WorldWideScience

Sample records for rna transcript heg

  1. Messenger RNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to DNA, messenger RNA (mRNA) in complex substrata is rarely analyzed, in large part because labile RNA molecules are difficult to purify. Nucleic acid extractions from fungi that colonize soil are particularly difficult and plagued by humic substances that interfere with Taq polymerase (Tebbe and Vahjen 1993 and references therein). Magnetic capture...

  2. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  3. Polymerase Chain Transcription: Exponential Synthesis of RNA and Modified RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tingjian; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2017-07-26

    There is increasing demand for RNA and modified RNA oligonucleotides, but in contrast to DNA oligonucleotides, they are typically prohibitively expensive to chemically synthesize, and unlike longer RNAs, they are only inefficiently produced by in vitro transcription, especially when modified. To address these challenges, we previously reported the evolution of a thermostable DNA polymerase, SFM4-3, that more efficiently accepts substrates with 2'-substituents. We now show that SFM4-3 efficiently transcribes RNA or 2'-F-modified RNA and that it also efficiently PCR amplifies oligonucleotides of mixed RNA and DNA composition. In addition, with thermocycling and the use of a novel DNA template, we demonstrate a polymerase chain transcription (PCT) reaction that results in the exponential production of orders of magnitude more RNA or modified RNA than is available by conventional transcription. PCT is more efficient and general than conventional transcription and can produce large amounts of any RNA or modified RNA oligonucleotide at a fraction of the cost of chemical synthesis.

  4. RNA helicase DDX21 coordinates transcription and ribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calo, Eliezer; Flynn, Ryan A; Martin, Lance; Spitale, Robert C; Chang, Howard Y; Wysocka, Joanna

    2015-02-12

    DEAD-box RNA helicases are vital for the regulation of various aspects of the RNA life cycle, but the molecular underpinnings of their involvement, particularly in mammalian cells, remain poorly understood. Here we show that the DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX21 can sense the transcriptional status of both RNA polymerase (Pol) I and II to control multiple steps of ribosome biogenesis in human cells. We demonstrate that DDX21 widely associates with Pol I- and Pol II-transcribed genes and with diverse species of RNA, most prominently with non-coding RNAs involved in the formation of ribonucleoprotein complexes, including ribosomal RNA, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and 7SK RNA. Although broad, these molecular interactions, both at the chromatin and RNA level, exhibit remarkable specificity for the regulation of ribosomal genes. In the nucleolus, DDX21 occupies the transcribed rDNA locus, directly contacts both rRNA and snoRNAs, and promotes rRNA transcription, processing and modification. In the nucleoplasm, DDX21 binds 7SK RNA and, as a component of the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex, is recruited to the promoters of Pol II-transcribed genes encoding ribosomal proteins and snoRNAs. Promoter-bound DDX21 facilitates the release of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from the 7SK snRNP in a manner that is dependent on its helicase activity, thereby promoting transcription of its target genes. Our results uncover the multifaceted role of DDX21 in multiple steps of ribosome biogenesis, and provide evidence implicating a mammalian RNA helicase in RNA modification and Pol II elongation control.

  5. RNA Polymerase II–The Transcription Machine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 3. RNA Polymerase II – The Transcription Machine - Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2006. Jiyoti Verma Aruna Naorem Anand Kumar Manimala Sen Parag Sadhale. General Article Volume 12 Issue 3 March 2007 pp 47-53 ...

  6. Functional Integration of Transcriptional and RNA Processing Machineries

    OpenAIRE

    Pandit, Shatakshi; Wang, Dong; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2008-01-01

    Co-transcriptional RNA processing not only permits temporal RNA processing before the completion of transcription, but also allows sequential recognition of RNA processing signals on nascent transcripts threading out from the elongating RNAPII complex. Rapid progress in recent years has established multiple contacts that physically connect the transcription and RNA processing machineries, which centers on the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNAPII. While co-transcriptional R...

  7. A complex variable form of the HEG technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killingbeck, John P [Mathematics Department, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX (United Kingdom); Grosjean, Alain [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UMR 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France); Jolicard, Georges [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de l' Observatoire de Besancon (CNRS, UMR 6091), 41 bis Avenue de l' Observatoire, BP 1615, 25010 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2005-10-21

    A previously reported simple method for calculating complex matrix eigenvalues is modified to incorporate the traditional HEG approach for the case of even parity potentials. Two examples of resonance calculations are given. Our matrix and perturbation results agree with each other, but are not in full accord with previously published results for one of the test potentials. New results are given for the resonances of the inverted Gaussian potential. (letter to the editor)

  8. Processivity and coupling in messenger RNA transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of messenger RNA processing is now being uncovered by experimental techniques that are capable of detecting individual copies of mRNA in cells, and by quantitative real-time observations that reveal the kinetics. This processing is commonly modelled by permitting mRNA to be transcribed only when the promoter is in the on state. In this simple on/off model, the many processes involved in active transcription are represented by a single reaction. These processes include elongation, which has a minimum time for completion and processing that is not captured in the model.In this paper, we explore the impact on the mRNA distribution of representing the elongation process in more detail. Consideration of the mechanisms of elongation leads to two alternative models of the coupling between the elongating polymerase and the state of the promoter: Processivity allows polymerases to complete elongation irrespective of the promoter state, whereas coupling requires the promoter to be active to produce a full-length transcript. We demonstrate that these alternatives have a significant impact on the predicted distributions. Models are simulated by the Gillespie algorithm, and the third and fourth moments of the resulting distribution are computed in order to characterise the length of the tail, and sharpness of the peak. By this methodology, we show that the moments provide a concise summary of the distribution, showing statistically-significant differences across much of the feasible parameter range.We conclude that processivity is not fully consistent with the on/off model unless the probability of successfully completing elongation is low--as has been observed. The results also suggest that some form of coupling between the promoter and a rate-limiting step in transcription may explain the cell's inability to maintain high mRNA levels at low noise--a prediction of the on/off model that has no supporting evidence.

  9. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in c...

  10. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcript...

  11. The RNA polymerase II CTD coordinates transcription and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Manley, James L

    2012-10-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit consists of multiple heptad repeats (consensus Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7), varying in number from 26 in yeast to 52 in vertebrates. The CTD functions to help couple transcription and processing of the nascent RNA and also plays roles in transcription elongation and termination. The CTD is subject to extensive post-translational modification, most notably phosphorylation, during the transcription cycle, which modulates its activities in the above processes. Therefore, understanding the nature of CTD modifications, including how they function and how they are regulated, is essential to understanding the mechanisms that control gene expression. While the significance of phosphorylation of Ser2 and Ser5 residues has been studied and appreciated for some time, several additional modifications have more recently been added to the CTD repertoire, and insight into their function has begun to emerge. Here, we review findings regarding modification and function of the CTD, highlighting the important role this unique domain plays in coordinating gene activity.

  12. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...... and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo...... also results in RNAPII stopping, and removal of collided RNAPII from the DNA template can be achieved via ubiquitylation-directed proteolysis. Indeed, in cells lacking efficient RNAPII polyubiquitylation, the half-life of collided polymerases increases, so that they can be detected between convergent...

  13. Decision-Making in Adolescents According to reaction Time, HEG and PASS

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Álvarez, Frederic; Serra Sala, Mireia; Timoneda Gallart, Carme

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Planning, Attention, Simultaneous and Successive (PASS) theory of intelligence allows us cognitive assessment. Hemoencephalography (HEG) allows us to assess cortical prefrontal activity. Reaction time (RT) allows us to assess decision-making. We aim to find teenager profile according to the PASS, HEG, and RT. Methods and findings: 59 secondary education adolescent students (30 females and 29 males, 14-16- year-old, mean=15.29, SD=0.67) were tested by two RT + HEG expe...

  14. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription.

  15. Coupling pre-mRNA processing to transcription on the RNA factory assembly line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo-Ming; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2013-03-01

    It has been well-documented that nuclear processing of primary transcripts of RNA polymerase II occurs co-transcriptionally and is functionally coupled to transcription. Moreover, increasing evidence indicates that transcription influences pre-mRNA splicing and even several post-splicing RNA processing events. In this review, we discuss the issues of how RNA polymerase II modulates co-transcriptional RNA processing events via its carboxyl terminal domain, and the protein domains involved in coupling of transcription and RNA processing events. In addition, we describe how transcription influences the expression or stability of mRNAs through the formation of distinct mRNP complexes. Finally, we delineate emerging findings that chromatin modifications function in the regulation of RNA processing steps, especially splicing, in addition to transcription. Overall, we provide a comprehensive view that transcription could integrate different control systems, from epigenetic to post-transcriptional control, for efficient gene expression.

  16. Transcription arrest caused by long nascent RNA chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentin, Thomas; Cherny, Dmitry; Larsen, H Jakob

    2004-01-01

    The transcription process is highly processive. However, specific sequence elements encoded in the nascent RNA may signal transcription pausing and/or termination. We find that under certain conditions nascent RNA chains can have a strong and apparently sequence-independent inhibitory effect...... on transcription. Using phage T3 RNA polymerase (T3 RNAP) and covalently closed circular (cccDNA) DNA templates that did not contain any strong termination signal, transcription was severely inhibited after a short period of time. Less than approximately 10% residual transcriptional activity remained after 10 min...... of incubation. The addition of RNase A almost fully restored transcription in a dose dependent manner. Throughout RNase A rescue, an elongation rate of approximately 170 nt/s was maintained and this velocity was independent of RNA transcript length, at least up to 6 kb. Instead, RNase A rescue increased...

  17. Dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription during disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, K M; Sanij, E; Rothblum, L I; Hannan, R D; Pearson, R B

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of the ribosomal RNA genes by the dedicated RNA polymerase I enzyme and subsequent processing of the ribosomal RNA are fundamental control steps in the synthesis of functional ribosomes. Dysregulation of Pol I transcription and ribosome biogenesis is linked to the etiology of a broad range of human diseases. Diseases caused by loss of function mutations in the molecular constituents of the ribosome, or factors intimately associated with RNA polymerase I transcription and processing are collectively termed ribosomopathies. Ribosomopathies are generally rare and treatment options are extremely limited tending to be more palliative than curative. Other more common diseases are associated with profound changes in cellular growth such as cardiac hypertrophy, atrophy or cancer. In contrast to ribosomopathies, altered RNA polymerase I transcriptional activity in these diseases largely results from dysregulated upstream oncogenic pathways or by direct modulation by oncogenes or tumor suppressors at the level of the RNA polymerase I transcription apparatus itself. Ribosomopathies associated with mutations in ribosomal proteins and ribosomal RNA processing or assembly factors have been covered by recent excellent reviews. In contrast, here we review our current knowledge of human diseases specifically associated with dysregulation of RNA polymerase I transcription and its associated regulatory apparatus, including some cases where this dysregulation is directly causative in disease. We will also provide insight into and discussion of possible therapeutic approaches to treat patients with dysregulated RNA polymerase I transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Transcription by Odd Pols. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutual Interference between Genomic RNA Replication and Subgenomic mRNA Transcription in Brome Mosaic Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.; Garcia-Ruiz, Hernan; Watanabe, Tokiko; Ahlquist, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Replication by many positive-strand RNA viruses includes genomic RNA amplification and subgenomic mRNA (sgRNA) transcription. For brome mosaic virus (BMV), both processes occur in virus-induced, membrane-associated compartments, require BMV replication factors 1a and 2a, and use negative-strand RNA3 as a template for genomic RNA3 and sgRNA syntheses. To begin elucidating their relations, we examined the interaction of RNA3 replication and sgRNA transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expres...

  19. Transcriptional profiling of cells sorted by RNA abundance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemm, Sandy; Semrau, Stefan; Wiebrands, Kay; Mooijman, Dylan; Faddah, Dina A; Jaenisch, Rudolf; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    We have developed a quantitative technique for sorting cells on the basis of endogenous RNA abundance, with a molecular resolution of 10-20 transcripts. We demonstrate efficient and unbiased RNA extraction from transcriptionally sorted cells and report a high-fidelity transcriptome measurement of

  20. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Discovering the RNA Transcription Landscape using Directional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafo, Daniela B.; Liu, Pingfang; Sumner, Christine J.; Apone, Lynne M.; Langhorst, Bradley W.; Yigit, Erbay; Dimalanta, Eileen T.; Davis, Theodore B.; Stewart, Fiona J.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput complementary DNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a powerful technique that allows for sensitive digital quantification of transcript levels. Moreover, RNA-Seq enables the detection of non-canonical transcription start sites and termination sites, alternative splice isoforms and transcript mutation and edition. Standard “next-generation” RNA-sequencing approaches generally require double-stranded cDNA synthesis, which erases RNA strand information. In this approach, the synthesis of randomly primed double-stranded cDNA followed by addition of adaptors for sequencing leads to the loss of information about which strand was present in the original mRNA template. The polarity of the transcript is important for correct annotation of novel genes, identification of antisense transcripts with potential regulatory roles, and for correct determination of gene expression levels in the presence of antisense transcripts. Our objective was to address this need by developing a novel streamlined, low input method for Directional RNA-Sequencing that highly retains strand orientation information while maintaining even coverage of transcript expression. This method is based on second strand labeling and excision after adaptor ligation; allowing differential tagging of the first strand cDNA ends. As a result, we have enabled strand specific mRNA sequencing, as well as whole transcriptome sequencing (Total RNA-Seq) from ribosomal-depleted samples. Total RNA-Seq provides a much broader picture of expression dynamics including discovery of antisense transcripts. This work presents a streamlined, fast solution for complete RNA sequencing, with high quality data that illustrates the complexity and diversity of the RNA transcription landscape.

  2. FACT facilitates chromatin transcription by RNA polymerases I and III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Joanna L; Tan, Bertrand C-M; Panov, Kostya I

    2009-01-01

    Efficient transcription elongation from a chromatin template requires RNA polymerases (Pols) to negotiate nucleosomes. Our biochemical analyses demonstrate that RNA Pol I can transcribe through nucleosome templates and that this requires structural rearrangement of the nucleosomal core particle....... The subunits of the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription), SSRP1 and Spt16, co-purify and co-immunoprecipitate with mammalian Pol I complexes. In cells, SSRP1 is detectable at the rRNA gene repeats. Crucially, siRNA-mediated repression of FACT subunit expression in cells results...... in a significant reduction in 47S pre-rRNA levels, whereas synthesis of the first 40 nt of the rRNA is not affected, implying that FACT is important for Pol I transcription elongation through chromatin. FACT also associates with RNA Pol III complexes, is present at the chromatin of genes transcribed by Pol III...

  3. Fast ribozyme cleavage releases transcripts from RNA polymerase II and aborts co-transcriptional pre-mRNA processing

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Nova; Ohman, Marie; Bentley, David L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY We investigated whether a continuous transcript is necessary for co-transcriptional pre-mRNA processing. Cutting an intron with the fast-cleaving hepatitis ? ribozyme, but not the slower hammerhead, inhibited splicing. Exon tethering to RNA pol II therefore cannot rescue splicing of a transcript severed by a ribozyme that cleaves rapidly relative to splicing. Ribozyme cutting also released cap-binding complex (CBC) from the gene, suggesting that exon 1 is not tethered. Unexpectedly, c...

  4. A conserved RNA polymerase III promoter required for gammaherpesvirus TMER transcription and microRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Kevin W; Claypool, David J; van Dyk, Linda F

    2014-07-01

    Canonical RNA polymerase III (pol III) type 2 promoters contain a single A and B box and are well documented for their role in tRNA and SINE transcription in eukaryotic cells. The genome of Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) contains eight polycistronic tRNA-microRNA encoded RNA (TMER) genes that are transcribed from a RNA pol III type 2-like promoter containing triplicated A box elements. Here, we demonstrate that the triplicated A box sequences are required in their entirety to produce functional MuHV-4 miRNAs. We also identify that these RNA pol III type 2-like promoters are conserved in eukaryotic genomes. Human and mouse predicted tRNA genes containing these promoters also show enrichment of alternative RNA pol III transcription termination sequences and are predicted to give rise to longer tRNA primary transcripts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcript RNA supports precise repair of its own DNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Meers, Chance; Storici, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is considered an extraordinary process in molecular biology. Despite the fact that cells transcribe abundant amount of RNA with a wide range of functions, it has been difficult to uncover whether RNA can serve as a template for DNA repair and recombination. An increasing number of experimental evidences suggest a direct role of RNA in DNA modification. Recently, we demonstrated that endogenous transcript RNA can serve as a template to repair a DNA double-strand break (DSB), the most harmful DNA lesion, not only indirectly via formation of a DNA copy (cDNA) intermediate, but also directly in a homology driven mechanism in budding yeast. These results point out that the transfer of genetic information from RNA to DNA is more general than previously thought. We found that transcript RNA is more efficient in repairing a DSB in its own DNA (in cis) than in a homologous but ectopic locus (in trans). Here, we summarize current knowledge about the process of RNA-driven DNA repair and recombination, and provide further data in support of our model of DSB repair by transcript RNA in cis. We show that a DSB is precisely repaired predominately by transcript RNA and not by residual cDNA in conditions in which formation of cDNA by reverse transcription is inhibited. Additionally, we demonstrate that defects in ribonuclease (RNase) H stimulate precise DSB repair by homologous RNA or cDNA sequence, and not by homologous DNA sequence carried on a plasmid. These results highlight an antagonistic role of RNase H in RNA-DNA recombination. Ultimately, we discuss several questions that should be addressed to better understand mechanisms and implications of RNA-templated DNA repair and recombination.

