an sRNA, we employed differential RNA sequencing analysis. This study provides a significant resource for future study of small RNAs and their roles in physiology and pathogenesis of S. pyogenes. PMID:23762235

  9. Detection of Exosomal miRNAs in the Plasma of Melanoma Patients

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    Susan R. Pfeffer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of 22–25 nucleotide RNAs that control gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs have potential as cancer biomarkers. Melanoma is a highly aggressive form of skin cancer accounting for almost 4% of cancers among men and women, and ~80% of skin cancer-related deaths in the US. In the present study we analyzed plasma-derived exosomal miRNAs from clinically affected and unaffected familial melanoma patients (CDKN2A/p16 gene carriers and compared them with affected (nonfamilial melanoma and unaffected control subjects in order to identify novel risk biomarkers for melanoma. Intact miRNAs can be isolated from the circulation because of their presence in exosomes. A number of differentially regulated miRNAs identified by NanoString human V2 miRNA array were validated by quantitative PCR. Significantly, miR-17, miR-19a, miR-21, miR-126, and miR-149 were expressed at higher levels in patients with metastatic sporadic melanoma as compared with familial melanoma patients or unaffected control subjects. Surprisingly, no substantial differences in miRNA expression were detected between familial melanoma patients (all inclusive and unaffected control subjects. The miRNAs differentially expressed in the different patient cohorts, especially in patients with metastatic melanoma, may play important roles in tumor progression and metastasis, and may be used as predictive biomarkers to monitor remission as well as relapse following therapeutic intervention.

  10. Two Chloroplastic Viroids Induce the Accumulation of Small RNAs Associated with Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

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    Martínez de Alba, A. E.; Flores, R.; Hernández, C.

    2002-01-01

    In plants, posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) has been reported for cytoplasmic RNAs from endogenous nuclear genes, transgenes, viruses, and, recently, for a viroid with nuclear replication and accumulation. However, phenomena of this kind have not been described for mitochondrial or chloroplastic RNAs. Here we show that viroids that replicate and accumulate in the chloroplast are also targets of PTGS and this process may control viroid titer. PMID:12438638

  11. Behind the curtain of non-coding RNAs; long non-coding RNAs regulating hepatocarcinogenesis

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    El Khodiry, Aya; Afify, Menna; El Tayebi, Hend M

    2018-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive cancers worldwide. HCC is the fifth common malignancy in the world and the second leading cause of cancer death in Asia. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are RNAs with a length greater than 200 nucleotides that do not encode proteins. lncRNAs can regulate gene expression and protein synthesis in several ways by interacting with DNA, RNA and proteins in a sequence specific manner. They could regulate cellular and developmental processes through either gene inhibition or gene activation. Many studies have shown that dysregulation of lncRNAs is related to many human diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, genetic disorders, neurological diseases, immune mediated disorders and cancers. However, the study of lncRNAs is challenging as they are poorly conserved between species, their expression levels aren’t as high as that of mRNAs and have great interpatient variations. The study of lncRNAs expression in cancers have been a breakthrough as it unveils potential biomarkers and drug targets for cancer therapy and helps understand the mechanism of pathogenesis. This review discusses many long non-coding RNAs and their contribution in HCC, their role in development, metastasis, and prognosis of HCC and how to regulate and target these lncRNAs as a therapeutic tool in HCC treatment in the future. PMID:29434445

  12. Dehydration-responsive miRNAs in foxtail millet: genome-wide identification, characterization and expression profiling.

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    Yadav, Amita; Khan, Yusuf; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    A set of novel and known dehydration-responsive miRNAs have been identified in foxtail millet. These findings provide new insights into understanding the functional role of miRNAs and their respective targets in regulating plant response to dehydration stress. MicroRNAs perform significant regulatory roles in growth, development and stress response of plants. Though the miRNA-mediated gene regulatory networks under dehydration stress remain largely unexplored in plant including foxtail millet (Setaria italica), which is a natural abiotic stress tolerant crop. To find out the dehydration-responsive miRNAs at the global level, four small RNA libraries were constructed from control and dehydration stress treated seedlings of two foxtail millet cultivars showing contrasting tolerance behavior towards dehydration stress. Using Illumina sequencing technology, 55 known and 136 novel miRNAs were identified, representing 22 and 48 miRNA families, respectively. Eighteen known and 33 novel miRNAs were differentially expressed during dehydration stress. After the stress treatment, 32 dehydration-responsive miRNAs were up-regulated in tolerant cultivar and 22 miRNAs were down-regulated in sensitive cultivar, suggesting that miRNA-mediated molecular regulation might play important roles in providing contrasting characteristics to these cultivars. Predicted targets of identified miRNAs were found to encode various transcription factors and functional enzymes, indicating their involvement in broad spectrum regulatory functions and biological processes. Further, differential expression patterns of seven known miRNAs were validated by northern blot and expression of ten novel dehydration-responsive miRNAs were confirmed by SL-qRT PCR. Differential expression behavior of five miRNA-target genes was verified under dehydration stress treatment and two of them also validated by RLM RACE. Overall, the present study highlights the importance of dehydration stress-associated post

  13. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

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    Alice Telesnitsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA, some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive.

  14. MicroRNAs in the Pineal Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clokie, Samuel J. H.; Lau, Pierre; Kim, Hyun Hee; Coon, Steven L.; Klein, David C.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a broad range of roles in biological regulation. In this study, rat pineal miRNAs were profiled for the first time, and their importance was evaluated by focusing on the main function of the pineal gland, melatonin synthesis. Massively parallel sequencing and related methods revealed the miRNA population is dominated by a small group of miRNAs as follows: ∼75% is accounted for by 15 miRNAs; miR-182 represents 28%. In addition to miR-182, miR-183 and miR-96 are also highly enriched in the pineal gland, a distinctive pattern also found in the retina. This effort also identified previously unrecognized miRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs. Pineal miRNAs do not exhibit a marked night/day difference in abundance with few exceptions (e.g. 2-fold night/day differences in the abundance of miR-96 and miR-182); this contrasts sharply with the dynamic 24-h pattern that characterizes the pineal transcriptome. During development, the abundance of most pineal gland-enriched miRNAs increases; however, there is a marked decrease in at least one, miR-483. miR-483 is a likely regulator of melatonin synthesis, based on the following. It inhibits melatonin synthesis by pinealocytes in culture; it acts via predicted binding sites in the 3′-UTR of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) mRNA, the penultimate enzyme in melatonin synthesis, and it exhibits a developmental profile opposite to that of Aanat transcripts. Additionally, a miR-483 targeted antagonist increased melatonin synthesis in neonatal pinealocytes. These observations support the hypothesis that miR-483 suppresses Aanat mRNA levels during development and that the developmental decrease in miR-483 abundance promotes melatonin synthesis. PMID:22908386

  15. Molecular basis for photoreceptor outer segment architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Andrew F X; Moritz, Orson L; Williams, David S

    2016-11-01

    To serve vision, vertebrate rod and cone photoreceptors must detect photons, convert the light stimuli into cellular signals, and then convey the encoded information to downstream neurons. Rods and cones are sensory neurons that each rely on specialized ciliary organelles to detect light. These organelles, called outer segments, possess elaborate architectures that include many hundreds of light-sensitive membranous disks arrayed one atop another in precise register. These stacked disks capture light and initiate the chain of molecular and cellular events that underlie normal vision. Outer segment organization is challenged by an inherently dynamic nature; these organelles are subject to a renewal process that replaces a significant fraction of their disks (up to ∼10%) on a daily basis. In addition, a broad range of environmental and genetic insults can disrupt outer segment morphology to impair photoreceptor function and viability. In this chapter, we survey the major progress that has been made for understanding the molecular basis of outer segment architecture. We also discuss key aspects of organelle lipid and protein composition, and highlight distributions, interactions, and potential structural functions of key OS-resident molecules, including: kinesin-2, actin, RP1, prominin-1, protocadherin 21, peripherin-2/rds, rom-1, glutamic acid-rich proteins, and rhodopsin. Finally, we identify key knowledge gaps and challenges that remain for understanding how normal outer segment architecture is established and maintained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered expression of miRNAs in the uterus from a letrozole-induced rat PCOS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunjin; Chen, Lu; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Shuxiong; Fu, Lulu; Jiang, Yanwen; Gao, Shan; Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Fengge; Zhu, Xiaoling; Rao, Jiahui; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xu

    2017-01-20

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) causes female subfertility with ovarian disorders and may be associated with increased rate of early-pregnancy failure. Rat PCOS models were established using letrozole to understand the uterine pathogenesis of PCOS. The differential expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) was observed in rat uterus with PCOS. After estrous cycles were disrupted, significantly abnormal ovarian morphology and hormone level were observed in rats with PCOS. A total of 148 miRNAs differentially expressed were identified in the uterus from the letrozole-induced rat model compared with the control. These miRNAs included 111 upregulated miRNAs and 37 downregulated miRNAs. The differential expression of miR-484, miR-375-3p, miR-324-5p, and miR-223-3p was further confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatic analysis showed that these four miRNAs were predicted to regulate a large number of genes with different functions. Pathway analysis supported that target genes of miRNAs were involved in insulin secretion and signaling pathways, such as wnt, AMPK, PI3K-Akt, and Ras. These data indicated that miRNAs differentially expressed in rat uterus with PCOS may be associated with PCOS pathogenesis in the uterus. Our findings can help clarify the mechanism of uterine defects in PCOS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Apple ring rot-responsive putative microRNAs revealed by high-throughput sequencing in Malus × domestica Borkh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin-Yi; Du, Bei-Bei; Gao, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Tu, Xu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Zhen; Qu, Shen-Chun

    2014-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, which silence target mRNA via cleavage or translational inhibition to function in regulating gene expression. MiRNAs act as important regulators of plant development and stress response. For understanding the role of miRNAs responsive to apple ring rot stress, we identified disease-responsive miRNAs using high-throughput sequencing in Malus × domestica Borkh.. Four small RNA libraries were constructed from two control strains in M. domestica, crabapple (CKHu) and Fuji Naga-fu No. 6 (CKFu), and two disease stress strains, crabapple (DSHu) and Fuji Naga-fu No. 6 (DSFu). A total of 59 miRNA families were identified and five miRNAs might be responsive to apple ring rot infection and validated via qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we predicted 76 target genes which were regulated by conserved miRNAs potentially. Our study demonstrated that miRNAs was responsive to apple ring rot infection and may have important implications on apple disease resistance.

  18. Network analysis of microRNAs and their regulation in human ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2011-11-03

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that repress the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) or degrade mRNAs. These functions of miRNAs allow them to control key cellular processes such as development, differentiation and apoptosis, and they have also been implicated in several cancers such as leukaemia, lung, pancreatic and ovarian cancer (OC). Unfortunately, the specific machinery of miRNA regulation, involving transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs), is not well understood. In the present study we focus on computationally deciphering the underlying network of miRNAs, their targets, and their control mechanisms that have an influence on OC development.Results: We analysed experimentally verified data from multiple sources that describe miRNA influence on diseases, miRNA targeting of mRNAs, and on protein-protein interactions, and combined this data with ab initio transcription factor binding site predictions within miRNA promoter regions. From these analyses, we derived a network that describes the influence of miRNAs and their regulation in human OC. We developed a methodology to analyse the network in order to find the nodes that have the largest potential of influencing the network\\'s behaviour (network hubs). We further show the potentially most influential miRNAs, TFs and TcoFs, showing subnetworks illustrating the involved mechanisms as well as regulatory miRNA network motifs in OC. We find an enrichment of miRNA targeted OC genes in the highly relevant pathways cell cycle regulation and apoptosis.Conclusions: We combined several sources of interaction and association data to analyse and place miRNAs within regulatory pathways that influence human OC. These results represent the first comprehensive miRNA regulatory network analysis for human OC. This suggests that miRNAs and their regulation may play a major role in OC and that further directed research in this area is of utmost importance to enhance

  19. Extracellular Onchocerca-derived small RNAs in host nodules and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Juan F; Makepeace, Benjamin L; Babayan, Simon A; Ivens, Alasdair; Pfarr, Kenneth M; Blaxter, Mark; Debrah, Alexander; Wanji, Samuel; Ngangyung, Henrietta F; Bah, Germanus S; Tanya, Vincent N; Taylor, David W; Hoerauf, Achim; Buck, Amy H

    2015-01-27

    microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of short, non-coding RNA can be found in a highly stable, cell-free form in mammalian body fluids. Specific miRNAs are secreted by parasitic nematodes in exosomes and have been detected in the serum of murine and dog hosts infected with the filarial nematodes Litomosoides sigmodontis and Dirofilaria immitis, respectively. Here we identify extracellular, parasite-derived small RNAs associated with Onchocerca species infecting cattle and humans. Small RNA libraries were prepared from total RNA extracted from the nodule fluid of cattle infected with Onchocerca ochengi as well as serum and plasma from humans infected with Onchocerca volvulus in Cameroon and Ghana. Parasite-derived miRNAs were identified based on the criteria that sequences unambiguously map to hairpin structures in Onchocerca genomes, do not align to the human genome and are not present in European control serum. A total of 62 mature miRNAs from 52 distinct pre-miRNA candidates were identified in nodule fluid from cattle infected with O. ochengi of which 59 are identical in the genome of the human parasite O. volvulus. Six of the extracellular miRNAs were also identified in sequencing analyses of serum and plasma from humans infected with O. volvulus. Based on sequencing analysis the abundance levels of the parasite miRNAs in serum or plasma range from 5 to 127 reads/per million total host miRNA reads identified, comparable to our previous analyses of Schistosoma mansoni and L. sigmodontis miRNAs in serum. All six of the O. volvulus miRNAs identified have orthologs in other filarial nematodes and four were identified in the serum of mice infected with L. sigmodontis. We have identified parasite-derived miRNAs associated with onchocerciasis in cattle and humans. Our results confirm the conserved nature of RNA secretion by diverse nematodes. Additional species-specific small RNAs from O. volvulus may be present in serum based on the novel miRNA sequences identified in the

  20. Response of microRNAs to cold treatment in the young spikes of common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guoqi; Zhang, Rongzhi; Zhang, Shujuan; Li, Yulian; Gao, Jie; Han, Xiaodong; Chen, Mingli; Wang, Jiao; Li, Wei; Li, Genying

    2017-02-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that play important roles in biotic and abiotic stresses by regulating their target genes. For common wheat, spring frost damage frequently occurs, especially when low temperature coincides with plants at early floral organ differentiation, which may result in significant yield loss. Up to date, the role of miRNAs in wheat response to frost stress is not well understood. We report here the sequencing of small RNA transcriptomes from the young spikes that were treated with cold stress and the comparative analysis with those of the control. A total of 192 conserved miRNAs from 105 families and nine novel miRNAs were identified. Among them, 34 conserved and five novel miRNAs were differentially expressed between the cold-stressed samples and the controls. The expression patterns of 18 miRNAs were further validated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Moreover, nearly half of the miRNAs were cross inducible by biotic and abiotic stresses when compared with previously published work. Target genes were predicted and validated by degradome sequencing. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis showed that the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs were enriched for response to the stimulus, regulation of transcription, and ion transport functions. Since many targets of differentially expressed miRNAs were transcription factors that are associated with floral development such as ARF, SPB (Squamosa Promoter Binding like protein), MADS-box (MCM1, AG, DEFA and SRF), MYB, SPX (SYG1, Pho81 and XPR1), TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED, Cycloidea and PCF), and PPR (PentatricoPeptide Repeat) genes, cold-altered miRNA expression may cause abnormal reproductive organ development. Analysis of small RNA transcriptomes and their target genes provide new insight into miRNA regulation in developing wheat inflorescences under cold stress. MiRNAs provide another layer of gene regulation in cold stress response that

  1. microRNAs in CNS disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocerha, Jannet; Kauppinen, Sakari; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2009-01-01

    RNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and are reported to mediate pivotal roles in many aspects of neuronal functions. Disruption of miRNA-based post-transcriptional regulation has been implicated in a range of CNS disorders as one miRNA is predicted to impact...... of miRNAs in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, including the characterization of their downstream CNS mRNA targets, such as beta-secretase (BACE1) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Here, we present an overview of the current progress in miRNA research related to CNS disorders...

  2. MicroRNAs in mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Simon; Geisler, Christian; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. New treatment modalities, including intensive induction regimens with immunochemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, have improved survival. However, many patients still relapse, and there is a need...... for novel therapeutic strategies. Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in MCL. Comparisons of tumor samples from patients with MCL with their normal counterparts (naive B-cells) have identified differentially expressed miRNAs with roles in cellular growth...

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polycistronic MicroRNAs in Cultivated and Wild Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrich, Patricia; Hsing, Yue-Ie Caroline; San Segundo, Blanca

    2016-04-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that direct posttranscriptional gene silencing in eukaryotes. They are frequently clustered in the genomes of animals and can be independently transcribed or simultaneously transcribed into single polycistronic transcripts. Only a few miRNA clusters have been described in plants, and most of them are generated from independent transcriptional units. Here, we used a combination of bioinformatic tools and experimental analyses to discover new polycistronic miRNAs in rice. A genome-wide analysis of clustering patterns of MIRNA loci in the rice genome was carried out using a criterion of 3 kb as the maximal distance between two miRNAs. This analysis revealed 28 loci with the ability to form the typical hairpin structure of miRNA precursors in which 2 or more mature miRNAs mapped along the same structure. RT-PCR provided evidence for the polycistronic nature of seven miRNA precursors containing homologous or nonhomologous miRNA species. Polycistronic miRNAs and candidate polycistronic miRNAs are located across different rice chromosomes, except chromosome 12, and resided in both duplicated and nonduplicated chromosomal regions. Finally, most polycistronic and candidate polycistronic miRNAs showed a pattern of conservation in the genome of rice species with an AA genome. The diversity in the organization of MIR genes that are transcribed as polycistrons suggests a versatile mechanism for the control of gene expression in different biological processes and supports additional levels of complexity in miRNA functioning in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Tissue-specific target analysis of disease-associated microRNAs in human signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Kowarsch

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are a large class of post-transcriptional regulators that bind to the 3' untranslated region of messenger RNAs. They play a critical role in many cellular processes and have been linked to the control of signal transduction pathways. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs can function as tumor suppressors or even as oncogenes when aberrantly expressed. For more general insights of disease-associated microRNAs, we analyzed their impact on human signaling pathways from two perspectives. On a global scale, we found a core set of signaling pathways with enriched tissue-specific microRNA targets across diseases. The function of these pathways reflects the affinity of microRNAs to regulate cellular processes associated with apoptosis, proliferation or development. Comparing cancer and non-cancer related microRNAs, we found no significant differences between both groups. To unveil the interaction and regulation of microRNAs on signaling pathways locally, we analyzed the cellular location and process type of disease-associated microRNA targets and proteins. While disease-associated proteins are highly enriched in extracellular components of the pathway, microRNA targets are preferentially located in the nucleus. Moreover, targets of disease-associated microRNAs preferentially exhibit an inhibitory effect within the pathways in contrast to disease proteins. Our analysis provides systematic insights into the interaction of disease-associated microRNAs and signaling pathways and uncovers differences in cellular locations and process types of microRNA targets and disease-associated proteins.

  5. The Role of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Herpesvirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Piedade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs important in gene regulation. They are able to regulate mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity. Cellular miRNAs have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways, and their deregulation has been associated with several diseases such as cancer. Given the importance of microRNAs to cell homeostasis, it is no surprise that viruses have evolved to take advantage of this cellular pathway. Viruses have been reported to be able to encode and express functional viral microRNAs that target both viral and cellular transcripts. Moreover, viral inhibition of key proteins from the microRNA pathway and important changes in cellular microRNA pool have been reported upon viral infection. In addition, viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to avoid being targeted by cellular microRNAs. This complex interaction between host and viruses to control the microRNA pathway usually favors viral infection and persistence by either reducing immune detection, avoiding apoptosis, promoting cell growth, or promoting lytic or latent infection. One of the best examples of this virus-host-microRNA interplay emanates from members of the Herperviridae family, namely the herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, and the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV. In this review, we will focus on the general functions of microRNAs and the interactions between herpesviruses, human hosts, and microRNAs and will delve into the related mechanisms that contribute to infection and pathogenesis.

  6. The Role of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedade, Diogo; Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel

    2016-06-02

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs important in gene regulation. They are able to regulate mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity. Cellular miRNAs have been involved in the regulation of nearly all cellular pathways, and their deregulation has been associated with several diseases such as cancer. Given the importance of microRNAs to cell homeostasis, it is no surprise that viruses have evolved to take advantage of this cellular pathway. Viruses have been reported to be able to encode and express functional viral microRNAs that target both viral and cellular transcripts. Moreover, viral inhibition of key proteins from the microRNA pathway and important changes in cellular microRNA pool have been reported upon viral infection. In addition, viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to avoid being targeted by cellular microRNAs. This complex interaction between host and viruses to control the microRNA pathway usually favors viral infection and persistence by either reducing immune detection, avoiding apoptosis, promoting cell growth, or promoting lytic or latent infection. One of the best examples of this virus-host-microRNA interplay emanates from members of the Herperviridae family, namely the herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this review, we will focus on the general functions of microRNAs and the interactions between herpesviruses, human hosts, and microRNAs and will delve into the related mechanisms that contribute to infection and pathogenesis.

