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Sample records for rna turnover plant

  1. Tritium turnover in succulent plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, T.M.; Gogate, S.S.; Soman, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of turnover rates for tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and tissue bound tritium (TBT) were carried out in three succulent plants, Opuntia sp., E. Trigona and E. Mili using tritiated water as tracer. The estimated half-times were 52, 57.5 and 80 days for TFWT and 212, 318 and 132 days for TBT in the stems of the above plants respectively. Opuntia sp. showed significant incorporation of TBT, 10% of TFWT on weight basis, while the other two plants showed lesser incorporation, 2-3% of TFWT. However, the leaves of E. Mili indicated the same level of fixation of TBT as the stem of Opuntia sp. (author)

  2. Endogenous Turnover of Cyanogenic Glycosides in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picmanova, Martina

    , there is strong evidence that CNglcs serve a no less significant purpose as a transport and storage form of reduced nitrogen which may be remobilized and recycled to balance the needs of primary metabolism during certain developmental events. Reduced nitrogen from CNglcs may be recovered either via HCN refixation...... revealed the formation of glycosides of amides, carboxylic acids and "anitriles", including their di- and triglycosides, evidently derived from CNglcs. Based on results common to the three phylogenetically unrelated plant species, a recycling endogenous turnover pathway for CNglcs was suggested in which...

  3. An Association of Unique microRNA Turnover Machinery with Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    targeting of critical androgen receptor -604 coregulator interactions in prostate cancer . Nature communications 4, 1923, 605 doi:10.1038/ncomms2912 (2013...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0474 TITLE: An Association of Unique microRNA Turnover Machinery with Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Sep 2017 4. Title An Association of Unique microRNA Turnover Machinery with Prostate Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  4. UO3 plant turnover - facility description document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapp, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document was developed to provide a facility description for those portions of the UO 3 Facility being transferred to Bechtel Hanford Company, Inc. (BHI) following completion of facility deactivation. The facility and deactivated state condition description is intended only to serve as an overview of the plant as it is being transferred to BHI

  5. Dynamic Proteomics Emphasizes the Importance of Selective mRNA Translation and Protein Turnover during Arabidopsis Seed Germination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Marc; Huguet, Romain; Arc, Erwann; Cueff, Gwendal; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2014-01-01

    During seed germination, the transition from a quiescent metabolic state in a dry mature seed to a proliferative metabolic state in a vigorous seedling is crucial for plant propagation as well as for optimizing crop yield. This work provides a detailed description of the dynamics of protein synthesis during the time course of germination, demonstrating that mRNA translation is both sequential and selective during this process. The complete inhibition of the germination process in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide established that mRNA translation is critical for Arabidopsis seed germination. However, the dynamics of protein turnover and the selectivity of protein synthesis (mRNA translation) during Arabidopsis seed germination have not been addressed yet. Based on our detailed knowledge of the Arabidopsis seed proteome, we have deepened our understanding of seed mRNA translation during germination by combining two-dimensional gel-based proteomics with dynamic radiolabeled proteomics using a radiolabeled amino acid precursor, namely [35S]-methionine, in order to highlight de novo protein synthesis, stability, and turnover. Our data confirm that during early imbibition, the Arabidopsis translatome keeps reflecting an embryonic maturation program until a certain developmental checkpoint. Furthermore, by dividing the seed germination time lapse into discrete time windows, we highlight precise and specific patterns of protein synthesis. These data refine and deepen our knowledge of the three classical phases of seed germination based on seed water uptake during imbibition and reveal that selective mRNA translation is a key feature of seed germination. Beyond the quantitative control of translational activity, both the selectivity of mRNA translation and protein turnover appear as specific regulatory systems, critical for timing the molecular events leading to successful germination and seedling establishment. PMID:24198433

  6. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un eHuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific binding. Host plants intensively use RNA binding proteins for defense against viral infections in nature. In this mini review, we will summarize the function of some host RNA binding proteins which act in a sequence-specific binding manner to the infecting virus RNA. It is important to understand how plants effectively suppresses RNA virus infections via RNA binding proteins, and this defense system can be potentially developed as a synthetic virus defense strategy for use in crop engineering.

  7. RNA Editing in Plant Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Wissinger, Bernd; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1989-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of genomic and complementary DNA clones from several mitochondrial genes in the higher plant Oenothera revealed nucleotide sequence divergences between the genomic and the messenger RNA-derived sequences. These sequence alterations could be most easily explained by specific post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications. Most of the nucleotide exchanges in coding regions lead to altered codons in the mRNA that specify amino acids better conserved in evolution than those encoded by the genomic DNA. Several instances show that the genomic arginine codon CGG is edited in the mRNA to the tryptophan codon TGG in amino acid positions that are highly conserved as tryptophan in the homologous proteins of other species. This editing suggests that the standard genetic code is used in plant mitochondria and resolves the frequent coincidence of CGG codons and tryptophan in different plant species. The apparently frequent and non-species-specific equivalency of CGG and TGG codons in particular suggests that RNA editing is a common feature of all higher plant mitochondria.

  8. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Mäkinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and

  9. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Lõhmus, Andres; Pollari, Maija

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and their individual

  10. Amplified plant turnover in response to climate change forecast by Late Quaternary records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogues, David Bravo; Veloz, S.; Holt, Benjamin George

    2016-01-01

    calibrated against taxa-climate relationships for the past 21,000 years. We find that incorporating long-term data into niche-based models increases the magnitude of projected future changes for plant abundances and community turnover. The larger projected changes in abundances and community turnover...

  11. Viral RNAi suppressor reversibly binds siRNA to outcompete Dicer and RISC via multiple turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Renata A; Krishnan, Vishalakshi; Walter, Nils G

    2011-04-29

    RNA interference is a conserved gene regulatory mechanism employed by most eukaryotes as a key component of their innate immune response to viruses and retrotransposons. During viral infection, the RNase-III-type endonuclease Dicer cleaves viral double-stranded RNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) 21-24 nucleotides in length and helps load them into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to guide the cleavage of complementary viral RNA. As a countermeasure, many viruses have evolved viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSS) that tightly, and presumably quantitatively, bind siRNAs to thwart RNA-interference-mediated degradation. Viral RSS proteins also act across kingdoms as potential immunosuppressors in gene therapeutic applications. Here we report fluorescence quenching and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that probe siRNA binding by the dimeric RSS p19 from Carnation Italian Ringspot Virus, as well as by human Dicer and RISC assembly complexes. We find that the siRNA:p19 interaction is readily reversible, characterized by rapid binding [(1.69 ± 0.07) × 10(8) M(-)(1) s(-1)] and marked dissociation (k(off)=0.062 ± 0.002 s(-1)). We also observe that p19 efficiently competes with recombinant Dicer and inhibits the formation of RISC-related assembly complexes found in human cell extract. Computational modeling based on these results provides evidence for the transient formation of a ternary complex between siRNA, human Dicer, and p19. An expanded model of RNA silencing indicates that multiple turnover by reversible binding of siRNAs potentiates the efficiency of the suppressor protein. Our predictive model is expected to be applicable to the dosing of p19 as a silencing suppressor in viral gene therapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. RNA-Binding Proteins in Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Woloshen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant defence responses against pathogen infection are crucial to plant survival. The high degree of regulation of plant immunity occurs both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Once transcribed, target gene RNA must be processed prior to translation. This includes polyadenylation, 5′capping, editing, splicing, and mRNA export. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs have been implicated at each level of RNA processing. Previous research has primarily focused on structural RNA-binding proteins of yeast and mammals; however, more recent work has characterized a number of plant RBPs and revealed their roles in plant immune responses. This paper provides an update on the known functions of RBPs in plant immune response regulation. Future in-depth analysis of RBPs and other related players will unveil the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms of RNA processing during plant immune responses.

  13. Investigation on the turnover of plant proteins. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.; Winkler, E.; Jung, K.; Huebner, G.

    1981-01-01

    Based on kinetic analyses of amino acid and protein turnover by means of compartment models the synthesis and degradation of the soluble proteins in etiolated epicotyl segments of Pisum sativum L. as well as their dependence on the herbicide 2'-methyl-4'-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) were determined quantitatively. The segments were incubated for 10 h in a medium containing 14 C-leucine and subsequently placed in an inactive medium. The radioactivity in the soluble proteins and in the amino acid fraction was followed up for a total of 24 h. A 3-pool model in which the total measurable amino acid pool was divided into a direct precursor pool for protein synthesis and into a degradation pool was best suited to interpret the data. The turnover rate for the soluble proteins of untreated epicotyl segments was determined to be 0.058 h -1 ; at an MCPA concentration of 10 -4 M this value was nearly doubled. An increased proteolytic activity in the epicotyl segments ran parallel to the change of the turnover rate in dependence on MCPA concentration. The heterogeneity of the soluble protein with respect to the turnover rate was investigated by means of 3 H/ 14 C double labelling for individual protein fractions separated by gel electrophoresis. The results obtained in this way were comparable with those of the total pool turnover. (author)

  14. Elevated CO2 and water addition enhance nitrogen turnover in grassland plants with implications for temporal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Feike A; Carrillo, Yolima; Blumenthal, Dana M; Mueller, Kevin E; LeCain, Dan R; Morgan, Jack A; Zelikova, Tamara J; Williams, David G; Follett, Ronald F; Pendall, Elise

    2018-05-01

    Temporal variation in soil nitrogen (N) availability affects growth of grassland communities that differ in their use and reuse of N. In a 7-year-long climate change experiment in a semi-arid grassland, the temporal stability of plant biomass production varied with plant N turnover (reliance on externally acquired N relative to internally recycled N). Species with high N turnover were less stable in time compared to species with low N turnover. In contrast, N turnover at the community level was positively associated with asynchrony in biomass production, which in turn increased community temporal stability. Elevated CO 2 and summer irrigation, but not warming, enhanced community N turnover and stability, possibly because treatments promoted greater abundance of species with high N turnover. Our study highlights the importance of plant N turnover for determining the temporal stability of individual species and plant communities affected by climate change. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  15. RNA trafficking in parasitic plant systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Megan; Kim, Gunjune; Westwood, James H.

    2012-01-01

    RNA trafficking in plants contributes to local and long-distance coordination of plant development and response to the environment. However, investigations of mobile RNA identity and function are hindered by the inherent difficulty of tracing a given molecule of RNA from its cell of origin to its destination. Several methods have been used to address this problem, but all are limited to some extent by constraints associated with accurately sampling phloem sap or detecting trafficked RNA. Certain parasitic plant species form symplastic connections to their hosts and thereby provide an additional system for studying RNA trafficking. The haustorial connections of Cuscuta and Phelipanche species are similar to graft junctions in that they are able to transmit mRNAs, viral RNAs, siRNAs, and proteins from the host plants to the parasite. In contrast to other graft systems, these parasites form connections with host species that span a wide phylogenetic range, such that a high degree of nucleotide sequence divergence may exist between host and parasites and allow confident identification of most host RNAs in the parasite system. The ability to identify host RNAs in parasites, and vice versa, will facilitate genomics approaches to understanding RNA trafficking. This review discusses the nature of host–parasite connections and the potential significance of host RNAs for the parasite. Additional research on host–parasite interactions is needed to interpret results of RNA trafficking studies, but parasitic plants may provide a fascinating new perspective on RNA trafficking. PMID:22936942

  16. RNA trafficking in parasitic plant systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L LeBlanc

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA trafficking in plants contributes to local and long-distance coordination of plant development and response to the environment. However, investigations of mobile RNA identity and function are hindered by the inherent difficulty of tracing a given molecule of RNA from its cell of origin to its destination. Several methods have been used to address this problem, but all are limited to some extent by constraints associated with accurately sampling phloem sap or detecting trafficked RNA. Certain parasitic plant species form symplastic connections to their hosts and thereby provide an additional system for studying RNA trafficking. The haustorial connections of Cuscuta and Phelipanche species are similar to graft junctions in that they are able to transmit mRNAs, viral RNAs, siRNAs and proteins from the host plants to the parasite. In contrast to other graft systems, these parasites form connections with host species that span a wide phylogenetic range, such that a high degree of nucleotide sequence divergence may exist between host and parasites and allow confident identification of most host RNAs in the parasite system. The ability to identify host RNAs in parasites, and vice versa, will facilitate genomics approaches to understanding RNA trafficking. This review discusses the nature of host parasite connections and the potential significance of host RNAs for the parasite. Additional research on host-parasite interactions is needed to interpret results of RNA trafficking studies, but parasitic plants may provide a fascinating new perspective on RNA trafficking.

  17. Messenger RNA 3' end formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A G

    2008-01-01

    Messenger RNA 3' end formation is an integral step in the process that gives rise to mature, translated messenger RNAs in eukaryotes. With this step, a pre-messenger RNA is processed and polyadenylated, giving rise to a mature mRNA bearing the characteristic poly(A) tract. The poly(A) tract is a fundamental feature of mRNAs, participating in the process of translation initiation and being the focus of control mechanisms that define the lifetime of mRNAs. Thus messenger RNA 3' end formation impacts two steps in mRNA biogenesis and function. Moreover, mRNA 3' end formation is something of a bridge that integrates numerous other steps in mRNA biogenesis and function. While the process is essential for the expression of most genes, it is also one that is subject to various forms of regulation, such that both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression may be modulated via the polyadenylation complex. In this review, the current status of understanding of mRNA 3' end formation in plants is discussed. In particular, the nature of mRNA 3' ends in plants is reviewed, as are recent studies that are beginning to yield insight into the functioning and regulation of plant polyadenylation factor subunits.

  18. Turnover of galactans and other cell wall polysaccharides during development of flax plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkova, T.A.; Chemikosova, S.B.; Lozovaya, V.V.; Carpita, N.C.

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the synthesis and turnover of cell wall polysaccharides of the flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) plant during development of the phloem fibers. One-month-old flax plants were exposed to a 40-min pulse with 14CO2 followed by 8-h, 24-h, and 1-month periods of chase with ambient CO2, and radioactivity in cell wall sugars was determined in various plant parts. The relative radioactivity of glucose in noncellulosic polysaccharides was the highest compared with all other cell wall sugars immediately after the pulse and decreased substantially during the subsequent chase. The relative radioactivities of the other cell wall sugars changed with differing rates, indicating turnover of specific polysaccharides. Notably, after 1 month of chase there was a marked decrease in the proportional mass and total radioactivity in cell wall galactose, indicating a long-term turnover of the galactans enriched in the fiber-containing tissues. The ratio of radiolabeled xylose to arabinose also increased during the chase, indicating a turnover of arabinose-containing polymers and interconversion to xylose. The pattern of label redistribution differed between organs, indicating that the cell wall turnover processes are tissue- and cell-specific

  19. Photosynthate consumption and carbon turnover in the rhizosphere depending on plant species and growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerbeck, D.R.; Helal, H.M.; Nonnen, S.; Allard, J.-l.

    1982-01-01

    The root tissue which can be isolated from soils represents only part of the total plant carbon incorporation. Between 20 and 40% of the photosynthetic production of plants is expended for root growth and root metabolism. This indicates a striking turnover of energy in the rhizosphere, because relatively litle root-derived organic matter remains there until harvest time. Plant species and variety, soil conditions and temperature were shown to be the most decisive factors governing the assimilate consumption of plant root systems. A special technique is described which enables to study how this extensive turnover affects the surrounding soil depending on its proximity to the roots. Plant-derived carbon can be detected up to 20mm away from the roots. A priming effect has been found on the decomposition of soil organic matter. This explains why, in spite of the rhizo-deposition mentioned, no net-accumulation of carbon in the rhizosphere has been found. (Author) [pt

  20. Job Creation, Job Destruction and Plant Turnover in Norwegian Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Tor Jakob Klette; Astrid Mathiassen

    1995-01-01

    The labour market in Norway, as in other Scandinavian countries, is often claimed to be overregulated and incapable of adjustment to changes in job opportunities. The results presented in this paper suggest to the contrary that in terms of job creation and job reallocation between plants, the manufacturing sector in Norway is surprisingly flexible, and similar to the manufacturing sector in other OECD countries such as the U.S. We show that 8.4 percent of the manufacturing jobs are eliminated...

  1. Turnover of plant lineages shapes herbivore phylogenetic beta diversity along ecological gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellissier, Loïc; Ndiribe, Charlotte; Dubuis, Anne; Pradervand, Jean-Nicolas; Salamin, Nicolas; Guisan, Antoine; Rasmann, Sergio

    2013-05-01

    Understanding drivers of biodiversity patterns is of prime importance in this era of severe environmental crisis. More diverse plant communities have been postulated to represent a larger functional trait-space, more likely to sustain a diverse assembly of herbivore species. Here, we expand this hypothesis to integrate environmental, functional and phylogenetic variation of plant communities as factors explaining the diversity of lepidopteran assemblages along elevation gradients in the Swiss Western Alps. According to expectations, we found that the association between butterflies and their host plants is highly phylogenetically structured. Multiple regression analyses showed the combined effect of climate, functional traits and phylogenetic diversity in structuring butterfly communities. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence that plant phylogenetic beta diversity is the major driver explaining butterfly phylogenetic beta diversity. Along ecological gradients, the bottom up control of herbivore diversity is thus driven by phylogenetically structured turnover of plant traits as well as environmental variables. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  2. Role of RNA interference in plant improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Umesh Balkrishna; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant

    2011-06-01

    Research to alter crops for their better performance involving modern technology is underway in numerous plants, and achievements in transgenic plants are impacting crop improvements in unparalleled ways. Striking progress has been made using genetic engineering technology over the past two decades in manipulating genes from diverse and exotic sources, and inserting them into crop plants for inducing desirable characteristics. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been identified as a natural mechanism for regulation of gene expression in all higher organisms from plants to humans and promises greater accuracy and precision to plant improvement. The expression of any gene can be down-regulated in a highly explicit manner exclusive of affecting the expression of any other gene by using RNAi technologies. Additional research in this field has been focused on a number of other areas including microRNAs, hairpin RNA, and promoter methylation. Manipulating new RNAi pathways, which generate small RNA molecules to amend gene expression in crops, can produce new quality traits and having better potentiality of protection against abiotic and biotic stresses. Nutritional improvement, change in morphology, or enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis are some of the other advantages of RNAi technology. In addition to its roles in regulating gene expression, RNAi is also used as a natural defense mechanism against molecular parasites such as jumping genes and viral genetic elements that affect genome stability. Even though much advancement has been made on the field of RNAi over the preceding few years, the full prospective of RNAi for crop improvement remains to be fully realized. The intricacy of RNAi pathway, the molecular machineries, and how it relates to plant development are still to be explained.

  3. Role of RNA interference in plant improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Umesh Balkrishna; Gurav, Ranjit Gajanan; Bapat, Vishwas Anant

    2011-06-01

    Research to alter crops for their better performance involving modern technology is underway in numerous plants, and achievements in transgenic plants are impacting crop improvements in unparalleled ways. Striking progress has been made using genetic engineering technology over the past two decades in manipulating genes from diverse and exotic sources, and inserting them into crop plants for inducing desirable characteristics. RNA interference (RNAi) has recently been identified as a natural mechanism for regulation of gene expression in all higher organisms from plants to humans and promises greater accuracy and precision to plant improvement. The expression of any gene can be down-regulated in a highly explicit manner exclusive of affecting the expression of any other gene by using RNAi technologies. Additional research in this field has been focused on a number of other areas including microRNAs, hairpin RNA, and promoter methylation. Manipulating new RNAi pathways, which generate small RNA molecules to amend gene expression in crops, can produce new quality traits and having better potentiality of protection against abiotic and biotic stresses. Nutritional improvement, change in morphology, or enhanced secondary metabolite synthesis are some of the other advantages of RNAi technology. In addition to its roles in regulating gene expression, RNAi is also used as a natural defense mechanism against molecular parasites such as jumping genes and viral genetic elements that affect genome stability. Even though much advancement has been made on the field of RNAi over the preceding few years, the full prospective of RNAi for crop improvement remains to be fully realized. The intricacy of RNAi pathway, the molecular machineries, and how it relates to plant development are still to be explained.

  4. Viral RNAi suppressor reversibly binds siRNA to outcompete Dicer and RISC via multiple-turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Renata A.; Krishnan, Vishalakshi; Walter, Nils G.

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved gene regulatory mechanism employed by most eukaryotes as a key component of their innate immune response against viruses and retrotransposons. During viral infection, the RNase III-type endonuclease Dicer cleaves viral double-stranded RNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), 21–24 nucleotides in length, and helps load them into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to guide cleavage of complementary viral RNA. As a countermeasure, many viruses have evolved viral RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) proteins that tightly, and presumably quantitatively, bind siRNAs to thwart RNAi-mediated degradation. Viral RSS proteins also act across kingdoms as potential immunosuppressors in gene therapeutic applications. Here we report fluorescence quenching and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that probe siRNA binding by the dimeric RSS p19 from Carnation Italian Ringspot Virus (CIRV), as well as by human Dicer and RISC assembly complexes. We find that the siRNA:p19 interaction is readily reversible, characterized by rapid binding ((1.69 ± 0.07)×108 M−1s−1) and marked dissociation (koff = 0.062 ± 0.002 s−1). We also observe that p19 efficiently competes with recombinant Dicer and inhibits formation of RISC-related assembly complexes found in human cell extract. Computational modeling based on these results provides evidence for the transient formation of a ternary complex between siRNA, human Dicer, and p19. An expanded model of RNA silencing indicates that multiple-turnover by reversible binding of siRNAs potentiates the efficiency of the suppressor protein. Our predictive model is expected to be applicable to the dosing of p19 as a silencing suppressor in viral gene therapy. PMID:21354178

  5. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  6. Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Eliana; Rös, Matthias; Bonilla, María Argenis; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

  7. Habitat Heterogeneity Affects Plant and Arthropod Species Diversity and Turnover in Traditional Cornfields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Martínez

    Full Text Available The expansion of the agricultural frontier by the clearing of remnant forests has led to human-dominated landscape mosaics. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of these landscape mosaics on arthropod diversity at local spatial scales in temperate and tropical regions, but little is known about fragmentation effects in crop systems, such as the complex tropical traditional crop systems that maintain a high diversity of weeds and arthropods in low-Andean regions. To understand the factors that influence patterns of diversity in human-dominated landscapes, we investigate the effect of land use types on plant and arthropod diversity in traditionally managed cornfields, via surveys of plants and arthropods in twelve traditional cornfields in the Colombian Andes. We estimated alpha and beta diversity to analyze changes in diversity related to land uses within a radius of 100 m to 1 km around each cornfield. We observed that forests influenced alpha diversity of plants, but not of arthropods. Agricultural lands had a positive relationship with plants and herbivores, but a negative relationship with predators. Pastures positively influenced the diversity of plants and arthropods. In addition, forest cover seemed to influence changes in plant species composition and species turnover of herbivore communities among cornfields. The dominant plant species varied among fields, resulting in high differentiation of plant communities. Predator communities also exhibited high turnover among cornfields, but differences in composition arose mainly among rare species. The crop system evaluated in this study represents a widespread situation in the tropics, therefore, our results can be of broad significance. Our findings suggest that traditional agriculture may not homogenize biological communities, but instead could maintain the regional pool of species through high beta diversity.

  8. RNA regulatory elements and polyadenylation in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur G. Hunt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative poly(A site choice (also known as alternative polyadenylation, or APA has the potential to affect gene expression in qualitative and quantitative ways. Alternative polyadenylation may affect as many as 82% of all expressed genes in a plant. The consequences of APA include the generation of transcripts with differing 3’-UTRs (and thus differing potential regulatory potential and of transcripts with differing protein-coding potential. Genome-wide studies of possible APA suggest a linkage with pre-mRNA splicing, and indicate a coincidence of and perhaps cooperation between RNA regulatory elements that affect splicing efficiency and the recognition of novel intronic poly(A sites. These studies also raise the possibility of the existence of a novel class of polyadenylation-related cis elements that are distinct from the well-characterized plant polyadenylation signal. Many potential APA events, however, have not been associated with identifiable cis elements. The present state of the field reveals a broad scope of APA, and also numerous opportunities for research into mechanisms that govern both choice and regulation of poly(A sites in plants.

  9. Mediated Plastid RNA Editing in Plant Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Andrade, Javier; Ramírez, Vicente; López, Ana; Vera, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Plant regulatory circuits coordinating nuclear and plastid gene expression have evolved in response to external stimuli. RNA editing is one of such control mechanisms. We determined the Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded homeodomain-containing protein OCP3 is incorporated into the chloroplast, and contributes to control over the extent of ndhB transcript editing. ndhB encodes the B subunit of the chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH) involved in cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I. In ocp3 mutant strains, ndhB editing efficiency decays, CEF is impaired and disease resistance to fungal pathogens substantially enhanced, a process recapitulated in plants defective in editing plastid RNAs encoding NDH complex subunits due to mutations in previously described nuclear-encoded pentatricopeptide-related proteins (i.e. CRR21, CRR2). Furthermore, we observed that following a pathogenic challenge, wild type plants respond with editing inhibition of ndhB transcript. In parallel, rapid destabilization of the plastidial NDH complex is also observed in the plant following perception of a pathogenic cue. Therefore, NDH complex activity and plant immunity appear as interlinked processes. PMID:24204264

  10. Effects of growth state and 3H labeling level on RNA turnover in WI-38 fibroblasts and HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sameshima, M.; Schlessinger, D.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of turnover of prelabeled RNA in WI-38 human diploid fibroblasts varied with the level of 3 H incorporated, the cell density of cultures, and the arrest of growth by senescence. The half-life of RNA in sparse cultures of growing WI-38 diploid fibroblasts depended on the level of [ 3 H]uridine incorporated; extrapolated to zero levels of incorporation, the half-life was 15 to 20 days. At any level of incorporated [ 3 H]uridine, however, RNA half-life decreased to 4 to 5 days in superconfluent cultures as the culture growth slowed. A similar shortening of half-life was observed when growth was stopped by 3 H irradiation or clonal senescence. However, the rate of turnover was not simply dependent on whether cells were growing; for example, turnover did not increase when growth was arrested by incubating cells in conditioned medium. HeLa and L cells also showed an RNA half-life of about 14 to 20 days with an increase in turnover rate of crowded cultures. However, this increase occurred at higher cell densities than with the diploid fibroblasts. Also, the growth rate and rate of RNA turnover of HeLa and L cells were much less affected by incorporated 3 H. The differential responses to confluence and 3 H label can explain the higher turnover rate of RNA in normal human fibroblasts compared to SV40-transformed cells [S.A. Liebhaber, S. Wolf, and D. Schlessinger, Cell 13, 121-127 (1978)

  11. Plant-Microbiota Interactions as a Driver of the Mineral Turnover in the Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria Terrazas, R; Giles, C; Paterson, E; Robertson-Albertyn, S; Cesco, S; Mimmo, T; Pii, Y; Bulgarelli, D

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge facing agriculture in the 21st century is the need to increase the productivity of cultivated land while reducing the environmentally harmful consequences of mineral fertilization. The microorganisms thriving in association and interacting with plant roots, the plant microbiota, represent a potential resource of plant probiotic function, capable of conjugating crop productivity with sustainable management in agroecosystems. However, a limited knowledge of the organismal interactions occurring at the root-soil interface is currently hampering the development and use of beneficial plant-microbiota interactions in agriculture. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the recruitment cues of the plant microbiota and the molecular basis of nutrient turnover in the rhizosphere will be required to move toward efficient and sustainable crop nutrition. In this chapter, we will discuss recent insights into plant-microbiota interactions at the root-soil interface, illustrate the processes driving mineral dynamics in soil, and propose experimental avenues to further integrate the metabolic potential of the plant microbiota into crop management and breeding strategies for sustainable agricultural production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is an RNA-binding protein that modulates the mRNA turnover properties of late-exponential and stationary phase Staphylococcus aureus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Morrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of mRNA turnover is gaining recognition as a mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus regulates gene expression, but the factors that orchestrate alterations in transcript degradation are poorly understood. In that regard, we previously found that 138 mRNA species, including the virulence factors protein A (spa and collagen binding protein (cna, are stabilized in a sarA-dependent manner during exponential phase growth, suggesting that SarA protein may directly or indirectly effect the RNA turnover properties of these transcripts. Herein, we expanded our characterization of the effects of sarA on mRNA turnover during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Results revealed that the locus affects the RNA degradation properties of cells during both growth phases. Further, using gel mobility shift assays and RIP-ChIP, it was found that SarA protein is capable of binding mRNA species that it stabilizes both in vitro and within bacterial cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SarA post-transcriptionally regulates S. aureus gene expression in a manner that involves binding to and consequently altering the mRNA turnover properties of target transcripts.

  13. Structures of two exonucleases involved in controlled RNA turnover in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    divalent cations. The Pop2p structure reveals that the ability of this enzyme to degrade poly(A)/(U)/(C), but not poly(G) may be determined by structural hindrance of interaction with this specific nucleotide. In Rrp6p, mutations known to confer specific RNA degradation phenotypes in yeast nuclei can now...... rid of aberrant RNAs. Here we describe the structures of two 3'-5' exonucleases involved in controlled RNA decay in yeast, Pop2p and Rrp6p. Rrp6p is associated with the nuclear exosome where it participates in the degradation of improperly processed precursor mRNAs and trimming of stable RNAs [1]. Pop...

  14. The Dynamic of the N-Turnover of Plant Residues in The soil using nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, M.M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Laboratory and greenhouse experiments were carried out to study the dynamic of the N-turnover of leguminous and non-leguminous plant residues in sandy soil using N-15 . tracer technique. Also, the availability of N from labelled or unlabelled ammonium sulfate was included. using 15 N-technique, data obtained generally indicated that 15 N-mineralization percent for soybean (narrow C/N ratio) increased with time, being more effective and superior over wheat residue-N (wide C/N ratio) on the net 15 N-mineralization through out the time of incubation (10 weeks).Data obtained generally indicated that the N-mineralization significantly decreased due to the application of soybean, wheat, wheat + soybean and / or ammonium sulfate along with the time of vegetative growth stage until harvesting period under with or without wheat stands . In general at any period of growth plant stages of wheat, the amount of microbial biomass-N under wheat residue and/or ammonium sulfate treated and untreated soil significantly decreased rapidly from an initial of vegetative stage until harvesting time. the positive effect of plant residues on the amount of biomass-N was arranged as follows : soybean>wheat + soybean> wheat residues

  15. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle ( pre- & post- transcriptional maturation and protein turnover : Implications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALAV SUCHIN TRIVEDI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, as well as due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions. Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic. This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition and behavior. Thus a regulatory switch, controlling the lifespan, maturation and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at 1.The pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA (pre-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and 2. the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins (RNP and RNA binding proteins (RNABP in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione antioxidant levels, the redox status of neurons might be the central regulatory switch for methylation

  16. An engine for global plant diversity: Highest evolutionary turnover and emigration in the American tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre eAntonelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the processes that have generated the latitudinal biodiversity gradient and the continental differences in tropical biodiversity remains a major goal of evolutionary biology. Here we estimate the timing and direction of range shifts of extant flowering plants (angiosperms between tropical and non-tropical zones, and into and out of the major tropical regions of the world. We then calculate rates of speciation and extinction taking into account incomplete taxonomic sampling. We use a recently published fossil calibrated phylogeny and apply novel bioinformatic tools to code species into user-defined polygons. We reconstruct biogeographic history using stochastic character mapping to compute relative numbers of range shifts in proportion to the number of available lineages through time. Our results, based on the analysis of c. 22,600 species and c. 20 million geo-referenced occurrence records, show no significant differences between the speciation and extinction of tropical and non-tropical angiosperms. This suggests that at least in plants, the tropical biodiversity gradient primarily derives from other factors than differential rates of diversification. In contrast, the outstanding species richness found today in the American tropics (the Neotropics, as compared to tropical Africa and tropical Asia, is associated with significantly higher speciation and extinction rates. This suggests an exceedingly rapid evolutionary turnover, i.e. Neotropical species being formed and replaced by one another at unparalleled rates. In addition, tropical America stands out from other continents by having ‘pumped out’ more species than it received through most of the last 66 million years. These results imply that the Neotropics have acted as an engine for global plant diversity.

  17. Nuclear pre-mRNA processing in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.S.N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology and Program in Molecular Plant Biology; Golovkin, M. (eds.) [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    2008-07-01

    This volume of CTMI, entitled Nuclear premRNA Processing in Plants, with 16 chapters from leading scientists in this area, summarizes recent advances in nuclear pre-mRNA processing and its role in plant growth and development. It provides researchers in the field, as well as those in related areas, with an up-to-date and comprehensive, yet concise, overview of the current status and future potential of this research in understanding plant biology. The first four chapters focus on spliceosome composition, genome-wide alternative splicing, and splice site requirements for U1 and U12 introns using computational and empirical approaches. Analysis of sequenced plant genomes has revealed that 80% of all protein-coding nuclear genes contain one or more introns. The lack of an in vitro plant splicing system has made it difficult to identify general and plant-specific components of splicing machinery in plants. The next three chapters focus on serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, which are known to play key roles in constitutive and regulated splicing of pre-mRNA and other aspects of RNA metabolism in metazoans. These proteins engage both in RNA binding and protein.protein interactions and function as splicing regulators at multiple stages of spliceosome assembly. This family of proteins has expanded considerably in plants with several plant-specific SR proteins. Several serendipitous discoveries made using forward genetics are indicating that RNA metabolism (alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, mRNA transport) plays an important role in many aspects of plant growth and development and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The next seven chapters focus on these aspects of RNA metabolism. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates a number of physiological processes during plant growth and development. The next chapter or A.B. Rose discusses the ways introns affect gene expression both positively and

  18. Nuclear pre-mRNA processing in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Golovkin, M.

    2008-01-01

    This volume of CTMI, entitled Nuclear premRNA Processing in Plants, with 16 chapters from leading scientists in this area, summarizes recent advances in nuclear pre-mRNA processing and its role in plant growth and development. It provides researchers in the field, as well as those in related areas, with an up-to-date and comprehensive, yet concise, overview of the current status and future potential of this research in understanding plant biology. The first four chapters focus on spliceosome composition, genome-wide alternative splicing, and splice site requirements for U1 and U12 introns using computational and empirical approaches. Analysis of sequenced plant genomes has revealed that 80% of all protein-coding nuclear genes contain one or more introns. The lack of an in vitro plant splicing system has made it difficult to identify general and plant-specific components of splicing machinery in plants. The next three chapters focus on serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, which are known to play key roles in constitutive and regulated splicing of pre-mRNA and other aspects of RNA metabolism in metazoans. These proteins engage both in RNA binding and protein.protein interactions and function as splicing regulators at multiple stages of spliceosome assembly. This family of proteins has expanded considerably in plants with several plant-specific SR proteins. Several serendipitous discoveries made using forward genetics are indicating that RNA metabolism (alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, mRNA transport) plays an important role in many aspects of plant growth and development and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The next seven chapters focus on these aspects of RNA metabolism. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates a number of physiological processes during plant growth and development. The next chapter or A.B. Rose discusses the ways introns affect gene expression both positively and

  19. The origin and effect of small RNA signaling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien eParent

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Given their sessile condition, land plants need to integrate environmental cues rapidly and send signal throughout the organism to modify their metabolism accordingly. Small RNA (sRNA molecules are among the messengers that plant cells use to carry such signals. These molecules originate from fold-back stem-loops transcribed from endogenous loci or from perfect double-stranded RNA produced through the action of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Once produced, sRNAs associate with Argonaute and other proteins to form the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC that executes silencing of complementary RNA molecules. Depending on the nature of the RNA target and the Argonaute protein involved, RISC triggers either DNA methylation and chromatin modification (leading to transcriptional gene silencing, TGS or RNA cleavage or translational inhibition (leading to post-transcriptional gene silencing, PTGS. In some cases, sRNAs move to neighboring cells and/or to the vascular tissues for long-distance trafficking. Many genes are involved in the biogenesis of sRNAs and recent studies have shown that both their origin and their protein partners have great influence on their activity and range. Here we summarize the work done to uncover the mode of action of the different classes of small RNA with special emphasis on their movement and how plants can take advantage of their mobility. We also review the various genetic requirements needed for production, movement and perception of the silencing signal.

  20. Phosphatidic acid produced by phospholipase D promotes RNA replication of a plant RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiwamu Hyodo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA [(+RNA] viruses are intracellular obligate parasites replicate using the membrane-bound replicase complexes that contain multiple viral and host components. To replicate, (+RNA viruses exploit host resources and modify host metabolism and membrane organization. Phospholipase D (PLD is a phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing enzyme that catalyzes the production of phosphatidic acid (PA, a lipid second messenger that modulates diverse intracellular signaling in various organisms. PA is normally present in small amounts (less than 1% of total phospholipids, but rapidly and transiently accumulates in lipid bilayers in response to different environmental cues such as biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. However, the precise functions of PLD and PA remain unknown. Here, we report the roles of PLD and PA in genomic RNA replication of a plant (+RNA virus, Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV. We found that RCNMV RNA replication complexes formed in Nicotiana benthamiana contained PLDα and PLDβ. Gene-silencing and pharmacological inhibition approaches showed that PLDs and PLDs-derived PA are required for viral RNA replication. Consistent with this, exogenous application of PA enhanced viral RNA replication in plant cells and plant-derived cell-free extracts. We also found that a viral auxiliary replication protein bound to PA in vitro, and that the amount of PA increased in RCNMV-infected plant leaves. Together, our findings suggest that RCNMV hijacks host PA-producing enzymes to replicate.

  1. RNA mobility in parasitic plant – host interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunjune

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The parasitic plant Cuscuta exchanges mRNAs with its hosts. Systemic mobility of mRNAs within plants is well documented, and has gained increasing attention as studies using grafted plant systems have revealed new aspects of mobile mRNA regulation and function. But parasitic plants take this phenomenon to a new level by forming seamless connections to a wide range of host species, and raising questions about how mRNAs might function after transfer to a different species. Cuscuta and other parasitic plant species also take siRNAs from their hosts, indicating that multiple types of RNA are capable of trans-specific movement. Parasitic plants are intriguing systems for studying RNA mobility, in part because such exchange opens new possibilities for control of parasitic weeds, but also because they provide a fresh perspective into understanding roles of RNAs in inter-organismal communication. PMID:28277936

  2. Antiviral RNA silencing viral counter defense in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    The research described in this thesis centres around the mechanism of RNA silencing in relation to virus-host interaction, an area of increasing importance. It shows how this recently disclosed mechanism can be used to produce virus-resistant plants. Based on the activity of the RNA silencing

  3. Species turnover drives β-diversity patterns across multiple spatial scales of plant-galling interactions in mountaintop grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marcel Serra; Carneiro, Marco Antônio Alves; Branco, Cristina Alves; Borges, Rafael Augusto Xavier; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson

    2018-01-01

    This study describes differences in species richness and composition of the assemblages of galling insects and their host plants at different spatial scales. Sampling was conducted along altitudinal gradients composed of campos rupestres and campos de altitude of two mountain complexes in southeastern Brazil: Espinhaço Range and Mantiqueira Range. The following hypotheses were tested: i) local and regional richness of host plants and galling insects are positively correlated; ii) beta diversity is the most important component of regional diversity of host plants and galling insects; and iii) Turnover is the main mechanism driving beta diversity of both host plants and galling insects. Local richness of galling insects and host plants increased with increasing regional richness of species, suggesting a pattern of unsaturated communities. The additive partition of regional richness (γ) into local and beta components shows that local richnesses (α) of species of galling insects and host plants are low relative to regional richness; the beta (β) component incorporates most of the regional richness. The multi-scale analysis of additive partitioning showed similar patterns for galling insects and host plants with the local component (α) incorporated a small part of regional richness. Beta diversity of galling insects and host plants were mainly the result of turnover, with little contribution from nesting. Although the species composition of galling insects and host plant species varied among sample sites, mountains and even mountain ranges, local richness remained relatively low. In this way, the addition of local habitats with different landscapes substantially affects regional richness. Each mountain contributes fundamentally to the composition of regional diversity of galling insects and host plants, and so the design of future conservation strategies should incorporate multiple scales.

  4. RNA Interference in Insect Vectors for Plant Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Kanakala, Surapathrudu; Ghanim, Murad

    2016-01-01

    Insects and other arthropods are the most important vectors of plant pathogens. The majority of plant pathogens are disseminated by arthropod vectors such as aphids, beetles, leafhoppers, planthoppers, thrips and whiteflies. Transmission of plant pathogens and the challenges in managing insect vectors due to insecticide resistance are factors that contribute to major food losses in agriculture. RNA interference (RNAi) was recently suggested as a promising strategy for controlling insect pests...

  5. Negative-strand RNA viruses: the plant-infecting counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormelink, Richard; Garcia, Maria Laura; Goodin, Michael; Sasaya, Takahide; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2011-12-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome organization, while others have just recently been/or are still classified in floating genera. In most cases, at least two striking differences can still be discerned between the animal/human-infecting viruses and their plant-infecting counterparts which for the latter relate to their adaptation to plants as hosts. The first one is the capacity to modify plasmodesmata to facilitate systemic spread of infectious viral entities throughout the plant host. The second one is the capacity to counteract RNA interference (RNAi, also referred to as RNA silencing), the innate antiviral defence system of plants and insects. In this review an overview will be presented on the negative-strand RNA plant viruses classified within the families Bunyaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Ophioviridae and floating genera Tenuivirus and Varicosavirus. Genetic differences with the animal-infecting counterparts and their evolutionary descendants will be described in light of the above processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. RNA interference in plant parasitic nematodes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... grower preference or by government restrictions to limit the environmental ... risks associated with chemical control and (c) the pro- vision of ... certain model organisms. The first ... reproductive system (Lilley et al., 2005b), sperm (Urwin .... interference of dual oxidase in the plant nematode Meloidogyne.

  7. Phylogenetic distribution of plant snoRNA families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Bhattacharya, Deblina; Canzler, Sebastian; Kehr, Stephanie; Hertel, Jana; Grosse, Ivo; Stadler, Peter F

    2016-11-24

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are one of the most ancient families amongst non-protein-coding RNAs. They are ubiquitous in Archaea and Eukarya but absent in bacteria. Their main function is to target chemical modifications of ribosomal RNAs. They fall into two classes, box C/D snoRNAs and box H/ACA snoRNAs, which are clearly distinguished by conserved sequence motifs and the type of chemical modification that they govern. Similarly to microRNAs, snoRNAs appear in distinct families of homologs that affect homologous targets. In animals, snoRNAs and their evolution have been studied in much detail. In plants, however, their evolution has attracted comparably little attention. In order to chart the phylogenetic distribution of individual snoRNA families in plants, we applied a sophisticated approach for identifying homologs of known plant snoRNAs across the plant kingdom. In response to the relatively fast evolution of snoRNAs, information on conserved sequence boxes, target sequences, and secondary structure is combined to identify additional snoRNAs. We identified 296 families of snoRNAs in 24 species and traced their evolution throughout the plant kingdom. Many of the plant snoRNA families comprise paralogs. We also found that targets are well-conserved for most snoRNA families. The sequence conservation of snoRNAs is sufficient to establish homologies between phyla. The degree of this conservation tapers off, however, between land plants and algae. Plant snoRNAs are frequently organized in highly conserved spatial clusters. As a resource for further investigations we provide carefully curated and annotated alignments for each snoRNA family under investigation.

  8. Negative-strand RNA viruses: The plant-infecting counterparts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kormelink, R.J.M.; Garcia, M.L.; Goodin, M.; Sasaya, T.; Haenni, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    While a large number of negative-strand (-)RNA viruses infect animals and humans, a relative small number have plants as their primary host. Some of these have been classified within families together with animal/human infecting viruses due to similarities in particle morphology and genome

  9. Plant traits and environment: floating leaf blade production and turnover of waterlilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Klok

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Floating leaf blades of waterlilies fulfill several functions in wetland ecosystems by production, decomposition and turnover as well as exchange processes. Production and turnover rates of floating leaf blades of three waterlily species, Nuphar lutea (L. Sm., Nymphaea alba L. and Nymphaea candida Presl, were studied in three freshwater bodies, differing in trophic status, pH and alkalinity. Length and percentages of leaf loss of marked leaf blades were measured weekly during the growing season. Area and biomass were calculated based on leaf length and were used to calculate the turnover rate of floating leaf blades. Seasonal changes in floating leaf production showed that values decreased in the order: Nymphaea alba, Nuphar lutea, Nymphaea candida. The highest production was reached for Nuphar lutea and Nymphaea alba in alkaline, eutrophic water bodies. The production per leaf was relatively high for both species in the acid water body. Nymphaea candida showed a very short vegetation period and low turnover rates. The ratio Total potential leaf biomass/Maximum potential leaf biomass (P/Bmax of the three species ranged from 1.35–2.25. The ratio Vegetation period (Period with floating leaves/Mean leaf life span ranged from 2.94–4.63, the ratio Growth period (Period with appearance of new floating leaves/Vegetation period from 0.53–0.73. The clear differences between Nymphaea candida versus Nuphar lutea and Nymphaea alba, may be due to adaptations of Nymphaea candida to an Euro-Siberic climate with short-lasting summer conditions.

  10. Plant traits and environment: floating leaf blade production and turnover of waterlilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Peter F; van der Velde, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Floating leaf blades of waterlilies fulfill several functions in wetland ecosystems by production, decomposition and turnover as well as exchange processes. Production and turnover rates of floating leaf blades of three waterlily species, Nuphar lutea (L.) Sm., Nymphaea alba L. and Nymphaea candida Presl, were studied in three freshwater bodies, differing in trophic status, pH and alkalinity. Length and percentages of leaf loss of marked leaf blades were measured weekly during the growing season. Area and biomass were calculated based on leaf length and were used to calculate the turnover rate of floating leaf blades. Seasonal changes in floating leaf production showed that values decreased in the order: Nymphaea alba , Nuphar lutea , Nymphaea candida . The highest production was reached for Nuphar lutea and Nymphaea alba in alkaline, eutrophic water bodies. The production per leaf was relatively high for both species in the acid water body. Nymphaea candida showed a very short vegetation period and low turnover rates. The ratio Total potential leaf biomass/Maximum potential leaf biomass (P/B max ) of the three species ranged from 1.35-2.25. The ratio Vegetation period (Period with floating leaves)/Mean leaf life span ranged from 2.94-4.63, the ratio Growth period (Period with appearance of new floating leaves)/Vegetation period from 0.53-0.73. The clear differences between Nymphaea candida versus Nuphar lutea and Nymphaea alba , may be due to adaptations of Nymphaea candida to an Euro-Siberic climate with short-lasting summer conditions.

  11. Phylogenetic distribution of plant snoRNA families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patra Bhattacharya, Deblina; Canzler, Sebastian; Kehr, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    RNAs and box H/ACA snoRNAs, which are clearly distinguished by conserved sequence motifs and the type of chemical modification that they govern. Similarly to microRNAs, snoRNAs appear in distinct families of homologs that affect homologous targets. In animals, snoRNAs and their evolution have been studied...... in much detail. In plants, however, their evolution has attracted comparably little attention. RESULTS: In order to chart the phylogenetic distribution of individual snoRNA families in plants, we applied a sophisticated approach for identifying homologs of known plant snoRNAs across the plant kingdom....... In response to the relatively fast evolution of snoRNAs, information on conserved sequence boxes, target sequences, and secondary structure is combined to identify additional snoRNAs. We identified 296 families of snoRNAs in 24 species and traced their evolution throughout the plant kingdom. Many of the plant...

  12. Using small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing to understand global virus distribution in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs (sRNAs), a class of regulatory RNAs, have been used to serve as the specificity determinants of suppressing gene expression in plants and animals. Next generation sequencing (NGS) uncovered the sRNA landscape in most organisms including their associated microbes. In the current study, w...

  13. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  14. Disentangling effects of abiotic factors and biotic interactions on cross-taxon congruence in species turnover patterns of plants, moths and beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Meichun; Liu, Yunhui; Yu, Zhenrong; Baudry, Jacques; Li, Liangtao; Wang, Changliu; Axmacher, Jan C

    2016-04-01

    High cross-taxon congruence in species diversity patterns is essential for the use of surrogate taxa in biodiversity conservation, but presence and strength of congruence in species turnover patterns, and the relative contributions of abiotic environmental factors and biotic interaction towards this congruence, remain poorly understood. In our study, we used variation partitioning in multiple regressions to quantify cross-taxon congruence in community dissimilarities of vascular plants, geometrid and arciinid moths and carabid beetles, subsequently investigating their respective underpinning by abiotic factors and biotic interactions. Significant cross-taxon congruence observed across all taxon pairs was linked to their similar responses towards elevation change. Changes in the vegetation composition were closely linked to carabid turnover, with vegetation structure and associated microclimatic conditions proposed causes of this link. In contrast, moth assemblages appeared to be dominated by generalist species whose turnover was weakly associated with vegetation changes. Overall, abiotic factors exerted a stronger influence on cross-taxon congruence across our study sites than biotic interactions. The weak congruence in turnover observed particularly between plants and moths highlights the importance of multi-taxon approaches based on groupings of taxa with similar turnovers, rather than the use of single surrogate taxa or environmental proxies, in biodiversity assessments.

  15. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 in potato (Solanum tuberosum) and its relationship to other plant RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Lydia J R; Brockington, Samuel F; Murphy, Alex M; Pate, Adrienne E; Gruden, Kristina; MacFarlane, Stuart A; Palukaitis, Peter; Carr, John P

    2016-03-16

    Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) catalyze synthesis of double-stranded RNAs that can serve to initiate or amplify RNA silencing. Arabidopsis thaliana has six RDR genes; RDRs 1, 2 and 6 have roles in anti-viral RNA silencing. RDR6 is constitutively expressed but RDR1 expression is elevated following plant treatment with defensive phytohormones. RDR1 also contributes to basal virus resistance. RDR1 has been studied in several species including A. thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), N. benthamiana, N. attenuata and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) but not to our knowledge in potato (S. tuberosum). StRDR1 was identified and shown to be salicylic acid-responsive. StRDR1 transcript accumulation decreased in transgenic potato plants constitutively expressing a hairpin construct and these plants were challenged with three viruses: potato virus Y, potato virus X, and tobacco mosaic virus. Suppression of StRDR1 gene expression did not increase the susceptibility of potato to these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of RDR genes present in potato and in a range of other plant species identified a new RDR gene family, not present in potato and found only in Rosids (but apparently lost in the Rosid A. thaliana) for which we propose the name RDR7.

  16. Patterns of plant diversity loss and species turnover resulting from land abandonment and intensification in semi-natural grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Kei; Koyanagi, Tomoyo F; Matsumura, Toshikazu; Koyama, Asuka

    2018-07-15

    Land-use changes cause biodiversity loss in semi-natural ecosystems worldwide. Biotic homogenization has led to biodiversity loss, mainly through declines in species composition turnover. Elucidating patterns of turnover in species composition could enhance our understanding of how anthropogenic activities affect community assembly. Here, we focused on whether the decreasing patterns in plant diversity and turnover of species composition resulting from land-use change vary in two regions. We estimated the species diversity and composition of semi-natural grasslands surrounding paddy fields in satoyama landscapes. We examined the differences in species diversity and composition across three land-use types (abandoned, traditional, and intensified) in two regions (Hyogo and Niigata Prefectures, Japan), which were characterized by different climatic conditions. We then assessed alpha-, beta-, and gamma-diversity to compare the patterns of diversity losses in the two regions as a result of land-use changes. In each region, gamma-diversity was consistently higher in the traditional sites compared to abandoned or intensified sites. The analyses revealed that most of the beta-diversity in traditional sites differed significantly from those of abandoned and intensified sites in both regions. However, the beta-diversity of total and perennial species did not differ between traditional and abandoned sites in the Hyogo region. We noted that the beta-diversity of total and perennial species in intensified sites was much lower than that in the traditional sites of the Niigata region. Overall, the patterns of alpha- and gamma-diversity loss were similar in both study regions. Although the biotic homogenization was caused by intensified land-use in the Niigata region, this hypothesis did not completely explain the loss of biodiversity in the abandoned sites in the Hyogo region. The present study contributes to the growing body of work investigating changes in biodiversity as a

  17. RNA Interference in Insect Vectors for Plant Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surapathrudu Kanakala

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Insects and other arthropods are the most important vectors of plant pathogens. The majority of plant pathogens are disseminated by arthropod vectors such as aphids, beetles, leafhoppers, planthoppers, thrips and whiteflies. Transmission of plant pathogens and the challenges in managing insect vectors due to insecticide resistance are factors that contribute to major food losses in agriculture. RNA interference (RNAi was recently suggested as a promising strategy for controlling insect pests, including those that serve as important vectors for plant pathogens. The last decade has witnessed a dramatic increase in the functional analysis of insect genes, especially those whose silencing results in mortality or interference with pathogen transmission. The identification of such candidates poses a major challenge for increasing the role of RNAi in pest control. Another challenge is to understand the RNAi machinery in insect cells and whether components that were identified in other organisms are also present in insect. This review will focus on summarizing success cases in which RNAi was used for silencing genes in insect vector for plant pathogens, and will be particularly helpful for vector biologists.