  6. Measure transcript integrity using RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liguo; Nie, Jinfu; Sicotte, Hugues; Li, Ying; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Dasari, Surendra; Vedell, Peter T; Barman, Poulami; Wang, Liewei; Weinshiboum, Richard; Jen, Jin; Huang, Haojie; Kohli, Manish; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A

    2016-02-03

    Stored biological samples with pathology information and medical records are invaluable resources for translational medical research. However, RNAs extracted from the archived clinical tissues are often substantially degraded. RNA degradation distorts the RNA-seq read coverage in a gene-specific manner, and has profound influences on whole-genome gene expression profiling. We developed the transcript integrity number (TIN) to measure RNA degradation. When applied to 3 independent RNA-seq datasets, we demonstrated TIN is a reliable and sensitive measure of the RNA degradation at both transcript and sample level. Through comparing 10 prostate cancer clinical samples with lower RNA integrity to 10 samples with higher RNA quality, we demonstrated that calibrating gene expression counts with TIN scores could effectively neutralize RNA degradation effects by reducing false positives and recovering biologically meaningful pathways. When further evaluating the performance of TIN correction using spike-in transcripts in RNA-seq data generated from the Sequencing Quality Control consortium, we found TIN adjustment had better control of false positives and false negatives (sensitivity = 0.89, specificity = 0.91, accuracy = 0.90), as compared to gene expression analysis results without TIN correction (sensitivity = 0.98, specificity = 0.50, accuracy = 0.86). TIN is a reliable measurement of RNA integrity and a valuable approach used to neutralize in vitro RNA degradation effect and improve differential gene expression analysis.

  7. Disengaging polymerase: Terminating RNA polymerase II transcription in budding yeast☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischo, Hannah E.; Proudfoot, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Termination of transcription by RNA polymerase II requires two distinct processes: The formation of a defined 3′ end of the transcribed RNA, as well as the disengagement of RNA polymerase from its DNA template. Both processes are intimately connected and equally pivotal in the process of functional messenger RNA production. However, research in recent years has elaborated how both processes can additionally be employed to control gene expression in qualitative and quantitative ways. This review embraces these new findings and attempts to paint a broader picture of how this final step in the transcription cycle is of critical importance to many aspects of gene regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA polymerase II Transcript Elongation. PMID:23085255

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 links RNA polymerase II transcription to processing of ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Coordes, Britta; Heidemann, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Strässer, Katja; Eick, Dirk

    2013-07-19

    Ribosome biogenesis is a process required for cellular growth and proliferation. Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is highly sensitive to flavopiridol, a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9). Cdk9 has been characterized as the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we studied the connection between RNAPII transcription and rRNA processing. We show that inhibition of RNAPII activity by α-amanitin specifically blocks processing of rRNA. The block is characterized by accumulation of 3' extended unprocessed 47 S rRNAs and the entire inhibition of other 47 S rRNA-specific processing steps. The transcription rate of rRNA is moderately reduced after inhibition of Cdk9, suggesting that defective 3' processing of rRNA negatively feeds back on RNAPI transcription. Knockdown of Cdk9 caused a strong reduction of the levels of RNAPII-transcribed U8 small nucleolar RNA, which is essential for 3' rRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our data demonstrate a pivotal role of Cdk9 activity for coupling of RNAPII transcription with small nucleolar RNA production and rRNA processing.

  9. Analysis of S. cerevisiae RNA Polymerase I Transcription In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilsl, Michael; Merkl, Philipp E; Milkereit, Philipp; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Tschochner, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) activity is crucial to provide cells with sufficient amounts of ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Synthesis of rRNA takes place in the nucleolus, is tightly regulated and is coordinated with synthesis and assembly of ribosomal proteins, finally resulting in the formation of mature ribosomes. Many studies on Pol I mechanisms and regulation in the model organism S. cerevisiae were performed using either complex in vitro systems reconstituted from more or less purified fractions or genetic analyses. While providing many valuable insights these strategies did not always discriminate between direct and indirect effects in transcription initiation and termination, when mutated forms of Pol I subunits or transcription factors were investigated. Therefore, a well-defined minimal system was developed which allows to reconstitute highly efficient promoter-dependent Pol I initiation and termination of transcription. Transcription can be initiated at a minimal promoter only in the presence of recombinant core factor and extensively purified initiation competent Pol I. Addition of recombinant termination factors triggers transcriptional pausing and release of the ternary transcription complex. This minimal system represents a valuable tool to investigate the direct impact of (lethal) mutations in components of the initiation and termination complexes on the mechanism and regulation of rRNA synthesis.

  10. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  11. miRNA-target prediction based on transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara Toyofumi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are tiny endogenous RNAs that have been discovered in animals and plants, and direct the post-transcriptional regulation of target mRNAs for degradation or translational repression via binding to the 3'UTRs and the coding exons. To gain insight into the biological role of miRNAs, it is essential to identify the full repertoire of mRNA targets (target genes. A number of computer programs have been developed for miRNA-target prediction. These programs essentially focus on potential binding sites in 3'UTRs, which are recognized by miRNAs according to specific base-pairing rules. Results Here, we introduce a novel method for miRNA-target prediction that is entirely independent of existing approaches. The method is based on the hypothesis that transcription of a miRNA and its target genes tend to be co-regulated by common transcription factors. This hypothesis predicts the frequent occurrence of common cis-elements between promoters of a miRNA and its target genes. That is, our proposed method first identifies putative cis-elements in a promoter of a given miRNA, and then identifies genes that contain common putative cis-elements in their promoters. In this paper, we show that a significant number of common cis-elements occur in ~28% of experimentally supported human miRNA-target data. Moreover, we show that the prediction of human miRNA-targets based on our method is statistically significant. Further, we discuss the random incidence of common cis-elements, their consensus sequences, and the advantages and disadvantages of our method. Conclusions This is the first report indicating prevalence of transcriptional regulation of a miRNA and its target genes by common transcription factors and the predictive ability of miRNA-targets based on this property.

  12. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Transcription and RNA-processing in fission yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Bernd; Hansen, Monika; Lang, B Franz

    2005-05-01

    We systematically examined transcription and RNA-processing in mitochondria of the petite-negative fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Two presumptive transcription initiation sites at opposite positions on the circular-mapping mtDNA were confirmed by in vitro capping of primary transcripts with guanylyl-transferase. The major promoter (Pma) is located adjacent to the 5'-end of the rnl gene, and a second, minor promoter (Pmi) upstream from cox3. The primary 5'-termini of the mature rnl and cox3 transcripts remain unmodified. A third predicted accessory transcription initiation site is within the group IIA1 intron of the cob gene (cobI1). The consensus promoter motif of S. pombe closely resembles the nonanucleotide promoter motifs of various yeast mtDNAs. We further characterized all mRNAs and the two ribosomal RNAs by Northern hybridization, and precisely mapped their 5'- and 3'-ends. The mRNAs have leader sequences with a length of 38 up to 220 nt and, in most instances, are created by removal of tRNAs from large precursor RNAs. Like cox2 and rnl, cox1 and cox3 are not separated by tRNA genes; instead, transcription initiation from the promoters upstream from rnl and cox3 compensates for the lack of tRNA-mediated 5'-processing. The 3'-termini of mRNAs and of SSU rRNA are processed at distinct, C-rich motifs that are located at a variable distance (1-15 nt) downstream from mRNA and SSU-rRNA coding regions. The accuracy of RNA-processing at these sites is sequence-dependent. Similar 3'-RNA-processing motifs are present in species of the genus Schizosaccharomyces, but not in budding yeasts that have functionally analogous A+T-rich dodecamer processing signals.

  14. Alternative mRNA transcription, processing, and translation: insights from RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Klerk, Eleonora; 't Hoen, Peter A C

    2015-03-01

    The human transcriptome comprises >80,000 protein-coding transcripts and the estimated number of proteins synthesized from these transcripts is in the range of 250,000 to 1 million. These transcripts and proteins are encoded by less than 20,000 genes, suggesting extensive regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational level. Here we review how RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technologies have increased our understanding of the mechanisms that give rise to alternative transcripts and their alternative translation. We highlight four different regulatory processes: alternative transcription initiation, alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, and alternative translation initiation. We discuss their transcriptome-wide distribution, their impact on protein expression, their biological relevance, and the possible molecular mechanisms leading to their alternative regulation. We conclude with a discussion of the coordination and the interdependence of these four regulatory layers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Swinger RNA self-hybridization and mitochondrial non-canonical swinger transcription, transcription systematically exchanging nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-06-21

    Stem-loop hairpins punctuate mitochondrial post-transcriptional processing. Regulation of mitochondrial swinger transcription, transcription producing RNAs matching the mitogenome only assuming systematic exchanges between nucleotides (23 bijective transformations along 9 symmetric exchanges XY, e.g. AG, and 14 asymmetric exchanges X>Y>Z>X, e.g. A>G>C>A) remains unknown. Does swinger RNA self-hybridization regulate swinger, as regular, transcription? Groups of 8 swinger transformations share canonical self-hybridization properties within each group, group 0 includes identity (regular) transcription. The human mitogenome has more stem-loop hairpins than randomized sequences for all groups. Group 2 transformations reveal complementarity of the light strand replication origin (OL) loop and a neighboring tRNA gene, detecting the longtime presumed OL/tRNA homology. Non-canonical G=U pairings in hairpins increases with swinger RNA detection. These results confirm biological relevancy of swinger-transformed DNA/RNA, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected swinger DNA/RNA and swinger peptides. Swinger-transformed mitogenomes include unsuspected multilayered information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Conformational flexibility of RNA polymerase III during transcriptional elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Böttcher, Bettina; Rashid, Umar Jan; Steuerwald, Ulrich; Flörchinger, Beate; Devos, Damien P; Lindner, Doris; Müller, Christoph W

    2010-01-01

    RNA polymerase (Pol) III is responsible for the transcription of genes encoding small RNAs, including tRNA, 5S rRNA and U6 RNA. Here, we report the electron cryomicroscopy structures of yeast Pol III at 9.9 Å resolution and its elongation complex at 16.5 Å resolution. Particle sub-classification reveals prominent EM densities for the two Pol III-specific subcomplexes, C31/C82/C34 and C37/C53, that can be interpreted using homology models. While the winged-helix-containing C31/C82/C34 subcomplex initiates transcription from one side of the DNA-binding cleft, the C37/C53 subcomplex accesses the transcription bubble from the opposite side of this cleft. The transcribing Pol III enzyme structure not only shows the complete incoming DNA duplex, but also reveals the exit path of newly synthesized RNA. During transcriptional elongation, the Pol III-specific subcomplexes tightly enclose the incoming DNA duplex, which likely increases processivity and provides structural insights into the conformational switch between Pol III-mediated initiation and elongation. PMID:20967027

  17. Uncovering layers of human RNA polymerase II transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    In recent years DNA microarray and high-throughput sequencing technologies have challenged the “gene-centric” view that pre-mRNA is the only RNA species transcribed off protein-coding genes. Instead unorthodox transcription from within genic- and intergenic regions has been demonstrated to occur ...... and unstable RNAs emitted from within, and immediately upstream human protein-coding genes. Mechanisms of their production and turn-over as well as their possible functions will be discussed...

  18. When transcription goes on Holliday: Double Holliday junctions block RNA polymerase II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipathsouk, Anne; Belotserkovskii, Boris P; Hanawalt, Philip C

    2017-02-01

    Non-canonical DNA structures can obstruct transcription. This transcription blockage could have various biological consequences, including genomic instability and gratuitous transcription-coupled repair. Among potential structures causing transcription blockage are Holliday junctions (HJs), which can be generated as intermediates in homologous recombination or during processing of stalled replication forks. Of particular interest is the double Holliday junction (DHJ), which contains two HJs. Topological considerations impose the constraint that the total number of helical turns in the DNA duplexes between the junctions cannot be altered as long as the flanking DNA duplexes are intact. Thus, the DHJ structure should strongly resist transient unwinding during transcription; consequently, it is predicted to cause significantly stronger blockage than single HJ structures. The patterns of transcription blockage obtained for RNA polymerase II transcription in HeLa cell nuclear extracts were in accordance with this prediction. However, we did not detect transcription blockage with purified T7 phage RNA polymerase; we discuss a possible explanation for this difference. In general, our findings implicate naturally occurring Holliday junctions in transcription arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Deciphering Transcriptional Dynamics In Vivo by Counting Nascent RNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane; Sanchez, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deciphering how the regulatory DNA sequence of a gene dictates its expression in response to intra and extracellular cues is one of the leading challenges in modern genomics. The development of novel single-cell sequencing and imaging techniques, as well as a better exploitation of currently available single-molecule imaging techniques, provides an avenue to interrogate the process of transcription and its dynamics in cells by quantifying the number of RNA polymerases engaged in the transcription of a gene (or equivalently the number of nascent RNAs) at a given moment in time. In this paper, we propose that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability in the number of nascent RNAs provide a mostly unexplored method for deciphering mechanisms of transcription initiation in cells. We propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which we calculate nascent RNA copy-number fluctuations. To demonstrate the usefulness of this approach, we test our theory against published nascent RNA data for twelve constitutively expressed yeast genes. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate limiting step, as it had been previously proposed, our single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Surprisingly, half of the genes analyzed have nearly identical rates of transcription initiation, suggesting a common mechanism. Our analytical framework can be used to extract quantitative information about dynamics of transcription from single-cell sequencing data, as well as from single-molecule imaging and electron micrographs of fixed cells, and provides the mathematical means to exploit the quantitative power of these technologies. PMID:26544860

  20. RNA polymerase III promoter elements enhance transcription of RNA polymerase II genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliviero, S.; Monaci, P.

    1988-02-25

    Using transient expression assays in cultured human cells the authors have observed that RNA Polymerase III promoter sequences exert a positive cis-acting enhancer effect on RNA Polymerase II transcription. A DNA segment containing a copy of the Alu repeated element enhances transcription of the liver specific Haptoglobin related (Hpr) promoter in Hepatoma cell lines but not in HeLa cells. A tRNA/sup pro/ gene acts as enhancer of the SV40 promoter both in Hepatoma and in HeLa cell lines. Transcription from the SV40 promoter is also enhanced by DNA segments containing only the box A or the box B of the tRNA/sup pro/ promoter.

  1. Meta-analysis of small RNA-sequencing errors reveals ubiquitous post-transcriptional RNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebhardt, H Alexander; Tsang, Herbert H; Dai, Denny C; Liu, Yifeng; Bostan, Babak; Fahlman, Richard P

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in DNA-sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain large datasets of small RNA sequences. Here we demonstrate that not all non-perfectly matched small RNA sequences are simple technological sequencing errors, but many hold valuable biological information. Analysis of three small RNA datasets originating from Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA-sequencing projects demonstrates that many single nucleotide substitution errors overlap when aligning homologous non-identical small RNA sequences. Investigating the sites and identities of substitution errors reveal that many potentially originate as a result of post-transcriptional modifications or RNA editing. Modifications include N1-methyl modified purine nucleotides in tRNA, potential deamination or base substitutions in micro RNAs, 3' micro RNA uridine extensions and 5' micro RNA deletions. Additionally, further analysis of large sequencing datasets reveal that the combined effects of 5' deletions and 3' uridine extensions can alter the specificity by which micro RNAs associate with different Argonaute proteins. Hence, we demonstrate that not all sequencing errors in small RNA datasets are technical artifacts, but that these actually often reveal valuable biological insights to the sites of post-transcriptional RNA modifications.

  2. Defining transcriptional networks through integrative modeling of mRNA expression and transcription factor binding data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussemaker Harmen J

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional genomics studies are yielding information about regulatory processes in the cell at an unprecedented scale. In the yeast S. cerevisiae, DNA microarrays have not only been used to measure the mRNA abundance for all genes under a variety of conditions but also to determine the occupancy of all promoter regions by a large number of transcription factors. The challenge is to extract useful information about the global regulatory network from these data. Results We present MA-Networker, an algorithm that combines microarray data for mRNA expression and transcription factor occupancy to define the regulatory network of the cell. Multivariate regression analysis is used to infer the activity of each transcription factor, and the correlation across different conditions between this activity and the mRNA expression of a gene is interpreted as regulatory coupling strength. Applying our method to S. cerevisiae, we find that, on average, 58% of the genes whose promoter region is bound by a transcription factor are true regulatory targets. These results are validated by an analysis of enrichment for functional annotation, response for transcription factor deletion, and over-representation of cis-regulatory motifs. We are able to assign directionality to transcription factors that control divergently transcribed genes sharing the same promoter region. Finally, we identify an intrinsic limitation of transcription factor deletion experiments related to the combinatorial nature of transcriptional control, to which our approach provides an alternative. Conclusion Our reliable classification of ChIP positives into functional and non-functional TF targets based on their expression pattern across a wide range of conditions provides a starting point for identifying the unknown sequence features in non-coding DNA that directly or indirectly determine the context dependence of transcription factor action. Complete analysis results are

  3. Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Gene Regulation by Long Non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Iain M; Emanueli, Costanza

    2017-06-01

    Advances in genomics technology over recent years have led to the surprising discovery that the genome is far more pervasively transcribed than was previously appreciated. Much of the newly-discovered transcriptome appears to represent long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), a heterogeneous group of largely uncharacterised transcripts. Understanding the biological function of these molecules represents a major challenge and in this review we discuss some of the progress made to date. One major theme of lncRNA biology seems to be the existence of a network of interactions with microRNA (miRNA) pathways. lncRNA has been shown to act as both a source and an inhibitory regulator of miRNA. At the transcriptional level, a model is emerging whereby lncRNA bridges DNA and protein by binding to chromatin and serving as a scaffold for modifying protein complexes. Such a mechanism can bridge promoters to enhancers or enhancer-like non-coding genes by regulating chromatin looping, as well as conferring specificity on histone modifying complexes by directing them to specific loci. Copyright © 2017 Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Genetics Society of China. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by mRNA modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Roundtree, Ian A.; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of reversible mRNA methylation has opened a new realm of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. The identification and functional characterization of proteins that specifically recognize RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) unveiled it as a modification that cells utilize to accelerate mRNA metabolism and translation. N6-adenosine methylation directs mRNAs to distinct fates by grouping them for differential processing, translation and decay in processes such as cell differentiation, embryonic development and stress responses. Other mRNA modifications, including N1-methyladenosine (m1A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine, together with m6A form the epitranscriptome and collectively code a new layer of information that controls protein synthesis. PMID:27808276

  5. Complexity on Acute Myeloid Leukemia mRNA Transcript Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the sequence analysis of acute myeloid leukemia mRNA. Six transcript variants of mlf1 mRNA, with more than 2000 bps, are analyzed by focusing on the autocorrelation of each distribution. Through the correlation matrix, some patches and similarities are singled out and commented, with respect to similar distributions. The comparison of Kolmogorov fractal dimension will be also given in order to classify the six variants. The existence of a fractal shape, patterns, and symmetries are discussed as well.