  7. microRNAs and Acute Myeloid Leukemia Chemoresistance: A Mechanistic Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Marco Gabra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Up until the early 2000s, a functional role for microRNAs (miRNAs was yet to be elucidated. With the advent of increasingly high-throughput and precise RNA-sequencing techniques within the last two decades, it has become well established that miRNAs can regulate almost all cellular processes through their ability to post-transcriptionally regulate a majority of protein-coding genes and countless other non-coding genes. In cancer, miRNAs have been demonstrated to play critical roles by modifying or controlling all major hallmarks including cell division, self-renewal, invasion, and DNA damage among others. Before the introduction of anthracyclines and cytarabine in the 1960s, acute myeloid leukemia (AML was considered a fatal disease. In decades since, prognosis has improved substantially; however, long-term survival with AML remains poor. Resistance to chemotherapy, whether it is present at diagnosis or induced during treatment is a major therapeutic challenge in the treatment of this disease. Certain mechanisms such as DNA damage response and drug targeting, cell cycling, cell death, and drug trafficking pathways have been shown to be further dysregulated in treatment resistant cancers. miRNAs playing key roles in the emergence of these drug resistance phenotypes have recently emerged and replacement or inhibition of these miRNAs may be a viable treatment option. Herein, we describe the roles miRNAs can play in drug resistant AML and we describe miRNA-transcript interactions found within other cancer states which may be present within drug resistant AML. We describe the mechanisms of action of these miRNAs and how they can contribute to a poor overall survival and outcome as well. With the precision of miRNA mimic- or antagomir-based therapies, miRNAs provide an avenue for exquisite targeting in the therapy of drug resistant cancers.

  8. Differential expression of miRNAs in Osborne's ligament of cubital tunnel syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xian-Hu; Ren, Yi-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Jian; Lin, Wei; Fan, Bao-You; Liu, Shen; Hao, Yan; Shi, Gui-Dong; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome (CuTS) is the second most common peripheral nerve compression disease, however, the pathogenesis and pathology of CuTS remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to compare the expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs) in pachyntic Osborne's ligament with that in control tendinous tissue, and select meaningful miRNAs for further investigation of the clinical pathological mechanism underlying CuTS. A microarray assay was performed to examine the expression profiles of miRNAs in the Osborne's ligament and control tendinous tissues. An online bioinformatics algorithms tool (miRWalk) was used to predict putative target genes for the deregulated miRNAs, and functional annotation was performed by Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. Finally, the results of microarray were partially validated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. The expression of total of 60 miRNAs were found to be significantly different between the pachyntic Osborne's ligament and control tendinous tissues. MiRWalk2.0 predicted 1,804 target genes for these miRNAs, and the GO functional analysis of the predicted genes suggested cellular mechanisms, including metabolic process, regulation of cell growth, cell cycle processes, cell division regulation, cellular metabolic process and signal transmission, were involved. Furthermore, KEGG pathway analysis revealed important pathways, including adherent junction, focal adhesion, lysine degradation, cell adhesion molecules and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Compared with the heathy tissue, Osborne's ligament tissue from patients with CuTS showed a markedly different miRNA expression profile, which suggested that miRNAs may be involved in the pathogenesis of CuTS. PMID:28586055

  9. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages Ciencia e Technologia (Brazil), and the Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologia e Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  10. Regulatory RNAs discovered in unexpected places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Jun Wei; Okamura, Katsutomo

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered both small and long noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) encoded in unexpected places. These ncRNA genes were surprises at the time of their discovery, but many quickly became well-accepted families of functional regulatory RNA species. Even after years of extensive gene annotation studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, new types of ncRNA genes continue to be discovered in unexpected places. We highlight ncRNAs that have atypical structures and that are encoded in what are generally considered 'junk' sequences, such as spacers and introns. We also discuss current bottlenecks in the approaches for identifying novel ncRNAs and the possibility that many remain to be discovered. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  12. MicroRNAs mir-184 and let-7 alter Drosophila metabolism and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Christi M; Pletcher, Scott D

    2017-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression associated with many complex biological processes. By comparing miRNA expression between long-lived cohorts of Drosophila melanogaster that were fed a low-nutrient diet with normal-lived control animals fed a high-nutrient diet, we identified miR-184, let-7, miR-125, and miR-100 as candidate miRNAs involved in modulating aging. We found that ubiquitous, adult-specific overexpression of these individual miRNAs led to significant changes in fat metabolism and/or lifespan. Most impressively, adult-specific overexpression of let-7 in female nervous tissue increased median fly lifespan by ~22%. We provide evidence that this lifespan extension is not due to alterations in nutrient intake or to decreased insulin signaling. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. microRNAs related to angiogenesis are dysregulated in endometrioid endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón, Luis A; Braza-Boïls, Aitana; Gilabert, Juan; Chirivella, Melitina; España, Francisco; Estellés, Amparo; Gilabert-Estellés, Juan

    2012-10-01

    Which is the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) related to several angiogenesis regulators such as VEGF-A (Vascular endothelial growth factor-A) and TSP-1 (Thrombospondin-1) in endometrial cancer? A dysregulated expression of miRNAs related to angiogenesis and an increase in the VEGF-A levels were observed in endometrial cancer in comparison with control. The different expression of miRNAs could modulate the expression of angiogenic and antiangiogenic factors, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer. Dysregulated miRNA expression has been previously evaluated in endometrial adenocarcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, there are no studies on the relationship between angiogenic factors and miRNAs in endometrial cancer. Case-control study: 41 patients with histologically proven endometrioid endometrial cancer and 56 women without endometrial cancer. RNAs isolated from tissue samples were analyzed using the GeneChip miRNA 2.0 Array platform (Affymetrix). TaqMan qRT-PCR was used to assess the expression of the selected miRNAs related to angiogenesis (miR-15b, -16, -17-5p, -20a, -21, -125a, -200b, -210, -214*, -221, -222 and -424), and VEGF-A and TSP-1 mRNAs were assessed by qRT-PCR using SYBR Green. Protein levels were quantified by ELISAs. Compared with the miRNAs in the control endometrium, eight miRNAs (miR-15b, -17-5p, -20a, -125a, -214*, -221, -222 and -424) were significantly down-regulated and two miRNAs (miR-200b and -210) were significantly up-regulated in the cancerous endometrium. A significant increase in VEGF-A mRNA and protein expression and in TSP-1 protein levels (P Plan Nacional de Investigación Científica, Desarrollo e Innovación Tecnológica (Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Fondo de Investigación Sanitaria, PI080185, PI0110091) and Red RECAVA (RD06/0014/0004), by Consellería de Sanidad (AP-141/11) and Consellería de Educación (PROMETEO/2011/027), Generalitat Valenciana, by Beca Fibrinolisis 2009 and Becario 2010

  14. The application of microRNAs in cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Kristensen, Helle

    2012-01-01

    common human malignancies and discuss remaining barriers to clinical translation. Finally, we describe new emerging classes of noncoding RNAs, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), with potential as cancer biomarkers. Conceivably, these could be used in combination with miRNAs in molecular diagnostic...

  15. MicroRNAs: role and therapeutic targets in viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ree, Meike H.; de Bruijne, Joep; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Jansen, Peter Lm; Reesink, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The importance of microRNAs has been shown for several liver diseases, for example, viral hepatitis. MicroRNA-122 is highly abundant in the liver and is involved in the regulation of

  16. Synaptic microRNAs Coordinately Regulate Synaptic mRNAs: Perturbation by Chronic Alcohol Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Dana; Leiter, Courtney; Blednov, Yuri A; Harris, R Adron; Mayfield, R Dayne

    2016-01-01

    Local translation of mRNAs in the synapse has a major role in synaptic structure and function. Chronic alcohol use causes persistent changes in synaptic mRNA expression, possibly mediated by microRNAs localized in the synapse. We profiled the transcriptome of synaptoneurosomes (SN) obtained from the amygdala of mice that consumed 20% ethanol (alcohol) in a 30-day continuous two-bottle choice test to identify the microRNAs that target alcohol-induced mRNAs. SN are membrane vesicles containing pre- and post-synaptic compartments of neurons and astroglia and are a unique model for studying the synaptic transcriptome. We previously showed that chronic alcohol regulates mRNA expression in a coordinated manner. Here, we examine microRNAs and mRNAs from the same samples to define alcohol-responsive synaptic microRNAs and their predicted interactions with targeted mRNAs. The aim of the study was to identify the microRNA-mRNA synaptic interactions that are altered by alcohol. This was accomplished by comparing the effect of alcohol in SN and total homogenate preparations from the same samples. We used a combination of unbiased bioinformatic methods (differential expression, correlation, co-expression, microRNA-mRNA target prediction, co-targeting, and cell type-specific analyses) to identify key alcohol-sensitive microRNAs. Prediction analysis showed that a subset of alcohol-responsive microRNAs was predicted to target many alcohol-responsive mRNAs, providing a bidirectional analysis for identifying microRNA-mRNA interactions. We found microRNAs and mRNAs with overlapping patterns of expression that correlated with alcohol consumption. Cell type-specific analysis revealed that a significant number of alcohol-responsive mRNAs and microRNAs were unique to glutamate neurons and were predicted to target each other. Chronic alcohol consumption appears to perturb the coordinated microRNA regulation of mRNAs in SN, a mechanism that may explain the aberrations in synaptic

  17. Deep sequencing discovery of novel and conserved microRNAs in trifoliate orange (Citrus trifoliata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huaping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a critical role in post-transcriptional gene regulation and have been shown to control many genes involved in various biological and metabolic processes. There have been extensive studies to discover miRNAs and analyze their functions in model plant species, such as Arabidopsis and rice. Deep sequencing technologies have facilitated identification of species-specific or lowly expressed as well as conserved or highly expressed miRNAs in plants. Results In this research, we used Solexa sequencing to discover new microRNAs in trifoliate orange (Citrus trifoliata which is an important rootstock of citrus. A total of 13,106,753 reads representing 4,876,395 distinct sequences were obtained from a short RNA library generated from small RNA extracted from C. trifoliata flower and fruit tissues. Based on sequence similarity and hairpin structure prediction, we found that 156,639 reads representing 63 sequences from 42 highly conserved miRNA families, have perfect matches to known miRNAs. We also identified 10 novel miRNA candidates whose precursors were all potentially generated from citrus ESTs. In addition, five miRNA* sequences were also sequenced. These sequences had not been earlier described in other plant species and accumulation of the 10 novel miRNAs were confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. Potential target genes were predicted for most conserved and novel miRNAs. Moreover, four target genes including one encoding IRX12 copper ion binding/oxidoreductase and three genes encoding NB-LRR disease resistance protein have been experimentally verified by detection of the miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage in C. trifoliata. Conclusion Deep sequencing of short RNAs from C. trifoliata flowers and fruits identified 10 new potential miRNAs and 42 highly conserved miRNA families, indicating that specific miRNAs exist in C. trifoliata. These results show that regulatory miRNAs exist in agronomically important trifoliate orange

  18. MicroRNAs in Parkinson's disease and emerging therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Martinez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, with the clinical main symptoms caused by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, corpus striatum and brain cortex. Over 90% of patients with PD have sporadic PD and occur in people with no known family history of the disorder. Currently there is no cure for PD. Treatment with medications to increase dopamine relieves the symptoms but does not slow down or reverse the damage to neurons in the brain. Increasing evidence points to inflammation as a chief mediator of PD with inflammatory response mechanisms, involving microglia and leukocytes, activated following loss of dopaminergic neurons. Oxidative stress is also recognized as one of the main causes of PD, and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species can lead to dopaminergic neuron vulnerability and eventual death. MicroRNAs control a range of physiological and pathological functions, and may serve as potential targets for intervention against PD to mitigate damage to the brain. Several studies have demonstrated that microRNAs can regulate oxidative stress and prevent ROS-mediated damage to dopaminergic neurons, suggesting that specific microRNAs may be putative targets for novel therapeutic strategies in PD. Recent human and animal studies have identified a large number of dysregulated microRNAs in PD brain tissue samples, many of which were downregulated. The dysregulated microRNAs affect downstream targets such as SNCA, PARK2, LRRK2, TNFSF13B, LTA, SLC5A3, PSMB2, GSR, GBA, LAMP-2A, HSC. Apart from one study, none of the studies reviewed had used agomirs or antagomirs to reverse the levels of downregulated or upregulated microRNAs, respectively, in mouse models of PD or with isolated human or mouse dopaminergic cells. Further large-scale studies of brain tissue samples collected with short postmortem interval from human PD patients are warranted to provide more

  19. Identification and characterization of cold-responsive microRNAs in tea plant (Camellia sinensis) and their targets using high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Xujun; Chen, Xuan; Song, Changnian; Zou, Zhongwei; Wang, Yuhua; Wang, Mingle; Fang, Wanping; Li, Xinghui

    2014-10-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 19 ~ 21 nucleotide noncoding RNAs produced by Dicer-catalyzed excision from stem-loop precursors. Many plant miRNAs have critical functions in development, nutrient homeostasis, abiotic stress responses, and pathogen responses via interaction with specific target mRNAs. Camellia sinensis is one of the most important commercial beverage crops in the world. However, miRNAs associated with cold stress tolerance in C. sinensis remains unexplored. The use of high-throughput sequencing can provide a much deeper understanding of miRNAs. To obtain more insight into the function of miRNAs in cold stress tolerance, Illumina sequencing of C. sinensis sRNA was conducted. Solexa sequencing technology was used for high-throughput sequencing of the small RNA library from the cold treatment of tea leaves. To align the sequencing data with known plant miRNAs, we characterized 106 conserved C. sinensis miRNAs. In addition, 215 potential candidate miRNAs were found, among, which 98 candidates with star sequences were chosen as novel miRNAs. Both congruously and differentially regulated miRNAs were obtained, and cultivar-specific miRNAs were identified by microarray-based hybridization in response to cold stress. The results were also confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. To confirm the targets of miRNAs, two degradome libraries from two treatments were constructed. According to degradome sequencing, 455 and 591 genes were identified as cleavage targets of miRNAs from cold treatments and control libraries, respectively, and 283 targets were present in both libraries. Functional analysis of these miRNA targets indicated their involvement in important activities, such as development, regulation of transcription, and stress response. We discovered 31 up-regulated miRNAs and 43 down-regulated miRNAs in 'Yingshuang', and 46 up-regulated miRNA and 45 down-regulated miRNAs in 'Baiye 1' in response to cold stress, respectively. A

  20. Cancer Cachexia and MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Gonzalez Camargo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cachexia is a paraneoplastic syndrome compromising quality of life and survival, mainly characterized by involuntary weight loss, fatigue, and systemic inflammation. The syndrome is described as a result of tumor-host interactions characterized by an inflammatory response by the host to the presence of the tumor. Indeed, systemic inflammation is considered a pivotal feature in cachexia progression and maintenance. Cytokines are intimately related to chronic systemic inflammation and the mechanisms underlying the release of these factors are not totally elucidated, the etiology of cachexia being still not fully understood. Therefore, the understanding of cachexia-related mechanisms, as well as the establishment of markers for the syndrome, is very relevant. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of noncoding RNAs interfering with gene regulation. Different miRNA expression profiles are associated with different diseases and inflammatory processes. miRNAs modulate adipose and skeletal muscle tissue metabolism in cancer cachexia and also tumor and tissue derived inflammation. Therefore, we propose a possible role for miRNAs in the modulation of the host inflammatory response during cachexia. Moreover, the establishment of a robust body of evidence in regard to miRNAs and the mechanisms underlying cachexia is mandatory, and shall contribute to the improvement of its diagnosis and treatment.

  1. MicroRNAs: Modulators of Tooth Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Cuong; Nirvani, Minou; Utheim, Tor P; Sehic, Amer

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that are involved in various biological pathways by regulating gene expression. Teeth develop via reciprocal and sequential interactions between the epithelium and the ectomesenchyme. The speci.c functions of several genes during tooth development are known, and the involvement of their mutations in the pathogenesis of congenital dental defects has been widely studied. The miRNA pathway is considered to have a significant role in embryogenesis including tooth development. It has been shown that miRNAs regulate morphogenesis of tooth by fine-tuning the signalling networks, however, their precise role in tooth differentiation and morphogenesis is still elusive. The present review focuses on the studies that have used animal models to explore the function of miRNAs in tooth development. Major findings with special emphasis on the miRNA involvement in .ne-tuning and network regulation are presented and discussed. Disturbances in tooth development in the global miRNA processing knockouts mirror the essential fine-tuning guiding appropriate formation of dental hard tissues. However, further investigation of single miRNA function and mutation, including deletion and overexpression, may lead to improved knowledge on development of particular dental defects in humans. In the light of similarities between tooth development and other organs originating from the epithelium, further understanding of miRNAs` function during tooth development may have wide biological relevance.

  2. Integrated profiling of microRNAs and mRNAs: microRNAs located on Xq27.3 associate with clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of second-generation sequencing, the expression of gene transcripts can be digitally measured with high accuracy. The purpose of this study was to systematically profile the expression of both mRNA and miRNA genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC using massively parallel sequencing technology.The expression of mRNAs and miRNAs were analyzed in tumor tissues and matched normal adjacent tissues obtained from 10 ccRCC patients without distant metastases. In a prevalence screen, some of the most interesting results were validated in a large cohort of ccRCC patients.A total of 404 miRNAs and 9,799 mRNAs were detected to be differentially expressed in the 10 ccRCC patients. We also identified 56 novel miRNA candidates in at least two samples. In addition to confirming that canonical cancer genes and miRNAs (including VEGFA, DUSP9 and ERBB4; miR-210, miR-184 and miR-206 play pivotal roles in ccRCC development, promising novel candidates (such as PNCK and miR-122 without previous annotation in ccRCC carcinogenesis were also discovered in this study. Pathways controlling cell fates (e.g., cell cycle and apoptosis pathways and cell communication (e.g., focal adhesion and ECM-receptor interaction were found to be significantly more likely to be disrupted in ccRCC. Additionally, the results of the prevalence screen revealed that the expression of a miRNA gene cluster located on Xq27.3 was consistently downregulated in at least 76.7% of ∼50 ccRCC patients.Our study provided a two-dimensional map of the mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of ccRCC using deep sequencing technology. Our results indicate that the phenotypic status of ccRCC is characterized by a loss of normal renal function, downregulation of metabolic genes, and upregulation of many signal transduction genes in key pathways. Furthermore, it can be concluded that downregulation of miRNA genes clustered on Xq27.3 is associated with ccRCC.

  3. Global storm time depletion of the outer electron belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Millan, R M; Kress, B T; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Barnes, R J

    2015-04-01

    The outer radiation belt consists of relativistic (>0.5 MeV) electrons trapped on closed trajectories around Earth where the magnetic field is nearly dipolar. During increased geomagnetic activity, electron intensities in the belt can vary by orders of magnitude at different spatial and temporal scales. The main phase of geomagnetic storms often produces deep depletions of electron intensities over broad regions of the outer belt. Previous studies identified three possible processes that can contribute to the main-phase depletions: adiabatic inflation of electron drift orbits caused by the ring current growth, electron loss into the atmosphere, and electron escape through the magnetopause boundary. In this paper we investigate the relative importance of the adiabatic effect and magnetopause loss to the rapid depletion of the outer belt observed at the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during the main phase of 17 March 2013 storm. The intensities of >1 MeV electrons were depleted by more than an order of magnitude over the entire radial extent of the belt in less than 6 h after the sudden storm commencement. For the analysis we used three-dimensional test particle simulations of global evolution of the outer belt in the Tsyganenko-Sitnov (TS07D) magnetic field model with an inductive electric field. Comparison of the simulation results with electron measurements from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer experiment shows that magnetopause loss accounts for most of the observed depletion at L >5, while at lower L shells the depletion is adiabatic. Both magnetopause loss and the adiabatic effect are controlled by the change in global configuration of the magnetic field due to storm time development of the ring current; a simulation of electron evolution without a ring current produces a much weaker depletion.

  4. MicroRNAs in renal cell carcinoma: diagnostic implications of serum miR-1233 levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena M Wulfken

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNA expression is altered in cancer cells, and microRNAs could serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarker for cancer patients. Our study was designed to analyze circulating serum microRNAs in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first explored microrna expression profiles in tissue and serum using taqman low density arrays in each six malignant and benign samples: Although 109 microRNAs were circulating at higher levels in cancer patients' serum, we identified only 36 microRNAs with up-regulation in RCC tissue and serum of RCC patients. Seven candidate microRNAs were selected for verification based on the finding of up-regulation in serum and tissue of RCC patients: miR-7-1*, miR-93, miR-106b*, miR-210, miR-320b, miR-1233 and miR-1290 levels in serum of healthy controls (n = 30 and RCC (n = 33 patients were determined using quantitative real-time PCR (TaqMan MicroRNA Assays. miR-1233 was increased in RCC patients, and thus validated in a multicentre cohort of 84 RCC patients and 93 healthy controls using quantitative real-time PCR (sensitivity 77.4%, specificity 37.6%, AUC 0.588. We also studied 13 samples of patients with angiomyolipoma or oncocytoma, whose serum miR-1233 levels were similar to RCC patients. Circulating microRNAs were not correlated with clinical-pathological parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MicroRNA levels are distinctly increased in cancer patients, although only a small subset of circulating microRNAs has a tumor-specific origin. We identify circulating miR-1233 as a potential biomarker for RCC patients. Larger-scaled studies are warranted to fully explore the role of circulating microRNAs in RCC.