  18. Climate and soil attributes determine plant species turnover in global drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Fernando T.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Quero, José L.; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Bowker, Matthew A.; Eldridge, David J.; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Valencia, Enrique; Berdugo, Miguel; Escolar, Cristina; García-Gómez, Miguel; Escudero, Adrián; Prina, Aníbal; Alfonso, Graciela; Arredondo, Tulio; Bran, Donaldo; Cabrera, Omar; Cea, Alex; Chaieb, Mohamed; Contreras, Jorge; Derak, Mchich; Espinosa, Carlos I.; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Muro, Victoria García; Ghiloufi, Wahida; Gómez-González, Susana; Gutiérrez, Julio R.; Hernández, Rosa M.; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L.; Hughes, Frederic Mendes; Miriti, Maria; Monerris, Jorge; Muchane, Muchai; Naseri, Kamal; Pucheta, Eduardo; Ramírez-Collantes, David A.; Raveh, Eran; Romão, Roberto L.; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Val, James; Veiga, José Pablo; Wang, Deli; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Aim Geographic, climatic, and soil factors are major drivers of plant beta diversity, but their importance for dryland plant communities is poorly known. This study aims to: i) characterize patterns of beta diversity in global drylands, ii) detect common environmental drivers of beta diversity, and iii) test for thresholds in environmental conditions driving potential shifts in plant species composition. Location 224 sites in diverse dryland plant communities from 22 geographical regions in six continents. Methods Beta diversity was quantified with four complementary measures: the percentage of singletons (species occurring at only one site), Whittake’s beta diversity (β(W)), a directional beta diversity metric based on the correlation in species occurrences among spatially contiguous sites (β(R2)), and a multivariate abundance-based metric (β(MV)). We used linear modelling to quantify the relationships between these metrics of beta diversity and geographic, climatic, and soil variables. Results Soil fertility and variability in temperature and rainfall, and to a lesser extent latitude, were the most important environmental predictors of beta diversity. Metrics related to species identity (percentage of singletons and β(W)) were most sensitive to soil fertility, whereas those metrics related to environmental gradients and abundance ((β(R2)) and β(MV)) were more associated with climate variability. Interactions among soil variables, climatic factors, and plant cover were not important determinants of beta diversity. Sites receiving less than 178 mm of annual rainfall differed sharply in species composition from more mesic sites (> 200 mm). Main conclusions Soil fertility and variability in temperature and rainfall are the most important environmental predictors of variation in plant beta diversity in global drylands. Our results suggest that those sites annually receiving ~ 178 mm of rainfall will be especially sensitive to future climate changes. These

  19. Climate and soil attributes determine plant species turnover in global drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Werner; Soliveres, Santiago; Maestre, Fernando T; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Quero, José L; Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Bowker, Matthew A; Eldridge, David J; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; Valencia, Enrique; Berdugo, Miguel; Escolar, Cristina; García-Gómez, Miguel; Escudero, Adrián; Prina, Aníbal; Alfonso, Graciela; Arredondo, Tulio; Bran, Donaldo; Cabrera, Omar; Cea, Alex; Chaieb, Mohamed; Contreras, Jorge; Derak, Mchich; Espinosa, Carlos I; Florentino, Adriana; Gaitán, Juan; Muro, Victoria García; Ghiloufi, Wahida; Gómez-González, Susana; Gutiérrez, Julio R; Hernández, Rosa M; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Mau, Rebecca L; Hughes, Frederic Mendes; Miriti, Maria; Monerris, Jorge; Muchane, Muchai; Naseri, Kamal; Pucheta, Eduardo; Ramírez-Collantes, David A; Raveh, Eran; Romão, Roberto L; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Val, James; Veiga, José Pablo; Wang, Deli; Yuan, Xia; Zaady, Eli

    2014-12-01

    Geographic, climatic, and soil factors are major drivers of plant beta diversity, but their importance for dryland plant communities is poorly known. This study aims to: i) characterize patterns of beta diversity in global drylands, ii) detect common environmental drivers of beta diversity, and iii) test for thresholds in environmental conditions driving potential shifts in plant species composition. 224 sites in diverse dryland plant communities from 22 geographical regions in six continents. Beta diversity was quantified with four complementary measures: the percentage of singletons (species occurring at only one site), Whittake's beta diversity (β(W)), a directional beta diversity metric based on the correlation in species occurrences among spatially contiguous sites (β(R 2 )), and a multivariate abundance-based metric (β(MV)). We used linear modelling to quantify the relationships between these metrics of beta diversity and geographic, climatic, and soil variables. Soil fertility and variability in temperature and rainfall, and to a lesser extent latitude, were the most important environmental predictors of beta diversity. Metrics related to species identity (percentage of singletons and β(W)) were most sensitive to soil fertility, whereas those metrics related to environmental gradients and abundance ((β(R 2 )) and β(MV)) were more associated with climate variability. Interactions among soil variables, climatic factors, and plant cover were not important determinants of beta diversity. Sites receiving less than 178 mm of annual rainfall differed sharply in species composition from more mesic sites (> 200 mm). Soil fertility and variability in temperature and rainfall are the most important environmental predictors of variation in plant beta diversity in global drylands. Our results suggest that those sites annually receiving ~ 178 mm of rainfall will be especially sensitive to future climate changes. These findings may help to define appropriate

  20. RNA virus interference via CRISPR/Cas13a system in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Aman, Rashid; Ali, Zahir; Butt, Haroon; Mahas, Ahmed; Aljedaani, Fatimah R.; Khan, Muhammad Zuhaib; Ding, Shouwei; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2018-01-01

    -crRNAs into functional crRNAs.Our data indicate that CRISPR/Cas13a can be used for engineering interference against RNA viruses, providing a potential novel mechanism for RNA-guided immunity against RNA viruses and for other RNA manipulations in plants.

  1. miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles Reveal Insight into Chitosan-Mediated Regulation of Plant Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Kecheng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Chen, Xiaolin; Yang, Haoyue; Li, Pengcheng

    2018-04-18

    Chitosan has been numerously studied as a plant growth regulator and stress tolerance inducer. To investigate the roles of chitosan as bioregulator on plant and unravel its possible metabolic responses mechanisms, we simultaneously investigated mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) expression profiles of wheat seedlings in response to chitosan heptamer. We found 400 chitosan-responsive differentially expressed genes, including 268 up-regulated and 132 down-regulated mRNAs, many of which were related to photosynthesis, primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism, defense responses, and transcription factors. Moreover, miRNAs also participate in chitosan-mediated regulation on plant growth. We identified 87 known and 21 novel miRNAs, among which 56 miRNAs were induced or repressed by chitosan heptamer, such as miRNA156, miRNA159a, miRNA164, miRNA171a, miRNA319, and miRNA1127. The integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in this case provides fundamental information for further investigation of regulation mechanisms of chitosan on plant growth and will facilitate its application in agriculture.

  2. Regulation and Turnover of Nitric Oxide by Phytoglobins in Plant Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Hebelstrup, Kim; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of phytoglobins in the metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) produced during stress, plant growth, and development is discussed. The action of phytoglobin expression upon NO leads to the maintenance of redox status, minimization of the damage from...... to the mobility of both NO and phytohormones, plants developed strategies to regulate specific cell hormonal actions to permit differentiation during development and to respond to stress. Phytoglobins are the agents responsible for differential cellular responses to hormones that use NO as a signal transduction...... reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the cytoplasm of the cell, and regulation of hormonal and stress responses. NO scavenging is achieved via phytoglobins, and it can also involve S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and a direct interaction of NO with superoxide anion followed by detoxification of formed...

  3. The plant i-AAA protease controls the turnover of an essential mitochondrial protein import component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Magdalena; Parys, Katarzyna; Murcha, Monika W; Jańska, Hanna

    2018-01-29

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles that play a central role in energy metabolism. Owing to the life-essential functions of these organelles, mitochondrial content, quality and dynamics are tightly controlled. Across the species, highly conserved ATP-dependent proteases prevent malfunction of mitochondria through versatile activities. This study focuses on a molecular function of the plant mitochondrial inner membrane-embedded AAA protease (denoted i -AAA) FTSH4, providing its first bona fide substrate. Here, we report that the abundance of the Tim17-2 protein, an essential component of the TIM17:23 translocase (Tim17-2 together with Tim50 and Tim23), is directly controlled by the proteolytic activity of FTSH4. Plants that are lacking functional FTSH4 protease are characterized by significantly enhanced capacity of preprotein import through the TIM17:23-dependent pathway. Taken together, with the observation that FTSH4 prevents accumulation of Tim17-2, our data point towards the role of this i -AAA protease in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in plants. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK28 buffers plant immunity and regulates BIK1 turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaghan, Jacqueline; Matschi, Susanne; Shorinola, Oluwaseyi

    2014-01-01

    Plant perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) triggers a phosphorylation relay leading to PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Despite increasing knowledge of PTI signaling, how immune homeostasis is maintained remains largely unknown. Here we describe a forward-genetic screen...... the plasma-membrane-associated cytoplasmic kinase BIK1, an important convergent substrate of multiple pattern recognition receptor (PRR) complexes. We find that BIK1 is rate limiting in PTI signaling and that it is continuously turned over to maintain cellular homeostasis. We further show that CPK28...

  5. RNA Silencing in Plants: Mechanisms, Technologies and Applications in Horticultural Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qigao; Liu, Qing; Smith, Neil A; Liang, Guolu; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the fundamental nature of a molecular process or a biological pathway is often a catalyst for the development of new technologies in biology. Indeed, studies from late 1990s to early 2000s have uncovered multiple overlapping but functionally distinct RNA silencing pathways in plants, including the posttranscriptional microRNA and small interfering RNA pathways and the transcriptional RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. These findings have in turn been exploited for developing artificial RNA silencing technologies such as hairpin RNA, artificial microRNA, intrinsic direct repeat, 3' UTR inverted repeat, artificial trans-acting siRNA, and virus-induced gene silencing technologies. Some of these RNA silencing technologies, such as the hairpin RNA technology, have already been widely used for genetic improvement of crop plants in agriculture. For horticultural plants, RNA silencing technologies have been used to increase disease and pest resistance, alter plant architecture and flowering time, improve commercial traits of fruits and flowers, enhance nutritional values, remove toxic compounds and allergens, and develop high-value industrial products. In this article we aim to provide an overview of the RNA silencing pathways in plants, summarize the existing RNA silencing technologies, and review the current progress in applying these technologies for the improvement of agricultural crops particularly horticultural crops.

  6. The RNA silencing enzyme RNA polymerase v is required for plant immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana López

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM is an epigenetic control mechanism driven by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs that influence gene function. In plants, little is known of the involvement of the RdDM pathway in regulating traits related to immune responses. In a genetic screen designed to reveal factors regulating immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified NRPD2 as the OVEREXPRESSOR OF CATIONIC PEROXIDASE 1 (OCP1. NRPD2 encodes the second largest subunit of the plant-specific RNA Polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and Pol V, which are crucial for the RdDM pathway. The ocp1 and nrpd2 mutants showed increases in disease susceptibility when confronted with the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina. Studies were extended to other mutants affected in different steps of the RdDM pathway, such as nrpd1, nrpe1, ago4, drd1, rdr2, and drm1drm2 mutants. Our results indicate that all the mutants studied, with the exception of nrpd1, phenocopy the nrpd2 mutants; and they suggest that, while Pol V complex is required for plant immunity, Pol IV appears dispensable. Moreover, Pol V defective mutants, but not Pol IV mutants, show enhanced disease resistance towards the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Interestingly, salicylic acid (SA-mediated defenses effective against PsDC3000 are enhanced in Pol V defective mutants, whereas jasmonic acid (JA-mediated defenses that protect against fungi are reduced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that, through differential histone modifications, SA-related defense genes are poised for enhanced activation in Pol V defective mutants and provide clues for understanding the regulation of gene priming during defense. Our results highlight the importance of epigenetic control as an additional layer of complexity in the regulation of plant immunity and point towards multiple components of the RdDM pathway being involved in plant immunity based on genetic evidence

  7. The RNA silencing enzyme RNA polymerase v is required for plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ana; Ramírez, Vicente; García-Andrade, Javier; Flors, Victor; Vera, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an epigenetic control mechanism driven by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that influence gene function. In plants, little is known of the involvement of the RdDM pathway in regulating traits related to immune responses. In a genetic screen designed to reveal factors regulating immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified NRPD2 as the OVEREXPRESSOR OF CATIONIC PEROXIDASE 1 (OCP1). NRPD2 encodes the second largest subunit of the plant-specific RNA Polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and Pol V), which are crucial for the RdDM pathway. The ocp1 and nrpd2 mutants showed increases in disease susceptibility when confronted with the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina. Studies were extended to other mutants affected in different steps of the RdDM pathway, such as nrpd1, nrpe1, ago4, drd1, rdr2, and drm1drm2 mutants. Our results indicate that all the mutants studied, with the exception of nrpd1, phenocopy the nrpd2 mutants; and they suggest that, while Pol V complex is required for plant immunity, Pol IV appears dispensable. Moreover, Pol V defective mutants, but not Pol IV mutants, show enhanced disease resistance towards the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Interestingly, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defenses effective against PsDC3000 are enhanced in Pol V defective mutants, whereas jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated defenses that protect against fungi are reduced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that, through differential histone modifications, SA-related defense genes are poised for enhanced activation in Pol V defective mutants and provide clues for understanding the regulation of gene priming during defense. Our results highlight the importance of epigenetic control as an additional layer of complexity in the regulation of plant immunity and point towards multiple components of the RdDM pathway being involved in plant immunity based on genetic evidence, but whether

  8. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. In situ DNA-RNA hybridization using in vitro 125I-labeled ribosomal RNA of higher plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Seiichi; Kikuchi, Tadatoshi; Ishida, M.R.; Tanaka, Ryuso.

    1975-01-01

    In situ hybridization using 125 I-labeled ribosomal RNA was applied to plant cells. Cytoplasmic 25 s rRNA, which was eluted from acrylamide gels after electrophoretic separation, was labeled in vitro with carrier-free 125 I and hybridized with the interphase nuclei in root tips of Vicia faba. In most of the preparations, the nucleoli were more heavily labeled than the other regions within nuclei, and several types of grain distribution were observed on the nucleoli. From these results, it was confirmed that in situ hybridization using 125 I-labeled rRNA can be used very effectively to detect the annealing sites of different molecular species of rRNA within the nuclei of plant cells, for which it is not as easy to obtain high specific radioactive rRNA in vivo as it is in the case of cultured animal cells. (auth.)

  10. Seeing the forest for the trees: annotating small RNA producing genes in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruh, Ceyda; Shahid, Saima; Axtell, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    A key goal in genomics is the complete annotation of the expressed regions of the genome. In plants, substantial portions of the genome make regulatory small RNAs produced by Dicer-Like (DCL) proteins and utilized by Argonaute (AGO) proteins. These include miRNAs and various types of endogenous siRNAs. Small RNA-seq, enabled by cheap and fast DNA sequencing, has produced an enormous volume of data on plant miRNA and siRNA expression in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent progress in using small RNA-seq data to produce stable and reliable annotations of miRNA and siRNA genes in plants. In addition, we highlight key goals for the future of small RNA gene annotation in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, Mary [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    It is now understood that most plant C is utilized or transformed by soil microorganisms en route to stabilization. Hence the composition of microbial communities that mediate decomposition and transformation of root C is critical, as are the metabolic capabilities of these communities. The change in composition and function of the C-transforming microbial communities over time in effect defines the biological component of soil C stabilization. Our research was designed to test 2 general hypotheses; the first two hypotheses are discussed first; H1: Root-exudate interactions with soil microbial populations results in the expression of enzymatic capacities for macromolecular, complex carbon decomposition; and H2: Microbial communities surrounding roots undergo taxonomic succession linked to functional gene activities as roots grow, mature, and decompose in soil. Over the term of the project we made significant progress in 1) quantifying the temporal pattern of root interactions with the soil decomposing community and 2) characterizing the role of root exudates in mediating these interactions.

  12. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance.

  13. RNA regulatory networks in animals and plants: a long noncoding RNA perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Youhuang; Dai, Xiaozhuan; Harrison, Andrew P; Chen, Ming

    2015-03-01

    A recent highlight of genomics research has been the discovery of many families of transcripts which have function but do not code for proteins. An important group is long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), which are typically longer than 200 nt, and whose members originate from thousands of loci across genomes. We review progress in understanding the biogenesis and regulatory mechanisms of lncRNAs. We describe diverse computational and high throughput technologies for identifying and studying lncRNAs. We discuss the current knowledge of functional elements embedded in lncRNAs as well as insights into the lncRNA-based regulatory network in animals. We also describe genome-wide studies of large amount of lncRNAs in plants, as well as knowledge of selected plant lncRNAs with a focus on biotic/abiotic stress-responsive lncRNAs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Plant effects on soil carbon storage and turnover in montane beech (Nothofagus) forest and adjacent tussock grassland in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tate, K.R.; Scott, N.A.; Ross, D.J.; Parshotam, A.; Claydon, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Land cover is a critical factor that influences, and is influenced by, atmospheric chemistry and potential climate changes. As considerable uncertainty exists about the effects of differences in land cover on below-ground carbon (C) storage, we have compared soil C contents and turnover at adjacent, unmanaged, indigenous forest (Nothofagus solandri var. cliffortiodes) and grassland (Chionochloa pallens) sites near the timberline in the same climo-edaphic environment in Craigieburn Forest Park, Canterbury, New Zealand. Total soil profile C was 13% higher in the grassland than in the forest ( 19.9 v. 16.7 kg/m 2 ), and based on bomb 14 C measurements, the differences mainly resulted from more recalcitrant soil C in the grassland (5.3 v. 3.0 kg/m 2 ). Estimated annual net primary production was about 0.4 kg C/m 2 for the forest and 0.5 kg C/m 2 for the grassland; estimated annual root production was about 0.2 and 0.4 kg C/m 2 , respectively. In situ soil surface CO 2 -C production was similar in the grassland and the forest. The accumulation of recalcitrant soil C was unrelated to differences in mineral weathering or soil texture, but was apparently enhanced by greater soil water retention in the grassland ecosystem. Thus, contrary to model (ROTHC) predictions, this soil C fraction could be expected to respond to the effects of climate change on precipitation patterns. Overall, our results suggest that the different patterns of soil C accumulation in these ecosystems have resulted from differences in plant C inputs, soil aluminium, and soil physical characteristics, rather than from differences in soil mineral weathering or texture. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  15. Complementation and recombination between alfalfa mosaic virus RNA3 mutants in tobacco plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, A. C.; Neeleman, L.; Bol, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    Deletions were made in an infectious cDNA clone of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) RNA3 and the replication of RNA transcripts of these cDNAs was studied in tobacco plants transformed with AIMV replicase genes (P12 plants). Previously, we found that deletions in the P3 gene did not affect accumulation

  16. RNA Silencing in Plants: Mechanisms, Technologies and Applications in Horticultural Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Qigao; Liu, Qing; Smith, Neil A.; Liang, Guolu; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental nature of a molecular process or a biological pathway is often a catalyst for the development of new technologies in biology. Indeed, studies from late 1990s to early 2000s have uncovered multiple overlapping but functionally distinct RNA silencing pathways in plants, including the posttranscriptional microRNA and small interfering RNA pathways and the transcriptional RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. These findings have in turn been exploited for developing ...

  17. Turnover Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecosystems contain energy and materials such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and water, and are open to their flow-through. Turnover time refers to the amount of time required for replacement by flow-through of the energy or substance of interest contained in the system, and is ...

  18. TAPIR, a web server for the prediction of plant microRNA targets, including target mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Eric; He, Ying; Billiau, Kenny; Van de Peer, Yves

    2010-06-15

    We present a new web server called TAPIR, designed for the prediction of plant microRNA targets. The server offers the possibility to search for plant miRNA targets using a fast and a precise algorithm. The precise option is much slower but guarantees to find less perfectly paired miRNA-target duplexes. Furthermore, the precise option allows the prediction of target mimics, which are characterized by a miRNA-target duplex having a large loop, making them undetectable by traditional tools. The TAPIR web server can be accessed at: http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/tapir. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. AGO/RISC-mediated antiviral RNA silencing in a plant in vitro system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Jana; Gursinsky, Torsten; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Burgyán, Jozsef; Behrens, Sven-Erik

    2013-05-01

    AGO/RISC-mediated antiviral RNA silencing, an important component of the plant's immune response against RNA virus infections, was recapitulated in vitro. Cytoplasmic extracts of tobacco protoplasts were applied that supported Tombusvirus RNA replication, as well as the formation of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) that could be functionally reconstituted with various plant ARGONAUTE (AGO) proteins. For example, when RISC containing AGO1, 2, 3 or 5 were programmed with exogenous siRNAs that specifically targeted the viral RNA, endonucleolytic cleavages occurred and viral replication was inhibited. Antiviral RNA silencing was disabled by the viral silencing suppressor p19 when this was present early during RISC formation. Notably, with replicating viral RNA, only (+)RNA molecules were accessible to RISC, whereas (-)RNA replication intermediates were not. The vulnerability of viral RNAs to RISC activity also depended on the RNA structure of the target sequence. This was most evident when we characterized viral siRNAs (vsiRNAs) that were particularly effective in silencing with AGO1- or AGO2/RISC. These vsiRNAs targeted similar sites, suggesting that accessible parts of the viral (+)RNA may be collectively attacked by different AGO/RISC. The in vitro system was, hence, established as a valuable tool to define and characterize individual molecular determinants of antiviral RNA silencing.

  20. SoMART, a web server for miRNA, tasiRNA and target gene analysis in Solanaceae plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant micro(mi)RNAs and trans-acting small interfering (tasi)RNAs mediate posttranscriptional silencing of genes and play important roles in a variety of biological processes. Although bioinformatics prediction and small (s)RNA cloning are the key approaches used for identification of miRNAs, tasiRN...

  1. Function and anatomy of plant siRNA pools derived from hairpin transgenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kevin AW

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference results in specific gene silencing by small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs. Synthetic siRNAs provide a powerful tool for manipulating gene expression but high cost suggests that novel siRNA production methods are desirable. Strong evolutionary conservation of siRNA structure suggested that siRNAs will retain cross-species function and that transgenic plants expressing heterologous siRNAs might serve as useful siRNA bioreactors. Here we report a detailed evaluation of the above proposition and present evidence regarding structural features of siRNAs extracted from plants. Results Testing the gene silencing capacity of plant-derived siRNAs in mammalian cells proved to be very challenging and required partial siRNA purification and design of a highly sensitive assay. Using the above assay we found that plant-derived siRNAs are ineffective for gene silencing in mammalian cells. Plant-derived siRNAs are almost exclusively double-stranded and most likely comprise a mixture of bona fide siRNAs and aberrant partially complementary duplexes. We also provide indirect evidence that plant-derived siRNAs may contain a hitherto undetected physiological modification, distinct from 3' terminal 2-O-methylation. Conclusion siRNAs produced from plant hairpin transgenes and extracted from plants are ineffective for gene silencing in mammalian cells. Thus our findings establish that a previous claim that transgenic plants offer a cost-effective, scalable and sustainable source of siRNAs is unwarranted. Our results also indicate that the presence of aberrant siRNA duplexes and possibly a plant-specific siRNA modification, compromises the gene silencing capacity of plant-derived siRNAs in mammalian cells.

  2. Evaluating Methods for Isolating Total RNA and Predicting the Success of Sequencing Phylogenetically Diverse Plant Transcriptomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruskiewich, Richard; Burris, Jason N.; Carrigan, Charlotte T.; Chase, Mark W.; Clarke, Neil D.; Covshoff, Sarah; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Edger, Patrick P.; Goh, Falicia; Graham, Sean; Greiner, Stephan; Hibberd, Julian M.; Jordon-Thaden, Ingrid; Kutchan, Toni M.; Leebens-Mack, James; Melkonian, Michael; Miles, Nicholas; Myburg, Henrietta; Patterson, Jordan; Pires, J. Chris; Ralph, Paula; Rolf, Megan; Sage, Rowan F.; Soltis, Douglas; Soltis, Pamela; Stevenson, Dennis; Stewart, C. Neal; Surek, Barbara; Thomsen, Christina J. M.; Villarreal, Juan Carlos; Wu, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yong; Deyholos, Michael K.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing plays a central role in the characterization and quantification of transcriptomes. Although numerous metrics are purported to quantify the quality of RNA, there have been no large-scale empirical evaluations of the major determinants of sequencing success. We used a combination of existing and newly developed methods to isolate total RNA from 1115 samples from 695 plant species in 324 families, which represents >900 million years of phylogenetic diversity from green algae through flowering plants, including many plants of economic importance. We then sequenced 629 of these samples on Illumina GAIIx and HiSeq platforms and performed a large comparative analysis to identify predictors of RNA quality and the diversity of putative genes (scaffolds) expressed within samples. Tissue types (e.g., leaf vs. flower) varied in RNA quality, sequencing depth and the number of scaffolds. Tissue age also influenced RNA quality but not the number of scaffolds ≥1000 bp. Overall, 36% of the variation in the number of scaffolds was explained by metrics of RNA integrity (RIN score), RNA purity (OD 260/230), sequencing platform (GAIIx vs HiSeq) and the amount of total RNA used for sequencing. However, our results show that the most commonly used measures of RNA quality (e.g., RIN) are weak predictors of the number of scaffolds because Illumina sequencing is robust to variation in RNA quality. These results provide novel insight into the methods that are most important in isolating high quality RNA for sequencing and assembling plant transcriptomes. The methods and recommendations provided here could increase the efficiency and decrease the cost of RNA sequencing for individual labs and genome centers. PMID:23185583

  3. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  4. RNA Isolation from Plant Tissues: A Hands-On Laboratory Experimental Experience for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianhui; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2018-01-01

    The practice of RNA isolation in undergraduate experimental courses is rare because of the existence of robust, ubiquitous and stable ribonucleases. We reported here modifications to our original protocol for RNA isolation from plant tissues, including the recovery of nucleic acids by ethanol precipitation at 0 degrees C for 10 min and the…

  5. Tracking fungal community responses to maize plants by DNA- and RNA-based pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiko E Kuramae

    Full Text Available We assessed soil fungal diversity and community structure at two sampling times (t1 = 47 days and t2 = 104 days of plant age in pots associated with four maize cultivars, including two genetically modified (GM cultivars by high-throughput pyrosequencing of the 18S rRNA gene using DNA and RNA templates. We detected no significant differences in soil fungal diversity and community structure associated with different plant cultivars. However, DNA-based analyses yielded lower fungal OTU richness as compared to RNA-based analyses. Clear differences in fungal community structure were also observed in relation to sampling time and the nucleic acid pool targeted (DNA versus RNA. The most abundant soil fungi, as recovered by DNA-based methods, did not necessary represent the most "active" fungi (as recovered via RNA. Interestingly, RNA-derived community compositions at t1 were highly similar to DNA-derived communities at t2, based on presence/absence measures of OTUs. We recovered large proportions of fungal sequences belonging to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Basidiomycota, especially at the RNA level, suggesting that these important and potentially beneficial fungi are not affected by the plant cultivars nor by GM traits (Bt toxin production. Our results suggest that even though DNA- and RNA-derived soil fungal communities can be very different at a given time, RNA composition may have a predictive power of fungal community development through time.

  6. High-Level Accumulation of Exogenous Small RNAs Not Affecting Endogenous Small RNA Biogenesis and Function in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan-xia; Neil A Smith; ZHOU Chang-yong; WANG Ming-bo

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is a fundamental plant defence and gene control mechanism in plants that are directed by 20-24 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Infection of plants with viral pathogens or transformation of plants with RNA interference (RNAi) constructs is usually associated with high levels of exogenous siRNAs, but it is unclear if these siRNAs interfere with endogenous small RNA pathways and hence affect plant development. Here we provide evidence that viral satellite RNA (satRNA) infection does not affect siRNA and miRNA biogenesis or plant growth despite the extremely high level of satRNA-derived siRNAs. We generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that no longer develop the speciifc yellowing symptoms generally associated with infection by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat). We then used these plants to show that CMV Y-Sat infection did not cause any visible phenotypic changes in comparison to uninfected plants, despite the presence of high-level Y-Sat siRNAs. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-derived siRNAs or miRNAs, and the level of siRNA-directed transgene silencing, are not signiifcantly affected by CMV Y-Sat infection. Taken together, our results suggest that the high levels of exogenous siRNAs associated with viral infection or RNAi-inducing transgenes do not saturate the endogenous RNA silencing machineries and have no signiifcant impact on normal plant development.

  7. Noncoding RNA mediated traffic of foreign mRNA into chloroplasts reveals a novel signaling mechanism in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gómez

    Full Text Available Communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus is one of the milestones of the evolution of plants on earth. Proteins encoded by ancestral chloroplast-endogenous genes were transferred to the nucleus during the endosymbiotic evolution and originated this communication, which is mainly dependent on specific transit-peptides. However, the identification of nuclear-encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast lacking these canonical signals suggests the existence of an alternative cellular pathway tuning this metabolic crosstalk. Non-coding RNAS (NcRNAs are increasingly recognized as regulators of gene expression as they play roles previously believed to correspond to proteins. Avsunviroidae family viroids are the only noncoding functional RNAs that have been reported to traffic inside the chloroplasts. Elucidating mechanisms used by these pathogens to enter this organelle will unearth novel transport pathways in plant cells. Here we show that a viroid-derived NcRNA acting as a 5'UTR-end mediates the functional import of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP mRNA into chloroplast. This claim is supported by the observation at confocal microscopy of a selective accumulation of GFP in the chloroplast of the leaves expressing the chimeric vd-5'UTR/GFP and by the detection of the GFP mRNA in chloroplasts isolated from cells expressing this construct. These results support the existence of an alternative signaling mechanism in plants between the host cell and chloroplasts, where an ncRNA functions as a key regulatory molecule to control the accumulation of nuclear-encoded proteins in this organelle. In addition, our findings provide a conceptual framework to develop new biotechnological tools in systems using plant chloroplast as bioreactors. Finally, viroids of the family Avsunviroidae have probably evolved to subvert this signaling mechanism to regulate their differential traffic into the chloroplast of infected cells.

  8. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  9. Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 - Novel virus at the edge of myco- and plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabáková, Lenka; Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2017-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a new RNA mycovirus in the KY isolate of Phomopsis longicolla Hobbs 1985 and its protoplasts subcultures p5, p9, and ME711 was discovered. The virus, provisionally named Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 (PlRV1), was localized in mitochondria and was determined to have a genome 2822 nucleotides long. A single open reading frame could be translated in silico by both standard and mitochondrial genetic codes into a product featuring conservative domains for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The RdRp of PlRV1 has no counterpart among mycoviruses, but it is about 30% identical with the RdRp of plant ourmiaviruses. Recently, new mycoviruses related to plant ourmiaviruses and forming one clade with PlRV1 have been discovered. This separate clade could represent the crucial link between plant and fungal viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  11. Post-translational regulation of miRNA pathway components, AGO1 and HYL1, in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Shah, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    , the complexity of the proteome increases, and this then influences most biological processes. Although small RNAs are crucial regulatory elements for gene expression in most eukaryotes, PTMs of small RNA microprocessor and RNA silencing components have not been extensively investigated in plants. To date...... findings on the PTMs of microprocessor and RNA silencing components in plants....

  12. RECOVERY OF amiRNA3-PARP1 TRANSGENIC MAIZE PLANTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Positive plant selectable marker genes are commonly used in plant transformation because they not only enhance the frequency of generation transgenic tissues but are considered biosafe, unlike antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes. In this study, the binary vector pNOV2819-ubiamiRNA3PARP1, harbouring the ...

  13. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Yanagisawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV, a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as “DECS-C,” is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses.

  14. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV.

  15. Novel RNA viruses within plant parasitic cyst nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruark, Casey L; Gardner, Michael; Mitchum, Melissa G; Davis, Eric L; Sit, Tim L

    2018-01-01

    The study of invertebrate-and particularly nematode-viruses is emerging with the advancement of transcriptome sequencing. Five single-stranded RNA viruses have now been confirmed within the economically important soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines). From previous research, we know these viruses to be widespread in greenhouse and field populations of SCN. Several of the SCN viruses were also confirmed within clover (H. trifolii) and beet (H. schachtii) cyst nematodes. In the presented study, we sequenced the transcriptomes of several inbred SCN populations and identified two previously undiscovered viral-like genomes. Both of these proposed viruses are negative-sense RNA viruses and have been named SCN nyami-like virus (NLV) and SCN bunya-like virus (BLV). Finally, we analyzed publicly available transcriptome data of two potato cyst nematode (PCN) species, Globodera pallida and G. rostochiensis. From these data, a third potential virus was discovered and called PCN picorna-like virus (PLV). PCN PLV is a positive-sense RNA virus, and to the best of our knowledge, is the first virus described within PCN. The presence of these novel viruses was confirmed via qRT-PCR, endpoint PCR, and Sanger sequencing with the exception of PCN PLV due to quarantine restrictions on the nematode host. While much work needs to be done to understand the biological and evolutionary significance of these viruses, they offer insight into nematode ecology and the possibility of novel nematode management strategies.

  16. RNA virus interference via CRISPR/Cas13a system in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Aman, Rashid

    2018-01-04

    CRISPR/Cas systems confer immunity against invading nucleic acids and phages in bacteria and archaea. CRISPR/Cas13a (known previously as C2c2) is a class 2 type VI-A ribonuclease capable of targeting and cleaving single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) molecules of the phage genome. Here, we employ CRISPR/Cas13a to engineer interference with an RNA virus, Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV), in plants.CRISPR/Cas13a produces interference against green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing TuMV in transient assays and stable overexpression lines of Nicotiana benthamiana. CRISPR RNA (crRNAs) targeting the HC-Pro and GFP sequences exhibit better interference than those targeting other regions such as coat protein (CP) sequence. Cas13a can also process pre-crRNAs into functional crRNAs.Our data indicate that CRISPR/Cas13a can be used for engineering interference against RNA viruses, providing a potential novel mechanism for RNA-guided immunity against RNA viruses and for other RNA manipulations in plants.

  17. Effect of bacterial contamination on the incorporation of radioactive phosphate in plant r-RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleva, S; Khanymova, T; Marinova, E; Varadinova, S

    1974-01-01

    It is ascertained that the amount of bacterial colonies in root tips of maize seedlings (Wisconsin 641 AA) constitutes approximately 4.5x10/sup 7/ per gram of fresh weight, 90% of the bacterial colonies being various pseudomonas. In the case when plant RNA is labelled with /sup 32/P, the bacteria take up a large amount of phosphate. Owing to this, the RNA isolated from the root tips and fractionated in agar gel, in addition to 25S and 18S r-RNA of the plant cell cytoplasma contains also 23S and 16S of the bacterial r-RNA. Chloramphenicol at a concentration of 50/cm/sup 3/ does not suppress the incorporation of /sup 32/P by the bacteria. The pseudomonas strains isolated are almost insensitive to chloramphenicol and a number of other antibiotics, such as penicyllin, erythromycin, neomycin and oxacylin. This results, as well as the results, obtained by other researchers, indicate that antibiotics do not suppress effectively the action of bacterial contamination if plant RNA is labelled. Furtheremore, some of them, as streptomycin, for instance, if employed at higher concentrations inhibit the growth of the plant cell. Of all asceptic agents (hypochlorite, ethanol, sulphuric acid, etc.), used for surface sterilization, best results in the elimination of bacterial infection on maize seeds have been obtained with 0.1% HgCl/sub 2/ after treatment for 2 min. In spite of the elimination of the bacterial contamination with HgCl/sub 2/,the RNA from the elongated cells, labelled with /sup 32/P for an hour, is distributed into four fractions in the agar gel conversely to the RNA isolated from dividing cells, where only the two 25S and 18S fractions of plant cytoplasmic r-RNA are observed. An assumption is made that the two more fast-moving r-RNA fractions, as compared with 25S and 18S of plant r-RNA, isolated from elongating cells, originate from subcellular organelles, since the mitochondria and the proplstids are fully differentiated during the phase of the elongation of the

  18. Supervised learning classification models for prediction of plant virus encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenia Jagga

    Full Text Available Viral encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins interfere with the host RNA silencing machinery, facilitating viral infection by evading host immunity. In plant hosts, the viral proteins have several basic science implications and biotechnology applications. However in silico identification of these proteins is limited by their high sequence diversity. In this study we developed supervised learning based classification models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins in plant viruses. We developed four classifiers based on supervised learning algorithms: J48, Random Forest, LibSVM and Naïve Bayes algorithms, with enriched model learning by correlation based feature selection. Structural and physicochemical features calculated for experimentally verified primary protein sequences were used to train the classifiers. The training features include amino acid composition; auto correlation coefficients; composition, transition, and distribution of various physicochemical properties; and pseudo amino acid composition. Performance analysis of predictive models based on 10 fold cross-validation and independent data testing revealed that the Random Forest based model was the best and achieved 86.11% overall accuracy and 86.22% balanced accuracy with a remarkably high area under the Receivers Operating Characteristic curve of 0.95 to predict viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins. The prediction models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressors can potentially aid identification of novel viral RNA silencing suppressors, which will provide valuable insights into the mechanism of RNA silencing and could be further explored as potential targets for designing novel antiviral therapeutics. Also, the key subset of identified optimal features may help in determining compositional patterns in the viral proteins which are important determinants for RNA silencing suppressor activities. The best prediction model developed in the study is available as a

  19. Domestication of transposable elements into MicroRNA genes in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TE usually take up a substantial portion of eukaryotic genome. Activities of TEs can cause genome instability or gene mutations that are harmful or even disastrous to the host. TEs also contribute to gene and genome evolution at many aspects. Part of miRNA genes in mammals have been found to derive from transposons while convincing evidences are absent for plants. We found that a considerable number of previously annotated plant miRNAs are identical or homologous to transposons (TE-MIR, which include a small number of bona fide miRNA genes that conform to generally accepted plant miRNA annotation rules, and hairpin derived siRNAs likely to be pre-evolved miRNAs. Analysis of these TE-MIRs indicate that transitions from the medium to high copy TEs into miRNA genes may undergo steps such as inverted repeat formation, sequence speciation and adaptation to miRNA biogenesis. We also identified initial target genes of the TE-MIRs, which contain homologous sequences in their CDS as consequence of cognate TE insertions. About one-third of the initial target mRNAs are supported by publicly available degradome sequencing data for TE-MIR sRNA induced cleavages. Targets of the TE-MIRs are biased to non-TE related genes indicating their penchant to acquire cellular functions during evolution. Interestingly, most of these TE insertions span boundaries between coding and non-coding sequences indicating their incorporation into CDS through alteration of splicing or translation start or stop signals. Taken together, our findings suggest that TEs in gene rich regions can form foldbacks in non-coding part of transcripts that may eventually evolve into miRNA genes or be integrated into protein coding sequences to form potential targets in a "temperate" manner. Thus, transposons may supply as resources for the evolution of miRNA-target interactions in plants.

  20. Interplays between soil-borne plant viruses and RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defense in roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Andika

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of plant viruses are transmitted by arthropod vectors and invade the host plants through the aerial parts, there is a considerable number of plant viruses that infect roots via soil-inhabiting vectors such as plasmodiophorids, chytrids, and nematodes. These soil-borne viruses belong to diverse families, and many of them cause serious diseases in major crop plants. Thus, roots are important organs for the life cycle of many viruses. Compared to shoots, roots have a distinct metabolism and particular physiological characteristics due to the differences in development, cell composition, gene expression patterns, and surrounding environmental conditions. RNA silencing is an important innate defense mechanism to combat virus infection in plants, but the specific information on the activities and molecular mechanism of RNA silencing-mediated viral defense in root tissue is still limited. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge regarding RNA silencing aspects of the interactions between soil-borne viruses and host plants. Overall, research evidence suggests that soil-borne viruses have evolved to adapt to the distinct mechanism of antiviral RNA silencing in roots.

  1. RNA virus interference via CRISPR/Cas13a system in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Aman, Rashid

    2017-11-04

    CRISPR/Cas systems confer immunity against invading nucleic acids and phages in bacteria and archaea. CRISPR/Cas13a (known previously as C2c2) is a class 2 type VI-A ribonuclease capable of targeting and cleaving single stranded RNA (ssRNA) molecules of the phage genome. Here, we employ CRISPR/Cas13a to engineer interference with an RNA virus, Turnip Mosaic Virus (TuMV), in plants. CRISPR/Cas13a produced interference against green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing TuMV in transient assays and stable overexpression lines of Nicotiana benthamiana. crRNAs targeting the HC-Pro and GFP sequences exhibited better interference than those targeting other regions such as coat protein (CP) sequence. Cas13a can also process pre-crRNAs into functional crRNAs. Our data indicate that CRISPR/Cas13a can be used for engineering interference against RNA viruses, providing a potential novel mechanism for RNA-guided immunity against RNA viruses, and for other RNA manipulations in plants.

  2. Turnover among healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ben D

    2009-01-01

    Turnover among healthcare professionals is a costly consequence. The existing body of knowledge on healthcare professional turnover is correlated with job satisfaction levels. A landmark study differentiated 2 areas of job satisfaction categories: satisfiers and dissatisfiers (intrinsic and extrinsic motivators). The aim of this article is to examine existing research on precursors of turnover, such as burnout behaviors experienced by healthcare professionals, job satisfaction levels, employee organizational commitment, health complications which precede turnover, some current strategies to reduce turnover, and some effects CEO turnover has on employee turnover intentions.

  3. Phytophthora effector targets a novel component of small RNA pathway in plants to promote infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yongli; Shi, Jinxia; Zhai, Yi; Hou, Yingnan; Ma, Wenbo

    2015-05-05

    A broad range of parasites rely on the functions of effector proteins to subvert host immune response and facilitate disease development. The notorious Phytophthora pathogens evolved effectors with RNA silencing suppression activity to promote infection in plant hosts. Here we report that the Phytophthora Suppressor of RNA Silencing 1 (PSR1) can bind to an evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein containing the aspartate-glutamate-alanine-histidine-box RNA helicase domain in plants. This protein, designated PSR1-Interacting Protein 1 (PINP1), regulates the accumulation of both microRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis. A null mutation of PINP1 causes embryonic lethality, and silencing of PINP1 leads to developmental defects and hypersusceptibility to Phytophthora infection. These phenotypes are reminiscent of transgenic plants expressing PSR1, supporting PINP1 as a direct virulence target of PSR1. We further demonstrate that the localization of the Dicer-like 1 protein complex is impaired in the nucleus of PINP1-silenced or PSR1-expressing cells, indicating that PINP1 may facilitate small RNA processing by affecting the assembly of dicing complexes. A similar function of PINP1 homologous genes in development and immunity was also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana. These findings highlight PINP1 as a previously unidentified component of RNA silencing that regulates distinct classes of small RNAs in plants. Importantly, Phytophthora has evolved effectors to target PINP1 in order to promote infection.

  4. Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2016-09-24

    Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor RNAs enhances transcriptome plasticity and proteome diversity in response to diverse growth and stress cues. Recent work has shown that AS is pervasive across plant species, with more than 60% of intron-containing genes producing different isoforms. Mammalian cell-based assays have discovered various inhibitors of AS. Here, we show that the macrolide pladienolide B (PB) inhibits constitutive splicing and AS in plants. Also, our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that PB mimics abiotic stress signals including salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). PB activates the abiotic stress- and ABA-responsive reporters RD29A

  5. Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu; Alshareef, Sahar; Butt, Haroon; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Li, Lixin; Galal, Aya A.; Moustafa, Ahmed; Momin, Afaque Ahmad Imtiyaz; Tashkandi, Manal; Richardson, Dale N.; Fujii, Hiroaki; Arold, Stefan T.; Rodriguez, Pedro L.; Duque, Paula; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor RNAs enhances transcriptome plasticity and proteome diversity in response to diverse growth and stress cues. Recent work has shown that AS is pervasive across plant species, with more than 60% of intron-containing genes producing different isoforms. Mammalian cell-based assays have discovered various inhibitors of AS. Here, we show that the macrolide pladienolide B (PB) inhibits constitutive splicing and AS in plants. Also, our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that PB mimics abiotic stress signals including salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). PB activates the abiotic stress- and ABA-responsive reporters RD29A

  6. Does resource availability, resource heterogeneity or species turnover mediate changes in plant species richness in grazed grasslands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, C; Blair, JM; Knapp, AK

    2003-01-01

    Grazing by large ungulates often increases plant species richness in grasslands of moderate to high productivity. In a mesic North American grassland with and without the presence of bison (Bos bison), a native ungulate grazer, three non-exclusive hypotheses for increased plant species richness in

  7. The Role of Non-­Coding RNA in Plant Stress

    KAUST Repository

    MacPherson, Cameron R.

    2012-12-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a powerful mechanism that can be adapted to genetically modify crop plants. PTGS operates in many plant signaling pathways including those mediating stress responses. Given the small number of miRNAs known, research on the characterization of stress-related micro-RNA (miRNA) and their targets could provide the basis for engineering stress tolerant traits in crops. Indeed, several examples of miRNA mediated crop tolerance have been reported. In the research presented here, we aimed to analyze the role of small non-coding RNA (smRNA) pathways involved in plant stress. In particular, we focused on miRNA-mediated PTGS in phosphate (Pi) starvation. The analysis was split into two research projects. First, to identify potential miRNA targets we began by analyzing the response and recovery of coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) to Pi starvation in shoot and root. The results obtained were the first genome-wide description of the root’s Pi starvation response and recovery. We found that the root\\'s response involved a widely different set of genes than that of the shoot. In the second research project, the results of the first project were correlated with the responses of miRNA and trans-acting small-interfering RNA (tasiRNA) during Pi starvation. Many miRNA circuits have been predicted before, however, tasiRNA circuits are not as well defined. Therefore, we made use of the double-stranded RNA-binding protein 4 (DRB4) smRNA libraries to enhance our prediction of tasiRNAs. Altogether, we provided evidence to support the following miRNA-mRNA pairs that may function in Pi starvation: IPS1:miR399:PHO2; miR399:RS4; miR399:NF-YA10; miR398:CSD1/2; miR2111:TPS11; miR164:NAC6; miR157:TMO7; miR157:PSB28; RPS2:miR169:IPS2; miR397:LAC2; TAS4:PAP1; NR1:PAP1; and Chr3_1967672:TMO7. In general, we found that non-miR399 related circuits were active only during the root’s recovery from Pi starvation. The functional roles of the genes

  8. C-mii: a tool for plant miRNA and target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numnark, Somrak; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Ingsriswang, Supawadee; Wichadakul, Duangdao

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been known to play an important role in several biological processes in both animals and plants. Although several tools for miRNA and target identification are available, the number of tools tailored towards plants is limited, and those that are available have specific functionality, lack graphical user interfaces, and restrict the number of input sequences. Large-scale computational identifications of miRNAs and/or targets of several plants have been also reported. Their methods, however, are only described as flow diagrams, which require programming skills and the understanding of input and output of the connected programs to reproduce. To overcome these limitations and programming complexities, we proposed C-mii as a ready-made software package for both plant miRNA and target identification. C-mii was designed and implemented based on established computational steps and criteria derived from previous literature with the following distinguishing features. First, software is easy to install with all-in-one programs and packaged databases. Second, it comes with graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for ease of use. Users can identify plant miRNAs and targets via step-by-step execution, explore the detailed results from each step, filter the results according to proposed constraints in plant miRNA and target biogenesis, and export sequences and structures of interest. Third, it supplies bird's eye views of the identification results with infographics and grouping information. Fourth, in terms of functionality, it extends the standard computational steps of miRNA target identification with miRNA-target folding and GO annotation. Fifth, it provides helper functions for the update of pre-installed databases and automatic recovery. Finally, it supports multi-project and multi-thread management. C-mii constitutes the first complete software package with graphical user interfaces enabling computational identification of both plant miRNA genes and miRNA

  9. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish A. Malik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a pulse-chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of root-associated soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h and DNA (30 h turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 d, while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs had the slowest turnover (42 d. PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings.

  10. MicroRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing in Plant Defense and Viral Counter-Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Rui Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs of approximately 20–24 nucleotides in length that serve as central regulators of eukaryotic gene expression by targeting mRNAs for cleavage or translational repression. In plants, miRNAs are associated with numerous regulatory pathways in growth and development processes, and defensive responses in plant–pathogen interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding miRNA-mediated gene silencing and how viruses counter this defense mechanism. Here, we summarize the current knowledge and recent advances in understanding the roles of miRNAs involved in the plant defense against viruses and viral counter-defense. We also document the application of miRNAs in plant antiviral defense. This review discusses the current understanding of the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated gene silencing and provides insights on the never-ending arms race between plants and viruses.

  11. RNA-protein interactions in plant disease: hackers at the dinner table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Pietro D

    2015-09-01

    Plants are the source of most of our food, whether directly or as feed for the animals we eat. Our dinner table is a trophic level we share with the microbes that also feed on the primary photosynthetic producers. Microbes that enter into close interactions with plants need to evade or suppress detection and host immunity to access nutrients. They do this by deploying molecular tools - effectors - which target host processes. The mode of action of effector proteins in these events is varied and complex. Recent data from diverse systems indicate that RNA-interacting proteins and RNA itself are delivered by eukaryotic microbes, such as fungi and oomycetes, to host plants and contribute to the establishment of successful interactions. This is evidence that pathogenic microbes can interfere with the host software. We are beginning to see that pathogenic microbes are capable of hacking into the plants' immunity programs. © 2015 The Author. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. REDIdb 3.0: A Comprehensive Collection of RNA Editing Events in Plant Organellar Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice, Claudio; Pesole, Graziano; Picardi, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    RNA editing is an important epigenetic mechanism by which genome-encoded transcripts are modified by substitutions, insertions and/or deletions. It was first discovered in kinetoplastid protozoa followed by its reporting in a wide range of organisms. In plants, RNA editing occurs mostly by cytidine (C) to uridine (U) conversion in translated regions of organelle mRNAs and tends to modify affected codons restoring evolutionary conserved aminoacid residues. RNA editing has also been described in non-protein coding regions such as group II introns and structural RNAs. Despite its impact on organellar transcriptome and proteome complexity, current primary databases still do not provide a specific field for RNA editing events. To overcome these limitations, we developed REDIdb a specialized database for RNA editing modifications in plant organelles. Hereafter we describe its third release containing more than 26,000 events in a completely novel web interface to accommodate RNA editing in its genomics, biological and evolutionary context through whole genome maps and multiple sequence alignments. REDIdb is freely available at http://srv00.recas.ba.infn.it/redidb/index.html.

  13. REDIdb 3.0: A Comprehensive Collection of RNA Editing Events in Plant Organellar Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Lo Giudice

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA editing is an important epigenetic mechanism by which genome-encoded transcripts are modified by substitutions, insertions and/or deletions. It was first discovered in kinetoplastid protozoa followed by its reporting in a wide range of organisms. In plants, RNA editing occurs mostly by cytidine (C to uridine (U conversion in translated regions of organelle mRNAs and tends to modify affected codons restoring evolutionary conserved aminoacid residues. RNA editing has also been described in non-protein coding regions such as group II introns and structural RNAs. Despite its impact on organellar transcriptome and proteome complexity, current primary databases still do not provide a specific field for RNA editing events. To overcome these limitations, we developed REDIdb a specialized database for RNA editing modifications in plant organelles. Hereafter we describe its third release containing more than 26,000 events in a completely novel web interface to accommodate RNA editing in its genomics, biological and evolutionary context through whole genome maps and multiple sequence alignments. REDIdb is freely available at http://srv00.recas.ba.infn.it/redidb/index.html

  14. Intragenomic matching reveals a huge potential for miRNA-mediated regulation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Jacobsen, Anders; Nygaard, Sanne

    2007-01-01

    indicates that only a few of the candidates are conserved between the species. We conclude that there is a large potential for miRNA-mediated regulatory interactions encoded in the genomes of the investigated plants. We hypothesize that some of these interactions may be realized under special environmental...

  15. RNA polyadenylation sites on the genomes of microorganisms, animals, and plants.

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    Xiu-Qing Li

    Full Text Available Pre-messenger RNA (mRNA 3'-end cleavage and subsequent polyadenylation strongly regulate gene expression. In comparison with the upstream or downstream motifs, relatively little is known about the feature differences of polyadenylation [poly(A] sites among major kingdoms. We suspect that the precise poly(A sites are very selective, and we therefore mapped mRNA poly(A sites on complete and nearly complete genomes using mRNA sequences available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI Nucleotide database. In this paper, we describe the mRNA nucleotide [i.e., the poly(A tail attachment position] that is directly in attachment with the poly(A tail and the pre-mRNA nucleotide [i.e., the poly(A tail starting position] that corresponds to the first adenosine of the poly(A tail in the 29 most-mapped species (2 fungi, 2 protists, 18 animals, and 7 plants. The most representative pre-mRNA dinucleotides covering these two positions were UA, CA, and GA in 17, 10, and 2 of the species, respectively. The pre-mRNA nucleotide at the poly(A tail starting position was typically an adenosine [i.e., A-type poly(A sites], sometimes a uridine, and occasionally a cytidine or guanosine. The order was U>C>G at the attachment position but A>>U>C≥G at the starting position. However, in comparison with the mRNA nucleotide composition (base composition, the poly(A tail attachment position selected C over U in plants and both C and G over U in animals, in both A-type and non-A-type poly(A sites. Animals, dicot plants, and monocot plants had clear differences in C/G ratios at the poly(A tail attachment position of the non-A-type poly(A sites. This study of poly(A site evolution indicated that the two positions within poly(A sites had distinct nucleotide compositions and were different among kingdoms.

  16. Ecological studies in a Scanian woodland and meadow area, southern Sweden. Ti. Plant biomass, primary production and turnover of organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, F

    1970-01-01

    As a part of an IBP project the productivity of the south Swedish deciduous woodland ecosystems and their secondary successional stages a comparison between the distribution of organic matter in a mixed deciduous woodland dominated by Quercus robur, Tilia cordata, Corylus avellana and Anemone nemorosa and a tall herb meadow with Filipendula ulmaria within the nemoral zone in the southernmost part of Sweden has been made. Estimations of the plant biomass and production in the woodland was made by a dimension analysis applying allometric equations. A total plant biomass of 240 t/ha was found with 201 t/ha and 39 t/ha as above-and below-ground figures respectively. The corresponding figures of the net primary production are 15.6, 13.3 and 2.3 t/ha. A production of 0.77 t/ha is included for the above-ground production of the field layer. The litter fall, fractions less than 50 cm long, during a three year period amounted to 5.28 t/ha with considerable variation between years. Including coarser litter fractions an yearly input to the ground of 6.5 t/ha was found. After estimation of the remaining litter before the leaf fall, 6.1 t/ha, the yearly turnover of the litter layer is calculated to 52%. As the humus fraction amounts to 218 t/ha, the total content of organic matter in the woodland ecosystem thus is 463 t/ha with an almost equal distribution between above-and below-ground portions. In the meadow the distribution of above-and below-ground portions of the organic matter is 1/49, calculated from the following figures: Above-ground biomass 4.7 t/ha, below-ground biomass 13.2 t/ha, surface litter 2.4 t/ha and humus 304 t/ha making the total organic matter of the meadow ecosystem 324 t/ha. The yearly above-ground production is estimated to be 7.2 t/ha and taking this as the yearly litter input to the ground and taking the remaining litter into account a turnover of the litter layer 75% is calculated.