  6. The Transcription Factor THO Promotes Transcription Initiation and Elongation by RNA Polymerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinfeng; French, Sarah L; Beyer, Ann L; Schneider, David A

    2016-02-05

    Although ribosomal RNA represents the majority of cellular RNA, and ribosome synthesis is closely connected to cell growth and proliferation rates, a complete understanding of the factors that influence transcription of ribosomal DNA is lacking. Here, we show that the THO complex positively affects transcription by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). We found that THO physically associates with the rDNA repeat and interacts genetically with Pol I transcription initiation factors. Pol I transcription in hpr1 or tho2 null mutants is dramatically reduced to less than 20% of the WT level. Pol I occupancy of the coding region of the rDNA in THO mutants is decreased to ~50% of WT level. Furthermore, although the percentage of active rDNA repeats remains unaffected in the mutant cells, the overall rDNA copy number increases ~2-fold compared with WT. Together, these data show that perturbation of THO function impairs transcription initiation and elongation by Pol I, identifying a new cellular target for the conserved THO complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Translation with frameshifting of ribosome along mRNA transcript

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    Translation is an important process for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to produce necessary proteins for cell growth. Numerious experiments have been performed to explore the translational properties. Diverse models have also been developed to determine the biochemical mechanism of translation. However, to simplify the majority of the existing models, the frameshifting of ribosome along the mRNA transcript is neglected, which actually occurs in real cells and has been extensively experimentally studied. The frameshifting of ribosome evidently influences the efficiency and speed of translation, considering that the peptide chains synthesized by shifted ribosomes will not fold into functional proteins and will degrade rapidly. In this study, a theoretical model is presented to describe the translational process based on the model for totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. In this model, the frameshifting of the ribosome along the mRNA transcript and the attachment/detachment of the ribosome to/from the ...

  8. The impact of transcriptional tuning on in vitro integrated rRNA transcription and ribosome construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ribosome construction could enable studies of ribosome assembly and function, provide a route toward constructing minimal cells for synthetic biology, and permit the construction of ribosome variants with new functions. Toward these long-term goals, we recently reported on an integrated, one-pot ribosomal RNA synthesis (rRNA), ribosome assembly, and translation technology (termed iSAT) for the construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude ribosome-free S150 extracts. Here, we aimed to improve the activity of iSAT through transcriptional tuning. Specifically, we increased transcriptional efficiency through 3′ modifications to the rRNA gene sequences, optimized plasmid and polymerase concentrations, and demonstrated the use of a T7-promoted rRNA operon for stoichiometrically balanced rRNA synthesis and native rRNA processing. Our modifications produced a 45-fold improvement in iSAT protein synthesis activity, enabling synthesis of 429 ± 15 nmol/l green fluorescent protein in 6 h batch reactions. Further, we show that the translational activity of ribosomes purified from iSAT reactions is about 20% the activity of native ribosomes purified directly from E. coli cells. Looking forward, we believe iSAT will enable unique studies to unravel the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis and open the way to new methods for making and studying ribosomal variants. PMID:24792158

  9. Direct Regulation of tRNA and 5S rRNA Gene Transcription by Polo-like Kinase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairley, Jennifer A.; Mitchell, Louise E.; Berg, Tracy; Kenneth, Niall S.; von Schubert, Conrad; Sillje, Herman H. W.; Medema, Rene H.; Nigg, Erich A.; White, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase Plk1 controls numerous aspects of cell-cycle progression. We show that it associates with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes and regulates their transcription by RNA polymerase Ill (pol Ill) through direct binding and phosphorylation of transcription factor Brit During interphase, Plk1 promotes

  10. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Hiraku; Shimada, Tomohiro; Dey, Debashish; Quyyum, M Zuhaib; Nakano, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Akira; Yoshida, Hideji; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi; Sen, Ranjan; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order) and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon), within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons are expressed

  11. Differential Regulation of rRNA and tRNA Transcription from the rRNA-tRNA Composite Operon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takada

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli contains seven rRNA operons, each consisting of the genes for three rRNAs (16S, 23S and 5S rRNA in this order and one or two tRNA genes in the spacer between 16S and 23S rRNA genes and one or two tRNA genes in the 3' proximal region. All of these rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from two promoters, P1 and P2, into single large precursors that are afterward processed to individual rRNAs and tRNAs by a set of RNases. In the course of Genomic SELEX screening of promoters recognized by RNA polymerase (RNAP holoenzyme containing RpoD sigma, a strong binding site was identified within 16S rRNA gene in each of all seven rRNA operons. The binding in vitro of RNAP RpoD holoenzyme to an internal promoter, referred to the promoter of riRNA (an internal RNA of the rRNA operon, within each 16S rRNA gene was confirmed by gel shift assay and AFM observation. Using this riRNA promoter within the rrnD operon as a representative, transcription in vitro was detected with use of the purified RpoD holoenzyme, confirming the presence of a constitutive promoter in this region. LacZ reporter assay indicated that this riRNA promoter is functional in vivo. The location of riRNA promoter in vivo as identified using a set of reporter plasmids agrees well with that identified in vitro. Based on transcription profile in vitro and Northern blot analysis in vivo, the majority of transcript initiated from this riRNA promoter was estimated to terminate near the beginning of 23S rRNA gene, indicating that riRNA leads to produce the spacer-coded tRNA. Under starved conditions, transcription of the rRNA operon is markedly repressed to reduce the intracellular level of ribosomes, but the levels of both riRNA and its processed tRNAGlu stayed unaffected, implying that riRNA plays a role in the continued steady-state synthesis of tRNAs from the spacers of rRNA operons. We then propose that the tRNA genes organized within the spacers of rRNA-tRNA composite operons

  12. Characteristics and significance of intergenic polyadenylated RNA transcription in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Gaurav D; Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D; Seddon, Alex E; Yin, Shan; Chen, Yani; Juntawong, Piyada; Brandizzi, Federica; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome is the most well-annotated plant genome. However, transcriptome sequencing in Arabidopsis continues to suggest the presence of polyadenylated (polyA) transcripts originating from presumed intergenic regions. It is not clear whether these transcripts represent novel noncoding or protein-coding genes. To understand the nature of intergenic polyA transcription, we first assessed its abundance using multiple messenger RNA sequencing data sets. We found 6,545 intergenic transcribed fragments (ITFs) occupying 3.6% of Arabidopsis intergenic space. In contrast to transcribed fragments that map to protein-coding and RNA genes, most ITFs are significantly shorter, are expressed at significantly lower levels, and tend to be more data set specific. A surprisingly large number of ITFs (32.1%) may be protein coding based on evidence of translation. However, our results indicate that these "translated" ITFs tend to be close to and are likely associated with known genes. To investigate if ITFs are under selection and are functional, we assessed ITF conservation through cross-species as well as within-species comparisons. Our analysis reveals that 237 ITFs, including 49 with translation evidence, are under strong selective constraint and relatively distant from annotated features. These ITFs are likely parts of novel genes. However, the selective pressure imposed on most ITFs is similar to that of randomly selected, untranscribed intergenic sequences. Our findings indicate that despite the prevalence of ITFs, apart from the possibility of genomic contamination, many may be background or noisy transcripts derived from "junk" DNA, whose production may be inherent to the process of transcription and which, on rare occasions, may act as catalysts for the creation of novel genes.

  13. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2012-01-01

    and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1 (ZIRD......)) as subunits of a novel protein complex--named DBIRD--that binds directly to RNAPII. DBIRD regulates alternative splicing of a large set of exons embedded in (A + T)-rich DNA, and is present at the affected exons. RNA-interference-mediated DBIRD depletion results in region-specific decreases in transcript...... elongation, particularly across areas encompassing affected exons. Together, these data indicate that the DBIRD complex acts at the interface between mRNP particles and RNAPII, integrating transcript elongation with the regulation of alternative splicing....

  14. In silico methods for co-transcriptional RNA secondary structure prediction and for investigating alternative RNA structure expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2017-05-01

    RNA transcripts are the primary products of active genes in any living organism, including many viruses. Their cellular destiny not only depends on primary sequence signals, but can also be determined by RNA structure. Recent experimental evidence shows that many transcripts can be assigned more than a single functional RNA structure throughout their cellular life and that structure formation happens co-transcriptionally, i.e. as the transcript is synthesised in the cell. Moreover, functional RNA structures are not limited to non-coding transcripts, but can also feature in coding transcripts. The picture that now emerges is that RNA structures constitute an additional layer of information that can be encoded in any RNA transcript (and on top of other layers of information such as protein-context) in order to exert a wide range of functional roles. Moreover, different encoded RNA structures can be expressed at different stages of a transcript's life in order to alter the transcript's behaviour depending on its actual cellular context. Similar to the concept of alternative splicing for protein-coding genes, where a single transcript can yield different proteins depending on cellular context, it is thus appropriate to propose the notion of alternative RNA structure expression for any given transcript. This review introduces several computational strategies that my group developed to detect different aspects of RNA structure expression in vivo. Two aspects are of particular interest to us: (1) RNA secondary structure features that emerge during co-transcriptional folding and (2) functional RNA structure features that are expressed at different times of a transcript's life and potentially mutually exclusive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cell growth- and differentiation-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase III transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; Da Silva, Daniel; Roeder, Robert G; Teichmann, Martin

    2010-09-15

    RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that fulfill essential cellular functions in regulating transcription, RNA processing, translation and protein translocation. RNA polymerase III transcription activity is tightly regulated during the cell cycle and coupled to growth control mechanisms. Furthermore, there are reports of changes in RNA polymerase III transcription activity during cellular differentiation, including the discovery of a novel isoform of human RNA polymerase III that has been shown to be specifically expressed in undifferentiated human H1 embryonic stem cells. Here, we review major regulatory mechanisms of RNA polymerase III transcription during the cell cycle, cell growth and cell differentiation.

  16. Coupling mRNA processing with transcription in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, David L

    2014-03-01

    Maturation of mRNA precursors often occurs simultaneously with their synthesis by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). The co-transcriptional nature of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of coupling mechanisms that coordinate transcription with mRNA capping, splicing, editing and 3' end formation. Recent experiments using sophisticated new methods for analysis of nascent RNA have provided important insights into the relative amount of co-transcriptional and post-transcriptional processing, the relationship between mRNA elongation and processing, and the role of the Pol II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) in regulating these processes.

  17. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation.

  18. Mutual relationships between transcription and pre-mRNA processing in the synthesis of mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenasi, Tina; Barboric, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    The generation of messenger RNA (mRNA) in eukaryotes is achieved by transcription from the DNA template and pre-mRNA processing reactions of capping, splicing, and polyadenylation. Although RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) catalyzes the synthesis of pre-mRNA, it also serves as a principal coordinator of the processing reactions in the course of transcription. In this review, we focus on the interplay between transcription and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA maturation events, mediated by the recruitment of RNA processing factors to differentially phosphorylated C-terminal domain of Rbp1, the largest subunit of RNAPII. Furthermore, we highlight the bidirectional nature of the interplay by discussing the impact of RNAPII kinetics on pre-mRNA processing as well as how the processing events reach back to different phases of gene transcription. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Hericium erinaceus polysaccharide-protein HEG-5 inhibits SGC-7901 cell growth via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Xinyi; Cui, Fengjie; Li, Yunhong; Yang, Yan; Wu, Di; Sun, Wenjing; Ping, Lifeng

    2015-05-01

    HEG-5 is a novel polysaccharide-protein purified from the fermented mycelia of Hericium erinaceus CZ-2. The present study aims to investigate the effects of HEG-5 on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells SGC-7901. Here, we first uncover that HEG-5 significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of SGC-7901 cells by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S phase. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis suggested that HEG-5 could decrease the expressions of Bcl2, PI3K and AKT1, while increase the expressions of Caspase-8, Caspase-3, p53, CDK4, Bax and Bad. These findings indicated that the Caspase-8/-3-dependent, p53-dependent mitochondrial-mediated and PI3k/Akt signaling pathways involved in the molecular events of HEG-5 induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Thus, our study provides in vitro evidence that HEG-5 may be taken as a potential candidate for treating gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Termination of Transcription of Short Noncoding RNAs by RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Karen M; Reines, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The RNA polymerase II transcription cycle is often divided into three major stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. Research over the last decade has blurred these divisions and emphasized the tightly regulated transitions that occur as RNA polymerase II synthesizes a transcript from start to finish. Transcription termination, the process that marks the end of transcription elongation, is regulated by proteins that interact with the polymerase, nascent transcript, and/or chromatin template. The failure to terminate transcription can cause accumulation of aberrant transcripts and interfere with transcription at downstream genes. Here, we review the mechanism, regulation, and physiological impact of a termination pathway that targets small noncoding transcripts produced by RNA polymerase II. We emphasize the Nrd1-Nab3-Sen1 pathway in yeast, in which the process has been extensively studied. The importance of understanding small RNA termination pathways is underscored by the need to control noncoding transcription in eukaryotic genomes.

  1. A Long Noncoding RNA lincRNA-EPS Acts as a Transcriptional Brake to Restrain Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atianand, Maninjay K; Hu, Wenqian; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Shen, Ying; Ricci, Emiliano P; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Bhatta, Ankit; Schattgen, Stefan A; McGowan, Jason D; Blin, Juliana; Braun, Joerg E; Gandhi, Pallavi; Moore, Melissa J; Chang, Howard Y; Lodish, Harvey F; Caffrey, Daniel R; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-06-16

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. Although lincRNAs are expressed in immune cells, their functions in immunity are largely unexplored. Here, we identify an immunoregulatory lincRNA, lincRNA-EPS, that is precisely regulated in macrophages to control the expression of immune response genes (IRGs). Transcriptome analysis of macrophages from lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice, combined with gain-of-function and rescue experiments, revealed a specific role for this lincRNA in restraining IRG expression. Consistently, lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice manifest enhanced inflammation and lethality following endotoxin challenge in vivo. lincRNA-EPS localizes at regulatory regions of IRGs to control nucleosome positioning and repress transcription. Further, lincRNA-EPS mediates these effects by interacting with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L via a CANACA motif located in its 3' end. Together, these findings identify lincRNA-EPS as a repressor of inflammatory responses, highlighting the importance of lincRNAs in the immune system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of RNA integrity on transcript quantification by total RNA sequencing of clinically collected human placental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Mario; Laan, Maris; Rull, Kristiina; Sõber, Siim

    2017-08-01

    RNA degradation is a ubiquitous process that occurs in living and dead cells, as well as during handling and storage of extracted RNA. Reduced RNA quality caused by degradation is an established source of uncertainty for all RNA-based gene expression quantification techniques. RNA sequencing is an increasingly preferred method for transcriptome analyses, and dependence of its results on input RNA integrity is of significant practical importance. This study aimed to characterize the effects of varying input RNA integrity [estimated as RNA integrity number (RIN)] on transcript level estimates and delineate the characteristic differences between transcripts that differ in degradation rate. The study used ribodepleted total RNA sequencing data from a real-life clinically collected set (n = 32) of human solid tissue (placenta) samples. RIN-dependent alterations in gene expression profiles were quantified by using DESeq2 software. Our results indicate that small differences in RNA integrity affect gene expression quantification by introducing a moderate and pervasive bias in expression level estimates that significantly affected 8.1% of studied genes. The rapidly degrading transcript pool was enriched in pseudogenes, short noncoding RNAs, and transcripts with extended 3' untranslated regions. Typical slowly degrading transcripts (median length, 2389 nt) represented protein coding genes with 4-10 exons and high guanine-cytosine content.-Reiman, M., Laan, M., Rull, K., Sõber, S. Effects of RNA integrity on transcript quantification by total RNA sequencing of clinically collected human placental samples. © FASEB.