  5. Identification of circulating miRNAs profiles that distinguish malignant pleural mesothelioma from lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayosso-Gómez, LV; Zárraga-Granados, G; Paredes-Garcia, P; Falfán-Valencia, R; Vazquez-Manríquez, ME; Martinez-Barrera, LM; Castillo-Gonzalez, P; Rumbo-Nava, U; Guevara-Gutierrez, R; Rivera-Bravo, B; Ramirez-Venegas, A; Sansores, R; Negrete-Garcia, MC; Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of malignant pleura mesothelioma (MPM) is challenging. Differential diagnosis of MPM versus lung adenocarcinoma (AD) is particularly difficult, yet clinically important since the two neoplasias call for different treatment approaches. Circulating miRNA-profiling to identify miRNAs that can be used to distinguish MPM from AD has not been reported. We conducted a wide screening study of miRNA profiles in serum pools of MPM patients (N = 11), AD patients (N = 36), and healthy subjects (N = 45) to identify non-invasive biomarkers for differential diagnosis of MPM and AD, using deep sequencing. Sequencing detected up to 300 known miRNAs and up to 25 novel miRNAs species in the serum samples. Among known miRNAs, 7 were upregulated in MPM and 12 were upregulated in AD compared to healthy controls. Of these, eight were distinctive for AD and three were unique for MPM. Direct comparison of the miRNA profiles for MPM and AD revealed differences in miRNA levels that could be useful for differential diagnosis. No differentially expressed novel miRNAs were found. Further bioinformatics analysis indicated that three upregulated miRNAs in MPM are associated with the p38 pathway. There are unique alterations in serum miRNAs in MPM and AD compared to healthy controls, as well as differences between MPM and AD profiles. Differing miRNA levels between MPM and AD may be useful for differential diagnosis. A potential association to p38 pathway of three upregulated miRNAs in MPM was revealed. PMID:26417297

  6. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of Technology, Gdansk, Poland. 3Department of Mathematics, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran. 4Department of Mathematics .... We have the following relation between the outer-2-independent domination number of a graph and the 2-independence number of the graph obtained from it by removing all leaves and ...

  7. The magnetospheres of the outer planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcnutt, R.L., Jr. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Research on the magnetospheres of all of the outer planets including Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto is reviewed for the 1987-1990 time period. Particular attention is given to magnetospheric structure, plasma transport, Jovian aurora, Io and the plasma torus, Titan and its magnetospheric interactions, rings and dusty plasmas, magnetospheric convection, and satellite interactions.

  8. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, L.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Drukarev, E.G. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  9. Genome wide identification of chilling responsive microRNAs in Prunus persica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Abdelali; Sriram, Aditya; Park, Joseph; Zhebentyayeva, Tetyana; Main, Dorrie; Abbott, Albert

    2012-09-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (sRNAs) approximately 21 nucleotides in length that negatively control gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene transcripts. Within this context, miRNAs and siRNAs are coming to the forefront as molecular mediators of gene regulation in plant responses to annual temperature cycling and cold stress. For this reason, we chose to identify and characterize the conserved and non-conserved miRNA component of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) focusing our efforts on both the recently released whole genome sequence of peach and sRNA transcriptome sequences from two tissues representing non-dormant leaves and dormant leaf buds. Conserved and non-conserved miRNAs, and their targets were identified. These sRNA resources were used to identify cold-responsive miRNAs whose gene targets co-localize with previously described QTLs for chilling requirement (CR). Analysis of 21 million peach sRNA reads allowed us to identify 157 and 230 conserved and non-conserved miRNA sequences. Among the non-conserved miRNAs, we identified 205 that seem to be specific to peach. Comparative genome analysis between peach and Arabidopsis showed that conserved miRNA families, with the exception of miR5021, are similar in size. Sixteen of these conserved miRNA families are deeply rooted in land plant phylogeny as they are present in mosses and/or lycophytes. Within the other conserved miRNA families, five families (miR1446, miR473, miR479, miR3629, and miR3627) were reported only in tree species (Populustrichocarpa, Citrus trifolia, and Prunus persica). Expression analysis identified several up-regulated or down-regulated miRNAs in winter buds versus young leaves. A search of the peach proteome allowed the prediction of target genes for most of the conserved miRNAs and a large fraction of non-conserved miRNAs. A fraction of predicted targets in peach have not been previously reported in other species. Several conserved and non

  10. Genome wide identification of chilling responsive microRNAs in Prunus persica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat Abdelali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs (sRNAs approximately 21 nucleotides in length that negatively control gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene transcripts. Within this context, miRNAs and siRNAs are coming to the forefront as molecular mediators of gene regulation in plant responses to annual temperature cycling and cold stress. For this reason, we chose to identify and characterize the conserved and non-conserved miRNA component of peach (Prunus persica (L. Batsch focusing our efforts on both the recently released whole genome sequence of peach and sRNA transcriptome sequences from two tissues representing non-dormant leaves and dormant leaf buds. Conserved and non-conserved miRNAs, and their targets were identified. These sRNA resources were used to identify cold-responsive miRNAs whose gene targets co-localize with previously described QTLs for chilling requirement (CR. Results Analysis of 21 million peach sRNA reads allowed us to identify 157 and 230 conserved and non-conserved miRNA sequences. Among the non-conserved miRNAs, we identified 205 that seem to be specific to peach. Comparative genome analysis between peach and Arabidopsis showed that conserved miRNA families, with the exception of miR5021, are similar in size. Sixteen of these conserved miRNA families are deeply rooted in land plant phylogeny as they are present in mosses and/or lycophytes. Within the other conserved miRNA families, five families (miR1446, miR473, miR479, miR3629, and miR3627 were reported only in tree species (Populustrichocarpa, Citrus trifolia, and Prunus persica. Expression analysis identified several up-regulated or down-regulated miRNAs in winter buds versus young leaves. A search of the peach proteome allowed the prediction of target genes for most of the conserved miRNAs and a large fraction of non-conserved miRNAs. A fraction of predicted targets in peach have not been previously reported in other

  11. MicroRNAs in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis: extending Drosophilid miRNA conservation to the Tephritidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, Bernarda; Geib, Scott M

    2015-10-05

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an important plant pest species in the family Tephritidae. It is a phytophagous species with broad host range, and while not established in the mainland United States, is a species of great concern for introduction. Despite the vast amount of information available from the closely related model organism Drosophila melanogaster, information at the genome and transcriptome level is still very limited for this species. Small RNAs act as regulatory molecules capable of determining transcript levels in the cells. The most studied small RNAs are micro RNAs, which may impact as much as 30 % of all protein coding genes in animals. We have sequenced small RNAs (sRNAs) from the Tephritid fruit fly, B. dorsalis (oriental fruit fly), specifically sRNAs corresponding to the 17 to 28 nucleotides long fraction of total RNA. Sequencing yielded more than 16 million reads in total. Seventy five miRNAs orthologous to known miRNAs were identified, as well as five additional novel miRNAs that might be specific to the genera, or to the Tephritid family. We constructed a gene expression profile for the identified miRNAs, and used comparative analysis with D. melanogaster to support our expression data. In addition, several miRNA clusters were identified in the genome that show conservancy with D. melanogaster. Potential targets for the identified miRNAs were also searched. The data presented here adds to our growing pool of information concerning the genome structure and characteristics of true fruit flies. It provides a basis for comparative studies with other Dipteran and within Tephritid species, and can be used for applied research such as in the development of new control strategies based on gene silencing and transgenesis.

  12. Identification of Novel and Conserved miRNAs from Extreme Halophyte, Oryza coarctata, a Wild Relative of Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Tapan Kumar; Ganie, Showkat Ahmad; Debnath, Ananda Bhusan

    2015-01-01

    Oryza coarctata, a halophyte and wild relative of rice, is grown normally in saline water. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play pivotal roles in every domain of life including stress response. There are very few reports on the discovery of salt-responsive miRNAs from halophytes. In this study, two small RNA libraries, one each from the control and salt-treated (450 mM NaCl for 24 h) leaves of O. coarctata were sequenced, which yielded 338 known and 95 novel miRNAs. Additionally, we used publicly available transcriptomics data of O. coarctata which led to the discovery of additional 48 conserved miRNAs along with their pre-miRNA sequences through in silico analysis. In total, 36 known and 7 novel miRNAs were up-regulated whereas, 12 known and 7 novel miRNAs were down-regulated under salinity stress. Further, 233 and 154 target genes were predicted for 48 known and 14 novel differentially regulated miRNAs respectively. These targets with the help of gene ontology analysis were found to be involved in several important biological processes that could be involved in salinity tolerance. Relative expression trends of majority of the miRNAs as detected by real time-PCR as well as predicted by Illumina sequencing were found to be coherent. Additionally, expression of most of the target genes was negatively correlated with their corresponding miRNAs. Thus, the present study provides an account of miRNA-target networking that is involved in salinity adaption of O. coarctata. PMID:26506249

  13. Identification of novel and conserved microRNAs related to drought stress in potato by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a group of small, non-coding RNAs that play important roles in plant growth, development and stress response. There have been an increasing number of investigations aimed at discovering miRNAs and analyzing their functions in model plants (such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. In this research, we constructed small RNA libraries from both polyethylene glycol (PEG 6,000 treated and control potato samples, and a large number of known and novel miRNAs were identified. Differential expression analysis showed that 100 of the known miRNAs were down-regulated and 99 were up-regulated as a result of PEG stress, while 119 of the novel miRNAs were up-regulated and 151 were down-regulated. Based on target prediction, annotation and expression analysis of the miRNAs and their putative target genes, 4 miRNAs were identified as regulating drought-related genes (miR811, miR814, miR835, miR4398. Their target genes were MYB transcription factor (CV431094, hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (TC225721, quaporin (TC223412 and WRKY transcription factor (TC199112, respectively. Relative expression trends of those miRNAs were the same as that predicted by Solexa sequencing and they showed a negative correlation with the expression of the target genes. The results provide molecular evidence for the possible involvement of miRNAs in the process of drought response and/or tolerance in the potato plant.

  14. B-Myb, Cancer, Senescence, and MicroRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Ivan; DiMaio, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor B-Myb plays a critical role in regulating gene expression and is implicated in controlling carcinogenesis and cellular senescence. Transcription of the B-Myb gene is regulated by retinoblastoma proteins acting directly on the B-Myb promoter. Recently, we found that microRNAs also control the abundance of B-Myb mRNA during senescence, adding another level of complexity to B-Myb regulation. This review focuses on the importance of B-Myb in cancer and senescence, with an...

  15. DES-ncRNA: A knowledgebase for exploring information about human micro and long noncoding RNAs based on literature-mining

    KAUST Repository

    Salhi, Adil

    2017-04-07

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), particularly microRNAs (miRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), are important players in diseases and emerge as novel drug targets. Thus, unraveling the relationships between ncRNAs and other biomedical entities in cells are critical for better understanding ncRNA roles that may eventually help develop their use in medicine. To support ncRNA research and facilitate retrieval of relevant information regarding miRNAs and lncRNAs from the plethora of published ncRNA-related research, we developed DES-ncRNA ( www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/des_ncrna ). DES-ncRNA is a knowledgebase containing text- and data-mined information from public scientific literature and other public resources. Exploration of mined information is enabled through terms and pairs of terms from 19 topic-specific dictionaries including, for example, antibiotics, toxins, drugs, enzymes, mutations, pathways, human genes and proteins, drug indications and side effects, mutations, diseases, etc. DES-ncRNA contains approximately 878,000 associations of terms from these dictionaries of which 36,222 (5,373) are with regards to miRNAs (lncRNAs). We provide several ways to explore information regarding ncRNAs to users including controlled generation of association networks as well as hypotheses generation. We show an example how DES-ncRNA can aid research on Alzheimer\\'s disease and suggest potential therapeutic role for Fasudil. DES-ncRNA is a powerful tool that can be used on its own or as a complement to the existing resources, to support research in human ncRNA. To our knowledge, this is the only knowledgebase dedicated to human miRNAs and lncRNAs derived primarily through literature-mining enabling exploration of a broad spectrum of associated biomedical entities, not paralleled by any other resource.

  16. DES-ncRNA: A knowledgebase for exploring information about human micro and long noncoding RNAs based on literature-mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Adil; Essack, Magbubah; Alam, Tanvir; Bajic, Vladan P; Ma, Lina; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Marchand, Benoit; Schmeier, Sebastian; Zhang, Zhang; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2017-07-03

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), particularly microRNAs (miRNAs) and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), are important players in diseases and emerge as novel drug targets. Thus, unraveling the relationships between ncRNAs and other biomedical entities in cells are critical for better understanding ncRNA roles that may eventually help develop their use in medicine. To support ncRNA research and facilitate retrieval of relevant information regarding miRNAs and lncRNAs from the plethora of published ncRNA-related research, we developed DES-ncRNA ( www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/des_ncrna ). DES-ncRNA is a knowledgebase containing text- and data-mined information from public scientific literature and other public resources. Exploration of mined information is enabled through terms and pairs of terms from 19 topic-specific dictionaries including, for example, antibiotics, toxins, drugs, enzymes, mutations, pathways, human genes and proteins, drug indications and side effects, mutations, diseases, etc. DES-ncRNA contains approximately 878,000 associations of terms from these dictionaries of which 36,222 (5,373) are with regards to miRNAs (lncRNAs). We provide several ways to explore information regarding ncRNAs to users including controlled generation of association networks as well as hypotheses generation. We show an example how DES-ncRNA can aid research on Alzheimer disease and suggest potential therapeutic role for Fasudil. DES-ncRNA is a powerful tool that can be used on its own or as a complement to the existing resources, to support research in human ncRNA. To our knowledge, this is the only knowledgebase dedicated to human miRNAs and lncRNAs derived primarily through literature-mining enabling exploration of a broad spectrum of associated biomedical entities, not paralleled by any other resource.

  17. Computational identification of microRNAs in the strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) genome sequence and validation of their precise sequences by miR-RACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian; Li, Aying; Liu, Hong; Wen, Xicheng; Zhao, Mizhen; Korir, Nadira Bilkish; Korir, Nicholas Kibet; Wang, Chen; Fang, Jinggui

    2014-02-15

    In plants, microRNAs (miRNAs) play significant roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation and have been found to control many genes involved in different biological and metabolic processes. Extensive studies were carried out to discover miRNAs and analyze their functions in model plant species, such as in Arabidopsis and rice that have been reported. In this research, we used bioinformatics to predict microRNAs in an important strawberry rootstock cultivar to discover and validate precise sequences of microRNAs in strawberry. By adopting a range of filtering criteria, we obtained 59 potential miRNAs belonging to 40 miRNA families from the Fragaria vesca genome. Using two specific 5' and 3' miRNA RACE PCR reactions and a sequence-directed cloning method, we accurately determined 34 precise sequences of candidate miRNAs, while six other sequences exhibited some minor divergence in their termini nucleotides, and 19 miRNAs that could not be cloned owing to expression abundance may be too low or these mirRNAs predicted could not be existing in strawberry. Potential target genes were further predicted for the miRNAs above. The expression of the 16 miRNAs unreported and having exact sequences and their targets by experiment could be detected in different tissues of strawberry ranging from roots, stems, leaves, flowers and fruits by qRT-PCR and some of them showed differential expression in various tissues. The functional analysis of 16 miRNAs and their targets was carried out. Finally, we conclude that there are 34 mirRNAs in strawberry and their targets play vital roles not only in growth and development, but also in diverse physiological processes. These results show that regulatory miRNAs exist in agronomically important strawberry and might have an important function in strawberry growth and development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of reference genes for quantitative expression analysis of microRNAs and mRNAs in barley under various stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannatul Ferdous

    Full Text Available For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR, the selection of appropriate reference genes as an internal control for normalization is crucial. We hypothesized that non-coding, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAswould be stably expressed in different barley varieties and under different experimental treatments,in different tissues and at different developmental stages of plant growth and therefore might prove to be suitable reference genes for expression analysis of both microRNAs (miRNAsand mRNAs. In this study, we examined the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in six barley genotypes under five experimental stresses, drought, fungal infection,boron toxicity, nutrient deficiency and salinity. We compared four commonly used housekeeping genes; Actin (ACT, alpha-Tubulin (α-TUB, Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH, ADP-ribosylation factor 1-like protein (ADP, four snoRNAs; (U18,U61, snoR14 and snoR23 and two microRNAs (miR168, miR159 as candidate reference genes. We found that ADP, snoR14 and snoR23 were ranked as the best of these candidates across diverse samples. Additionally, we found that miR168 was a suitable reference gene for expression analysis in barley. Finally, we validated the performance of our stable and unstable candidate reference genes for both mRNA and miRNA qPCR data normalization under different stress conditions and demonstrated the superiority of the stable candidates. Our data demonstrate the suitability of barley snoRNAs and miRNAs as potential reference genes form iRNA and mRNA qPCR data normalization under different stress treatments [corrected].

  19. miRNAs Regulate hERG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiangfang; Guo, Jian; Huang, Xiaoyan; Yang, X I; Huang, Guochang; Mao, Haiyan; Sun, Huan Huan; Ba, Yanna; Zhou, Jianqing

    2016-12-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) is the major molecular component of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (Ikr ). Impairment of hERG function is believed to be a mechanism causing long-QT syndromes (LQTS). Growing evidences have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in functional modulation of the hERG pathway. The purpose of this study was to screen and validate miRNAs that regulate the hERG pathway. The miRNAs identified in this study will provide new tools to assess the mechanism of LQTS. Six miRNAs were selected by algorithm predictions based on potential interaction with hERG. The effects of each miRNA on hERG were assessed by use of the Dual-Luciferase Reporter assay system, qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, whole-cell patch clamp technique was used to validate the effect of miR-103a-1 on the electrophysiological characteristic of the Ikr of the hERG protein channel. miR-134, miR-103a-1, miR-143, and miR-3619 significantly downregulated luciferase activity (P hERG mRNA and protein in U2OS cells (P hERG mRNA and protein. Confocal microscopy showed that all 4 miRNAs reduced the expression of both immature and mature hERG protein. miR-103a-1 decreased the maximum current and tail current amplitudes of hERG channel. Expression and functions of hERG are regulated by specific miRNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Progress and Prospects of Long Noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with poor prognosis, and novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for HCC are urgently required. With the advance of high-resolution microarrays and massively parallel sequencing technology, lncRNAs are suggested to play critical roles in the tumorigenesis and development of human HCC. To date, dysregulation of many HCC-related lncRNAs such as HULC, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and H19 have been identified. From transcriptional “noise” to indispensable elements, lncRNAs may re-write the central dogma. Also, lncRNAs found in body fluids have demonstrated their utility as fluid-based noninvasive markers for clinical use and as therapeutic targets for HCC. Even though several lncRNAs have been characterized, the underlying mechanisms of their contribution to HCC remain unknown, and many important questions about lncRNAs need resolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism in HCC-related lncRNAs will provide a rationale for novel effective lncRNA-based targeted therapies. In this review, we highlight the emerging roles of lncRNAs in HCC, and discuss their potential clinical applications as biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of HCC.

  1. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals: The story so far

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... germline stem cell maintenance, epigenetic regulation, and transposition. Although the biogenesis pathways of piRNAs are not well understood but recent scientific advances have revealed some important aspects of their synthesis. Studies on regulatory mechanism of piRNAs are in their early stages.

  2. MicroRNAs in Heart Failure, Cardiac Transplantation, and Myocardial Recovery: Biomarkers with Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Palak; Bristow, Michael R; Port, J David

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure is increasing in prevalence with a lack of recently developed therapies that produce major beneficial effects on its associated mortality. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression, are differentially regulated in heart failure, and are found in the circulation serving as a biomarker of heart failure. Data suggests that microRNAs may be used to detect allograft rejection in cardiac transplantation and may predict the degree of myocardial recovery in patients with a left ventricular assist device or treated with beta-blocker therapy. Given their role in regulating cellular function, microRNAs are an intriguing target for oligonucleotide therapeutics, designed to mimic or antagonize (antagomir) their biological effects. We review the current state of microRNAs as biomarkers of heart failure and associated conditions, the mechanisms by which microRNAs control cellular function, and how specific microRNAs may be targeted with novel therapeutics designed to treat heart failure.

  3. Small RNAs in plant defense responses during viral and bacterial interactions: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo ePeláez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs constitute an important class of gene expression regulators that control different biological processes in most eukaryotes. In plants, several small RNA silencing pathways have evolved to produce a wide range of small RNAs (sRNAs with specialized functions. Evidence for the diverse mode of action of the small RNA pathways has been highlighted during plant-microbe interactions. Host sRNAs and small RNA silencing pathways have been recognized as essential components of plant immunity. One way plants respond and defend against pathogen infections is through the small RNA silencing immune system. To deal with plant defense responses, pathogens have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to avoid and counterattack this defense strategy. The relevance of the small RNA-mediated plant defense responses during viral infections has been well established. Recent evidence points out its importance also during plant-bacteria interactions. Herein, this review discusses recent findings, similarities and differences about the small RNA-mediated arms race between plants and these two groups of microbes, including the small RNA silencing pathway components that contribute to plant immune responses, the pathogen-responsive endogenous sRNAs and the pathogen-delivered effector proteins.

  4. Genome-wide profiling and analysis of Arabidopsis siRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin D Kasschau

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotes contain a diversified set of small RNA-guided pathways that control genes, repeated sequences, and viruses at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Genome-wide profiles and analyses of small RNAs, particularly the large class of 24-nucleotide (nt short interfering RNAs (siRNAs, were done for wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and silencing pathway mutants with defects in three RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR and four Dicer-like (DCL genes. The profiling involved direct analysis using a multiplexed, parallel-sequencing strategy. Small RNA-generating loci, especially those producing predominantly 24-nt siRNAs, were found to be highly correlated with repetitive elements across the genome. These were found to be largely RDR2- and DCL3-dependent, although alternative DCL activities were detected on a widespread level in the absence of DCL3. In contrast, no evidence for RDR2-alternative activities was detected. Analysis of RDR2- and DCL3-dependent small RNA accumulation patterns in and around protein-coding genes revealed that upstream gene regulatory sequences systematically lack siRNA-generating activities. Further, expression profiling suggested that relatively few genes, proximal to abundant 24-nt siRNAs, are regulated directly by RDR2- and DCL3-dependent silencing. We conclude that the widespread accumulation patterns for RDR2- and DCL3-dependent siRNAs throughout the Arabidopsis genome largely reflect mechanisms to silence highly repeated sequences.