  17. Ins and Outs of Multipartite Positive-Strand RNA Plant Viruses: Packaging versus Systemic Spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Dall’Ara

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Viruses possessing a non-segmented genome require a specific recognition of their nucleic acid to ensure its protection in a capsid. A similar feature exists for viruses having a segmented genome, usually consisting of viral genomic segments joined together into one viral entity. While this appears as a rule for animal viruses, the majority of segmented plant viruses package their genomic segments individually. To ensure a productive infection, all viral particles and thereby all segments have to be present in the same cell. Progression of the virus within the plant requires as well a concerted genome preservation to avoid loss of function. In this review, we will discuss the “life aspects” of chosen phytoviruses and argue for the existence of RNA-RNA interactions that drive the preservation of viral genome integrity while the virus progresses in the plant.

  18. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Nidhi; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verma, Praveen C; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Tuli, Rakesh; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2014-01-01

    Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA) designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi), thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA) coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  19. Enhanced whitefly resistance in transgenic tobacco plants expressing double stranded RNA of v-ATPase A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Thakur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expression of double strand RNA (dsRNA designed against important insect genes in transgenic plants have been shown to give protection against pests through RNA interference (RNAi, thus opening the way for a new generation of insect-resistant crops. We have earlier compared the efficacy of dsRNAs/siRNAs, against a number of target genes, for interference in growth of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci upon oral feeding. The v-ATPase subunit A (v-ATPaseA coding gene was identified as a crucial target. We now report the effectiveness of transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA to silence v-ATPaseA gene expression for the control of whitefly infestation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transgenic tobacco lines were developed for the expression of long dsRNA precursor to make siRNA and knock down the v-ATPaseA mRNA in whitefly. Molecular analysis and insecticidal properties of the transgenic plants established the formation of siRNA targeting the whitefly v-ATPaseA, in the leaves. The transcript level of v-ATPaseA in whiteflies was reduced up to 62% after feeding on the transgenic plants. Heavy infestation of whiteflies on the control plants caused significant loss of sugar content which led to the drooping of leaves. The transgenic plants did not show drooping effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Host plant derived pest resistance was achieved against whiteflies by genetic transformation of tobacco which generated siRNA against the whitefly v-ATPaseA gene. Transgenic tobacco lines expressing dsRNA of v-ATPaseA, delivered sufficient siRNA to whiteflies feeding on them, mounting a significant silencing response, leading to their mortality. The transcript level of the target gene was reduced in whiteflies feeding on transgenic plants. The strategy can be taken up for genetic engineering of plants to control whiteflies in field crops.

  20. Interspecific RNA interference of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS-like disrupts Cuscuta pentagona plant parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakonya, Amos; Kumar, Ravi; Koenig, Daniel; Kimura, Seisuke; Townsley, Brad; Runo, Steven; Garces, Helena M; Kang, Julie; Yanez, Andrea; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Machuka, Jesse; Sinha, Neelima

    2012-07-01

    Infection of crop species by parasitic plants is a major agricultural hindrance resulting in substantial crop losses worldwide. Parasitic plants establish vascular connections with the host plant via structures termed haustoria, which allow acquisition of water and nutrients, often to the detriment of the infected host. Despite the agricultural impact of parasitic plants, the molecular and developmental processes by which host/parasitic interactions are established are not well understood. Here, we examine the development and subsequent establishment of haustorial connections by the parasite dodder (Cuscuta pentagona) on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Formation of haustoria in dodder is accompanied by upregulation of dodder KNOTTED-like homeobox transcription factors, including SHOOT MERISTEMLESS-like (STM). We demonstrate interspecific silencing of a STM gene in dodder driven by a vascular-specific promoter in transgenic host plants and find that this silencing disrupts dodder growth. The reduced efficacy of dodder infection on STM RNA interference transgenics results from defects in haustorial connection, development, and establishment. Identification of transgene-specific small RNAs in the parasite, coupled with reduced parasite fecundity and increased growth of the infected host, demonstrates the efficacy of interspecific small RNA-mediated silencing of parasite genes. This technology has the potential to be an effective method of biological control of plant parasite infection.

  1. psRNATarget: a plant small RNA target analysis server (2017 release).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinbin; Zhuang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2018-04-30

    Plant regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs), which include most microRNAs (miRNAs) and a subset of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), such as the phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs), play important roles in regulating gene expression. Although generated from genetically distinct biogenesis pathways, these regulatory sRNAs share the same mechanisms for post-translational gene silencing and translational inhibition. psRNATarget was developed to identify plant sRNA targets by (i) analyzing complementary matching between the sRNA sequence and target mRNA sequence using a predefined scoring schema and (ii) by evaluating target site accessibility. This update enhances its analytical performance by developing a new scoring schema that is capable of discovering miRNA-mRNA interactions at higher 'recall rates' without significantly increasing total prediction output. The scoring procedure is customizable for the users to search both canonical and non-canonical targets. This update also enables transmitting and analyzing 'big' data empowered by (a) the implementation of multi-threading chunked file uploading, which can be paused and resumed, using HTML5 APIs and (b) the allocation of significantly more computing nodes to its back-end Linux cluster. The updated psRNATarget server has clear, compelling and user-friendly interfaces that enhance user experiences and present data clearly and concisely. The psRNATarget is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/psRNATarget/.

  2. Plant MicroRNA Prediction by Supervised Machine Learning Using C5.0 Decision Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Philip H; Eyles, Rod; Weiller, Georg

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are nonprotein coding RNAs between 20 and 22 nucleotides long that attenuate protein production. Different types of sequence data are being investigated for novel miRNAs, including genomic and transcriptomic sequences. A variety of machine learning methods have successfully predicted miRNA precursors, mature miRNAs, and other nonprotein coding sequences. MirTools, mirDeep2, and miRanalyzer require "read count" to be included with the input sequences, which restricts their use to deep-sequencing data. Our aim was to train a predictor using a cross-section of different species to accurately predict miRNAs outside the training set. We wanted a system that did not require read-count for prediction and could therefore be applied to short sequences extracted from genomic, EST, or RNA-seq sources. A miRNA-predictive decision-tree model has been developed by supervised machine learning. It only requires that the corresponding genome or transcriptome is available within a sequence window that includes the precursor candidate so that the required sequence features can be collected. Some of the most critical features for training the predictor are the miRNA:miRNA(∗) duplex energy and the number of mismatches in the duplex. We present a cross-species plant miRNA predictor with 84.08% sensitivity and 98.53% specificity based on rigorous testing by leave-one-out validation.

  3. Tracer kinetics: Modelling of tracer behaviour in nonlinear and nonsteady state systems exemplified by the evaluation of protein turnover in plant organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, E.

    1991-01-01

    If nonlinear biological processes are investigated by means of tracer experiments they can be modelled with linear kinetic equations (compartment equations) as long as the total system is in a stationary state. But if nonstationary behaviour is included considerations on the kinetics of the individual processes are necessary. Within the range of biological and agricultural investigations especially first order reactions (constant fraction processes), zero order reactions (constant amount process) and saturation reactions (Michaelis-Menten-kinetics) are to be taken into account. A rigorous treatment of data based on system theory can be preceeded by graphic-algebraic procedure which may be more or less uncertain in its results but which can easily be handled. An example is given of methodological considerations concerning the combination of evaluation procedures and the discrimination between different reaction mechanisms. It treats protein turnover in 2 different parts of growing wheat plants investigated by means of an 15 N-tracer experiment. Whereas in a stationary system (upper stalk section) linear tracer equations were sufficient irrespective of the true reaction mechanism, for protein synthesis in the upper leaf as a nonstationary system it was necessary to decide between the hypotheses of a zero order and a first order reaction. In accordance with statements in the literature the unambiguous result was a combination of protein synthesis as a zero order process and of protein degradation as a first order process. (orig.) [de

  4. RNA Interference: A Novel Source of Resistance to Combat Plant Parasitic Nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Banerjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant parasitic nematodes cause severe damage and yield loss in major crops all over the world. Available control strategies include use of insecticides/nematicides but these have proved detrimental to the environment, while other strategies like crop rotation and resistant cultivars have serious limitations. This scenario provides an opportunity for the utilization of technological advances like RNA interference (RNAi to engineer resistance against these devastating parasites. First demonstrated in the model free living nematode, Caenorhabtidis elegans; the phenomenon of RNAi has been successfully used to suppress essential genes of plant parasitic nematodes involved in parasitism, nematode development and mRNA metabolism. Synthetic neurotransmitants mixed with dsRNA solutions are used for in vitro RNAi in plant parasitic nematodes with significant success. However, host delivered in planta RNAi has proved to be a pioneering phenomenon to deliver dsRNAs to feeding nematodes and silence the target genes to achieve resistance. Highly enriched genomic databases are exploited to limit off target effects and ensure sequence specific silencing. Technological advances like gene stacking and use of nematode inducible and tissue specific promoters can further enhance the utility of RNAi based transgenics against plant parasitic nematodes.

  5. Isolation of high quality RNA from pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) and other woody plants high in secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzam Jazi, Maryam; Rajaei, Saideh; Seyedi, Seyed Mahdi

    2015-10-01

    The quality and quantity of RNA are critical for successful downstream transcriptome-based studies such as microarrays and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). RNA isolation from woody plants, such as Pistacia vera, with very high amounts of polyphenols and polysaccharides is an enormous challenge. Here, we describe a highly efficient protocol that overcomes the limitations posed by poor quality and low yield of isolated RNA from pistachio and various recalcitrant woody plants. The key factors that resulted in a yield of 150 μg of high quality RNA per 200 mg of plant tissue include the elimination of phenol from the extraction buffer, raising the concentration of β-mercaptoethanol, long time incubation at 65 °C, and nucleic acid precipitation with optimized volume of NaCl and isopropyl alcohol. Also, the A260/A280 and A260/A230 of extracted RNA were about 1.9-2.1and 2.2-2.3, respectively, revealing the high purity. Since the isolated RNA passed highly stringent quality control standards for sensitive reactions, including RNA sequencing and real-time PCR, it can be considered as a reliable and cost-effective method for RNA extraction from woody plants.

  6. Integrated RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq Analysis Identifies Chilling and Freezing Responsive Key Molecular Players and Pathways in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yu; Shen, Jiazhi; Zhang, Yinfei; Jia, Sisi; Li, Yusheng; Ding, Zhaotang

    2015-01-01

    Tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O. Kuntze, Theaceae] is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages worldwide. Cold stress is one of the most severe abiotic stresses that limit tea plants’ growth, survival and geographical distribution. However, the genetic regulatory network and signaling pathways involved in cold stress responses in tea plants remain unearthed. Using RNA-Seq, DGE and sRNA-Seq technologies, we performed an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling and their regulatory network of tea plants under chilling (4℃) and freezing (-5℃) stress. Differentially expressed (DE) miRNA and mRNA profiles were obtained based on fold change analysis, miRNAs and target mRNAs were found to show both coherent and incoherent relationships in the regulatory network. Furthermore, we compared several key pathways (e.g., ‘Photosynthesis’), GO terms (e.g., ‘response to karrikin’) and transcriptional factors (TFs, e.g., DREB1b/CBF1) which were identified as involved in the early chilling and/or freezing response of tea plants. Intriguingly, we found that karrikins, a new group of plant growth regulators, and β-primeverosidase (BPR), a key enzyme functionally relevant with the formation of tea aroma might play an important role in both early chilling and freezing response of tea plants. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-Seq and sRNA-Seq analysis. This is the first study to simultaneously profile the expression patterns of both miRNAs and mRNAs on a genome-wide scale to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of early responses of tea plants to cold stress. In addition to gaining a deeper insight into the cold resistant characteristics of tea plants, we provide a good case study to analyse mRNA/miRNA expression and profiling of non-model plant species using next-generation sequencing technology. PMID:25901577

  7. Analysis of small RNA production patterns among the two potato spindle tuber viroid variants in tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charith Raj Adkar-Purushothama

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the production of small RNA (sRNA by viroids upon infecting the plants, the tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar Rutgers were inoculated with the variants of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd. After 21-days of postinoculation, total RNA was extracted and subjected for deep-sequencing using Illumina HiSeq platform. The primers were trimmed and only 21- to 24-nt long sRNAs were filtered after quality check of the raw data. The filtered sRNA population was then mapped against both the genomic (+ and antigenomic (− strands of the respective PSTVd variants using standard pattern-matching algorithm. The profiling of viroid derived sRNA (vd-sRNA revealed that the viroids are susceptible to host RNA silencing mechanism. High-throughput sequence data linked to this project have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE69225.

  8. BIOLOGICAL FUNCTION OF TOMBUSVIRUS-ENCODED SUPPRESSOR OF RNA SILENCING IN PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omarov R.T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi plays multiple biological roles in eukaryotic organisms to regulate gene expression. RNAi also operates as a conserved adaptive molecular immune mechanism against invading viruses. The antiviral RNAi pathway is initiated with the generation of virus-derived short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs that are used for subsequent sequence-specific recognition and degradation of the cognate viral RNA molecules. As an efficient counter-defensive strategy, most plant viruses evolved the ability to encode specific proteins capable of interfering with RNAi, and this process is commonly known as RNA silencing suppression. Virus-encoded suppressors of RNAi (VSRs operate at different steps in the RNAi pathway and display distinct biochemical properties that enable these proteins to efficiently interfere with the host-defense system. Tombusvirus-encoded P19 is an important pathogenicity factor, required for symptom development and elicitation of a hypersensitive response in a host-dependent manner. Protein plays a crucial role of TBSV P19 in protecting viral RNA during systemic infection on Nicotiana benthamiana. The X-ray crystallographic studies conducted by two independent groups revealed the existence of a P19-siRNA complex; a conformation whereby caliper tryptophan residues on two subunits of P19 dimers measure and bind 21-nt siRNA duplexes. These structural studies provided the first details on the possible molecular mechanism of any viral suppressor to block RNAi. The association between P19 and siRNAs was also shown to occur in infected plants These and related studies revealed that in general the ability of P19 to efficiently sequester siRNAs influences symptom severity, however this is not a strict correlation in all hosts.The current working model is that during TBSV infection of plants, P19 appropriates abundantly circulating Tombusvirus-derived siRNAs thereby rendering these unavailable to program RISC, to prevent degradation of

  9. Plant MicroRNA Prediction by Supervised Machine Learning Using C5.0 Decision Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip H. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are nonprotein coding RNAs between 20 and 22 nucleotides long that attenuate protein production. Different types of sequence data are being investigated for novel miRNAs, including genomic and transcriptomic sequences. A variety of machine learning methods have successfully predicted miRNA precursors, mature miRNAs, and other nonprotein coding sequences. MirTools, mirDeep2, and miRanalyzer require “read count” to be included with the input sequences, which restricts their use to deep-sequencing data. Our aim was to train a predictor using a cross-section of different species to accurately predict miRNAs outside the training set. We wanted a system that did not require read-count for prediction and could therefore be applied to short sequences extracted from genomic, EST, or RNA-seq sources. A miRNA-predictive decision-tree model has been developed by supervised machine learning. It only requires that the corresponding genome or transcriptome is available within a sequence window that includes the precursor candidate so that the required sequence features can be collected. Some of the most critical features for training the predictor are the miRNA:miRNA∗ duplex energy and the number of mismatches in the duplex. We present a cross-species plant miRNA predictor with 84.08% sensitivity and 98.53% specificity based on rigorous testing by leave-one-out validation.

  10. Overexpression of a natural chloroplast-encoded antisense RNA in tobacco destabilizes 5S rRNA and retards plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern David B

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of non-coding RNAs in regulating gene expression have been extensively studied in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, however few reports exist as to their roles in organellar gene regulation. Evidence for accumulation of natural antisense RNAs (asRNAs in chloroplasts comes from the expressed sequence tag database and cDNA libraries, while functional data have been largely obtained from artificial asRNAs. In this study, we used Nicotiana tabacum to investigate the effect on sense strand transcripts of overexpressing a natural chloroplast asRNA, AS5, which is complementary to the region which encodes the 5S rRNA and tRNAArg. Results AS5-overexpressing (AS5ox plants obtained by chloroplast transformation exhibited slower growth and slightly pale green leaves. Analysis of AS5 transcripts revealed four distinct species in wild-type (WT and AS5ox plants, and additional AS5ox-specific products. Of the corresponding sense strand transcripts, tRNAArg overaccumulated several-fold in transgenic plants whereas 5S rRNA was unaffected. However, run-on transcription showed that the 5S-trnR region was transcribed four-fold more in the AS5ox plants compared to WT, indicating that overexpression of AS5 was associated with decreased stability of 5S rRNA. In addition, polysome analysis of the transformants showed less 5S rRNA and rbcL mRNA associated with ribosomes. Conclusions Our results suggest that AS5 can modulate 5S rRNA levels, giving it the potential to affect Chloroplast translation and plant growth. More globally, overexpression of asRNAs via chloroplast transformation may be a useful strategy for defining their functions.

  11. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  12. Convergence of Domain Architecture, Structure, and Ligand Affinity in Animal and Plant RNA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Manny, Austin; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of ancestral protein sequences using phylogenetic methods is a powerful technique for directly examining the evolution of molecular function. Although ancestral sequence reconstruction (ASR) is itself very efficient, downstream functional, and structural studies necessary to characterize when and how changes in molecular function occurred are often costly and time-consuming, currently limiting ASR studies to examining a relatively small number of discrete functional shifts. As a result, we have very little direct information about how molecular function evolves across large protein families. Here we develop an approach combining ASR with structure and function prediction to efficiently examine the evolution of ligand affinity across a large family of double-stranded RNA binding proteins (DRBs) spanning animals and plants. We find that the characteristic domain architecture of DRBs-consisting of 2-3 tandem double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsrms)-arose independently in early animal and plant lineages. The affinity with which individual dsrms bind double-stranded RNA appears to have increased and decreased often across both animal and plant phylogenies, primarily through convergent structural mechanisms involving RNA-contact residues within the β1-β2 loop and a small region of α2. These studies provide some of the first direct information about how protein function evolves across large gene families and suggest that changes in molecular function may occur often and unassociated with major phylogenetic events, such as gene or domain duplications. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Regulation of Plant Microprocessor Function in Shaping microRNA Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Dolata

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small molecules (∼21 nucleotides long that are key regulators of gene expression. They originate from long stem–loop RNAs as a product of cleavage by a protein complex called Microprocessor. The core components of the plant Microprocessor are the RNase type III enzyme Dicer-Like 1 (DCL1, the zinc finger protein Serrate (SE, and the double-stranded RNA binding protein Hyponastic Leaves 1 (HYL1. Microprocessor assembly and its processing of microRNA precursors have been reported to occur in discrete nuclear bodies called Dicing bodies. The accessibility of and modifications to Microprocessor components affect microRNA levels and may have dramatic consequences in plant development. Currently, numerous lines of evidence indicate that plant Microprocessor activity is tightly regulated. The cellular localization of HYL1 is dependent on a specific KETCH1 importin, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1 indirectly protects HYL1 from degradation in a light-dependent manner. Furthermore, proper localization of HYL1 in Dicing bodies is regulated by MOS2. On the other hand, the Dicing body localization of DCL1 is regulated by NOT2b, which also interacts with SE in the nucleus. Post-translational modifications are substantial factors that contribute to protein functional diversity and provide a fine-tuning system for the regulation of protein activity. The phosphorylation status of HYL1 is crucial for its activity/stability and is a result of the interplay between kinases (MPK3 and SnRK2 and phosphatases (CPL1 and PP4. Additionally, MPK3 and SnRK2 are known to phosphorylate SE. Several other proteins (e.g., TGH, CDF2, SIC, and RCF3 that interact with Microprocessor have been found to influence its RNA-binding and processing activities. In this minireview, recent findings on the various modes of Microprocessor activity regulation are discussed.

  14. Multiple RNA processing defects and impaired chloroplast function in plants deficient in the organellar protein-only RNase P enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA precursors undergo endoribonucleolytic processing of their 5' and 3' ends. 5' cleavage of the precursor transcript is performed by ribonuclease P (RNase P. While in most organisms RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein that harbors a catalytically active RNA component, human mitochondria and the chloroplasts (plastids and mitochondria of seed plants possess protein-only RNase P enzymes (PRORPs. The plant organellar PRORP (PRORP1 has been characterized to some extent in vitro and by transient gene silencing, but the molecular, phenotypic and physiological consequences of its down-regulation in stable transgenic plants have not been assessed. Here we have addressed the function of the dually targeted organellar PRORP enzyme in vivo by generating stably transformed Arabidopsis plants in which expression of the PRORP1 gene was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi. PRORP1 knock-down lines show defects in photosynthesis, while mitochondrial respiration is not appreciably affected. In both plastids and mitochondria, the effects of PRORP1 knock-down on the processing of individual tRNA species are highly variable. The drastic reduction in the levels of mature plastid tRNA-Phe(GAA and tRNA-Arg(ACG suggests that these two tRNA species limit plastid gene expression in the PRORP1 mutants and, hence, are causally responsible for the mutant phenotype.

  15. mirEX: a platform for comparative exploration of plant pri-miRNA expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielewicz, Dawid; Dolata, Jakub; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Alaba, Sylwia; Szarzynska, Bogna; Szczesniak, Michal W; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2012-01-01

    mirEX is a comprehensive platform for comparative analysis of primary microRNA expression data. RT-qPCR-based gene expression profiles are stored in a universal and expandable database scheme and wrapped by an intuitive user-friendly interface. A new way of accessing gene expression data in mirEX includes a simple mouse operated querying system and dynamic graphs for data mining analyses. In contrast to other publicly available databases, the mirEX interface allows a simultaneous comparison of expression levels between various microRNA genes in diverse organs and developmental stages. Currently, mirEX integrates information about the expression profile of 190 Arabidopsis thaliana pri-miRNAs in seven different developmental stages: seeds, seedlings and various organs of mature plants. Additionally, by providing RNA structural models, publicly available deep sequencing results, experimental procedure details and careful selection of auxiliary data in the form of web links, mirEX can function as a one-stop solution for Arabidopsis microRNA information. A web-based mirEX interface can be accessed at http://bioinfo.amu.edu.pl/mirex.

  16. mRNA Transcript abundance during plant growth and the influence of Li(+) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M C; Kuhne, W W; Halverson, N V; Chang, C-S; Kitamura, E; Hawthorn, L; Martinez, N E; Stafford, C; Milliken, C E; Caldwell, E F; Stieve-Caldwell, E

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li(+) concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li(+) focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li(+) exposure in Arabidopsis with Li(+) uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li(+)-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li(+) resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li(+) exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li(+) exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li(+)-sensitive genes and a gene-based "response plan" for acute and chronic Li(+) exposure are delineated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolution of green plants as deduced from 5S rRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, H; Lim, B L; Osawa, S

    1985-02-01

    We have constructed a phylogenic tree for green plants by comparing 5S rRNA sequences. The tree suggests that the emergence of most of the uni- and multicellular green algae such as Chlamydomonas, Spirogyra, Ulva, and Chlorella occurred in the early stage of green plant evolution. The branching point of Nitella is a little earlier than that of land plants and much later than that of the above green algae, supporting the view that Nitella-like green algae may be the direct precursor to land plants. The Bryophyta and the Pteridophyta separated from each other after emergence of the Spermatophyta. The result is consistent with the view that the Bryophyta evolved from ferns by degeneration. In the Pteridophyta, Psilotum (whisk fern) separated first, and a little later Lycopodium (club moss) separated from the ancestor common to Equisetum (horsetail) and Dryopteris (fern). This order is in accordance with the classical view. During the Spermatophyta evolution, the gymnosperms (Cycas, Ginkgo, and Metasequoia have been studied here) and the angiosperms (flowering plants) separated, and this was followed by the separation of Metasequoia and Cycas (cycad)/Ginkgo (maidenhair tree) on one branch and various flowering plants on the other.

  18. Effect of temperature on the pathogenesis, accumulation of viral and satellite RNAs and on plant proteome in peanut stunt virus and satellite RNA-infected plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra eObrępalska-Stęplowska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is an important environmental factor influencing plant development in natural and diseased conditions. The growth rate of plants grown at 27°C is more rapid than for plants grown at 21°C. Thus, temperature affects the rate of pathogenesis progression in individual plants. We have analyzed the effect of temperature conditions (either 21°C or 27°C during the day on the accumulation rate of the virus and satellite RNA (satRNA in Nicotiana benthamiana plants infected by peanut stunt virus (PSV with and without its satRNA, at four time points. In addition, we extracted proteins from PSV and PSV+satRNA-infected plants harvested at 21 dpi, when disease symptoms began to appear on plants grown at 21°C and were well developed on those grown at 27°C, to assess the proteome profile in infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants grown at these two temperatures, using 2D-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry approaches. The accumulation rate of the viral RNAs and satRNA was more rapid at 27°C at the beginning of the infection and then rapidly decreased in PSV-infected plants. At 21 dpi, PSV and satRNA accumulation was higher at 21°C and had a tendency to increase further. In all studied plants grown at 27°C, we observed a significant drop in the identified proteins participating in photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism at the proteome level, in comparison to plants maintained at 21°C. On the other hand, the proteins involved in protein metabolic processes were all more abundant in plants grown at 27°C. This was especially evident when PSV-infected plants were analyzed, where increase in abundance of proteins involved in protein synthesis, degradation, and folding was revealed. In mock-inoculated and PSV-infected plants we found an increase in abundance of the majority of stress-related differently-regulated proteins and those associated with protein metabolism. In contrast, in PSV+satRNA-infected plants the shift in the

  19. Creation of targeted inversion mutations in plants using an RNA-guided endonuclease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Congsheng Zhang; Changlin Liu; Jianfeng Weng; Beijiu Cheng; Fang Liu; Xinhai Li; Chuanxiao Xie

    2017-01-01

    Inversions are DNA rearrangements that are essential for plant gene evolution and adaptation to environmental changes. We demonstrate the creation of targeted inversions and previously reported targeted deletion mutations via delivery of a pair of RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs) of CRISPR/Cas9. The efficiencies of the targeted inversions were 2.6%and 2.2%in the Arabidopsis FLOWERING TIME (AtFT) and TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (AtTFL1) loci, respectively. Thus, we successfully established an approach that can potentially be used to introduce targeted DNA inversions of interest for functional studies and crop improvement.

  20. PlantRNA_Sniffer: A SVM-Based Workflow to Predict Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Lucas Maciel; Grativol, Clicia; Thiebaut, Flavia; Carvalho, Thais G; Hardoim, Pablo R; Hemerly, Adriana; Lifschitz, Sergio; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes; Walter, Maria Emilia M T

    2017-03-04

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) constitute an important set of transcripts produced in the cells of organisms. Among them, there is a large amount of a particular class of long ncRNAs that are difficult to predict, the so-called long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs), which might play essential roles in gene regulation and other cellular processes. Despite the importance of these lincRNAs, there is still a lack of biological knowledge and, currently, the few computational methods considered are so specific that they cannot be successfully applied to other species different from those that they have been originally designed to. Prediction of lncRNAs have been performed with machine learning techniques. Particularly, for lincRNA prediction, supervised learning methods have been explored in recent literature. As far as we know, there are no methods nor workflows specially designed to predict lincRNAs in plants. In this context, this work proposes a workflow to predict lincRNAs on plants, considering a workflow that includes known bioinformatics tools together with machine learning techniques, here a support vector machine (SVM). We discuss two case studies that allowed to identify novel lincRNAs, in sugarcane ( Saccharum spp.) and in maize ( Zea mays ). From the results, we also could identify differentially-expressed lincRNAs in sugarcane and maize plants submitted to pathogenic and beneficial microorganisms.

  1. PlantRNA_Sniffer: A SVM-Based Workflow to Predict Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Maciel Vieira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs constitute an important set of transcripts produced in the cells of organisms. Among them, there is a large amount of a particular class of long ncRNAs that are difficult to predict, the so-called long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs, which might play essential roles in gene regulation and other cellular processes. Despite the importance of these lincRNAs, there is still a lack of biological knowledge and, currently, the few computational methods considered are so specific that they cannot be successfully applied to other species different from those that they have been originally designed to. Prediction of lncRNAs have been performed with machine learning techniques. Particularly, for lincRNA prediction, supervised learning methods have been explored in recent literature. As far as we know, there are no methods nor workflows specially designed to predict lincRNAs in plants. In this context, this work proposes a workflow to predict lincRNAs on plants, considering a workflow that includes known bioinformatics tools together with machine learning techniques, here a support vector machine (SVM. We discuss two case studies that allowed to identify novel lincRNAs, in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. and in maize (Zea mays. From the results, we also could identify differentially-expressed lincRNAs in sugarcane and maize plants submitted to pathogenic and beneficial microorganisms.

  2. Characterization of the RNA silencing suppression activity of the Ebola virus VP35 protein in plants and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yali; Cherukuri, Nil Celebi; Jackel, Jamie N; Wu, Zetang; Crary, Monica; Buckley, Kenneth J; Bisaro, David M; Parris, Deborah S

    2012-03-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which there is no approved effective treatment or prevention strategy. EBOV VP35 is a virulence factor that blocks innate antiviral host responses, including the induction of and response to alpha/beta interferon. VP35 is also an RNA silencing suppressor (RSS). By inhibiting microRNA-directed silencing, mammalian virus RSSs have the capacity to alter the cellular environment to benefit replication. A reporter gene containing specific microRNA target sequences was used to demonstrate that prior expression of wild-type VP35 was able to block establishment of microRNA silencing in mammalian cells. In addition, wild-type VP35 C-terminal domain (CTD) protein fusions were shown to bind small interfering RNA (siRNA). Analysis of mutant proteins demonstrated that reporter activity in RSS assays did not correlate with their ability to antagonize double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase R (PKR) or bind siRNA. The results suggest that enhanced reporter activity in the presence of VP35 is a composite of nonspecific translational enhancement and silencing suppression. Moreover, most of the specific RSS activity in mammalian cells is RNA binding independent, consistent with VP35's proposed role in sequestering one or more silencing complex proteins. To examine RSS activity in a system without interferon, VP35 was tested in well-characterized plant silencing suppression assays. VP35 was shown to possess potent plant RSS activity, and the activities of mutant proteins correlated strongly, but not exclusively, with RNA binding ability. The results suggest the importance of VP35-protein interactions in blocking silencing in a system (mammalian) that cannot amplify dsRNA.

  3. RNA Interference towards the Potato Psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli, Is Induced in Plants Infected with Recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuriyanghan, Hada; Falk, Bryce W.

    2013-01-01

    The potato/tomato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (B. cockerelli), is an important plant pest and the vector of the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous (solanacearum), which is associated with the zebra chip disease of potatoes. Previously, we reported induction of RNA interference effects in B. cockerelli via in vitro-prepared dsRNA/siRNAs after intrathoracic injection, and after feeding of artificial diets containing these effector RNAs. In order to deliver RNAi effectors via plant hosts and to rapidly identify effective target sequences in plant-feeding B. cockerelli, here we developed a plant virus vector-based in planta system for evaluating candidate sequences. We show that recombinant Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) containing B. cockerelli sequences can efficiently infect and generate small interfering RNAs in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants, and more importantly delivery of interfering sequences via TMV induces RNAi effects, as measured by actin and V-ATPase mRNA reductions, in B. cockerelli feeding on these plants. RNAi effects were primarily detected in the B. cockerelli guts. In contrast to our results with TMV, recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) and Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) did not give robust infections in all plants and did not induce detectable RNAi effects in B. cockerelli. The greatest RNA interference effects were observed when B. cockerelli nymphs were allowed to feed on leaf discs collected from inoculated or lower expanded leaves from corresponding TMV-infected plants. Tomatillo plants infected with recombinant TMV containing B. cockerelli actin or V-ATPase sequences also showed phenotypic effects resulting in decreased B. cockerelli progeny production as compared to plants infected by recombinant TMV containing GFP. These results showed that RNAi effects can be achieved in plants against the phloem feeder, B. cockerelli, and the TMV-plant system will

  4. Comparison of preribosomal RNA processing pathways in yeast, plant and human cells - focus on coordinated action of endo- and exoribonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Sikorski, Pawel J; Zakrzewska-Placzek, Monika

    2017-07-01

    Proper regulation of ribosome biosynthesis is mandatory for cellular adaptation, growth and proliferation. Ribosome biogenesis is the most energetically demanding cellular process, which requires tight control. Abnormalities in ribosome production have severe consequences, including developmental defects in plants and genetic diseases (ribosomopathies) in humans. One of the processes occurring during eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis is processing of the ribosomal RNA precursor molecule (pre-rRNA), synthesized by RNA polymerase I, into mature rRNAs. It must not only be accurate but must also be precisely coordinated with other phenomena leading to the synthesis of functional ribosomes: RNA modification, RNA folding, assembly with ribosomal proteins and nucleocytoplasmic RNP export. A multitude of ribosome biogenesis factors ensure that these events take place in a correct temporal order. Among them are endo- and exoribonucleases involved in pre-rRNA processing. Here, we thoroughly present a wide spectrum of ribonucleases participating in rRNA maturation, focusing on their biochemical properties, regulatory mechanisms and substrate specificity. We also discuss cooperation between various ribonucleolytic activities in particular stages of pre-rRNA processing, delineating major similarities and differences between three representative groups of eukaryotes: yeast, plants and humans. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Diversity, expression and mRNA targeting abilities of Argonaute-targeting miRNAs among selected vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Soham; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V

    2014-12-02

    Micro (mi)RNAs are important regulators of plant development. Across plant lineages, Dicer-like 1 (DCL1) proteins process long ds-like structures to produce micro (mi) RNA duplexes in a stepwise manner. These miRNAs are incorporated into Argonaute (AGO) proteins and influence expression of RNAs that have sequence complementarity with miRNAs. Expression levels of AGOs are greatly regulated by plants in order to minimize unwarranted perturbations using miRNAs to target mRNAs coding for AGOs. AGOs may also have high promoter specificity-sometimes expression of AGO can be limited to just a few cells in a plant. Viral pathogens utilize various means to counter antiviral roles of AGOs including hijacking the host encoded miRNAs to target AGOs. Two host encoded miRNAs namely miR168 and miR403 that target AGOs have been described in the model plant Arabidopsis and such a mechanism is thought to be well conserved across plants because AGO sequences are well conserved. We show that the interaction between AGO mRNAs and miRNAs is species-specific due to the diversity in sequences of two miRNAs that target AGOs, sequence diversity among corresponding target regions in AGO mRNAs and variable expression levels of these miRNAs among vascular plants. We used miRNA sequences from 68 plant species representing 31 plant families for this analysis. Sequences of miR168 and miR403 are not conserved among plant lineages, but surprisingly they differ drastically in their sequence diversity and expression levels even among closely related plants. Variation in miR168 expression among plants correlates well with secondary structures/length of loop sequences of their precursors. Our data indicates a complex AGO targeting interaction among plant lineages due to miRNA sequence diversity and sequences of miRNA targeting regions among AGO mRNAs, thus leading to the assumption that the perturbations by viruses that use host miRNAs to target antiviral AGOs can only be species-specific. We also show

  6. Managing teacher turnover

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    - ... vacant teaching posts are not filled (Pretorius & Heard, 1999; Anon., ... it reaches critical proportions. This article therefore investigates teacher turnover as a phenome- non to be managed and suggests ways of doing so. The study is based.

  7. Role of plant MicroRNA in cross-species regulatory networks of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Yanpu; Liu, Yuanning; Liu, Haiming; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Wen; Zhang, Yanmei; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Dong

    2016-08-08

    It has been found that microRNAs (miRNAs) can function as a regulatory factor across species. For example, food-derived plant miRNAs may pass through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, enter into the plasma and serum of mammals, and interact with endogenous RNAs to regulate their expression. Although this new type of regulatory mechanism is not well understood, it provides a fresh look at the relationship between food consumption and physiology. To investigate this new type of mechanism, we conducted a systematic computational study to analyze the potential functions of these dietary miRNAs in the human body. In this paper, we predicted human and plant target genes using RNAhybrid and set some criteria to further filter them. Then we built the cross-species regulatory network according to the filtered targets, extracted central nodes by PageRank algorithm and built core modules. We summarized the functions of these modules to three major categories: ion transport, metabolic process and stress response, and especially some target genes are highly related to ion transport, polysaccharides and the lipid metabolic process. Through functional analysis, we found that human and plants have similar functions such as ion transport and stress response, so our study also indicates the existence of a close link between exogenous plant miRNA targets and digestive/urinary organs. According to our analysis results, we suggest that the ingestion of these plant miRNAs may have a functional impact on consuming organisms in a cross-kingdom way, and the dietary habit may affect the physiological condition at a genetic level. Our findings may be useful for discovering cross-species regulatory mechanism in further study.

  8. Global SUMO proteome responses guide gene regulation, mRNA biogenesis, and plant stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena eMazur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Small-ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO is a key regulator of abiotic stress, disease resistance and development in plants. The identification of >350 plant SUMO targets has revealed many processes modulated by SUMO and potential consequences of SUMO on its targets. Importantly, highly related proteins are SUMO-modified in plants, yeast, and metazoans. Overlapping SUMO targets include heat-shock proteins, transcription regulators, histones, histone-modifying enzymes, proteins involved in DNA damage repair, but also proteins involved in mRNA biogenesis and nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Proteomics studies indicate key roles for SUMO in gene repression by controlling histone (deacetylation activity at genomic loci. The responsible heavily sumoylated transcriptional repressor complexes are recruited by EAR (Ethylene-responsive element binding factor [ERF]-associated Amphiphilic Repression-motif containing transcription factors in plants. These transcription factors are not necessarily themselves a SUMO target. Conversely, SUMO acetylation prevents binding of downstream partners by preventing binding of SIMs (SUMO-interaction peptide motifs presents in these partners, while SUMO acetylation has emerged as mechanism to recruit specifically bromodomains; bromodomain are generally linked with gene activation. These findings strengthen the idea of a bidirectional sumo-/acetylation switch in gene regulation. Quantitative proteomics has highlighted that global sumoylation provides a dynamic response to protein damage involving SUMO chain-mediated protein degradation, but also SUMO E3 ligase-dependent transcription of HSP (Heat-shock protein genes. With these insights in SUMO function and novel technical advancements, we can now study SUMO dynamics in responses to (abiotic stress in plants.

  9. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Julian Bujarski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings along with nonreplicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (i How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (ii What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (iii Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (iv Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (v What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  10. Genetic recombination in plant-infecting messenger-sense RNA viruses: overview and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujarski, Jozef J

    2013-01-01

    RNA recombination is one of the driving forces of genetic variability in (+)-strand RNA viruses. Various types of RNA-RNA crossovers were described including crosses between the same or different viral RNAs or between viral and cellular RNAs. Likewise, a variety of molecular mechanisms are known to support RNA recombination, such as replicative events (based on internal or end-to-end replicase switchings) along with non-replicative joining among RNA fragments of viral and/or cellular origin. Such mechanisms as RNA decay or RNA interference are responsible for RNA fragmentation and trans-esterification reactions which are likely accountable for ligation of RNA fragments. Numerous host factors were found to affect the profiles of viral RNA recombinants and significant differences in recombination frequency were observed among various RNA viruses. Comparative analyses of viral sequences allowed for the development of evolutionary models in order to explain adaptive phenotypic changes and co-evolving sites. Many questions remain to be answered by forthcoming RNA recombination research. (1) How various factors modulate the ability of viral replicase to switch templates, (2) What is the intracellular location of RNA-RNA template switchings, (3) Mechanisms and factors responsible for non-replicative RNA recombination, (4) Mechanisms of integration of RNA viral sequences with cellular genomic DNA, and (5) What is the role of RNA splicing and ribozyme activity. From an evolutionary stand point, it is not known how RNA viruses parasitize new host species via recombination, nor is it obvious what the contribution of RNA recombination is among other RNA modification pathways. We do not understand why the frequency of RNA recombination varies so much among RNA viruses and the status of RNA recombination as a form of sex is not well documented.

  11. MicroRNA from Moringa oleifera: Identification by High Throughput Sequencing and Their Potential Contribution to Plant Medicinal Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrò, Stefano; Zanella, Letizia; Kenzo, Maurice; Montesano, Carla; Minutolo, Antonella; Potestà, Marina; Sobze, Martin Sanou; Canini, Antonella; Cirilli, Marco; Muleo, Rosario; Colizzi, Vittorio; Galgani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera is a widespread plant with substantial nutritional and medicinal value. We postulated that microRNAs (miRNAs), which are endogenous, noncoding small RNAs regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, might contribute to the medicinal properties of plants of this species after ingestion into human body, regulating human gene expression. However, the knowledge is scarce about miRNA in Moringa. Furthermore, in order to test the hypothesis on the pharmacological potential properties of miRNA, we conducted a high-throughput sequencing analysis using the Illumina platform. A total of 31,290,964 raw reads were produced from a library of small RNA isolated from M. oleifera seeds. We identified 94 conserved and two novel miRNAs that were validated by qRT-PCR assays. Results from qRT-PCR trials conducted on the expression of 20 Moringa miRNA showed that are conserved across multiple plant species as determined by their detection in tissue of other common crop plants. In silico analyses predicted target genes for the conserved miRNA that in turn allowed to relate the miRNAs to the regulation of physiological processes. Some of the predicted plant miRNAs have functional homology to their mammalian counterparts and regulated human genes when they were transfected into cell lines. To our knowledge, this is the first report of discovering M. oleifera miRNAs based on high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis and we provided new insight into a potential cross-species control of human gene expression. The widespread cultivation and consumption of M. oleifera, for nutritional and medicinal purposes, brings humans into close contact with products and extracts of this plant species. The potential for miRNA transfer should be evaluated as one possible mechanism of action to account for beneficial properties of this valuable species.

  12. RNase MRP RNA and RNase P activity in plants are associated with a Pop1p containing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehan, Mario; Heubeck, Christian; Menzel, Nicolas; Seibel, Peter; Schön, Astrid

    2012-09-01

    RNase P processes the 5'-end of tRNAs. An essential catalytic RNA has been demonstrated in Bacteria, Archaea and the nuclei of most eukaryotes; an organism-specific number of proteins complement the holoenzyme. Nuclear RNase P from yeast and humans is well understood and contains an RNA, similar to the sister enzyme RNase MRP. In contrast, no protein subunits have yet been identified in the plant enzymes, and the presence of a nucleic acid in RNase P is still enigmatic. We have thus set out to identify and characterize the subunits of these enzymes in two plant model systems. Expression of the two known Arabidopsis MRP RNA genes in vivo was verified. The first wheat MRP RNA sequences are presented, leading to improved structure models for plant MRP RNAs. A novel mRNA encoding the central RNase P/MRP protein Pop1p was identified in Arabidopsis, suggesting the expression of distinct protein variants from this gene in vivo. Pop1p-specific antibodies precipitate RNase P activity and MRP RNAs from wheat extracts. Our results provide evidence that in plants, Pop1p is associated with MRP RNAs and with the catalytic subunit of RNase P, either separately or in a single large complex.

  13. Double strand RNA oral delivery methods to induce RNA interference in phloem and plant-sap-feeding insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phloem and plant sap feeding insect pests invade the integrity of crops and fruits to retrieve nutrients in the process damaging food productivity. Hemipteran insects account for a number of economically substantial pests of plants that cause damage to crops by feeding on phloem sap. Halyomorpha hal...

  14. Expression of the double-stranded RNA of the soybean pod borer Leguminivora glycinivorella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) ribosomal protein P0 gene enhances the resistance of transgenic soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanli; Li, Yang; Zang, Zhenyuan; Li, Na; Ran, Ruixue; Cao, Yingxue; Li, Tianyu; Zhou, Quan; Li, Wenbin

    2017-12-01

    The soybean pod borer [SPB; Leguminivora glycinivorella (Matsumura) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)] is the most important soybean pest in northeastern Asia. Silencing genes using plant-mediated RNA-interference is a promising strategy for controlling SPB infestations. The ribosomal protein P0 is important for protein translation and DNA repair in the SPB. Thus, transferring P0 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into plants may help prevent SPB-induced damage. We investigated the effects of SpbP0 dsRNA injections and SpbP0 dsRNA-expressing transgenic soybean plants on the SPB. Larval mortality rates were greater for SpbP0 dsRNA-injected larvae (96%) than for the control larvae (31%) at 14 days after injections. Transgenic T 2 soybean plants expressing SpbP0 dsRNA sustained less damage from SPB larvae than control plants. In addition, the expression level of the SpbP0 gene decreased and the mortality rate increased when SPB larvae were fed on T 3 transgenic soybean pods. Moreover, the surviving larvae were deformed and exhibited inhibited growth. Silencing SpbP0 expression is lethal to the SPB. Transgenic soybean plants expressing SpbP0 dsRNA are more resistant to the SPB than wild-type plants. Thus, SpbP0 dsRNA-expressing transgenic plants may be useful for controlling insect pests. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis reveals conservation and diversification of micro RNA166 genes among diverse plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Suvakanta; SarkarDas, Shabari; Singh, Archita; Gautam, Vibhav; Kumar, Pramod; Majee, Manoj; Sarkar, Ananda K

    2014-01-01

    Similar to the majority of the microRNAs, mature miR166s are derived from multiple members of MIR166 genes (precursors) and regulate various aspects of plant development by negatively regulating their target genes (Class III HD-ZIP). The evolutionary conservation or functional diversification of miRNA166 family members remains elusive. Here, we show the phylogenetic relationships among MIR166 precursor and mature sequences from three diverse model plant species. Despite strong conservation, some mature miR166 sequences, such as ppt-miR166m, have undergone sequence variation. Critical sequence variation in ppt-miR166m has led to functional diversification, as it targets non-HD-ZIPIII gene transcript (s). MIR166 precursor sequences have diverged in a lineage specific manner, and both precursors and mature osa-miR166i/j are highly conserved. Interestingly, polycistronic MIR166s were present in Physcomitrella and Oryza but not in Arabidopsis. The nature of cis-regulatory motifs on the upstream promoter sequences of MIR166 genes indicates their possible contribution to the functional variation observed among miR166 species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative analysis among the small RNA populations of source, sink and conductive tissues in two different plant-virus pathosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Mari Carmen; Navarro, Jose Antonio; Sommen, Evelien; Pallas, Vicente

    2015-02-22

    In plants, RNA silencing plays a fundamental role as defence mechanism against viruses. During last years deep-sequencing technology has allowed to analyze the sRNA profile of a large variety of virus-infected tissues. Nevertheless, the majority of these studies have been restricted to a unique tissue and no comparative analysis between phloem and source/sink tissues has been conducted. In the present work, we compared the sRNA populations of source, sink and conductive (phloem) tissues in two different plant virus pathosystems. We chose two cucurbit species infected with two viruses very different in genome organization and replication strategy; Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV). Our findings showed, in both systems, an increase of the 21-nt total sRNAs together with a decrease of those with a size of 24-nt in all the infected tissues, except for the phloem where the ratio of 21/24-nt sRNA species remained constant. Comparing the vsRNAs, both PNRSV- and MNSV-infected plants share the same vsRNA size distribution in all the analyzed tissues. Similar accumulation levels of sense and antisense vsRNAs were observed in both systems except for roots that showed a prevalence of (+) vsRNAs in both pathosystems. Additionally, the presence of overrepresented discrete sites along the viral genome, hot spots, were identified and validated by stem-loop RT-PCR. Despite that in PNRSV-infected plants the presence of vsRNAs was scarce both viruses modulated the host sRNA profile. We compare for the first time the sRNA profile of four different tissues, including source, sink and conductive (phloem) tissues, in two plant-virus pathosystems. Our results indicate that antiviral silencing machinery in melon and cucumber acts mainly through DCL4. Upon infection, the total sRNA pattern in phloem remains unchanged in contrast to the rest of the analyzed tissues indicating a certain tissue-tropism to this polulation. Independently of the

  17. ANTESEDEN EMPLOYEE TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heryadi Fardilah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is concerning the effect of workplace environment, job satisfaction, and  job performance on employee turnover, and the background is to get the convenience of employees condition, the satisfaction of job results, maximum performance, and keep and reduce in and out employees. The purpose of this research is to see how far the influence of workplace environment, job satisfaction, and job performance on employee turnover. Planning of this research uses primary data that is got by handing over questioners to 200 employees in Telecommunication company in East Jakarta. The analysis method which is used is double regresi.  Results of  this  research give conclusion that there's a positive and significant influence of workplace environment, job satisfaction, and job performance on employee turnover.

  18. Plant rhabdoviruses: new insights and research needs in the interplay of negative-strand RNA viruses with plant and insect hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Krin S; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2014-08-01

    Rhabdoviruses are taxonomically classified in the family Rhabdoviridae, order Mononegavirales. As a group, rhabdoviruses can infect plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Plant cyto- and nucleorhabdoviruses infect a wide variety of species across both monocot and dicot families, including agriculturally important crops such as lettuce, wheat, barley, rice, maize, potato and tomato. Plant rhabdoviruses are transmitted by and replicate in hemipteran insects such as aphids (Aphididae), leafhoppers (Cicadellidae), or planthoppers (Delphacidae). These specific interactions between plants, viruses and insects offer new insights into host adaptation and molecular virus evolution. This review explores recent advances as well as knowledge gaps in understanding of replication, RNA silencing suppression and movement of plant rhabdoviruses with respect to both plant and insect hosts.

  19. Scale dependence in species turnover reflects variance in species occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinn, Daniel J; Hurlbert, Allen H

    2012-02-01

    Patterns of species turnover may reflect the processes driving community dynamics across scales. While the majority of studies on species turnover have examined pairwise comparison metrics (e.g., the average Jaccard dissimilarity), it has been proposed that the species-area relationship (SAR) also offers insight into patterns of species turnover because these two patterns may be analytically linked. However, these previous links only apply in a special case where turnover is scale invariant, and we demonstrate across three different plant communities that over 90% of the pairwise turnover values are larger than expected based on scale-invariant predictions from the SAR. Furthermore, the degree of scale dependence in turnover was negatively related to the degree of variance in the occupancy frequency distribution (OFD). These findings suggest that species turnover diverges from scale invariance, and as such pairwise turnover and the slope of the SAR are not redundant. Furthermore, models developed to explain the OFD should be linked with those developed to explain species turnover to achieve a more unified understanding of community structure.

  20. Dual pathways for ribonucleic acid turnover in WI-38 but not in I-cell human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sameshima, M.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Schlessinger, D.

    1981-01-01

    The turnover rates of /sup 3/H-labeled 18S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA), 28S ribsomal RNA, transfer RNA, and total cytoplasmic RNA were very similar in growing WI-38 diploid fibroblasts. The rate of turnover was at least twofold greater when cell growth stopped due to cell confluence, /sup 3/H irradiation, or treatment with 20 mM NaN/sub 3/ or 2 mM NaF. In contrast, the rate of total /sup 3/H-protein turnover was the same in growing and nongrowing cells. Both RNA and protein turnovers were accelerated at least twofold in WI-38 cells deprived of serum, and this increase in turnover was inhibited by NH/sub 4/Cl. These results are consistent with two pathways for RNA turnover, oe of them being nonlysosomal and the other being lyosome mediated (NH/sub 4/Cl sensitive), as has been suggested for protein turnover. Also consistent with the notion of two pathways for RNA turnover were findings with I-cells, which are deficient for many lysosomal enzymes, and in which all RNA turnover were nonlysosomal (NH/sub 4/Cl resistant)

  1. Costs of employee turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to establish a general methodology for calculating the costs incurred by employee turnover. This paper deals with identification of costs incurred by the departure of an employee, and does not deal with the cost of recruitment of a new employee. Economic calculations are adjusted to the tax policy in the Czech Republic. The costs of employee turnover (according to Bliss, 2012 include the costs of substitution of the unoccupied position, costs of conducting the exit interview and termination of the contract. The cost of an executive’s time to understand the causes of leaving and costs of the leaving employee’s training were also determined. Important factors in the costs of employee turnover also include the loss of knowledge and possibly also a loss of customers. Costs of lost employee and department productiveness represent an important part of the costs of employee turnover, as well. For all of these costs there have been proposed general calculations formulas.

  2. Short Communication An efficient method for simultaneous extraction of high-quality RNA and DNA from various plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R R; Viana, A J C; Reátegui, A C E; Vincentz, M G A

    2015-12-29

    Determination of gene expression is an important tool to study biological processes and relies on the quality of the extracted RNA. Changes in gene expression profiles may be directly related to mutations in regulatory DNA sequences or alterations in DNA cytosine methylation, which is an epigenetic mark. Correlation of gene expression with DNA sequence or epigenetic mark polymorphism is often desirable; for this, a robust protocol to isolate high-quality RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample is required. Although commercial kits and protocols are available, they are mainly optimized for animal tissues and, in general, restricted to RNA or DNA extraction, not both. In the present study, we describe an efficient and accessible method to extract both RNA and DNA simultaneously from the same sample of various plant tissues, using small amounts of starting material. The protocol was efficient in the extraction of high-quality nucleic acids from several Arabidopsis thaliana tissues (e.g., leaf, inflorescence stem, flower, fruit, cotyledon, seedlings, root, and embryo) and from other tissues of non-model plants, such as Avicennia schaueriana (Acanthaceae), Theobroma cacao (Malvaceae), Paspalum notatum (Poaceae), and Sorghum bicolor (Poaceae). The obtained nucleic acids were used as templates for downstream analyses, such as mRNA sequencing, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, bisulfite treatment, and others; the results were comparable to those obtained with commercial kits. We believe that this protocol could be applied to a broad range of plant species, help avoid technical and sampling biases, and facilitate several RNA- and DNA-dependent analyses.