  3. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  4. Quantitative analysis of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase I in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, David Alan

    2012-01-01

    The elongation step in transcription has gained attention for its roles in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression and for its influence on RNA processing. Sophisticated genetic analyses have identified factors and/or conditions that may affect transcription elongation rate or processivity; however, differentiation of direct and indirect effects on transcription is difficult using in vivo strategies. Therefore, effective, reproducible in vitro assays have been developed to test whether a given factor or condition can have a direct effect on the kinetics of transcription elongation. We have adapted a fully reconstituted transcription system for RNA polymerase I (Pol I) for kinetic analysis of transcription elongation rate in vitro. The assay described here has proven to be effective in the characterization of defects or enhancement of wild-type transcription elongation by RNA Pol I. Since transcription elongation by RNA Pol I has only recently gained significant attention, this assay will be a valuable resource for years to come.

  5. Regulation of transcription from two ssrS promoters in 6S RNA biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hongmarn; Bak, Geunu; Kim, Kwang-sun; Lee, Younghoon

    2013-09-01

    ssrS-encoded 6S RNA is an abundant noncoding RNA that binds σ(70)-RNA polymerase and regulates expression at a subset of promoters in Escherichia coli. It is transcribed from two tandem promoters, ssrS P1 and ssrS P2. Regulation of transcription from two ssrS promoters in 6S RNA biogenesis was examined. Both P1 and P2 were growth phase-dependently regulated. Depletion of 6S RNA had no effect on growth-phase-dependent transcription from either promoter, whereas overexpression of 6S RNA increased P1 transcription and decreased P2 transcription, suggesting that transcription from P1 and P2 is subject to feedback activation and feedback inhibition, respectively. This feedback regulation disappeared in Δfis strains, supporting involvement of Fis in this process. The differential feedback regulation may provide a means for maintaining appropriate cellular concentrations of 6S RNA.

  6. Pol I Transcription and Pre-rRNA Processing Are Coordinated in a Transcription-dependent Manner in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, K.; Gasiorowski, J. Z.; Chen, D.; Gilmore, R.; Norton, J. T.; Wang, C.; Leary, D. J.; Chan, E.K.L.; Dean, D. A.; Huang, S.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-rRNA synthesis and processing are key steps in ribosome biogenesis. Although recent evidence in yeast suggests that these two processes are coupled, the nature of their association is unclear. In this report, we analyze the coordination between rDNA transcription and pre-rRNA processing in mammalian cells. We found that pol I transcription factor UBF interacts with pre-rRNA processing factors as analyzed by immunoprecipitations, and the association depends on active rRNA synthesis. In add...

  7. Transcription inactivation through local refolding of the RNA polymerase structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Appleman, James R.; Xiang, Alan X.; Lira, Ricardo; Webber, Stephen E.; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Nudler, Evgeny; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; (OSU); (UAB); (Anadys); (NYUSM)

    2009-02-12

    Structural studies of antibiotics not only provide a shortcut to medicine allowing for rational structure-based drug design, but may also capture snapshots of dynamic intermediates that become 'frozen' after inhibitor binding. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by an unknown mechanism. Here we report the structure of dMyx - a desmethyl derivative of myxopyronin B - complexed with a Thermus thermophilus RNAP holoenzyme. The antibiotic binds to a pocket deep inside the RNAP clamp head domain, which interacts with the DNA template in the transcription bubble. Notably, binding of dMyx stabilizes refolding of the {beta}'-subunit switch-2 segment, resulting in a configuration that might indirectly compromise binding to, or directly clash with, the melted template DNA strand. Consistently, footprinting data show that the antibiotic binding does not prevent nucleation of the promoter DNA melting but instead blocks its propagation towards the active site. Myxopyronins are thus, to our knowledge, a first structurally characterized class of antibiotics that target formation of the pre-catalytic transcription initiation complex - the decisive step in gene expression control. Notably, mutations designed in switch-2 mimic the dMyx effects on promoter complexes in the absence of antibiotic. Overall, our results indicate a plausible mechanism of the dMyx action and a stepwise pathway of open complex formation in which core enzyme mediates the final stage of DNA melting near the transcription start site, and that switch-2 might act as a molecular checkpoint for DNA loading in response to regulatory signals or antibiotics. The universally conserved switch-2 may have the same role in all multisubunit RNAPs.

  8. Loss of human ribosomal gene CpG methylation enhances cryptic RNA polymerase II transcription and disrupts ribosomal RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon-Kugler, Thérèse; Langlois, Frédéric; Stefanovsky, Victor; Lessard, Frédéric; Moss, Tom

    2009-08-28

    Epigenetic methyl-CpG silencing of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is thought to downregulate rRNA synthesis in mammals. In contrast, we now show that CpG methylation in fact positively influences rRNA synthesis and processing. Human HCT116 cells, inactivated for DNMT1 and DNMT3b or treated with aza-dC, lack CpG methylation and reactivate a large fraction of normally silent rRNA genes. Unexpectedly, these cells display reduced rRNA synthesis and processing and accumulate unprocessed 45S rRNA. Reactivation of the rRNA genes is associated with their cryptic transcription by RNA polymerase II. Ectopic expression of cryptic rRNA gene transcripts recapitulates the defects associated with loss of CpG methylation. The data demonstrate that rRNA gene silencing prevents cryptic RNA polymerase II transcription of these genes. Lack of silencing leads to the partial disruption of rRNA synthesis and rRNA processing, providing an explanation for the cytotoxic effects of loss of CpG methylation.

  9. Primary microRNA processing is functionally coupled to RNAP II transcription in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Shanye; Yu, Yong; Reed, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in vivo reported that processing of primary microRNA (pri-miRNA) is coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and can occur co-transcriptionally. Here we have established a robust in vivo system in which pri-miRNA is transcribed by RNAP II and processed to pre-miRNA in HeLa cell nuclear extracts. We show that both the kinetics and efficiency of pri-miRNA processing are dramatically enhanced in this system compared to that of the corresponding naked pri-miRNA. Mo...

  10. Studying transcription initiation by RNA polymerase with diffusion-based single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadid, Yazan; Chung, SangYoon; Lerner, Eitan; Taatjes, Dylan J; Borukhov, Sergei; Weiss, Shimon

    2017-07-01

    Over the past decade, fluorescence-based single-molecule studies significantly contributed to characterizing the mechanism of RNA polymerase at different steps in transcription, especially in transcription initiation. Transcription by bacterial DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is a multistep process that uses genomic DNA to synthesize complementary RNA molecules. Transcription initiation is a highly regulated step in E. coli, but it has been challenging to study its mechanism because of its stochasticity and complexity. In this review, we describe how single-molecule approaches have contributed to our understanding of transcription and have uncovered mechanistic details that were not observed in conventional assays because of ensemble averaging. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  11. Molecular Basis of Transcription-Coupled Pre-mRNA Capping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Rucobo, Fuensanta W.; Kohler, Rebecca; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412537761; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Hemann, Matthias; Herzog, Franz; Stark, Holger; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Capping is the first step in pre-mRNA processing, and the resulting 5'-RNA cap is required for mRNA splicing, export, translation, and stability. Capping is functionally coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, but the coupling mechanism remains unclear. We show that efficient binding of

  12. Mapping Transcription Regulatory Networks with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genomes encode numerous transcription factors, DNA-binding proteins that regulate transcription initiation. Identifying the regulatory targets of transcription factors is a major challenge of systems biology. Here I describe the use of two genome-scale approaches, ChIP-seq and RNA-seq, that are used to map transcription factor regulons. ChIP-seq maps the association of transcription factors with DNA, and RNA-seq determines changes in RNA levels associated with transcription factor perturbation. I discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these and related approaches, and I describe how ChIP-seq and RNA-seq can be combined to map individual transcription factor regulons and entire regulatory networks.

  13. Possible roles of σ-dependent RNA polymerase pausing in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petushkov, Ivan; Esyunina, Daria; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2017-12-02

    The σ subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase is required for promoter recognition during transcription initiation but may also regulate transcription elongation. The principal σ 70 subunit of Escherichia coli was shown to travel with RNA polymerase and induce transcriptional pausing at promoter-like motifs, with potential regulatory output. We recently demonstrated that an alternative σ 38 subunit can also induce RNA polymerase pausing. Here, we outline proposed regulatory roles of σ-dependent pausing in bacteria and discuss possible interplay between alternative σ variants and regulatory factors during transcription elongation.

  14. High SINE RNA Expression Correlates with Post-Transcriptional Downregulation of BRCA1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bosco

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs are non-autonomous retrotransposons that comprise a large fraction of the human genome. SINEs are demethylated in human disease, but whether SINEs become transcriptionally induced and how the resulting transcripts may affect the expression of protein coding genes is unknown. Here, we show that downregulation of the mRNA of the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 is associated with increased transcription of SINEs and production of sense and antisense SINE small RNAs. We find that BRCA1 mRNA is post-transcriptionally down-regulated in a Dicer and Drosha dependent manner and that expression of a SINE inverted repeat with sequence identity to a BRCA1 intron is sufficient for downregulation of BRCA1 mRNA. These observations suggest that transcriptional activation of SINEs could contribute to a novel mechanism of RNA mediated post-transcriptional silencing of human genes.

  15. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1. PMID:25654332

  16. Identification of regulatory RNA in bacterial genomes by genome-scale mapping of transcription start sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navjot; Wade, Joseph T

    2014-01-01

    The ability to map transcription start sites is critical for studies of gene regulation and for identification of novel RNAs. Conventional RNA-seq is often insufficient for identification of transcription start sites due to low coverage and/or RNA processing events. We have developed a highly sensitive, genome-scale method for detection of transcription start sites in bacteria. This method uses deep sequencing of cDNA libraries to identify transcription start sites with strand specificity at nucleotide resolution. Here, we describe the application of this method for transcription start site identification in Escherichia coli.

  17. Involvement of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in RNA polymerase I transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Castano, Enrique; Sobol, Margarita; Philimonenko, Vlada V; Dzijak, Rastislav; Venit, Tomás; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-06-15

    RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription is essential for the cell cycle, growth and protein synthesis in eukaryotes. In the present study, we found that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a part of the protein complex on the active ribosomal promoter during transcription. PIP2 makes a complex with Pol I and the Pol I transcription factor UBF in the nucleolus. PIP2 depletion reduces Pol I transcription, which can be rescued by the addition of exogenous PIP2. In addition, PIP2 also binds directly to the pre-rRNA processing factor fibrillarin (Fib), and co-localizes with nascent transcripts in the nucleolus. PIP2 binding to UBF and Fib modulates their binding to DNA and RNA, respectively. In conclusion, PIP2 interacts with a subset of Pol I transcription machinery, and promotes Pol I transcription.

  18. HIV-1 in the RNA world: Transcription regulation, miRNAs and antiviral RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harwig, A.

    2015-01-01

    All organisms, from bacteria to human, use three biological molecules that each serve critical functions in the expression of genes in the cell. These are deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proteins. RNA is synthesized from DNA in a process called transcription. RNA differs from

  19. Degraded RNA transcript stable regions (StaRs) as targets for enhanced forensic RNA body fluid identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Han; Albani, Patricia P; Fleming, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The detection of messenger RNA (mRNA) using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) is becoming common practice for forensic body fluid identification. However, the degraded and scarce nature of RNA from forensic samples mean that mRNA transcripts are not consistently detected or remain undetected in practice. Conventional primer design for RT-PCR (and quantitative RT-PCR) includes targeting primers to span exon-exon boundaries or by having the primers on two separate exons, and satisfying common primer thermodynamic criteria. We have found that the conventional placement of primers is not always optimal for obtaining reproducible results from degraded samples. Using massively parallel sequencing data from degraded body fluids, we designed primers to amplify transcript regions of high read coverage, hence, higher stability, and compared these with primers designed using conventional methodology. Our findings are that primers designed for transcript regions of higher read coverage resulted in vastly improved detection of mRNA transcripts that were not previously detected or were not consistently detected in the same samples using conventional primers. We developed a new concept whereby primers targeted to transcript stable regions (StaRs) are able to consistently and specifically amplify a wide range of RNA biomarkers in various body fluids of varying degradation levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Altered minor-groove hydrogen bonds in DNA block transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasova, Marina; Goeldi, Silvan; Meyer, Fabian; Hanawalt, Philip C; Spivak, Graciela; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-05-26

    DNA transcription depends upon the highly efficient and selective function of RNA polymerases (RNAPs). Modifications in the template DNA can impact the progression of RNA synthesis, and a number of DNA adducts, as well as abasic sites, arrest or stall transcription. Nonetheless, data are needed to understand why certain modifications to the structure of DNA bases stall RNA polymerases while others are efficiently bypassed. In this study, we evaluate the impact that alterations in dNTP/rNTP base-pair geometry have on transcription. T7 RNA polymerase was used to study transcription over modified purines and pyrimidines with altered H-bonding capacities. The results suggest that introducing wobble base-pairs into the DNA:RNA heteroduplex interferes with transcriptional elongation and stalls RNA polymerase. However, transcriptional stalling is not observed if mismatched base-pairs do not H-bond. Together, these studies show that RNAP is able to discriminate mismatches resulting in wobble base-pairs, and suggest that, in cases of modifications with minor steric impact, DNA:RNA heteroduplex geometry could serve as a controlling factor for initiating transcription-coupled DNA repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. FARNA: knowledgebase of inferred functions of non-coding RNA transcripts

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2016-10-12

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes play a major role in control of heterogeneous cellular behavior. Yet, their functions are largely uncharacterized. Current available databases lack in-depth information of ncRNA functions across spectrum of various cells/tissues. Here, we present FARNA, a knowledgebase of inferred functions of 10,289 human ncRNA transcripts (2,734 microRNA and 7,555 long ncRNA) in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. Since transcription factors (TFs) and TF co-factors (TcoFs) are crucial components of regulatory machinery for activation of gene transcription, cellular processes and diseases in which TFs and TcoFs are involved suggest functions of the transcripts they regulate. In FARNA, functions of a transcript are inferred from TFs and TcoFs whose genes co-express with the transcript controlled by these TFs and TcoFs in a considered cell/tissue. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues based on guilt-by-association principle. Expression profiles across cells/tissues based on Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) are provided. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across widest spectrum of human cells/tissues, has a potential to greatly contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. FARNA can be accessed at: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/farna

  3. The ribosomal RNA transcription unit of Entamoeba invadens: accumulation of unprocessed pre-rRNA and a long non coding RNA during encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Sandeep; Singh, Nishant; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA genes in Entamoeba spp. are located on extrachromosomal circular molecules. Unlike model organisms where rRNA transcription stops during growth stress, Entamoeba histolytica continues transcription; but unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during stress, along with a novel class of circular transcripts from the 5'-external transcribed spacer (ETS). To determine the fate of rRNA transcription during stage conversion between trophozoite to cyst we analyzed Entamoeba invadens, a model system for differentiation studies in Entamoeba. We characterized the complete rDNA transcription unit by mapping the ends of pre-rRNA and mature rRNAs. The 3' end of mature 28S rRNA was located 321 nt downstream of the end predicted by sequence homology with E. histolytica. The major processing sites were mapped in external and internal transcribed spacers. The promoter located within 146 nt upstream of 5' ETS was used to transcribe the pre-rRNA. On the other hand, a second promoter located at the 3' end of 28S rDNA was used to transcribe almost the entire intergenic spacer into a long non coding (nc) RNA (>10 kb). Interestingly we found that the levels of pre-rRNA and long ncRNA, measured by northern hybridization, decreased initially in cells shifted to encystation medium, after which they began to increase and reached high levels by 72 h when mature cysts were formed. Unlike E. histolytica, no circular transcripts were found in E. invadens. E. histolytica and E. invadens express fundamentally different ncRNAs from the rDNA locus, which may reflect their adaptation to different hosts (human and reptiles, respectively). This is the first description of rDNA organization and transcription in E. invadens, and provides the framework for further studies on regulation of rRNA synthesis during cyst formation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhancement of single guide RNA transcription for efficient CRISPR/Cas-based genomic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Maruyama, Shohei; Nakano, Yuko

    2017-06-01

    Genomic engineering using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein is a promising approach for targeting the genomic DNA of virtually any organism in a sequence-specific manner. Recent remarkable advances in CRISPR/Cas technology have made it a feasible system for use in therapeutic applications and biotechnology. In the CRISPR/Cas system, a guide RNA (gRNA), interacting with the Cas protein, recognizes a genomic region with sequence complementarity, and the double-stranded DNA at the target site is cleaved by the Cas protein. A widely used gRNA is an RNA polymerase III (pol III)-driven single gRNA (sgRNA), which is produced by artificial fusion of CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activation crRNA (tracrRNA). However, we identified a TTTT stretch, known as a termination signal of RNA pol III, in the scaffold region of the sgRNA. Here, we revealed that sgRNA carrying a TTTT stretch reduces the efficiency of sgRNA transcription due to premature transcriptional termination, and decreases the efficiency of genome editing. Unexpectedly, it was also shown that the premature terminated sgRNA may have an adverse effect of inducing RNA interference. Such disadvantageous effects were avoided by substituting one base in the TTTT stretch.

  5. Transcription of ribosomal RNA genes is initiated in the third cell cycle of bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Anne Sørig; Avery, Birthe; Dieleman, Steph J.