  5. Differential expression of long non-coding RNAs in hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Tian-Ping; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Huai-Ping; Cui, Xian-Wei; Tian, Zhao-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common complication of premature birth that seriously affects the survival rate and quality of life among preterm neonates. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in many human diseases. However, the role of lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of BPD remains poorly understood. Here, we exposed neonatal C57BL/6J mice to 95% concentrations of ambient oxygen and established a mouse lung injury model that mimicked human BPD. Next, we compared lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles between BPD and normal lung tissues using a high-throughput mouse lncRNA + mRNA array system. Compared with the control group, 882 lncRNAs were upregulated, and 887 lncRNAs were downregulated in BPD lung tissues. We validated some candidate BPD-associated lncRNAs by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in eight pairs of BPD and normal lung tissues. Gene ontology, pathway and bioinformatics analyses revealed that a downregulated lncRNA, namely AK033210, associated with tenascin C may be involved in the pathogenesis of BPD. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to reveal differential lncRNA expression in BPD, which provides a foundation for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of BPD development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. MicroRNAs as new Characters in the Plot between Epigenetics and Prostate Cancer

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    Alessio ePaone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCA still represents a leading cause of death. An increasing number of studies have documented that microRNAs (miRNAs, a subgroup of non-coding RNAs with gene regulatory functions, are differentially expressed in PCA respect to the normal tissue counterpart, suggesting their involvement in prostate carcinogenesis and dissemination. Interestingly, it has been shown that miRNAs undergo the same regulatory mechanisms than any other protein coding gene, including epigenetic regulation. In turn, miRNAs can also affect the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes by targeting effectors of the epigenetic machinery, therefore indirectly affecting the epigenetic controls on these genes. Among the genes that undergo this complex regulation, there is the androgen receptor (AR, a key therapeutic target for PCA. This review will focus on the role of epigenetically regulated and epigenetically regulating miRNAs in prostate cancer and on the fine regulation of AR expression, as mediated by this miRNA-epigenetics interaction.

  7. Wnt-signalling pathways and microRNAs network in carcinogenesis: experimental and bioinformatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyido, Emenike K; Sweeney, Eloise; Nateri, Abdolrahman Shams

    2016-09-02

    Over the past few years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have not only emerged as integral regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level but also respond to signalling molecules to affect cell function(s). miRNAs crosstalk with a variety of the key cellular signalling networks such as Wnt, transforming growth factor-β and Notch, control stem cell activity in maintaining tissue homeostasis, while if dysregulated contributes to the initiation and progression of cancer. Herein, we overview the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the crosstalk between Wnt-signalling components (canonical and non-canonical) and miRNAs, as well as changes in the miRNA/Wnt-signalling components observed in the different forms of cancer. Furthermore, the fundamental understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation of Wnt-signalling pathway and vice versa has been significantly improved by high-throughput genomics and bioinformatics technologies. Whilst, these approaches have identified a number of specific miRNA(s) that function as oncogenes or tumour suppressors, additional analyses will be necessary to fully unravel the links among conserved cellular signalling pathways and miRNAs and their potential associated components in cancer, thereby creating therapeutic avenues against tumours. Hence, we also discuss the current challenges associated with Wnt-signalling/miRNAs complex and the analysis using the biomedical experimental and bioinformatics approaches.

  8. Identification of neoblast- and regeneration-specific miRNAs in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Vidyanand; Lu, Yi-Chien; Bansal, Dhiru; Dasari, Pranavi; Poduval, Deepak; Seshasayee, Aswin; Resch, Alissa M; Graveley, Brenton R; Palakodeti, Dasaradhi

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has emerged as a tractable model system to study stem cell biology and regeneration. MicroRNAs are small RNA species that control gene expression by modulating translational repression and mRNA stability and have been implicated in the regulation of various cellular processes. Though recent studies have identified several miRNAs in S. mediterranea, their expression in neoblast subpopulations and during regeneration has not been examined. Here, we identify several miRNAs whose expression is enriched in different neoblast subpopulations and in regenerating tissue at different time points in S. mediterranea. Some of these miRNAs were enriched within 3 h post-amputation and may, therefore, play a role in wound healing and/or neoblast migration. Our results also revealed miRNAs, such as sme-miR-2d-3p and the sme-miR-124 family, whose expression is enriched in the cephalic ganglia, are also expressed in the brain primordium during CNS regeneration. These results provide new insight into the potential biological functions of miRNAs in neoblasts and regeneration in planarians.

  9. MicroRNAs and Toll-like Receptor/Interleukin-1 Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virtue Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The discovery of miRNAs has revolutionized the way we examine the genome, RNA products, and the regulation of transcription and translation. Their ability to modulate protein expression through mRNA degradation and translation repression resulted in avid scientific interest in miRNAs over the past decade. This research has led to findings that indicate miRNAs can regulate an array of cellular functions such as cellular apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. Specifically, the capability of miRNAs to finely-tune gene expression naturally lends itself to immune system regulation which requires precise control for proper activity. In fact, abnormal miRNAs expression is often seen with inflammatory disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erthematosus, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and inflammatory cancers. As a result, research investigating miRNAs modulation of immune cell proliferation, differentiation, and cellular signaling has yielded fruitful results. Specifically, in this review, we will examine the impact of miRNAs on toll-like receptor (TLRs and interleukin-1β (IL-1β signaling, which are integral in the proper functioning of the innate immune system. These signaling pathways share several key downstream signaling adaptors and therefore produce similar downstream effects such as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and interferons. This review will examine in depth the specific interactions of miRNAs with receptors, adaptor molecules, and regulator molecules within these cellular pathways. In addition, we will discuss the modulation of miRNAs’ expression by TLR and IL-1R signaling through positive and negative feedback loops.

  10. Genome-wide identification and functional prediction of novel and drought-responsive lincRNAs in Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Peng; Liang, Dan; Tang, Sha; Zhang, Zhoujia; Ye, Chu-Yu; Su, Yanyan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2014-09-01

    Protein-coding genes are considered to be a dominant component of the eukaryotic transcriptome; however, many studies have shown that intergenic, non-coding transcripts also play an important role. Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) were found to play a vital role in human and Arabidopsis. However, lincRNAs and their regulatory roles remain poorly characterized in woody plants, especially Populus trichocarpa (P. trichocarpa). A large set of Populus RNA-Seq data were examined with high sequencing depth under control and drought conditions and a total of 2542 lincRNA candidates were identified. In total, 51 lincRNAs and 20 lincRNAs were identified as putative targets and target mimics of known Populus miRNAs, respectively. A total of 504 lincRNAs were found to be drought responsive, eight of which were confirmed by RT-qPCR. These findings provide a comprehensive view of Populus lincRNAs, which will enable in-depth functional analysis. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Identification of Retinopathy of Prematurity Related miRNAs in Hyperoxia-Induced Neonatal Rats by Deep Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruibin Zhao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP remains a major problem for many preterm infants. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and have been studied in many diseases. To understand the roles of miRNAs in ROP model rats, we constructed two small RNA libraries from the plasma of hyperoxia-induced rats and normal controls. Sequencing data revealed that 44 down-regulated microRNAs and 22 up-regulated microRNAs from the hyperoxia-induced rats were identified by deep sequencing technology. Some of the differentially expressed miRNAs were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR. A total of 594 target genes of the differentially expressed microRNAs were identified using a bioinformatics approach. Functional annotation analysis indicated that a number of pathways might be involved in angiogenesis, cell proliferation and cell differentiation, which might be involved in the genesis and development of ROP. The elevated expression level of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF protein in the hyperoxia-induced neonatal rats was also confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. This study provides some insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie ROP development, thereby aiding the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  12. Functional Roles of microRNAs in Agronomically Important Plants—Potential as Targets for Crop Improvement and Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T.; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Dubery, Ian A.

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression, mainly through cleavage and/or translation inhibition of the target mRNAs during or after transcription. miRNAs play important roles by regulating a multitude of biological processes in plants which include maintenance of genome integrity, development, metabolism, and adaptive responses toward environmental stresses. The increasing population of the world and their food demands requires focused efforts for the improvement of crop plants to ensure sustainable food production. Manipulation of mRNA transcript abundance via miRNA control provides a unique strategy for modulating differential plant gene expression and miRNAs are thus emerging as the next generation targets for genetic engineering for improvement of the agronomic properties of crops. However, a deeper understanding of its potential and the mechanisms involved will facilitate the design of suitable strategies to obtain the desirable traits with minimum trade-offs in the modified crops. In this regard, this review highlights the diverse roles of conserved and newly identified miRNAs in various food and industrial crops and recent advances made in the uses of miRNAs to improve plants of agronomically importance so as to significantly enhance crop yields and increase tolerance to various environmental stress agents of biotic—or abiotic origin. PMID:28382044

  13. Functional Roles of microRNAs in Agronomically Important Plants-Potential as Targets for Crop Improvement and Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Dubery, Ian A

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression, mainly through cleavage and/or translation inhibition of the target mRNAs during or after transcription. miRNAs play important roles by regulating a multitude of biological processes in plants which include maintenance of genome integrity, development, metabolism, and adaptive responses toward environmental stresses. The increasing population of the world and their food demands requires focused efforts for the improvement of crop plants to ensure sustainable food production. Manipulation of mRNA transcript abundance via miRNA control provides a unique strategy for modulating differential plant gene expression and miRNAs are thus emerging as the next generation targets for genetic engineering for improvement of the agronomic properties of crops. However, a deeper understanding of its potential and the mechanisms involved will facilitate the design of suitable strategies to obtain the desirable traits with minimum trade-offs in the modified crops. In this regard, this review highlights the diverse roles of conserved and newly identified miRNAs in various food and industrial crops and recent advances made in the uses of miRNAs to improve plants of agronomically importance so as to significantly enhance crop yields and increase tolerance to various environmental stress agents of biotic-or abiotic origin.

  14. Sindbis virus induces the production of a novel class of endogenous siRNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Z N; Anderson, M A E; Liu, M; Zhang, L; Myles, K M

    2012-06-01

    Small RNA regulatory pathways are used to control the activity of transposons, regulate gene expression and resist infecting viruses. We examined the biogenesis of mRNA-derived endogenous short-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in the disease vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Under standard conditions, mRNA-derived endo-siRNAs were produced from the bidirectional transcription of tail-tail overlapping gene pairs. Upon infection with the alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV), another class of mRNA-derived endo-siRNAs was observed. Genes producing SINV-induced endo-siRNAs were not enriched for overlapping partners or nearby genes, but were enriched for transcripts with long 3' untranslated regions. Endo-siRNAs from this class derived uniformly from the entire length of the target transcript, and were found to regulate the transcript levels of the genes from which they were derived. Strand-specific quantitative PCR experiments demonstrated that antisense strands of targeted mRNA genes were produced to exonic, but not intronic regions. Finally, small RNAs mapped to both sense and antisense strands of exon-exon junctions, suggesting double-stranded RNA precursors to SINV-induced endo-siRNAs may be synthesized from mature mRNA templates. These results suggest additional complexity in small RNA pathways and gene regulation in the presence of an infecting virus in disease vector mosquitoes. © 2012 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  15. Outer rotor eddy current heater for wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorache Tiberiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a conversion system of wind energy into thermal energy by means of an outer rotor permanent magnet eddy current heater. The main advantages of this device are the following: compactness, easy temperature control by water flow rate regulation, reduced energy cost per kWh, possibility of combination with other heating systems. The analysis presented in the paper is based on the finite element method and its purpose is to optimize the device and to evaluate its performance and operation characteristics such as: analysis of demagnetization level of permanent magnets, output power–rotor speed and electromagnetic torque–rotor speed curves.

  16. Potentials of Long Noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs in Sarcoma: From Biomarkers to Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoma includes some of the most heterogeneous tumors, which make the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of these rare yet diverse neoplasms especially challenging. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are important regulators of cancer initiation and progression, which implies their potential as neoteric prognostic and diagnostic markers in cancer, including sarcoma. A relationship between lncRNAs and sarcoma pathogenesis and progression is emerging. Recent studies demonstrate that lncRNAs influence sarcoma cell proliferation, metastasis, and drug resistance. Additionally, lncRNA expression profiles are predictive of sarcoma prognosis. In this review, we summarize contemporary advances in the research of lncRNA biogenesis and functions in sarcoma. We also highlight the potential for lncRNAs to become innovative diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as therapeutic targets in sarcoma.

  17. Selective release of miRNAs via extracellular vesicles is associated with house-dust mite allergen-induced airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Y; Maruoka, S; Inoue, T; Kuroda, K; Yamagishi, K; Kozu, Y; Shikano, S; Soda, K; Lötvall, J; Hashimoto, S

    2017-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may facilitate cell-to-cell communication via extracellular vesicles (EVs). The biological roles of miRNAs in EVs on allergic airway inflammation are unclear. Airway-secreted EVs (AEVs) were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of control and house-dust mite (HDM) allergen-exposed HDM-sensitized mice. The expression of miRNAs in AEVs or miRNAs and mRNAs in lung tissue was analysed using miRNA microarray. The amount of AEV increased 8.9-fold in BALF from HDM-exposed mice compared with that from sham-control mice. HDM exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of 139 miRNAs in EVs and 175 miRNAs in lung tissues, with 54 miRNAs being common in both samples. Expression changes of these 54 miRNAs between miRNAs in AEVs and lung tissues after HDM exposure were inversely correlated. Computational analysis revealed that 31 genes, including IL-13 and IL-5Ra, are putative targets of the miRNAs up-regulated in AEVs but down-regulated in lung tissues after HDM exposure. The amount of AEV in BALF after HDM exposure was diminished by treatment with the sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869. The treatment with GW4869 also decreased Th2 cytokines and eosinophil counts in BALFs and reduced eosinophil accumulation in airway walls and mucosa. These results indicate that selective sorting of miRNA including Th2 inhibitory miRNAs into AEVs and increase release to the airway after HDM exposure would be involved in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Deep sequencing on genome-wide scale reveals the unique composition and expression patterns of microRNAs in developing pollen of Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li Qin; Yan, Long Feng; Wang, Tai

    2011-06-16

    Pollen development in flowering plants requires strict control of the gene expression program and genetic information stability by mechanisms possibly including the miRNA pathway. However, our understanding of the miRNA pathway in pollen development remains limited, and the dynamic profile of miRNAs in developing pollen is unknown. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we pyrosequenced small RNA populations from rice uninucleate microspores to tricellular pollen and control sporophytic tissues at the genome-wide level. We identified 292 known miRNAs, including members of all 20 families conserved in plants, and 75 novel miRNAs. Of the 292 known miRNAs, 202 were expressed, with 103 enriched, in developing pollen. More than half of these novel miRNAs displayed pollen-or stage-specific expression. Furthermore, analyzing the 367 miRNAs and their predicted targets indicated that correlation in expression profiles of pollen-enriched known miRNAs and their targets significantly differs from that of sporophyte-enriched known miRNAs and their targets in some functional terms, while novel miRNAs appeared to negatively regulate their targets. Importantly, gene ontology abundance analysis demonstrated chromatin assembly and disassembly was important in the targets of bicellular pollen-expressed novel miRNAs. Principal component analysis revealed pollen of all three stages was discriminated from sporophytes, largely because of the novel and non-conserved known miRNAs. Our study, for the first time, revealed the differences in composition and expression profiles of miRNAs between developing pollen and sporophytes, with novel and non-conserved known miRNAs the main contributors. Our results suggest the important roles of the miRNA pathway in pollen development.

  19. The Contribution of Outer H I Disks to the Merging Binary Black Hole Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya; Chang, Philip; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Brooks, Alyson M.; Shen, Sijing; Bellovary, Jillian; Gladysz, Wojciech; Belczynski, Chris

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the contribution of outer H I disks to the observable population of merging black hole binaries. Like dwarf galaxies, the outer H I disks of spirals have low star formation rates and lower metallicities than the inner disks of spirals. Since low-metallicity star formation can produce more detectable compact binaries than typical star formation, the environments in the outskirts of spiral galaxies may be conducive to producing a rich population of massive binary black holes. We consider here both detailed controlled simulations of spirals and cosmological simulations, as well as the current range of observed values for metallicity and star formation in outer disks. We find that the outer H I disks contribute at least as much as dwarf galaxies do to the observed LIGO/Virgo detection rates. Identifying the host galaxies of merging massive black holes should provide constraints on cosmological parameters and insights into the formation channels of binary mergers.

  20. The secret role of microRNAs in cancer stem cell development and potential therapy: A Notch-pathway approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna eProkopi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in the development of some if not all cancer types and have been identified as attractive targets for prognosis, diagnosis and therapy of the disease. MiRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs (20-22 nucleotides in length that bind imperfectly to the 3’-untranslated region of target mRNA regulating gene expression. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs in cancer, sometimes known as oncomiRNAs, have been shown to play a major role in oncogenesis, metastasis and drug resistance. Amplification of oncomiRNAs during cancer development correlates with the silencing of tumor suppressor genes; on the other hand, down-regulation of miRNAs has also been observed in cancer and cancer stem cells (CSCs. In both cases, miRNA regulation is inversely correlated with cancer progression. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are also involved in the metastatic process by either suppressing or promoting metastasis-related genes leading to the reduction or activation of cancer cell migration and invasion processes. In particular, circulating miRNAs (vesicle-encapsulated or non-encapsulated have significant effects on tumorigenesis: membrane-particles, apoptotic bodies and exosomes have been described as providers of a cell-to-cell communication system transporting oncogenic miRNAs from tumors to neighboring cells and distant metastatic sites. It is hypothesized that MiRNAs control cancer development in a traditional manner, by regulating signaling pathways and factors. In addition, recent developments indicate a non-conventional mechanism of cancer regulation by stem cell reprogramming via a regulatory network consisting of miRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are involved in controlling stem cell functions of CSCs. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNAs in the Notch pathway and how they regulate CSC self-renewal, differentiation and tumorigenesis by direct/indirect targeting of

  1. Induction of cell proliferation and survival genes by estradiol-repressed microRNAs in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In estrogen responsive MCF-7 cells, estradiol (E2 binding to ERα leads to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and survival. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. The aim of this study was to explore whether miRNAs were involved in hormonally regulated expression of estrogen responsive genes. Methods Western blot and QPCR were used to determine the expression of estrogen responsive genes and miRNAs respectively. Target gene expression regulated by miRNAs was validated by luciferase reporter assays and transfection of miRNA mimics or inhibitors. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTS assay. Results E2 significantly induced bcl-2, cyclin D1 and survivin expression by suppressing the levels of a panel of miRNAs (miR-16, miR-143, miR-203 in MCF-7 cells. MiRNA transfection and luciferase assay confirmed that bcl-2 was regulated by miR-16 and miR-143, cyclinD1 was modulated by miR-16. Importantly, survivin was found to be targeted by miR-16, miR-143, miR-203. The regulatory effect of E2 can be either abrogated by anti-estrogen ICI 182, 780 and raloxifene pretreatment, or impaired by ERα siRNA, indicating the regulation is dependent on ERα. In order to investigate the functional significance of these miRNAs in estrogen responsive cells, miRNAs mimics were transfected into MCF-7 cells. It revealed that overexpression of these miRNAs significantly inhibited E2-induced cell proliferation. Further study of the expression of the miRNAs indicated that miR-16, miR-143 and miR-203 were highly expressed in triple positive breast cancer tissues, suggesting a potential tumor suppressing effect of these miRNAs in ER positive breast cancer. Conclusions These results demonstrate that E2 induces bcl-2, cyclin D1 and survivin by orchestrating the coordinate downregulation of a panel of miRNAs. In turn, the miRNAs manifest growth suppressive effects

  2. Analysis of Deregulated microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonas Juzėnas

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are widely studied non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression. MiRNAs are deregulated in different tumors including gastric cancer (GC and have potential diagnostic and prognostic implications. The aim of our study was to determine miRNA profile in GC tissues, followed by evaluation of deregulated miRNAs in plasma of GC patients. Using available databases and bioinformatics methods we also aimed to evaluate potential target genes of confirmed differentially expressed miRNA and validate these findings in GC tissues.The study included 51 GC patients and 51 controls. Initially, we screened miRNA expression profile in 13 tissue samples of GC and 12 normal gastric tissues with TaqMan low density array (TLDA. In the second stage, differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a replication cohort using qRT-PCR in tissue and plasma samples. Subsequently, we analyzed potential target genes of deregulated miRNAs using bioinformatics approach, determined their expression in GC tissues and performed correlation analysis with targeting miRNAs.Profiling with TLDA revealed 15 deregulated miRNAs in GC tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa. Replication analysis confirmed that miR-148a-3p, miR-204-5p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 were consistently deregulated in GC tissues. Analysis of GC patients' plasma samples showed significant down-regulation of miR-148a-3p, miR-375 and up-regulation of miR-223-3p compared to healthy subjects. Further, using bioinformatic tools we identified targets of replicated miRNAs and performed disease-associated gene enrichment analysis. Ultimately, we evaluated potential target gene BCL2 and DNMT3B expression by qRT-PCR in GC tissue, which correlated with targeting miRNA expression.Our study revealed miRNA profile in GC tissues and showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 are deregulated in GC plasma samples, but these circulating miRNAs showed relatively weak diagnostic performance as sole biomarkers

  3. MicroRNAs and their putative targets in Brassica napus seed maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 20–21 nucleotide RNA molecules that suppress the transcription of target genes and may also inhibit translation. Despite the thousands of miRNAs identified and validated in numerous plant species, only small numbers have been identified from the oilseed crop plant Brassica napus (canola) – especially in seeds. Results Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we performed a comprehensive analysis of miRNAs during seed maturation at 9 time points from 10 days after flowering (DAF) to 50 DAF using whole seeds and included separate analyses of radicle, hypocotyl, cotyledon, embryo, endosperm and seed coat tissues at 4 selected time points. We identified more than 500 conserved miRNA or variant unique sequences with >300 sequence reads and also found 10 novel miRNAs. Only 27 of the conserved miRNA sequences had been previously identified in B. napus (miRBase Release 18). More than 180 MIRNA loci were identified/annotated using the B. rapa genome as a surrogate for the B.napus A genome. Numerous miRNAs were expressed in a stage- or tissue-specific manner suggesting that they have specific functions related to the fine tuning of transcript abundance during seed development. miRNA targets in B. napus were predicted and their expression patterns profiled using microarray analyses. Global correlation analysis of the expression patterns of miRNAs and their targets revealed complex miRNA-target gene regulatory networks during seed development. The miR156 family was the most abundant and the majority of the family members were primarily expressed in the embryo. Conclusions Large numbers of miRNAs with diverse expression patterns, multiple-targeting and co-targeting of many miRNAs, and complex relationships between expression of miRNAs and targets were identified in this study. Several key miRNA-target expression patterns were identified and new roles of miRNAs in regulating seed development are suggested. miR156, miR159, miR172, mi

  4. Microvasculature and healing potential of the inner versus outer preputial skin: preliminary immunohistochemical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakry, Adel; Matar, Adel; Zalata, Khaled; Zakaria, Ahmed; Al Atrash, Gamal

    2015-02-01

    To assess healing potential of the inner and the outer layers of the prepuce and to determine which layer is better for hypospadias neourethral reconstruction. The study has been carried out to assess the microvessels density and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) concentration in the inner and the outer preputial layers. Specimens from the outer and the inner prepuce were harvested during hypospadias repair in 26 children. Control specimens were collected during elective circumcision of 10 normal and age-matched children. Sections were prepared, and immunohistochemical staining was done using monoclonal antibodies of CD34 (vascular marker) and of the EGFR. CD34-positive microvessels were assessed under the outer and the inner layers of the prepuce and were counted in five high-power fields under each layer. Expression of EGFR in both layers was assessed using H-score system. The density of microvessels and EGFR expression are significantly higher in control group either for inner or for outer preputial layers (p 0.05). In hypospadias patients, the healing potential of both inner and outer prepuce is nearly similar. However, it is markedly reduced than that of normal prepuce. It seems that both layers can be used for hypospadias repair without obvious preference to either of them. The usual tradition to use inner prepuce in hypospadias repair has no scientific evidence.