  3. Identification of Appropriate Reference Genes for Normalization of miRNA Expression in Grafted Watermelon Plants under Different Nutrient Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weifang; Deng, Qin; Shi, Pibiao; Yang, Jinghua; Hu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Mingfang

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) is a globally important crop belonging to the family Cucurbitaceae. The grafting technique is commonly used to improve its tolerance to stress, as well as to enhance its nutrient uptake and utilization. It is believed that miRNA is most likely involved in its nutrient-starvation response as a graft-transportable signal. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction is the preferred method for miRNA functional analysis, in which reliable reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy. The purpose of this study was to select appropriate reference genes in scion (watermelon) and rootstocks (squash and bottle gourd) of grafted watermelon plants under normal growth conditions and nutrient stresses (nitrogen and phosphorus starvation). Under nutrient starvation, geNorm identified miR167c and miR167f as two most stable genes in both watermelon leaves and squash roots. miR166b was recommended by both geNorm and NormFinder as the best reference in bottle gourd roots under nutrient limitation. Expression of a new Cucurbitaceae miRNA, miR85, was used to validate the reliability of candidate reference genes under nutrient starvation. Moreover, by comparing several target genes expression in qRT-PCR analysis with those in RNA-seq data, miR166b and miR167c were proved to be the most suitable reference genes to normalize miRNA expression under normal growth condition in scion and rootstock tissues, respectively. This study represents the first comprehensive survey of the stability of miRNA reference genes in Cucurbitaceae and provides valuable information for investigating more accurate miRNA expression involving grafted watermelon plants.

  4. An optimised method for the extraction of bacterial mRNA from plant roots infected with Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashleigh eHolmes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of microbial gene expression during host colonisation provides valuable information on the nature of interaction, beneficial or pathogenic, and the adaptive processes involved. Isolation of bacterial mRNA for in planta analysis can be challenging where host nucleic acid may dominate the preparation, or inhibitory compounds affect downstream analysis, e.g. qPCR, microarray or RNA-seq. The goal of this work was to optimise the isolation of bacterial mRNA of food-borne pathogens from living plants. Reported methods for recovery of phytopathogen-infected plant material, using hot phenol extraction and high concentration of bacterial inoculation or large amounts of infected tissues, were found to be inappropriate for plant roots inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7. The bacterial RNA yields were too low and increased plant material resulted in a dominance of plant RNA in the sample. To improve the yield of bacterial RNA and reduce the number of plants required, an optimised method was developed which combines bead beating with directed bacterial lysis using SDS and lysozyme. Inhibitory plant compounds, such as phenolics and polysaccharides, were counteracted with the addition of HMW-PEG and CTAB. The new method increased the total yield of bacterial mRNA substantially and allowed assessment of gene expression by qPCR. This method can be applied to other bacterial species associated with plant roots, and also in the wider context of food safety.

  5. Advances in RNA interference technology and its impact on nutritional improvement, disease and insect control in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoch, Rajan; Thakur, Neelam

    2013-03-01

    This review highlights the advances in the knowledge of RNA interference (RNAi) and discusses recent progress on the functionality of different components RNAi machinery operating in the organisms. The silencing of genes by RNA interference has become the technology of choice for investigation of gene functions in different organisms. The refinement in the knowledge of the endogenous RNAi pathways in plants along with the development of new strategies and applications for the improvement of nutritional value of important agricultural crops through suppression of genes in different plants have opened new vistas for nutritional security. The improvement in the nutritional status of the plants and reduction in the level of toxins or antinutrients was desired for long, but the available technology was not completely successful in achieving the tissue specific regulation of some genes. In the recent years, a number of economically important crop plants have been tested successfully for improving plant nutritional value through metabolic engineering using RNAi. The implications of this technology for crop improvement programs, including nutritional enrichment, reduction of antinutrients, disease, and insect control have been successfully tested in variety of crops with commercial considerations. The enhancement of the nutraceutical traits for the desired health benefits in common crop plants through manipulation of gene expression has been elaborated in this article. The tremendous potential with RNAi technology is expected to revolutionize the modern agriculture for meeting the growing challenges is discussed.

  6. Pitfalls in quantifying species turnover: the residency effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Chase Burns

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The composition of ecological communities changes continuously through time and space. Understanding this turnover in species composition is a central goal in biogeography, but quantifying species turnover can be problematic. Here, I describe an underappreciated source of bias in quantifying species turnover, namely ‘the residency effect’, which occurs when the contiguous distributions of species across sampling domains are small relative to census intervals. I present the results of a simulation model that illustrates the problem theoretically and then I demonstrate the problem empirically using a long-term dataset of plant species turnover on islands. Results from both exercises indicate that empirical estimates of species turnover may be susceptible to significant observer bias, which may potentially cloud a better understanding of how the composition of ecological communities changes through time.

  7. Interaction of amatoxins with plant cells and RNA polymerases II: selection of amanitin-resistant cell lines and synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments directed toward deriving basic information regarding plant RNA polymerase II is presented. The experiments described relate to the potential of isolating RNA polymerase II mutants in plants, using carrot cell cultures as models. Additionally, the synthesis of amanitin-based affinity ligands to immobilize isolated plant RNA polymerase II and associated transcriptional complexes is described. RNA polymerase II activities have been isolated from suspension cultures of carrot and compared to other plant RNA polymerases II with respect to subunit analysis and inhibition with α-amanitin. RNA polymerase II purified by polymin P absorption, DE52, phosphocellulose, and RNA-agarose chromatography is shown to copurify with proteins of 175 (and 200), 135, 70, 43, 28, 22, and 17 kdaltons apparent molecular weights. Conditions for accurate determination of amanitin inhibition of the enzyme are established using 3 H-amanitin and are presented for the first time for plant RNA polymerase II; RNA polymerase II from these cultures is shown to be inhibited by 50% at 3-5 nM by α-amanitin, a value 10-50 times lower than previously reported

  8. Protein turnover in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made in the knowledge of the mechanisms and control of synthesis and degradation of proteins in animal tissues during the last decade. Most of the work on the measurement of synthetic and degradative rates of the mixed protein fraction from tissues has been conducted in the rat. There have, unfortunately, been few publications describing results of protein turnover studies with ruminants. Consideration is given here to the techniques used to measure protein turnover, and some of the results obtained, particularly with sheep, are summarized. No attempt has been made to discuss directly the situation in parasitized animals; rather the aim is to provide background information which complements other work dealing with the effects of parasites on the nitrogen metabolism of ruminants. (author)

  9. A transcriptome-wide study on the microRNA- and the Argonaute 1-enriched small RNA-mediated regulatory networks involved in plant leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J; Ma, X; Yi, Z; Tang, Z; Meng, Y

    2016-03-01

    Leaf senescence is an important physiological process during the plant life cycle. However, systemic studies on the impact of microRNAs (miRNAs) on the expression of senescence-associated genes (SAGs) are lacking. Besides, whether other Argonaute 1 (AGO1)-enriched small RNAs (sRNAs) play regulatory roles in leaf senescence remains unclear. In this study, a total of 5,123 and 1,399 AGO1-enriched sRNAs, excluding miRNAs, were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), respectively. After retrieving SAGs from the Leaf Senescence Database, all of the AGO1-enriched sRNAs and the miRBase-registered miRNAs of these two plants were included for target identification. Supported by degradome signatures, 200 regulatory pairs involving 120 AGO1-enriched sRNAs and 40 SAGs, and 266 regulatory pairs involving 64 miRNAs and 42 SAGs were discovered in Arabidopsis. Moreover, 13 genes predicted to interact with some of the above-identified target genes at protein level were validated as regulated by 17 AGO1-enriched sRNAs and ten miRNAs in Arabidopsis. In rice, only one SAG was targeted by three AGO1-enriched sRNAs, and one SAG was targeted by miR395. However, five AGO1-enriched sRNAs were conserved between Arabidopsis and rice. Target genes conserved between the two plants were identified for three of the above five sRNAs, pointing to the conserved roles of these regulatory pairs in leaf senescence or other developmental procedures. Novel targets were discovered for three of the five AGO1-enriched sRNAs in rice, indicating species-specific functions of these sRNA-target pairs. These results could advance our understanding of the sRNA-involved molecular processes modulating leaf senescence. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  10. Heterologous RNA-silencing suppressors from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses support plum pox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliogka, Varvara I; Calvo, María; Carbonell, Alberto; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-07-01

    HCPro, the RNA-silencing suppressor (RSS) of viruses belonging to the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, is a multifunctional protein presumably involved in all essential steps of the viral infection cycle. Recent studies have shown that plum pox potyvirus (PPV) HCPro can be replaced successfully by cucumber vein yellowing ipomovirus P1b, a sequence-unrelated RSS from a virus of the same family. In order to gain insight into the requirement of a particular RSS to establish a successful potyviral infection, we tested the ability of different heterologous RSSs from both plant- and animal-infecting viruses to substitute for HCPro. Making use of engineered PPV chimeras, we show that PPV HCPro can be replaced functionally by some, but not all, unrelated RSSs, including the NS1 protein of the mammal-infecting influenza A virus. Interestingly, the capacity of a particular RSS to replace HCPro does not correlate strictly with its RNA silencing-suppression strength. Altogether, our results suggest that not all suppression strategies are equally suitable for efficient escape of PPV from the RNA-silencing machinery. The approach followed here, based on using PPV chimeras in which an under-consideration RSS substitutes for HCPro, could further help to study the function of diverse RSSs in a 'highly sensitive' RNA-silencing context, such as that taking place in plant cells during the process of a viral infection.

  11. Molecular phylogenetics and comparative modeling of HEN1, a methyltransferase involved in plant microRNA biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obarska Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, HEN1 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana was discovered as an essential enzyme in plant microRNA (miRNA biogenesis. HEN1 transfers a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to the 2'-OH or 3'-OH group of the last nucleotide of miRNA/miRNA* duplexes produced by the nuclease Dicer. Previously it was found that HEN1 possesses a Rossmann-fold methyltransferase (RFM domain and a long N-terminal extension including a putative double-stranded RNA-binding motif (DSRM. However, little is known about the details of the structure and the mechanism of action of this enzyme, and about its phylogenetic origin. Results Extensive database searches were carried out to identify orthologs and close paralogs of HEN1. Based on the multiple sequence alignment a phylogenetic tree of the HEN1 family was constructed. The fold-recognition approach was used to identify related methyltransferases with experimentally solved structures and to guide the homology modeling of the HEN1 catalytic domain. Additionally, we identified a La-like predicted RNA binding domain located C-terminally to the DSRM domain and a domain with a peptide prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase fold, but without the conserved PPIase active site, located N-terminally to the catalytic domain. Conclusion The bioinformatics analysis revealed that the catalytic domain of HEN1 is not closely related to any known RNA:2'-OH methyltransferases (e.g. to the RrmJ/fibrillarin superfamily, but rather to small-molecule methyltransferases. The structural model was used as a platform to identify the putative active site and substrate-binding residues of HEN and to propose its mechanism of action.

  12. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  13. The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants: phylogeny, structural modeling, activity and subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Michael WC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puf proteins have important roles in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by promoting RNA decay and repressing translation. The Pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD is a conserved region within Puf proteins that binds to RNA with sequence specificity. Although Puf proteins have been well characterized in animal and fungal systems, little is known about the structural and functional characteristics of Puf-like proteins in plants. Results The Arabidopsis and rice genomes code for 26 and 19 Puf-like proteins, respectively, each possessing eight or fewer Puf repeats in their PUM-HD. Key amino acids in the PUM-HD of several of these proteins are conserved with those of animal and fungal homologs, whereas other plant Puf proteins demonstrate extensive variability in these amino acids. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the predicted structure of this domain in plant Puf proteins provides a suitable surface for binding RNA. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments showed that the Arabidopsis AtPum2 PUM-HD binds with high affinity to BoxB of the Drosophila Nanos Response Element I (NRE1 RNA, whereas a point mutation in the core of the NRE1 resulted in a significant reduction in binding affinity. Transient expression of several of the Arabidopsis Puf proteins as fluorescent protein fusions revealed a dynamic, punctate cytoplasmic pattern of localization for most of these proteins. The presence of predicted nuclear export signals and accumulation of AtPuf proteins in the nucleus after treatment of cells with leptomycin B demonstrated that shuttling of these proteins between the cytosol and nucleus is common among these proteins. In addition to the cytoplasmically enriched AtPum proteins, two AtPum proteins showed nuclear targeting with enrichment in the nucleolus. Conclusions The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants consists of a greater number of members than any other model species studied to

  14. Interspecific RNA Interference of SHOOT MERISTEMLESS-Like Disrupts Cuscuta pentagona Plant Parasitism[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alakonya, Amos; Kumar, Ravi; Koenig, Daniel; Kimura, Seisuke; Townsley, Brad; Runo, Steven; Garces, Helena M.; Kang, Julie; Yanez, Andrea; David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Machuka, Jesse; Sinha, Neelima

    2012-01-01

    Infection of crop species by parasitic plants is a major agricultural hindrance resulting in substantial crop losses worldwide. Parasitic plants establish vascular connections with the host plant via structures termed haustoria, which allow acquisition of water and nutrients, often to the detriment of the infected host. Despite the agricultural impact of parasitic plants, the molecular and developmental processes by which host/parasitic interactions are established are not well understood. Here, we examine the development and subsequent establishment of haustorial connections by the parasite dodder (Cuscuta pentagona) on tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Formation of haustoria in dodder is accompanied by upregulation of dodder KNOTTED-like homeobox transcription factors, including SHOOT MERISTEMLESS-like (STM). We demonstrate interspecific silencing of a STM gene in dodder driven by a vascular-specific promoter in transgenic host plants and find that this silencing disrupts dodder growth. The reduced efficacy of dodder infection on STM RNA interference transgenics results from defects in haustorial connection, development, and establishment. Identification of transgene-specific small RNAs in the parasite, coupled with reduced parasite fecundity and increased growth of the infected host, demonstrates the efficacy of interspecific small RNA–mediated silencing of parasite genes. This technology has the potential to be an effective method of biological control of plant parasite infection. PMID:22822208

  15. Effects of elevated CO2 on soil organic matter turnover and plant nitrogen uptake: First results from a dual labeling mesocosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Lucia Muriel; Weber, Enrico; Schrumpf, Marion; Zaehle, Sönke

    2017-04-01

    The response of plant growth to elevated concentrations of CO2 (eCO2) is often constrained by plant nitrogen (N) uptake. To overcome potential N limitation, plants may invest photosynthetically fixed carbon (C) into N acquiring strategies, including fine root biomass, root exudation, or C allocation to mycorrhizal fungi. In turn, these strategies may affect the decomposition of soil organic matter, leading to uncertainties in net effects of eCO2 on C storage. To gain more insight into these plant-soil C-N-interactions, we combined C and N stable isotope labeling in a mesocosm experiment. Saplings of Fagus sylvatica L. were exposed to a 13CO2 enriched atmosphere at near ambient (380 ppm) or elevated (550 ppm) CO2 concentrations for four months of the vegetation period in 2016. Aboveground and belowground net CO2 fluxes were measured separately and the 13C label enabled partitioning of total soil CO2 efflux into old, soil derived and new, plant-derived C. We used ingrowth cores to assess effects of eCO2on belowground C allocation and plant N uptake in more detail and in particular we evaluated the relative importance of ectomycorrhizal associations. In the soil of each sapling, ingrowth cores with different mesh sizes allowed fine roots or only mycorrhizal hyphae to penetrate. In one type of ingrowth core each, we incorporated fine root litter that was enriched in 15N. Additionally, total N uptake was estimated by using 15N enriched saplings and unlabeled control plants. We found that eCO2 increased aboveground net CO2 exchange rates by 19% and total soil respiration by 11%. The eCO2 effect for GPP and also for NPP was positive (+23% and +11%, respectively). By combining gaseous C fluxes with data on new and old C stocks in bulk soil and plants through destructive harvesting in late autumn 2016, we will be able to infer net effects of eCO2 on the fate of C in these mesocosms. Biomass allocation patterns can reveal physiological responses to high C availability under

  16. In vivo visualization of RNA in plants cells using the λN₂₂ system and a GATEWAY-compatible vector series for candidate RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberger, Johannes; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has seen a tremendous increase in RNA research, which has demonstrated that RNAs are involved in many more processes than were previously thought. The dynamics of RNA synthesis towards their regulated activity requires the interplay of RNAs with numerous RNA binding proteins (RBPs). The localization of RNA, a mechanism for controlling translation in a spatial and temporal fashion, requires processing and assembly of RNA into transport granules in the nucleus, transport towards cytoplasmic destinations and regulation of its activity. Compared with animal model systems little is known about RNA dynamics and motility in plants. Commonly used methods to study RNA transport and localization are time-consuming, and require expensive equipment and a high level of experimental skill. Here, we introduce the λN₂₂ RNA stem-loop binding system for the in vivo visualization of RNA in plant cells. The λN₂₂ system consists of two components: the λN₂₂ RNA binding peptide and the corresponding box-B stem loops. We generated fusions of λN₂₂ to different fluorophores and a GATEWAY vector series for the simple fusion of any target RNA 5' or 3' to box-B stem loops. We show that the λN₂₂ system can be used to detect RNAs in transient expression assays, and that it offers advantages compared with the previously described MS2 system. Furthermore, the λN₂₂ system can be used in combination with the MS2 system to visualize different RNAs simultaneously in the same cell. The toolbox of vectors generated for both systems is easy to use and promises significant progress in our understanding of RNA transport and localization in plant cells. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Expression of SANT/HTH Myb mRNA, a plant morphogenesis-regulating transcription factor, changes due to viroid infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Piernikarczyk, R.J.J.; Týcová, Anna; Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj; Kocábek, Tomáš; Steger, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 183, JUL (2015), s. 85-94 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP501/10/J018 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : mRNA target * RNA decay * Biolistic plant inoculation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.971, year: 2015

  18. Step-wise and lineage-specific diversification of plant RNA polymerase genes and origin of the largest plant-specific subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqiong; Ma, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Proteins often function as complexes, yet little is known about the evolution of dissimilar subunits of complexes. DNA-directed RNA polymerases (RNAPs) are multisubunit complexes, with distinct eukaryotic types for different classes of transcripts. In addition to Pol I-III, common in eukaryotes, plants have Pol IV and V for epigenetic regulation. Some RNAP subunits are specific to one type, whereas other subunits are shared by multiple types. We have conducted extensive phylogenetic and sequence analyses, and have placed RNAP gene duplication events in land plant history, thereby reconstructing the subunit compositions of the novel RNAPs during land plant evolution. We found that Pol IV/V have experienced step-wise duplication and diversification of various subunits, with increasingly distinctive subunit compositions. Also, lineage-specific duplications have further increased RNAP complexity with distinct copies in different plant families and varying divergence for subunits of different RNAPs. Further, the largest subunits of Pol IV/V probably originated from a gene fusion in the ancestral land plants. We propose a framework of plant RNAP evolution, providing an excellent model for protein complex evolution. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. The Role of Non-­Coding RNA in Plant Stress

    KAUST Repository

    MacPherson, Cameron R.

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a powerful mechanism that can be adapted to genetically modify crop plants. PTGS operates in many plant signaling pathways including those mediating stress responses. Given the small number of mi

  20. Is plant mitochondrial RNA editing a source of phylogenetic incongruence? An answer from in silico and in vivo data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quagliariello Carla

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plant mitochondria, the post-transcriptional RNA editing process converts C to U at a number of specific sites of the mRNA sequence and usually restores phylogenetically conserved codons and the encoded amino acid residues. Sites undergoing RNA editing evolve at a higher rate than sites not modified by the process. As a result, editing sites strongly affect the evolution of plant mitochondrial genomes, representing an important source of sequence variability and potentially informative characters. To date no clear and convincing evidence has established whether or not editing sites really affect the topology of reconstructed phylogenetic trees. For this reason, we investigated here the effect of RNA editing on the tree building process of twenty different plant mitochondrial gene sequences and by means of computer simulations. Results Based on our simulation study we suggest that the editing ‘noise’ in tree topology inference is mainly manifested at the cDNA level. In particular, editing sites tend to confuse tree topologies when artificial genomic and cDNA sequences are generated shorter than 500 bp and with an editing percentage higher than 5.0%. Similar results have been also obtained with genuine plant mitochondrial genes. In this latter instance, indeed, the topology incongruence increases when the editing percentage goes up from about 3.0 to 14.0%. However, when the average gene length is higher than 1,000 bp (rps3, matR and atp1 no differences in the comparison between inferred genomic and cDNA topologies could be detected. Conclusions Our findings by the here reported in silico and in vivo computer simulation system seem to strongly suggest that editing sites contribute in the generation of misleading phylogenetic trees if the analyzed mitochondrial gene sequence is highly edited (higher than 3.0% and reduced in length (shorter than 500 bp. In the current lack of direct experimental evidence the results

  1. Functional specialization of the plant miR396 regulatory network through distinct microRNA-target interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Debernardi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ∼21 nt small RNAs that regulate gene expression in animals and plants. They can be grouped into families comprising different genes encoding similar or identical mature miRNAs. Several miRNA families are deeply conserved in plant lineages and regulate key aspects of plant development, hormone signaling, and stress response. The ancient miRNA miR396 regulates conserved targets belonging to the GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF family of transcription factors, which are known to control cell proliferation in Arabidopsis leaves. In this work, we characterized the regulation of an additional target for miR396, the transcription factor bHLH74, that is necessary for Arabidopsis normal development. bHLH74 homologs with a miR396 target site could only be detected in the sister families Brassicaceae and Cleomaceae. Still, bHLH74 repression by miR396 is required for margin and vein pattern formation of Arabidopsis leaves. MiR396 contributes to the spatio-temporal regulation of GRF and bHLH74 expression during leaf development. Furthermore, a survey of miR396 sequences in different species showed variations in the 5' portion of the miRNA, a region known to be important for miRNA activity. Analysis of different miR396 variants in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that they have an enhanced activity toward GRF transcription factors. The interaction between the GRF target site and miR396 has a bulge between positions 7 and 8 of the miRNA. Our data indicate that such bulge modulates the strength of the miR396-mediated repression and that this modulation is essential to shape the precise spatio-temporal pattern of GRF2 expression. The results show that ancient miRNAs can regulate conserved targets with varied efficiency in different species, and we further propose that they could acquire new targets whose control might also be biologically relevant.

  2. Salary, Performance, and Superintendent Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Jason A.; Mitani, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Superintendent retention is an important goal for many school districts, yet the factors contributing to superintendent turnover are poorly understood. Most prior quantitative studies of superintendent turnover have relied on small, cross-sectional samples, limiting the evidence base. Utilizing longitudinal administrative records from…

  3. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  4. Towards annotating the plant epigenome: the Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA locus map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Thomas J; Müller, Sebastian Y; Baulcombe, David C

    2018-04-20

    Based on 98 public and internal small RNA high throughput sequencing libraries, we mapped small RNAs to the genome of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana and defined loci based on their expression using an empirical Bayesian approach. The resulting loci were subsequently classified based on their genetic and epigenetic context as well as their expression properties. We present the results of this classification, which broadly conforms to previously reported divisions between transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene silencing small RNAs, and to PolIV and PolV dependencies. However, we are able to demonstrate the existence of further subdivisions in the small RNA population of functional significance. Moreover, we present a framework for similar analyses of small RNA populations in all species.

  5. Plant population processes in the course of forest succession in abandoned meadows. I. Variability and diversity of floristic compositions, and biological mechanisms of species turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Falińska

    2014-01-01

    Within Białowieża Forest the studies on the rate and nature of changes in meadow vegetation on the sites no longer mown were conducted for 15 years (1974-1988). The successional processes were analysed at various organizational levels by applying hierarchi­cal system of study areas, varying in size (Figs. 1, 2). Changes in plant landscape were studied on 15 ha, those in phytocoenoses - 4 × 1 ha, populations - 24 × 200 ml, and those in the individual development - 6 × 25 m2. Forest re-colonize...

  6. Occupational stress and employee turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, Robert S; Day, Andrea J; Morton, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaire data captured in January-March 2007 were examined in relation to turnover in males and females during the next five years. In general, most of the workplace stressors (such as role conflict or peer support) were not antecedents of turnover in any group. Junior personnel with psychological strain in 2007 had an increased risk of turnover in the next five years. Low commitment to the service in 2007 increased the odds of turnover in male and female juniors and in female officers. Female juniors with less effective skills for coping with stress and who exercised less frequently on a weekly basis were more likely to leave. An incidental finding was that the odds of turnover were three times greater in female officers with children than in female officers with no children. Stress management interventions focusing on effective coping and sports and exercise participation which are targeted appropriately may improve retention.

  7. EdiPy: a resource to simulate the evolution of plant mitochondrial genes under the RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Ernesto; Quagliariello, Carla

    2006-02-01

    EdiPy is an online resource appropriately designed to simulate the evolution of plant mitochondrial genes in a biologically realistic fashion. EdiPy takes into account the presence of sites subjected to RNA editing and provides multiple artificial alignments corresponding to both genomic and cDNA sequences. Each artificial data set can successively be submitted to main and widespread evolutionary and phylogenetic software packages such as PAUP, Phyml, PAML and Phylip. As an online bioinformatic resource, EdiPy is available at the following web page: http://biologia.unical.it/py_script/index.html.

  8. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; de Pater, I.E.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees’ challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  9. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Pater, I.E. de; Vianen, A.E.M. van; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees' challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  10. Dual RNA-seq of the plant pathogen phytophthora ramorum and its tanoak host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; Brian J. Knaus; Richard C. Cronn; Hardeep Rai; Jessica W. Wright

    2014-01-01

    Emergent diseases are an ever-increasing threat to forests and forest ecosystems and necessitate the development of research tools for species that often may have few preexisting resources. We sequenced the mRNA expressed by the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum and its most susceptible forest host, tanoak, within the same tissue at two time points after...

  11. Plant perception of β-aminobutyric acid is mediated by an aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luna, E.; Van Hulten, M.; Zhang, Y.; Berkowitz, O.; López, A.; Pétriacq, P.; Sellwood, M.A.; Chen, B.; Burrell, M.; Van de Meene, A.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Flors, V.; Ton, J.

    2014-01-01

    Specific chemicals can prime the plant immune system for augmented defense. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) is a priming agent that provides broad-spectrum disease protection. However, BABA also suppresses plant growth when applied in high doses, which has hampered its application as a crop defense

  12. Plant perception of β-aminobutyric acid is mediated by an aspartyl-tRNA synthetase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luna, Estrella; van Hulten, Marieke; Zhang, Yuhua; Berkowitz, Oliver; López, Ana; Pétriacq, Pierre; Sellwood, Matthew A; Chen, Beining; Burrell, Mike; van de Meene, Allison; Pieterse, Corné M J; Flors, Victor; Ton, Jurriaan

    Specific chemicals can prime the plant immune system for augmented defense. β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) is a priming agent that provides broad-spectrum disease protection. However, BABA also suppresses plant growth when applied in high doses, which has hampered its application as a crop defense

  13. Cytogenetic features of rRNA genes across land plants: analysis of the Plant rDNA database

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Garcia, S.; Kovařík, Aleš; Leitch, A. R.; Garnatje, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 5 (2017), s. 1020-1030 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC16-02149J Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : in-situ hybridization * 5s rdna * 45s rdna * concerted evolution Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  14. The absence of A-to-I editing in the anticodon of plant cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG demands a relaxation of the wobble decoding rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldinger, Carolin A; Leisinger, Anne-Katrin; Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A; Igloi, Gabor L

    2012-10-01

    It is a prevalent concept that, in line with the Wobble Hypothesis, those tRNAs having an adenosine in the first position of the anticodon become modified to an inosine at this position. Sequencing the cDNA derived from the gene coding for cytoplasmic tRNA (Arg) ACG from several higher plants as well as mass spectrometric analysis of the isoacceptor has revealed that for this kingdom an unmodified A in the wobble position of the anticodon is the rule rather than the exception. In vitro translation shows that in the plant system the absence of inosine in the wobble position of tRNA (Arg) does not prevent decoding. This isoacceptor belongs to the class of tRNA that is imported from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria of higher plants. Previous studies on the mitochondrial tRNA pool have demonstrated the existence of tRNA (Arg) ICG in this organelle. In moss the mitochondrial encoded distinct tRNA (Arg) ACG isoacceptor possesses the I34 modification. The implication is that for mitochondrial protein biosynthesis A-to-I editing is necessary and occurs by a mitochondrion-specific deaminase after import of the unmodified nuclear encoded tRNA (Arg) ACG.

  15. Plant adaptation or acclimation to rising CO2 ? Insight from first multigenerational RNA-Seq transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Lazowski, Alexander; Lin, Yunan; Miglietta, Franco; Edwards, Richard J; Chapman, Mark A; Taylor, Gail

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) directly determines the rate of plant photosynthesis and indirectly effects plant productivity and fitness and may therefore act as a selective pressure driving evolution, but evidence to support this contention is sparse. Using Plantago lanceolata L. seed collected from a naturally high CO 2 spring and adjacent ambient CO 2 control site, we investigated multigenerational response to future, elevated atmospheric CO 2 . Plants were grown in either ambient or elevated CO 2 (700 μmol mol -1 ), enabling for the first time, characterization of the functional and population genomics of plant acclimation and adaptation to elevated CO 2 . This revealed that spring and control plants differed significantly in phenotypic plasticity for traits underpinning fitness including above-ground biomass, leaf size, epidermal cell size and number and stomatal density and index. Gene expression responses to elevated CO 2 (acclimation) were modest [33-131 genes differentially expressed (DE)], whilst those between control and spring plants (adaptation) were considerably larger (689-853 DE genes). In contrast, population genomic analysis showed that genetic differentiation between spring and control plants was close to zero, with no fixed differences, suggesting that plants are adapted to their native CO 2 environment at the level of gene expression. An unusual phenotype of increased stomatal index in spring but not control plants in elevated CO 2 correlated with altered expression of stomatal patterning genes between spring and control plants for three loci (YODA, CDKB1;1 and SCRM2) and between ambient and elevated CO 2 for four loci (ER, YODA, MYB88 and BCA1). We propose that the two positive regulators of stomatal number (SCRM2) and CDKB1;1 when upregulated act as key controllers of stomatal adaptation to elevated CO 2 . Combined with significant transcriptome reprogramming of photosynthetic and dark respiration and enhanced growth in spring plants

  16. Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1-Novel virus at the edge of myco- and plant viruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabáková, Lenka; Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 506, June (2017), s. 14-18 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13136; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : double-stranded-rna * molecular characterization * genus ourmiavirus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Virology Impact factor: 3.353, year: 2016

  17. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...... moderate this effect so that the negative consequences of employee turnover are less severe for larger, older and capital intensive firms. These moderating variables indicate the presence of slack resources in the firm, and thus that the accumulation of slack reduces the efficiency losses from employee...

  18. Expression of modified 7SL RNA gene in transgenic Solanum tuberosum plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Lukáš; Matoušek, Jaroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2005), 371-380 ISSN 0006-3134 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : transgenic plants * Solanum tuberosum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.792, year: 2005

  19. A plant microRNA regulates the adaptation of roots to drought stress

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao; Li, Zhuofu; Xiong, Liming

    2012-01-01

    Plants tend to restrict their horizontal root proliferation in response to drought stress, an adaptive response mediated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) in antagonism with auxin through unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that stress

  20. Targeting a heterologous protein to multiple plant organelles via rationally designed 5? mRNA tags

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voges, M.J.; Silver, P.A.; Way, J.C.; Mattozzi, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant bioengineers require simple genetic devices for predictable localization of heterologous proteins to multiple subcellular compartments. Results We designed novel hybrid signal sequences for multiple-compartment localization and characterize their function when fused to GFP in

  1. Tendon 'turnover lengthening' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerovac, S; Miranda, B H

    2013-11-01

    Tendon defect reconstruction is amongst the most technically challenging areas in hand surgery. Tendon substance deficiency reconstruction techniques include lengthening, grafting, two-stage reconstruction and tendon transfers, however each is associated with unique challenges over and above direct repair. We describe a novel 'turnover lengthening' technique for hand tendons that has successfully been applied to the repair of several cases, including a case of attritional flexor and traumatic extensor tendon rupture in two presented patients where primary tenorrhaphy was not possible. In both cases a good post-operative outcome was achieved, as the patients were happy having returned back to normal activities of daily living such that they were discharged 12 weeks post-operatively. Our technique avoids the additional morbidity and complications associated with grafting, transfers and two stage reconstructions. It is quick, simple and reproducible for defects not exceeding 3-4 cm, provides a means of immediate one stage reconstruction, no secondary donor site morbidity and does not compromise salvage by tendon transfer and/or two-stage reconstruction in cases of failure. To our knowledge no such technique has been previously been described to reconstruct such hand tendon defects. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An RNA-Seq transcriptome analysis of orthophosphate-deficient white lupin reveals novel insights into phosphorus acclimation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Jamie A; Yang, S Samuel; Miller, Susan S; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Liu, Junqi; Rydeen, Ariel; Bozsoki, Zoltan; Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Tu, Zheng Jin; Allan, Deborah; Gronwald, John W; Vance, Carroll P

    2013-02-01

    Phosphorus, in its orthophosphate form (P(i)), is one of the most limiting macronutrients in soils for plant growth and development. However, the whole-genome molecular mechanisms contributing to plant acclimation to P(i) deficiency remain largely unknown. White lupin (Lupinus albus) has evolved unique adaptations for growth in P(i)-deficient soils, including the development of cluster roots to increase root surface area. In this study, we utilized RNA-Seq technology to assess global gene expression in white lupin cluster roots, normal roots, and leaves in response to P(i) supply. We de novo assembled 277,224,180 Illumina reads from 12 complementary DNA libraries to build what is to our knowledge the first white lupin gene index (LAGI 1.0). This index contains 125,821 unique sequences with an average length of 1,155 bp. Of these sequences, 50,734 were transcriptionally active (reads per kilobase per million reads ≥ 3), representing approximately 7.8% of the white lupin genome, using the predicted genome size of Lupinus angustifolius as a reference. We identified a total of 2,128 sequences differentially expressed in response to P(i) deficiency with a 2-fold or greater change and P ≤ 0.05. Twelve sequences were consistently differentially expressed due to P(i) deficiency stress in three species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), potato (Solanum tuberosum), and white lupin, making them ideal candidates to monitor the P(i) status of plants. Additionally, classic physiological experiments were coupled with RNA-Seq data to examine the role of cytokinin and gibberellic acid in P(i) deficiency-induced cluster root development. This global gene expression analysis provides new insights into the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in the acclimation to P(i) deficiency.

  3. Collagen turnover after tibial fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joerring, S; Krogsgaard, M; Wilbek, H

    1994-01-01

    Collagen turnover after tibial fractures was examined in 16 patients with fracture of the tibial diaphysis and in 8 patients with fracture in the tibial condyle area by measuring sequential changes in serological markers of turnover of types I and III collagen for up to 26 weeks after fracture....... The markers were the carboxy-terminal extension peptide of type I procollagen (PICP), the amino-terminal extension peptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP), and the pyridinoline cross-linked carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP). The latter is a new serum marker of degradation of type I...... collagen. A group comparison showed characteristic sequential changes in the turnover of types I and III collagen in fractures of the tibial diaphysis and tibial condyles. The turnover of type III collagen reached a maximum after 2 weeks in both groups. The synthesis of type I collagen reached a maximum...

  4. Extractions of High Quality RNA from the Seeds of Jerusalem Artichoke and Other Plant Species with High Levels of Starch and Lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornkham, Tanupat; Wangsomnuk, Preeya Puangsomlee; Fu, Yong-Bi; Wangsomnuk, Pinich; Jogloy, Sanun; Patanothai, Aran

    2013-04-29

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is an important tuber crop. However, Jerusalem artichoke seeds contain high levels of starch and lipid, making the extraction of high-quality RNA extremely difficult and the gene expression analysis challenging. This study was aimed to improve existing methods for extracting total RNA from Jerusalem artichoke dry seeds and to assess the applicability of the improved method in other plant species. Five RNA extraction methods were evaluated on Jerusalem artichoke seeds and two were modified. One modified method with the significant improvement was applied to assay seeds of diverse Jerusalem artichoke accessions, sunflower, rice, maize, peanut and marigold. The effectiveness of the improved method to extract total RNA from seeds was assessed using qPCR analysis of four selected genes. The improved method of Ma and Yang (2011) yielded a maximum RNA solubility and removed most interfering substances. The improved protocol generated 29 to 41 µg RNA/30 mg fresh weight. An A260/A280 ratio of 1.79 to 2.22 showed their RNA purity. Extracted RNA was effective for downstream applications such as first-stranded cDNA synthesis, cDNA cloning and qPCR. The improved method was also effective to extract total RNA from seeds of sunflower, rice, maize and peanut that are rich in polyphenols, lipids and polysaccharides.

  5. Extractions of High Quality RNA from the Seeds of Jerusalem Artichoke and Other Plant Species with High Levels of Starch and Lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanupat Mornkham

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. is an important tuber crop. However, Jerusalem artichoke seeds contain high levels of starch and lipid, making the extraction of high-quality RNA extremely difficult and the gene expression analysis challenging. This study was aimed to improve existing methods for extracting total RNA from Jerusalem artichoke dry seeds and to assess the applicability of the improved method in other plant species. Five RNA extraction methods were evaluated on Jerusalem artichoke seeds and two were modified. One modified method with the significant improvement was applied to assay seeds of diverse Jerusalem artichoke accessions, sunflower, rice, maize, peanut and marigold. The effectiveness of the improved method to extract total RNA from seeds was assessed using qPCR analysis of four selected genes. The improved method of Ma and Yang (2011 yielded a maximum RNA solubility and removed most interfering substances. The improved protocol generated 29 to 41 µg RNA/30 mg fresh weight. An A260/A280 ratio of 1.79 to 2.22 showed their RNA purity. Extracted RNA was effective for downstream applications such as first-stranded cDNA synthesis, cDNA cloning and qPCR. The improved method was also effective to extract total RNA from seeds of sunflower, rice, maize and peanut that are rich in polyphenols, lipids and polysaccharides.

  6. RNA-mediated gene silencing signals are not graft transmissible from the rootstock to the scion in greenhouse-grown apple plants Malus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachowsky, Henryk; Tränkner, Conny; Szankowski, Iris; Waidmann, Sascha; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Treutter, Dieter; Fischer, Thilo C

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing describes the sequence specific degradation of RNA targets. Silencing is a non-cell autonomous event that is graft transmissible in different plant species. The present study is the first report on systemic acquired dsRNA-mediated gene silencing of transgenic and endogenous gene sequences in a woody plant like apple. Transgenic apple plants overexpressing a hairpin gene construct of the gusA reporter gene were produced. These plants were used as rootstocks and grafted with scions of the gusA overexpressing transgenic apple clone T355. After grafting, we observed a reduction of the gusA gene expression in T355 scions in vitro, but not in T355 scions grown in the greenhouse. Similar results were obtained after silencing of the endogenous Mdans gene in apple that is responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis. Subsequently, we performed grafting experiments with Mdans silenced rootstocks and red leaf scions of TNR31-35 in order to evaluate graft transmitted silencing of the endogenous Mdans. The results obtained suggested a graft transmission of silencing signals in in vitro shoots. In contrast, no graft transmission of dsRNA-mediated gene silencing signals was detectable in greenhouse-grown plants and in plants grown in an insect protection tent.

  7. [Turnover Experience of Male Nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsu; Lee, Jeongseop

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify turnover experiences of men in nursing and to derive a substantive theory on the turnover experience of men who are nurses. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 13 men who had worked as a nurse for 1 year or more, and had a turnover experience during that period. Collected data were analyzed on the basis of Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory. The core category in the turnover experiences of the respondents was 'seeking a stable place for me'. In the analysis of the core category, types of 'contentment', 'seeking', 'survival' and 'confusion' were identified. The sequential stages of these nurses' turnover experience were 'confrontation', 'incertitude', 'retrying' and 'realization'. However, when a problem arose in the process, they returned to the stage of confusion. Thus, these stages could occur in a circular fashion. These findings provide a deep understanding of the turnover experience of men in nursing and offers new information about how they adapt to nursing practice. The findings should be useful as foundational data for men who hope to become nurses and also for managers responsible for nurses who are men. © 2017 Korean Society of Nursing Science

  8. Impact of SO(2) on Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome in wildtype and sulfite oxidase knockout plants analyzed by RNA deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamisch, Domenica; Randewig, Dörte; Schliesky, Simon; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P M; Geffers, Robert; Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz; Mendel, Ralf R; Hänsch, Robert

    2012-12-01

    High concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO(2) ) as an air pollutant, and its derivative sulfite, cause abiotic stress that can lead to cell death. It is currently unknown to what extent plant fumigation triggers specific transcriptional responses. To address this question, and to test the hypothesis that sulfite oxidase (SO) is acting in SO(2) detoxification, we compared Arabidopsis wildtype (WT) and SO knockout lines (SO-KO) facing the impact of 600 nl l(-1) SO(2) , using RNAseq to quantify absolute transcript abundances. These transcriptome data were correlated to sulfur metabolism-related enzyme activities and metabolites obtained from identical samples in a previous study. SO-KO plants exhibited remarkable and broad regulative responses at the mRNA level, especially in transcripts related to sulfur metabolism enzymes, but also in those related to stress response and senescence. Focusing on SO regulation, no alterations were detectable in the WT, whereas in SO-KO plants we found up-regulation of two splice variants of the SO gene, although this gene is not functional in this line. Our data provide evidence for the highly specific coregulation between SO and sulfur-related enzymes like APS reductase, and suggest two novel candidates for involvement in SO(2) detoxification: an apoplastic peroxidase, and defensins as putative cysteine mass storages. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. The first phlebo-like virus infecting plants: a case study on the adaptation of negative-stranded RNA viruses to new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Beatriz; Minutolo, Maria; De Stradis, Angelo; Palmisano, Francesco; Alioto, Daniela; Di Serio, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    A novel negative-stranded (ns) RNA virus associated with a severe citrus disease reported more than 80 years ago has been identified. Transmission electron microscopy showed that this novel virus, tentatively named citrus concave gum-associated virus, is flexuous and non-enveloped. Notwithstanding, its two genomic RNAs share structural features with members of the genus Phlebovirus, which are enveloped arthropod-transmitted viruses infecting mammals, and with a group of still unclassified phlebo-like viruses mainly infecting arthropods. CCGaV genomic RNAs code for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, a nucleocapsid protein and a putative movement protein showing structural and phylogenetic relationships with phlebo-like viruses, phleboviruses and the unrelated ophioviruses, respectively, thus providing intriguing evidence of a modular genome evolution. Phylogenetic reconstructions identified an invertebrate-restricted virus as the most likely ancestor of this virus, revealing that its adaptation to plants was independent from and possibly predated that of the other nsRNA plant viruses. These data are consistent with an evolutionary scenario in which trans-kingdom adaptation occurred several times during the history of nsRNA viruses and followed different evolutionary pathways, in which genomic RNA segments were gained or lost. The need to create a new genus for this bipartite nsRNA virus and the impact of the rapid and specific detection methods developed here on citrus sanitation and certification are also discussed. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Business Ethics & Employee Turnover: CAFE Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sapovadia, Vrajlal; Patel, Sweta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Business ethics is in discussion for its importance universally, so is the employee turnover in business. Unethical practices are unwanted, so is the high employee turnover. Unethical practices and high employee turnover in business is ubiquitous. No consensus exists on defining ethics. Employee turnover is well defined, but there is no consensus on when employee turnover is disadvantageous for the company. The Golden Rule or ethic of reciprocity, a maxim states that either ...

  11. The effect of calcium salts on Dna-ase and Rna-ase activity of irradiated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanova, S.V.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of the post-radiation factor helping the restoration of radiation damages in the early sorts of cotton plant 1306'DV Goss. hirsutum was studied. In particular the action of treating the irradiated seed in the solution of calcium salts on the functional state of alcaline and acid forms of nucleases in cellular components was investigated. The dry seed of cotton was irradiated with gamma-rays at dose of 30 krad. It was found that irradiation of the dry seed at the radiosensitive organ (roots) increased the acid DNA-ase in the cellular nuclei, in the radioresistant (leaves) - the alcaline DNA-ase and RNA-ase. With irradiation both forms of DNA-ase in the mitochondriae diminished. After treatment of the irradiated seed in the solution of calcium salts the activity of acid nucleases and alcaline enzymes remained normal

  12. A plant microRNA regulates the adaptation of roots to drought stress

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2012-06-01

    Plants tend to restrict their horizontal root proliferation in response to drought stress, an adaptive response mediated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) in antagonism with auxin through unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that stress-regulated miR393-guided cleavage of the transcripts encoding two auxin receptors, TIR1 and AFB2, was required for inhibition of lateral root growth by ABA or osmotic stress. Unlike in the control plants, the lateral root growth of seedlings expressing miR393-resistant TIR1 or AFB2 was no longer inhibited by ABA or osmotic stress. Our results indicate that miR393-mediated attenuation of auxin signaling modulates root adaptation to drought stress. © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recovery of Nicotiana benthamiana plants from a necrotic response induced by a nepovirus is associated with RNA silencing but not with reduced virus titer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovel, Juan; Walker, Melanie; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2007-11-01

    Recovery of plants from virus-induced symptoms is often described as a consequence of RNA silencing, an antiviral defense mechanism. For example, recovery of Nicotiana clevelandii from a nepovirus (tomato black ring virus) is associated with a decreased viral RNA concentration and sequence-specific resistance to further virus infection. In this study, we have characterized the interaction of another nepovirus, tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV), with host defense responses during symptom induction and subsequent recovery. Early in infection, ToRSV induced a necrotic phenotype in Nicotiana benthamiana that showed characteristics typical of a hypersensitive response. RNA silencing was also activated during ToRSV infection, as evidenced by the presence of ToRSV-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that could direct degradation of ToRSV sequences introduced into sensor constructs. Surprisingly, disappearance of symptoms was not accompanied by a commensurate reduction in viral RNA levels. The stability of ToRSV RNA after recovery was also observed in N. clevelandii and Cucumis sativus and in N. benthamiana plants carrying a functional RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 ortholog from Medicago truncatula. In experiments with a reporter transgene (green fluorescent protein), ToRSV did not suppress the initiation or maintenance of transgene silencing, although the movement of the silencing signal was partially hindered. Our results demonstrate that although RNA silencing is active during recovery, reduction of virus titer is not required for the initiation of this phenotype. This scenario adds an unforeseen layer of complexity to the interaction of nepoviruses with the host RNA silencing machinery. The possibility that viral proteins, viral RNAs, and/or virus-derived siRNAs inactivate host defense responses is discussed.

  14. Histone turnover within nonproliferating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commerford, S.L.; Carsten, A.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    The turnover of DNA and histones in the livers and brains of mice has been determined. These mice had been exposed to constant levels of tritiated water from conception until they were 8 months old. At this point, exposure to tritium was discontinued, and the tritium remaining in DNA and histones was measured at various intervals afterward. The half-lives calculated for these components (with 95% confidence limits given in parentheses) were 117 (85 to 188) days for liver histone, 318 (241 to 466) days for liver DNA, 159 (129 to 208) days for brain histone and 593 (376 to 1406) days for brain DNA. The difference between histone and DNA turnover is statistically significant for both tissues and indicates that histone turnover within tissues cannot be solely accounted for by cell turnover within the tissue but also must include histone turnover within living cells. The half-life of histone within cells is estimated to be 117 (88 to 178) days in liver and 223 (187 to 277) days in brain

  15. Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes revealing insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Conti, Raphael; Araújo, Janete Magali; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA) and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase) ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant. PMID:22481887

  16. Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes reveling insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Nóbrega Dourado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant.

  17. Analysis of 16S rRNA and mxaF genes revealing insights into Methylobacterium niche-specific plant association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Manuella Nóbrega; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Conti, Raphael; Araújo, Janete Magali; Araújo, Welington Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The genus Methylobacterium comprises pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophic (PPFM) bacteria, known to be an important plant-associated bacterial group. Species of this group, described as plant-nodulating, have the dual capacity of producing cytokinin and enzymes, such as pectinase and cellulase, involved in systemic resistance induction and nitrogen fixation under specific plant environmental conditions. The aim hereby was to evaluate the phylogenetic distribution of Methylobacterium spp. isolates from different host plants. Thus, a comparative analysis between sequences from structural (16S rRNA) and functional mxaF (which codifies for a subunit of the enzyme methanol dehydrogenase) ubiquitous genes, was undertaken. Notably, some Methylobacterium spp. isolates are generalists through colonizing more than one host plant, whereas others are exclusively found in certain specific plant-species. Congruency between phylogeny and specific host inhabitance was higher in the mxaF gene than in the 16S rRNA, a possible indication of function-based selection in this niche. Therefore, in a first stage, plant colonization by Methylobacterium spp. could represent generalist behavior, possibly related to microbial competition and adaptation to a plant environment. Otherwise, niche-specific colonization is apparently impelled by the host plant.

  18. Selection and Verification of Candidate Reference Genes for Mature MicroRNA Expression by Quantitative RT-PCR in the Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR is a rapid and sensitive method for analyzing microRNA (miRNA expression. However, accurate qRT-PCR results depend on the selection of reliable reference genes as internal positive controls. To date, few studies have identified reliable reference genes for differential expression analysis of miRNAs among tissues, and among experimental conditions in plants. In this study, three miRNAs and four non-coding small RNAs (ncRNA were selected as reference candidates, and the stability of their expression was evaluated among different tissues and under different experimental conditions in the tea plant (Camellia sinensis using the geNorm and NormFinder programs. It was shown that miR159a was the best single reference gene in the bud to the fifth leaf, 5S rRNA was the most suitable gene in different organs, miR6149 was the most stable gene when the leaves were attacked by Ectropis oblique and U4, miR5368n and miR159a were the best genes when the leaves were treated by methyl jasmonate (MeJA, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid (ABA, respectively. Our results provide suitable reference genes for future investigations on miRNA functions in tea plants.

  19. How to store plant tissues in the absence of liquid nitrogen? Ethanol preserves the RNA integrity of Cannabis sativa stem tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauralie Mangeot-Peter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of intact RNA is a limiting step when gene expression profiling is performed using field-collected plant material. The use of liquid nitrogen ensures the optimal preservation of RNA, however it is not always practical, especially if the plant material has to be sampled in remote locations. Ethanol is known to preserve DNA in plant tissues even after a long storage period and here its suitability to preserve the RNA of textile hemp cortical tissues was tested. Hemp (Cannabis sativa L. is an economically important fibre crop because it supplies cellulosic bast fibres used in different industrial sectors. In this study we demonstrate the suitability of ethanol for RNA preservation by analyzing tissues stored at 4 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 8 days. We show that in all the cases the extracted RNA is intact. We finally analyze hemp stem tissues stored in ethanol for 1 month and demonstrate the preservation of the tissue structure, particularly of bast fibres.

  20. RNA-guided Transcriptional Regulation in Plants via dCas9 Chimeric Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Baazim, Hatoon

    2014-05-01

    Developing targeted genome regulation approaches holds much promise for accelerating trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs)/CRISPR associated (Cas) system provides bacteria and archaea with an adaptive molecular immunity mechanism against invading nucleic acids through phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing purposes across a variety of cell types and organisms. Recently, the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate the expression patterns in bacterial, yeast and human cells. Here, we employed this DNA-targeting system for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based activators and repressors. For example, we fused to the C-terminus of dCas9 with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors, respectively, to generate transcriptional activators, and the SRDX repression domain to generate transcriptional repressor. Our data demonstrate that the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators, guided by gRNAs complementary to promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on episomal targets in plant cells. Moreover, our data suggest that the dCas9:SRDX repressor and the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators are capable of markedly repressing or activating, respectively, the transcription of an endogenous genomic target. Our data indicate that the CRISPR/dCas9:TFs DNA targeting system can be used in plants as a functional genomic tool and for biotechnological applications.

  1. Job turnover and labor turnover : a taxonomy of employment dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, Wolter H.J.; Hamermesh, Daniel S.

    1994-01-01

    We present an organized set of stylized facts on the relations among flows of workers,changes in employment and changes in the numer of jobs at the firm level. Job turnover isusually measured by comparing stocks of employment in each firm at two points in time andadding up the absolute employment

  2. Deep RNA-Seq profile reveals biodiversity, plant-microbe interactions and a large family of NBS-LRR resistance genes in walnut (Juglans regia) tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Britton, Monica; Martínez-García, P J; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2016-03-01

    Deep RNA-Seq profiling, a revolutionary method used for quantifying transcriptional levels, often includes non-specific transcripts from other co-existing organisms in spite of stringent protocols. Using the recently published walnut genome sequence as a filter, we present a broad analysis of the RNA-Seq derived transcriptome profiles obtained from twenty different tissues to extract the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in the walnut ecosystem in California. Since the residual nature of the transcripts being analyzed does not provide sufficient information to identify the exact strain, inferences made are constrained to the genus level. The presence of the pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora was detected in the root through the presence of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Cryptococcus, the causal agent of cryptococcosis, was found in the catkins and vegetative buds, corroborating previous work indicating that the plant surface supported the sexual cycle of this human pathogen. The RNA-Seq profile revealed several species of the endophytic nitrogen fixing Actinobacteria. Another bacterial species implicated in aerobic biodegradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (Methylibium petroleiphilum) is also found in the root. RNA encoding proteins from the pea aphid were found in the leaves and vegetative buds, while a serine protease from mosquito with significant homology to a female reproductive tract protease from Drosophila mojavensis in the vegetative bud suggests egg-laying activities. The comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq data present also unraveled detailed, tissue-specific information of ~400 transcripts encoded by the largest family of resistance (R) genes (NBS-LRR), which possibly rationalizes the resistance of the specific walnut plant to the pathogens detected. Thus, we elucidate the biodiversity and possible plant-microbe interactions in several walnut (Juglans regia) tissues in California using deep RNA-Seq profiling.

  3. Gene silencing of mannose 6-phosphate reductase in the parasitic weed Orobanche aegyptiaca through the production of homologous dsRNA sequences in the host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Radi; Cholakh, Hila; Joel, Daniel M; Leibman, Diana; Steinitz, Benjamin; Zelcer, Aaron; Naglis, Anna; Yarden, Oded; Gal-On, Amit

    2009-08-01

    Orobanche spp. (broomrape) are parasitic plants which subsist on the roots of a wide range of hosts, including tomato, causing severe losses in yield quality and quantity. Large amounts of mannitol accumulate in this parasitic weed during development. Mannose 6-phosphate reductase (M6PR) is a key enzyme in mannitol biosynthesis, and it has been suggested that mannitol accumulation may be very important for Orobanche development. Therefore, the Orobanche M6PR gene is a potential target for efforts to control this parasite. Transgenic tomato plants were produced bearing a gene construct containing a specific 277-bp fragment from Orobanche aegyptiaca M6PR-mRNA, in an inverted-repeat configuration. M6PR-siRNA was detected in three independent transgenic tomato lines in the R1 generation, but was not detected in the parasite. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the amount of endogenous M6PR mRNA in the tubercles and underground shoots of O. aegyptiaca grown on transgenic host plants was reduced by 60%-80%. Concomitant with M6PR mRNA suppression, there was a significant decrease in mannitol level and a significant increase in the percentage of dead O. aegyptiaca tubercles on the transgenic host plants. The detection of mir390, which is involved with cytoplasmic dsRNA processing, is the first indication of the existence of gene-silencing mechanisms in Orobanche spp. Gene silencing mechanisms are probably involved with the production of decreased levels of M6PR mRNA in the parasites grown on the transformed tomato lines.