    2006-01-01

    Transcription from the embryos own ribosomal genes is initiated in most species at the same time as the maternal-embryonic transition. Recently data have indicated that a minor activation may take place during the third embryonic cell cycle in the bovine, one cell cycle before the major activation...... bovine embryos were investigated to allow comparison of transcription initiation. Signs of active transcription of rRNA were observed in the third cell cycle in 29% of the in vitro produced embryos (n=35) and in 58% of the in vivo developed embryos (n=11). Signs of active transcription of rRNA were...... not apparent in the early phase of the fourth cell cycle but restarted later on. All embryos in the fifth or later cell cycles were all transcribing rRNA. The signs of rRNA synthesis during the third and fourth embryonic cell cycles could be blocked by actinomycin D, which is a strong inhibitor of RNA...

  6. Kinetic competition between RNA Polymerase II and Sen1-dependent transcription termination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazelbaker, Dane Z; Marquardt, Sebastian; Wlotzka, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    processed. Sen1 mutants or faster-transcribing Pol II increase the average lengths of preprocessed snoRNA, CUT, and SUT transcripts, while slowed Pol II transcription produces shorter transcripts. These connections between transcription rate and Sen1 activity support a model whereby kinetic competition......The essential helicase-like protein Sen1 mediates termination of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcription at snoRNAs and other noncoding RNAs in yeast. A mutation in the Pol II subunit Rpb1 that increases the elongation rate increases read-through transcription at Sen1-mediated terminators....... Termination and growth defects in sen1 mutant cells are partially suppressed by a slowly transcribing Pol II mutant and are exacerbated by a faster-transcribing Pol II mutant. Deletion of the nuclear exosome subunit Rrp6 allows visualization of noncoding RNA intermediates that are terminated but not yet...

  7. Single-molecule RNA observation in vivo reveals dynamics of co-transcriptional splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, M. L.; Coulon, A.; de Turris, V.; Palangat, M.; Chow, C. C.; Singer, R. H.; Larson, D. R.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of pre-mRNA and the splicing of that pre-mRNA to form completed transcripts requires coordination between two large multi-subunit complexes (the transcription elongation complex and the spliceosome). How this coordination occurs in vivo is unknown. Here we report the first experimental observation of transcription and splicing occurring at the same gene in living cells. By utilizing the PP7/MS2 fluorescent RNA reporter system, we can directly observe two distinct regions of the nascent RNA, allowing us to measure the rise and fall time of the intron and exon of a reporter gene stably integrated into a human cell line. The reporter gene consists of a beta globin gene where we have inserted a 24 RNA hairpin cassette into the intron/exon. Upon synthesis, the RNA hairpins are tightly bound by fluorescently-labeled PP7/MS2 bacteriophage coat proteins. After gene induction, a single locus of active transcription in the nucleus shows fluorescence intensity changes characteristic of the synthesis and excision of the intron/exon. Using fluctuation analysis, we determine the elongation rate to be 1.5 kb/min. From the temporal cross correlation function, we determine that splicing of this gene must be co-transcriptional with a splicing time of ~100 seconds before termination and a ~200 second pause at termination. We propose that dual-color RNA imaging may be extended to investigate other mechanisms of transcription, gene regulation, and RNA processing.

  8. Heat shock response in yeast involves changes in both transcription rates and mRNA stabilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Castells-Roca

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the heat stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by determining mRNA levels and transcription rates for the whole transcriptome after a shift from 25 °C to 37 °C. Using an established mathematical algorithm, theoretical mRNA decay rates have also been calculated from the experimental data. We have verified the mathematical predictions for selected genes by determining their mRNA decay rates at different times during heat stress response using the regulatable tetO promoter. This study indicates that the yeast response to heat shock is not only due to changes in transcription rates, but also to changes in the mRNA stabilities. mRNA stability is affected in 62% of the yeast genes and it is particularly important in shaping the mRNA profile of the genes belonging to the environmental stress response. In most cases, changes in transcription rates and mRNA stabilities are homodirectional for both parameters, although some interesting cases of antagonist behavior are found. The statistical analysis of gene targets and sequence motifs within the clusters of genes with similar behaviors shows that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulons apparently contribute to the general heat stress response by means of transcriptional factors and RNA binding proteins.

  9. MicroRNA-27a regulates basal transcription by targeting the p44 subunit of general transcription factor IIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Maximiliano M

    2011-05-24

    General transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a complex RNA polymerase II basal transcription factor comprising 10 different polypeptides that display activities involved in transcription and DNA repair processes. Although biochemical studies have uncovered TFIIH importance, little is known about how the mRNAs that code for TFIIH subunits are regulated. Here it is shown that mRNAs encoding seven of the TFIIH subunits (p34, p44, p52, p62, XPB, CDK7, and p8) are regulated at the posttranscriptional level in a Dicer-dependent manner. Indeed, abolition of the miRNA pathway induces abnormal accumulation, stabilization, and translational activation of these seven mRNAs. Herein, miR-27a was identified as a key regulator of p44 mRNA. Moreover, miR-27a was shown to destabilize the p44 subunit of the TFIIH complex during the G2-M phase, thereby modulating the transcriptional shutdown observed during this transition. This work is unique in providing a demonstration of global transcriptional regulation through the action of a single miRNA.

  10. The TFIIB tip domain couples transcription initiation to events involved in RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Khiem; Gralla, Jay D

    2010-12-17

    TFIIB is the only factor within the multimegadalton transcription complex that is obligatorily required to undergo dissociation and re-association with each round of mRNA transcription. Here we show that a six-amino acid human TFIIB tip region is needed for appropriate levels of serine 5 C-terminal domain phosphorylation and mRNA capping and for retention of the required elongation factor TFIIF. We suggest that the broad functions of this tiny region are used to suppress transcription noise by restricting functional RNA synthesis from non-promoter sites on the genome, which will not contain TFIIB.

  11. Preparation of Small RNAs Using Rolling Circle Transcription and Site-Specific RNA Disconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A facile and robust RNA preparation protocol was developed by combining rolling circle transcription (RCT with RNA cleavage by RNase H. Circular DNA with a complementary sequence was used as the template for promoter-free transcription. With the aid of a 2′-O-methylated DNA, the RCT-generated tandem repeats of the desired RNA sequence were disconnected at the exact end-to-end position to harvest the desired RNA oligomers. Compared with the template DNA, more than 4 × 103 times the amount of small RNA products were obtained when modest cleavage was carried out during transcription. Large amounts of RNA oligomers could easily be obtained by simply increasing the reaction volume.

  12. Significance of A-to-I RNA editing of transcripts modulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masataka; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-07-15

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that alters the nucleotide sequence of RNA transcripts to generate transcriptome diversity. Among the various types of RNA editing, adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is the most frequent type of RNA editing in mammals. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, ADAR1 and ADAR2, convert adenosines in double-stranded RNA structures into inosines by hydrolytic deamination. Inosine forms a base pair with cytidine as if it were guanosine; therefore, the conversion may affect the amino acid sequence, splicing, microRNA targeting, and miRNA maturation. It became apparent that disrupted RNA editing or abnormal ADAR expression is associated with several diseases including cancer, neurological disorders, metabolic diseases, viral infections, and autoimmune disorders. The biological significance of RNA editing in pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD)-related genes is starting to be demonstrated. The authors conducted pioneering studies to reveal that RNA editing modulates drug metabolism potencies in the human liver, as well as the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy agents. Awareness of the importance of RNA editing in drug therapy is growing. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the RNA editing that affects the expression and function of drug response-related genes. Continuing studies on the RNA editing that regulates pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics would provide new beneficial information for personalized medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Traveling Rocky Roads: The Consequences of Transcription-Blocking DNA Lesions on RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Barbara; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2017-10-27

    The faithful transcription of eukaryotic genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) is crucial for proper cell function and tissue homeostasis. However, transcription-blocking DNA lesions of both endogenous and environmental origin continuously challenge the progression of elongating RNAP2. The stalling of RNAP2 on a transcription-blocking lesion triggers a series of highly regulated events, including RNAP2 processing to make the lesion accessible for DNA repair, R-loop-mediated DNA damage signaling, and the initiation of transcription-coupled DNA repair. The correct execution and coordination of these processes is vital for resuming transcription following the successful repair of transcription-blocking lesions. Here, we outline recent insights into the molecular consequences of RNAP2 stalling on transcription-blocking DNA lesions and how these lesions are resolved to restore mRNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. A novel pea mitochondrial in vitro transcription system recognizes homologous and heterologous mRNA and tRNA promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, S; Hatzack, F; Brennicke, A

    1995-09-22

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the transcription initiation process in mitochondria of dicotyledonous plants, an in vitro transcription system was established for pea (Pisum sativum L.). The partially purified mitochondrial protein extract initiates transcription on homologous pea templates as well as on heterologous mitochondrial DNA from other dicot plant species. In vitro transcription begins within the nonanucleotide 5'-(-7)CRTAAGAGA(+2)-3' (transcription start site is underlined) conserved at most of the identified transcription initiation sites in dicot plant mitochondria. The in vitro initiation at promoters of protein as well as of tRNA coding genes indicates a common mode of transcription initiation for different types of RNA. The competent recognition of different heterologous templates supports a general functional role of the conserved nonanucleotide within mitochondrial promoters of dicotyledonous plants. Initial studies of the promoter structure by deletion analysis in the 5' region of the pea atp9 promoter show that in addition to the conserved nonanucleotide, which is essential for transcription initiation in vitro, sequences up to 25 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site are necessary for an efficient initiation event.

  15. Effect of Soil Clay Content on RNA Isolation and on Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Gene Transcripts in Soil by Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinscak, A.; Filion, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil clay content on RNA isolation and on quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) quantification of microbial gene transcripts. The amount of clay significantly altered RNA isolation yields and qRT-PCR analyses. Recommendations are made for quantifying microbial gene transcripts in soil samples varying in clay content. PMID:21724880

  16. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Valen, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed, yielding a complex transcriptome with high variability in composition and cellular abundance. Although recent efforts have identified thousands of new long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and demonstrated a complex transcriptional repertoire produced by protei...... a vast majority of unstable transcripts. The predictive power of the approach promises to streamline the functional analysis of known and novel RNAs....

  17. Initiation and Direction of RNA Transcription by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Virion Transcriptase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Polly; Bishop, D. H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of RNA transcription by the virion-bound RNA transcriptase of vesicular stomatitis virus has been examined. Multiple initiation sequences have been observed, two of which have been characterized (pppApCpGp... and pppGpCp...) suggestive of a transcription process which can start at different sites along the template RNA. By the use of sequential labeling techniques and exonucleases, it has been determined that there is a 5′ to 3′ direction of product RNA synthesis. PMID:4349490

  18. A Comparative Study of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Machinery in Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nimisha; Mehta, Surbhi

    The control of gene expression, predominantly at the level of transcription, plays a fundamental role in biological processes determining the phenotypic changes in cells and organisms. The eukaryotes have evolved a complex and sophisticated transcription machinery to transcribe DNA into RNA. RNA polymerase II enzyme lies at the centre of the transcription apparatus that comprises nearly 60 polypeptides and is responsible for the expression and regulation of proteinencoding genes. Much of our present understanding and knowledge of the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in eukaryotes has been derived from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More recently, Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as a better model system to study transcription because the transcription mechanism in this yeast is closer to that in higher eukaryotes. Also, studies on components of the basal transcription machinery have revealed a number of properties that are common with other eukaryotes, but have also highlighted some features unique to S. pombe. In fact, the fungal transcription associated protein families show greater species specificity and only 15% of these proteins contain homologues shared between both S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. In this chapter, we compare the RNA polymerase II transcription apparatus in different yeasts.

  19. An Ago2-associated capped transcriptional start site small RNA suppresses adenovirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Wael; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2017-11-01

    Here we show that the adenovirus major late promoter produces a 31-nucleotide transcriptional start site small RNA (MLP-TSS-sRNA) that retains the 7-methylguanosine (m7G)-cap and is incorporated onto Ago2-containing RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) in human adenovirus-37 infected cells. RNA polymerase II CLIP (UV-cross linking immunoprecipitation) experiments suggest that the MLP-TSS-sRNA is produced by promoter proximal stalling/termination of RNA polymerase II transcription at the site of the small RNA 3' end. The MLP-TSS-sRNA is highly stable in cells and functionally active, down-regulating complementary targets in a sequence and dose-dependent manner. The MLP-TSS-sRNA is transcribed from the opposite strand to the adenoviral DNA polymerase and preterminal protein mRNAs, two essential viral replication proteins. We show that the MLP-TSS-sRNA act in trans to reduce DNA polymerase and preterminal protein mRNA expression. As a consequence of this, the MLP-TSS-sRNA has an inhibitory effect on the efficiency of viral DNA replication. Collectively, our results suggest that this novel sRNA may serve a regulatory function controlling viral genome replication during a lytic and/or persistent adenovirus infection in its natural host. © 2017 Kamel and Akusjärvi; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    a different fluorophore. II. Cell culture and infection conditions. Cells must be plated on an appropriate substrate for subsequent microscopy...Only.. Vero cells infected with Ebola virus were fixed in methanol. Viral RNA (red) was detected using a 5 minute RNA FISH incubation with...hybridization buffer containing RNA FISH probes and DAPI. Cells were imaged on a confocal microscope with a 10x air objective (top left), a 20x air objective

  1. Characterization of Transcriptional Complexity during Berry Development in Vitis vinifera Using RNA-Seq1[W

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sara Zenoni; Alberto Ferrarini; Enrico Giacomelli; Luciano Xumerle; Marianna Fasoli; Giovanni Malerba; Diana Bellin; Mario Pezzotti; Massimo Delledonne

    2010-01-01

    ... of transcriptomes can be studied. Here we report on the first use of RNA-Seq to gain insight into the wide range of transcriptional responses that are associated with berry development in Vitis vinifera 'Corvina...

  2. Characterization of Transcriptional Complexity during Berry Development in Vitis vinifera Using RNA-Seq

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sara Zenoni; Alberto Ferrarini; Enrico Giacomelli; Luciano Xumerle; Marianna Fasoli; Giovanni Malerba; Diana Bellin; Mario Pezzotti; Massimo Delledonne

    2010-01-01

    ... of transcriptomes can be studied. Here we report on the first use of RNA-Seq to gain insight into the wide range of transcriptional responses that are associated with berry development in Vitis vinifera 'Corvina...

  3. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augix Guohua Xu

    Full Text Available Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20% represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  4. Expression of an RNA glycosidase inhibits HIV-1 transactivation of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutky, Meherzad; Hudak, Katalin A

    2017-10-05

    HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus) transcription is primarily controlled by the virally encoded Tat (transactivator of transcription) protein and its interaction with the viral TAR (transcription response element) RNA element. Specifically, binding of a Tat-containing complex to TAR recruits cellular factors that promote elongation of the host RNA polymerase engaging the viral DNA template. Disruption of this interaction halts viral RNA transcription. In the present study, we investigated the effect of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), an RNA glycosidase (EC#: 3.2.2.22) synthesized by the pokeweed plant (Phytolacca americana), on transcription of HIV-1 mRNA. We show that co-expression of PAP with a proviral clone in culture cells resulted in a Tat-dependent decrease in viral mRNA levels. PAP reduced HIV-1 transcriptional activity by inhibiting Tat protein synthesis. The effects of PAP expression on host factors AP-1 (activator protein 1), NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells) and specificity protein 1, which modulate HIV-1 transcription by binding to the viral LTR (5'-long terminal repeat), were also investigated. Only AP-1 showed a modest JNK pathway-dependent increase in activity in the presence of PAP; however, this activation was not sufficient to significantly enhance transcription from a partial viral LTR containing AP-1 binding sites. Therefore, the primary effect of PAP on HIV-1 transcription is to reduce viral RNA synthesis by decreasing the abundance of Tat. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed decrease in viral RNAs in cells expressing PAP and contribute to our understanding of the antiviral effects of this plant protein. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Primary microRNA processing is functionally coupled to RNAP II transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shanye; Yu, Yong; Reed, Robin

    2015-07-07

    Previous studies in vivo reported that processing of primary microRNA (pri-miRNA) is coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and can occur co-transcriptionally. Here we have established a robust in vivo system in which pri-miRNA is transcribed by RNAP II and processed to pre-miRNA in HeLa cell nuclear extracts. We show that both the kinetics and efficiency of pri-miRNA processing are dramatically enhanced in this system compared to that of the corresponding naked pri-miRNA. Moreover, this enhancement is general as it occurs with multiple pri-miRNAs. We also show that nascent pri-miRNA is efficiently processed before it is released from the DNA template. Together, our work directly demonstrates that transcription and pri-miRNA processing are functionally coupled and establishes the first in vivo model systems for this functional coupling and for co-transcriptional processing.

  6. NusG inhibits RNA polymerase backtracking by stabilizing the minimal transcription bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtola, Matti; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2016-10-04

    Universally conserved factors from NusG family bind at the upstream fork junction of transcription elongation complexes and modulate RNA synthesis in response to translation, processing, and folding of the nascent RNA. Escherichia coli NusG enhances transcription elongation in vitro by a poorly understood mechanism. Here we report that E. coli NusG slows Gre factor-stimulated cleavage of the nascent RNA, but does not measurably change the rates of single nucleotide addition and translocation by a non-paused RNA polymerase. We demonstrate that NusG slows RNA cleavage by inhibiting backtracking. This activity is abolished by mismatches in the upstream DNA and is independent of the gate and rudder loops, but is partially dependent on the lid loop. Our comprehensive mapping of the upstream fork junction by base analogue fluorescence and nucleic acids crosslinking suggests that NusG inhibits backtracking by stabilizing the minimal transcription bubble.