  5. Identification of differential microRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqiang Wan

    Full Text Available Major depression is a debilitating disease. To date, the development of biomarkers of major depressive disorder (MDD remains a challenge. Recently, alterations in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs from post-mortem brain tissue and peripheral blood have been linked to MDD. The goals of this study were to detect the differential miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and serum of MDD patients. First, the relative expression levels of 179 miRNAs (relative high levels in serum were analyzed by miRNA PCR Panel in the CSF of MDD patients. Then, the differentially altered miRNAs from CSF were further assessed by qRT-PCR in the serum of the same patients. Finally, the serum differentially altered miRNAs were further validated by qRT-PCR in the serum of another MDD patients. The CSF-results indicated that 11 miRNAs in MDD patients were significantly higher than these in control subjects, and 5 miRNAs were significantly lower than these in control subjects. The serum-results from the same patients showed that 3 miRNAs (miR-221-3p, miR-34a-5p, and let-7d-3p of the 11 miRNAs were significantly higher than these in control subjects, and 1 miRNA (miR-451a of 5 miRNAs was significantly lower than these in control subjects. The up-regulation of miR-221-3p, miR-34a-5p, let-7d-3p and down-regulation of miR-451a was further validated in another 32 MDD patients. ROC analysis showed that the area under curve of let-7d-3p, miR-34a-5p, miR-221-3p and miR-451a was 0.94, 0.98, 0.97 and 0.94, with specificity of 90.48%, 95.24%, 90.48% and 90.48%, and sensitivity of 93.75%, 96.88%, 90.63% and 84.85%, respectively. In addition, target gene prediction found that the altered miRNAs are involved in affecting some important genes and pathway related to MDD. Our results suggested that differentially altered miRNAs in CSF might be involved in MDD, and serum miR-221-3p, miR-34a-5p, let-7d-3p, and miR-451a might be able to serve as biomarkers for MDD.

  6. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna eDuggirala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Withinthe spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbour concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease.

  7. Long noncoding RNAs in diseases of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Noh, Ji Heon; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a process during which progressive deteriorating of cells, tissues, and organs over time lead to loss of function, disease, and death. Towards the goal of extending human health span, there is escalating interest in understanding the mechanisms that govern aging-associated pathologies. Adequate regulation of expression of coding and noncoding genes is critical for maintaining organism homeostasis and preventing disease processes. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key regulators of gene expression at all levels--transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational. In this review, we discuss our emerging understanding of lncRNAs implicated in aging illnesses. We focus on diseases arising from age-driven impairment in energy metabolism (obesity, diabetes), the declining capacity to respond homeostatically to proliferative and damaging stimuli (cancer, immune dysfunction), and neurodegeneration. We identify the lncRNAs involved in these ailments and discuss the rising interest in lncRNAs as diagnostic and therapeutic targets to ameliorate age-associated pathologies and prolong health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Microbiota Small RNAs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Anca T; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Marian, Catalin; Anghel, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    MiRNAs are a class of potential gene regulators of critical importance in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). This review aims to present the connection between gut microbiota, probiotics administration and microRNA (miRNA) expression in IBD. It also brings into question cross-kingdom RNAi (RNA interference). Not only that gut host cells garden the intestinal microbiome via miRNA, but also strong evidence supports the idea that different species of bacteria have an impact on the intestinal immune response by modulating miRNA expression. Cross-kingdom RNAi refers to RNA silencing signals that travel between two unrelated, interacting organisms. RNAs communication between prokaryotes and eukaryotes (bacteria and nematodes) via RNAs transfer has been proved. Some authors also support the idea that non-coding RNAs are being transferred by bacterial pathogens to the host cells as part of the intracellular infection process. Further studies are required in order to clarify whether the mechanism by which bacteria modulate miRNA expression concerns RNAs transfer. These findings may lead to a different approach to IBD therapy in the future.

  9. Circular RNAs in cancer: an emerging key player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeping Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Circular RNAs (circRNAs are a class of endogendous RNAs that form a covalently closed continuous loop and exist extensively in mammalian cells. Majority of circRNAs are conserved across species and often show tissue/developmental stage-specific expression. CircRNAs were first thought to be the result of splicing error; however, subsequent research shows that circRNAs can function as microRNA (miRNA sponges and regulate splicing and transcription. Emerging evidence shows that circRNAs possess closely associated with human diseases, especially cancers, and may serve as better biomarkers. After miRNA and long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, circRNAs are becoming a new hotspot in the field of RNA of cancer. Here, we review biogenesis and metabolism of circRNAs, their functions, and potential roles in cancer.

  10. Altered serum microRNAs as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuhua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB is a highly lethal infectious disease and early diagnosis of TB is critical for the control of disease progression. The objective of this study was to profile a panel of serum microRNAs (miRNAs as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary TB infection. Methods Using TaqMan Low-Density Array (TLDA analysis followed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR validation, expression levels of miRNAs in serum samples from 30 patients with active tuberculosis and 60 patients with Bordetella pertussis (BP, varicella-zoster virus (VZV and enterovirus (EV were analyzed. Results The Low-Density Array data showed that 97 miRNAs were differentially expressed in pulmonary TB patient sera compared with healthy controls (90 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated. Following qRT-PCR confirmation and receiver operational curve (ROC analysis, three miRNAs (miR-361-5p, miR-889 and miR-576-3p were shown to distinguish TB infected patients from healthy controls and other microbial infections with moderate sensitivity and specificity (area under curve (AUC value range, 0.711-0.848. Multiple logistic regression analysis of a combination of these three miRNAs showed an enhanced ability to discriminate between these two groups with an AUC value of 0.863. Conclusions Our study suggests that altered levels of serum miRNAs have great potential to serve as non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of pulmonary TB infection.

  11. Circulating early- and mid-pregnancy microRNAs and risk of gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wander, Pandora L; Boyko, Edward J; Hevner, Karin; Parikh, Viraj J; Tadesse, Mahlet G; Sorensen, Tanya K; Williams, Michelle A; Enquobahrie, Daniel A

    2017-10-01

    Epigenetic regulators, including microRNAs (miRNAs), are implicated in type 2 diabetes, but evidence linking circulating miRNAs in pregnancy and risk of gestational diabetes (GDM) is sparse. Potential modifiers, including pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity and offspring sex, are unexamined. We hypothesized that circulating levels of early-mid-pregnancy (range 7-23weeks of gestation) candidate miRNAs are related to subsequent development of GDM. We also hypothesized that miRNA-GDM associations might vary by pre-pregnancy body-mass index (ppBMI) or offspring sex. In a case-control analysis (36GDM cases/80 controls) from the Omega study, a prospective cohort study of pregnancy complications, we measured early-mid-pregnancy plasma levels of 10miRNAs chosen for potential roles in pregnancy course and complications (miR-126-3p, -155-5p, -21-3p, -146b-5p, -210-3p, -222-3p, -223-3p, -517-5p, -518a-3p, and 29a-3p) using qRT-PCR. Logistic regression models adjusted for gestational age at blood draw (GA) were fit to compare circulating miRNAs between cases and controls. We repeated analyses among overweight/obese (ppBMI≥25kg/m 2 ) or lean (ppBMIpregnancy miRNAs are associated with GDM, particularly among women who are overweight/obese pre-pregnancy or pregnant with male offspring. This area has potential to clarify mechanisms underlying GDM pathogenesis and identify at-risk mothers earlier in pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Oral delivery of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs induces RNAi effects in the potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hada Wuriyanghan

    Full Text Available The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericerca cockerelli (B. cockerelli, and the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (D. citri, are very important plant pests, but they are also vectors of phloem-limited bacteria that are associated with two devastating plant diseases. B. cockerelli is the vector of Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum, which is associated with zebra chip disease of potatoes, and D. citri is the vector of Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus, which is associated with the Huanglongbing (citrus greening disease that currently threatens the entire Florida citrus industry. Here we used EST sequence information from D. citri to identify potential targets for RNA interference in B. cockerelli. We targeted ubiquitously expressed and gut-abundant mRNAs via injection and oral acquisition of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs and were able to induce mortality in recipient psyllids. We also showed knockdown of target mRNAs, and that oral acquisition resulted primarily in mRNA knockdown in the psyllid gut. Concurrent with gene knockdown was the accumulation of target specific ∼ 21 nucleotide siRNAs for an abundant mRNA for BC-Actin. These results showed that RNAi can be a powerful tool for gene function studies in psyllids, and give support for continued efforts for investigating RNAi approaches as possible tools for psyllid and plant disease control.

  13. The Outer Space as an Educational Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Melquíades; Hernández-López, Montserrat

    2017-06-01

    STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end results are students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. The Outer Space is a window to the past and the future of our travel around the history of the Universe and can be used as a educational tool in primary and secondary education. This paper talks about the integration of the resources of European Space Agency, Space Awareness, Nuclio, Scientix and Schoolnet as motivation to integrate STEAM methodology in secondary education. Keywords: STEAM, outer space, motivation, methodology

  14. Performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Arink, R; Bachmann, S.; Bagaturia, Y.; Band, H.; Bauer, Th.; Berkien, A.; Farber, Ch.; Bien, A.; Blouw, J.; Ceelie, L.; Coco, V.; Deckenhoff, M.; Deng, Z.; Dettori, F.; van Eijk, D.; Ekelhof, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Grillo, L.; Hulsbergen, W.D.; Karbach, T.M.; Koopman, R.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Langenbruch, Ch.; Lavrentyev, V.; Linn, Ch.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Meissner, M.; Michalowski, J.; Morawski, P.; Nawrot, A.; Nedos, M.; Pellegrino, A.; Polok, G.; van Petten, O.; Rovekamp, J.; Schimmel, F.; Schuylenburg, H.; Schwemmer, R.; Seyfert, P.; Serra, N.; Sluijk, T.; Spaan, B.; Spelt, J.; Storaci, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Swientek, S.; Tolk, S.; Tuning, N.; Uwer, U.; Wiedner, D.; Witek, M.; Zeng, M.; Zwart, A.

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is a gaseous detector covering an area of 5x6 m2 with 12 double layers of straw tubes. The detector with its services are described together with the commissioning and calibration procedures. Based on data of the first LHC running period from 2010 to 2012, the performance of the readout electronics and the single hit resolution and efficiency are presented. The efficiency to detect a hit in the central half of the straw is estimated to be 99.2%, and the position resolution is determined to be approximately 200 um. The Outer Tracker received a dose in the hottest region corresponding to 0.12 C/cm, and no signs of gain deterioration or other ageing effects are observed.

  15. Outer magnetospheric fluctuations and pulsar timing noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, K.S.

    1987-10-01

    The Cheng, Ho, and Ruderman (1986) outer-magnetosphere gap model was used to investigate the stability of Crab-type outer magnetosphere gaps for pulsars having the parameter (Omega-square B) similar to that of the Crab pulsar. The Lamb, Pines, and Shaham (1978) fluctuating magnetosphere noise model was applied to the Crab pulsar to examine the type of the equation of state that best describes the structure of the neutron star. The noise model was also applied to other pulsars, and the theoretical results were compared with observational data. The results of the comparison are consistent with the stiff equation of state, as suggested by the vortex creep model of the neutron star interior. The timing-noise observations also contribute to the evidence for the existence of superfluid in the core of the neutron star. 37 references.

  16. Outer spiral structure in disk galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsis, P. A.

    2017-03-01

    In several grand design barred-spiral galaxies it is observed a second, fainter, outer set of spiral arms. Typical examples of objects of this morphology can be considered NGC 1566 and NGC 5248. I suggest that such an overall structure can be the result of two dynamical mechanisms acting in the disc. The bar and both spiral systems rotate with the same pattern speed. The inner spiral is reinforced by regular orbits trapped around the stable, elliptical, periodic orbits of the central family, while the outer system of spiral arms is supported by chaotic orbits. Chaotic orbits are also responsible for a rhomboidal area surrounding the inner barred-spiral region. In general there is a discontinuity between the two spiral structures at the corotation region.

  17. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina are excellent examples of the nearly 300 barrier islands rimming the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. These low, sandy islands are among the most dynamic natural landscapes occupied by man. Beach sands move offshore, onshore, and along the shore in the direction of the prevailing longshore currents. In this way, sandy coasts continuously adjust to different tide, wave, and current conditions and to rising sea level that causes the islands to migrate landward.Despite such changes, barrier islands are of considerable environmental importance. The Outer Banks are home to diverse natural ecosystems that are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Native species tend to be robust and many are specifically adapted to withstand salt spray, periodic saltwater flooding, and the islands’ well-drained sandy soil. The Outer Banks provide an important stopover for birds on the Atlantic flyway, and many species inhabit the islands year round. In addition, Outer Banks beaches provide an important nesting habitat for five endangered or threatened sea turtle species.European explorers discovered North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 16th century, although the islands were not permanently settled until the middle 17th century. By the early 19th century, shipbuilding and lumber industries were among the most successful, until forest resources were depleted. Commercial fishing eventually followed, and it expanded considerably after the Civil War. By the Great Depression, however, little industry existed on the Outer Banks. In response to the effects of a severe hurricane in 1933, the National Park Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps proposed a massive sand-fixation program to stabilize the moving sand and prevent storm waves from sweeping across the entire width of some sections of the islands. Between 1933 and 1940, this program constructed sand fencing on 185 kilometers (115 miles) of beach and planted grass seedlings

  18. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  19. Deep sequencing of Brachypodium small RNAs at the global genome level identifies microRNAs involved in cold stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Kang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs having large-scale regulatory effects on plant development and stress responses. Extensive studies of miRNAs have only been performed in a few model plants. Although miRNAs are proved to be involved in plant cold stress responses, little is known for winter-habit monocots. Brachypodium distachyon, with close evolutionary relationship to cool-season cereals, has recently emerged as a novel model plant. There are few reports of Brachypodium miRNAs. Results High-throughput sequencing and whole-genome-wide data mining led to the identification of 27 conserved miRNAs, as well as 129 predicted miRNAs in Brachypodium. For multiple-member conserved miRNA families, their sizes in Brachypodium were much smaller than those in rice and Populus. The genome organization of miR395 family in Brachypodium was quite different from that in rice. The expression of 3 conserved miRNAs and 25 predicted miRNAs showed significant changes in response to cold stress. Among these miRNAs, some were cold-induced and some were cold-suppressed, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated under cold stress condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that Brachypodium miRNAs are composed of a set of conserved miRNAs and a large proportion of non-conserved miRNAs with low expression levels. Both kinds of miRNAs were involved in cold stress response, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated, implying an important role for cold-induced miRNAs. The different size and genome organization of miRNA families in Brachypodium and rice suggest that the frequency of duplication events or the selection pressure on duplicated miRNAs are different between these two closely related plant species.

  20. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  1. The significance of microRNAs or the cellular response in endothelium cells; Die Bedeutung von microRNAs fuer die zellulaere Strahlenantwort in Endothelzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moertl, Simone; Heider, Theresa [Helmholtz Center Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Clinical Radiation Biology

    2016-08-01

    Ionizing radiation causes a variety of cell damages. Several cell constituents like DNA, mitochondria, proteins or membranes are affected. Cells have developed numerous and cross-linked radiation response processes for counteraction. In case of failure of the repair mechanism cell proliferation or cell death are the consequences. Many proteins in these processes are controlled by microRNAs (miRNAs). The accurate knowledge of miRNA functions is therefore importance not only for radiation protection but also the therapeutic use of ionizing radiations.

  2. Mitochondrial small RNAs that are up-regulated in hippocampus during olfactory discrimination training in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Lugli, Giovanni; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Cook, Edwin H; Larson, John

    2011-11-01

    Adult mice were trained to execute a nose-poke in a port containing one of two simultaneously present odors in order to obtain a reward. Hippocampus RNA of trained mice vs. controls was subjected to Illumina deep sequencing. Two mitochondrial RNAs (a tRNA and Mt-1) gave rise to 25-30-nt. small RNAs that showed a dramatic and specific increase with training (>50-fold relative to controls). Mt-1 is encoded within the termination association sequence (TAS) of the mitochondrial DNA control region. Small RNAs may link behavioral plasticity to protein synthesis and replication of mitochondria to support dendritic growth, spine stabilization, and synapse formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

  3. MicroRNAs regulate tight junction proteins and modulate epithelial/endothelial barrier functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichon, Christoph; Sabharwal, Harshana; Rüter, Christian; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Tightly controlled epithelial and endothelial barriers are a prerequisite for life as these barriers separate multicellular organisms from their environment and serve as first lines of defense. Barriers between neighboring epithelial cells are formed by multiple intercellular junctions including the 'apical junctional complex-AJC' with tight junctions (TJ), adherens junctions (AJ), and desmosomes. TJ consist of tetraspan transmembrane proteins like occludin, various claudins that directly control paracellular permeability, and the 'Junctional Adhesion Molecules' (JAMs). For establishing tight barriers TJ are essential but at the same time have to allow also selective permeability. For this, TJ need to be tightly regulated and controlled. This is organized by a variety of adaptor molecules, i.e., protein kinases, phosphatases and GTPases, which in turn are regulated and fine-tuned involving microRNAs (miRNAs). In this review we summarize available data on the role and targeting of miRNAs in the maintenance of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers.

  4. Outer membrane proteins of pathogenic spirochetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Paul A; Haake, David A; Adler, Ben

    2004-06-01

    Pathogenic spirochetes are the causative agents of several important diseases including syphilis, Lyme disease, leptospirosis, swine dysentery, periodontal disease and some forms of relapsing fever. Spirochetal bacteria possess two membranes and the proteins present in the outer membrane are at the site of interaction with host tissue and the immune system. This review describes the current knowledge in the field of spirochetal outer membrane protein (OMP) biology. What is known concerning biogenesis and structure of OMPs, with particular regard to the atypical signal peptide cleavage sites observed amongst the spirochetes, is discussed. We examine the functions that have been determined for several spirochetal OMPs including those that have been demonstrated to function as adhesins, porins or to have roles in complement resistance. A detailed description of the role of spirochetal OMPs in immunity, including those that stimulate protective immunity or that are involved in antigenic variation, is given. A final section is included which covers experimental considerations in spirochetal outer membrane biology. This section covers contentious issues concerning cellular localization of putative OMPs, including determination of surface exposure. A more detailed knowledge of spirochetal OMP biology will hopefully lead to the design of new vaccines and a better understanding of spirochetal pathogenesis.

  5. Isolation and Identification of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing-Related Micro-RNAs by Functionalized Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-I.; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Li, Keng-Hui; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Su, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Wei; Tseng, Kun-Chang; Lin, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chii-Dong; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Many transcribed RNAs are non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNAs to regulate the translation efficacy. Therefore, identifying the miRNAs expressed in cells/organisms aids in understanding genetic control in cells/organisms. In this report, we determined the binding of oligonucleotides to a receptor-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) by monitoring the changes in conductance of the SiNW-FET. We first modified a SiNW-FET with a DNA probe to directly and selectively detect the complementary miRNA in cell lysates. This SiNW-FET device has 7-fold higher sensitivity than reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in detecting the corresponding miRNA. Next, we anchored viral p19 proteins, which bind the double-strand small RNAs (ds-sRNAs), on the SiNW-FET. By perfusing the device with synthesized ds-sRNAs of different pairing statuses, the dissociation constants revealed that the nucleotides at the 3‧-overhangs and pairings at the terminus are important for the interactions. After perfusing the total RNA mixture extracted from Nicotiana benthamiana across the device, this device could enrich the ds-sRNAs for sequence analysis. Finally, this bionanoelectronic SiNW-FET, which is able to isolate and identify the interacting protein-RNA, adds an additional tool in genomic technology for the future study of direct biomolecular interactions.