  4. Employee turnover: measuring the malady.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One measure of an organization's value to its employees is turnover. But how do you know if your employees are wondering if the grass is greener elsewhere? Scott Badler in his book What's So Funny about Looking for a Job? suggests a quick quiz to find out.

  5. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Deog Yoon

    1999-01-01

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  6. Species turnover and geographic distance in an urban river network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouquette, James R.; Dallimer, Martin; Armsworth, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    AimUnderstanding the relationships between species turnover, environmental features and the geographic distance between sites can provide important insights into the processes driving species diversity. This is particularly relevant where the effective distance between sites may be a function...... patterns of species turnover and to determine whether these patterns differ between different taxonomic groups. LocationSheffield area, UK. MethodsAquatic (macroinvertebrates, diatoms) and terrestrial (birds, plants, butterflies) organisms were surveyed at 41 sites across an urban river network. We...... of the geographic distance measures, although network distance remained significant for birds and some plant groups after removing the effect of environmental distance. Water-dispersed and neophyte plant groups were significantly related to network and flow distance. Main conclusionsThe results suggest that aquatic...

  7. An improved and reproducible protocol for the extraction of high quality fungal RNA from plant biomass substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Mäkelä, Miia R; Sietiö, Outi-Maaria; de Vries, Ronald P; Hildén, Kristiina S; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of high quantity and quality RNA is a crucial step in the detection of meaningful gene expression data. Obtaining intact fungal RNA from complex lignocellulosic substrates is often difficult, producing low integrity RNA which perform poorly in downstream applications. In this study we

  8. Plant 7SL RNA and tRNA(Tyr) genes with inserted antisense sequences are efficiently expressed in an in vitro transcription system from Nicotiana tabacum cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yukawa, Y.; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Grimm, M.; Vrba, Lukáš; Steger, G.; Sugiura, M.; Beier, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 50, - (2002), s. 713-723 ISSN 0167-4412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/99/1591; GA MŠk ME 463 Keywords : antisense RNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.529, year: 2002

  9. Antigen-driven T-cell turnover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraser, Christophe; Ferguson, Neil M.; de Wolf, Frank; Ghani, Azra C.; Garnett, Geoff P.; Anderson, Roy M.

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to characterize the distribution of cell turnover rates within a population of T lymphocytes. Previous models of T-cell dynamics have assumed a constant uniform turnover rate; here we consider turnover in a cell pool subject to clonal proliferation in response to

  10. How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronfeldt, Matthew; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers often assume that teacher turnover harms student achievement, though recent studies suggest this may not be the case. Using a unique identification strategy that employs school-by-grade level turnover and two classes of fixed-effects models, this study estimates the effects of teacher turnover on over 850,000 New York…

  11. Using Turnover as a Recruitment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Teacher turnover is notoriously high in the field of early childhood education with an estimated 33% of staff exiting the workplace each year. Turnover is costly. Not only do high levels of turnover negatively impact children's growth and development, it also erodes the program's economic stability and wherewithal to provide effective operations…

  12. Structural characterization of an intermolecular RNA–RNA interaction involved in the transcription regulation element of a bipartite plant virus

    OpenAIRE

    Guenther, Richard H.; Sit, Tim L.; Gracz, Hanna S.; Dolan, Michael A.; Townsend, Hannah L.; Liu, Guihua; Newman, Winnell H.; Agris, Paul F.; Lommel, Steven A.

    2004-01-01

    The 34-nucleotide trans-activator (TA) located within the RNA-2 of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus folds into a simple hairpin. The eight-nucleotide TA loop base pairs with eight complementary nucleotides in the TA binding sequence (TABS) of the capsid protein subgenomic promoter on RNA-1 and trans-activates subgenomic RNA synthesis. Short synthetic oligoribonucleotide mimics of the RNA-1 TABS and the RNA-2 TA form a weak 1:1 bimolecular complex in vitro with a Ka of 5.3 × 104 M–1. Ka determ...

  13. Transgenic plants over-expressing insect-specific microRNA acquire insecticidal activity against Helicoverpa armigera: an alternative to Bt-toxin technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Aditi; Rajamani, Vijayalakshmi; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar; Bhatnagar, Raj K

    2015-10-01

    The success of Bt transgenics in controlling predation of crops has been tempered by sporadic emergence of resistance in targeted insect larvae. Such emerging threats have prompted the search for novel insecticidal molecules that are specific and could be expressed through plants. We have resorted to small RNA-based technology for an investigative search and focused our attention to an insect-specific miRNA that interferes with the insect molting process resulting in the death of the larvae. In this study, we report the designing of a vector that produces artificial microRNA (amiR), namely amiR-24, which targets the chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera. This vector was used as transgene in tobacco. Northern blot and real-time analysis revealed the high level expression of amiR-24 in transgenic tobacco plants. Larvae feeding on the transgenic plants ceased to molt further and eventually died. Our results demonstrate that transgenic tobacco plants can express amiR-24 insectice specific to H. armigera.

  14. Oncogenic pathways and myrna: effects on messenger's turnover, regulation by synthetic oligo ribonucleotides and therapeutic applications in experimental settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The project has been focusing on molecular mechanisms determining the rate of RNA degradation eventually important to regulate gene expression and phenotype at post transcription level. Exogenous synthetic oligonucleotides targeting the relevant domains of b- RNA degradation could stabilize the transcript, efficiently enhance gene expression and alter the cellular phenotype accordingly. The experimental model was the bcl2 RNA (b-RNA), its molecular mechanisms of degradation and the functional effects of turnover modifications by exogenous means

  15. Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation: RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift from acclimation to survival strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Nauts, Robin; Van Hees, May; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2017-04-01

    Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plant species. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treatments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stress in plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morphological and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7days in a dose-rate dependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosynthetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined the gene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expression data reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by triggering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes related to antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting that only high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the photosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study, supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towards survival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis and control of employee turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2007-01-01

    Turnover is a relatively simple and easily described concept. However, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect, and thus, not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some which can be corrected and some which cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role.

  17. Supervisory Turnover in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Danica K.; Broome, Kirk M.; Edwards, Jennifer R.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2009-01-01

    Staff turnover is a significant issue within substance abuse treatment, with implications for service delivery and organizational health. This study examined factors associated with turnover among supervisors in outpatient substance abuse treatment. Turnover was conceptualized as being an individual response to organizational-level influences, and predictors represent aggregate program measures. Participants included 532 staff (including 467 counselors and 65 clinical/program directors) from 90 programs in four regions of the USA. Using logistic regression, analyses of structural factors indicated that programs affiliated with a parent organization and those providing more counseling hours to clients had higher turnover rates. When measures of job attitudes were included, only parent affiliation and collective appraisal of satisfaction were related to turnover. Subsequent analyses identified a trend toward increased supervisory turnover when satisfaction was low following the departure of a previous supervisor. These findings suggest that organizational-level factors can be influential in supervisory turnover. PMID:19949883

  18. Bone turnover in postmenopausal osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, K.

    1988-02-01

    Studies of the bone turnover in postmenopausal osteoporosis are essential, because the associated bone loss is inevitably due to the relative increase of bone resorption compared with bone formation. Measurement of the bone mineral content (BMC) in normal adults is assessed - partly on the uncorrected values and partly in proportion to the body muscle mass. The whole body retention (WBR) method is presented. The WBR and alternative urinary excretion (UE) methods used by the author are characterised and compared with the retention methods described in the literature. The representativity of WBR and UE for the estimation of bone turnover in normal subjects and patients with various bone metabolic diseases is discussed. The conclusion is that the modified retention methods used by the author have a satisfactory precision and accuracy in relation to the clinical studies carried out. The author's modification of the WBR method for determination of bone turnover and the alternative urinary excretion method (UE) consists in continuous scanning in the whole body count, using a gamma camera, and with the collimator a short distance from the volunteer. This procedure has the advantage of restricting the radioactive dose to 2 mCi (72 MBa). This is smaller by a factor of 5-10 than the dose used to measure WBR with equally simple counting equipment: With the author's procedure, using frontal counting, WBR is systematically underestimated by about 4 per cent point compared to the purely dorsal count, but since the frontal position is the most comfortable, requires a smaller radioactive dose, and the error is systematic, it is the preferred counting procedure. Correction of WBR and UE for bone mineral content is in principle a new parameter of bone turnover, whose improved accuracy increases the validity of the retention determinations. 136 refs. (EG)

  19. Evolution of RLSB, a nuclear-encoded S1 domain RNA binding protein associated with post-transcriptional regulation of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Stata, Matt; Siford, Rebecca; Sage, Tammy L; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Albert, Victor A; Berry, James O

    2016-06-29

    RLSB, an S-1 domain RNA binding protein of Arabidopsis, selectively binds rbcL mRNA and co-localizes with Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) within chloroplasts of C3 and C4 plants. Previous studies using both Arabidopsis (C3) and maize (C4) suggest RLSB homologs are post-transcriptional regulators of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA. While RLSB accumulates in all Arabidopsis leaf chlorenchyma cells, in C4 leaves RLSB-like proteins accumulate only within Rubisco-containing bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type species, and only within central compartment chloroplasts in the single cell C4 plant Bienertia. Our recent evidence implicates this mRNA binding protein as a primary determinant of rbcL expression, cellular localization/compartmentalization, and photosynthetic function in all multicellular green plants. This study addresses the hypothesis that RLSB is a highly conserved Rubisco regulatory factor that occurs in the chloroplasts all higher plants. Phylogenetic analysis has identified RLSB orthologs and paralogs in all major plant groups, from ancient liverworts to recent angiosperms. RLSB homologs were also identified in algae of the division Charophyta, a lineage closely related to land plants. RLSB-like sequences were not identified in any other algae, suggesting that it may be specific to the evolutionary line leading to land plants. The RLSB family occurs in single copy across most angiosperms, although a few species with two copies were identified, seemingly randomly distributed throughout the various taxa, although perhaps correlating in some cases with known ancient whole genome duplications. Monocots of the order Poales (Poaceae and Cyperaceae) were found to contain two copies, designated here as RLSB-a and RLSB-b, with only RLSB-a implicated in the regulation of rbcL across the maize developmental gradient. Analysis of microsynteny in angiosperms revealed high levels of conservation across eudicot species and for both paralogs in

  20. SAD1, an RNA polymerase I subunit A34.5 of rice, interacts with Mediator and controls various aspects of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiqiang; Yoshida, Akiko; Takahashi, Megumu; Maekawa, Masahiko; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kyozuka, Junko

    2015-01-01

    The DWARF14 (D14) gene of rice functions within the signaling pathway of strigolactones, a group of plant hormones that inhibits shoot branching. We isolated a recessive mutant named super apical dormant (sad1-1) from a suppressor screen of d14-1. The growth of tillers (vegetative shoot branches) is suppressed in both the d14-1 sad1-1 double mutant and the sad1-1 single mutant. In addition, the sad1-1 mutant shows pleiotropic defects throughout development. SAD1 encodes an ortholog of RPA34.5, a subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Consequently, the level of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is severely reduced in the sad1-1 mutant. These results indicate that proper ribosome function is a prerequisite for normal development in plants. The Arabidopsis ortholog of SAD1 was previously isolated as a Mediator-interacting protein. Here we show that SAD1 interacts physically with the Mediator complex through direct binding with OsMED4, a component of the middle module of the Mediator complex in rice. It is known that Mediator interacts with Pol II, which transcribes mRNAs and functions as a central regulator of transcription. This study indicates a novel aspect of Mediator function in Pol I-controlled rRNA transcription. TFIIF2 and RPC53 are the counterparts of RPA34.5 in Pol II and Pol III, respectively. We demonstrate that the rice orthologs of these proteins also interact with OsMED4. Our results suggest that interaction with MED4 in the Mediator complex is a common feature of the three types of RNA polymerases. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. KECENDERUNGAN KEPUASAN KERJA SEBAGAI TRIGGER TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raditya Adi Saputra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study are: (1 To determine the effect of job satisfaction on turnover intention; (2 To determine the effect of work stress on turnover intention; (3 To determine the effect of compensation on turnover intention; (4 To determine the effect of organizational climate on turnover intention; and (5 To determine the stress of work, compensation, organizational climate and job satisfaction effect on turnover intention. The population in this study are employees of the Cooperative KOKAPURA AVIA totaling 180 people, while employees who have worked more than three years as many as 128 people. Samples were taken 97 people. The technique of collecting data using questionnaires. The analysis used is multiple regression analysis and path analysis using PLS 3.0 Smart program. Based on the results of the study concluded that: (1 Job satisfaction significantly influence employee turnover intention; (2 Work stress significantly influence employee turnover intention; (3 Compensation incentives significantly influence employee turnover intention; (4 organizational climate significantly influence employee turnover intention; and (5 Work stress, incentive compensation, organizational climate and job satisfaction simultaneously significantly influence employee turnover intention.

  2. Water turnover in reindeer. Some environmental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.D.; Luick, J.R.; White, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The nutritional and climatic effects on water turnover (determined using tritiated water) in reindeer are described. At low ambient temperatures (ca. -20 0 C) water turnover is related to protein and mineral intake, which is reflected in the relations of faecal and urinary water to nitrogen and ash excretion via these avenues. As ambient temperature increases, respiratory water, faecal water and urine flow increase, resulting in an increase in water turnover

  3. The costs of turnover in nursing homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Spector, William D.; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Background Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. Objectives To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. Data and sample 902 nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), Medicare enrollment files, Census and Area Resource File (ARF). Research Design We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable (IV) limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. Results The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The IV estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (p=0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10 percentage point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. Conclusion The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs. PMID:19648834

  4. The costs of turnover in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B; Spector, William D; Limcangco, Rhona; Wang, Ying; Feng, Zhanlian; Mor, Vincent

    2009-10-01

    Turnover rates in nursing homes have been persistently high for decades, ranging upwards of 100%. To estimate the net costs associated with turnover of direct care staff in nursing homes. DATA AND SAMPLE: Nine hundred two nursing homes in California in 2005. Data included Medicaid cost reports, the Minimum Data Set, Medicare enrollment files, Census, and Area Resource File. We estimated total cost functions, which included in addition to exogenous outputs and wages, the facility turnover rate. Instrumental variable limited information maximum likelihood techniques were used for estimation to deal with the endogeneity of turnover and costs. The cost functions exhibited the expected behavior, with initially increasing and then decreasing returns to scale. The ordinary least square estimate did not show a significant association between costs and turnover. The instrumental variable estimate of turnover costs was negative and significant (P = 0.039). The marginal cost savings associated with a 10% point increase in turnover for an average facility was $167,063 or 2.9% of annual total costs. The net savings associated with turnover offer an explanation for the persistence of this phenomenon over the last decades, despite the many policy initiatives to reduce it. Future policy efforts need to recognize the complex relationship between turnover and costs.

  5. [New nurse turnover intention and influencing factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Sook; Sohn, In Soon; Kim, Nam Eun

    2009-12-01

    The study was done to identify turnover intention in new nurses according to characteristics of the nurses and other factors affecting turnover and to provide data to set up a strategy to reduce the turnover. Data were collected from 1,077 new nurses who had less than 12 months employment experience and worked in one of 188 hospitals. Eight research instruments were used. Data analysis was done using SPSS WIN 15.0 program. Several factors influence new nurse turnover intention. The average score for turnover intention was 2.12. The scores for subscales were self efficacy, 3.76, nursing performance, 3.90, job satisfaction, 2.09, organization commitment, 1.28, stress, 1.32, burnout, 2.82 and nursing organizational culture, 3.29. Turnover intention was related to self efficacy, nursing performance, job satisfaction, organization commitment, stress, burnout, nursing organizational culture, duration of in-class training, duration of on the job training, number of hospital beds, length of employment and duration of employment in current workplace. The predicting factors for turnover intention were burnout, stress, duration of employment in the current workplace, self efficacy and nursing performance. Those factors explained 51.6% of turnover intention. New nurse turnover intention can be reduced by mitigating the factors affecting this intention.

  6. Biotic turnover rates during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivrins, Normunds; Soininen, Janne; Amon, Leeli; Fontana, Sonia L.; Gryguc, Gražyna; Heikkilä, Maija; Heiri, Oliver; Kisielienė, Dalia; Reitalu, Triin; Stančikaitė, Miglė; Veski, Siim; Seppä, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    The Northern Hemisphere is currently warming at the rate which is unprecedented during the Holocene. Quantitative palaeoclimatic records show that the most recent time in the geological history with comparable warming rates was during the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (PHT) about 14,000 to 11,000 years ago. To better understand the biotic response to rapid temperature change, we explore the community turnover rates during the PHT by focusing on the Baltic region in the southeastern sector of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet, where an exceptionally dense network on microfossil and macrofossil data that reflect the biotic community history are available. We further use a composite chironomid-based summer temperature reconstruction compiled specifically for our study region to calculate the rate of temperature change during the PHT. The fastest biotic turnover in the terrestrial and aquatic communities occurred during the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift at 11,700 years ago. This general shift in species composition was accompanied by regional extinctions, including disappearance of mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and many arctic-alpine plant taxa, such as Dryas octopetala, Salix polaris and Saxifraga aizoides, from the region. This rapid biotic turnover rate occurred when the rate of warming was 0.17 °C/decade, thus slightly lower than the current Northern Hemisphere warming of 0.2 °C/decade. We therefore conclude that the Younger Dryas-Holocene shift with its rapid turnover rates and associated regional extinctions represents an important palaeoanalogue to the current high latitude warming and gives insights about the probable future turnover rates and patterns of the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem change.

  7. High throughput multiplex real time PCR assay for the simultaneous quantification of DNA and RNA viruses infecting cassava plants

    OpenAIRE

    Otti, Gerald; Bouvaine, Sophie; Kimata, Bernadetha; Mkamillo, Geoffrey; Kumar, Lava; Tomlins, Keith; Maruthi, M.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To develop a multiplex TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay (qPCR) for the simultaneous detection and quantification of both RNA and DNA viruses affecting cassava (Manihot esculenta) in eastern Africa.\\ud \\ud Methods and Results: The diagnostic assay was developed for two RNA viruses; Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Uganda cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) and two predominant DNA viruses; African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV), which cause t...

  8. Simultaneous detection and identification of four cherry viruses by two step multiplex RT-PCR with an internal control of plant nad5 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorani, Md Salik; Awasthi, Prachi; Sharma, Maheshwar Prasad; Ram, Raja; Zaidi, Aijaz Asgar; Hallan, Vipin

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) was developed and standardized for the simultaneous detection of four cherry viruses: Cherry virus A (CVA, Genus; Capillovirus), Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV, unassigned species of the Betaflexiviridae), Little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1, Genus; Closterovirus) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV, Genus; Ilarvirus) with nad5 as plant internal control. A reliable and quick method for total plant RNA extraction from pome and stone fruit trees was also developed. To minimize primer dimer formation, a single antisense primer for CVA and CNRMV was used. A mixture of random hexamer and oligo (dT) primer was used for cDNA synthesis, which was highly suited and economic for multiplexing. All four viruses were detected successfully by mRT-PCR in artificially created viral RNA mixture and field samples of sweet cherry. The identity of the viruses was confirmed by sequencing. The assay could detect above viruses in diluted cDNA (10(-4)) and RNA (10(-3), except PNRSV which was detected only till ten times lesser dilution). The developed mRT-PCR will not only be useful for the detection of viruses from single or multiple infections of sweet cherry plants but also for other stone and pome fruits. The developed method will be therefore quite helpful for virus indexing, plant quarantine and certification programs. This is the first report for the simultaneous detection of four cherry viruses by mRT-PCR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescent whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization (F-WISH) in plant germ cells and the fertilized ovule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckmann, Andrea; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    First evidence on gene function and regulation is provided by the cellular expression pattern in complex tissues. However, to understand the activity of a specific gene, it is essential to analyze the regulatory network, which controls the spatio-temporal translation pattern during the entire life span of the transcribed mRNA. To explore mechanisms which control mRNA abundance and localization in space and time, it is necessary to visualize mRNAs quantitatively with a subcellular resolution, without sectioning the tissues. We have adapted and optimized a protocol for colorimetric whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization (WISH) using egg cell-specific digoxigenin (DIG) labeled probes (Hejátko et al., 2006) [1] on ovules and early seeds of Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we established a fluorescent whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization (F-WISH) protocol, which allows mRNA visualization on a subcellular level. The polar localized mRNA of SBT4.13, encoding a subtilase, was identified using this protocol. Both methods are described and discussed in detail. Additionally a (F)-WISH flow-chart is provided along with a troubleshooting table. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acceleration of leaf senescence is slowed down in transgenic barley plants deficient in the DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharewicz, Weronika; Distelfeld, Assaf; Bilger, Wolfgang; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Hensel, Götz; Krupinska, Karin

    2017-02-01

    WHIRLY1 in barley was isolated as a potential regulator of the senescence-associated gene HvS40. In order to investigate whether the plastid-nucleus-located DNA/RNA-binding protein WHIRLY1 plays a role in regulation of leaf senescence, primary foliage leaves from transgenic barley plants with an RNAi-mediated knockdown of the WHIRLY1 gene were characterized by typical senescence parameters, namely pigment contents, function and composition of the photosynthetic apparatus, as well as expression of selected genes known to be either down- or up-regulated during leaf senescence. When the plants were grown at low light intensity, senescence progression was similar between wild-type and RNAi-W1 plants. Likewise, dark-induced senescence of detached leaves was not affected by reduction of WHIRLY1. When plants were grown at high light intensity, however, senescence was induced prematurely in wild-type plants but was delayed in RNAi-W1 plants. This result suggests that WHIRLY1 plays a role in light sensing and/or stress communication between chloroplasts and the nucleus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Strong congruence in tree and fern community turnover in response to soils and climate in central Panama

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Mirkka; Ferrier, Simon; Condit, Richard

    2013-01-01

    1. Plant species turnover in central Panamanian forests has been principally attributed to the effects of dispersal limitation and a strong Caribbean to Pacific gradient in rainfall seasonality. Despite marked geological heterogeneity, the role of soil variation has not been rigorously examined. 2....... We modelled the compositional turnover of trees and ferns in the Panama Canal watershed as a function of soil chemistry, climate and geographical separation, using generalized dissimilarity models (GDMs). 3. Predictability in both plant groups was strong, with 74% of turnover explained in trees...... and 49% in ferns. Major trends in the two plant groups were strikingly similar. The independent effects of soils, and of climate for trees, were sizeable, but those of geographical distance were minor. In both plant groups, distance and climatic effects on species turnover covaried strongly. 4. Including...

  12. Employee Turnover among Full-time Public Librarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Richard

    1989-01-01

    A study of employee turnover in 31 public libraries in the American Midwest established baseline turnover rates and examined the relationship of gender to turnover behavior. Findings showed that: turnover rates are low compared to other occupations; and turnover rates of males and females are similar. (28 references) (Author/MES)

  13. Tospovirus : induction and suppression of RNA silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedil, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    While infecting their hosts, viruses must deal with host immunity. In plants the antiviral RNA silencing pathway is an important part of plant innate immunity. Tospoviruses are segmented negative-stranded RNA viruses of plants. To counteract the antiviral RNA silencing response in plants,

  14. Psoriatic T cells reduce epidermal turnover time and affect cell proliferation contributed from differential gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junqin; Li, Xinhua; Hou, Ruixia; Liu, Ruifeng; Zhao, Xincheng; Dong, Feng; Wang, Chunfang; Yin, Guohua; Zhang, Kaiming

    2015-09-01

    Psoriasis is mediated primarily by T cells, which reduce epidermal turnover time and affect keratinocyte proliferation. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG) in T cells from normal, five pairs of monozygotic twins concordant or discordant for psoriasis, to determine whether these DEG may account for the influence to epidermal turnover time and keratinocyte proliferation. The impact of T cells on keratinocyte proliferation and epidermal turnover time were investigated separately by immunohistochemistry and cultured with (3) H-TdR. mRNA expression patterns were investigated by RNA sequencing and verified by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After co-culture with psoriatic T cells, the expression of Ki-67, c-Myc and p53 increased, while expression of Bcl-2 and epidermal turnover time decreased. There were 14 DEG which were found to participate in the regulation of cell proliferation or differentiation. Psoriatic T cells exhibited the ability to decrease epidermal turnover time and affect keratinocyte proliferation because of the differential expression of PPIL1, HSPH1, SENP3, NUP54, FABP5, PLEKHG3, SLC9A9 and CHCHD4. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Employee Turnover: Evidence from a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Patterns of employee turnover from a medium-sized law firm in Australia were examined in regard to theories of worker mobility (matching, sectoral shift, and incentive). Results support a role for matching effects, but personnel practices affect the timing of turnover. Matching and incentive-based theories do not explain the high rates of turnover…

  16. Predicting Employee Turnover from Communication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Thomas H.; Barnett, George A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates three social network models of employee turnover: a structural equivalence model, a social influence model, and an erosion model. Administers a communication network questionnaire to all 170 employees of an organization. Finds support for all three models of turnover, with the erosion model explaining more of the variance than do the…

  17. Employee Turnover: An Empirical and Methodological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchinsky, Paul M.; Tuttle, Mark L.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews research on the prediction of employee turnover. Groups predictor variables into five general categories: attitudinal (job satisfaction), biodata, work-related, personal, and test-score predictors. Consistent relationships between common predictor variables and turnover were found for four categories. Eight methodological problems/issues…

  18. University Lecturers' Professional Empowerment and Turnover in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many universities in Uganda are grappling with the challenge of academic staff turnover. While research conducted so far has established different factors explaining the problems of turnover, many of which have been addressed, this challenge has not been resolved. Hitherto, attention has not been paid to whether ...

  19. Relationship between Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the association between job satisfaction and turnover intentions among lecturers in three public universities in Tanzania. It had three objectives: (1) to determine the level of perceived job satisfaction among lecturers; (2) to determine the association between job satisfaction and turnover intention; and (3) ...

  20. Leaf and fine root carbon stocks and turnover are coupled across Arctic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Victoria L; Fletcher, Benjamin J; Press, Malcolm C; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of vegetation carbon pools and their turnover rates are central to understanding and modelling ecosystem responses to climate change and their feedbacks to climate. In the Arctic, a region containing globally important stores of soil carbon, and where the most rapid climate change is expected over the coming century, plant communities have on average sixfold more biomass below ground than above ground, but knowledge of the root carbon pool sizes and turnover rates is limited. Here, we show that across eight plant communities, there is a significant positive relationship between leaf and fine root turnover rates (r(2) = 0.68, P turnover rates of both leaf (r(2) = 0.63, P community scale. These ecological relationships not only demonstrate close links between above and below-ground plant carbon dynamics but also allow plant carbon pool sizes and their turnover rates to be predicted from the single readily quantifiable (and remotely sensed) parameter of LAI, including the possibility of estimating root data from satellites. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dealing with the problem of non-specific in situ mRNA hybridization signals associated with plant tissues undergoing programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokela Anne

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ hybridization is a general molecular method typically used for the localization of mRNA transcripts in plants. The method provides a valuable tool to unravel the connection between gene expression and anatomy, especially in species such as pines which show large genome size and shortage of sequence information. Results In the present study, expression of the catalase gene (CAT related to the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the polyamine metabolism related genes, diamine oxidase (DAO and arginine decarboxylase (ADC, were localized in developing Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. seeds. In addition to specific signals from target mRNAs, the probes continually hybridized non-specifically in the embryo surrounding region (ESR of the megagametophyte tissue, in the remnants of the degenerated suspensors as well as in the cells of the nucellar layers, i.e. tissues exposed to cell death processes and extensive nucleic acid fragmentation during Scots pine seed development. Conclusions In plants, cell death is an integral part of both development and defence, and hence it is a common phenomenon in all stages of the life cycle. Our results suggest that extensive nucleic acid fragmentation during cell death processes can be a considerable source of non-specific signals in traditional in situ mRNA hybridization. Thus, the visualization of potential nucleic acid fragmentation simultaneously with the in situ mRNA hybridization assay may be necessary to ensure the correct interpretation of the signals in the case of non-specific hybridization of probes in plant tissues.

  2. A dominant mutation in mediator of paramutation2, one of three second-largest subunits of a plant-specific RNA polymerase, disrupts multiple siRNA silencing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Dorweiler, Jane E; Cigan, A Mark; Arteaga-Vazquez, Mario; Vyas, Meenal; Kermicle, Jerry; Jurcin, Diane; Brzeski, Jan; Cai, Yu; Chandler, Vicki L

    2009-11-01

    Paramutation involves homologous sequence communication that leads to meiotically heritable transcriptional silencing. We demonstrate that mop2 (mediator of paramutation2), which alters paramutation at multiple loci, encodes a gene similar to Arabidopsis NRPD2/E2, the second-largest subunit of plant-specific RNA polymerases IV and V. In Arabidopsis, Pol-IV and Pol-V play major roles in RNA-mediated silencing and a single second-largest subunit is shared between Pol-IV and Pol-V. Maize encodes three second-largest subunit genes: all three genes potentially encode full length proteins with highly conserved polymerase domains, and each are expressed in multiple overlapping tissues. The isolation of a recessive paramutation mutation in mop2 from a forward genetic screen suggests limited or no functional redundancy of these three genes. Potential alternative Pol-IV/Pol-V-like complexes could provide maize with a greater diversification of RNA-mediated transcriptional silencing machinery relative to Arabidopsis. Mop2-1 disrupts paramutation at multiple loci when heterozygous, whereas previously silenced alleles are only up-regulated when Mop2-1 is homozygous. The dramatic reduction in b1 tandem repeat siRNAs, but no disruption of silencing in Mop2-1 heterozygotes, suggests the major role for tandem repeat siRNAs is not to maintain silencing. Instead, we hypothesize the tandem repeat siRNAs mediate the establishment of the heritable silent state-a process fully disrupted in Mop2-1 heterozygotes. The dominant Mop2-1 mutation, which has a single nucleotide change in a domain highly conserved among all polymerases (E. coli to eukaryotes), disrupts both siRNA biogenesis (Pol-IV-like) and potentially processes downstream (Pol-V-like). These results suggest either the wild-type protein is a subunit in both complexes or the dominant mutant protein disrupts both complexes. Dominant mutations in the same domain in E. coli RNA polymerase suggest a model for Mop2-1 dominance

  3. Chronic Teacher Turnover in Urban Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacey Guin

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the characteristics of elementary schools that experience chronic teacher turnover and the impacts of turnover on a school’s working climate and ability to effectively function. Based on evidence from staff climate surveys and case studies, it is clear that high turnover schools face significant organizational challenges. Schools with high teacher turnover rates have difficulty planning and implementing a coherent curriculum and sustaining positive working relationships among teachers. The reality of these organizational challenges is particularly alarming, given that high turnover schools are more likely to serve low-income and minority students. The negative relationship between teacher turnover and school functioning, and the fact that turbulent schools are disproportionately likely to serve lowincome and minority students have important implications for both district and school-level policies. Specifically: Teacher turnover rates are one indicator of school health, which school districts should consider when focusing on school improvements. Districts need to begin by developing the means to identify individual schools that experience high levels of teacher turnover. Current district policies in implementing professional development for teachers in low-performing schools are inefficient when teachers do not remain in the schools in which they are trained. In order for low-performing schools to improve, districts need to consider providing incentive programs so that high quality teachers apply for, and remain in, these schools. Future research is needed to address the causal link between turnover, organizational functioning and student outcomes. Additionally, there is a need for research examining district policies that may facilitate teacher turnover within a district, including how districts place and transfer teachers, as well as how teachers’ salaries are budgeted.

  4. High turnover of fungal hyphae in incubation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Franciska T; Bååth, Erland; Kuyper, Thom W; Bloem, Jaap

    2009-03-01

    Soil biological studies are often conducted on sieved soils without the presence of plants. However, soil fungi build delicate mycelial networks, often symbiotically associated with plant roots (mycorrhizal fungi). We hypothesized that as a result of sieving and incubating without plants, the total fungal biomass decreases. To test this, we conducted three incubation experiments. We expected total and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal biomass to be higher in less fertilized soils than in fertilized soils, and thus to decrease more during incubation. Indeed, we found that fungal biomass decreased rapidly in the less fertilized soils. A shift towards thicker hyphae occurred, and the fraction of septate hyphae increased. However, analyses of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and neutral lipid fatty acids could not clarify which fungal groups were decreasing. We propose that in our soils, there was a fraction of fungal biomass that was sensitive to fertilization and disturbance (sieving, followed by incubation without plants) with a very high turnover (possibly composed of fine hyphae of AM and saprotrophic fungi), and a fraction that was much less vulnerable with a low turnover (composed of saprotrophic fungi and runner hyphae of AMF). Furthermore, PLFAs might not be as sensitive in detecting changes in fungal biomass as previously thought.

  5. Application of a Novel and Automated Branched DNA in Situ Hybridization Method for the Rapid and Sensitive Localization of mRNA Molecules in Plant Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Bowling

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: A novel branched DNA detection technology, RNAscope in situ hybridization (ISH, originally developed for use on human clinical and animal tissues, was adapted for use in plant tissue in an attempt to overcome some of the limitations associated with traditional ISH assays. Methods and Results: Zea mays leaf tissue was formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE and then probed with the RNAscope ISH assay for two endogenous genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK. Results from both manual and automated methods showed tissue- and cell-specific mRNA localization patterns expected from these well-studied genes. Conclusions: RNAscope ISH is a sensitive method that generates high-quality, easily interpretable results from FFPE plant tissues. Automation of the RNAscope method on the Ventana Discovery Ultra platform allows significant advantages for repeatability, reduction in variability, and flexibility of workflow processes.

  6. The atypical genesis and bioavailability of the plant-based small RNA MIR2911: Bulking up while breaking down

    Science.gov (United States)

    The uptake of dietary plant small RNAs (sRNAs) in consumers remains controversial, which is mainly due to low dietary content in combination with poor fractional absorption. MIR2911, among all the plant sRNAs including microRNAs, has been shown to be one of the most robustly absorbed sRNAs. Here we ...

  7. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzari, Andre L D A; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C B; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38 mg/mL). Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p activity (-48%, p active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum.

  8. Nurse turnover: a literature review - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Laureen J; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Duffield, Christine; Shamian, Judith; Buchan, James; Hughes, Frances; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; North, Nicola

    2012-07-01

    Concerns related to the complex issue of nursing turnover continue to challenge healthcare leaders in every sector of health care. Voluntary nurse turnover is shown to be influenced by a myriad of inter-related factors, and there is increasing evidence of its negative effects on nurses, patients and health care organizations. The objectives were to conduct a comprehensive review of the related literature to examine recent findings related to the issue of nursing turnover and its causes and consequences, and to identify on methodological challenges and the implications of new evidence for future studies. A comprehensive search of the recent literature related to nursing turnover was undertaken to summarize findings published in the past six years. Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL and PubMed, reference lists of journal publications. Keyword searches were conducted for publications published 2006 or later that examined turnover or turnover intention in employee populations of registered or practical/enrolled or assistant nurses working in the hospital, long-term or community care areas. Literature findings are presented using an integrative approach and a table format to report individual studies. From about 330 citations or abstracts that were initially scanned for content relevance, 68 studies were included in this summary review. The predominance of studies continues to focus on determinants of nurse turnover in acute care settings. Recent studies offer insight into generational factors that should be considered in strategies to promote stable staffing in healthcare organizations. Nursing turnover continues to present serious challenges at all levels of health care. Longitudinal research is needed to produce new evidence of the relationships between nurse turnover and related costs, and the impact on patients and the health care team. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity of Antifungal Compounds-Producing Bacillus spp. Isolated from Rhizosphere of Soybean Plant Based on ARDRA and 16S rRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIS TRI WAHYUDI

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR play an important role in improvement of seed germination, root development, and water utilization by plants. These rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth directly by producing growth hormones or indirectly by producing antifungal compounds/antibiotics to suppress phytopathogenic fungi. The objective of this research was to analyze the diversity of 22 antifungal-producing rhizobacteria of Bacillus sp. isolated from rhizosphere of soybean plant based on Amplified rDNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA and 16S rRNA Sequence. Restriction enzymes in ARDRA analysis, HinfI, HaeIII, and RsaI were used to digest 22 16S rDNA amplified from Bacillus sp. genomes. Based on this analysis, genetic diversity of 22 Bacillus sp. producing antifungal compounds were classified into eight different groups. Moreover, six selected isolates randomly from each ARDRA group that have strong activity to suppress fungal growth were analyzed for their 16S rDNA sequences compared with reference strains. The distributions of these isolates were genetically diverse on several species of Bacillus sp. such as B. subtilis, B. cereus, and B. fusiformis. ARDRA is a reliable technique to analyze genetic diversity of Bacillus sp. community in the rhizosphere.

  10. AN ECONOMETRIC APPROACH ABOUT VOLUNTARY TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADALET EREN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes individual and organizational variables that affect voluntary turnover are determined in the special defence and security companies. A binomial logistic regression model is used to estimate voluntary turnover.  Binomial Logistic regression, reliability test (scale alfa, variance (ANOVA, Post-hoc/Tukey, correlation (Pearson and other basic statistical techniques  with SPSS 13 statistical packet program was used in the analyzes ofresearch data. The study finds that; situation of suppose working, number of child, number of death child, number of home’s moving, support of rent, total monthly income of household, last work’s region, number of prizes, affect voluntary turnover are determined.

  11. The validation of the turnover intention scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris F.C. Bothma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Turnover intention as a construct has attracted increased research attention in the recent past, but there are seemingly not many valid and reliable scales around to measure turnover intention. Research purpose: This study focused on the validation of a shortened, six-item version of the turnover intention scale (TIS-6. Motivation for the study: The research question of whether the TIS-6 is a reliable and a valid scale for measuring turnover intention and for predicting actual turnover was addressed in this study. Research design, approach and method: The study was based on a census-based sample (n= 2429 of employees in an information, communication and technology (ICT sector company (N= 23 134 where the TIS-6 was used as one of the criterion variables. The leavers (those who left the company in this sample were compared with the stayers (those who remained in the employ of the company in this sample in respect of different variables used in the study. Main findings: It was established that the TIS-6 could measure turnover intentions reliably (α= 0.80. The TIS-6 could significantly distinguish between leavers and stayers (actual turnover, thereby confirming its criterion-predictive validity. The scale also established statistically significant differences between leavers and stayers in respect of a number of the remaining theoretical variables used in the study, thereby also confirming its differential validity. These comparisons were conducted for both the 4-month and the 4-year period after the survey was conducted. Practical/managerial implications: Turnover intention is related to a number of variables in the study which necessitates a reappraisal and a reconceptualisation of existing turnover intention models. Contribution/value-add: The TIS-6 can be used as a reliable and valid scale to assess turnover intentions and can therefore be used in research to validly and reliably assess turnover intentions or to

  12. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B; Hubble, Michael W; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). To quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a six-month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data-collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for three categories of agency staff mix: all-paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed) staff, and all-volunteer staff. The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix (all-paid = 10.2%, mixed = 12.3%, all-volunteer = 12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n = 25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $86,452.05, mixed = $9,766.65, and all-volunteer = $0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $7,161.38, mixed = $1,409.64, and all-volunteer = $0). Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study's mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings provide estimates of two key

  13. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in EMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B.; Hubble, Michael W.; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D.; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). The purpose of this study was to quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. Methods A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a 6 month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for 3 categories of agency staff mix: all paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed), and all-volunteer. Results The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=10.2%, mixed=12.3%, all-volunteer=12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n=25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$86,452.05, mixed=$9,766.65, and all-volunteer=$0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix: (all-paid=$7,161.38, mixed=$1,409.64, and all-volunteer=$0). Conclusions Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study’s mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings

  14. MicroRNA160 Modulates Plant Development and Heat Shock Protein Gene Expression to Mediate Heat Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Shane Lin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is causing a negative impact on plant growth and adversely impacts on crop yield. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical in regulating the expression of genes involved in plant development as well as defense responses. The effects of miRNAs on heat-stressed Arabidopsis warrants further investigation. Heat stress increased the expression of miR160 and its precursors but considerably reduced that of its targets, ARF10, ARF16, and ARF17. To study the roles of miR160 during heat stress, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing miR160 precursor a (160OE and artificial miR160 (MIM160, which mimics an inhibitor of miR160, were created. T-DNA insertion mutants of miR160 targets were also used to examine their tolerances to heat stress. Results presented that overexpressing miR160 improved seed germination and seedling survival under heat stress. The lengths of hypocotyl elongation and rachis were also longer in 160OE than the wild-type (WT plants under heat stress. Interestingly, MIM160 plants showed worse adaption to heat. In addition, arf10, arf16, and arf17 mutants presented similar phenotypes to 160OE under heat stress to advance abilities of thermotolerance. Moreover, transcriptome and qRT-PCR analyses revealed that HSP17.6A, HSP17.6II, HSP21, and HSP70B expression levels were regulated by heat in 160OE, MIM160, arf10, arf16, and arf17 plants. Hence, miR160 altered the expression of the heat shock proteins and plant development to allow plants to survive heat stress.

  15. The role of microRNA399 and sucrose in physiological responses to phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis thalina plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Mohammadsaleh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are noncoding small RNAs that generally function as posttranscriptional negative regulators. The miRNAs play a direct role in plant responses to many types of environmental stresses. For example miR399 had a role in response to Pi deficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR399 and sucrose in some physiological responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to phosphate deficiency. Therefore, miR399-overexpressing transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants were used. The plant seeds were cultured on the Suc+Pi+ (S+P+, Suc-Pi+ (S-P+, Suc+Pi- (S+P- and Suc-Pi- (S-P- media. Pi+ and Pi- refer to 1.2 mM and 10 µM Pi, respectively and Suc+ or Suc- are media culture with 1% sucrose or without. The results showed that sucrose and miR399 had a dramatic effect on root architecture so that primary root length and its branches on S-P+ medium were significantly reduced in over expressed as compared with wild type plants. The highest anthocyanin and starch accumulation was achieved in S+P- media in both plant types. However, miR399 over expression was resulted in significant rise in anthocyanin accumulation on S-P- medium in transgenic relative to wild type plants. In addition, miR399 was resulted in significant rise in free phosphorous level in all types' media. compared to wild type. These results were probably due to the role of sucrose and miR399 in signalling pathway during phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis plant.

  16. Phylogenetic turnover during subtropical forest succession across environmental and phylogenetic scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purschke, Oliver; Michalski, Stefan G; Bruelheide, Helge; Durka, Walter

    2017-12-01

    Although spatial and temporal patterns of phylogenetic community structure during succession are inherently interlinked and assembly processes vary with environmental and phylogenetic scales, successional studies of community assembly have yet to integrate spatial and temporal components of community structure, while accounting for scaling issues. To gain insight into the processes that generate biodiversity after disturbance, we combine analyses of spatial and temporal phylogenetic turnover across phylogenetic scales, accounting for covariation with environmental differences. We compared phylogenetic turnover, at the species- and individual-level, within and between five successional stages, representing woody plant communities in a subtropical forest chronosequence. We decomposed turnover at different phylogenetic depths and assessed its covariation with between-plot abiotic differences. Phylogenetic turnover between stages was low relative to species turnover and was not explained by abiotic differences. However, within the late-successional stages, there was high presence-/absence-based turnover (clustering) that occurred deep in the phylogeny and covaried with environmental differentiation. Our results support a deterministic model of community assembly where (i) phylogenetic composition is constrained through successional time, but (ii) toward late succession, species sorting into preferred habitats according to niche traits that are conserved deep in phylogeny, becomes increasingly important.

  17. An RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Orthophosphate-Deficient White Lupin Reveals Novel Insights into Phosphorus Acclimation in Plants1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Rourke, Jamie A.; Yang, S. Samuel; Miller, Susan S.; Bucciarelli, Bruna; Liu, Junqi; Rydeen, Ariel; Bozsoki, Zoltan; Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Tu, Zheng Jin; Allan, Deborah; Gronwald, John W.; Vance, Carroll P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus, in its orthophosphate form (Pi), is one of the most limiting macronutrients in soils for plant growth and development. However, the whole-genome molecular mechanisms contributing to plant acclimation to Pi deficiency remain largely unknown. White lupin (Lupinus albus) has evolved unique adaptations for growth in Pi-deficient soils, including the development of cluster roots to increase root surface area. In this study, we utilized RNA-Seq technology to assess global gene expression in white lupin cluster roots, normal roots, and leaves in response to Pi supply. We de novo assembled 277,224,180 Illumina reads from 12 complementary DNA libraries to build what is to our knowledge the first white lupin gene index (LAGI 1.0). This index contains 125,821 unique sequences with an average length of 1,155 bp. Of these sequences, 50,734 were transcriptionally active (reads per kilobase per million reads ≥ 3), representing approximately 7.8% of the white lupin genome, using the predicted genome size of Lupinus angustifolius as a reference. We identified a total of 2,128 sequences differentially expressed in response to Pi deficiency with a 2-fold or greater change and P ≤ 0.05. Twelve sequences were consistently differentially expressed due to Pi deficiency stress in three species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), potato (Solanum tuberosum), and white lupin, making them ideal candidates to monitor the Pi status of plants. Additionally, classic physiological experiments were coupled with RNA-Seq data to examine the role of cytokinin and gibberellic acid in Pi deficiency-induced cluster root development. This global gene expression analysis provides new insights into the biochemical and molecular mechanisms involved in the acclimation to Pi deficiency. PMID:23197803

  18. In vitro Effects of Four Native Brazilian Medicinal Plants in CYP3A4 mRNA Gene Expression, Glutathione Levels, and P-Glycoprotein Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzari, Andre L. D. A.; Milton, Flora; Frangos, Samantha; Carvalho, Ana C. B.; Silveira, Dâmaris; de Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae), Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae), Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae) and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae) are medicinal plant species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI). In this work, we assess non-toxic concentrations (100 μg/mL) of the plant infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR). Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (twofold decrease, p Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p < 0.001). The latter plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p < 0.01). In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum. PMID:27594838

  19. Extraction of total nucleic acid based on silica-coated magnetic particles for RT-qPCR detection of plant RNA virus/viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Deng, Congliang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qi; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Yi; Yan, Wenlong; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a nucleic acid extraction method based on silica-coated magnetic particles (SMPs) and RT-qPCR assay was developed to detect Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Lily symptomless virus (LSV), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) and grape yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd-1). The amplification sequences of RT-qPCR were reversely transcribed in vitro as RNA standard templates. The standard curves covered six or seven orders of magnitude with a detection limit of 100 copies per each assay. Extraction efficiency of the SMPs method was evaluated by recovering spiked ssRNAs from plant samples and compared to two commercial kits (TRIzol and RNeasy Plant mini kit). Results showed that the recovery rate of SMPs method was comparable to the commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from lily leaves, whereas it was two or three times higher than commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from grapevine leaves. SMPs method was also used to extract viral nucleic acid from15 ArMV-positive lily leaf samples and 15 LSV-positive lily leaf samples. SMPs method did not show statistically significant difference from other methods on detecting ArMV, but LSV. The SMPs method has the same level of virus load as the TRIzol, and its mean virus load of was 0.5log10 lower than the RNeasy Plant mini kit. Nucleic acid was extracted from 19 grapevine-leaf samples with SMPs and the two commercial kits and subsequently screened for HSVd and GYSVd-1 by RT-qPCR. Regardless of HSVd or GYSVd-1, SMPs method outperforms other methods on both positive rate and the viroid load. In conclusion, SMPs method was able to efficiently extract the nucleic acid of RNA viruses or viroids, especially grapevine viroids, from lily-leaf or grapevine-leaf samples for RT-qPCR detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Organisational Commitment, Job Satisfaction and Turnover ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated organisational commitment, job satisfaction and turnover intentions among records management personnel in Ondo State Civil Service, Akure, Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique was used to draw 240 subjects from a population size of 275 records management personnel.

  1. Rethinking Teacher Turnover: Longitudinal Measures of Instability in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Jennifer Jellison; Jabbar, Huriya; Germain, Emily; Dinning, John

    2018-01-01

    While there is a robust literature examining the patterns and causes of teacher turnover, few articles to date have critically examined the measures of turnover used in these studies. Yet, an assessment of the way turnover is measured is important, as the measures become the means by which the "problem" of turnover becomes defined and…

  2. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double

  3. Addressing employee turnover and retention: keeping your valued performers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee turnover and employee retention are inextricably linked; to control turnover is to enhance retention. Turnover is a relatively simple concept; however, considerable confusion often results when addressing turnover because of differences in how it is defined; that is, what is counted, how it is counted, and how the turnover rates are expressed. Turnover is also costly, although not enough attention is paid to its cost because so much of it is indirect and thus not readily visible. There are a variety of causes of turnover, some that can be corrected and some that cannot be avoided. Reducing or otherwise controlling turnover requires continuing management attention to its causes and constant recognition of what can and should be controlled and what cannot be controlled. Ongoing attention to turnover is an essential part of the department manager's role; every improvement in turnover is a direct improvement in retention, with eventual positive effects on the bottom line.

  4. An improved method to quantitate mature plant microRNA in biological matrices using periodate treatment and internal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) ubiquitously exist in microorganisms, plants and animals, and appear to modulate a wide range of critical biological processes. However, no definitive conclusion has been reached regarding the uptake of exogenous dietary small RNAs into mammalian circulation and organs and cross-k...

  5. Overexpression of Nitrate Reductase in Tobacco Delays Drought-Induced Decreases in Nitrate Reductase Activity and mRNA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Valadier, Marie-Hélène; Foyer, Christine H.

    1998-01-01

    Transformed (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter [35S]) tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.) plants constitutively expressing nitrate reductase (NR) and untransformed controls were subjected to drought for 5 d. Drought-induced changes in biomass accumulation and photosynthesis were comparable in both lines of plants. After 4 d of water deprivation, a large increase in the ratio of shoot dry weight to fresh weight was observed, together with a decrease in the rate of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Foliar sucrose increased in both lines during water stress, but hexoses increased only in leaves from untransformed controls. Foliar NO3− decreased rapidly in both lines and was halved within 2 d of the onset of water deprivation. Total foliar amino acids decreased in leaves of both lines following water deprivation. After 4 d of water deprivation no NR activity could be detected in leaves of untransformed plants, whereas about 50% of the original activity remained in the leaves of the 35S-NR transformants. NR mRNA was much more stable than NR activity. NR mRNA abundance increased in the leaves of the 35S-NR plants and remained constant in controls for the first 3 d of drought. On the 4th d, however, NR mRNA suddenly decreased in both lines. Rehydration at d 3 caused rapid recovery (within 24 h) of 35S-NR transcripts, but no recovery was observed in the controls. The phosphorylation state of the protein was unchanged by long-term drought. There was a strong correlation between maximal extractable NR activity and ambient photosynthesis in both lines. We conclude that drought first causes increased NR protein turnover and then accelerates NR mRNA turnover. Constitutive NR expression temporarily delayed drought-induced losses in NR activity. 35S-NR expression may therefore allow more rapid recovery of N assimilation following short-term water deficit. PMID:9576799

  6. KORELASI ANTARA EMPLOYEES INVOLVEMENT, TURNOVER SERTA PENGARUHNYA TERHADAP PRODUKTIVITAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnawan Adi Wicaksono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Praktek yang berkembang menyatakan bahwa employee involvement memiliki efek positif terhadap kinerja organisasi. Perubahan pada kultur organisasi dapat menimbulkan dampak berkurangnya absen, turnover, pengambilan keputusan yang lebih baik dan sebagainya. Sehingga menarik untuk diteliti apakah ada korelasi antara aplikasi perubahan organisasi yaitu employee involvement, turnover serta produktivitas Berdasarkan studi literatur didapatkan hubungan antara employee involvement dengan level turnover, serta hubungan turnover dengan produktivitas. Sehingga employee involvement dapat digunakan sebagai salah satu aspek menghitung produktivitas Keyword : employee involvement, turnover, produktivitas

  7. Dietary methionine level affects growth performance and hepatic gene expression of GH-IGF system and protein turnover regulators in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed plant protein-based diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Holm, Jorgen

    2015-01-01

    The effects of dietary level of methionine were investigated in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed five plant-based diets containing increasing content of crystalline methionine (Met), in a six week growth trial. Changes in the hepatic expression of genes related to i...

  8. Biphasic Study to Characterize Agricultural Biogas Plants by High-Throughput 16S rRNA Gene Amplicon Sequencing and Microscopic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Irena; Kim, Yong Sung; Wibberg, Daniel; Stolze, Yvonne; Off, Sandra; Antonczyk, Sebastian; Pühler, Alfred; Scherer, Paul; Schlüter, Andreas

    2017-02-28

    Process surveillance within agricultural biogas plants (BGPs) was concurrently studied by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and an optimized quantitative microscopic fingerprinting (QMF) technique. In contrast to 16S rRNA gene amplicons, digitalized microscopy is a rapid and cost-effective method that facilitates enumeration and morphological differentiation of the most significant groups of methanogens regarding their shape and characteristic autofluorescent factor 420. Moreover, the fluorescence signal mirrors cell vitality. In this study, four different BGPs were investigated. The results indicated stable process performance in the mesophilic BGPs and in the thermophilic reactor. Bacterial subcommunity characterization revealed significant differences between the four BGPs. Most remarkably, the genera Defluviitoga and Halocella dominated the thermophilic bacterial subcommunity, whereas members of another taxon, Syntrophaceticus , were found to be abundant in the mesophilic BGP. The domain Archaea was dominated by the genus Methanoculleus in all four BGPs, followed by Methanosaeta in BGP1 and BGP3. In contrast, Methanothermobacter members were highly abundant in the thermophilic BGP4. Furthermore, a high consistency between the sequencing approach and the QMF method was shown, especially for the thermophilic BGP. The differences elucidated that using this biphasic approach for mesophilic BGPs provided novel insights regarding disaggregated single cells of Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta species. Both dominated the archaeal subcommunity and replaced coccoid Methanoculleus members belonging to the same group of Methanomicrobiales that have been frequently observed in similar BGPs. This work demonstrates that combining QMF and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing is a complementary strategy to describe archaeal community structures within biogas processes.