  7. Genome-wide modeling of transcription kinetics reveals patterns of RNA production delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkela, Antti; Peltonen, Jaakko; Topa, Hande; Charapitsa, Iryna; Matarese, Filomena; Grote, Korbinian; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Reid, George; Lawrence, Neil D; Rattray, Magnus

    2015-10-20

    Genes with similar transcriptional activation kinetics can display very different temporal mRNA profiles because of differences in transcription time, degradation rate, and RNA-processing kinetics. Recent studies have shown that a splicing-associated RNA production delay can be significant. To investigate this issue more generally, it is useful to develop methods applicable to genome-wide datasets. We introduce a joint model of transcriptional activation and mRNA accumulation that can be used for inference of transcription rate, RNA production delay, and degradation rate given data from high-throughput sequencing time course experiments. We combine a mechanistic differential equation model with a nonparametric statistical modeling approach allowing us to capture a broad range of activation kinetics, and we use Bayesian parameter estimation to quantify the uncertainty in estimates of the kinetic parameters. We apply the model to data from estrogen receptor α activation in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. We use RNA polymerase II ChIP-Seq time course data to characterize transcriptional activation and mRNA-Seq time course data to quantify mature transcripts. We find that 11% of genes with a good signal in the data display a delay of more than 20 min between completing transcription and mature mRNA production. The genes displaying these long delays are significantly more likely to be short. We also find a statistical association between high delay and late intron retention in pre-mRNA data, indicating significant splicing-associated production delays in many genes.

  8. Inference of RNA decay rate from transcriptional profiling highlights the regulatory programs of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkallas, Rached; Fish, Lisa; Goodarzi, Hani; Najafabadi, Hamed S

    2017-10-13

    The abundance of mRNA is mainly determined by the rates of RNA transcription and decay. Here, we present a method for unbiased estimation of differential mRNA decay rate from RNA-sequencing data by modeling the kinetics of mRNA metabolism. We show that in all primary human tissues tested, and particularly in the central nervous system, many pathways are regulated at the mRNA stability level. We present a parsimonious regulatory model consisting of two RNA-binding proteins and four microRNAs that modulate the mRNA stability landscape of the brain, which suggests a new link between RBFOX proteins and Alzheimer's disease. We show that downregulation of RBFOX1 leads to destabilization of mRNAs encoding for synaptic transmission proteins, which may contribute to the loss of synaptic function in Alzheimer's disease. RBFOX1 downregulation is more likely to occur in older and female individuals, consistent with the association of Alzheimer's disease with age and gender."mRNA abundance is determined by the rates of transcription and decay. Here, the authors propose a method for estimating the rate of differential mRNA decay from RNA-seq data and model mRNA stability in the brain, suggesting a link between mRNA stability and Alzheimer's disease."

  9. Dissecting the nascent human transcriptome by analysing the RNA content of transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudron-Herger, Maïwen; Cook, Peter R.; Rippe, Karsten; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    While mapping total and poly-adenylated human transcriptomes has now become routine, characterizing nascent transcripts remains challenging, largely because nascent RNAs have such short half-lives. Here, we describe a simple, fast and cost-effective method to isolate RNA associated with transcription factories, the sites responsible for the majority of nuclear transcription. Following stimulation of human endothelial cells with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, we isolate and analyse the RNA content of factories by sequencing. Comparison with total, poly(A)+ and chromatin RNA fractions reveals that sequencing of purified factory RNA maps the complete nascent transcriptome; it is rich in intronic unprocessed transcript, as well as long intergenic non-coding (lincRNAs) and enhancer-associated RNAs (eRNAs), micro-RNA precursors and repeat-derived RNAs. Hence, we verify that transcription factories produce most nascent RNA and confer a regulatory role via their association with a set of specifically-retained non-coding transcripts. PMID:25897132

  10. A Molecular Titration System Coordinates Ribosomal Protein Gene Transcription with Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Benjamin; Knight, Britta; Merwin, Jason; Martin, Victoria; Ottoz, Diana; Gloor, Yvonne; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Rudner, Adam; Shore, David

    2016-11-17

    Cell growth potential is determined by the rate of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires massive and coordinated transcriptional output. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. Although evidence for a system that coordinates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein gene (RPG) transcription has been described, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that an interaction between the RPG transcriptional activator Ifh1 and the rRNA processing factor Utp22 serves to coordinate RPG transcription with that of rRNA. We demonstrate that Ifh1 is rapidly released from RPG promoters by a Utp22-independent mechanism following growth inhibition, but that its long-term dissociation requires Utp22. We present evidence that RNA polymerase I activity inhibits the ability of Utp22 to titrate Ifh1 from RPG promoters and propose that a dynamic Ifh1-Utp22 interaction fine-tunes RPG expression to coordinate RPG and rRNA transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genome transcription/translation of segmented, negative-strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts-Dimitriadou, C.

    2011-01-01

    The requirements for alignment of capped RNA leader sequences along the viral genome during influenza transcription initiation (“cap-snatching”) have long been an enigma. Previous work on Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) transcription initiation has revealed that this virus displays a

  12. Analysis of Single-cell Gene Transcription by RNA Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronander, Elena; Bengtsson, Dominique C; Joergensen, Louise

    2012-01-01

    fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of var gene transcription by the parasite in individual nuclei of P. falciparum IE(1). Here, we present a detailed protocol for carrying out the RNA-FISH methodology for analysis of var gene transcription in single-nuclei of P. falciparum infected human...

  13. Traveling Rocky Roads: The Consequences of Transcription-Blocking DNA Lesions on RNA Polymerase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Steurer (Barbara); J.A. Marteijn (Jurgen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe faithful transcription of eukaryotic genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) is crucial for proper cell function and tissue homeostasis. However, transcription-blocking DNA lesions of both endogenous and environmental origin continuously challenge the progression of elongating RNAP2. The

  14. Processing of a phosphoglycerate kinase reporter mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei is not coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mhairi; Haile, Simon; Jha, Bhaskar Anand; Cristodero, Marina; Li, Chi-Ho; Clayton, Christine

    2010-08-01

    Capping of mRNAs is strictly coupled to RNA polymerase II transcription and there is evidence, mainly from metazoans, that other steps in pre-mRNA processing show a similar linkage. In trypanosomes, however, the mRNA cap is supplied by a trans spliced leader sequence. Thus pre-mRNAs transcribed by RNA Polymerase I are capped by trans splicing, and translation-competent transgenic mRNAs can be produced by RNA Polymerase I and T7 RNA polymerase so long as the primary transcript has a splice acceptor signal. We quantified the efficiency of processing of trypanosome pre-mRNAs produced from a plasmid integrated either at the tubulin locus, or in an rRNA spacer, and transcribed by RNA polymerase II, RNA polymerase I or T7 RNA polymerase. The processing efficiencies were similar for primary transcripts from the tubulin locus, produced by RNA polymerase II, and for RNA from an rRNA spacer, transcribed by RNA polymerase I. Primary transcripts produced by T7 RNA polymerase from the tubulin locus were processed almost as well. There was therefore no evidence for recruitment of the 3'-splicing apparatus by the RNA polymerase. Abundant transcripts transcribed from the rRNA locus by T7 RNA polymerase were somewhat less efficiently processed.

  15. Distributed biotin-streptavidin transcription roadblocks for mapping cotranscriptional RNA folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Eric J; Watters, Kyle E; Nedialkov, Yuri; Artsimovitch, Irina; Lucks, Julius B

    2017-07-07

    RNA folding during transcription directs an order of folding that can determine RNA structure and function. However, the experimental study of cotranscriptional RNA folding has been limited by the lack of easily approachable methods that can interrogate nascent RNA structure at nucleotide resolution. To address this, we previously developed cotranscriptional selective 2΄-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq) to simultaneously probe all intermediate RNA transcripts during transcription by stalling elongation complexes at catalytically dead EcoRIE111Q roadblocks. While effective, the distribution of elongation complexes using EcoRIE111Q requires laborious PCR using many different oligonucleotides for each sequence analyzed. Here, we improve the broad applicability of cotranscriptional SHAPE-Seq by developing a sequence-independent biotin-streptavidin (SAv) roadblocking strategy that simplifies the preparation of roadblocking DNA templates. We first determine the properties of biotin-SAv roadblocks. We then show that randomly distributed biotin-SAv roadblocks can be used in cotranscriptional SHAPE-Seq experiments to identify the same RNA structural transitions related to a riboswitch decision-making process that we previously identified using EcoRIE111Q. Lastly, we find that EcoRIE111Q maps nascent RNA structure to specific transcript lengths more precisely than biotin-SAv and propose guidelines to leverage the complementary strengths of each transcription roadblock in cotranscriptional SHAPE-Seq. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. A Genetic Assay for Transcription Errors Reveals Multilayer Control of RNA Polymerase II Fidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Irvin, Jordan D.; Kireeva, Maria L.; Gotte, Deanna R.; Shafer, Brenda K.; Ingold Huang; Mikhail Kashlev; Strathern, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary Mistakes made during the synthesis of messenger RNAs have been difficult to detect, both because mRNAs can be short lived, and because the translation of mRNAs into proteins has a much higher error rate that masks transcription errors. We present here a highly sensitive genetic screen that detects transcription errors and use it to identify mutations that increase the error rate of RNA polymerase II. The screen incorporates a new principle that allows transient transcription er...

  17. Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase I Is Linked to Efficient rRNA Processing and Ribosome Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, David A.; Michel, Antje; Sikes, Martha L.; Vu, Loan; Dodd, Jonathan A.; Salgia, Shilpa; Osheim, Yvonne N.; Beyer, Ann L.; Nomura, Masayasu

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of ribosomes in eukaryotic cells is a complex process involving many nonribosomal protein factors and snoRNAs. In general, the processes of rRNA transcription and ribosome assembly are treated as temporally or spatially distinct. Here, we describe the identification of a point mutation in the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase I near the active center of the enzyme that results in an elongation-defective enzyme in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In vivo, this mutant sh...

  18. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on transcriptional landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O’Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-01-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA co-factors short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) antisense to germline transcripts and associates with chromatin in a siRNA-dependent manner. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here, we used a genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts to demonstrate that the CSR-1 RNAi pathway promotes sense-oriented Pol II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. Based on these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway has a role in maintaining the directionality of active transcription thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions. PMID:24681887

  19. Sequence and generation of mature ribosomal RNA transcripts in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesler, Carsten; Kruse, Janis; Söderbom, Fredrik; Hammann, Christian

    2011-05-20

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a well established model organism for studying numerous aspects of cellular and developmental functions. Its ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is encoded in an extrachromosomal palindrome that exists in ∼100 copies in the cell. In this study, we have set out to investigate the sequence of the expressed rRNA. For this, we have ligated the rRNA ends and performed RT-PCR on these circular RNAs. Sequencing revealed that the mature 26 S, 17 S, 5.8 S, and 5 S rRNAs have sizes of 3741, 1871, 162, and 112 nucleotides, respectively. Unlike the published data, all mature rRNAs of the same type uniformly display the same start and end nucleotides in the analyzed AX2 strain. We show the existence of a short lived primary transcript covering the rRNA transcription unit of 17 S, 5.8 S, and 26 S rRNA. Northern blots and RT-PCR reveal that from this primary transcript two precursor molecules of the 17 S and two precursors of the 26 S rRNA are generated. We have also determined the sequences of these precursor molecules, and based on these data, we propose a model for the maturation of the rRNAs in Dictyostelium discoideum that we compare with the processing of the rRNA transcription unit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. RNA editing in transcripts of the mitochondrial genes of the insect trypanosome Crithidia fasciculata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, H.; Speijer, D.; Arts, G. J.; van den Burg, J.; van Steeg, H.; Sloof, P.; Benne, R.

    1990-01-01

    With the aid of cDNA and RNA sequence analysis, we have determined to what extent transcripts of mitochondrial maxicircle genes of the insect trypanosome Crithidia fasciculata are altered by RNA editing, a novel mechanism of gene expression which operates via the insertion and deletion of uridine

  1. Integrated genome-wide analysis of transcription factor occupancy, RNA polymerase II binding and steady-state RNA levels identify differentially regulated functional gene classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokry, M.; Hatzis, P.; Schuijers, J.; Lansu, N.; Ruzius, F.P.; Clevers, H.; Cuppen, E.

    2012-01-01

    Routine methods for assaying steady-state mRNA levels such as RNA-seq and micro-arrays are commonly used as readouts to study the role of transcription factors (TFs) in gene expression regulation. However, cellular RNA levels do not solely depend on activity of TFs and subsequent transcription by

  2. Coupled RNA polymerase II transcription and 3′ end formation with yeast whole-cell extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Mariconti, Luisa; Loll, Bernhard; Schlinkmann, Karola; Wengi, Agnieszka; Meinhart, Anton; Dichtl, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcription and pre-mRNA 3′ end formation are linked through physical and functional interactions. We describe here a highly efficient yeast in vitro system that reproduces both transcription and 3′ end formation in a single reaction. The system is based on simple whole-cell extracts that were supplemented with a hybrid Gal4-VP16 transcriptional activator and supercoiled plasmid DNA templates encoding G-less cassette reporters. We found that the coupling of trans...

  3. Trypanosoma equiperdum minicircles encode three distinct primary transcripts which exhibit guide RNA characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, V W; Hajduk, S L

    1991-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of trypanosomes is composed of maxicircle and minicircle DNAs catenated into a network, called the kinetoplast. Maxicircles encode proteins and RNAs necessary for mitochondrial assembly. Minicircles encode small transcripts which are believed to serve as guide RNAs in the process of RNA editing of maxicircle transcripts. Trypanosoma equiperdum minicircles contain three transcription units which produce three distinct transcripts. The genes for these transcripts are flanked by imperfect 18-bp repeats separated by approximately 110 bp. The transcripts have a 5' triphosphate, indicating that they are primary transcripts. Minicircle transcription initiates at a purine within a conserved sequence, 5'-AYAYA-3', where Y is a pyrimidine, 32 bp from the upstream inverted repeat, suggesting that the repeats may function in transcript initiation. Transcripts from a single minicircle transcription unit range in size from 55 to 70 nucleotides. This size heterogeneity within a single sequence class is due to the variable length of nontemplated uridine residues composing a 3' tail. The size range and heterogeneous polyuridylate 3' end of the minicircle transcripts appear to be conserved features and may be related to transcript function. Images PMID:1825348

  4. Exosome Cofactors Connect Transcription Termination to RNA Processing by Guiding Terminated Transcripts to the Appropriate Exonuclease within the Nuclear Exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyumin; Heo, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Iktae; Suh, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Minkyu

    2016-06-17

    The yeast Nrd1 interacts with the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (RNApII) through its CTD-interacting domain (CID) and also associates with the nuclear exosome, thereby acting as both a transcription termination and RNA processing factor. Previously, we found that the Nrd1 CID is required to recruit the nuclear exosome to the Nrd1 complex, but it was not clear which exosome subunits were contacted. Here, we show that two nuclear exosome cofactors, Mpp6 and Trf4, directly and competitively interact with the Nrd1 CID and differentially regulate the association of Nrd1 with two catalytic subunits of the exosome. Importantly, Mpp6 promotes the processing of Nrd1-terminated transcripts preferentially by Dis3, whereas Trf4 leads to Rrp6-dependent processing. This suggests that Mpp6 and Trf4 may play a role in choosing a particular RNA processing route for Nrd1-terminated transcripts within the exosome by guiding the transcripts to the appropriate exonuclease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. MicroRNA-like off-target transcript regulation by siRNAs is species specific

    OpenAIRE

    Burchard, Julja; Aimee L. Jackson; Malkov, Vladislav; Needham, Rachel H. V.; Tan, Yejun; Bartz, Steven R; Dai, Hongyue; Alan B Sachs; Linsley, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    siRNAs mediate sequence-specific gene silencing in cultured mammalian cells but also silence unintended transcripts. Many siRNA off-target transcripts match the guide-strand “seed region,” similar to the way microRNAs match their target sites. The extent to which this seed-matched, microRNA-like, off-target silencing affects the specificity of therapeutic siRNAs in vivo is currently unknown. Here, we compare microRNA-like off-target regulations in mouse liver in vivo with those seen in cell c...

  6. Coupled RNA polymerase II transcription and 3' end formation with yeast whole-cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariconti, Luisa; Loll, Bernhard; Schlinkmann, Karola; Wengi, Agnieszka; Meinhart, Anton; Dichtl, Bernhard

    2010-11-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcription and pre-mRNA 3' end formation are linked through physical and functional interactions. We describe here a highly efficient yeast in vitro system that reproduces both transcription and 3' end formation in a single reaction. The system is based on simple whole-cell extracts that were supplemented with a hybrid Gal4-VP16 transcriptional activator and supercoiled plasmid DNA templates encoding G-less cassette reporters. We found that the coupling of transcription and processing in vitro enhanced pre-mRNA 3' end formation and reproduced requirements for poly(A) signals and polyadenylation factors. Unexpectedly, however, we show that in vitro transcripts lacked m⁷G-caps. Reconstitution experiments with CF IA factor assembled entirely from heterologous components suggested that the CTD interaction domain of the Pcf11 subunit was required for proper RNAP II termination but not 3' end formation. Moreover, we observed reduced termination activity associated with extracts prepared from cells carrying a mutation in the 5'-3' exonuclease Rat1 or following chemical inhibition of exonuclease activity. Thus, in vitro transcription coupled to pre-mRNA processing recapitulates hallmarks of poly(A)-dependent RNAP II termination. The in vitro transcription/processing system presented here should provide a useful tool to further define the role of factors involved in coupling.