  6. Combined small RNA and degradome sequencing to identify miRNAs and their targets in response to drought in foxtail millet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Li, Lin; Tang, Sha; Liu, Jianguang; Zhang, Hanshuang; Zhi, Hui; Jia, Guanqing; Diao, Xianmin

    2016-04-12

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica) is a diploid C4 panicoid species. Because of its prominent drought resistance, small genome size, self-pollination, and short life cycle, foxtail millet has become an ideal model system for studying drought tolerance of crops. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, small RNAs that play important regulatory roles in the development and stress response in plants. In this study, we applied Illumina sequencing to systematically investigate the drought-responsive miRNAs derived from S. italica inbred An04-4783 seedlings grown under control and drought conditions. Degradome sequencing was applied to confirm the targets of these miRNAs at a global level. A total of 81 known miRNAs belonging to 28 families were identified, among which 14 miRNAs were upregulated and four were downregulated in response to drought. In addition, 72 potential novel miRNAs were identified, three of which were differentially expressed under drought conditions. Degradome sequencing analysis showed that 56 and 26 genes were identified as targets of known and novel miRNAs, respectively. Our analysis revealed post-transcriptional remodeling of cell development, transcription factors, ABA signaling, and cellar homeostasis in S.italica in response to drought. This preliminary characterization provided useful information for further studies on the regulatory networks of drought-responsive miRNAs in foxtail millet.

  7. Genome-wide identification of endogenous RNA-directed DNA methylation loci associated with abundant 21-nucleotide siRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2016-10-27

    In Arabidopsis, the 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mediates RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of transposable elements (TEs). In the present study, we examined genome-wide changes in DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis induced by expression of the Cucumber mosaic virus silencing suppressor protein 2b known to directly bind to both the 21/24-nt siRNAs as well as their associated Argonaute proteins. We demonstrated a genome-wide reduction of CHH and CHG methylation in the 2b-transgenic plants. We found that 2b suppressed RdDM not only at the previously annotated loci directed by 24-nt siRNAs but also a new set of loci associated with 21/22-nt siRNAs. Further analysis showed that the reduced methylation of TEs and coding genes targeted by 21/22-nt siRNAs was associated with sequestration of the duplex siRNAs by the 2b protein but not with changes in either siRNA production or transcription. Notably, we detected both the deletion and/or the transposition of multicopy TEs associated with 2b-induced hypomethylation, suggesting potential TE reactivation. We propose that the silencing of many TEs in Arabidopsis is controlled by the 24- and 21-nt endogenous siRNAs analogous to Drosophila TE silencing by PIWI-interacting RNAs and siRNAs.

  8. Identification of conserved and novel microRNAs in Catharanthus roseus by deep sequencing and computational prediction of their potential targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Pravin; Ghosliya, Dolly; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-10

    MicroRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNAs of ~19-24 nucleotides and perform regulatory roles in many plant processes. To identify miRNAs involved in regulatory networks controlling diverse biological processes including secondary metabolism in Catharanthus roseus, an important medicinal plant, we employed deep sequencing of small RNA from leaf tissue. A total of 88 potential miRNAs comprising of 81 conserved miRNAs belonging to 35 families and seven novel miRNAs were identified. Precursors for 16 conserved and seven novel cro-miRNAs were identified, and their stem-loop hairpin structures were predicted. Selected cro-miRNAs were analyzed by stem-loop qRT-PCR and differential expression patterns were observed in different vegetative tissues of C. roseus. Targets were predicted for conserved and novel cro-miRNAs, which were found to be involved in diverse biological role(s) including secondary metabolism. Our study enriches available resources and information regarding miRNAs and their potential targets for better understanding of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulation of connexins expression levels by microRNAs, an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Calderon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Control of cell-cell coordination and communication is regulated by several factors, including paracrine and autocrine release of biomolecules, and direct exchange of soluble factors between cells through gap junction channels. Additionally, hemichannels also participate in cell-cell coordination through the release of signaling molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. A family of transmembrane proteins named connexins forms both gap junction channels and hemichannels. Because of their importance in cell and tissue coordination, connexins are controlled both by post-translational and post-transcriptional modifications. In recent years, non-coding RNAs have garnered research interest due to their ability to exert post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. One of the most recent, well-documented control mechanisms of protein synthesis is found through the action of small, single-stranded RNA, called micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs. Put simply, miRNAs are negative regulators of the expression of a myriad proteins involved in many physiological and pathological processes. This mini review will briefly summarize what is currently known about the action of miRNAs over Cxs expression/function in different organs under some relevant physiological and pathological conditions

  10. Early Second-Trimester Serum MicroRNAs as Potential Biomarker for Nondiabetic Macrosomia

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    Lingmin Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Macrosomia has become a worldwide problem with the rapid economic growth in the past few years. However, the detailed mechanism of how the macrosomia happened remains unknown. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are involved in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. We hypothesized that serum miRNAs are potential biomarkers for macrosomia. Methods. We performed miRNAs profiling using TLDA chips in the discovery phase in two pooled samples from 30 cases and 30 controls, respectively. Individual qRT-PCR was conducted for the discovery phase samples. To confirm the results, we detected the miRNAs which were differentially expressed in the microarray assays and individual qRT-PCR in external validation phase with another 30 cases and 30 controls. Results. In the discovery stage, miR-194 and miR-376a expression levels were significantly different between macrosomia group and controls (P=0.048 for miR-194 and P=0.018 for miR-376a, resp.. Further evaluation of the two miRNAs on a total of 120 serum samples showed that the miR-376a remains significantly lower in macrosomia (P=0.032. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the area under curve for miR-376a was 67.8% (sensitivity = 96.7% and specificity = 40.0%. Conclusions. Serum miR-376a may serve as a potential noninvasive biomarker in detecting macrosomia.

  11. Early second-trimester serum microRNAs as potential biomarker for nondiabetic macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lingmin; Han, Jing; Zheng, Fangxiu; Ma, Hongxia; Chen, Jiaping; Jiang, Yue; Jiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Macrosomia has become a worldwide problem with the rapid economic growth in the past few years. However, the detailed mechanism of how the macrosomia happened remains unknown. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are involved in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. We hypothesized that serum miRNAs are potential biomarkers for macrosomia. We performed miRNAs profiling using TLDA chips in the discovery phase in two pooled samples from 30 cases and 30 controls, respectively. Individual qRT-PCR was conducted for the discovery phase samples. To confirm the results, we detected the miRNAs which were differentially expressed in the microarray assays and individual qRT-PCR in external validation phase with another 30 cases and 30 controls. In the discovery stage, miR-194 and miR-376a expression levels were significantly different between macrosomia group and controls (P=0.048 for miR-194 and P=0.018 for miR-376a, resp.). Further evaluation of the two miRNAs on a total of 120 serum samples showed that the miR-376a remains significantly lower in macrosomia (P=0.032). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the area under curve for miR-376a was 67.8% (sensitivity=96.7% and specificity=40.0%). Serum miR-376a may serve as a potential noninvasive biomarker in detecting macrosomia.

  12. Dynamics of microRNAs in bull spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Govindaraju Aruna; Uzun Alper; Robertson LaShonda; Atli Mehmet O; Kaya Abdullah; Topper Einko; Crate Elizabeth A; Padbury James; Perkins Andy; Memili Erdogan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and thus play important roles in mammalian development. However, the comprehensive lists of microRNAs, as well as, molecular mechanisms by which microRNAs regulate gene expression during gamete and embryo development are poorly defined. The objectives of this study were to determine microRNAs in bull sperm and predict their functions. Methods To accomplish our objectives we isolated miRNAs from sperm of high...

  13. Epigenetic regulation by long noncoding RNAs in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jae Bok; Lee, Yong-Suk; Sung, Sibum

    2013-12-01

    Many eukaryotes, including plants, produce a large number of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs).Growing number of lncRNAs are being reported to have regulatory roles in various developmental processes.Emerging mechanisms underlying the function of lncRNAs indicate that lncRNAs are versatile regulatory molecules. They function as potent cis- and trans-regulators of gene expression, including the formation of modular scaffolds that recruit chromatin-modifying complexes to target chromatin. LncRNAs have also been reported in plants. Here, we describe our current understanding on potential roles of lncRNA in plants.

  14. Generation of endo-siRNAs in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnumeir, Sammer; Werner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) are well documented and characterized in C. elegans and Drosophila. Endo-siRNAs can also be found in vertebrates; however, their biology is much less clear. They are thought to be produced by Dicer and to contribute to transposon silencing. Because of their generally low abundance and their similarity with miRNAs and products of physiological RNA turn-over, endo-siRNAs are difficult to investigate. Here, we report a system, oocytes from Xenopus laevis, that allows for the generation and analysis of endo-siRNAs from double-stranded RNA precursors.

  15. Male germ cells express abundant endogenous siRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Hennig, Grant W.; Wu, Qiuxia; Jose, Charlie; Zheng, Huili; Yan, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) have only been reported in murine oocytes and embryonic stem cells. Here, we show that murine spermatogenic cells express numerous endo-siRNAs, which are likely to be derived from naturally occurring double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) precursors. The biogenesis of these testicular endo-siRNAs is DROSHA independent, but DICER dependent. These male germ cell endo-siRNAs can potentially target hundreds of transcripts or thousands of DNA regions in the genome. Overall, our work has unveiled another hidden layer of regulation imposed by small noncoding RNAs during male germ cell development. PMID:21788498

  16. Systematic identification of long noncoding RNAs expressed during zebrafish embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Andrea; Valen, Eivind; Lin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    vertebrate embryogenesis has been elusive. To identify lncRNAs with potential functions in vertebrate embryogenesis, we performed a time series of RNA-Seq experiments at eight stages during early zebrafish development. We reconstructed 56,535 high-confidence transcripts in 28,912 loci, recovering the vast...... overlapping lncRNAs, and precursors for small RNAs (sRNAs). Zebrafish lncRNAs share many of the characteristics of their mammalian counterparts: relatively short length, low exon number, low expression, and conservation levels comparable to introns. Subsets of lncRNAs carry chromatin signatures characteristic...

  17. Microarray expression profile of lncRNAs and mRNAs in the placenta of non-diabetic macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, G Y; Na, Q; Wang, D; Qiao, C

    2017-11-16

    Macrosomia, not only is closely associated with short-term, birth-related problems, but also has long-term consequences for the offspring. We investigated the expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the placenta of macrosomia births using a microarray profile. The data showed that 2929 lncRNAs and 4574 mRNAs were upregulated in the placenta of macrosomia births compared with the normal birth weight group (fold change ⩾2.0, Pmacrosomia placenta. Four lncRNAs were randomly chosen from the differentially expressed lncRNAs to validate the microarray data by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The qPCR results were consistent with the microarray data. In conclusion, lncRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in the placenta of macrosomia patients, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of macrosomia.

  18. LncRNAs: new players in gliomas, with special emphasis on the interaction of lncRNAs With EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Er-Bao; Li, Jia; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Zong, Gang; Li, Jun; Zhao, Bing

    2015-03-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary malignancy in the brain, accounting for 50-60%. Despite all the efforts of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intense chemoradiotherapy, glioma remains an incurable disease. Recent studies have shown that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in the pathology of gliomas. LncRNAs are involved in many cellular processes, such as angiogenesis, invasion, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In this review we focus on the dysregulation of lncRNAs in gliomas. We also address that epigenetic modification such as DNA methylation and microRNAs interact with lncRNAs in gliomas. In addition, the interaction of lncRNAs with signaling pathways in gliomas is discussed systematically, with particular emphasis on the interaction of lncRNAs with EZH2. Such approaches provide valuable insights into the potential future applications of lncRNAs in the treatment of gliomas. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Identification and characterization of microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in Schistosoma japonicum

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    Wang Heng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs such as small interfering RNA (siRNA, microRNA and other small RNA transcripts are derived from distinct loci in the genome and play critical roles in RNA-mediated gene silencing mechanisms in plants and metazoa. They are approximately 22 nucleotides long; regulate mRNA stability through perfect or imperfect match to the targets. The biological activities of sncRNAs have been related to many biological events, from resistance to microbe infections to cellular differentiation. The development of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma japonicum parasite includes multiple steps of morphological alterations and biological differentiations, which provide a unique model for studies on the functions of small RNAs. Characterization of the genome-wide transcription of the sncRNAs will be a major step in understanding of the parasite biology. The objective of this study is to investigate the transcriptional profile and potential function of the small non-coding RNAs in the development of S. japanicum. Results The endogenous siRNAs were found mainly derived from transposable elements (TE or transposons and the natural antisense transcripts (NAT. In contrast to other organisms, the TE-derived siRNAs in S. japonicum were more predominant than other sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs. Further, there were distinct length and 3'end variations in the sncRNAs, which were associated with the developmental differentiation of the parasite. Among the identified miRNA transcripts, there were 38 unique to S. japonicum and 16 that belonged to 13 miRNA families are common to other metazoan lineages. These miRNAs were either ubiquitously expressed, or they exhibited specific expression patterns related to the developmental stages or sex. Genes that encoded miRNAs are mainly located in clusters within the genome of S. japonicum. However, genes within one cluster could be differentially transcribed, which suggested

  20. Expression Variations of miRNAs and mRNAs in Rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Xie, Munan; He, Lian; Wang, Yushuai; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-12-31

    Differences in expression levels are an important source of phenotypic variation within and between populations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional gene regulation that are important for plant development and stress responses. We surveyed expression variation of miRNAs and mRNAs of six accessions from two rice subspecies Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica and Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica using deep sequencing. While more than half (53.7%) of the mature miRNAs exhibit differential expression between grains and seedlings of rice, only 11.0% show expression differences between subspecies, with an additional 2.2% differentiated for the development-by-subspecies interaction. Expression variation is greater for lowly conserved miRNAs than highly conserved miRNAs, whereas the latter show stronger negative correlation with their targets in expression changes between subspecies. Using a permutation test, we identified 51 miRNA-mRNA pairs that correlate negatively or positively in expression level among cultivated rice. Genes involved in various metabolic processes and stress responses are enriched in the differentially expressed genes between rice indica and japonica subspecies. Our results indicate that stabilizing selection is the major force governing miRNA expression in cultivated rice, albeit positive selection may be responsible for much of the between-subspecies expression divergence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Double in situ hybridization for microRNAs and mRNAs in brain tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kasai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs participate in a variety of functions in the brain. Understanding the in vivo localization of miRNAs is an important step for uncovering their roles in brain function. However, the in situ detection of low-abundance miRNAs in brain tissues remains difficult and requires extensive optimization of in situ hybridization (ISH protocols in individual laboratories. Thus, detailed information regarding experimental conditions would serve as a useful reference for researchers in this field. Here, we investigated and summarized the effects of adjusting a series of critical steps, including tissue fixation, probe accessibility and hybridization stringency, to standardize the currently used miRNA ISH procedures. As a result, we successfully detected several low-abundance miRNAs by ISH using the following experimental conditions: (1 use of fresh brain tissues, (2 digestion of brain samples with proteinase K, (3 LNA-probe hybridization at a temperature 37°C below the melting temperature of the RNA, (4 performance of high-stringency wash steps using 50% formamide in 1× standard saline citrate (SSC buffer. RT-PCR of the punched-out tissues using TaqManTM primers confirmed the ISH results. Finally, double-fluorescence ISH successfully demonstrated the colocalization of miRNAs and mRNAs. Thus, the detailed information regarding the miRNA ISH procedures used in this study may help to resolve the technical hurdles observed in the in vivo localization of miRNAs, and the elucidation of the specific roles of miRNAs.

  2. Long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs are dysregulated in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM.

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    Casey M Wright

    Full Text Available Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM is an aggressive cancer that is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is characterized by a long latency period (20-40 years between initial exposure and diagnosis and prior exposure to asbestos. Currently accurate diagnosis of MPM is difficult due to the lack of sensitive biomarkers and despite minor improvements in treatment, median survival rates do not exceed 12 months. Accumulating evidence suggests that aberrant expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs play an important functional role in cancer biology. LncRNAs are a class of recently discovered non-protein coding RNAs >200 nucleotides in length with a role in regulating transcription. Here we used NCode long noncoding microarrays to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs potentially involved in MPM pathogenesis. High priority candidate lncRNAs were selected on the basis of statistical (P3-fold difference. Expression levels of 9 candidate lncRNAs were technically validated using RT-qPCR, and biologically validated in three independent test sets: (1 57 archived MPM tissues obtained from extrapleural pneumonectomy patients, (2 15 cryopreserved MPM and 3 benign pleura, and (3 an extended panel of 10 MPM cell lines. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated consistent up-regulation of these lncRNAs in independent datasets. ROC curve analysis showed that two candidates were able to separate benign pleura and MPM with high sensitivity and specificity, and were associated with nodal metastases and survival following induction chemotherapy. These results suggest that lncRNAs have potential to serve as biomarkers in MPM.

  3. MicroRNAs in Human Placental Development and Pregnancy Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Peng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs, which function as critical posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation and translational inhibition. Placenta expresses many ubiquitous as well as specific miRNAs. These miRNAs regulate trophoblast cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion/migration, and angiogenesis, suggesting that miRNAs play important roles during placental development. Aberrant miRNAs expression has been linked to pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. Recent research of placental miRNAs focuses on identifying placental miRNA species, examining differential expression of miRNAs between placentas from normal and compromised pregnancies, and uncovering the function of miRNAs in the placenta. More studies are required to further understand the functional significance of miRNAs in placental development and to explore the possibility of using miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for pregnancy-related disorders. In this paper, we reviewed the current knowledge about the expression and function of miRNAs in placental development, and propose future directions for miRNA studies.

  4. Comprehensive in silico prediction and analysis of chlamydial outer membrane proteins reflects evolution and life style of the Chlamydiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Garry

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria comprising some of the most important bacterial pathogens of animals and humans. Although chlamydial outer membrane proteins play a key role for attachment to and entry into host cells, only few have been described so far. We developed a comprehensive, multiphasic in silico approach, including the calculation of clusters of orthologues, to predict outer membrane proteins using conservative criteria. We tested this approach using Escherichia coli (positive control and Bacillus subtilis (negative control, and applied it to five chlamydial species; Chlamydia trachomatis, Chlamydia muridarum, Chlamydia (a.k.a. Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia (a.k.a. Chlamydophila caviae, and Protochlamydia amoebophila. Results In total, 312 chlamydial outer membrane proteins and lipoproteins in 88 orthologous clusters were identified, including 238 proteins not previously recognized to be located in the outer membrane. Analysis of their taxonomic distribution revealed an evolutionary conservation among Chlamydiae, Verrucomicrobia, Lentisphaerae and Planctomycetes as well as lifestyle-dependent conservation of the chlamydial outer membrane protein composition. Conclusion This analysis suggested a correlation between the outer membrane protein composition and the host range of chlamydiae and revealed a common set of outer membrane proteins shared by these intracellular bacteria. The collection of predicted chlamydial outer membrane proteins is available at the online database pCOMP http://www.microbial-ecology.net/pcomp and might provide future guidance in the quest for anti-chlamydial vaccines.

  5. Histone code and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) aberrations in lung cancer: implications in the therapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Solorio, Abril Marcela; Armas-López, Leonel; Arrieta, Oscar; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Ávila-Moreno, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory diseases hold several genome, epigenome, and transcriptional aberrations as a cause of the accumulated damage promoted by, among others, environmental risk factors. Such aberrations can also come about as an adaptive response when faced with therapeutic oncological drugs. In epigenetic terms, aberrations in DNA methylation patterns, histone code marks balance, and/or chromatin-remodeling complexes recruitment, among Polycomb Repressive Complex-2 (PRC2) versus Trithorax (TRX) Activator Complex, have been proposed to be affected by several previously characterized functional long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Such molecules are involved in modulating and/or controlling lung cancer epigenome and genome expression, as well as in malignancy and clinical progression in lung cancer. Several recent reports have described diverse epigenetic modifications in lung cancer cells and solid tumors, among others genomic DNA methylation and post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone tails, as well as lncRNAs patterns and levels of expression. However, few systematic approaches have attempted to demonstrate a biological function and clinical association, aiming to improve therapeutic decisions in basic research and lung clinical oncology. A widely used example is the lncRNA HOTAIR and its functional histone mark H3K27me3, which is directly associated to the PRC2; however, few systematic pieces of solid evidence have been experimentally performed, conducted and/or validated to predict lung oncological therapeutic efficacy. Recent evidence suggests that chromatin-remodeling complexes accompanied by lncRNAs profiles are involved in several comprehensive lung carcinoma clinical parameters, including histopathology progression, prognosis, and/or responsiveness to unique or combined oncological therapies. The present manuscript offers a systematic revision of the current knowledge about the major epigenetic aberrations represented by changes in histone PTMs and lncRNAs

  6. Effects of semi-floating ring bearing outer clearance on the subsynchronous oscillation of turbocharger rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Zhou, Ming; Xu, Quanyong

    2016-09-01

    Semi-floating ring bearing(SFRB) is developed to control the vibration of turbocharger rotor. The outer clearance of SFRB affects the magnitude and frequency of nonlinear whirl motion, which is significant for the design of turbocharger. In order to explore the effects of outer clearance, a transient finite element analysis program for rotor and oil film bearing is built and validated by a published experimental case. The nonlinear dynamic behaviors of rotor-SFRB system are simulated. According to the simulation results, two representative subsynchronous oscillations excited by the two bearings respectively are discovered. As the outer clearance of SFRB increases from 24 μm to 60 μm, the low-frequency subsynchronous oscillation experiences three steps, including a strong start, a gradual recession and a combination with the other one. At the same time, the high-frequency subsynchronous oscillation starts to appear gradually, then strengthens, and finally combines. If gravity and unbalance are neglected, the combination will start starts from high rotor speed and extents to low rotor speed, just like a "zipper". It is found from the quantitative analysis that when the outer clearance increases, the vibration amplitude experiences large value firstly, then reduction, and suddenly increasing after combination. A useful design principle of SFRB outer clearance for minimum vibration amplitude is proposed: the outer clearance value should be chosen to keep the frequency of two subsynchronous oscillations clearly separated and their amplitudes close.