  9. Identification of reference genes for quantitative expression analysis using large-scale RNA-seq data of Arabidopsis thaliana and model crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Toru; Sasaki, Yohei; Terashima, Shin; Matsuda-Imai, Noriko; Takano, Tomoyuki; Saito, Misa; Kanno, Maasa; Ozaki, Soichi; Suwabe, Keita; Suzuki, Go; Watanabe, Masao; Matsuoka, Makoto; Takayama, Seiji; Yano, Kentaro

    2016-10-13

    In quantitative gene expression analysis, normalization using a reference gene as an internal control is frequently performed for appropriate interpretation of the results. Efforts have been devoted to exploring superior novel reference genes using microarray transcriptomic data and to evaluating commonly used reference genes by targeting analysis. However, because the number of specifically detectable genes is totally dependent on probe design in the microarray analysis, exploration using microarray data may miss some of the best choices for the reference genes. Recently emerging RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an ideal resource for comprehensive exploration of reference genes since this method is capable of detecting all expressed genes, in principle including even unknown genes. We report the results of a comprehensive exploration of reference genes using public RNA-seq data from plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis), Glycine max (soybean), Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Oryza sativa (rice). To select reference genes suitable for the broadest experimental conditions possible, candidates were surveyed by the following four steps: (1) evaluation of the basal expression level of each gene in each experiment; (2) evaluation of the expression stability of each gene in each experiment; (3) evaluation of the expression stability of each gene across the experiments; and (4) selection of top-ranked genes, after ranking according to the number of experiments in which the gene was expressed stably. Employing this procedure, 13, 10, 12 and 21 top candidates for reference genes were proposed in Arabidopsis, soybean, tomato and rice, respectively. Microarray expression data confirmed that the expression of the proposed reference genes under broad experimental conditions was more stable than that of commonly used reference genes. These novel reference genes will be useful for analyzing gene expression profiles across experiments carried out under various

  10. Blue light alters miR167 expression and microRNA-targeted auxin response factor genes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkovskiy, Pavel P; Kartashov, Alexander V; Zlobin, Ilya E; Pogosyan, Sergei I; Kuznetsov, Vladimir V

    2016-07-01

    The effect of blue LED (450 nm) on the photomorphogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants and the transcript levels of several genes, including miRNAs, photoreceptors and auxin response factors (ARF) was investigated. It was observed that blue light accelerated the generative development, reduced the rosette leaf number, significantly reduced the leaf area, dry biomass and led to the disruption of conductive tissue formation. The blue LED differentially influenced the transcript levels of several phytochromes (PHY a, b, c, d, and e), cryptochromes (CRY 1 and 2) and phototropins (PHOT 1 and 2). At the same time, the blue LED significantly increased miR167 expression compared to a fluorescent lamp or white LEDs. This increase likely resulted in the enhanced transcription of the auxin response factor genes ARF4 and ARF8, which are regulated by this miRNA. These findings support the hypothesis that the effects of blue light on A. thaliana are mediated by auxin signalling pathway involving miRNA-dependent regulation of ARF gene expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. In vitro effects of four native Brazilian medicinal plants in CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression, glutathione levels and P-glycoprotein activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luis Dias Araujo Mazzari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Erythrina mulungu Benth. (Fabaceae, Cordia verbenacea A. DC. (Boraginaceae, Solanum paniculatum L. (Solanaceae and Lippia sidoides Cham. (Verbenaceae are medicinal plants species native to Brazil shortlisted by the Brazilian National Health System for future clinical use. However, nothing is known about their effects in metabolic and transporter proteins, which could potentially lead to herb-drug interactions (HDI. In this work we assess non-toxic concentrations (100μg/mL of their infusions for their in vitro ability to modulate CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression and intracellular glutathione levels in HepG2 cells, as well as P-glycoprotein (P-gp activity in vincristine-resistant Caco-2 cells (Caco-2 VCR. Their mechanisms of action were further studied by measuring the activation of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells and the inhibition of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT in HepG2 cells. Our results show that P-gp activity was not affected in any case and that only Solanum paniculatum was able to significantly change CYP3A4 mRNA gene expression (two-fold decrease, p<0.05, this being correlated with an antagonist effect upon hPXR (EC50 = 0.38mg/mL. Total intracellular glutathione levels were significantly depleted by exposure to Solanum paniculatum (-44%, p<0.001, Lippia sidoides (-12%, p<0.05 and Cordia verbenacea (-47%, p<0.001. The later plant extract was able to decrease GGT activity (-48%, p<0.01. In conclusion, this preclinical study shows that the administration of some of these herbal medicines may be able to cause disturbances to metabolic mechanisms in vitro. Although Erythrina mulungu appears safe in our tests, active pharmacovigilance is recommended for the other three species, especially in the case of Solanum paniculatum.

  12. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction.

  13. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change over Time Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Garner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians’ responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians ( N = 96 being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction.

  14. Glutathione turnover in 14 rat tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, D.W.; Tran, T.

    1990-01-01

    GSH is a tripeptide found in all tissues and is important in maintaining cellular redox status. First-order rate constants for GSH turnover were determined for various tissues of Fischer male rats. Animals were administered [ 35 S]Cys by tail vein injection and GSH turnover was estimated by the decrease in GSH specific activity following incorporation of Cys, 1-102 hr after administration. Tissue nonprotein sulfhydryls (NPSH) were detected by Ellman's assay and compared with GSH and Cys concentrations determined by HPLC with electrochemical detection. [ 35 S]GSH was analyzed by HPLC equipped with a flow-through radioactivity detector. Although total GSH and Cys were usually slightly lower than NPSH concentrations for the tissues examined, both assay systems gave comparable results. An exception was the glandular stomach which had approximately 2-fold higher NPSH. Liver and kidney had rapid turnover rates with GSH half-lives between 2-5 hr, while heart and skeletal muscle tissue had half-lives of 80-90 hr. Turnover in the blood was slowest, with a half-life of 170 hr. Gastrointestinal tract tissues were shown to have intermediate turnover rates of the following order: glandular stomach > duodenum = small intestine = caecum = large intestine = colon > forestomach. GSH half-life in lung and skin was approximately 45 hr. These studies indicate that tissues utilize GSH at markedly different rates

  15. Nurse turnover: the mediating role of burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Michael P; Maslach, Christina

    2009-04-01

    This study tested whether the mediation model of burnout could predict nurses' turnover intentions. A better understanding of what factors support a commitment to a nursing career could inform both policies and workplace practices. The mediation model of burnout provides a way of linking the quality of a nurse's worklife to various outcomes, such as turnover. Data on areas of worklife, burnout, and turnover intentions were collected by surveying 667 Canadian nurses in the Atlantic Provinces. The findings supported the mediation model of burnout, in which areas of worklife predicted burnout, which in turn predicted turnover intentions. Cynicism was the key burnout dimension for turnover, and the most critical areas of worklife were value conflicts and inadequate rewards. The results of this study provide some new insights into how the intention of nurses to leave their job is related to particular aspects of their worklife and to burnout. These results suggest what may be the most appropriate areas to target for interventions to reduce the risk of nurses exiting early from their chosen career.

  16. AGO1, QDE-2, and RDE-1 are related proteins required for post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants, quelling in fungi, and RNA interference in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagard, M; Boutet, S; Morel, J B; Bellini, C; Vaucheret, H

    2000-10-10

    Introduction of transgene DNA may lead to specific degradation of RNAs that are homologous to the transgene transcribed sequence through phenomena named post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in plants, quelling in fungi, and RNA interference (RNAi) in animals. It was shown previously that PTGS, quelling, and RNAi require a set of related proteins (SGS2, QDE-1, and EGO-1, respectively). Here we report the isolation of Arabidopsis mutants impaired in PTGS which are affected at the Argonaute1 (AGO1) locus. AGO1 is similar to QDE-2 required for quelling and RDE-1 required for RNAi. Sequencing of ago1 mutants revealed one amino acid essential for PTGS that is also present in QDE-2 and RDE-1 in a highly conserved motif. Taken together, these results confirm the hypothesis that these processes derive from a common ancestral mechanism that controls expression of invading nucleic acid molecules at the post-transcriptional level. As opposed to rde-1 and qde-2 mutants, which are viable, ago1 mutants display several developmental abnormalities, including sterility. These results raise the possibility that PTGS, or at least some of its elements, could participate in the regulation of gene expression during development in plants.

  17. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x regulates hippo pathway activity by controlling angiomotin protein turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thanh Hung; Andrejeva, Diana; Gupta, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    /TAZ activity. We demonstrate that USPx regulates ubiquitin-mediated turnover of the YAP inhibitor, Angiomotin. USP9x acts to deubiquitylate Angiomotin at lysine 496, resulting in stabilization of Angiomotin and lower YAP/TAZ activity. USP9x mRNA levels were reduced in several cancers. Clinically, USP9x m......RNA levels were reduced in several cancers with low USPx expression correlating with poor prognosis in renal clear cell carcinoma. Our data indicate that USP9x may be a useful biomarker for renal clear cell carcinoma....

  18. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  19. Does Judge Turnover Affect Judicial Performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Alice; Tagliapietra, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    office to another after three years of mandate, and the law prescribes their transfer after ten years to guarantee their independence. Flaws in the process managing the backlog of outbound judges and the existence of asynchrony between outbound and inbound transfers produce a chain of delays...... to the disposition of court cases. Using a novel dataset on Court of Appeal Districts in Italy (2008–2012), we provide evidence of a strong negative relation between high turnover rates and judicial performance. We find that marginal increases in judge turnover rates lead to a statistically significant decrease...... in judicial performance over two years of time...

  20. Expression of 5 S rRNA genes linked to 35 S rDNA in plants, their epigenetic modification and regulatory element divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Sònia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plants, the 5 S rRNA genes usually occur as separate tandems (S-type arrangement or, less commonly, linked to 35 S rDNA units (L-type. The activity of linked genes remains unknown so far. We studied the homogeneity and expression of 5 S genes in several species from family Asteraceae known to contain linked 35 S-5 S units. Additionally, their methylation status was determined using bisulfite sequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to reveal the sub-nuclear positions of rDNA arrays. Results We found that homogenization of L-type units went to completion in most (4/6 but not all species. Two species contained major L-type and minor S-type units (termed Ls-type. The linked genes dominate 5 S rDNA expression while the separate tandems do not seem to be expressed. Members of tribe Anthemideae evolved functional variants of the polymerase III promoter in which a residing C-box element differs from the canonical angiosperm motif by as much as 30%. On this basis, a more relaxed consensus sequence of a plant C-box: (5’-RGSWTGGGTG-3’ is proposed. The 5 S paralogs display heavy DNA methylation similarly as to their unlinked counterparts. FISH revealed the close association of 35 S-5 S arrays with nucleolar periphery indicating that transcription of 5 S genes may occur in this territory. Conclusions We show that the unusual linked arrangement of 5 S genes, occurring in several plant species, is fully compatible with their expression and functionality. This extraordinary 5 S gene dynamics is manifested at different levels, such as variation in intrachromosomal positions, unit structure, epigenetic modification and considerable divergence of regulatory motifs.

  1. The rate and cost of nurse turnover in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael A; Duffield, Christine M; Homer, Caroline; Buchan, James; Dimitrelis, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Nurse turnover is a critical issue facing workforce planners across the globe, particularly in light of protracted and continuing workforce shortages. An ageing population coupled with the rise in complex and chronic diseases, have contributed to increased demands placed on the health system and importantly, nurses who themselves are ageing. Costs associated with nurse turnover are attracting more attention; however, existing measurements of turnover show inconsistent findings, which can be attributed to differences in study design, metrics used to calculate turnover and variations in definitions for turnover. This paper will report the rates and costs of nurse turnover across three States in Australia.

  2. Growth rate correlates negatively with protein turnover in Arabidopsis accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hirofumi; Moraes, Thiago Alexandre; Pyl, Eva-Theresa; Schulze, Waltraud X; Obata, Toshihiro; Scheffel, André; Fernie, Alisdair R; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies with Arabidopsis accessions revealed that biomass correlates negatively to dusk starch content and total protein, and positively to the maximum activities of enzymes in photosynthesis. We hypothesized that large accessions have lower ribosome abundance and lower rates of protein synthesis, and that this is compensated by lower rates of protein degradation. This would increase growth efficiency and allow more investment in photosynthetic machinery. We analysed ribosome abundance and polysome loading in 19 accessions, modelled the rates of protein synthesis and compared them with the observed rate of growth. Large accessions contained less ribosomes than small accessions, due mainly to cytosolic ribosome abundance falling at night in large accessions. The modelled rates of protein synthesis resembled those required for growth in large accessions, but were up to 30% in excess in small accessions. We then employed 13 CO 2 pulse-chase labelling to measure the rates of protein synthesis and degradation in 13 accessions. Small accessions had a slightly higher rate of protein synthesis and much higher rates of protein degradation than large accessions. Protein turnover was negligible in large accessions but equivalent to up to 30% of synthesised protein day -1 in small accessions. We discuss to what extent the decrease in growth in small accessions can be quantitatively explained by known costs of protein turnover and what factors may lead to the altered diurnal dynamics and increase of ribosome abundance in small accessions, and propose that there is a trade-off between protein turnover and maximisation of growth rate. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of triiodothyronine on turnover rate and metabolizing enzymes for thyroxine in thyroidectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Hidenori; Sasaki, Makoto; Imazu, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Kenjo; Aoki, Hironori; Minato, Kouichi

    2014-10-29

    Previous studies in rats have indicated that surgical thyroidectomy represses turnover of serum thyroxine (T4). However, the mechanism of this process has not been identified. To clarify the mechanism, we studied adaptive variation of metabolic enzymes involved in T4 turnover. We compared serum T4 turnover rates in thyroidectomized (Tx) rats with or without infusion of active thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine (T3). Furthermore, the levels of mRNA expression and activity of the metabolizing enzymes, deiodinase type 1 (D1), type 2 (D2), uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and sulfotransferase were also compared in several tissues with or without T3 infusion. After the T3 infusion, the turnover rate of serum T4 in Tx rats returned to normal. Although mRNA expression and activity of D1 decreased significantly in both liver and kidneys without T3 infusion, D2 expression and activity increased markedly in the brain, brown adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, hepatic UGT mRNA expression and activity in Tx rats increased significantly in comparison with normal rats, and returned to normal after T3 infusion. This study suggests that repression of the disappearance of serum T4 in rats after Tx is a homeostatic response to decreased serum T3 concentrations. Additionally, T4 glucuronide is a storage form of T4, but may also have biological significance. These results suggest strongly that repression of deiodination of T4 by D1 in the liver and kidneys plays a major role in thyroid hormone homeostasis in Tx rats, and that hepatic UGT also plays a key role in this mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    introducerede vores gruppe den enkeltstrengede RNA-origami metode, der giver mulighed for cotranscriptional foldning af veldefinerede nanostrukturer, og er en central del af arbejdet præsenteret heri. Denne ph.d.-afhandling udforsker potentielle anvendelser af RNA-origami nanostrukturer, som nanomedicin eller...... biosensorer. Afhandlingen består af en introduktion til RNA-nanoteknologi feltet, en introduktion af enkeltstrenget RNA-origami design, og fire studier, der beskriver design, produktion og karakterisering af både strukturelle og funktionelle RNA-origamier. Flere RNA-origami designs er blevet undersøgt, og...... projekterne, der indgår i denne afhandling, inkluderer de nyeste fremskridt indenfor strukturel RNA-nanoteknologi og udvikling af funktionelle RNA-baserede enheder. Det første studie beskriver konstruktion og karakterisering af en enkeltstrenget 6-helix RNA-origami stuktur, som er den første demonstration af...

  5. The quantum Kramers' turnover. IT-23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Debashis; Shankar Ray, Deb [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata (India)

    2004-12-01

    The key result of Kramers' dynamical theory of reaction rate is that the rate varies linearly in the weak dissipative regime and inversely in the high dissipative regime with friction of the reaction medium. That is in between the energy diffusion and spatial diffusion limited regime the rate constant as a function of friction exhibits a bell-shaped curve known as Kramers' turnover.

  6. The quantum Kramers' turnover. IT-23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barik, Debashis; Shankar Ray, Deb

    2004-01-01

    The key result of Kramers' dynamical theory of reaction rate is that the rate varies linearly in the weak dissipative regime and inversely in the high dissipative regime with friction of the reaction medium. That is in between the energy diffusion and spatial diffusion limited regime the rate constant as a function of friction exhibits a bell-shaped curve known as Kramers' turnover

  7. Employee Development and Turnover Intention: Theory Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wali; Nas, Zekeriya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the pattern of behavior of turnover intentions in developing countries "vis-a-vis" the one in advanced countries through the empirical data from public universities in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The study provides empirical evidence from academia in Pakistan, thereby enriching the understanding of…

  8. A Turnover Model for the Mexican Maquiladoras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertz, Carl P.; Stevens, Michael J.; Campion, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    From interviews with 47 Mexican maquiladora workers, a model of voluntary turnover was created and compared with models from the United States, Canada, England, and Australia. Despite similarities, the cultural and economic environment affected the precise content of antecedents in the Mexican model. (Contains 63 references.) (SK)

  9. Health care workplace discrimination and physician turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    To examine the association between physician race/ ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007 of practicing physicians (n = 529) randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and the National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and chi2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-4.9). Among physicians who experienced workplace discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value workplace discrimination, p value Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist.

  10. Biochemical Markers of Joint Tissue Turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Jensen, Anne-Christine; Sondergaard, Bodil Cecilie; Christiansen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    available for the study of tissue turnover in each of the three compartments of the articular joint, that is the bone, the cartilage, and the synovium. Finally, we provide some perspective to future developments in biomarker discovery and discuss the potential impact such technologies could have on the drug...

  11. Turnover of Public School Superintendents in Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joyce Ntsoaki

    2013-01-01

    This study used a descriptive qualitative design utilizing a phenomenological approach to determine and examine the reasons behind the voluntary or involuntary turnover of Arizona school superintendents. Open-ended questions were used to interview five superintendents who had left their districts between 2008 and 2013 about their perceptions on…

  12. Teacher Turnover in Charter Schools. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuit, David; Smith, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to contribute to a deeper understanding of the organizational conditions of charter schools by examining teacher turnover. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) 2003-04 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) and the Teacher Follow-Up Survey (TFS), researchers from the National Center on School…

  13. Director Turnover: An Australian Academic Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kym; Ryan, Yoni

    2012-01-01

    Although it can be argued that directors of central academic development units (ADUs) are critical to the implementation of university teaching and learning strategies, it would appear there is a high director turnover rate. While research in the USA, the UK, and Australia illustrates that ADUs are frequently closed or restructured, that research…

  14. Antecedents of Norwegian Beginning Teachers' Turnover Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiplic, Dijana; Brandmo, Christian; Elstad, Eyvind

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at exploring several individual, organizational, and contextual factors that may affect beginning teachers' turnover intentions during their first years of practice. The sample consists of 227 beginning teachers (69% female and 31% male) from 133 schools in Norway. The results show four important antecedents of beginning teachers'…

  15. Turnover among Community Mental Health Workers in Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukach, Ashley M; Ejaz, Farida K; Dawson, Nicole; Gitter, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    This study examined turnover of community mental health workers in 42 randomly selected mental health agencies in Ohio. The turnover rate in 2011 was 26 %. A regression analysis indicated that agencies with lower turnover offered higher maximum pay and were smaller in size, while those offering career advancement opportunities, such as career ladder programs, had higher turnover. The findings suggest that improving wages for workers is likely to reduce turnover. It is also possible that smaller agencies have lower turnover due to stronger relationships with workers and/or more successful hiring practices. Furthermore, turnover that occurs as a result of career advancement could have positive effects and should be examined separate from other types of turnover in the future.

  16. Work-life balance, job satisfaction and turnover intention amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-life balance, job satisfaction and turnover intention amongst ... Employee turnover has signifi cant costs and negative consequences for ... However, no interaction effect was observed between overall work-life balance and job ...

  17. Turnover of grain legume N rhizodeposits and effect of rhizodeposition on the turnover of crop residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, J.; Buegger, F.; Jensen, E.S.

    2004-01-01

    The turnover of N derived from rhizodeposition of faba bean (Vicia faba L.), pea (Pisum sativum L.) and white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) and the effects of the rhizodeposition on the subsequent C and N turnover of its crop residues were investigated in an incubation experiment (168 days, 15 degrees....... In the experiment the turnover of C and N was compared in soils with and without previous growth of three legumes and with and without incorporation of crop residues. After 168 days, 21% (lupin), 26% (faba bean) and 27% (pea) of rhizodeposition N was mineralised in the treatments without crop residues. A smaller...... amount of 15-17% was present as microbial biomass and between 30 and 55% of mineralised rhizodeposition N was present as microbial residue pool, which consists of microbial exoenzymes, mucous substances and dead microbial biomass. The effect of rhizodeposition on the C and N turnover of crop residues...

  18. Earnings Management Surrounding CEO Turnover: Evidence from Korea

    OpenAIRE

    JONG-SEO CHOI; YOUNG-MIN KWAK; CHONGWOO CHOE

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the empirical relation between CEO turnover and earnings management in Korea using a sample of 317 CEO turnovers and 634 non-turnover control firms during the period of 2001-2008. We classify CEO turnovers into four types depending on whether the departure of outgoing CEO is peaceful or forced and the incoming CEO is promoted from within or recruited from outside the firm. We measure earnings management by both discretionary accruals and real activities management. We al...

  19. Accelerated extracellular matrix turnover during exacerbations of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Jannie M B; Knox, Alan J; Lange, Peter

    2015-01-01

    progression. Extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover reflects activity in tissues and consequently assessment of ECM turnover may serve as biomarkers of disease activity. We hypothesized that the turnover of lung ECM proteins were altered during exacerbations of COPD. METHODS: 69 patients with COPD hospitalised...... of circulating fragments of structural proteins, which may serve as markers of disease activity. This suggests that patients with COPD have accelerated ECM turnover during exacerbations which may be related to disease progression....

  20. A Ministudy of employee turnover in US hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric P; Collins, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    A ministudy was conducted to collect self-reported employee turnover rates in US hospitals. The results indicate many hospitals are struggling with high employee turnover rates. Widespread variances in ratings were observed across hospitals, which may be due to lack of consistency in how they each calculate their employee turnover. This makes benchmarking for the purposes of performance improvement challenging.

  1. The research methods and model of protein turnover in animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xilin; Yang Feng

    2002-01-01

    The author discussed the concept and research methods of protein turnover in animal body. The existing problems and the research results of animal protein turnover in recent years were presented. Meanwhile, the measures to improve the models of animal protein turnover were analyzed

  2. Salary and Ranking and Teacher Turnover: A Statewide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Cynthia Martinez; Slate, John R.; Delgado, Carmen Tejeda

    2009-01-01

    This study examined three years of data obtained from the Academic Excellence Indicator System of the State of Texas regarding teacher turnover rate and teacher salary. Across all public school districts, teacher salary was consistently negatively related to teacher turnover; that is, where salary was lower, turnover rate was higher When data were…

  3. Investing in Leadership: The District's Role in Managing Principal Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascall, Blair; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of research into the impact of principal turnover on schools, and the ability of schools to mitigate the negative effects of frequent turnover by distributing leadership in the schools. The findings from this qualitative and quantitative analysis show that rapid principal turnover does indeed have a negative…

  4. Superintendent Turnover in Kentucky. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 113

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jerry; Huffman, Tyler; Madden, Karen; Shope, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines superintendent turnover in Kentucky public school districts for 1998/99-2007/08, looking at how turnover varies by rural status, Appalachian and non-Appalachian region, and 2007/08 school district characteristics. Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08;…

  5. High School Band Students' Perspectives of Teacher Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Teacher turnover remains an important issue in education. The least researched perspectives, though, are those of the students who experience teacher turnover. The purpose of this study was to examine how high school band students experience teacher turnover. A total of twelve students were interviewed, representing three schools that experienced…

  6. 41 CFR 109-27.5002 - Stores inventory turnover ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... turnover ratio. 109-27.5002 Section 109-27.5002 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property....5002 Stores inventory turnover ratio. Comparison of investment in stores inventories to annual issues... comparison may be expressed either as a turnover ratio (dollar value of issues divided by dollar value of...

  7. Turnover of regulated nurses in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Charlene H; Wodchis, Walter P; McGilton, Katherine S

    2014-07-01

    To describe the relationship between nursing staff turnover in long-term care (LTC) homes and organisational factors consisting of leadership practices and behaviours, supervisory support, burnout, job satisfaction and work environment satisfaction. The turnover of regulated nursing staff [Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs)] in LTC facilities is a pervasive problem, but there is a scarcity of research examining this issue in Canada. The study was conceptualized using a Stress Process model. Distinct surveys were distributed to administrators to measure organisational factors and to regulated nurses to measure personal and job-related sources of stress and workplace support. In total, 324 surveys were used in the linear regression analysis to examine factors associated with high turnover rates. Higher leadership practice scores were associated with lower nursing turnover; a one score increase in leadership correlated with a 49% decrease in nursing turnover. A significant inverse relationship between leadership turnover and nurse turnover was found: the higher the administrator turnover the lower the nurse turnover rate. Leadership practices and administrator turnover are significant in influencing regulated nurse turnover in LTC. Long-term care facilities may want to focus on building good leadership and communication as an upstream method to minimize nurse turnover. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Literature review of labour turnover and absenteeism costs in the coal mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolf, A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper includes labor turnover formulae, turnover costs, and turnover rates for the mining industry. Few meaningful studies or reports on absenteeism costs and labour turnover in mining were retrieved.

  9. A Role for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Plants: Pathogen Responses Are Induced in Arabidopsis thaliana NMD Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayson, Samantha; Arciga-Reyes, Luis; Wootton, Lucie; De Torres Zabala, Marta; Truman, William; Graham, Neil; Grant, Murray; Davies, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a conserved mechanism that targets aberrant mRNAs for destruction. NMD has also been found to regulate the expression of large numbers of genes in diverse organisms, although the biological role for this is unclear and few evolutionarily conserved targets have been identified. Expression analyses of three Arabidopsis thaliana lines deficient in NMD reveal that the vast majority of NMD-targeted transcripts are associated with response to pathogens. Congruently, NMD mutants, in which these transcripts are elevated, confer partial resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. These findings suggest a biological rationale for the regulation of gene expression by NMD in plants and suggest that manipulation of NMD could offer a new approach for crop protection. Amongst the few non-pathogen responsive NMD-targeted genes, one potential NMD targeted signal, the evolutionarily conserved upstream open reading frame (CuORF), was found to be hugely over-represented, raising the possibility that this feature could be used to target specific physiological mRNAs for control by NMD. PMID:22384098

  10. A complex small RNA repertoire is generated by a plant/fungal-like machinery and effected by a metazoan-like Argonaute in the single-cell human parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Braun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In RNA silencing, small RNAs produced by the RNase-III Dicer guide Argonaute-like proteins as part of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC to regulate gene expression transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally. Here, we have characterized the RNA silencing machinery and exhaustive small RNAome of Toxoplasma gondii, member of the Apicomplexa, a phylum of animal- and human-infecting parasites that cause extensive health and economic damages to human populations worldwide. Remarkably, the small RNA-generating machinery of Toxoplasma is phylogenetically and functionally related to that of plants and fungi, and accounts for an exceptionally diverse array of small RNAs. This array includes conspicuous populations of repeat-associated small interfering RNA (siRNA, which, as in plants, likely generate and maintain heterochromatin at DNA repeats and satellites. Toxoplasma small RNAs also include many microRNAs with clear metazoan-like features whose accumulation is sometimes extremely high and dynamic, an unexpected finding given that Toxoplasma is a unicellular protist. Both plant-like heterochromatic small RNAs and metazoan-like microRNAs bind to a single Argonaute protein, Tg-AGO. Toxoplasma miRNAs co-sediment with polyribosomes, and thus, are likely to act as translational regulators, consistent with the lack of catalytic residues in Tg-AGO. Mass spectrometric analyses of the Tg-AGO protein complex revealed a common set of virtually all known RISC components so far characterized in human and Drosophila, as well as novel proteins involved in RNA metabolism. In agreement with its loading with heterochromatic small RNAs, Tg-AGO also associates substoichiometrically with components of known chromatin-repressing complexes. Thus, a puzzling patchwork of silencing processor and effector proteins from plant, fungal and metazoan origin accounts for the production and action of an unsuspected variety of small RNAs in the single-cell parasite Toxoplasma and

  11. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Anji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  12. Columnar apple primary roots share some features of the columnar-specific gene expression profile of aerial plant parts as evidenced by RNA-Seq analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Romina; Djozgic, Haris; Rieger, Benjamin; Rapp, Steffen; Schmidt, Erwin Robert

    2015-02-04

    Primary roots (radicles) represent the first visible developmental stages of the plant and are crucial for nutrient supply and the integration of environmental signals. Few studies have analyzed primary roots at a molecular level, and were mostly limited to Arabidopsis. Here we study the primary root transcriptomes of standard type, heterozygous columnar and homozygous columnar apple (Malus x domestica) by RNA-Seq and quantitative real-time PCR. The columnar growth habit is characterized by a stunted main axis and the development of short fruit spurs instead of long lateral branches. This compact growth possesses economic potential because it allows high density planting and mechanical harvesting of the trees. Its molecular basis has been identified as a nested Gypsy-44 retrotransposon insertion; however the link between the insertion and the phenotype as well as the timing of the phenotype emergence are as yet unclear. We extend the transcriptomic studies of columnar tissues to the radicles, which are the earliest developmental stage and investigate whether homozygous columnar seedlings are viable. Radicles mainly express genes associated with primary metabolism, growth and development. About 200 genes show differential regulation in a comparison of heterozygous columnar radicles with non-columnar radicles, whereas the comparison of homozygous columnar radicles with non-columnar radicles yields about 300 differentially regulated genes. Genes involved in cellulose and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, cell wall modification, transcription and translation, ethylene and jasmonate biosynthesis are upregulated in columnar radicles. Genes in the vicinity of the columnar-specific Gypsy-44 insertion experience an especially strong differential regulation: the direct downstream neighbor, dmr6-like, is downregulated in heterozygous columnar radicles, but strongly upregulated in columnar shoot apical meristems. The transcriptomic profile of primary roots reflects their pivotal

  13. Autoantigen La promotes efficient RNAi, antiviral response, and transposon silencing by facilitating multiple-turnover RISC catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Tan, Huiling; Tian, Hui; Liang, Chunyang; Chen, She; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-11-04

    The effector of RNA interference (RNAi) is the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). C3PO promotes the activation of RISC by degrading the Argonaute2 (Ago2)-nicked passenger strand of duplex siRNA. Active RISC is a multiple-turnover enzyme that uses the guide strand of siRNA to direct the Ago2-mediated sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNA. How this effector step of RNAi is regulated is currently unknown. Here, we used the human Ago2 minimal RISC system to purify Sjögren's syndrome antigen B (SSB)/autoantigen La as an activator of the RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage activity. Our reconstitution studies showed that La could promote multiple-turnover RISC catalysis by facilitating the release of cleaved mRNA from RISC. Moreover, we demonstrated that La was required for efficient RNAi, antiviral defense, and transposon silencing in vivo. Taken together, the findings of C3PO and La reveal a general concept that regulatory factors are required to remove Ago2-cleaved products to assemble or restore active RISC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PERAN STRES KERJA DAN KEPUASAN KERJA UNTUK MENGURANGI TURNOVER INTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Nazenin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tujuan penelitian ini untuk menguji pengaruh variabel stres kerja dan kepuasan kerja pada turnover intention karyawan tetap bagian produksi. Sampel penelitian ini adalah 86 responden, menggunakan metode Slovin dengan teknik probability sampling dengan jenis proportionate random sampling. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, menunjukkan bahwa stres kerja berpengaruh positif signifikan pada turnover intention. Kemudian, kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif signifikan. Penelitian ini menyimpulkan, bahwa stres kerja berpengaruh positif dan signifikan pada turnover intention karyawan dan kepuasan kerja berpengaruh negatif dan signifikan terhadap turnover intention karyawan. Implikasi manajerial yang bisa dilakukan adalah dengan pengurangan tingkat stres karyawan dan membuat program untuk tujuan menekan turnover intention, seperti kesempatan promosi dan meningkatkan reward karyawan. The purpose of this study conducted to examine the effect of work stress and job satisfaction on turnover intention of employee in production department. The sample was 86 respondent, using Slovin method with proportionate random sampling technique. The result showed that job stress has a positive effect on turnover intention while job satisfaction has a negative effect on turnover intention. This study conclude that job stress has positive and significant impact on employee turnover intention and job satisfaction significantly and negatively related to turnover intention of employees. Therefore, it is recommended to managerial level people to reduce stress levels in employees and to create a program for pressing turnover intention, such as promotional opportunities and improve employee rewards.

  15. How Wage Compression Affects Job Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Heyman, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    I use Swedish establishment-level panel data to test Bertola and Rogerson’s (1997) hypothesis of a positive relation between the degree of wage compression and job reallocation. Results indicate that the effect of wage compression on job turnover is positive and significant in the manufacturing sector. The wage compression effect is stronger on job destruction than on job creation, consistent with downward wage rigidity. Further results include a strong positive relationship between the fract...

  16. Measuring temporal turnover in ecological communities

    OpenAIRE

    Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Dornelas, Maria; Magurran, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (project BioTIME 250189) and the Royal Society. MD acknowledges funding from the Marine Alliance for Science and Technology Scotland (MASTS). MASTS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (grant reference HR09011) and contributing institutions. 1.Range migrations in response to climate change, invasive species and the emergence of novel ecosystems highlight the importance of temporal turnover in community composition as a...

  17. Stock Option Compensation and Managerial Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca Georgiana NASTASESCU

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the association between managerial turnover and equity-based compensation. I investigate whether stock options act to bond executives to their firms and whether retention of managers is a motivation of companies in designing CEO incentive contracts. The results show that stock options do negatively influence the probability of a CEO leaving the company. The monetary cost of losing the value of equity-based compensation package keeps the manager with his company. I also fin...

  18. High bone turnover in Irish professional jockeys.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Waldron-Lynch, F

    2012-02-01

    SUMMARY: Professional jockeys are routinely exposed to high impact trauma and sustain fractures frequently. We found that jockeys restrict their caloric intake in order to maintain regulation weights, and that bone turnover is high. There are significant health and safety implications for the racing industry. INTRODUCTION: Professional jockeys routinely sustain fractures from high impact falls. Jockeys maintain a low percentage body fat and a low body mass index (BMI) to achieve low weight targets in order to race. We evaluated dietary habits and bone metabolism in jockeys. METHODS: Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 27 male jockeys of the 144 jockeys licensed in Ireland. Fourteen (52%) had BMD T score below -1.0, of whom 12 consented to clinical review, nutritional survey, endocrine studies, and bone turnover markers (BTM). BTM were compared to age- and sex-matched controls (n = 16). RESULTS: BMI was 20.6 +\\/- 1.7 kg\\/m(2); previous fracture frequency was 3.2 +\\/- 2.0 per rider. All had normal endocrine axes. The jockeys\\' diet as determined by a 7-day dietary recall was deficient in energy, calcium, and vitamin D intake. Compared with the control group, the jockey group had evidence of increased bone turnover. CONCLUSIONS: A substantial proportion of the professional jockeys in Ireland have low-normal BMD, low BMI, and high bone turnover that may result from weight and dietary restrictions. These factors seem to have a deleterious effect on their bone health and predispose the jockeys to a high fracture risk that should be remediated.

  19. Bone mass and turnover in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Gam, A; Egsmose, C

    1993-01-01

    Physical inactivity accelerates bone loss. Since patients with fibromyalgia are relatively physically inactive, bone mass and markers of bone metabolism were determined in 12 premenopausal women with fibromyalgia and in healthy age matched female control subjects. No differences were found in lum.......01. This was linked to lower urinary creatinine excretion (p = 0.02) probably reflecting lower physical activity in the patients with fibromyalgia. We conclude that bone mass and turnover are generally not affected in premenopausal women with fibromyalgia....

  20. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more...... sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  1. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice.

  2. Role of TGF-β in a Mouse Model of High Turnover Renal Osteodystrophy†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiguang; Song, Wenping; Boulanger, Joseph H; Tang, Wen; Sabbagh, Yves; Kelley, Brian; Gotschall, Russell; Ryan, Susan; Phillips, Lucy; Malley, Katie; Cao, Xiaohong; Xia, Tai-He; Zhen, Gehua; Cao, Xu; Ling, Hong; Dechow, Paul C; Bellido, Teresita M; Ledbetter, Steven R; Schiavi, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone turnover is a key pathologic feature of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Expression of TGF-β1, a known regulator of bone turnover, is increased in bone biopsies from individuals with CKD. Similarly, TGF-β1 mRNA and downstream signaling is increased in bones from jck mice, a model of high-turnover renal osteodystropy. A neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) was used to explore TGF-βs role in renal osteodystrophy. 1D11 administration to jck significantly attenuated elevated serum osteocalcin and type I collagen C-telopeptides. Histomorphometric analysis indicated that 1D11 administration increased bone volume and suppressed the elevated bone turnover in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were associated with reductions in osteoblast and osteoclast surface areas. μCT confirmed the observed increase in trabecular bone volume and demonstrated improvements in trabecular architecture and increased cortical thickness. 1D11 administration was associated with significant reductions in expression of osteoblast marker genes (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) and the osteoclast marker gene, Trap5. Importantly, in this model, 1D11 did not improve kidney function or reduce serum PTH levels indicating that 1D11 effects on bone are independent of changes in renal or parathyroid function. 1D11 also significantly attenuated high turnover bone disease in the adenine-induced uremic rat model. Antibody administration was associated with a reduction in pSMAD2/SMAD2 in bone but not bone marrow as assessed by quantitative immunoblot analysis. Immunostaining revealed pSMAD staining in osteoblasts and osteocytes but not osteoclasts, suggesting 1D11 effects on osteoclasts may be indirect. Immunoblot and whole genome mRNA expression analysis confirmed our previous observation that repression of Wnt/β catenin expression in bone is correlated with increased osteoclast activity in jck mice and bone biopsies from CKD patients. Furthermore

  3. Role of TGF-β in a mouse model of high turnover renal osteodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiguang; Song, Wenping; Boulanger, Joseph H; Tang, Wen; Sabbagh, Yves; Kelley, Brian; Gotschall, Russell; Ryan, Susan; Phillips, Lucy; Malley, Katie; Cao, Xiaohong; Xia, Tai-He; Zhen, Gehua; Cao, Xu; Ling, Hong; Dechow, Paul C; Bellido, Teresita M; Ledbetter, Steven R; Schiavi, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Altered bone turnover is a key pathologic feature of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Expression of TGF-β1, a known regulator of bone turnover, is increased in bone biopsies from individuals with CKD. Similarly, TGF-β1 mRNA and downstream signaling is increased in bones from jck mice, a model of high-turnover renal osteodystrophy. A neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody (1D11) was used to explore TGF-β's role in renal osteodystrophy. 1D11 administration to jck significantly attenuated elevated serum osteocalcin and type I collagen C-telopeptides. Histomorphometric analysis indicated that 1D11 administration increased bone volume and suppressed the elevated bone turnover in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were associated with reductions in osteoblast and osteoclast surface areas. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) confirmed the observed increase in trabecular bone volume and demonstrated improvements in trabecular architecture and increased cortical thickness. 1D11 administration was associated with significant reductions in expression of osteoblast marker genes (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) and the osteoclast marker gene, Trap5. Importantly, in this model, 1D11 did not improve kidney function or reduce serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels, indicating that 1D11 effects on bone are independent of changes in renal or parathyroid function. 1D11 also significantly attenuated high-turnover bone disease in the adenine-induced uremic rat model. Antibody administration was associated with a reduction in pSMAD2/SMAD2 in bone but not bone marrow as assessed by quantitative immunoblot analysis. Immunostaining revealed pSMAD staining in osteoblasts and osteocytes but not osteoclasts, suggesting 1D11 effects on osteoclasts may be indirect. Immunoblot and whole genome mRNA expression analysis confirmed our previous observation that repression of Wnt/β-catenin expression in bone is correlated with increased osteoclast activity in jck

  4. Effects of water and nitrogen addition on species turnover in temperate grasslands in northern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuwen Xu

    Full Text Available Global nitrogen (N deposition and climate change have been identified as two of the most important causes of current plant diversity loss. However, temporal patterns of species turnover underlying diversity changes in response to changing precipitation regimes and atmospheric N deposition have received inadequate attention. We carried out a manipulation experiment in a steppe and an old-field in North China from 2005 to 2009, to test the hypothesis that water addition enhances plant species richness through increase in the rate of species gain and decrease in the rate of species loss, while N addition has opposite effects on species changes. Our results showed that water addition increased the rate of species gain in both the steppe and the old field but decreased the rates of species loss and turnover in the old field. In contrast, N addition increased the rates of species loss and turnover in the steppe but decreased the rate of species gain in the old field. The rate of species change was greater in the old field than in the steppe. Water interacted with N to affect species richness and species turnover, indicating that the impacts of N on semi-arid grasslands were largely mediated by water availability. The temporal stability of communities was negatively correlated with rates of species loss and turnover, suggesting that water addition might enhance, but N addition would reduce the compositional stability of grasslands. Experimental results support our initial hypothesis and demonstrate that water and N availabilities differed in the effects on rate of species change in the temperate grasslands, and these effects also depend on grassland types and/or land-use history. Species gain and loss together contribute to the dynamic change of species richness in semi-arid grasslands under future climate change.

  5. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: Turnover rates and their association with client outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.; Modisette, Kathryn C.; Ihnes, Pamela C.; Godley, Susan H.

    2011-01-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (n=249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. Additionally, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. PMID:22154040

  6. Bacterial and enchytraeid abundance accelerate soil carbon turnover along a lowland vegetation gradient in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, M.R.; Petersen, D.G.; McGuire, A.D.; Briones, M.J.I.; Churchill, A.C.; Doctor, D.H.; Pruett, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Boreal wetlands are characterized by a mosaic of plant communities, including forests, shrublands, grasslands, and fens, which are structured largely by changes in topography and water table position. The soil associated with these plant communities contain quantitatively and qualitatively different forms of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrient availability that drive changes in biogeochemical cycling rates. Therefore different boreal plant communities likely contain different soil biotic communities which in turn affect rates of organic matter decomposition. We examined relationships between plant communities, microbial communities, enchytraeids, and soil C turnover in near-surface soils along a shallow topographic soil moisture and vegetation gradient in interior Alaska. We tested the hypothesis that as soil moisture increases along the gradient, surface soils would become increasingly dominated by bacteria and mesofauna and have more rapid rates of C turnover. We utilized bomb radiocarbon techniques to infer rates of C turnover and the 13C isotopic composition of SOM and respired CO2 to infer the degree of soil humification. Soil phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activities were generally higher in the rich fen compared with the forest and bog birch sites. Results indicated greater C fluxes and more rapid C turnover in the surface soils of the fen sites compared to the wetland forest and shrub sites. Quantitative PCR analyses of soil bacteria and archaea, combined with enchytraeid counts, indicated that surface soils from the lowland fen ecosystems had higher abundances of these microbial and mesofaunal groups. Fungal abundance was highly variable and not significantly different among sites. Microbial data was utilized in a food web model that confirmed that rapidly cycling systems are dominated by bacterial activity and enchytraeid grazing. However, our results also suggest that oxidative enzymes play an important role in the C mineralization process in

  7. Long-term nitrogen addition affects the phylogenetic turnover of soil microbial community responding to moisture pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi; Yao, Minjie; Stegen, James C; Rui, Junpeng; Li, Jiabao; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-12-13

    How press disturbance (long-term) influences the phylogenetic turnover of soil microbial communities responding to pulse disturbances (short-term) is not fully known. Understanding the complex connections between the history of environmental conditions, assembly processes and microbial community dynamics is necessary to predict microbial response to perturbation. We started by investigating phylogenetic spatial turnover (based on DNA) of soil prokaryotic communities after long-term nitrogen (N) deposition and temporal turnover (based on RNA) of communities responding to pulse by conducting short-term rewetting experiments. The results showed that moderate N addition increased ecological stochasticity and phylogenetic diversity. In contrast, high N addition slightly increased homogeneous selection and decreased phylogenetic diversity. Examining the system with higher phylogenetic resolution revealed a moderate contribution of variable selection across the whole N gradient. The moisture pulse experiment showed that high N soils had higher rates of phylogenetic turnover across short phylogenetic distances and significant changes in community compositions through time. Long-term N input history influenced spatial turnover of microbial communities, but the dominant community assembly mechanisms differed across different N deposition gradients. We further revealed an interaction between press and pulse disturbances whereby deterministic processes were particularly important following pulse disturbances in high N soils.

  8. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5). T...

  9. Primer-dependent and primer-independent initiation of double stranded RNA synthesis by purified arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerases RDR2 and RDR6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Devert, Anthony; Fabre, Nicolas; Floris, Maina Huguette Joséphine

    2015-01-01

    ) targeted by RNA silencing. The dsRNA is subsequently cleaved by the ribonuclease DICER-like into secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that reinforce and/or maintain the silenced state of the target RNA. Models of RNA silencing propose that RDRs could use primer-independent and primer......Cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRs) are fundamental components of RNA silencing in plants and many other eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana genetic studies have demonstrated that RDR2 and RDR6 are involved in the synthesis of double stranded RNA (dsRNA) from single stranded RNA (ssRNA......-dependent initiation to generate dsRNA from a transcript targeted by primary siRNA or microRNA (miRNA). However, the biochemical activities of RDR proteins are still partly understood. Here, we obtained active recombinant RDR2 and RDR6 in a purified form. We demonstrate that RDR2 and RDR6 have primer...

  10. Turnover in health care: the mediating effects of employee engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collini, Stevie A; Guidroz, Ashley M; Perez, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to understand the interaction between interpersonal respect, diversity climate, mission fulfilment and engagement to better predict turnover in health care. Registered nurse turnover has averaged 14% and current nursing shortages are expected to spread. Few studies have studied employee engagement as a mediator between organisational context and turnover. Study participants were employees working within 185 departments across ten hospitals within a large healthcare organisation in the USA. Although a total of 5443 employees work in these departments, employee opinion survey responses were aggregated by department before being linked to turnover rates gathered from company records. Engagement fully mediated the relationship between respect and turnover and the relationship between mission fulfilment and turnover. Diversity climate was not related to turnover. Turnover in health care poses a significant threat to the mission of creating a healing environment for patients and these results demonstrate that workplace respect and connection to the mission affect turnover by decreasing engagement. The findings demonstrated that to increase engagement, and improve turnover rates in health care, it would be beneficial for organisations, and nurse management to focus on improving mission fulfilment and interpersonal relationships. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Workforce turnover at local health departments: nature, characteristics, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Sarah J; Ye, Jiali; Leep, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Employee turnover, defined as total separations from employment, is expensive, can result in lost capacity, and can limit local health departments' (LHDs') ability to respond to public health needs. Despite the importance of workforce capacity in public health, little is known about workforce turnover in LHDs. To examine the extent to which LHDs experience turnover and identify LHD characteristics that are associated with turnover. A cross-sectional data set of employee turnover and LHD characteristics from the 2013 National Profile of LHDs was analyzed. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses were conducted in 2014 on turnover rates. The effect of the following LHD characteristics on turnover rates were examined: population size, governance type, degree of urbanization, top executive experience level, expenditures per capita, and LHD budget cuts. In 2013, LHDs experienced a mean turnover rate of 9.88%; approximately one third of turnover was due to retirements. LHDs with shared state and local governance experienced a higher turnover rate than LHDs with exclusive state or local governance. LHDs that are units of state agencies had a significantly higher retirement rate than those governed by local authorities. Top executive experience level, per capita expenditures, and LHD budget cuts were also related to turnover rates. LHDs experienced a lower overall turnover rate than state health departments in 2011 and lower than all local and state government agencies in 2012. Strengthening leadership skills of new top executives and ensuring adequate funding may reduce turnover in LHDs. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Estimating Population Turnover Rates by Relative Quantification Methods Reveals Microbial Dynamics in Marine Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, Richard; Bird, Jordan T; Shumaker, Alexander; Lloyd, Karen G

    2018-01-01

    The difficulty involved in quantifying biogeochemically significant microbes in marine sediments limits our ability to assess interspecific interactions, population turnover times, and niches of uncultured taxa. We incubated surface sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, USA, anoxically at 21°C for 122 days. Sulfate decreased until day 68, after which methane increased, with hydrogen concentrations consistent with the predicted values of an electron donor exerting thermodynamic control. We measured turnover times using two relative quantification methods, quantitative PCR (qPCR) and the product of 16S gene read abundance and total cell abundance (FRAxC, which stands for "fraction of read abundance times cells"), to estimate the population turnover rates of uncultured clades. Most 16S rRNA reads were from deeply branching uncultured groups, and ∼98% of 16S rRNA genes did not abruptly shift in relative abundance when sulfate reduction gave way to methanogenesis. Uncultured Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales increased at the onset of methanogenesis with population turnover times estimated from qPCR at 9.7 ± 3.9 and 12.6 ± 4.1 days, respectively. These were consistent with FRAxC turnover times of 9.4 ± 5.8 and 9.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively. Uncultured Syntrophaceae , which are possibly fermentative syntrophs of methanogens, and uncultured Kazan-3A-21 archaea also increased at the onset of methanogenesis, with FRAxC turnover times of 14.7 ± 6.9 and 10.6 ± 3.6 days. Kazan-3A-21 may therefore either perform methanogenesis or form a fermentative syntrophy with methanogens. Three genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria, Desulfovibrio , Desulfobacter , and Desulfobacterium , increased in the first 19 days before declining rapidly during sulfate reduction. We conclude that population turnover times on the order of days can be measured robustly in organic-rich marine sediment, and the transition from sulfate-reducing to methanogenic conditions stimulates

  13. Cereal aphid colony turnover and persistence in winter wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linton Winder

    Full Text Available An understanding of spatial and temporal processes in agricultural ecosystems provides a basis for rational decision-making with regards to the management and husbandry of crops, supporting the implementation of integrated farming strategies. In this study we investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of aphid pests (Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum within winter wheat fields. Using an intensive sampling programme we investigated distributions at both the small (single shoot and large (field scales. Within two fields, a grid with 82 locations was established (area 120 m by 168 m. At each location, 25 shoots were individually marked and aphid counts by observation conducted on 21 and 22 occasions as the crop matured, resulting in 43,050 and 45,100 counts being conducted in the two fields respectively. We quantified field scale spatial distributions, demonstrating that spatial pattern generally emerged, with temporal stability being both species- and field- dependent. We then measured turnover of colonies at the small (individual shoot and large (field scales by comparing consecutive pairs of sampling occasions. Four turnover categories were defined: Empty (no aphids recorded on either occasion; Colonised (aphids recorded on the second occasion but not the first; Extinction (aphids recorded on the first occasion but not the second; Stable (aphids recorded on both occasions. At the field scale, population stability soon established, but, at the small scale there was a consistently high proportion of unoccupied shoots with considerable colonisation and extinction and low stability. The redistribution of aphids within the crop at the local scale is a vulnerability which could be used to disrupt population development--by mediating exposure to ground-active natural enemies and by incurring a metabolic cost caused by the physiological demands to re-establish on a nearby host plant.

  14. 3'-5' RNA degradation pathways in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon

    RNA synthesis and degradation are key steps in the regulation of gene expression in all living organisms. During the course of his PhD studies, Michal Lubas centred his research on the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA turnover of both noncoding and coding RNAs in human cells. His proteomic studies...... revealed the interaction network of the main 3'-5' RNA degradation machinery – the RNA exosome complex. One of the key findings was the identification and characterisation of the Nuclear Exosome Targeting (NEXT) complex, important for nuclear functions of the exosome. Michal Lubas also studied the role...

  15. PENGARUH KEPUASAN KERJA DAN KOMITMEN ORGANISASI TERHADAP TURNOVER INTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mardi Widyadmono

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the influence of job satisfaction and organizational commitment on Turnover Intention. Futhermore, the study identify the mediation role of organizational commitment in the relationship between job satifaction and Turnover Intention. The participants of the study are 98 employees working in private companies operated in Yogyakarta, (36 men and 62 women. Respondents complete questionnaire containing questions on job satisfaction variable, questions on organizational commitment and questions on Turnover Intention. The statistics tools applied are regression analysis to assess the relation between variables and Sobel test to measure the mediation role of organizational commitment. The results of the investigation revealed that job satisfication and organizational commitment influence negatively and significantly Turnover Intention. The higher the job satisfication and the organizational commitment of employees lead to the lower Turnover Intention. The organizational commitment does not play mediation role in the relationship between job satisfication and Turnover Intention

  16. Mentor program boosts new nurses' satisfaction and lowers turnover rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kathy C

    2010-07-01

    In 2004, the turnover rate among first-year registered nurses (RNs) at St. Francis Hospital and Health Centers had mushroomed to 31%. Based on research, in 2006, the hospital embarked on a journey to implement an RN mentor program to improve satisfaction and reduce turnover. A pilot program was initiated, including 12 RN mentors and 12 RN protégés from select nursing units. The results showed a 0% turnover rate during the 1-year pilot program. Based on these findings, the mentor program was expanded to include RNs working in inpatient nursing units and surgery and emergency departments. Each year, the RN turnover rate has decreased. In 2009, the turnover rate was 10.3%. Because of the success of the program, it has been expanded in scope to include other professionals experiencing high turnover in targeted departments, including radiological technicians, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, and physical therapists.