  7. Coupled RNA polymerase II transcription and 3′ end formation with yeast whole-cell extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariconti, Luisa; Loll, Bernhard; Schlinkmann, Karola; Wengi, Agnieszka; Meinhart, Anton; Dichtl, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcription and pre-mRNA 3′ end formation are linked through physical and functional interactions. We describe here a highly efficient yeast in vitro system that reproduces both transcription and 3′ end formation in a single reaction. The system is based on simple whole-cell extracts that were supplemented with a hybrid Gal4-VP16 transcriptional activator and supercoiled plasmid DNA templates encoding G-less cassette reporters. We found that the coupling of transcription and processing in vitro enhanced pre-mRNA 3′ end formation and reproduced requirements for poly(A) signals and polyadenylation factors. Unexpectedly, however, we show that in vitro transcripts lacked m7G-caps. Reconstitution experiments with CF IA factor assembled entirely from heterologous components suggested that the CTD interaction domain of the Pcf11 subunit was required for proper RNAP II termination but not 3′ end formation. Moreover, we observed reduced termination activity associated with extracts prepared from cells carrying a mutation in the 5′-3′ exonuclease Rat1 or following chemical inhibition of exonuclease activity. Thus, in vitro transcription coupled to pre-mRNA processing recapitulates hallmarks of poly(A)-dependent RNAP II termination. The in vitro transcription/processing system presented here should provide a useful tool to further define the role of factors involved in coupling. PMID:20810619

  8. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  9. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  10. Distinctive Patterns of Transcription and RNA Processing for Human lincRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlackow, Margarita; Nojima, Takayuki; Gomes, Tomas; Dhir, Ashish; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Proudfoot, Nick J

    2017-01-05

    Numerous long intervening noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are generated from the mammalian genome by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription. Although multiple functions have been ascribed to lincRNAs, their synthesis and turnover remain poorly characterized. Here, we define systematic differences in transcription and RNA processing between protein-coding and lincRNA genes in human HeLa cells. This is based on a range of nascent transcriptomic approaches applied to different nuclear fractions, including mammalian native elongating transcript sequencing (mNET-seq). Notably, mNET-seq patterns specific for different Pol II CTD phosphorylation states reveal weak co-transcriptional splicing and poly(A) signal-independent Pol II termination of lincRNAs as compared to pre-mRNAs. In addition, lincRNAs are mostly restricted to chromatin, since they are rapidly degraded by the RNA exosome. We also show that a lincRNA-specific co-transcriptional RNA cleavage mechanism acts to induce premature termination. In effect, functional lincRNAs must escape from this targeted nuclear surveillance process. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross Talk between Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Transcription and RNA Surveillance during B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinguely, Aurélien; Chemin, Guillaume; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) genes naturally acquire frequent premature termination codons during the error-prone V(D)J recombination process. Although B cell differentiation is linked to the expression of productive Ig alleles, the transcriptional status of nonfunctionally recombined alleles remains unclear. Here, we tracked transcription and posttranscriptional regulation for both Ig heavy-chain (IgH) alleles in mice carrying a nonfunctional knock-in allele. We show that productively and nonproductively VDJ-rearranged alleles are transcribed throughout B cell development, carry similar active chromatin marks, and even display equivalent RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) loading after B cell stimulation. Hence, these results challenge the idea that the repositioning of one allele to heterochromatin could promote the silencing of nonproductive alleles. Interestingly, the efficiency of downstream RNA surveillance mechanisms fluctuates according to B cell activation and terminal differentiation: unspliced nonfunctional transcripts accumulate in primary B cells, while B cell activation promotes IgH transcription, RNA splicing, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Altogether, IgH transcription and RNA splicing rates determine by which RNA surveillance mechanisms a B cell can get rid of nonproductive IgH mRNAs. PMID:22037763

  12. Crosstalk between mRNA 3' end processing and transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapendano, Christophe K; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Kjems, Jørgen; Bertrand, Edouard; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2010-11-12

    Transcription and mRNA maturation are interdependent events. Although stimulatory connections between these processes within the same round of transcription are well described, functional coupling between separate transcription cycles remains elusive. Comparing time-resolved transcription profiles of single-copy integrated β-globin gene variants, we demonstrate that a polyadenylation site mutation decreases transcription initiation of the same gene. Upon depletion of the 3' end processing and transcription termination factor PCF11, endogenous genes exhibit a similar phenotype. Readthrough RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) engaged on polyadenylation site-mutated transcription units sequester the transcription initiation/elongation factors TBP, TFIIB and CDK9, leading to their depletion at the promoter. Additionally, high levels of TBP and TFIIB appear inside the gene body, and Ser2-phosphorylated RNAPII accumulates at the promoter. Our data demonstrate that 3' end formation stimulates transcription initiation and suggest that coordinated recycling of factors from a gene terminator back to the promoter is essential for sustaining continued transcription. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The proteomes of transcription factories containing RNA polymerases I, II or III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Svitlana; Deng, Binwei; Papantonis, Argyris; Baboo, Sabyasachi; Carr, Ian M; Cook, Peter R

    2011-09-25

    Human nuclei contain three RNA polymerases (I, II and III) that transcribe different groups of genes; the active forms of all three are difficult to isolate because they are bound to the substructure. Here we describe a purification approach for isolating active RNA polymerase complexes from mammalian cells. After isolation, we analyzed their protein content by mass spectrometry. Each complex represents part of the core of a transcription factory. For example, the RNA polymerase II complex contains subunits unique to RNA polymerase II plus various transcription factors but shares a number of ribonucleoproteins with the other polymerase complexes; it is also rich in polymerase II transcripts. We also describe a native chromosome conformation capture method to confirm that the complexes remain attached to the same pairs of DNA templates found in vivo.

  14. The In Vivo Kinetics of RNA Polymerase II Elongation during Co-Transcriptional Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Yehuda; Neufeld, Noa; Bieberstein, Nicole; Causse, Sebastien Z.; Böhnlein, Eva-Maria; Neugebauer, Karla M.; Darzacq, Xavier; Shav-Tal, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    RNA processing events that take place on the transcribed pre-mRNA include capping, splicing, editing, 3′ processing, and polyadenylation. Most of these processes occur co-transcriptionally while the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) enzyme is engaged in transcriptional elongation. How Pol II elongation rates are influenced by splicing is not well understood. We generated a family of inducible gene constructs containing increasing numbers of introns and exons, which were stably integrated in human cells to serve as actively transcribing gene loci. By monitoring the association of the transcription and splicing machineries on these genes in vivo, we showed that only U1 snRNP localized to the intronless gene, consistent with a splicing-independent role for U1 snRNP in transcription. In contrast, all snRNPs accumulated on intron-containing genes, and increasing the number of introns increased the amount of spliceosome components recruited. This indicates that nascent RNA can assemble multiple spliceosomes simultaneously. Kinetic measurements of Pol II elongation in vivo, Pol II ChIP, as well as use of Spliceostatin and Meayamycin splicing inhibitors showed that polymerase elongation rates were uncoupled from ongoing splicing. This study shows that transcription elongation kinetics proceed independently of splicing at the model genes studied here. Surprisingly, retention of polyadenylated mRNA was detected at the transcription site after transcription termination. This suggests that the polymerase is released from chromatin prior to the completion of splicing, and the pre-mRNA is post-transcriptionally processed while still tethered to chromatin near the gene end. PMID:21264352

  15. Genome-wide study of mRNA degradation and transcript elongation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huiyi; Shiroguchi, Katsuyuki; Ge, Hao; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    2015-01-12

    An essential part of gene expression is the coordination of RNA synthesis and degradation, which occurs in the same cellular compartment in bacteria. Here, we report a genome-wide RNA degradation study in Escherichia coli using RNA-seq, and present evidence that the stereotypical exponential RNA decay curve obtained using initiation inhibitor, rifampicin, consists of two phases: residual RNA synthesis, a delay in the interruption of steady state that is dependent on distance relative to the mRNA's 5' end, and the exponential decay. This gives a more accurate RNA lifetime and RNA polymerase elongation rate simultaneously genome-wide. Transcripts typically have a single RNA decay constant along all positions, which is distinct between different operons, indicating that RNA stability is unlikely determined by local sequences. These measurements allowed us to establish a model for RNA processing involving co-transcriptional degradation, providing quantitative description of the macromolecular coordination in gene expression in bacteria on a system-wide level. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. FARNA: knowledgebase of inferred functions of non-coding RNA transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Tanvir; Uludag, Mahmut; Essack, Magbubah; Salhi, Adil; Ashoor, Haitham; Hanks, John B; Kapfer, Craig; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2017-03-17

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes play a major role in control of heterogeneous cellular behavior. Yet, their functions are largely uncharacterized. Current available databases lack in-depth information of ncRNA functions across spectrum of various cells/tissues. Here, we present FARNA, a knowledgebase of inferred functions of 10,289 human ncRNA transcripts (2,734 microRNA and 7,555 long ncRNA) in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. Since transcription factors (TFs) and TF co-factors (TcoFs) are crucial components of regulatory machinery for activation of gene transcription, cellular processes and diseases in which TFs and TcoFs are involved suggest functions of the transcripts they regulate. In FARNA, functions of a transcript are inferred from TFs and TcoFs whose genes co-express with the transcript controlled by these TFs and TcoFs in a considered cell/tissue. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues based on guilt-by-association principle. Expression profiles across cells/tissues based on Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) are provided. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across widest spectrum of human cells/tissues, has a potential to greatly contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. FARNA can be accessed at: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/farna. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional “factories,” which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of “viral transcriptional factories” decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an “all-in-one” factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells. IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the

  18. Analysis of unannotated equine transcripts identified by mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Coleman

    Full Text Available Sequencing of equine mRNA (RNA-seq identified 428 putative transcripts which do not map to any previously annotated or predicted horse genes. Most of these encode the equine homologs of known protein-coding genes described in other species, yet the potential exists to identify novel and perhaps equine-specific gene structures. A set of 36 transcripts were prioritized for further study by filtering for levels of expression (depth of RNA-seq read coverage, distance from annotated features in the equine genome, the number of putative exons, and patterns of gene expression between tissues. From these, four were selected for further investigation based on predicted open reading frames of greater than or equal to 50 amino acids and lack of detectable homology to known genes across species. Sanger sequencing of RT-PCR amplicons from additional equine samples confirmed expression and structural annotation of each transcript. Functional predictions were made by conserved domain searches. A single transcript, expressed in the cerebellum, contains a putative kruppel-associated box (KRAB domain, suggesting a potential function associated with zinc finger proteins and transcriptional regulation. Overall levels of conserved synteny and sequence conservation across a 1MB region surrounding each transcript were approximately 73% compared to the human, canine, and bovine genomes; however, the four loci display some areas of low conservation and sequence inversion in regions that immediately flank these previously unannotated equine transcripts. Taken together, the evidence suggests that these four transcripts are likely to be equine-specific.

  19. DMPD: Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15733829 Transcriptional signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. Sen GC, Sa...rkar SN. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2005 Feb;16(1):1-14. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Transcriptional... signaling by double-stranded RNA: role of TLR3. PubmedID 15733829 Title Transcriptional signaling by double

  20. Targeting proteins to RNA transcription and processing sites within the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Noemí; Prieto-Sánchez, Silvia; Moreno-Castro, Cristina; Muñoz-Cobo, Juan Pablo; El Yousfi, Younes; Boyero-Corral, Sofía; Suñé-Pou, Marc; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Studies of the spatial organization of the highly compartmentalized eukaryotic nucleus and dynamics of transcription and RNA processing within it are fundamental for fully understanding how gene expression is regulated in the cell. Although some progress has been made in deciphering the functional consequences of this complex network of interacting molecules in the context of nuclear organization, how proteins and RNA move in the nucleus and how the transcription and RNA processing machineries find their targets are important questions that remain largely unexplored. Here, we review major hallmarks and novel insights regarding the movement of RNA and proteins in the context of nuclear organization as well as the mechanisms by which the proteins involved in RNA processing localize to specific nuclear compartments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  2. Mammalian NET-Seq Reveals Genome-wide Nascent Transcription Coupled to RNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Takayuki; Gomes, Tomás; Grosso, Ana Rita Fialho; Kimura, Hiroshi; Dye, Michael J; Dhir, Somdutta; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Proudfoot, Nicholas J

    2015-04-23

    Transcription is a highly dynamic process. Consequently, we have developed native elongating transcript sequencing technology for mammalian chromatin (mNET-seq), which generates single-nucleotide resolution, nascent transcription profiles. Nascent RNA was detected in the active site of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) along with associated RNA processing intermediates. In particular, we detected 5'splice site cleavage by the spliceosome, showing that cleaved upstream exon transcripts are associated with Pol II CTD phosphorylated on the serine 5 position (S5P), which is accumulated over downstream exons. Also, depletion of termination factors substantially reduces Pol II pausing at gene ends, leading to termination defects. Notably, termination factors play an additional promoter role by restricting non-productive RNA synthesis in a Pol II CTD S2P-specific manner. Our results suggest that CTD phosphorylation patterns established for yeast transcription are significantly different in mammals. Taken together, mNET-seq provides dynamic and detailed snapshots of the complex events underlying transcription in mammals. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A dynamic model for transcription elongation and sequence-dependent short pauses by RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping

    2008-09-01

    RNA polymerase is an enzyme that transcribes genes from DNA onto strands of RNA and the transcription is a processive, accurate but discontinuous process. Despite extensive structural, biochemical and biophysical studies, the transcription elongation mechanism by the RNA polymerase is still not well determined. Here a new Brownian ratchet model is presented for this transcription elongation by the RNA polymerase. The structure's conformational changes observed in the RNAP translocation cycle are incorporated into the model. Using the model, the dynamic behaviors of continuous transcription elongation between two pauses and inhibition of next nucleotide addition after misincorporation are well explained. Moreover, the sequence-dependent short pauses result from site-specific interactions of RNAP with dsDNA and/or RNA-DNA hybrid. With this model, it is demonstrated that, at a given sequence, the lifetime distribution of the short pause has the single-exponential form at saturating nucleotide concentration, which is in contrast to the multi-exponential distribution of the dwell time during the continuous transcription elongation.

  4. Meta-analysis of small RNA-sequencing errors reveals ubiquitous post-transcriptional RNA modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Ebhardt, H. Alexander; Tsang, Herbert H.; Dai, Denny C.; Liu, Yifeng; Bostan, Babak; Fahlman, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA-sequencing technology have made it possible to obtain large datasets of small RNA sequences. Here we demonstrate that not all non-perfectly matched small RNA sequences are simple technological sequencing errors, but many hold valuable biological information. Analysis of three small RNA datasets originating from Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana small RNA-sequencing projects demonstrates that many single nucleotide substitution errors overlap when aligning homologous...

  5. TDP-43 localizes in mRNA transcription and processing sites in mammalian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casafont, Iñigo; Bengoechea, Rocío; Tapia, Olga; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2009-09-01

    TDP-43 is a RNA/DNA-binding protein structurally related to nuclear hnRNP proteins. Previous biochemical studies have shown that this nuclear protein plays a role in the regulation of gene transcription, alternative splicing and mRNA stability. Despite the ubiquitous distribution of TDP-43, the growing list of TDP-43 proteinopathies is primarily associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Particularly, TDP-43 redistributes to the cytoplasm and forms pathological inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and several forms of sporadic and familiar frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Here, we have studied the nuclear compartmentalization of TDP-43 in normal rat neurons by using light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry with molecular markers for nuclear compartments, a transcription assay with 5'-fluorouridine, and in situ hybridization for telomeric DNA. TDP-43 is concentrated in euchromatin domains, specifically in perichromatin fibrils, nuclear sites of transcription and cotranscriptional splicing. In these structures, TDP-43 colocalizes with 5'-fluorouridine incorporation sites into nascent pre-mRNA. TDP-43 is absent in transcriptionally silent centromeric and telomeric heterochromatin, as well as in the Cajal body, a transcription free nuclear compartment. Furthermore, a weak TDP-43 immunolabeling is found in nuclear speckles of splicing factors. The specific localization of TDP-43 in active sites of transcription and cotranscriptional splicing is consistent with biochemical data indicating a role of TDP-43 in the regulation of transcription and alternative splicing.