  7. Differential microRNAs expression in serum of patients with lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Fattah, Amal A; Sadik, Nermin Abdel Hamid; Shaker, Olfat Gamil; Aboulftouh, Mariam Lotfy

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play critical regulatory roles in the physiological and pathological processes. The high stability of miRNAs in human serum represents attractive novel diagnostic biomarkers of clinical conditions. Several studies have shown that aberrant expression of miRNAs in human cancer including lung cancer, but little is known about their effects on some infectious lung diseases such as pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and pneumonia. In this study, we investigated miRNA expression pattern in serum of Egyptian patients with lung cancer, TB, and pneumonia compared with matched healthy controls. Using microarray-based expression profiling followed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction validation, we compared the levels of a series of circulating miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-182, and miR-197) in serum from patients with lung cancer (n = 65), pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 29), pneumonia (n = 29), and transudate (n = 16) compared with matched healthy controls (n = 37). MiRNA SNORD68 was the housekeeping endogenous control. We found that the serum levels of miR-21, miR-155, and miR-197 were significantly elevated in the patients with lung cancer and pneumonia whereas miR-182 and miR-197 levels were increased only in patients with lung cancer and TB, respectively, compared with controls. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that miR-182, miR-155, and miR-197 have superior diagnostic potential in discriminating patients with lung cancer, pneumonia, and TB, respectively, from controls. Our results conclude that the differential expression of the four studied miRNAs can be potential non-invasive biomarkers for patients with lung cancer, TB and pneumonia.

  8. Circulating microRNAs as specific biomarkers for breast cancer detection.

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    Enders K O Ng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed microRNAs (miRNAs in plasma are potential biomarkers for colorectal cancer detection. Here, we aimed to develop specific blood-based miRNA assay for breast cancer detection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: TaqMan-based miRNA profiling was performed in tumor, adjacent non-tumor, corresponding plasma from breast cancer patients, and plasma from matched healthy controls. All putative markers identified were verified in a training set of breast cancer patients. Selected markers were validated in a case-control cohort of 170 breast cancer patients, 100 controls, and 95 other types of cancers and then blindly validated in an independent set of 70 breast cancer patients and 50 healthy controls. Profiling results showed 8 miRNAs were concordantly up-regulated and 1 miRNA was concordantly down-regulated in both plasma and tumor tissue of breast cancer patients. Of the 8 up-regulated miRNAs, only 3 were significantly elevated (p<0.0001 before surgery and reduced after surgery in the training set. Results from the validation cohort showed that a combination of miR-145 and miR-451 was the best biomarker (p<0.0001 in discriminating breast cancer from healthy controls and all other types of cancers. In the blind validation, these plasma markers yielded Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve area of 0.931. The positive predictive value was 88% and the negative predictive value was 92%. Altered levels of these miRNAs in plasma have been detected not only in advanced stages but also early stages of tumors. The positive predictive value for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS cases was 96%. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggested that these circulating miRNAs could be a potential specific biomarker for breast cancer screening.

  9. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given. ...

  10. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Allowance. 38.629 Section 38.629 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial receptacle... section provides for payment of a monetary allowance for an outer burial receptacle for any interment in a...

  11. MicroRNAs expression profile in solid and unicystic ameloblastomas.

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    A Setién-Olarra

    Full Text Available Odontogenic tumors (OT represent a specific pathological category that includes some lesions with unpredictable biological behavior. Although most of these lesions are benign, some, such as the ameloblastoma, exhibit local aggressiveness and high recurrence rates. The most common types of ameloblastoma are the solid/multicystic (SA and the unicystic ameloblastoma (UA; the latter considered a much less aggressive entity as compared to the SA. The microRNA system regulates the expression of many human genes while its deregulation has been associated with neoplastic development. The aim of the current study was to determine the expression profiles of microRNAs present in the two most common types of ameloblastomas.MicroRNA expression profiles were assessed using TaqMan® Low Density Arrays (TLDAs in 24 samples (8 SA, 8 UA and 8 control samples. The findings were validated using quantitative RTqPCR in an independent cohort of 19 SA, 8 UA and 19 dentigerous cysts as controls.We identified 40 microRNAs differentially regulated in ameloblastomas, which are related to neoplastic development and differentiation, and with the osteogenic process. Further validation of the top ranked microRNAs revealed significant differences in the expression of 6 of them in relation to UA, 7 in relation to SA and 1 (miR-489 that was related to both types.We identified a new microRNA signature for the ameloblastoma and for its main types, which may be useful to better understand the etiopathogenesis of this neoplasm. In addition, we identified a microRNA (miR-489 that is suggestive of differentiating among solid from unicystic ameloblastoma.

  12. Circulating MicroRNAs in Plasma of Hepatitis B e Antigen Positive Children Reveal Liver-Specific Target Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Jacobsen, Kari Stougaard; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim. Hepatitis B e antigen positive (HBeAg-positive) children are at high risk of severe complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis. Liver damage is caused by the host immune response to infected hepatocytes, and we hypothesise that specific microRNAs play a role...... with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and in healthy controls, candidate microRNAs with aberrant plasma expressions in HBeAg-positive children were identified. MicroRNAs targeting liver-specific genes were selected based on bioinformatics analysis and validated by qRT-PCR using plasma samples from 34 HBe...

  13. Regulation of mouse stomach development and Barx1 expression by specific microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Woo, Janghee; Kanellopoulou, Chryssa; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2011-01-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are postulated to fine-tune many developmental processes, their relationships with specific targets and tissues remain largely undefined. The mesenchymal transcription factor Barx1 controls spleen and stomach morphogenesis and is required to specify stomach-specific epithelium in adjacent endoderm. Barx1 expression is precisely regulated in space and time, with a sharp drop in stomach levels after epithelial specification. We tested the hypothesis that specific miRNAs mediate this marked decline in Barx1 levels. Depletion of the miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer in cultured stomach mesenchyme and conditional Dicer gene deletion in mice significantly increased Barx1 levels, disrupted stomach and intestine development and caused spleen agenesis. Computational and experimental studies identified miR-7a and miR-203 as candidate miRNAs that regulate Barx1 and are expressed in inverse proportion to it in the fetal mouse stomach. Through specific interactions with cognate sequences in the Barx1 3′ untranslated region, miR-7a and miR-203 repress Barx1 expression in stomach mesenchymal cells and its function in inducing gastric epithelium. These results indicate that miRNAs are required for proper digestive tract organogenesis and that miR-7a and miR-203 control expression of the stomach homeotic regulator Barx1. PMID:21307095

  14. Noncoding RNAs regulate NF-κB signaling to modulate blood vessel inflammation

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    Henry S. Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, which include heart attack and stroke, occur several decades after initiation of the disease and become more severe with age. Inflammation of blood vessels plays a prominent role in atherogenesis. Activation of the endothelium by inflammatory mediators leads to the recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells, which drives atherosclerotic plaque formation and progression. Inflammatory signaling within the endothelium is driven predominantly by the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NF-κB. Interestingly, activation of NF-κB is enhanced during the normal aging process and this may contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Importantly, studies utilizing mouse models of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis are uncovering a network of noncoding RNAs, particularly microRNAs, which impinge on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here we summarize the literature regarding the control of vascular inflammation by microRNAs, and provide insight into how these microRNA-based pathways might be harnessed for therapeutic treatment of disease. We also discuss emerging areas of endothelial cell biology, including the involvement of long noncoding RNAs and circulating microRNAs in the control of vascular inflammation.

  15. A potential role for intragenic miRNAs on their hosts' interactome

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    Kuo Winston P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background miRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that mainly act as negative regulators of target gene messages. Due to their regulatory functions, they have lately been implicated in several diseases, including malignancies. Roughly half of known miRNA genes are located within previously annotated protein-coding regions ("intragenic miRNAs". Although a role of intragenic miRNAs as negative feedback regulators has been speculated, to the best of our knowledge there have been no conclusive large-scale studies investigating the relationship between intragenic miRNAs and host genes and their pathways. Results miRNA-containing host genes were three times longer, contained more introns and had longer 5' introns compared to a randomly sampled gene cohort. These results are consistent with the observation that more than 60% of intronic miRNAs are found within the first five 5' introns. Host gene 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs were 40% longer and contained significantly more adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs compared to a randomly sampled gene cohort. Coincidentally, recent literature suggests that several components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway are required for the rapid decay of mRNAs containing AREs. A high-confidence set of predicted mRNA targets of intragenic miRNAs also shared many of these features with the host genes. Approximately 20% of intragenic miRNAs were predicted to target their host mRNA transcript. Further, KEGG pathway analysis demonstrated that 22 of the 74 pathways in which host genes were associated showed significant overrepresentation of proteins encoded by the mRNA targets of associated intragenic miRNAs. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both host genes and intragenic miRNA targets may potentially be subject to multiple layers of regulation. Tight regulatory control of these genes is likely critical for cellular homeostasis and absence of disease. To this end, we examined the potential for negative

  16. Functional delivery of viral miRNAs via exosomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. Michiel Pegtel; Katherine Cosmopoulos; David A. Thorley-Lawson; Monique A. J. van Eijndhoven; Erik S. Hopmans; Jelle L. Lindenberg; Tanja D. de Gruijl; Thomas Würdinger; Jaap M. Middeldorp; Elliott Kieff

    2010-01-01

    .... Interestingly, miRNAs are secreted actively through small vesicles called "exosomes" that protect them from degradation by RNases, suggesting that these miRNAs may function outside the cell in which they were produced...

  17. The complexity of the translation ability of circRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Riveron, Javier T; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a new class of long non-coding RNAs that play a potential role in gene expression regulation, acting as efficient microRNAs sponges. The latest surprise concerning circRNAs is that we now know that they can serve as transcriptional activators in human cells, indicating that circRNAs are involved in important regulatory tasks. Recently, new insight has been gained about the coding potential of circular viroid RNAs, as well as the presence of Internal Ribosomal Entry Sites (IRES) allowing the formation of peptides or proteins from circular RNA. Here, we discuss the current state of our knowledge regarding evidence supporting the hypothesis that circRNAs serve as protein-coding sequences in vitro and in vivo. Also, we remark on the difficulties of their identification and highlight some tools currently available for exploring the coding potential of circRNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of novel sRNAs in mycobacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hsun Tsai

    Full Text Available Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs are short transcripts that typically do not encode proteins and often act as regulators of gene expression through a variety of mechanisms. Regulatory sRNAs have been identified in many species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. Here, we use a computational algorithm to predict sRNA candidates in the mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG and confirmed the expression of many sRNAs using Northern blotting. Thus, we have identified 17 and 23 novel sRNAs in M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG, respectively. We have also applied a high-throughput technique (Deep-RACE to map the 5' and 3' ends of many of these sRNAs and identified potential regulators of sRNAs by analysis of existing ChIP-seq datasets. The sRNAs identified in this work likely contribute to the unique biology of mycobacteria.

  19. miRNAs: Small but deadly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... Bandres E, Agirre X, Ramirez N, Zarate R, Garcia-Foncillas J (2007). MicroRNAs as cancer players: potential ... identification of individuals at risk for Lynch Syndrome. Fam. Cancer. 4(3): 255-265. ... microRNA genes are frequently located at fragile sites and genomic regions involved in cancers. Proc.

  20. Circulating microRNAs in Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlicka-Płocka, Marta; Gurda, Dorota; Fedoruk-Wyszomirska, Agnieszka; Smolarek, Iwona; Wyszko, Eliza

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) are currently one of the most common causes of death. Because heart related deaths occur on such an enormous scale this phenomenon is referred to as an epidemic. Chronic and acute injury of the heart could be an effect of cardiac remodeling, which is a result of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes, influenced by hemodynamic load or neurohormonal activation (Cohn et al., 2000). These small deviations in cardiac activity and morphology may lead to an enormous negative effect. Despite a significant progress, knowledge of standard risk factors for cardiovascular diseases has become less and less effective, which is why predicting and seeking an appropriate treatment is very challenging. As a result, there is a growing interest in finding new markers of the CD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), are short, non-coding RNAs responsible for regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Among them that have the greatest potential are microRNA molecules that circulate in the blood plasma or serum, that are related to direct activation of signaling pathways, implicated in the aging process and thus for the development of cardiovascular disease. This paper is a summary of the current state of knowledge on miRNAs, their biogenesis and potential role as biomarkers to diagnose heart disease.

  1. MicroRNAs horizon in retinoblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mirakholi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the retinoblastoma research, it is of great interest to identify molecular markers associated with the genetics of tumorigenesis. microRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play a regulatory role in many crucial cellular pathways such as differentiation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. A body of evidences showed dysregulation of miRNAs in tumor biology and many diseases. They potentially play a significant role in tumorigenesis processes and have been the subject of research in many types of cancers including retinal tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling was found to be associated with tumor development, progression and treatment. These associations demonstrate the putative applications of miRNAs in monitoring of different aspect of tumors consisting diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic. Herein, we review the current literature concerning to the study of miRNA target recognition, function to tumorigenesis and treatment in retinoblastoma. Identification the specific miRNA biomarkers associated with retinoblastoma cancer may help to establish new therapeutic approaches for salvage affected eyes in patients.

  2. Staufen2 Regulates Neuronal Target RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacki E. Heraud-Farlow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in directing RNA translation to neuronal synapses. Staufen2 (Stau2 has been implicated in both dendritic RNA localization and synaptic plasticity in mammalian neurons. Here, we report the identification of functionally relevant Stau2 target mRNAs in neurons. The majority of Stau2-copurifying mRNAs expressed in the hippocampus are present in neuronal processes, further implicating Stau2 in dendritic mRNA regulation. Stau2 targets are enriched for secondary structures similar to those identified in the 3′ UTRs of Drosophila Staufen targets. Next, we show that Stau2 regulates steady-state levels of many neuronal RNAs and that its targets are predominantly downregulated in Stau2-deficient neurons. Detailed analysis confirms that Stau2 stabilizes the expression of one synaptic signaling component, the regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4 mRNA, via its 3′ UTR. This study defines the global impact of Stau2 on mRNAs in neurons, revealing a role in stabilization of the levels of synaptic targets.

  3. Non‐coding RNAs in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Lara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Heart failure is one of the largest contributors to disease burden and healthcare outflow in the Western world. Despite significant progress in the treatment of heart failure, disease prognosis remains very poor, with the only curative therapy still being heart transplantation. To counteract the current situation, efforts have been made to better understand the underlying molecular pathways in the progression of cardiac disease towards heart failure, and to link the disease to novel therapeutic targets such as non‐coding RNAs. The non‐coding part of the genome has gained prominence over the last couple of decades, opening a completely new research field and establishing different non‐coding RNAs species as fundamental regulators of cellular functions. Not surprisingly, their dysregulation is increasingly being linked to pathology, including to cardiac disease. Pre‐clinically, non‐coding RNAs have been shown to be of great value as therapeutic targets in pathological cardiac remodelling and also as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for heart failure. Therefore, it is to be expected that non‐coding RNA‐based therapeutic strategies will reach the bedside in the future and provide new and more efficient treatments for heart failure. Here, we review recent discoveries linking the function and molecular interactions of non‐coding RNAs with the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. PMID:28233323

  4. Targeting of microRNAs for therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    and cardiovascular diseases, and thus miRNAs have rapidly emerged as potential targets for therapeutics. LNAs (locked nucleic acids) comprise a class of bicyclic conformational analogues of RNA, which exhibit high binding affinity to complementary RNA molecules and high stability in blood and tissues in vivo. Recent...

  5. The regulatory epicenter of miRNAs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Negative dataset details used for feature analysis for discrimination. Supplementary data 4. Expression similarity of co-regulated miRNAs, sharing common RBPs. http://www.ias.ac.in/jbiosci. Supplementary figure 1. Distribution plots for TFBS in intergenic regions (Blue) as well as intronic regions (Red). The distribution.

  6. Ion anisotropies in the outer Jovian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Keath, E. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Axford, W. I.; Armstrong, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Results are presented from Voyager 1 and 2 low-energy charged particle measurements of ion anisotropies in the outer Jovian magnetosphere (more than about 20 Jupiter radii). These anisotropies are the first observed from an instrument rotating in the spin plane of Jupiter. For the several ion species investigated, all the first-order anisotropies are strongly in the corotational sense throughout most of the Jovian magnetosphere and out to the magnetopause on the dayside. Evidence exists for a small component of outward flow in the corotating region. Beyond about 130-150 Jupiter radii along the Voyager outbound trajectories, the anisotropies suggest a magnetospheric wind flowing outward from Jupiter.

  7. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...... including an abutment part, which extends inwards from the inner side of the retention web such as to form an abutment surface for the respective screw web when the latter is positioned to be retained in the retention device, and extends from the abutment part into a locking part, which extends at an angle...

  8. Turbo Codes Extended with Outer BCH Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    1996-01-01

    The "error floor" observed in several simulations with the turbo codes is verified by calculation of an upper bound to the bit error rate for the ensemble of all interleavers. Also an easy way to calculate the weight enumerator used in this bound is presented. An extended coding scheme is propose...... including an outer BCH code correcting a few bit errors.......The "error floor" observed in several simulations with the turbo codes is verified by calculation of an upper bound to the bit error rate for the ensemble of all interleavers. Also an easy way to calculate the weight enumerator used in this bound is presented. An extended coding scheme is proposed...

  9. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  10. Dark matter in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Cruikshank, D.; De Bergh, C.; Geballe, T.

    1994-01-01

    There are now a large number of small bodies in the outer solar system that are known to be covered with dark material. Attempts to identify that material have been thwarted by the absence of discrete absorption features in the reflection spectra of these planetesimals. An absorption at 2.2 micrometers that appeared to be present in several objects has not been confirmed by new observations. Three absorptions in the spectrum of the unusually red planetesimal 5145 Pholus are well-established, but their identity remains a mystery.

  11. Characterization of Serum MicroRNAs Profile of PCOS and Identification of Novel Non-Invasive Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Long

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age, is characterized by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Despite the high prevalence of hyperandrogenemia, a definitive endocrine marker for PCOS has so far not been identified. Circulating miRNAs have recently been shown to serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in patients with cancers. Our current study focused on the altered expression of serum miRNAs and their correlation with PCOS. Method and Results: We systematically used the TaqMan Low Density Array followed by individual quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to identify and validate the expression of serum miRNAs of PCOS patients. The expression levels of three miRNAs (miR-222, miR-146a and miR-30c were significantly increased in PCOS patients with respect to the controls in our discovery evaluation and followed validation. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC is 0.799, 0.706, and 0.688, respectively. The combination of the three miRNAs using multiple logistic regression analysis showed a larger AUC (0.852 that was more efficient for the diagnosis of PCOS. In addition, logistic binary regression analyses show miR-222 is positively associated with serum insulin, while miR-146a is negatively associated with serum testosterone. Furthermore, bioinformatics analysis indicated that the predicted targets function of the three miRNAs mainly involved in the metastasis, cell cycle, apoptosis and endocrine. Conclusion: Serum miRNAs are differentially expressed between PCOS patients and controls. We identified and validated a class of three serum miRNAs that could act as novel non-invasive biomarkers for diagnosis of PCOS. These miRNAs may be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS.