  17. Turnover of circulating hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorie, M J; Maloney, M A; Patt, H M

    1979-10-01

    Short-term parabiosis of male and female CBA/CaJ mice was used to investigate the turnover of circulating hematopoietic stem cells. The change and subsequent disappearance of donor stem cells were monitored by spleen colony assay and chromosome analysis of individual colonies. The results revealed an exponential disappearance of pluripotent stem cells from blood with a characteristic half time of 1.7 h. Blood-borne stem cells were shown to be equilibrated with a subpopulation of marrow stem cells exhibiting a disappearance half time of 9.5 h. Splenectomy did not change the apparent rate of stem cell removal from the blood.

  18. The phase model of burnout and employee turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Eric A; Boss, R Wayne

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the phase model of burnout and investigates its relationship to actual turnover in a hospital. The results indicate that employees who turnover have significantly higher burnout phase scores that those who stay in the organization. A further comparison of voluntary and involuntary turnover demonstrates that there is no significant differences on burnout phase scores. The findings lend support to the usefulness of the phase model of burnout.

  19. Job and industry turnover for registered and licensed vocational nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Rickles, Jordan; Chapman, Susan; Ong, Paul M

    2008-09-01

    Most studies of nurse turnover focus on job turnover, which could reflect nurse advancement and thus not be detrimental to the workforce. The authors discuss findings from a study that involved 2 cohorts of graduates from registered nursing and licensed vocational nursing community college programs in California. The duration of employment in the healthcare industry, as well as with specific employers, is tracked, lending a more thorough analysis of nursing job and industry turnover than found in other studies.

  20. The Impact of Human Resource Management Practices on Employee Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Ozoliņa-Ozola, I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify the human resource management practices that are effective for employee turnover reducing. For this purpose the methods of document analysis and expert survey were used. On the basis of analysis of the scientific literature retrieved from academic databases the human resource management practices, which were mentioned in connection with employee turnover, were detected and described its effect on employee turnover. By conducting two separate expert sur...

  1. Does public service performance affect top management turnover?

    OpenAIRE

    Boyne, George A.; James, Oliver; John, Peter; Petrovsky, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Political and organizational theories suggest that the turnover of chief executives and other members of senior management teams are likely to be influenced by public service performance. We use a panel data set of 148 English local governments over 4 years to test this proposition. The empirical results show that performance has a negative effect on turnover, but that this effect is weaker for chief executives than for members of their senior management teams. In addition, top team turnover ...

  2. Explaining turnover intention in Korean public community hospitals: occupational differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jee-In; Chang, Hyejung

    2008-01-01

    Personnel in public hospitals had relatively low job satisfaction despite of tenure employment. High turnover rates degrade hospital image and incur additional costs related to recruitment and training. The purposes of this study were to describe the occupational differences and to identify factors affecting turnover intention among public hospital personnel. A questionnaire survey was conducted as part of Administrative Services Quality Evaluation Program by Seoul metropolitan municipality from 1 November to 1 December in 2003. The subjects were 1251 entire hospital personnel in four hospitals. The questionnaire was designed to measure job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intention, and demographic characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors influencing turnover intention. There were significant differences in job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intention according to the occupations. The turnover intention rates were highest among physicians, followed by paramedicals and nursing staffs and then administrators. The significant factors affecting turnover intention were involvement and loyalty among physicians, hospital type, satisfaction with systems and loyalty among nursing staffs, satisfaction with relationship and loyalty among administrators, and loyalty among paramedicals. There were different moderators that influence turnover intentions of hospital personnel. Loyalty had the most important effect upon turnover intention in all occupations. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  3. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youshi Wang

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L, at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8 resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1 on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  4. The effect of positive interactions on temporal turnover of community composition along an environmental gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youshi; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shurong; Soininen, Janne; Ai, Dexiecuo; Li, Yali; Chu, Chengjin

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the interplay between negative and positive interactions simultaneously shapes community structure and composition. However, few studies have attempted to examine the effect of facilitation on compositional changes in communities through time. Additionally, due to the difficulties in collecting the long-term data, it would be useful to indicate the rate of temporal turnover using a readily obtainable metric. Using an individual-based model incorporating plant strategies, we examined the role of facilitation on the temporal turnover of communities located at different positions along an environmental gradient for three model scenarios: CM without facilitation; CFM-U, a unimodal relationship between facilitation and environmental severity; and CFM-L, a positively linear relationship between facilitation and environmental severity. Our results demonstrated that facilitation could increase, decrease or have no remarkable effect on temporal turnover. The specific outcome depended on the location of the focal community across the environmental gradient and the model employed. Compared with CM, the inclusion of positive interactions (i.e. CFM-U and CFM-L), at intermediate environmental stress levels (such as S = 0.7 and 0.8) resulted in lower Bray-Curtis similarity values; at other severity levels, facilitation slowed down (such as S = 0.3 and 0.4 at low to medium stress levels, and S = 0.9 at high stress levels) or had only a subtle effect (such as at S = 0.1) on temporal turnover. We also found that the coefficient of variation (CV) in species abundances and the rate of temporal variability showed a significant quadratic relationship. Our theoretical analysis contributes to the understanding of factors driving temporal turnover in biotic communities, and presents a potential metric (i.e. CV in species abundances) assessing the consequences of ongoing environmental change on community structure.

  5. Dynamics of Adipocyte Turnover in Humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, K; Arner, E; Westermark, P; Bernard, S; Buchholz, B; Bergmann, O; Blomqvist, L; Hoffstedt, J; Naslund, E; Britton, T; Concha, H; Hassan, M; Ryden, M; Frisen, J; Arner, P

    2007-07-16

    Obesity is increasing in an epidemic fashion in most countries and constitutes a public health problem by enhancing the risk for cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Owing to the increase in obesity, life expectancy may start to decrease in developed countries for the first time in recent history. The factors determining fat mass in adult humans are not fully understood, but increased lipid storage in already developed fat cells is thought to be most important. We show that adipocyte number is a major determinant for the fat mass in adults. However, the number of fat cells stays constant in adulthood in lean and obese and even under extreme conditions, indicating that the number of adipocytes is set during childhood and adolescence. To establish the dynamics within the stable population of adipocytes in adults, we have measured adipocyte turnover by analyzing the integration of {sup 14}C derived from nuclear bomb tests in genomic DNA. Approximately 10% of fat cells are renewed annually at all adult ages and levels of body mass index. Neither adipocyte death nor generation rate is altered in obesity, suggesting a tight regulation of fat cell number that is independent of metabolic profile in adulthood. The high turnover of adipocytes establishes a new therapeutic target for pharmacological intervention in obesity.

  6. Different bacterial communities in heat and gamma irradiation treated replant disease soils revealed by 16S rRNA gene analysis – contribution to improved aboveground apple plant growth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunlong eYim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Replant disease (RD severely affects apple production in propagation tree nurseries and in fruit orchards worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the effects of soil disinfection treatments on plant growth and health in a biotest in two different RD soil types under greenhouse conditions and to link the plant growth status with the bacterial community composition at the time of plant sampling. In the biotest performed we observed that the aboveground growth of apple rootstock M26 plants after eight weeks was improved in the two RD soils either treated at 50 °C or with gamma irradiation compared to the untreated RD soils. Total community DNA was extracted from soil loosely adhering to the roots and quantitative real-time PCR revealed no pronounced differences in 16S rRNA gene copy numbers. 16S rRNA gene-based bacterial community analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and 454-pyrosequencing revealed significant differences in the bacterial community composition even after eight weeks of plant growth. In both soils, the treatments affected different phyla but only the relative abundance of Acidobacteria was reduced by both treatments. The genera Streptomyces, Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Sphingomonas had a higher relative abundance in both heat treated soils, whereas the relative abundance of Mucilaginibacter, Devosia and Rhodanobacter was increased in the gamma-irradiated soils and only the genus Phenylobacterium was increased in both treatments. The increased abundance of genera with potentially beneficial bacteria, i.e. potential degraders of phenolic compounds might have contributed to the improved plant growth in both treatments.

  7. Comparative Profiling of microRNA Expression in Soybean Seeds from Genetically Modified Plants and their Near-Isogenic Parental Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Lan, Qingkuo; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Wentao; Li, Feiwu; Wang, Qinying; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely demonstrated to play fundamental roles in gene regulation in most eukaryotes. To date, there has been no study describing the miRNA composition in genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, small RNAs from dry seeds of two GM soybean lines and their parental cultivars were investigated using deep sequencing technology and bioinformatic approaches. As a result, several differentially expressed gma-miRNAs were found between the GM and non-GM soybeans. Meanwhile, more differentially expressed gma-miRNAs were identified between distantly relatednon-GM soybeans, indicating that the miRNA components of soybean seeds varied among different soybean lines, including the GM and non-GM soybeans, and the extent of difference might be related to their genetic relationship. Additionally, fourteen novel gma-miRNA candidates were predicted in soybean seeds including a potential bidirectionally transcribed miRNA family with two genomic loci (gma-miR-N1). Our findings firstly provided useful data for miRNA composition in edible GM crops and also provided valuable information for soybean miRNA research. PMID:27214227

  8. Comparative profiling of miRNA expression in developing seeds of high linoleic and high oleic safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijiang eCao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable oils high in oleic acid are considered to be advantageous because of their better nutritional value and potential industrial applications. The oleic acid content in the classic safflower oil is normally 10-15% while a natural mutant (ol accumulates elevated oleic acid up to 70% in seed oil. As a part of our investigation into the molecular features of the high oleic (HO trait in safflower we have profiled the microRNA (miRNA populations in developing safflower seeds expressing the ol allele in comparison to the wild type high linoleic (HL safflower using deep sequencing technology. The small RNA populations of the mid-maturity developing embryos of homozygous ol HO and wild type HL safflower had a very similar size distribution pattern, however, only ~16.5% of the unique small RNAs were overlapping in these two genotypes. From these two small RNA populations we have found 55 known miRNAs and identified two candidate novel miRNA families to be likely unique to the developing safflower seeds. Target genes with conserved as well as novel functions were predicted for the conserved miRNAs. We have also identified 13 miRNAs differentially expressed between the HO and HL safflower genotypes. The results may lay a foundation for unravelling the miRNA-mediated molecular processes that regulate oleic acid accumulation in the HO safflower mutant and developmental processes in safflower embryos in general.

  9. Comparative Profiling of microRNA Expression in Soybean Seeds from Genetically Modified Plants and their Near-Isogenic Parental Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Lan, Qingkuo; Zhao, Xin; Xu, Wentao; Li, Feiwu; Wang, Qinying; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely demonstrated to play fundamental roles in gene regulation in most eukaryotes. To date, there has been no study describing the miRNA composition in genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this study, small RNAs from dry seeds of two GM soybean lines and their parental cultivars were investigated using deep sequencing technology and bioinformatic approaches. As a result, several differentially expressed gma-miRNAs were found between the GM and non-GM soybeans. Meanwhile, more differentially expressed gma-miRNAs were identified between distantly relatednon-GM soybeans, indicating that the miRNA components of soybean seeds varied among different soybean lines, including the GM and non-GM soybeans, and the extent of difference might be related to their genetic relationship. Additionally, fourteen novel gma-miRNA candidates were predicted in soybean seeds including a potential bidirectionally transcribed miRNA family with two genomic loci (gma-miR-N1). Our findings firstly provided useful data for miRNA composition in edible GM crops and also provided valuable information for soybean miRNA research.

  10. Comparative Profiling of microRNA Expression in Soybean Seeds from Genetically Modified Plants and their Near-Isogenic Parental Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been widely demonstrated to play fundamental roles in gene regulation in most eukaryotes. To date, there has been no study describing the miRNA composition in genetically modified organisms (GMOs. In this study, small RNAs from dry seeds of two GM soybean lines and their parental cultivars were investigated using deep sequencing technology and bioinformatic approaches. As a result, several differentially expressed gma-miRNAs were found between the GM and non-GM soybeans. Meanwhile, more differentially expressed gma-miRNAs were identified between distantly relatednon-GM soybeans, indicating that the miRNA components of soybean seeds varied among different soybean lines, including the GM and non-GM soybeans, and the extent of difference might be related to their genetic relationship. Additionally, fourteen novel gma-miRNA candidates were predicted in soybean seeds including a potential bidirectionally transcribed miRNA family with two genomic loci (gma-miR-N1. Our findings firstly provided useful data for miRNA composition in edible GM crops and also provided valuable information for soybean miRNA research.

  11. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect

  12. Foliage nitrogen turnover: differences among nitrogen absorbed at different times by Quercus serrata saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Miki U.; Mizumachi, Eri; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen turnover within plants has been intensively studied to better understand nitrogen use strategies. However, differences among the nitrogen absorbed at different times are not completely understood and the fate of nitrogen absorbed during winter is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, nitrogen absorbed at different times of the year (growing season, winter and previous growing season) was traced, and the within-leaf nitrogen turnover of a temperate deciduous oak Quercus serrata was investigated. Methods The contributions of nitrogen absorbed at the three different times to leaf construction, translocation during the growing season, and the leaf-level resorption efficiency during leaf senescence were compared using 15N. Key Results Winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen significantly contributed to leaf construction, although the contribution was smaller than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen. On the other hand, the leaf-level resorption efficiency of winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen was higher than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen, suggesting that older nitrogen is better retained in leaves than recently absorbed nitrogen. Conclusions The results demonstrate that nitrogen turnover in leaves varies with nitrogen absorption times. These findings are important for understanding plant nitrogen use strategies and nitrogen cycles in forest ecosystems. PMID:21515608

  13. Species Turnover across Different Life Stages from Seedlings to Canopy Trees in Swamp Forests of Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa G. Fontes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Processes driving the assembly of swamp forest communities have been poorly explored. We analyzed natural regeneration and adult tree communities data of a swamp gallery forest in Central Brazil to discuss the role of ecological filters in shaping plant species turnover in a successional gradient. Species data of 120 plots were used to assess species turnover between natural regeneration and adult tree communities. Our analyses were based on 4995 individuals belonging to 72 species. Community patterns were discerned using ordination analyses. A clear floristic turnover among plant life stages was distinguished. Regeneration community of swamp forests was richer in species composition than the adult community. Tree species commonly found in nonflooded gallery forests were present in the regeneration plots but not in the adult community. Differences in the floristic composition of these two strata suggest that not all species in the seedling stage can stand permanent flooding conditions and only a few tolerant species survive to become adult trees. We propose that natural disturbances play an important role by altering limiting resources, allowing seeds of nonflooded forest species to germinate. This paper elucidates the turnover between plant life stages in swamp forests and suggests mechanisms that may shape these communities.

  14. A genome-wide analysis of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in coffee reveals insights into its regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Noronha Fernandes-Brum

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNAs are derived from self-complementary hairpin structures, while small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs are derived from double-stranded RNA (dsRNA or hairpin precursors. The core mechanism of sRNA production involves DICER-like (DCL in processing the smallRNAs (sRNAs and ARGONAUTE (AGO as effectors of silencing, and siRNA biogenesis also involves action of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase (RDR, Pol IV and Pol V in biogenesis. Several other proteins interact with the core proteins to guide sRNA biogenesis, action, and turnover. We aimed to unravel the components and functions of the RNA-guided silencing pathway in a non-model plant species of worldwide economic relevance. The sRNA-guided silencing complex members have been identified in the Coffea canephora genome, and they have been characterized at the structural, functional, and evolutionary levels by computational analyses. Eleven AGO proteins, nine DCL proteins (which include a DCL1-like protein that was not previously annotated, and eight RDR proteins were identified. Another 48 proteins implicated in smallRNA (sRNA pathways were also identified. Furthermore, we identified 235 miRNA precursors and 317 mature miRNAs from 113 MIR families, and we characterized ccp-MIR156, ccp-MIR172, and ccp-MIR390. Target prediction and gene ontology analyses of 2239 putative targets showed that significant pathways in coffee are targeted by miRNAs. We provide evidence of the expansion of the loci related to sRNA pathways, insights into the activities of these proteins by domain and catalytic site analyses, and gene expression analysis. The number of MIR loci and their targeted pathways highlight the importance of miRNAs in coffee. We identified several roles of sRNAs in C. canephora, which offers substantial insight into better understanding the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this major crop.

  15. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hanna; Kwon, Chang Seob; Choi, Yoonjung; Lee, Daeyoup

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  16. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hanna [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chang Seob [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan, 614-822 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjung, E-mail: jjungii@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Daeyoup, E-mail: daeyoup@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  17. Organisational commitment and turnover intentions in humanitarian organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnmaalen, Julia; Heyse, Liesbet; Voordijk, Johannes T.

    2016-01-01

    Unwanted staff turnover is a prominent HRM problem in humanitarian organisations. In the profit sector, HRM tools such as pay, benefits, socialisation and training have proven to be effective in increasing organisational commitment and decreasing staff turnover. This study explores whether such

  18. How Multiple Interventions Influenced Employee Turnover: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    A 3-year study of 46 textile industry workers identified causes of employee turnover (supervision, training, organizational communication) using performance analysis. A study of multiple interventions based on the analysis resulted in changes in orientation procedures, organizational leadership, and climate, reducing turnover by 24%. (SK)

  19. Survey of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Survey of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover in selected business organisations in Lagos, Nigeria. ... Global Journal of Social Sciences ... The study was an attempt at investigating the relatedness of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover in business organizations in Lagos Nigeria.

  20. Performance and turnover intentions: a social exchange perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biron, M.; Boon, C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - Prior research has yielded mixed results regarding the relationship between performance and turnover intentions. Drawing from social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose that the performance-turnover intentions association may be contingent upon individuals' exchange

  1. Telaah Hubungan Kepuasan Kerja Dan Komitmen Organisasional Terhadap Turnover Intention

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Amran; Acep Rohendi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRAK Karyawan merupakan elemen yang sangat penting bagi perusahaan. Karyawan sebagai sumber daya manusia adalah penggerak utama berjalannya roda perusahaan sehingga perusahaan harus menjaga kepuasan kerja dan komitmen organisasional agar karyawan tidak berkeinginan untuk berpindah ke perusahaan lain (turnover intention). Hal ini perlu dikaji pengaruh kepuasan kerja dan komitmen organisasional terhadap turnover intention sehingga dapat bermanfaat untuk mengetahui nilai penting dari kepu...

  2. A Review of the Literature on Principal Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass Rangel, Virginia

    2018-01-01

    Among the many challenges facing public schools are high levels of principal turnover. Given the important role that principals play and are expected to play in the improvement process, concerns about principal turnover have resulted in a growing body of research on its causes and consequences. The purpose of this review is to take stock of what…

  3. Health workforce acquisition, retention and turnover in southwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Skill mix of health professionals, staff acquisition and turnover rate are among the major challenges for the delivery of quality health care. This study assessed the health workforce acquisition, retention, turnover rate and their intention to leave. Methods: A cross-sectional survey with quantitative and qualitative ...

  4. The Link between Training Satisfaction, Work Engagement and Turnover Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Mumtaz Ali; Salleh, Rohani; Baharom, Mohamed Noor Rosli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual relationship between training satisfaction, work engagement (WE) and turnover intention and the mediating role of WE between training satisfaction and turnover intention. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 409 oil and gas professionals using an email survey…

  5. Estimating Cause: Teacher Turnover and School Effectiveness in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesler, Venessa; Schneider, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is investigate issues related to within-school teacher supply and school-specific teacher turnover within the state of Michigan using state administrative data on Michigan's teaching force. This paper 1) investigates the key predictors of teacher turnover and mobility, 2) develops a profile of schools that are likely to…

  6. Efficacy of 22Na turnover in ecopbysiological studies of carnivores

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of 22Na turnover in ecopbysiological studies of carnivores. loS. Wilkinson and J.D. Skinner*. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002 Republic of South Africa. Received 8 December 1986; accepted 11 August 1987. 22Na turnover rates gave overestimates of mean 23Na intake in both ...

  7. ON THE TURNOVER OF THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RHEE, MH; PELETIER, RF; VANALBADA, TS

    1995-01-01

    The observed turnover at the high linewidth end of the infrared Tully-Fisher relation can be explained by the stellar population differences among galaxies. When the IRAS 60 mu m fluxes are added to the Tully-Fisher relation as a second parameter, the turnover disappears and the scatter becomes

  8. Below the Surface of Special Education Administrator Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The field of special education administration has experienced a shortage of high quality special education leadership candidates for several decades. If school districts are to effectively address the turnover of educational leaders, they must know what is happening that affects turnover of their leadership team. The intent of this study was to…

  9. Bone mass and turnover in fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Søren; Gam, A; Egsmose, C

    1993-01-01

    Physical inactivity accelerates bone loss. Since patients with fibromyalgia are relatively physically inactive, bone mass and markers of bone metabolism were determined in 12 premenopausal women with fibromyalgia and in healthy age matched female control subjects. No differences were found...... in lumbar bone mineral density, femoral neck bone mineral density, serum levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, ionized calcium and phosphate. The urinary excretion of both hydroxyproline and calcium relative to urinary creatinine excretion was significantly higher in patients with fibromyalgia, p = 0.......01. This was linked to lower urinary creatinine excretion (p = 0.02) probably reflecting lower physical activity in the patients with fibromyalgia. We conclude that bone mass and turnover are generally not affected in premenopausal women with fibromyalgia....

  10. In vivo measurement of myocardial protein turnover using an indicator dilution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revkin, J.H.; Young, L.H.; Stirewalt, W.S.; Dahl, D.M.; Gelfand, R.A.; Zaret, B.L.; Barrett, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    We applied a nondestructive tracer technique, previously developed for measuring skeletal muscle protein turnover, to the measurement of myocardial protein turnover in vivo. During a continuous infusion of L-[ring-2,6-3H]phenylalanine to anesthetized, overnight-fasted dogs, we measured the uptake of radiolabeled phenylalanine from plasma and the release of unlabeled phenylalanine from myocardial proteolysis using arterial and coronary sinus catheterization and analytic methods previously applied to skeletal muscle. Using these measurements, together with a model of myocardial protein synthesis that assumes rapid equilibration of tracer specific activity between myocardial phenylalanyl-tRNA and circulating phenylalanine, we estimated the rates of heart protein synthesis and degradation. The rate of heart protein synthesis was also estimated directly from the incorporation of labeled phenylalanine into tissue protein. The use of [3H]phenylalanine was compared with L-[1-14C]leucine in the measurement of heart protein turnover in dogs given simultaneous infusion of both tracers. Leucine uptake and release by the myocardium exceeded that of phenylalanine by 3.1 +/- 0.4- and 1.7 +/- 0.3-fold, respectively, consistent with leucine's 2.4-fold greater abundance in heart protein and its metabolism via other pathways. Phenylalanine is the preferred tracer for use with this method because of its limited metabolic fate in muscle. One theoretical limitation to the method, slow equilibration of circulating labeled phenylalanine with myocardial phenylalanyl-tRNA, was resolved by comparison of these specific activities after a 30-minute infusion of labeled phenylalanine in the rat. A second, empirical limitation involves precision in the measurement of the small decrements in phenylalanine specific activity that occur with each pass of blood through the coronary circulation

  11. Regulatory mechanisms of skeletal muscle protein turnover during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle protein turnover is a relatively slow metabolic process that is altered by various physiological stimuli such as feeding/fasting and exercise. During exercise, catabolism of amino acids contributes very little to ATP turnover in working muscle. With regards to protein turnover......, there is now consistent data from tracer studies in rodents and humans showing that global protein synthesis is blunted in working skeletal muscle. Whether there is altered skeletal muscle protein breakdown during exercise remains unclear. The blunting of protein synthesis is believed to be mediated...... downstream of changes in intracellular Ca(2+) and energy turnover. In particular, a signaling cascade involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin-eEF2 kinase-eEF2 is implicated. The possible functional significance of altered protein turnover in working skeletal muscle during exercise is discussed. Further work...

  12. One hundred years of employee turnover theory and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Peter W; Lee, Thomas W; Shaw, Jason D; Hausknecht, John P

    2017-03-01

    We review seminal publications on employee turnover during the 100-year existence of the Journal of Applied Psychology . Along with classic articles from this journal, we expand our review to include other publications that yielded key theoretical and methodological contributions to the turnover literature. We first describe how the earliest papers examined practical methods for turnover reduction or control and then explain how theory development and testing began in the mid-20th century and dominated the academic literature until the turn of the century. We then track 21st century interest in the psychology of staying (rather than leaving) and attitudinal trajectories in predicting turnover. Finally, we discuss the rising scholarship on collective turnover given the centrality of human capital flight to practitioners and to the field of human resource management strategy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. PENGARUH KEPUASAN KERJA TERHADAP KOMITMEN ORGANISASI DAN TURNOVER INTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agi Syarif Hidayat

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The high level of employee turnover in the marketing department at PT. Toyamilindo indicates low organizational commitment and high turnover intention. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of job satisfaction on organizational commitment and turnover intention. Quantitative methods are used in this study. Population is the  employees of marketing department at PT. Toyamilindo with 50 people. Sampling technique used is sampling saturated with the number of samples of 50 people. Data collection technique uses questionnaires and regression analysis. Finding on the research results shows that there are positive and significant influence of job satisfaction on organizational commitment and negative and significant influence of job satisfaction on turnover intention, and also the influence of organizational commitment on work satisfaction to turnover intention. The managerial implications of corporate leaders must improve employee work satisfaction, especially in terms of salary.

  14. Perceptions of hospital CEOs about the effects of CEO turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaliq, Amir A; Thompson, David M; Walston, Stephen L

    2006-01-01

    Empirical evidence is scarce on chief executive officer (CEO) turnover in U.S. hospitals, with potentially serious implications for many of these organizations. This study, based on a nationwide survey of CEOs at non-federal general surgical and medical community hospitals conducted in the spring of 2004, reports the perceptions of hospital CEOs regarding the circumstances and impact of CEO turnover on U.S. hospitals. In the opinion of the respondents, the impact includes competitors taking advantage of turnover by luring employees and physicians away from the target hospital, significantly increasing the likelihood of other senior executives leaving the hospital, and many of the important strategic activities being delayed or cancelled altogether. Interestingly, the perceptions of CEOs regarding the effects of turnover do not seem to differ regardless of voluntary or involuntary circumstances of turnover. However, there is a notable bias in emphasizing the perceived negative implications of respondents' own departures and allegedly positive effects of their predecessors' departures.

  15. How Serious of a Problem is Staff Turnover in Substance Abuse Treatment? A Longitudinal Study of Actual Turnover1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T.; Burk, Hannah; Maher, Charleen P.

    2010-01-01

    In the substance abuse treatment field, the annual turnover rate is cited as being anywhere between 19 and 50 percent (Johnson & Roman, 2002; Gallon, Gabriel, & Knudsen, 2003; Knudsen et al., 2003; McLellan et al., 2003). However, no research to date has evaluated these claims by tracking turnover longitudinally using organizational turnover data from substance abuse treatment centers. This research presents the results of a longitudinal study designed to systematically examine actual turnover among counselors and clinical supervisors. Twenty-seven geographically dispersed treatment organizations, serving a wide range of clients in the public and private sector, provided data for the study over a two year time span (2008–2009). The annual turnover rate was 33.2% for counselors and 23.4% for clinical supervisors. For both groups the majority of turnover was voluntary (employee-initiated). Specific reasons for turnover were largely consistent across the two groups, with the most common reason being a new job or new opportunity. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique employment context of substance abuse treatment. Practical recommendations are also discussed to help stem the tide of turnover in the field of substance abuse treatment. PMID:20675097

  16. How serious of a problem is staff turnover in substance abuse treatment? A longitudinal study of actual turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T; Burk, Hannah; Maher, Charleen P

    2010-10-01

    In the substance abuse treatment field, the annual turnover rate is cited as being anywhere between 19% and 50% (J.A. Johnson & P.M. Roman, 2002; S.L. Gallon, R.M. Gabriel, J.R.W. Knudsen, 2003; H.K. Knudsen, J.A. Johnson, & P.M. Roman, 2003; A.T. McLellan, D. Carise, & H.D. Kleber, 2003). However, no research to date has evaluated these claims by tracking turnover longitudinally using organizational turnover data from substance abuse treatment centers. This research presents the results of a longitudinal study designed to systematically examine actual turnover among counselors and clinical supervisors. Twenty-seven geographically dispersed treatment organizations, serving a wide range of clients in the public and private sector, provided data for the study over a 2-year time span (2008-2009). The annual turnover rate was 33.2% for counselors and 23.4% for clinical supervisors. For both groups, the majority of turnover was voluntary (employee-initiated). Specific reasons for turnover were largely consistent across the two groups, with the most common reason being a new job or new opportunity. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique employment context of substance abuse treatment. Practical recommendations are also discussed to help stem the tide of turnover in the field of substance abuse treatment. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nucleolin and YB-1 are required for JNK-mediated interleukin-2 mRNA stabilization during T-cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, C Y; Gherzi, R; Andersen, Jens S.

    2000-01-01

    Regulated mRNA turnover is a highly important process, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Using interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA as a model, we described a role for the JNK-signaling pathway in stabilization of IL-2 mRNA during T-cell activation, acting via a JNK response element (JRE) in the 5' un...

  18. Attempted development and cross-validation of predictive models of individual-level and organizational-level turnover of nuclear power operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasa-Sideris, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power accounts for 209% of the electric power generated in the U.S. by 107 nuclear plants which employ over 8,700 operators. Operator turnover is significant to utilities from the economic point of view since it costs almost three hundred thousand dollars to train and qualify one operator, and because turnover affects plant operability and therefore plant safety. The study purpose was to develop and cross-validate individual-level and organizational-level models of turnover of nuclear power plant operators. Data were obtained by questionnaires and from published data for 1983 and 1984 on a number of individual, organizational, and environmental predictors. Plants had been in operation for two or more years. Questionnaires were returned by 29 out of 50 plants on over 1600 operators. The objectives were to examine the reliability of the turnover criterion, to determine the classification accuracy of the multivariate predictive models and of categories of predictors (individual, organizational, and environmental) and to determine if a homology existed between the individual-level and organizational-level models. The method was to examine the shrinkage that occurred between foldback design (in which the predictive models were reapplied to the data used to develop them) and cross-validation. Results did not support the hypothesis objectives. Turnover data were accurate but not stable between the two years. No significant differences were detected between the low and high turnover groups at the organization or individual level in cross-validation. Lack of stability in the criterion, restriction of range, and small sample size at the organizational level were serious limitations of this study. The results did support the methods. Considerable shrinkage occurred between foldback and cross-validation of the models

  19. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Rollins, Angela L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover ...

  20. Differential challenge stressor-hindrance stressor relationships with job attitudes, turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsakoff, Nathan P; LePine, Jeffery A; LePine, Marcie A

    2007-03-01

    In this article, a 2-dimensional work stressor framework is used to explain inconsistencies in past research with respect to stressor relationships with retention-related criteria. Results of meta-analyses of 183 independent samples indicated that whereas hindrance stressors had dysfunctional relationships with these criteria (negative relationships with job satisfaction and organizational commitment and positive relationships with turnover intentions, turnover, and withdrawal behavior), relationships with challenge stressors were generally the opposite (positive relationships with job satisfaction and organizational commitment and negative relationships with turnover intentions and turnover). Results also suggested that the differential relationships between challenge stressors and hindrance stressors and the more distal criteria (withdrawal behavior and turnover) were due, in part, to the mediating effects of job attitudes. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Constitutive expression of interferon-induced human MxA protein in transgenic tobacco plants does not confer resistance to a variety of RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frese, M.; Prins, M.; Ponten, A.; Goldbach, R.W.; Haller, O.; Zeltz, P.

    2000-01-01

    MxA is a key component in the interferon-induced antiviral defense in humans. After viral infections, MxA is rapidly induced and accumulates in the cytoplasm. The multiplication of many RNA viruses,including all bunyaviruses tested so far, is inhibited by MxA. These findings prompted us to express

  2. An Analysis of the Effects of Deployment on Turnover in the United States Army Reserve

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCloskey, Michele

    1999-01-01

    .... Survey questions were developed using motivation and turnover theories, and a Integrated Turnover Model relating a Reservist's deployment experience to the presence or absence of six major factors...

  3. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Angela L; Salyers, Michelle P; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M

    2010-09-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature.

  4. CRISPR/Cas13 as a Tool for RNA Interference

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2018-03-28

    Almost all biological processes involve RNA, making it crucial to develop tools for manipulation of the transcriptome. The bacterial CRISPR/Cas13 system was recently rewired to facilitate RNA manipulation in eukaryotes, including plants. We discuss here the opportunities and limitations of using CRISPR/Cas13 in plants for various types of RNA manipulation.

  5. Understanding the factors that determine registered nurses' turnover intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuji, Joseph; Uzoka, Faith-Michael; Aladi, Flora; El-Hussein, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Turnover among registered nurses (RNs) produces a negative impact on the health outcomes of any health care organization. It is also recognized universally as a problem in the nursing profession. Little is known about the turnover intentions and career orientations of RNs working in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge of and to advance the discussion on the turnover of nursing professionals. The study population consisted of RNs employed in the five major hospitals in Calgary. There were 193 surveys returned, representing a response rate of 77.2%. The results show that age and education have a negative effect on turnover intention. Education was found to have a significant negative effect on career satisfaction but not on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Length of service has a significant negative effect on turnover intention. Role ambiguity has significant highly negative effect on career satisfaction. Growth opportunity and supervisor support have a very significant positive effect on job satisfaction, career satisfaction, and organizational commitment. External career opportunities and organizational commitment do not seem to have a significant effect on turnover intention. Career satisfaction, on the other hand, had negative significant effects on turnover intention.

  6. Analysis of growth and tissue replacement rates by stable sulfur isotope turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, L. S.; Macko, S. A.; Macavoy, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis has become a powerful tool to study animal ecology. Analysis of stable isotope ratios of elements such as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, hydrogen, oxygen and others have been used to trace migratory routes, reconstruct dietary sources and determine the physiological condition of individual animals. The isotopes most commonly used are carbon, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and nitrogen, due to the approximately 3% enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although all cells express sulfur-containing compounds, such as cysteine, methionine, and coenzyme A, the turnover rate of sulfur in tissues has not been examined in most studies, owing to the difficulty in determining the δ 34S signature. In this study, we have assessed the rate of sulfur isotopic turnover in mouse tissues following a diet change from terrestrial (7%) to marine (19%) source. Turnover models reflecting both growth rate and metabolic tissue replacement will be developed for blood, liver, fat and muscle tissues.

  7. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  8. Measurements of protein turnover in man with nitrogen-15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, P.J.; Waterlow, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Past and present methods of measuring total body protein turnover with 15 N-labelled compounds are reviewed, and a short assessment made of results achieved. Protein turnover in man was first measured by Sprinson and Rittenberg (1949) using 15 N glycine as tracer. The rate of turnover was calculated from the fraction of the dose excreted in urine in the days following a single oral dose of the isotope. In the following years a number of similar methods were devised but interest waned, perhaps because consistent changes in turnover rate under different conditions were not detected. A revival of interest came with the measurement of changes in protein turnover in malnourished and recovering children by Picou and Taylor-Roberts (1969). Nitrogen-15-glycine was infused and measurements were made of the abundance of 15 N in urinary urea, which reached a plateau in about 24 hours. Turnover rates were calculated from the proportion of the infused dose excreted in urea after the plateau had been reached. This method has also been used successfully on adults when the isotope has been given as three-hourly oral doses. In adults, however, plateau labelling in urea is not usually reached for two days. In our laboratory the use of urinary ammonia, which reaches a plateau more quickly than urea, has been examined. In addition, comparisons have been made between constant infusion and single dose of isotope. Halliday and McKeran (1975) infused 15 N-lysine and measured the 15 N abundance in the free lysine of plasma, which reached a plateau in about 12 hours. Turnover in the whole body and turnover of muscle proteins and of plasma albumin were estimated separately. These methods of measuring protein turnover with 15 N are described and results reviewed of the effects of food intake, nutritional status and age. (author)

  9. Carbon Turnover during Effluent Application to the Land: A Potential Role for Vegetation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios A. Tzanakakis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effect of plant species (Eucalyptus camaldulensis vs. Arundo donax on carbon (C turnover during wastewater application to the land. The study was carried out in 40-liter pots under field conditions and plant species were treated either with pre-treated municipal wastewater or freshwater. Plant species had a strong effect on soil organic matter with pots planted with E. camaldulensis showing greater values than pots planted with A. donax. In accordance, greater respiration rates were measured in E. camaldulensis pots compared to those planted with A. donax. The respiration rate followed a decreasing trend with the progress of the season for both species. These findings suggest differences in soil microbial community composition and/or activity in the rhizosphere of plant species. Minor effects of plant species or effluent were observed in dissolved organic carbon, protein, and hexoses content. In conclusion, the results of the present study reveal an important role of plant species on C cycling in terrestrial environments with potential implications on the sequestration of C and release of nutrients and pollutants.

  10. Phloem RNA-binding proteins as potential components of the long-distance RNA transport system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICENTE ePALLAS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs govern a myriad of different essential processes in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence reveals that apart from playing critical roles in RNA metabolism and RNA transport, RBPs perform a key function in plant adaption to various environmental conditions. Long distance RNA transport occurs in land plants through the phloem, a conducting tissue that integrates the wide range of signalling pathways required to regulate plant development and response to stress processes. The macromolecules in the phloem pathway vary greatly and include defence proteins, transcription factors, chaperones acting in long distance trafficking, and RNAs (mRNAs, siRNAs and miRNAs. How these RNA molecules translocate through the phloem is not well understood, but recent evidence indicates the presence of translocatable RNA-binding proteins in the phloem, which act as potential components of long distance RNA transport system. This review updates our knowledge on the characteristics and functions of RBPs present in the phloem.

  11. Partial characterization of the lettuce infectious yellows virus genomic RNAs, identification of the coat protein gene and comparison of its amino acid sequence with those of other filamentous RNA plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, V A; Boeshore, M; Dolja, V V; Falk, B W

    1994-07-01

    Purified virions of lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV), a tentative member of the closterovirus group, contained two RNAs of approximately 8500 and 7300 nucleotides (RNAs 1 and 2 respectively) and a single coat protein species with M(r) of approximately 28,000. LIYV-infected plants contained multiple dsRNAs. The two largest were the correct size for the replicative forms of LIYV virion RNAs 1 and 2. To assess the relationships between LIYV RNAs 1 and 2, cDNAs corresponding to the virion RNAs were cloned. Northern blot hybridization analysis showed no detectable sequence homology between these RNAs. A partial amino acid sequence obtained from purified LIYV coat protein was found to align in the most upstream of four complete open reading frames (ORFs) identified in a LIYV RNA 2 cDNA clone. The identity of this ORF was confirmed as the LIYV coat protein gene by immunological analysis of the gene product expressed in vitro and in Escherichia coli. Computer analysis of the LIYV coat protein amino acid sequence indicated that it belongs to a large family of proteins forming filamentous capsids of RNA plant viruses. The LIYV coat protein appears to be most closely related to the coat proteins of two closteroviruses, beet yellows virus and citrus tristeza virus.

  12. Employee turnover and productivity among small business entities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. N. Ugoani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the problems of employee turnover on productivity among small business entities in Nigeria, and recommend remedial actions. Employee turnover is the separation of employees from employers and replacement with other employees. Productive manpower is a critical element for the economic survival of any small business entity. The survey research design was used for the study. The sample comprised of 320 respondents. Data generated were analyzed by using descriptive, and Z-test statistical techniques. It was found that employee turnover adversely affects productivity in small business entities.

  13. Turnover and employment in the German wind energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuper, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the fast growing wind energy market in 1994 are the turnover reaching more than 800 million DM, and the number of employees to about 3,700. In 1995 the manufacturers expect to need less than 4 employees to build and to install 1 MW rated power and to decrease the ratio of manufacturer's turnover per installed power unit to about 1900 DM/kW. In spite of this development it is expected that the turnover and the number of employees will increase due to the still fast growing market. (orig.)

  14. The curvilinear effect of work engagement on employees' turnover intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesens, Gaëtane; Stinglhamber, Florence; Marmier, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies have shown the positive consequences of work engagement for both organisations and employees experiencing it. For instance, research has demonstrated that work-engaged employees have lower levels of turnover intentions than non-engaged employees. However, in this research, we examined whether there is a dark side of work engagement. More precisely, we investigated whether the relationship between work engagement and employees' turnover intentions might be non-linear. Based on two different samples, our results indicated that the relationship between work engagement and employees' turnover intentions is curvilinear. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  15. MiRNA Biogenesis and Intersecting Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Chaabane, Samir

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function as guide molecules in RNA silencing. Plant miRNAs are critical for plant growth, development and stress response, and are processed in Arabidopsis from primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) by the endonuclease activity of the DICER-LIKE1...... questions need to be addressed to establish a valid link, we provide encouraging evidence of the involvement of chromatin remodeling factors FAS1 and FAS2 in miRNA biogenesis. Together, we have expanded our understanding of the intersections between miRNA biogenesis and other pathways....

  16. tRNA Is the Source of Low-Level trans-Zeatin Production in Methylobacterium spp.†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Robbin L.; Morris, Roy O.; Polacco, Joe C.

    2002-01-01

    Pink-pigmented facultatively methylotrophic bacteria (PPFMs), classified as Methylobacterium spp., are persistent colonizers of plant leaf surfaces. Reports of PPFM-plant dialogue led us to examine cytokinin production by PPFMs. Using immunoaffinity and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification, we obtained 22 to 111 ng of trans-zeatin per liter from culture filtrates of four PPFM leaf isolates (from Arabidopsis, barley, maize, and soybean) and of a Methylobacterium extorquens type culture originally recovered as a soil isolate. We identified the zeatin isolated as the trans isomer by HPLC and by a radioimmunoassay in which monoclonal antibodies specific for trans-hydroxylated cytokinins were used. Smaller and variable amounts of trans-zeatin riboside were also recovered. trans-Zeatin was recovered from tRNA hydrolysates in addition to the culture filtrates, suggesting that secreted trans-zeatin resulted from tRNA turnover rather than from de novo synthesis. The product of the miaA gene is responsible for isopentenylation of a specific adenine in some tRNAs. To confirm that the secreted zeatin originated from tRNA, we mutated the miaA gene of M. extorquens by single exchange of an internal miaA fragment into the chromosomal gene. Mutant exconjugants, confirmed by PCR, did not contain zeatin in their tRNAs and did not secrete zeatin into the medium, findings which are consistent with the hypothesis that all zeatin is tRNA derived rather than synthesized de novo. In germination studies performed with heat-treated soybean seeds, cytokinin-null (miaA) mutants stimulated germination as well as wild-type bacteria. While cytokinin production may play a role in the plant-PPFM interaction, it is not responsible for stimulation of germination by PPFMs. PMID:11889088

  17. High-throughput multiplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous quantification of DNA and RNA viruses infecting cassava plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otti, G; Bouvaine, S; Kimata, B; Mkamillo, G; Kumar, P L; Tomlins, K; Maruthi, M N

    2016-05-01

    To develop a multiplex TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay (qPCR) for the simultaneous detection and quantification of both RNA and DNA viruses affecting cassava (Manihot esculenta) in eastern Africa. The diagnostic assay was developed for two RNA viruses; Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Uganda cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) and two predominant DNA viruses; African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV), which cause the economically important cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) and cassava mosaic disease (CMD) respectively. Our method, developed by analysing PCR products of viruses, was highly sensitive to detect target viruses from very low quantities of 4-10 femtograms. Multiplexing did not diminish sensitivity or accuracy compared to uniplex alternatives. The assay reliably detected and quantified four cassava viruses in field samples where CBSV and UCBSV synergy was observed in majority of mixed-infected varieties. We have developed a high-throughput qPCR diagnostic assay capable of specific and sensitive quantification of predominant DNA and RNA viruses of cassava in eastern Africa. The qPCR methods are a great improvement on the existing methods and can be used for monitoring virus spread as well as for accurate evaluation of the cassava varieties for virus resistance. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Sildenafil Stimulates Aqueous Humor Turnover in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Lawrence J.; Zamudio, Aldo C.; Candia, Oscar A.

    2013-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate increases ocular blood flow and accelerates the rate of anterior chamber refilling after paracentesis. The latter effect could have resulted from a reduction in outflow facility or from an increase in aqueous humor (AH) production. In this study, we used scanning ocular fluorophotometry to examine the effects of sildenafil on AH turnover, and thus, AH production in eyes of live normal rabbits. For this, the rate of aqueous humor flow (AHF) was quantified with a commercially available fluorophotometer that measured the rate of fluorescein clearance from the anterior segment, which predominantly occurs via the trabecular meshwork. After ≈ 2 hrs of control scans to determine the baseline rate of AHF, the rabbits were fed 33 mg of sildenafil and allowed ≈ 45 min for the drug to enter the systemic circulation. Thereafter, fluorescence scans were retaken for an additional 90–120 min. Sildenafil ingestion increased AHF by about 36%, from 2.31 μL/min to 3.14 μL/min (PViagra, Revatio), stimulates AHF in rabbits. Our results seem consistent with reports indicating that the drug dilates intraocular arteries and augments intraocular vascular flow. These physiological responses to the agent apparently led to increased fluid entry into the anterior chamber. As such, the drug might have utility in patients with ocular hypotony resulting from insufficient AH formation. PMID:23562660

  19. mRNA processing in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations in this laboratory center on basic enzymatic reactions of RNA. Still undefined are reactions involved in the conversion of precursors of mRA (pre-mRNA) to mRNA in eukaryotes. The pre-mRNA is called heterogeneous nuclear RNA and is 2 to 6 times larger than mRNA. The conversion, called splicing, involves a removal of internal sequences called introns by endoribonuclease action followed by a rejoining of the 3'- and 5'-end fragments, called exons, by ligating activity. It has not been possible yet to study the enzymes involved in vitro. Also undefined are reactions involved in the turnover or discarding of certain of the pre-mRNA molecules. Yeast is a simple eukaryote and may be expected to have the same, but perhaps simpler, processing reactions as the higher eukaryotes. Two enzymes involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in yeast are under investigation. Both enzymes have been partially purified from ribonucleoprotein particles of yeast. The first is a unique decapping enzyme which cleaves [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp [ 14 C]RNA-poly (A) of yeast, yielding [ 3 H]m 7 GDP and is suggested by the finding that the diphosphate product, m 7 GpppA(G), and UDP-glucose are not hydrolyzed. The second enzyme is an endoribonuclease which converts both the [ 3 H] and [ 14 C] labels of [ 3 H]m 7 Gppp[ 14 C]RNA-poly(A) from an oligo(dT)-cellulose bound form to an unbound, acid-insoluble form. Results show that the stimulation involves an interaction of the labeled RNA with the small nuclear RNA. The inhibition of the enzyme by ethidium bromide and its stimulation by small nuclear RNA suggest that it may be a processing ribonuclease, requiring specific double-stranded features in its substrate. The characterization of the unique decapping enzyme and endoribonuclease may help to understand reactions involved in the processing of pre-mRNA and mRNA in eukaryotes

  20. Plant pathology and RNAi: a brief history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, John A; Dougherty, William G

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the discovery of RNA-activated sequence-specific RNA degradation, a phenomenon now referred to as RNA silencing or RNA interference (RNAi). From 1992 to 1996, a series of articles were published on virus resistant transgenic plants expressing either translatable or nontranslatable versions of the coat protein gene of Tobacco etch virus (TEV). Certain transgenic plant lines were resistant to TEV but not to closely related viruses. In these plants a surprising correlation was observed: Transgenic plant lines with the highest degree of TEV resistance had actively transcribed transgenes but low steady-state levels of transgene RNA. Molecular analysis of these transgenic plants demonstrated the existence of a cellular-based, sequence-specific, posttranscriptional RNA-degradation system that was programmed by the transgene-encoded RNA sequence. This RNA-degradation activity specifically targeted both the transgene RNA and TEV (viral) RNA for degradation and was the first description of RNA-mediated gene silencing.

  1. A Comprehensive Model of the Employee's Turnover Decision Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donnelly, David

    2002-01-01

    .... In any environment in which retention is a primary goal, an essential first step in controlling attrition is the development of an in-depth understanding of the employee turnover decision process...

  2. Wind energy industry in Germany. Turnover and employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keuper, A.; Schmidt, A.

    1994-01-01

    As a consequence of the growing wind energy market in Germany the importance of the industry in this business are has grown. In 1994 the turnover will go beyond 500 million DM, and the number of employees will reach 2,900. The turnover and the number of employees are increasing in spite of the higher efficiency. In 1994 only 5 employees are needed by a manufacturer to install 1 MW rated power instead of 15 in 1989, and the ratio of installed power to manufacturer's turnover has risen from 0,25 W/DM in 1988 to 0,455 W/DM in 1994. On the other hand the turnover of the manufacturers per employee has increased from 80,000 DM in 1988 to 440,000 DM in 1994. Economic development has considerably been advanced by subsidies for the application of wind energy technology. (orig.)

  3. SOME FEATURES OF CONTROL STAFF TURNOVER IN PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kaznacheeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The author refers to the decision of the actual problem of staff turnover in the transformation of the Russian economy. In light of the problem of the effectiveness of human resources management the author indicates the most frequent problems faced by the company and focus on the problem of staff turnover. The author presents a different interpretation, defining "Marketing personnel" as a kind of administrative activity aimed at ensuring the long-term organization of human resources (identifying staffing needs, and these needs, that is, covering the organization's needs for personnel. It highlights the main features and distinctive features of marketing staff. We consider the objective (external and subjective reasons (internal reasons for staff turnover. The author proposes a number of measures to help identify the causes of turnover.

  4. Bone turnover and oxidative stress markers in estrogen- deficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone turnover and oxidative stress markers in estrogen- ... reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. ..... Institute for Laboratory Animal Research: Guide for the ... American Veterinary Medical Association.

  5. Autoradiographic imaging of phosphoinositide turnover in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, P.M.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H.

    1990-01-01

    With [ 3 H]cytidine as a precursor, phosphoinositide turnover can be localized in brain slices by selective autoradiography of the product [ 3 H]cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol, which is membrane-bound. In the cerebellum, glutamatergic stimulation elicits an increase of phosphoinositide turnover only in Purkinje cells and the molecular layer. In the hippocampus, both glutamatergic and muscarinic cholinergic stimulation increase phosphoinositide turnover, but with distinct localizations. Cholinergic stimulation affects CA1, CA3, CA4, and subiculum, whereas glutamatergic effects are restricted to the subiculum and CA3. Imaging phosphoinositide turnover in brain slices, which are amenable to electrophysiologic studies, will permit a dynamic localized analysis of regulation of this second messenger in response to synaptic stimulation of specific neuronal pathways

  6. survey of pay satisfaction, job satisfaction and employee turnover

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    employee turnover in business organizations in Lagos Nigeria. Data were .... to be making more money than them were more dissatisfied with ... postulates that an employee is a rational decision maker, hence, he makes efforts that lead to a ...

  7. Report: Remedial Project Manager Turnover at Superfund Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #2001-M-000015, June 15, 2001. We determined that EPA Region III did not have formal procedures in place to mitigate continuity problems caused by turnover of EPA personnel in the Superfund program.

  8. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and

  9. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K.; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Huebner, Christian A.; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication(1). Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements

  10. Rationale for the evaluation of trabecular bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, D.B.; Jee, W.S.S.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure for the morphometric evaluation of trabecular bone is identified. Its scrupulous use allows total identification of bone formation and resorption rates, items necessary for the direct histologic analysis of bone turnover

  11. CRISPR/Cas13 as a Tool for RNA Interference

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir; Mahas, Ahmed; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2018-01-01

    Almost all biological processes involve RNA, making it crucial to develop tools for manipulation of the transcriptome. The bacterial CRISPR/Cas13 system was recently rewired to facilitate RNA manipulation in eukaryotes, including plants. We discuss

  12. Suppressors of RNA silencing encoded by tomato leaf curl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-06

    Jan 6, 2013 ... Virus encoded RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs) are the key components evolved by the viruses to ... severe disease symptom in the host (Briddon et al. ..... Voinnet O 2001 RNA silencing as a plant immune system against.

  13. Employee motivation development opportunities seeking to reduce employee turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Pilukienė, Laura; Kšivickaitė, Gertūda

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors analyse one of the main nowadays human resources problem – growing employee turnover. Employee motivation process is analysed as a key competitive advantage in employee retention that leads to the growth of the business company’s productivity and competitive stability. The main goal of the article is to analyse the employee motivation and employee turnover relationship and its development possibilities in Lithuania’s business sector.

  14. Liquid Crystal Gel Reduces Age Spots by Promoting Skin Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Musashi; Ariella Coler-Reilly; Teruaki Nagasawa; Yoshiki Kubota; Satomi Kato; Yoko Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that liquid crystals structurally resembling the intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum can beneficially affect the skin when applied topically by stimulating the skin’s natural regenerative functions and accelerating epidermal turnover. In the present study, the effects of applying low concentrations of a liquid crystal gel of our own creation were evaluated using epidermal thickening in mouse skin as an assay for effective stimulation of epidermal turnover. A liquid ...

  15. Turnover rate of hypoxic cells in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungkvist, A.S.E.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and both the amount and duration of tumor hypoxia has been shown to influence the effect of radiation treatment negatively. It is important to understand the dynamic processes within the hypoxic cell population in non-treated tumors, and the effect of different treatment modalities on the kinetics of hypoxic cells to be able to design optimal combined modality treatments. The turnover rate of hypoxic cells was analyzed in three different solid tumor models with a double bio-reductive hypoxic marker assay with sequential injection of the two hypoxic markers. Previously it was shown that this assay could be used to detect both a decrease and an increase of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature with high spatial resolution. In this study the first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times relative to tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. The hypoxic cell turnover rate was calculated as the loss of pimonidazole positive cells relative to CCI-103F. The murine C38 line had the fastest hypoxic turnover rate of 60% /24h and the human xenograft line SCCNij3 had the slowest hypoxic turnover rate of 30% /24 h. The hypoxic turnover rate was most heterogeneous in the SCCNij3 line that even contained viable groups of cells that had been hypoxic for at least 5 days. The human xenograft line MEC82 fell in between with a hypoxic turnover rate of 50% /24 h. The hypoxic cell turnover was related to the potential tumor volume doubling time (Tpot) with a Tpot of 26h in C38 and 103h in SCCNij3. The dynamics of hypoxic cells, quantified with a double hypoxic marker method, showed large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rate and were related to Tpot

  16. Physician and staff turnover in community primary care practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhe, Mary; Gotler, Robin S; Goodwin, Meredith A; Stange, Kurt C

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a rapidly changing healthcare system on personnel turnover in community family practices has not been analyzed. We describe physician and staff turnover and examine its association with practice characteristics and patient outcomes. A cross-sectional evaluation of length of employment of 150 physicians and 762 staff in 77 community family practices in northeast Ohio was conducted. Research nurses collected data using practice genograms, key informant interviews, staff lists, practice environment checklists, medical record reviews, and patient questionnaires. The association of physician and staff turnover with practice characteristics, patient satisfaction, and preventive service data was tested. During a 2-year period, practices averaged a 53% turnover rate of staff. The mean length of duration of work at the current practice location was 9.1 years for physicians and 4.1 years for staff. Longevity varied by position, with a mean of 3.4 years for business employees, 4.0 years for clinical employees, and 7.8 years for office managers. Network-affiliated practices experienced higher turnover than did independent practices. Physician longevity was associated with a practice focus on managing chronic illness, keeping on schedule, and responding to insurers' requests. No association was found between turnover and patient satisfaction or preventive service delivery rates. Personnel turnover is pervasive in community primary care practices and is associated with employee role, practice network affiliation, and practice focus. The potentially disruptive effect of personnel turnover on practice functioning, finances, and longitudinal relationships with patients deserves further study despite the reassuring lack of association with patient satisfaction and preventive service delivery rates.