  12. Legal Implications of Military Uses of Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Johanna

    2002-01-01

    Acquisition of Space Weapons, the Legal, Political and Military Impact for International Peace and At the dawn of a new century an immediate danger is upon us: The weaponization of outer space, including potential cost implications upon the prospect of ushering an era of peace and prosperity. But, can such statements be explained as pure sentimentality for hopes of a new era? Or is the danger misplaced that the threat to peace and security is an ever more ominous? By militarising outer space one could monitor crisis areas that could become a potential threat and this would in turn build confidence and security amongst nations. However the Outer Space Treaty prohibits placing in orbit nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction. This does not include other military systems. Many countries feel the prohibition should be extended in the Treaty. Other military systems may involve anti-satellite weapons, (ASATS), emitting or simply placing technologies in space using laser and /or particle beams from space to intercept presently specific military targets such as ballistic missiles and hostile satellites, but in the future this may extend to destroying a target on earth. Military presence in space however, is not founded on weapons alone, but also through military surveillance systems and seen by some countries as an effective measure in verification on arms control. It is also seen as intensifying an arms race. At the forefront of the debate for space weapons is the possibility of countries deploying a National Missile Defence system. How does one reconcile such a system with present treaties? There has always been a direct relationship between weapons and space exploration, particularly if traced through the history of the late nineteenth century to the era of the space race. Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, (1857 - 1935), was one of the founders to astronautics. Robert Goddard, (1882-1945) an Englishman, developed Tsiolkovskys' work further. He built the first liquid

  13. A screen for nuclear transcripts identifies two linked noncoding RNAs associated with SC35 splicing domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Christopher R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noncoding RNA species play a diverse set of roles in the eukaryotic cell. While much recent attention has focused on smaller RNA species, larger noncoding transcripts are also thought to be highly abundant in mammalian cells. To search for large noncoding RNAs that might control gene expression or mRNA metabolism, we used Affymetrix expression arrays to identify polyadenylated RNA transcripts displaying nuclear enrichment. Results This screen identified no more than three transcripts; XIST, and two unique noncoding nuclear enriched abundant transcripts (NEAT RNAs strikingly located less than 70 kb apart on human chromosome 11: NEAT1, a noncoding RNA from the locus encoding for TncRNA, and NEAT2 (also known as MALAT-1. While the two NEAT transcripts share no significant homology with each other, each is conserved within the mammalian lineage, suggesting significant function for these noncoding RNAs. NEAT2 is extraordinarily well conserved for a noncoding RNA, more so than even XIST. Bioinformatic analyses of publicly available mouse transcriptome data support our findings from human cells as they confirm that the murine homologs of these noncoding RNAs are also nuclear enriched. RNA FISH analyses suggest that these noncoding RNAs function in mRNA metabolism as they demonstrate an intimate association of these RNA species with SC35 nuclear speckles in both human and mouse cells. These studies show that one of these transcripts, NEAT1 localizes to the periphery of such domains, whereas the neighboring transcript, NEAT2, is part of the long-sought polyadenylated component of nuclear speckles. Conclusion Our genome-wide screens in two mammalian species reveal no more than three abundant large non-coding polyadenylated RNAs in the nucleus; the canonical large noncoding RNA XIST and NEAT1 and NEAT2. The function of these noncoding RNAs in mRNA metabolism is suggested by their high levels of conservation and their intimate

  14. A screen for nuclear transcripts identifies two linked noncoding RNAs associated with SC35 splicing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John N; Ensminger, Alexander W; Clemson, Christine M; Lynch, Christopher R; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Chess, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    Noncoding RNA species play a diverse set of roles in the eukaryotic cell. While much recent attention has focused on smaller RNA species, larger noncoding transcripts are also thought to be highly abundant in mammalian cells. To search for large noncoding RNAs that might control gene expression or mRNA metabolism, we used Affymetrix expression arrays to identify polyadenylated RNA transcripts displaying nuclear enrichment. This screen identified no more than three transcripts; XIST, and two unique noncoding nuclear enriched abundant transcripts (NEAT) RNAs strikingly located less than 70 kb apart on human chromosome 11: NEAT1, a noncoding RNA from the locus encoding for TncRNA, and NEAT2 (also known as MALAT-1). While the two NEAT transcripts share no significant homology with each other, each is conserved within the mammalian lineage, suggesting significant function for these noncoding RNAs. NEAT2 is extraordinarily well conserved for a noncoding RNA, more so than even XIST. Bioinformatic analyses of publicly available mouse transcriptome data support our findings from human cells as they confirm that the murine homologs of these noncoding RNAs are also nuclear enriched. RNA FISH analyses suggest that these noncoding RNAs function in mRNA metabolism as they demonstrate an intimate association of these RNA species with SC35 nuclear speckles in both human and mouse cells. These studies show that one of these transcripts, NEAT1 localizes to the periphery of such domains, whereas the neighboring transcript, NEAT2, is part of the long-sought polyadenylated component of nuclear speckles. Our genome-wide screens in two mammalian species reveal no more than three abundant large non-coding polyadenylated RNAs in the nucleus; the canonical large noncoding RNA XIST and NEAT1 and NEAT2. The function of these noncoding RNAs in mRNA metabolism is suggested by their high levels of conservation and their intimate association with SC35 splicing domains in multiple mammalian

  15. MicroRNAs in inflammatory lung disease - master regulators or target practice?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Oglesby, Irene K

    2010-10-28

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a class of regulatory RNAs with immense significance in numerous biological processes. When aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of several disease states. Extensive research has explored miRNA involvement in the development and fate of immune cells and in both the innate and adaptive immune responses whereby strong evidence links miRNA expression to signalling pathways and receptors with critical roles in the inflammatory response such as NF-κB and the toll-like receptors, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that unique miRNA expression profiles exist in inflammatory lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. Evaluation of the global expression of miRNAs provides a unique opportunity to identify important target gene sets regulating susceptibility and response to infection and treatment, and control of inflammation in chronic airway disorders. Over 800 human miRNAs have been discovered to date, however the biological function of the majority remains to be uncovered. Understanding the role that miRNAs play in the modulation of gene expression leading to sustained chronic pulmonary inflammation is important for the development of new therapies which focus on prevention of disease progression rather than symptom relief. Here we discuss the current understanding of miRNA involvement in innate immunity, specifically in LPS\\/TLR4 signalling and in the progression of the chronic inflammatory lung diseases cystic fibrosis, COPD and asthma. miRNA in lung cancer and IPF are also reviewed.

  16. MicroRNAs in inflammatory lung disease--master regulators or target practice?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Oglesby, Irene K

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a class of regulatory RNAs with immense significance in numerous biological processes. When aberrantly expressed miRNAs have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of several disease states. Extensive research has explored miRNA involvement in the development and fate of immune cells and in both the innate and adaptive immune responses whereby strong evidence links miRNA expression to signalling pathways and receptors with critical roles in the inflammatory response such as NF-κB and the toll-like receptors, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that unique miRNA expression profiles exist in inflammatory lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. Evaluation of the global expression of miRNAs provides a unique opportunity to identify important target gene sets regulating susceptibility and response to infection and treatment, and control of inflammation in chronic airway disorders. Over 800 human miRNAs have been discovered to date, however the biological function of the majority remains to be uncovered. Understanding the role that miRNAs play in the modulation of gene expression leading to sustained chronic pulmonary inflammation is important for the development of new therapies which focus on prevention of disease progression rather than symptom relief. Here we discuss the current understanding of miRNA involvement in innate immunity, specifically in LPS\\/TLR4 signalling and in the progression of the chronic inflammatory lung diseases cystic fibrosis, COPD and asthma. miRNA in lung cancer and IPF are also reviewed.

  17. Circulating hepatitis B surface antigen particles carry hepatocellular microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Novellino

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV produces high quantities of subviral surface antigen particles (HBsAg which circulate in the blood outnumbering virions of about 1\\10(3-6 times. In individuals coinfected with the defective hepatitis Delta virus (HDV the small HDV-RNA-genome and Delta antigen circulate as ribonucleoprotein complexes within HBsAg subviral particles. We addressed the question whether subviral HBsAg particles may carry in the same way cellular microRNAs (miRNAs which are released into the bloodstream within different subcellular forms such as exosomes and microvescicles. Circulating HBsAg particles were isolated from sera of 11 HBsAg carriers by selective immunoprecipitation with monoclonal anti-HBs-IgG, total RNA was extracted and human miRNAs were screened by TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR Arrays. Thirty-nine human miRNAs were found to be significantly associated with the immunoprecipitated HBsAg, as determined by both comparative DDCT analysis and non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05 with respect to controls. Moreover immunoprecipitated HBsAg particles contained Ago2 protein that could be revealed in ELISA only after 0.5% NP40. HBsAg associated miRNAs were liver-specific (most frequent = miR-27a, miR-30b, miR-122, miR-126 and miR-145 as well as immune regulatory (most frequent = miR-106b and miR-223. Computationally predicted target genes of HBsAg-associated miRNAs highlighted molecular pathways dealing with host-pathogen. The finding that HBsAg particles carry selective pools of hepatocellular miRNAs opens new avenues of research to disentangle the complex interactions between host and HBV and provides a non invasive tool to study the physiopathology of liver epigenetics.

  18. A common set of developmental miRNAs are upregulated in Nicotiana benthamiana by diverse begomoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Shahid

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Begomoviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that cause economically important diseases of many crops throughout the world and induce symptoms in plants, including enations, leaf curling and stunting, that resemble developmental abnormalities. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous RNAs that are involved in a variety of activities, including plant development, signal transduction and protein degradation, as well as response to environmental stress, and pathogen invasion. Results The present study was aimed at understanding the deregulation of miRNAs upon begomovirus infection. Four distinct begomoviruses African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV, Cabbage leaf curl virus (CbLCuV, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV and Cotton leaf curl Multan virus/Cotton leaf curl betasatellite (CLCuV/CLCuMB, were used in this study. Ten developmental miRNA were studied. N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with begomoviruses and their miRNA profiles were analysed by northern blotting using specific miRNA probes. The levels of most developmental miRNA were increased in N. benthamiana by TYLCV, CLCuMV/CLCuMB and CbLCuV infection with a common pattern despite their diverse genomic components. However, the increased levels of individual miRNAs differed for distinct begomoviruses, reflecting differences in severity of symptom phenotypes. Some of these miRNA were also common to ACMV infection. Conclusions Our results have shown a common pattern of miRNAs accumulation upon begomovirus infection. It was found that begomoviruses generally increase the accumulation of miRNA and thus result in the decreased translation of genes involved in the development of plants. Identification of common miRNAs that are deregulated upon begomovirus infection may provide novel targets for control strategies aimed at developing broad-spectrum resistance.

  19. The therapeutic potential of MicroRNAs in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Stine Buch; Obad, Susanna; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2012-01-01

    suppressors. Thus, miRNAs have rapidly emerged as promising targets for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. The development of miRNA-based cancer therapeutics relies on restoring the activity of tumor suppressor miRNAs using double-stranded miRNA mimics or inhibition of oncogenic miRNAs using...

  20. Dicer-independent processing of short hairpin RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Schopman, Nick C. T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are widely used to induce RNA interference (RNAi). We tested a variety of shRNAs that differed in stem length and terminal loop size and revealed strikingly different RNAi activities and shRNA-processing patterns. Interestingly, we identified a specific shRNA design that

  1. Noncoding RNAs in protein clearance pathways: implications in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A class of small ncRNAs and miRNAs has gained much importance because of its involvement in human diseases such as cancer. Involvement of long ncRNAs have also been acknowledged in other human diseases, especially inneurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the ...

  2. Brain expressed microRNAs implicated in schizophrenia etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Line; Lindow, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Protein encoding genes have long been the major targets for research in schizophrenia genetics. However, with the identification of regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) as important in brain development and function, miRNAs genes have emerged as candidates for schizophrenia-associated genetic factors...

  3. Bioinformatic identification of microRNAs and their targets in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR NJ TONUKARI

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... As a model system, Aquilegia is of evolutionary and ecological significance. Availability of new genomic resources is facilitating the related researches at molecular level. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding and short RNAs directly involved in regulating gene expression at the.

  4. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potentia...

  5. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW miRNAs IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathmanaban

    2012-09-20

    Sep 20, 2012 ... was concluded that these newly identified conserved microRNAs in cotton have great potential in future efforts to improve abiotic stress tolerance in cotton. Key words: miRNA, cotton, abiotic stress resistance, in silico analysis. INTRODUCTION. miRNAs, also called 'killer RNAs', are a newly identified.

  6. Small Silencing RNAs: Piecing Together a Viral Genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierlo, J.T. van; Cleef, K.W.R. van; Rij, R.P. van

    2010-01-01

    Virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the hallmark of RNAi-based antiviral immunity. Wu and colleagues demonstrate how viral genomes can be assembled from these small RNA sequences. Their results provide an approach for virus discovery as well as important insights into how these siRNAs

  7. Potato Virus Y HCPro Suppression of Antiviral Silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana Plants Correlates with Its Ability To Bind In Vivo to 21- and 22-Nucleotide Small RNAs of Viral Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Toro, Francisco J; Donaire, Livia; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Chung, Bong-Nam; Tenllado, Francisco; Canto, Tomás

    2017-06-15

    We have investigated short and small RNAs (sRNAs) that were bound to a biologically active hexahistidine-tagged Potato virus Y (PVY) HCPro suppressor of silencing, expressed from a heterologous virus vector in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and purified under nondenaturing conditions. We found that RNAs in purified preparations were differentially enriched in 21-nucleotide (nt) and, to a much lesser extent, 22-nt sRNAs of viral sequences (viral sRNAs [vsRNAs]) compared to those found in a control plant protein background bound to nickel resin in the absence of HCPro or in a purified HCPro alanine substitution mutant (HCPro mutB) control that lacked suppressor-of-silencing activity. In both controls, sRNAs were composed almost entirely of molecules of plant sequence, indicating that the resin-bound protein background had no affinity for vsRNAs and also that HCPro mutB failed to bind to vsRNAs. Therefore, PVY HCPro suppressor activity correlated with its ability to bind to 21- and 22-nt vsRNAs. HCPro constituted at least 54% of the total protein content in purified preparations, and we were able to calculate its contribution to the 21- and the 22-nt pools of sRNAs present in the purified samples and its binding strength relative to the background. We also found that in the 21-nt vsRNAs of the HCPro preparation, 5'-terminal adenines were overrepresented relative to the controls, but this was not observed in vsRNAs of other sizes or of plant sequences.IMPORTANCE It was previously shown that HCPro can bind to long RNAs and small RNAs (sRNAs) in vitro and, in the case of Turnip mosaic virus HCPro, also in vivo in arabidopsis AGO2-deficient plants. Our data show that PVY HCPro binds in vivo to sRNAs during infection in wild-type Nicotiana benthamiana plants when expressed from a heterologous virus vector. Using a suppression-of-silencing-deficient HCPro mutant that can accumulate in this host when expressed from a virus vector, we also show that sRNA binding correlates

  8. Functional Architecture of the Outer Arm Dynein Conformational Switch*

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen M.; Patel-King, Ramila S.

    2012-01-01

    Dynein light chain 1 (LC1/DNAL1) is one of the most highly conserved components of ciliary axonemal outer arm dyneins, and it associates with both a heavy chain motor unit and tubulin located within the A-tubule of the axonemal outer doublet microtubules. In a variety of model systems, lack of LC1 or expression of mutant forms leads to profound defects in ciliary motility, including the failure of the hydrodynamic coupling needed for ciliary metachronal synchrony, random stalling during the power/recovery stroke transition, an aberrant response to imposed viscous load, and in some cases partial failure of motor assembly. These phenotypes have led to the proposal that LC1 acts as part of a mechanical switch to control motor function in response to alterations in axonemal curvature. Here we have used NMR chemical shift mapping to define the regions perturbed by a series of mutations in the C-terminal domain that yield a range of phenotypic effects on motility. In addition, we have identified the subdomain of LC1 involved in binding microtubules and characterized the consequences of an Asn → Ser alteration within the terminal leucine-rich repeat that in humans causes primary ciliary dyskinesia. Together, these data define a series of functional subdomains within LC1 and allow us to propose a structural model for the organization of the dynein heavy chain-LC1-microtubule ternary complex that is required for the coordinated activity of dynein motors in cilia. PMID:22157010

  9. Future exploration of the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.

    Exploration of the outer solar system is constrained by vast distances, consequent communications and light time limitations, power, and long flight times. Early reconnaissance missions (Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager 1 and 2) employed relatively fast trajectories resulting in very fast fly-bys. The next generation of exploration (Galileo and Cassini) has been characterized by spacecraft with large propellant systems and relatively slow (gravity assist) trajectories needed energetically to achieve orbit around Jupiter and Saturn. All of these spacecraft utilized radioisotope thermoelectric generators for reliable, but modest power. Future exploration priorities require highly capable spacecraft systems that go into orbit around the primary planet and then perform multiple tasks (e.g. orbiting individual moons and delivering surface and atmospheric scientific probes). To achieve major scientific advances will require significant increases in communication rates, improved instrumentation and high power available for experiments. Fission-powered nuclear electric propulsion is being studied to meet these requirements. A Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter is proposed as the first of this class of new, highly capable missions. The paper will review the scientific rationale for the JIMO mission and prospects for applying these techniques to exploration of Saturn and the other outer planets.

  10. Outer Regions of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, Francesca

    With the start of the Gaia era, the time has come to address the major challenge of deriving the star formation history and evolution of the disk of our Milky Way. Here we review our present knowledge of the outer regions of the Milky Way disk population. Its stellar content, its structure and its dynamical and chemical evolution are summarized, focussing on our lack of understanding both from an observational and a theoretical viewpoint. We describe the unprecedented data that Gaia and the upcoming ground-based spectroscopic surveys will provide in the next decade. More in detail, we quantify the expected accuracy in position, velocity and astrophysical parameters of some of the key tracers of the stellar populations in the outer Galactic disk. Some insights on the future capability of these surveys to answer crucial and fundamental issues are discussed, such as the mechanisms driving the spiral arms and the warp formation. Our Galaxy, the Milky Way, is our cosmological laboratory for understanding the process of formation and evolution of disk galaxies. What we learn in the next decades will be naturally transferred to the extragalactic domain.

  11. Environments in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Iess, L.; Lainey, V.; Cassidy, T. A.; Burger, M.; Sotin, C.; Neubauer, F.

    2010-06-01

    The outer planets of our solar system Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are fascinating objects on their own. Their intrinsic magnetic fields form magnetic environments (so called magnetospheres) in which charged and neutral particles and dust are produced, lost or being transported through the system. These magnetic environments of the gas giants can be envisaged as huge plasma laboratories in space in which electromagnetic waves, current systems, particle transport mechanisms, acceleration processes and other phenomena act and interact with the large number of moons in orbit around those massive planets. In general it is necessary to describe and study the global environments (magnetospheres) of the gas giants, its global configuration with its large-scale transport processes; and, in combination, to study the local environments of the moons as well, e.g. the interaction processes between the magnetospheric plasma and the exosphere/atmosphere/magnetosphere of the moon acting on time scales of seconds to days. These local exchange processes include also the gravity, shape, rotation, astrometric observations and orbital parameters of the icy moons in those huge systems. It is the purpose of this chapter of the book to describe the variety of the magnetic environments of the outer planets in a broad overview, globally and locally, and to show that those exchange processes can dramatically influence the surfaces and exospheres/atmospheres of the moons and they can also be used as a tool to study the overall physics of systems as a whole.

  12. Cosmics in the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider studies the decay of B mesons to test the description of CP violation in the Standard Model and to search for new physics. The decay $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ has been identified as very promising in the search for new physics. An excellent invariant mass resolution is required to suppress backgrounds to this decay. This in turn requires a momentum resolution of dp/p = 0.4%. The Outer Tracker is part of the LHCb tracking system and has been commissioned with cosmic muons. The noise in the Outer Tracker is shown to be less than 0.05%. To use drift time information in the reconstruction of cosmic tracks, the event time must be known. Four methods to obtain the event time are studied and compared. It is shown that the event time can be obtained with a resolution better than 2.6 ns. Using drift time information, tracks are reconstructed with a resolution of 344 $\\mu$m. Knowledge of the event time enables the calibration of electronic time offsets and the r(t)– relati...

  13. Discovery of Novel Leaf Rust Responsive microRNAs in Wheat and Prediction of Their Target Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhananjay; Singh, Dharmendra; Kanodia, Pulkit; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Kumar, Manish; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous small noncoding RNAs which play critical roles in gene regulation. Few wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) miRNA sequences are available in miRBase repertoire and knowledge of their biological functions related to biotic stress is limited. We identified 52 miRNAs, belonging to 19 families, from next-generation transcriptome sequence data based on homology search. One wheat specific novel miRNA was identified but could not be ascribed or assigned to any known miRNA family. Differentially expressed 22 miRNAs were found between susceptible and resistant wheat near-isogenic lines inoculated with leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina and compared with mock inoculated controls. Most miRNAs were more upregulated in susceptible NIL compared to resistant NIL. We identified 1306 potential target genes for these 52 miRNAs with vital roles in response to stimuli, signaling, and diverse metabolic and cellular processes. Gene ontology analysis showed 66, 20, and 35 target genes to be categorized into biological process, molecular function, and cellular component, respectively. A miRNA-mediated regulatory network revealed relationships among the components of the targetome. The present study provides insight into potential miRNAs with probable roles in leaf rust pathogenesis and their target genes in wheat which establish a foundation for future studies.

  14. Discovery of Novel Leaf Rust Responsive microRNAs in Wheat and Prediction of Their Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous small noncoding RNAs which play critical roles in gene regulation. Few wheat (Triticum aestivum L. miRNA sequences are available in miRBase repertoire and knowledge of their biological functions related to biotic stress is limited. We identified 52 miRNAs, belonging to 19 families, from next-generation transcriptome sequence data based on homology search. One wheat specific novel miRNA was identified but could not be ascribed or assigned to any known miRNA family. Differentially expressed 22 miRNAs were found between susceptible and resistant wheat near-isogenic lines inoculated with leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina and compared with mock inoculated controls. Most miRNAs were more upregulated in susceptible NIL compared to resistant NIL. We identified 1306 potential target genes for these 52 miRNAs with vital roles in response to stimuli, signaling, and diverse metabolic and cellular processes. Gene ontology analysis showed 66, 20, and 35 target genes to be categorized into biological process, molecular function, and cellular component, respectively. A miRNA-mediated regulatory network revealed relationships among the components of the targetome. The present study provides insight into potential miRNAs with probable roles in leaf rust pathogenesis and their target genes in wheat which establish a foundation for future studies.

  15. On revealing the gene targets of Ebola virus microRNAs involved in the human skin microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Hsu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus, a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus, causes severe viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high mortality rate. Histopathological and immunopathological analyses of Ebola virus have revealed that histopathological changes in skin tissue are associated with various degrees of endothelial cell swelling and necrosis. The interactions of microbes within or on a host are a crucial for the skin immune shield. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs in Ebola virus implies that immune escape, endothelial cell rupture, and tissue dissolution during Ebola virus infection are a result of the effects of Ebola virus miRNAs. Keratinocytes obtained from normal skin can attach and spread through expression of the thrombospondin family of proteins, playing a role in initiation of cell-mediated immune responses in the skin. Several miRNAs have been shown to bind the 3′ untranslated region of thrombospondin mRNA, thereby controlling its stability and translational activity. In this study, we discovered short RNA sequences that may act as miRNAs from Propionibacterium acnes using a practical workflow of bioinformatics methods. Subsequently, we deciphered the common target gene. These RNA sequences tended to bind to the same thrombospondin protein, THSD4, emphasizing the potential importance of the synergistic binding of miRNAs from Ebola virus, Propionibacterium acnes, and humans to the target. These results provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of thrombospondin proteins and miRNAs in Ebola virus infection.

  16. The Role of MicroRNAs as Predictors of Response to Tamoxifen Treatment in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina G. Egeland

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine therapy is a key treatment strategy to control or eradicate hormone-responsive breast cancer. However, resistance to endocrine therapy leads to breast cancer relapse. The recent extension of adjuvant tamoxifen treatment up to 10 years actualizes the need for identifying biological markers that may be used to monitor predictors of treatment response. MicroRNAs are promising biomarkers that may fill the gap between preclinical knowledge and clinical observations regarding endocrine resistance. MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by posttranscriptional repression or degradation of mRNA, most often leading to gene silencing. MicroRNAs have been identified directly in the primary tumor, but also in the circula