  17. Corporate governance mechanisms in family firms: Evidence from CEO turnovers

    OpenAIRE

    González, Maximiliano; Guzmán, Alexander; Pombo, Carlos; Trujillo, María Andréa

    2013-01-01

    Research Question/Issue: How sensitive is CEO turnover to firm performance in the context of family firms? Research Findings/Insights: Using a detailed database of mostly non-listed Colombian firms, we found that family ownership (direct and indirect through pyramidal structures) reduces the probability of CEO turnover when financial performance has been poor; however, we found that the opposite effect is true when families participate actively on the board of directors. These results hold tr...

  18. The Modern Technologies to Reduce Turnover of Company Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiko Tetiana O.; Poplavska Oksana M.

    2017-01-01

    The article is aimed at analyzing and substantiating the use in practice of modern technologies to reduce turnover of staff, which do not bear significant financial costs for the company. The authors have proved that non-material measures to reduce staff turnover in companies are becoming predominant nowadays. Among them as the most important are indicated: introduction of flexible schedule (mode) of work, transition to the remote form of employment, and distribution of internal shares, in pa...

  19. Prediction of Employee Turnover in Organizations using Machine Learning Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Punnoose; Pankaj Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Employee turnover has been identified as a key issue for organizations because of its adverse impact on work place productivity and long term growth strategies. To solve this problem, organizations use machine learning techniques to predict employee turnover. Accurate predictions enable organizations to take action for retention or succession planning of employees. However, the data for this modeling problem comes from HR Information Systems (HRIS); these are typically under-funded compared t...

  20. Kramers Turnover Theory for a Triple Well Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollak, E.; Talkner, P.

    2001-01-01

    Kramers turnover theory is solved for a particle in a symmetric triple well potential for temperatures above the crossover temperature between tunneling and activated barrier crossing. Comparison with the turnover theory for a double well potential shows that the presence of the intermediate well always leads to a decrease of the reaction rate. At most though, the rate is a factor of two smaller than in the case of a double well potential. (author)

  1. Molecular Characterization of the 16S rRNA Gene of Phytoplasmas Detected in Two Leafhopper Species Associated with Alfalfa Plants Infected with Witches' Broom in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J. Khan

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Two leafhopper species, Austroagallia avicula and Empoasca sp., were consistently found in alfalfa fields infected with witches’ broom phytoplasma (OmanAlfWB in the Al-Batinah, Dakhliya, North and South Sharqiya, Muscat, and Al-Bureimi regions of the Sultanate of Oman. Phytoplasmas from both leafhoppers were detected by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene and the spacer region in direct PCR using P1/P7 primer pairs. Comparative RFLP profiles of the amplified rRNA gene and the spacer region from leafhopper phytoplasmas and from 20 phytoplasma controls yielded patterns referable to phytoplasmas belonging to the peanut witches’ broom group (16SrII group. In particular, extensive RFLP analyses with the endonucleases HpaII, Tru9I, Tsp509I, and RsaI indicated that the phytoplasmas in A. avicula and Empoasca sp. were identical but showed some differences from OmanAlfWB; however, RFLP patterns obtained with TaqI showed the OmanAlfWB and the phytoplasmas from the two leafhoppers to be identical. Direct PCR products amplified from phytoplasma leafhopper DNA using the P1/P7 primer pair were cloned and sequenced yielding 1758 bp and 1755 bp products from A. avicula and Empoasca sp. respectively; the homology of these sequences with OmanAlfWB and papaya yellow crinkle phytoplasmas was more than 98%. A phylogenetic tree based on the 16S rRNA gene and spacer region sequences from 44 phytoplasmas revealed that the phytoplasmas from the leafhoppers clustered with OmanAlfWB, papaya yellow crinkle, and gerbera phyllody phytoplasmas, all belonging to 16SrII group, but were distinct from lime witches’ broom phytoplasma, the most commonly found phytoplasma in the Sultanate of Oman.

  2. Telaah Hubungan Kepuasan Kerja Dan Komitmen Organisasional Terhadap Turnover Intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Amran

    2017-04-01

    ABSTRACT       Employees are the most important resources of company. They are human resources to do and move all of the activities of company. Therefore, company needs to keep and maintain their job satisfaction and organizational commitment in order to reduce the intention to leave the company (turnover intention. It is necessary to study the relationship among job satisfaction, organizational commitment and turnover intention. This will give benefit to determine the important values of employees’ job satisfaction and organizational commitment and its influences on turnover intention. The research methods are descriptive survey and verificative survey that is used to assess the performance of independent variables: those are job satisfaction and organizational commitment,  and dependent variable: that is turnover intention with doing observation to employees of PT. Alexindo Bekasi. The result of this research is there is influence of job satisfaction and organizational commitment on turnover intention. This research is the improvement of existing researches which can be applied in the other companies specially for the human resource or employee behavior field.   Keywords: Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, Turnover Intention

  3. The tear turnover and tear clearance tests - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaszczuk, Izabela K; Montes Mico, Robert; Iskander, D Robert; Expósito, Alejandro Cerviño

    2018-03-01

    The aim is to provide a summary of methods available for the assessment of tear turnover and tear clearance rates. The review defines tear clearance and tear turnover and describes their implication for ocular surface health. Additionally, it describes main types of techniques for measuring tear turnover, including fluorescein tear clearance tests, techniques utilizing electromagnetic spectrum and tracer molecule and novel experimental techniques utilizing optical coherence tomography and fluorescein profilometry. Areas covered: Internet databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar) and most frequently cited references were used as a principal resource of information on tear turnover rate and tear clearance rate, presenting methodologies and equipment, as well as their definition and implications for the anterior eye surface health and function. Keywords used for data-search were as follows: tear turnover, tear clearance, fluorescein clearance, scintigraphy, fluorophotometry, tear flow, drainage, tear meniscus dynamics, Krehbiel flow and lacrimal functional unit. Expert commentary: After decades, the topic of tear turnover assessment has been reintroduced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to propose less invasive, less time consuming and simpler methodologies for the assessment of tear dynamics that have the potential to be utilized in clinical practice.

  4. Turnover intention among intensive care unit nurses in Alexandria, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosallam, Rasha; Hamidi, Samer; Elrefaay, Manal

    2015-06-01

    Given the difficulty in recruiting new nurses, it is imperative to retain those already in the profession. This cross-sectional study explored the relationship of demographic and work-related factors, burnout, conflict management and relationship between nurses and physicians on turnover intentions among ICU nurses in eight major hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt. Data on burnout, conflict management, nurse-physician communication, and turnover intention were collected by surveying 100 nurses in eight hospitals in Alexandria governorate. All nurses at the ICU of selected hospitals were approached (n=100) and a 47-item Likert scale questionnaire was administered to explore the factors affecting the turnover intention of ICU nurses in Alexandria. ICU nurses exhibited a mean score for turnover intention of 3.23 (mean score percentage 65.0%). There was a moderately positive statistically significant correlation between turnover intention and emotional exhaustion (r=0.29, Pturnover intention were emotional exhaustion and age. Nurses turnover intention at the ICU of the selected hospitals is high and is significantly associated with nurses' emotional exhaustion, poor nurse-physician communication, and nurses age.

  5. Stable isotopic constraints on global soil organic carbon turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Houlton, Benjamin Z.; Liu, Dongwei; Hou, Jianfeng; Cheng, Weixin; Bai, Edith

    2018-02-01

    Carbon dioxide release during soil organic carbon (SOC) turnover is a pivotal component of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global climate change. However, reliably measuring SOC turnover rates on large spatial and temporal scales remains challenging. Here we use a natural carbon isotope approach, defined as beta (β), which was quantified from the δ13C of vegetation and soil reported in the literature (176 separate soil profiles), to examine large-scale controls of climate, soil physical properties and nutrients over patterns of SOC turnover across terrestrial biomes worldwide. We report a significant relationship between β and calculated soil C turnover rates (k), which were estimated by dividing soil heterotrophic respiration rates by SOC pools. ln( - β) exhibits a significant linear relationship with mean annual temperature, but a more complex polynomial relationship with mean annual precipitation, implying strong-feedbacks of SOC turnover to climate changes. Soil nitrogen (N) and clay content correlate strongly and positively with ln( - β), revealing the additional influence of nutrients and physical soil properties on SOC decomposition rates. Furthermore, a strong (R2 = 0.76; p turnover and thereby improving predictions of multiple global change influences over terrestrial C-climate feedback.

  6. Turnover intention of graduate nurses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejung; Lim, Yeonjung; Jung, Hee Young; Shin, Youn-Wha

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the turnover intention of graduate nurses in South Korea and to explore the correlates of turnover intention. A descriptive, correlational design was used. The participants comprised 225 female nurses who were working at 13 general hospitals and who had accumulated turnover intention was 7.51. Turnover intention was found to be related to the number of beds in the hospital, workplace, and duration of job orientation (theory and practice), instruction by a preceptor, job stress, clinical competence, self-efficacy, and the practice environment. In the multivariate approach, the practice environment, job stress, and the workplace were found to be significantly related to turnover intention and accounted for 36% of the said intention in the studied graduate nurses. The results support that the characteristics of magnet hospitals that improve the practice environment could play a critical role in retaining nurses in hospitals. Managerial interventions that enhance the practice environment, reduce job stress, and place graduate nurses in nursing units with a single specialty could benefit the hospitals employing such nurses. Further research to explore the effects of managerial strategies on graduate nurses' turnover intention is warranted. © 2011 The Authors; Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2011 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  7. Factors influencing turnover intention among registered nurses in Samar Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, Leodoro J; Gloe, Donna; McEnroe, Denise M; Konstantinos, Kostas; Colet, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    Despite the massive nurse migration and turnover of nurses in the Philippines, there remains a lack of studies describing factors influencing the migration of Filipino nurses. This study explored the effects of nurses' characteristics, work satisfaction, and work stress with the intent to leave an organization among registered nurses in the Philippines. This study utilized a descriptive, cross-sectional approach. One hundred sixty six (166) nurses participated in the study during the months of September 2015 to December 2015. Three standardized instruments were used in the study: Job Satisfaction Index (JSI), Job Stress Scale (JSS), and Turnover Intention Inventory Scale (TIIS). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tools. Nurses' ages were found to significantly influence their turnover intentions. Job satisfaction (β=-0.47, p=0.001) and job stress (β=0.23, p=0.001) strongly predicted turnover intentions in the nurses. The mean values for the job satisfaction scale, job stress scale, and turnover intention inventory scale were 3.13 (SD=0.60), 2.74 (SD=0.71), and 2.43 (SD=0.67) respectively. Several predictors of turnover intentions were determined in this study through nurses' age, job satisfaction, and job stress as being the most influential factors. Efforts to increase nurses' job satisfaction and reduce job stress should be implemented to halt further loss of these skilled groups of healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Organisational commitment and turnover intentions: evidence from Nigerian paramilitary organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dotun Olaleye Faloye

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the empirical link between different dimensions of organizational commitment and turnover intentions on Nigeria paramilitary organisation. A literature review of organizational commitment and employee turnover provides the basis for the research hypotheses. Four research hypotheses were formulated and tested at 95% and 99% confidence level. The study adopted a survey research design. A self-administered questionnaire was used, involving 144 respondents from selected paramilitary organisation in Akure, Nigeria to collect data and testing the existing theory. Data collected were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. In contrary to theory, the study revealed a weak positive relationship between organizational commitment dimensions (affective, continuance and normative and turnover intentions. The relationships are statistically significant expect the one between turnover intention and normative commitment which is statistically insignificant. The study concluded that the commitment of an employee to organisational goals, missions, and values is not enough to predict his/her stay in the organisation. There are other variables apart from organisational commitment that are predictor of employees’ intentions to quit. Thus, organisations should look beyond forces in their internal environment, when considering reduction in employee’s turnover intentions and the actual employee’s turnover.

  9. Thiol-linked alkylation of RNA to assess expression dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Veronika A; Reichholf, Brian; Neumann, Tobias; Rescheneder, Philipp; Bhat, Pooja; Burkard, Thomas R; Wlotzka, Wiebke; von Haeseler, Arndt; Zuber, Johannes; Ameres, Stefan L

    2017-12-01

    Gene expression profiling by high-throughput sequencing reveals qualitative and quantitative changes in RNA species at steady state but obscures the intracellular dynamics of RNA transcription, processing and decay. We developed thiol(SH)-linked alkylation for the metabolic sequencing of RNA (SLAM seq), an orthogonal-chemistry-based RNA sequencing technology that detects 4-thiouridine (s 4 U) incorporation in RNA species at single-nucleotide resolution. In combination with well-established metabolic RNA labeling protocols and coupled to standard, low-input, high-throughput RNA sequencing methods, SLAM seq enabled rapid access to RNA-polymerase-II-dependent gene expression dynamics in the context of total RNA. We validated the method in mouse embryonic stem cells by showing that the RNA-polymerase-II-dependent transcriptional output scaled with Oct4/Sox2/Nanog-defined enhancer activity, and we provide quantitative and mechanistic evidence for transcript-specific RNA turnover mediated by post-transcriptional gene regulatory pathways initiated by microRNAs and N 6 -methyladenosine. SLAM seq facilitates the dissection of fundamental mechanisms that control gene expression in an accessible, cost-effective and scalable manner.

  10. Reviewing Employee Turnover: Focusing on Proximal Withdrawal States and an Expanded Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hom, Peter W.; Mitchell, Terence R.; Lee, Thomas W.; Griffeth, Rodger W.

    2012-01-01

    We reconceptualize employee turnover to promote researchers' understanding and prediction of why employees quit or stay in employing institutions. A literature review identifies shortcomings with prevailing turnover dimensions. In response, we expand the conceptual domain of the turnover criterion to include multiple types of turnover (notably,…

  11. Explaining the Gap in Charter and Traditional Public School Teacher Turnover Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuit, David A.; Smith, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses national survey data to examine why charter school teachers are more likely to turnover than their traditional public school counterparts. We test whether the turnover gap is explained by different distributions of factors that are empirically and theoretically linked to turnover risk. We find that the turnover rate of charter…

  12. Diverging affinity of tospovirus RNA silencing suppressor proteins, NSs, for various RNA duplex molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Hemmes, Hans; Huismann, Rik; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel; Kormelink, Richard

    2010-11-01

    The tospovirus NSs protein was previously shown to suppress the antiviral RNA silencing mechanism in plants. Here the biochemical analysis of NSs proteins from different tospoviruses, using purified NSs or NSs containing cell extracts, is described. The results showed that all tospoviral NSs proteins analyzed exhibited affinity to small double-stranded RNA molecules, i.e., small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNA (miRNA)/miRNA* duplexes. Interestingly, the NSs proteins from tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) also showed affinity to long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), whereas tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV) NSs did not. The TSWV NSs protein was shown to be capable of inhibiting Dicer-mediated cleavage of long dsRNA in vitro. In addition, it suppressed the accumulation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-specific siRNAs during coinfiltration with an inverted-repeat-GFP RNA construct in Nicotiana benthamiana. In vivo interference of TSWV NSs in the miRNA pathway was shown by suppression of an enhanced GFP (eGFP) miRNA sensor construct. The ability to stabilize miRNA/miRNA* by different tospovirus NSs proteins in vivo was demonstrated by increased accumulation and detection of both miRNA171c and miRNA171c* in tospovirus-infected N. benthamiana. All together, these data suggest that tospoviruses interfere in the RNA silencing pathway by sequestering siRNA and miRNA/miRNA* molecules before they are uploaded into their respective RNA-induced silencing complexes. The observed affinity to long dsRNA for only a subset of the tospoviruses studied is discussed in light of evolutional divergence and their ancestral relation to the animal-infecting members of the Bunyaviridae.

  13. A role for PERK in the mechanism underlying fluoride-induced bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Fei; Li, Xining; Yang, Chen; Lv, Peng; Li, Guangsheng; Xu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    While it has been well-documented that excessive fluoride exposure caused the skeletal disease and osteoblasts played a critical role in the advanced skeletal fluorosis, the underlying mechanism that mediated these effects remain poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of fluoride on bone of rats and MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro. Herein we found pathological features of high bone turnover in fluoride-treated rats, which was supported by an increase of osteogenic and osteoclastogenic genes expression in different stages of fluoride exposure. The skeletal toxicity of fluoride was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR). A novel finding of this study was that expression of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) was the same trend with receptor activator for nuclear factor-κ B ligand (RANKL), and NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was the same trend with Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in bones of rats exposed to varied fluoride condition. Based on these data, we hypothesized that up-regulation of PERK probably played a role in mediating bone turnover induced by fluoride. Action of fluoride on MC3T3-E1 cells differentiation was demonstrated through analysis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodules formation. Meantime, an increase of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) expression indicated the active ER stress in cells exposed to various dose of fluoride. Blocking PERK expression using siRNA showed the obvious decrease of osteogenic and osteoclastogenic factors expression in MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to certain dose of fluoride that could positively stimulate osteoblastic viability. In conclusion these findings underscore the importance of PERK in modulating fluoride induced bone formation and bone resorption. Understanding the link between PERK and bone turnover could probe into the mechanism underlying different bone lesion of

  14. Modelling carbon and nitrogen turnover in variably saturated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle-Aguilar, J.; Brovelli, A.; Porporato, A.; Barry, D. A.

    2009-04-01

    Natural ecosystems provide services such as ameliorating the impacts of deleterious human activities on both surface and groundwater. For example, several studies have shown that a healthy riparian ecosystem can reduce the nutrient loading of agricultural wastewater, thus protecting the receiving surface water body. As a result, in order to develop better protection strategies and/or restore natural conditions, there is a growing interest in understanding ecosystem functioning, including feedbacks and nonlinearities. Biogeochemical transformations in soils are heavily influenced by microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. Carbon and nutrient cycles are in turn strongly sensitive to environmental conditions, and primarily to soil moisture and temperature. These two physical variables affect the reaction rates of almost all soil biogeochemical transformations, including microbial and fungal activity, nutrient uptake and release from plants, etc. Soil water saturation and temperature are not constants, but vary both in space and time, thus further complicating the picture. In order to interpret field experiments and elucidate the different mechanisms taking place, numerical tools are beneficial. In this work we developed a 3D numerical reactive-transport model as an aid in the investigation the complex physical, chemical and biological interactions occurring in soils. The new code couples the USGS models (MODFLOW 2000-VSF, MT3DMS and PHREEQC) using an operator-splitting algorithm, and is a further development an existing reactive/density-dependent flow model PHWAT. The model was tested using simplified test cases. Following verification, a process-based biogeochemical reaction network describing the turnover of carbon and nitrogen in soils was implemented. Using this tool, we investigated the coupled effect of moisture content and temperature fluctuations on nitrogen and organic matter cycling in the riparian zone, in order to help understand the relative

  15. In vitro transcription of Sonchus yellow net virus RNA by a virus-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flore, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the investigation presented in this thesis was to elucidate the nature of the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase, thought to be associated with Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV), a rhabdovirus infecting plants. This research was initiated to shed light on the

  16. Amplicon based RNA interference targeting V2 gene of cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus-Burewala strain can provide resistance in transgenic cotton plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    An RNAi based gene construct designated “C2” was used to target the V2 region of the cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) genome which is responsible for virus movement. The construct was transformed into two elite cotton varieties MNH-786 and VH-289. A shoot apex method of plant transformation using Agr...

  17. Melatonin confers plant tolerance against cadmium stress via the decrease of cadmium accumulation and reestablishment of microRNA-mediated redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quan; Chen, Ziping; Yu, Xiuli; Cui, Weiti; Pan, Jincheng; Zhao, Gan; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Ren; Shen, Wenbiao

    2017-08-01

    Although melatonin-alleviated cadmium (Cd) toxicity both in animals and plants have been well studied, little is known about its regulatory mechanisms in plants. Here, we discovered that Cd stress stimulated the production of endogenous melatonin in alfalfa seedling root tissues. The pretreatment with exogenous melatonin not only increased melatonin content, but also alleviated Cd-induced seedling growth inhibition. The melatonin-rich transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing alfalfa SNAT (a melatonin synthetic gene) exhibited more tolerance than wild-type plants under Cd conditions. Cd content was also reduced in root tissues. In comparison with Cd stress alone, ABC transporter and PCR2 transcripts in alfalfa seedlings, PDR8 and HMA4 in Arabidopsis, were up-regulated by melatonin. By contrast, Nramp6 transcripts were down-regulated. Changes in above transporters were correlated with the less accumulation of Cd. Additionally Cd-triggered redox imbalance was improved by melatonin. These could be supported by the changes of the Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase gene regulated by miR398a and miR398b. Histochemical staining, laser scanning confocal microscope, and H 2 O 2 contents analyses showed the similar tendencies. Taking together, we clearly suggested that melatonin enhanced Cd tolerance via decreasing cadmium accumulation and reestablishing the microRNAs-mediated redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Plant-feeding insects harbor double-stranded RNA viruses encoding a novel proline-alanine rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to that of fungal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel double-stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genomes of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and Circulifer tenell...

  19. Novel double-stranded RNA viruses of plant-feeding insects encode a serine-alanine-proline rich protein and a polymerase distantly related to fungal viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel double stranded RNAs (~8 kbp) were isolated from the three cornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) and beet leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus), two plant-feeding hemipteran insect pests. Genome organization of the two new viruses, designated as Spissistilus festinus virus 1 (SpFV1) and ...

  20. Conifers have a unique small RNA silencing signature

    OpenAIRE

    Dolgosheina, Elena V.; Morin, Ryan D.; Aksay, Gozde; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R.; Mattsson, Jim; Unrau, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Plants produce small RNAs to negatively regulate genes, viral nucleic acids, and repetitive elements at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level in a process that is referred to as RNA silencing. While RNA silencing has been extensively studied across the different phyla of the animal kingdom (e.g., mouse, fly, worm), similar studies in the plant kingdom have focused primarily on angiosperms, thus limiting evolutionary studies of RNA silencing in plants. Here we report on an u...

  1. Quantifying high resolution transitional breaks in plant and mammal distributions at regional extent and their association with climate, topography and geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Giovanni; Laffan, Shawn W; Ebach, Malte C

    2013-01-01

    We quantify spatial turnover in communities of 1939 plant and 59 mammal species at 2.5 km resolution across a topographically heterogeneous region in south-eastern Australia to identify distributional breaks and low turnover zones where multiple species distributions overlap. Environmental turnover is measured to determine how climate, topography and geology influence biotic turnover differently across a variety of biogeographic breaks and overlaps. We identify the genera driving turnover and confirm the versatility of this approach across spatial scales and locations. Directional moving window analyses, rotated through 360°, were used to measure spatial turnover variation in different directions between gridded cells containing georeferenced plant and mammal occurrences and environmental variables. Generalised linear models were used to compare taxic turnover results with equivalent analyses for geology, regolith weathering, elevation, slope, solar radiation, annual precipitation and annual mean temperature, both uniformly across the entire study area and by stratifying it into zones of high and low turnover. Identified breaks and transitions were compared to a conservation bioregionalisation framework widely used in Australia. Detailed delineations of plant and mammal turnover zones with gradational boundaries denoted subtle variation in species assemblages. Turnover patterns often diverged from bioregion boundaries, though plant turnover adhered most closely. A prominent break zone contained either comparable or greater numbers of unique genera than adjacent overlaps, but these were concentrated in a small subsection relatively under-protected by conservation reserves. The environmental correlates of biotic turnover varied for different turnover zones in different subsections of the study area. Topography and temperature showed much stronger relationships with plant turnover in a topographically complex overlap, relative to a lowland overlap where weathering

  2. Turnover of registered nurses in Israel: characteristics and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toren, Orly; Zelker, Revital; Lipschuetz, Michal; Riba, Shoshana; Reicher, Sima; Nirel, Nurit

    2012-05-01

    In an era of global and local nursing shortages, nursing turnover has negative consequences in terms of diminished quality of care, increased costs and economic losses and decreased job satisfaction. To examine the turnover rate of registered nurses in Israel by assessing the varying degree of turnover between economic sectors, between hospital and community facilities, and/or between types of hospitals; and by examining potential predicting factors of turnover among registered nurses. A national phone survey was undertaken in Israel consisting of a random sampling of registered nurses of working age (up to age 60). The subjects comprised 10% of a national database of 32,000 registered nurses. The turnover rate among working nurses in Israel currently stands at 23%. In addition, 13% of employed nurses have taken a temporary leave of absence for a period greater than 6 months in the past 10 years, most up to 1 year. While job satisfaction rates were relatively high (72%), Professional satisfaction rates were 60% with no significant difference between hospital and community nurses. The turnover rate of registered nurses from a hospital setting to the community was significantly higher (pcommunity registered nurses to hospitals. Predicting factors of turnover were found to be: young age, part-time work, lack of advanced professional education, academic education and low satisfaction with the nursing profession. The shift of nursing workforce is mainly from hospitals to community health settings. There is a need to monitor and understand the characteristics of job and professional satisfaction among hospital nurses in order to implement crucial organizational interventions and retain hospital nursing staffs. Since young nurses, nurses working part time and nurses with no advanced professional and academic education, tend to move more than others, efforts should be targeted at these specific groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A case study into labour turnover within an NHS Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, David; Hall, Catherine

    2007-02-01

    This paper investigates turnover in a British NHS Trust, to find out why staff left and whether factors identified in the literature with regards to improving turnover were pertinent to the organization. The research also investigated staff groups with high turnover--staff with less than 12 months service, and the unqualified nursing staff group--to ascertain whether there were any reasons for leaving or areas of dissatisfaction particular to these groups. The outcomes of the research complied with much of the published research with some interesting differences. The main reasons for leaving were identified as moving house, promotion or career development and taking up education and training opportunities elsewhere. There was no evidence of 'level of pay', commonly given as a significant influence behind turnover, as a reason for leaving. It was also found that the retention strategies identified in the published research were mainly applicable to the research, with evidence to support the improvement of line management skills, training and development, career development, appraisal, communications and induction in order to reduce turnover. There was less evidence for introducing work-life balance policies, improving communications, pay and working relationships as retention strategies. Recommendations for future management of labour turnover within the NHS Trust and elsewhere are made, with observations about the validity of some existing models. The core contribution of this research is in adding to the body of knowledge about labour turnover issues. This is of value to those working in the UK health-care and wider public sector. Specific recommendations for future research are made.

  4. Customization of Artificial MicroRNA Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vu, Tien; Do, Vinh Nang

    2017-01-01

    RNAi approaches, including microRNA (miRNA) regulatory pathway, offer great tools for functional characterization of unknown genes. Moreover, the applications of artificial microRNA (amiRNA) in the field of plant transgenesis have also been advanced to engineer pathogen-resistant or trait-improved transgenic plants. Until now, despite the high potency of amiRNA approach, no commercial plant cultivar expressing amiRNAs with improved traits has been released yet. Beside the issues of biosafety policies, the specificity and efficacy of amiRNAs are of major concerns. Sufficient cares should be taken for the specificity and efficacy of amiRNAs due to their potential off-target effects and other issues relating to in vivo expression of pre-amiRNAs. For these reasons, the proper design of amiRNAs with the lowest off-target possibility is very important for successful applications of the approach in plant. Therefore, there are many studies with the aim to improve the amiRNA design and amiRNA expressing backbones for obtaining better specificity and efficacy. However, the requirement for an efficient reference for the design is still needed. In the present chapter, we attempt to summarize and discuss all the major concerns relating to amiRNA design with the hope to provide a significant guideline for this approach.

  5. Faster turnover of new soil carbon inputs under increased atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W; Terrer, César; Carrillo, Yolima; Dijkstra, Feike A; Heath, James; Nie, Ming; Pendall, Elise; Phillips, Richard P; Hungate, Bruce A

    2017-10-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 frequently stimulate plant inputs to soil, but the consequences of these changes for soil carbon (C) dynamics are poorly understood. Plant-derived inputs can accumulate in the soil and become part of the soil C pool ("new soil C"), or accelerate losses of pre-existing ("old") soil C. The dynamics of the new and old pools will likely differ and alter the long-term fate of soil C, but these separate pools, which can be distinguished through isotopic labeling, have not been considered in past syntheses. Using meta-analysis, we found that while elevated CO 2 (ranging from 550 to 800 parts per million by volume) stimulates the accumulation of new soil C in the short term (soil C pool over either temporal scale. Our results are inconsistent with predictions of conventional soil C models and suggest that elevated CO 2 might increase turnover rates of new soil C. Because increased turnover rates of new soil C limit the potential for additional soil C sequestration, the capacity of land ecosystems to slow the rise in atmospheric CO 2 concentrations may be smaller than previously assumed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  7. Role of RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and RNA recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaag, Hannah M; Lu, Qiasheng; Schmitt, Mark E; Nagy, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    RNA degradation, together with RNA synthesis, controls the steady-state level of viral RNAs in infected cells. The endoribonucleolytic cleavage of viral RNA is important not only for viral RNA degradation but for RNA recombination as well, due to the participation of some RNA degradation products in the RNA recombination process. To identify host endoribonucleases involved in degradation of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae model host, we tested eight known endoribonucleases. Here we report that downregulation of SNM1, encoding a component of the RNase MRP, and a temperature-sensitive mutation in the NME1 gene, coding for the RNA component of RNase MRP, lead to reduced production of the endoribonucleolytically cleaved TBSV RNA in yeast. We also show that the highly purified yeast RNase MRP cleaves the TBSV RNA in vitro, resulting in TBSV RNA degradation products similar in size to those observed in yeast cells. Knocking down the NME1 homolog in Nicotiana benthamiana also led to decreased production of the cleaved TBSV RNA, suggesting that in plants, RNase MRP is involved in TBSV RNA degradation. Altogether, this work suggests a role for the host endoribonuclease RNase MRP in viral RNA degradation and recombination.

  8. Evaluation of microRNA alignment techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Antony; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-01-01

    Genomic alignment of small RNA (smRNA) sequences such as microRNAs poses considerable challenges due to their short length (∼21 nucleotides [nt]) as well as the large size and complexity of plant and animal genomes. While several tools have been developed for high-throughput mapping of longer mRNA-seq reads (>30 nt), there are few that are specifically designed for mapping of smRNA reads including microRNAs. The accuracy of these mappers has not been systematically determined in the case of smRNA-seq. In addition, it is unknown whether these aligners accurately map smRNA reads containing sequence errors and polymorphisms. By using simulated read sets, we determine the alignment sensitivity and accuracy of 16 short-read mappers and quantify their robustness to mismatches, indels, and nontemplated nucleotide additions. These were explored in the context of a plant genome (Oryza sativa, ∼500 Mbp) and a mammalian genome (Homo sapiens, ∼3.1 Gbp). Analysis of simulated and real smRNA-seq data demonstrates that mapper selection impacts differential expression results and interpretation. These results will inform on best practice for smRNA mapping and enable more accurate smRNA detection and quantification of expression and RNA editing. PMID:27284164

  9. Investigating the adequacy of the Competence-Turnover Intention Model: how does nursing competence affect nurses' turnover intention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Miyuki; Teraoka, Sachiko; Kousuke, Yabase

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test the adequacy of the Competence-Turnover Intention Model, which was developed to identify how nursing competence could affect nurses' turnover intention (nurses' intention to voluntarily leave an organisation). Recent studies have suggested that the level of nursing competence is negatively related to nurses' intention to leave their jobs, suggesting that a lack of competence threatens both the quality and quantity of the nursing workforce. However, the mechanism of how nursing competence affects nurses' turnover intention has not been explored previously. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Surveys were distributed to 1337 Japanese registered nurses/midwives in October, 2013. The adequacy of the model was analysed using structural equation modelling. In total, 766 questionnaires were returned, with a return rate of 57%. The model fitted well with the data. The results showed that the level of nursing competence was related positively to the quantity of organisational rewards they felt they had received, and negatively related to the level of exhaustion they experienced. Moreover, the perceived organisational rewards and exhaustion were correlated with nurses' turnover intention through affective commitment. The Competence-Turnover Intention Model is useful for explaining how nursing competence impacts on their turnover intention. Clinical implications derived from the findings are that: promoting nursing competence is key to improving not only the quality of care provided by nurses, but also to retaining the nursing workforce, and the model can be used to develop strategies that would mitigate their turnover intention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Health insurance, cost expectations, and adverse job turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Randall P; Albert Ma, Ching-To

    2011-01-01

    Because less healthy employees value health insurance more than the healthy ones, when health insurance is newly offered job turnover rates for healthier employees decline less than turnover rates for the less healthy. We call this adverse job turnover, and it implies that a firm's expected health costs will increase when health insurance is first offered. Health insurance premiums may fail to adjust sufficiently fast because state regulations restrict annual premium changes, or insurers are reluctant to change premiums rapidly. Even with premiums set at the long run expected costs, some firms may be charged premiums higher than their current expected costs and choose not to offer insurance. High administrative costs at small firms exacerbate this dynamic selection problem. Using 1998-1999 MEDSTAT MarketScan and 1997 Employer Health Insurance Survey data, we find that expected employee health expenditures at firms that offer insurance have lower within-firm and higher between-firm variance than at firms that do not. Turnover rates are systematically higher in industries in which firms are less likely to offer insurance. Simulations of the offer decision capturing between-firm health-cost heterogeneity and expected turnover rates match the observed pattern across firm sizes well. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Cost of nursing turnover in a Teaching Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Paula Buck de Oliveira; Perroca, Marcia Galan; Jericó, Marli de Carvalho

    2016-02-01

    To map the sub processes related to turnover of nursing staff and to investigate and measure the nursing turnover cost. This is a descriptive-exploratory study, classified as case study, conducted in a teaching hospital in the southeastern, Brazil, in the period from May to November 2013. The population was composed by the nursing staff, using Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology. The total cost of turnover was R$314.605,62, and ranged from R$2.221,42 to R$3.073,23 per employee. The costs of pre-hire totaled R$101.004,60 (32,1%), and the hiring process consumed R$92.743,60 (91.8%) The costs of post-hire totaled R$213.601,02 (67,9%), for the sub process decreased productivity, R$199.982,40 (93.6%). The study identified the importance of managing the cost of staff turnover and the financial impact of the cost of the employee termination, which represented three times the average salary of the nursing staff.

  12. Changes of Protein Turnover in Aging Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhondt, Ineke; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Bauer, Sophie; Brewer, Heather M.; Smith, Richard D.; Depuydt, Geert; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2017-07-05

    Protein turnover rates severely decline in aging organisms, including C. elegans. However, limited information is available on turnover dynamics at the individual protein level during aging. We followed changes in protein turnover at one-day resolution using a multiple-pulse 15Nlabeling and accurate mass spectrometry approach. Forty percent of the proteome shows gradual slowdown in turnover with age, whereas only few proteins show increased turnover. Decrease in protein turnover was consistent for only a minority of functionally related protein subsets, including tubulins and vitellogenins, whereas randomly diverging turnover patterns with age were the norm. Our data suggests increased heterogeneity of protein turnover of the translation machinery, whereas protein turnover of ubiquitin-proteasome and antioxidant systems are well-preserved over time. Hence, we presume that maintenance of quality control mechanisms is a protective strategy in aging worms, although the ultimate proteome collapse is inescapable.

  13. Human 2'-phosphodiesterase localizes to the mitochondrial matrix with a putative function in mitochondrial RNA turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave; Andersen, Kasper Røjkjær; Kjær, Karina Hansen

    2011-01-01

    . Interestingly, 2′-PDE shares both functionally and structurally characteristics with the CCR4-type exonuclease–endonuclease–phosphatase family of deadenylases. Here we show that 2′-PDE locates to the mitochondrial matrix of human cells, and comprise an active 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exhibiting a preference...

  14. Endonucleolysis in the turnover of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Christiansen, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The overlapping transcription units constituting the rat insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) locus generate multiple mRNAs by using different promoters. Three promoters have been identified, giving rise to 4.6-, 3.8-, and 3.6-kilobase mRNAs. The latter, originating from promoter P3, is the most...

  15. RNA interference in designing transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nusrat; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence specific gene silencing mechanism, triggered by the introduction of dsRNA leading to mRNA degradation. It helps in switching on and off the targeted gene, which might have significant impact in developmental biology. Discovery of RNAi represents one of the most promising and rapidly advancing frontiers in plant functional genomics and in crop improvement by plant metabolic engineering and also plays an important role in reduction of allergenicity by silencing specific plant allergens. In plants the RNAi technology has been employed successfully in improvement of several plant species- by increasing their nutritional value, overall quality and by conferring resistance against pathogens and diseases. The review gives an insight to the perspective use of the technology in designing crops with innovation, to bring improvement to crop productivity and quality.

  16. Quality of working life: an antecedent to employee turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees' QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees' QWL and their intention to leave the organization. A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. This study empirically examined the relationships between employees' QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees' QWL and subsequently reduce employees' turnover.

  17. Estimation of Employee Turnover with Competing Risks Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzenda Wioletta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Employee turnover accompanies every business organization, regardless of the industry and size. Nowadays, many companies struggle with problems related to the lack of sufficient information about the nature of employee turnover processes. Therefore, comprehensive analysis of these processes is necessary. This article aims to examine the turnover of employees from a big manufacturing company using competing risks models with covariates and without covariates. This technique allows to incorporate the information about the type of employment contract termination. Moreover, Cox proportional hazard model enables the researcher to analyse simultaneously multiple factors that affect employment duration. One of the major observations is that employee remuneration level differentiates most strongly the risk of job resignation.

  18. PENGARUH JOB SATISFACTION TERHADAP OCB DAN TURNOVER INTENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febru Rida Ningsih

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide the impact of job satisfaction to OCB and turnover intention. This study used a quantitative method with a statistical analysis. Simple analysis regression used to test each hypotheses. The object of this research is a branch of national bank. Population in this research are entire employees of a brach of national bank that is e non frontliner employees. Non-probability sampling is used of this reseach. The measurement of job satiafaction and turnover intention variables used likert scale that developed by Rinaldi (2008 and measurement of OCB variable adopted from  Organ (1988.  The result of this research has shown that hypotheses one is rejected and hypotheses two is accepted. Eventually, through this article, an understanding that job satisfaction does not significantly influence to OCB but job satisfaction has significant influence to turnover intention.

  19. No turnover in lens lipids for the entire human lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jessica R; Levchenko, Vladimir A; Blanksby, Stephen J; Mitchell, Todd W; Williams, Alan; Truscott, Roger J W

    2015-03-11

    Lipids are critical to cellular function and it is generally accepted that lipid turnover is rapid and dysregulation in turnover results in disease (Dawidowicz 1987; Phillips et al., 2009; Liu et al., 2013). In this study, we present an intriguing counter-example by demonstrating that in the center of the human ocular lens, there is no lipid turnover in fiber cells during the entire human lifespan. This discovery, combined with prior demonstration of pronounced changes in the lens lipid composition over a lifetime (Hughes et al., 2012), suggests that some lipid classes break down in the body over several decades, whereas others are stable. Such substantial changes in lens cell membranes may play a role in the genesis of age-related eye disorders. Whether long-lived lipids are present in other tissues is not yet known, but this may prove to be important in understanding the development of age-related diseases.

  20. Cogema in 1996: increasing turnover and stable net results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This short article gives some financial informations about the Cogema group for 1996. The net result for 1996 reached 977 millions of French Francs (FF) with respect to 973 for the previous year. The turnover reached 34.427 billions of FF in 1996 and 30.611 in 1995, which represents a 12.5% growth. In the mining sector, the turnover has decreased to 2.853 billions of FF with respect to 3.238 in 1995. In the engineering and industry services sector the turnover of the overall companies, with the exception of Cogema, has considerably progressed (2.199 billions of FF in 1996, 1.738 in 1995). (J.S.)

  1. DNA turnover and strand breaks in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.; Grivell, A.; Nakayama, H.

    1975-01-01

    The extent of DNA turnover has been measured in a dnaB mutant of Escherichia coli, temperature sensitive for semiconservative DNA replication. At the nonpermissive temperature about 0.02 percent of the deoxynucleotides in DNA are exchanged per generation period. This turnover rate is markedly depressed in the presence of rifampicin. During thymine starvation strand breaks accumulate in the DNA of E. coli strains that are susceptible to thymineless death. Rifampicin suppresses the appearance of these breaks, consistent with our hypothesis that transcription may be accompanied by repairable single-strand breaks in DNA. DNA turnover is enhanced severalfold in strands containing 5-bromodeoxyuridine in place of thymidine, possibly because the analog (or the deoxyuridine, following debromination) is sometimes recognized and excised

  2. Peningkatan Komitmen Organisasi untuk Menurunkan Angka Turnover Karyawan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elita Halimsetiono

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Komitmen organisasi dapat diartikan sebagai suatu sikap yang harus dimiliki oleh setiap pegawai untuk menunjukkan loyalitas terhadap organisasi tempat mereka bekerja. Pada dasarnya, komitmen organisasi berkaitan erat dengan aspek-aspek psikologis dalam menerima dan memercayai nilai-nilai dan tujuan organisasi yang muncul sebagai keinginan untuk tetap mempertahankan keanggotaan dalam organisasi. Permasalahan yang sering dikaitkan dengan rendahnya komitmen organisasi adalah pindah kerja (turnover. Masalah ini memiliki dampak yang merugikan organisasi karena dapat menghambat efektivitas dan efisiensi kerja yang selanjutnya akan menurunkan tingkat produktivitas organisasi. Oleh karena itu, untuk mencegah tingginya turnover karyawan, organisasi perlu meningkatkan komitmen organisasi karyawannya. Caranya adalah dengan mengetahui faktor-faktor apa saja yang memengaruhi komitmen organisasi dan bagaimana cara untuk meningkatkan komitmen organisasi tersebut. Artikel ini membahas faktor-faktor apa saja yang memengaruhi komitmen organisasi dan cara-cara yang dapat digunakan untuk meningkatkan komitmen organisasi sebagai upaya untuk menurunkan angka turnover karyawan. Organizational commitment can be interpreted as an attitude that should be owned by every employee to demonstrate loyalty to the organization where they work. Basically, organizational commitment is closely related to the psychological aspects in the acceptance and confidence to the values and objectives of the organization that are presented through the existence of a desire to maintain membership in the organization. Problems which are associated with low organizational commitment is turnover. This problem has an adverse impact on the organization because it can inhibit the effectiveness and efficiency of the work that would lower the level of productivity of the organization. Therefore, to prevent the high employee turnover, the organization should increase the organizational commitment of

  3. 'Memory and molecular turnover,' 30 years after inception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    In 1984 Sir Francis Crick hypothesized that memory is recorded in the brain as reversible modifications to DNA and protein, but acknowledged that most biomolecules turn over too rapidly to account for long-term memories. To accommodate this possible paradox he modeled an enzymatic mechanism to maintain modifications on hemi-modified multimeric symmetrical molecules. While studies on the turnover of chromatin modifications that may be involved in memory are in their infancy, an exploration of his model in the light of modern epigenetics produced somewhat surprising results. The molecular turnover rates for two classes of chromatin modifications believed to record and store durable memories were approximated from experiments using diverse approaches and were found to be remarkably short. The half-lives of DNA cytosine methylation and post-translationally modified nucleosomal histones are measured in hours and minutes, respectively, for a subset of sites on chromatin controlling gene expression. It appears likely that the turnover of DNA methylation in the brain and in neurons, in particular, is even more rapid than in other cell types and organs, perhaps accommodating neuronal plasticity, learning, and memory. The machinery responsible for the rapid turnover of DNA methylation and nucleosomal histone modifications is highly complex, partially redundant, and appears to act in a sequence specific manner. Molecular symmetry plays an important part in maintaining site-specific turnover, but its particular role in memory maintenance is unknown. Elucidating Crick's paradox, the contradiction between rapid molecular turnover of modified biomolecules and long-term memory storage, appears fundamental to understanding cognitive function and neurodegenerative disease.

  4. Peptide Level Turnover Measurements Enable the Study of Proteoform Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Jana; Meng, Chen; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Samaras, Patroklos; Wilhelm, Mathias; Kuster, Bernhard

    2018-05-01

    The coordination of protein synthesis and degradation regulating protein abundance is a fundamental process in cellular homeostasis. Today, mass spectrometry-based technologies allow determination of endogenous protein turnover on a proteome-wide scale. However, standard dynamic SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling in Cell Culture) approaches can suffer from missing data across pulse time-points limiting the accuracy of such analysis. This issue is of particular relevance when studying protein stability at the level of proteoforms because often only single peptides distinguish between different protein products of the same gene. To address this shortcoming, we evaluated the merits of combining dynamic SILAC and tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeling of ten pulse time-points in a single experiment. Although the comparison to the standard dynamic SILAC method showed a high concordance of protein turnover rates, the pulsed SILAC-TMT approach yielded more comprehensive data (6000 proteins on average) without missing values. Replicate analysis further established that the same reproducibility of turnover rate determination can be obtained for peptides and proteins facilitating proteoform resolved investigation of protein stability. We provide several examples of differentially turned over splice variants and show that post-translational modifications can affect cellular protein half-lives. For example, N-terminally processed peptides exhibited both faster and slower turnover behavior compared with other peptides of the same protein. In addition, the suspected proteolytic processing of the fusion protein FAU was substantiated by measuring vastly different stabilities of the cleavage products. Furthermore, differential peptide turnover suggested a previously unknown mechanism of activity regulation by post-translational destabilization of cathepsin D as well as the DNA helicase BLM. Finally, our comprehensive data set facilitated a detailed evaluation of the impact of protein

  5. Emerging connections between RNA and autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Lubas, Michal; Lund, Anders H

    2017-01-01

    in yeast, plants and animals, reviewing the molecular mechanisms and biological importance in normal physiology, stress and disease. In addition, we explore emerging evidence of core autophagy regulation mediated by RNA-binding proteins and noncoding RNAs, and point to gaps in our current knowledge......Macroautophagy/autophagy is a key catabolic process, essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and survival through the removal and recycling of unwanted cellular material. Emerging evidence has revealed intricate connections between the RNA and autophagy research fields. While a majority...... of the connection between RNA and autophagy. Finally, we discuss the pathological implications of RNA-protein aggregation, primarily in the context of neurodegenerative disease....

  6. Platelet monoamine oxidase: specific activity and turnover number in headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, K.M.; Brown, G.K.; Craig, I.W.; Peatfield, R.; Rose, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase turnover numbers (molecules of substrate converted to product per minute per active site) have been calculated for the human platelet enzyme using [ 3 H]pargyline. Headache patients with high and low monoamine oxidase specific activities relative to controls were found to have turnover numbers very close to those for controls. This finding suggests that their specific activities vary because of differences in the concentration of active monoamine oxidase molecules, rather than differences in the ability of those enzyme molecules to catalyse the deamination reaction. (Auth.)

  7. [Pharmaceutical logistic in turnover of pharmaceutical products of Azerbaijan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhalilova, K I

    2009-11-01

    Development of pharmaceutical logistic system model promotes optimal strategy for pharmaceutical functioning. The goal of such systems is organization of pharmaceutical product's turnover in required quantity and assortment, at preset time and place, at a highest possible degree of consumption readiness with minimal expenses and qualitative service. Organization of the optimal turnover chain in the region is offered to start from approximate classification of medicaments by logistic characteristics. Supplier selection was performed by evaluation of timeliness of delivery, quality of delivered products (according to the minimum acceptable level of quality) and time-keeping of time spending for orders delivery.

  8. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading and inva......Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......-mediated invadopodia formation. Taken together, our results indicate that RNA-binding proteins exert profound effects on cellular adhesion and invasion during development and cancer formation....

  9. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-03-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations.

  10. Plant Invasions Associated with Change in Root-Zone Microbial Community Structure and Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The importance of plant-microbe associations for the invasion of plant species have not been often tested under field conditions. The research sought to determine patterns of change in microbial communities associated with the establishment of invasive plants with different taxonomic and phenetic traits. Three independent locations in Virginia, USA were selected. One site was invaded by a grass (Microstegium vimineum, another by a shrub (Rhamnus davurica, and the third by a tree (Ailanthus altissima. The native vegetation from these sites was used as reference. 16S rRNA and ITS regions were sequenced to study root-zone bacterial and fungal communities, respectively, in invaded and non-invaded samples and analyzed using Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology (QIIME. Though root-zone microbial community structure initially differed across locations, plant invasion shifted communities in similar ways. Indicator species analysis revealed that Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs closely related to Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Ascomycota increased in abundance due to plant invasions. The Hyphomonadaceae family in the Rhodobacterales order and ammonia-oxidizing Nitrospirae phylum showed greater relative abundance in the invaded root-zone soils. Hyphomicrobiaceae, another bacterial family within the phyla Proteobacteria increased as a result of plant invasion, but the effect associated most strongly with root-zones of M. vimineum and R. davurica. Functional analysis using Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt showed bacteria responsible for nitrogen cycling in soil increased in relative abundance in association with plant invasion. In agreement with phylogenetic and functional analyses, greater turnover of ammonium and nitrate was associated with plant invasion. Overall, bacterial and fungal communities changed congruently across plant invaders, and support the hypothesis that

  11. Substance Abuse-Specific Knowledge Transfer or Loss? Treatment Program Turnover versus Professional Turnover among Substance Abuse Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Lillian T.; Curtis, Sara L.

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the extent to which substance abuse (SA) clinician turnover is associated with SA-specific knowledge loss due to change in professions (professional turnover) versus SA-specific knowledge transfer due to movement from one SA clinical setting to another (treatment program turnover). For this study, clinicians had to voluntarily leave their current treatment program. Eligible clinicians completed a quantitative survey while employed and a qualitative post-employment exit interview 1 year later. Compared to those that exited the SA profession (N = 99), clinicians who changed treatment programs (N = 120) had greater SA-specific formal knowledge and were more likely to be personally in recovery. No differences were found between the two groups in terms of SA-specific practical knowledge. PMID:25115318

  12. Purification and properties of cowpea mosaic virus RNA replicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zabel, P.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis concerns the partial purification and properties of an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNA replicase) produced upon infection of Vigna unguiculata plants with Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV). The enzyme is believed to be coded, at least in part, by the virus genome and to

  13. Exonuclease hDIS3L2 specifies an exosome-independent 3'-5' degradation pathway of human cytoplasmic mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Tomecki, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    Turnover of mRNA in the cytoplasm of human cells is thought to be redundantly conducted by the monomeric 5'-3' exoribonuclease hXRN1 and the 3'-5' exoribonucleolytic RNA exosome complex. However, in addition to the exosome-associated 3'-5' exonucleases hDIS3 and hDIS3L, the human genome encodes...

  14. Exploring correlates of turnover among nursing assistants in the National Nursing Home Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, April; Dobbs, Debra; Andel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    High turnover of nursing assistants (NAs) has implications for the quality of nursing home care. Greater understanding of correlates of NA turnover is needed to provide insight into possible retention strategies. This study examined nursing home organizational characteristics and specific job characteristics of staff in relation to turnover of NAs. Cross-sectional data on 944 nationally representative nursing homes were derived from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. Using a 3-month turnover rate, 25% of the facilities with the lowest turnover rates were classified as low turnover, 25% of the facilities with the highest turnover were classified as high turnover, and the remaining 50% of the facilities were classified as moderate turnover. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine organizational and job characteristics associated with low and high turnover compared with moderate turnover. One organizational characteristic, staffing levels at or greater than 4.0 hours per patient day, was associated with greater odds of low NA turnover and reduced odds of high NA turnover. Job characteristics including higher wages and union membership were associated with greater odds of low NA turnover, whereas wages, fully paid health insurance, employee assistance benefits, and involvement in resident care planning were associated with reduced odds of high NA turnover. The results of this study suggest that job characteristics of NA staff may be particularly important for turnover. Specifically, the provision of competitive wages and benefits (particularly health insurance) and involvement of NAs in resident care planning could potentially reduce NA turnover, as could maintaining high levels of nurse staffing.

  15. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  16. Firm-level innovation activity, employee turnover and HRM practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Qin, Zhihua; Wang, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between employee turnover, HRM practices and innovation in Chinese firms in five high technology sectors. We estimate hurdle negative binomial models for count data on survey data allowing for analyses of the extensive as well as intensive margins of firms' in...

  17. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  18. Psychological contract as precursor for turnover and self-employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stormbroek-Burgers, van R.G.B.M.; Blomme, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of psychological contract (PC) fulfilment and violation on turnover intention and self-employment intentions. Design/methodology/approach A sample of 132 Dutch organizationally employed individuals was used to test the effect of PC

  19. Some Determinants of Employee Turnover in a Psychiatric Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zautra, Alex J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Used research from illness-prevention and job-enrichment approaches to enhancing quality of work environments to create instruments assessing number of job stressors and level of task interest on psychiatric hospital units. Instruments successfully predicted employee turnover during one year. Job stress and interaction between job stress and task…

  20. System wide cofactor turnovers can propagate metabolic stability between pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Y.; Guan, Y.H.; Villadsen, John

    2016-01-01

    . Furthermore, we elaborated the criteria to tell if a multi-enzyme over-all reaction path is of in vivo nature or not at the metabolic level. As new findings, we discovered that there are interactions between the enzyme feedback inhibition and the CI turnover, and such interactions may well lead to metabolic...