  6. HAfTs are novel lncRNA transcripts from aflatoxin exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Alex Merrick

    Full Text Available The transcriptome can reveal insights into precancer biology. We recently conducted RNA-Seq analysis on liver RNA from male rats exposed to the carcinogen, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, for 90 days prior to liver tumor onset. Among >1,000 differentially expressed transcripts, several novel, unannotated Cufflinks-assembled transcripts, or HAfTs (Hepatic Aflatoxin Transcripts were found. We hypothesized PCR-cloning and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends could further HAfT identification. Sanger data was obtained for 6 transcripts by PCR and 16 transcripts by 5'- and 3'-RACE. BLAST alignments showed, with two exceptions, HAfT transcripts were lncRNAs, >200nt without apparent long open reading frames. Six rat HAfT transcripts were classified as 'novel' without RefSeq annotation. Sequence alignment and genomic synteny showed each rat lncRNA had a homologous locus in the mouse genome and over half had homologous loci in the human genome, including at least two loci (and possibly three others that were previously unannotated. While HAfT functions are not yet clear, coregulatory roles may be possible from their adjacent orientation to known coding genes with altered expression that include 8 HAfT-gene pairs. For example, a unique rat HAfT, homologous to Pvt1, was adjacent to known genes controlling cell proliferation. Additionally, PCR and RACE Sanger sequencing showed many alternative splice variants and refinements of exon sequences compared to Cufflinks assembled transcripts and gene prediction algorithms. Presence of multiple splice variants and short tandem repeats found in some HAfTs may be consequential for secondary structure, transcriptional regulation, and function. In summary, we report novel, differentially expressed lncRNAs after exposure to the genotoxicant, AFB1, prior to neoplastic lesions. Complete cloning and sequencing of such transcripts could pave the way for a new set of sensitive and early prediction markers for chemical

  7. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  8. Molecular characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA genes and transcripts in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Vélez-Ramírez, Daniel E; Padilla-Mejía, Norma E; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic 5S rRNA, synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit. Most organisms contain hundreds of 5S rRNA genes organized into tandem arrays. However, the genome of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major contains only 11 copies of the 5S rRNA gene, which are interspersed and associated with other Pol III-transcribed genes. Here we report that, in general, the number and order of the 5S rRNA genes is conserved between different species of Leishmania. While in most organisms 5S rRNA genes are normally associated with the nucleolus, combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence experiments showed that 5S rRNA genes are mainly located at the nuclear periphery in L. major. Similarly, the tandemly repeated 5S rRNA genes in Trypanosoma cruzi are dispersed throughout the nucleus. In contrast, 5S rRNA transcripts in L. major were localized within the nucleolus, and scattered throughout the cytoplasm, where mature ribosomes are located. Unlike other rRNA species, stable antisense RNA complementary to 5S rRNA is not detected in L. major.

  9. 7SK small nuclear RNA transcription level down-regulates in human tumors and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasi, Mozhgan; Bazi, Zahra; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Soleimani, Masoud; Haghpanah, Vahid; Zargami, Nosratollah; Ghanbarian, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    The small nuclear noncoding RNA (snRNA) 7SK is a highly conserved noncoding RNA of 331 nucleotides in animals, which is present in a nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex with proteins such as methylphosphate capping enzyme (MePCE), hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible proteins 1 and 2 (HEXIM1 and HEXIM2) and La-related protein 7 (Larp7). Regulating the activity of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is the key function of 7SK noncoding RNA. Recently, we have shown that 7SK snRNA over-expression reduces human embryonic kidney 293T cell line viability. Here, we attempt to monitor the expression level of 7SK snRNA in different human cell lines and cancer tissues. Examination of 7SK transcription either in cell lines or in different malignant tissues including blood (CML), breast and colon showed that 7SK expression significantly down-regulated in cancer. Similar to human cancer tissues and cell lines, 7SK transcriptional level decreased in stem cells in comparison with differentiated cell types. In this regard, over-expression of 7SK snRNA might be a powerful tool for blocking cancer progression by controlling the activity of P-TEFb.

  10. Production and processing of siRNA precursor transcripts from the highly repetitive maize genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Hale

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the maintenance of heritable epigenetic states in maize identify multiple RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM factors including RMR1, a novel member of a plant-specific clade of Snf2-related proteins. Here we show that RMR1 is necessary for the accumulation of a majority of 24 nt small RNAs, including those derived from Long-Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, the most common repetitive feature in the maize genome. A genetic analysis of DNA transposon repression indicates that RMR1 acts upstream of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2 (MOP1. Surprisingly, we show that non-polyadenylated transcripts from a sampling of LTR retrotransposons are lost in both rmr1 and rdr2 mutants. In contrast, plants deficient for RNA Polymerase IV (Pol IV function show an increase in polyadenylated LTR RNA transcripts. These findings support a model in which Pol IV functions independently of the small RNA accumulation facilitated by RMR1 and RDR2 and support that a loss of Pol IV leads to RNA Polymerase II-based transcription. Additionally, the lack of changes in general genome homeostasis in rmr1 mutants, despite the global loss of 24 nt small RNAs, challenges the perceived roles of siRNAs in maintaining functional heterochromatin in the genomes of outcrossing grass species.

  11. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eVan Assche

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed towards the role of small RNAs in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, small RNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RNA-binding proteins, which include (i adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv regulating transcription terminator / antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future.

  12. Making ends meet: Coordination between RNA 3'end processing and transcription initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Jensen, Torben Heick; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated gene transcription initiates at promoters and ends at terminators. Transcription termination is intimately connected to 3'-end processing of the produced RNA and already when loaded at the promoter, RNAPII starts to become configured for this downstream event....... Conversely, RNAPII is 'reset' as part of the 3'-end processing/termination event, thus preparing the enzyme for its next round of transcription--possibly on the same gene. There is both direct and circumstantial evidence for preferential recycling of RNAPII from the gene terminator back to its own promoter......, which supposedly increases the efficiency of the transcription process under conditions where RNAPII levels are rate limiting. Here, we review differences and commonalities between initiation and 3'-end processing/termination processes on various types of RNAPII transcribed genes. In doing so, we...

  13. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Parijat Tripathi

    Full Text Available RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool, QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA by ab initio methods helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is

  14. Reverse Transcription Errors and RNA-DNA Differences at Short Tandem Repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungtammasan, Arkarachai; Tomaszkiewicz, Marta; Campos-Sánchez, Rebeca; Eckert, Kristin A; DeGiorgio, Michael; Makova, Kateryna D

    2016-10-01

    Transcript variation has important implications for organismal function in health and disease. Most transcriptome studies focus on assessing variation in gene expression levels and isoform representation. Variation at the level of transcript sequence is caused by RNA editing and transcription errors, and leads to nongenetically encoded transcript variants, or RNA-DNA differences (RDDs). Such variation has been understudied, in part because its detection is obscured by reverse transcription (RT) and sequencing errors. It has only been evaluated for intertranscript base substitution differences. Here, we investigated transcript sequence variation for short tandem repeats (STRs). We developed the first maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE) to infer RT error and RDD rates, taking next generation sequencing error rates into account. Using the MLE, we empirically evaluated RT error and RDD rates for STRs in a large-scale DNA and RNA replicated sequencing experiment conducted in a primate species. The RT error rates increased exponentially with STR length and were biased toward expansions. The RDD rates were approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the RT error rates. The RT error rates estimated with the MLE from a primate data set were concordant with those estimated with an independent method, barcoded RNA sequencing, from a Caenorhabditis elegans data set. Our results have important implications for medical genomics, as STR allelic variation is associated with >40 diseases. STR nonallelic transcript variation can also contribute to disease phenotype. The MLE and empirical rates presented here can be used to evaluate the probability of disease-associated transcripts arising due to RDD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Genome-Wide Dynamics of Nascent Noncoding RNA Transcription in Porcine Heart After Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Minna U; Halonen, Paavo; Liu, Oscar Hsin-Fu; Turunen, Tiia A; Pajula, Juho; Moreau, Pierre; Selvarajan, Ilakya; Tuomainen, Tomi; Aavik, Einari; Tavi, Pasi; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-06-01

    Microarrays and RNA sequencing are widely used to profile transcriptome remodeling during myocardial ischemia. However, the steady-state RNA analysis lacks in sensitivity to detect all noncoding RNA species and does not provide separation between transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. Here, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of nascent RNA profiles of mRNAs, primary micro-RNAs, long noncoding RNAs, and enhancer RNAs in a large animal model of acute infarction. Acute infarction was induced by cardiac catheterization of domestic swine. Nuclei isolated from healthy, border zone, and ischemic regions of the affected heart were subjected to global run-on sequencing. Global run-on sequencing analysis indicated that half of affected genes are regulated at the level of transcriptional pausing. A gradient of induction of inflammatory mediators and repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling and oxidative phosphorylation was detected when moving from healthy toward infarcted area. In addition, we interrogated the transcriptional regulation of primary micro-RNAs and provide evidence that several arrhythmia-related target genes exhibit repression at post-transcriptional level. We identified 450 long noncoding RNAs differently regulated by ischemia, including novel conserved long noncoding RNAs expressed in antisense orientation to myocardial transcription factors GATA-binding protein 4, GATA-binding protein 6, and Krüppel-like factor 6. Finally, characterization of enhancers exhibiting differential expression of enhancer RNAs pointed a central role for Krüppel-like factor, MEF2C, ETS, NFY, ATF, E2F2, and NRF1 transcription factors in determining transcriptional responses to ischemia. Global run-on sequencing allowed us to follow the gradient of gene expression occurring in the ischemic heart and identify novel noncoding RNAs regulated by oxygen deprivation. These findings highlight potential new targets for diagnosis and

  16. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  17. Enhanced 3D localization of individual RNA transcripts via astigmatic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perillo, Evan P.; De Haro, Leyma; Phipps, Mary E.; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Dunn, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Douglas P.; Werner, James H.

    2014-03-01

    Here we present an automated microscope capable of 3D multi-color single molecule localization of individual messenger RNA molecules in a wide range of cell types. We have implemented astigmatic imaging with a cylindrical lens to improve z-localization, and a maximum likelihood estimator on a graphics processing unit to improve localization precision and speed. This microscope will aid in gene expression analysis by its capability to perform high throughput imaging of thick cells and tissues while still maintaining sufficient z resolution to resolve single RNA transcripts in three dimensions. Enhanced z-localization allows for resolving membrane localized and co-localized transcripts.

  18. m^6A RNA methylation promotes XIST-mediated transcriptional repression

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Deepak P; Chen, Chun-Kan; Pickering, Brian F.; Chow, Amy; Jackson, Constanza; Guttman, Mitchell; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2016-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) mediates the transcriptional silencing of genes on the X chromosome. Here we show that, in human cells, XIST is highly methylated with at least 78 N^6-methyladenosine (m^6A) residues—a reversible base modification of unknown function in long non-coding RNAs. We show that m^6A formation in XIST, as well as in cellular mRNAs, is mediated by RNA-binding motif protein 15 (RBM15) and its paralogue RBM15B, which bind the m^6A-methylation...

  19. Effect of chronic uremia on the transcriptional profile of the calcified aorta analyzed by RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Gravesen, Eva; Mace, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of vascular calcification (VC) in chronic uremia (CU) is a tightly regulated process controlled by factors promoting and inhibiting mineralization. Next-generation high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful and sensitive tool for quantitative gene expression profiling...... and the detection of differentially expressed genes. In the present study, we, for the first time, used RNA-seq to examine rat aorta transcriptomes from CU rats compared with control rats. Severe VC was induced in CU rats, which lead to extensive changes in the transcriptional profile. Among the 10,153 genes...... by circulating Klotho only or if Klotho is produced locally in the vasculature. We found that Klotho was neither expressed in the normal aorta nor calcified aorta by RNA-seq. In conclusion, we demonstrated extensive changes in the transcriptional profile of the uremic calcified aorta, which were consistent...

  20. Recent advances in understanding transcription termination by RNA polymerase II [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J. Loya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcription termination is a fundamental process in which RNA polymerase ceases RNA chain extension and dissociates from the chromatin template, thereby defining the end of the transcription unit. Our understanding of the biological role and functional importance of termination by RNA polymerase II and the range of processes in which it is involved has grown significantly in recent years. A large set of nucleic acid-binding proteins and enzymes have been identified as part of the termination machinery. A greater appreciation for the coupling of termination to RNA processing and metabolism has been recognized. In addition to serving as an essential step at the end of the transcription cycle, termination is involved in the regulation of a broad range of cellular processes. More recently, a role for termination in pervasive transcription, non-coding RNA regulation, genetic stability, chromatin remodeling, the immune response, and disease has come to the fore. Interesting mechanistic questions remain, but the last several years have resulted in significant insights into termination and an increasing recognition of its biological importance.

  1. The Ess1 prolyl isomerase: traffic cop of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    Ess1 is a prolyl isomerase that regulates the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II. Ess1 works by catalyzing the cis/trans conversion of pSer5-Pro6 bonds, and to a lesser extent pSer2-Pro3 bonds, within the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNA pol II. Ess1 is conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. In budding yeast, Ess1 is essential for growth and is required for efficient transcription initiation and termination, RNA processing, and suppression of cryptic transcription. In mammals, Ess1 (called Pin1) functions in a variety of pathways, including transcription, but it is not essential. Recent work has shown that Ess1 coordinates the binding and release of CTD-binding proteins that function as co-factors in the RNA pol II complex. In this way, Ess1 plays an integral role in writing (and reading) the so-called CTD code to promote production of mature RNA pol II transcripts including non-coding RNAs and mRNAs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Ess1 prolyl isomerase: Traffic cop of the RNA polymerase II transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Ess1 is a prolyl isomerase that regulates the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II. Ess1 works by catalyzing the cis/trans conversion of pSer5–Pro6 bonds, and to a lesser extent pSer2–Pro3 bonds, within the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNA pol II. Ess1 is conserved in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. In budding yeast, Ess1 is essential for growth and is required for efficient transcription initiation and termination, RNA processing, and suppression of cryptic transcription. In mammals, Ess1 (called Pin1) functions in a variety of pathways, including transcription, but it is not essential. Recent work has shown that Ess1 coordinates the binding and release of CTD-binding proteins that function as co-factors in the RNA pol II complex. In this way, Ess1 plays an integral role in writing (and reading) the so-called CTD code to promote production of mature RNA pol II transcripts including non-coding RNAs and mRNAs. PMID:24530645

  3. Distribution of Repetitive and Nonrepetitive Sequence Transcripts in HeLa mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, William H.; Murphy, William; Attardi, Giuseppe; Britten, Roy J.; Davidson, Eric H.

    1974-01-01

    Polyadenylated messenger RNA extracted from HeLa cells was hybridized with a mass excess of HeLa DNA. The kinetics of the hybridization reaction demonstrated that most of the messenger RNA is transcribed from nonrepetitive DNA. The amount of messenger RNA hybridized to DNA was measured both with and without prior RNase treatment. Comparison of the results indicates that within the limits of detection, HeLa messenger RNA does not contain repetitive sequence elements covalently linked to nonrepetitive sequence transcripts. However, a small fraction of the HeLa messenger RNA preparation is transcribed entirely from repetitive DNA sequences. This fraction represents about 6% of the total polyadenylated messenger RNA preparation. PMID:4525461

  4. Stars and symbiosis: microRNA- and microRNA*-mediated transcript cleavage involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devers, Emanuel A; Branscheid, Anja; May, Patrick; Krajinski, Franziska

    2011-08-01

    The majority of plants are able to form the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in association with AM fungi. During symbiosis development, plant cells undergo a complex reprogramming resulting in profound morphological and physiological changes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important components of the regulatory network of plant cells. To unravel the impact of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage on root cell reprogramming during AM symbiosis, we carried out high-throughput (Illumina) sequencing of small RNAs and degradome tags of Medicago truncatula roots. This led to the annotation of 243 novel miRNAs. An increased accumulation of several novel and conserved miRNAs in mycorrhizal roots suggest a role of these miRNAs during AM symbiosis. The degradome analysis led to the identification of 185 root transcripts as mature miRNA and also miRNA*-mediated mRNA cleavage targets. Several of the identified miRNA targets are known to be involved in root symbioses. In summary, the increased accumulation of specific miRNAs and the miRNA-mediated cleavage of symbiosis-relevant genes indicate that miRNAs are an important part of the regulatory network leading to symbiosis development.

  5. Genetic alphabet expansion transcription generating functional RNA molecules containing a five-letter alphabet including modified unnatural and natural base nucleotides by thermostable T7 RNA polymerase variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Michiko; Meyer, Adam J; Hirao, Ichiro; Ellington, Andrew D

    2017-11-14

    Thermostable T7 RNA polymerase variants were explored for genetic alphabet expansion transcription involving the unnatural Ds-Pa pair. One variant exhibited high incorporation efficiencies of functionally modified Pa substrates and enabled the simultaneous incorporation of 2'-fluoro-nucleoside triphosphates of pyrimidines into transcripts, allowing the generation of novel, highly functional RNA molecules.

  6. Reduced RNA polymerase II transcription in intact and permeabilized Cockayne syndrome group B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajee, A S; May, A; Dianov, G L; Friedberg, E C; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-29

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is characterized by increased photosensitivity, growth retardation, and neurological and skeletal abnormalities. The recovery of RNA synthesis is abnormally delayed in CS cells after exposure to UV radiation. Gene-specific repair studies have shown a defect in the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) of active genes in CS cells from genetic complementation groups A and B (CS-A and CS-B). We have analyzed transcription in vivo in intact and permeabilized CS-B cells. Uridine pulse labeling in intact CS-B fibroblasts and lymphoblasts shows a reduction of approximately 50% compared with various normal cells and with cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group A. In permeabilized CS-B cells transcription in chromatin isolated under physiological conditions is reduced to about 50% of that in normal chromatin and there is a marked reduction in fluorescence intensity in transcription sites in interphase nuclei. Transcription in CS-B cells is sensitive to alpha-amanitin, suggesting that it is RNA polymerase II-dependent. The reduced transcription in CS-B cells is complemented in chromatin by the addition of normal cell extract, and in intact cells by transfection with the CSB gene. CS-B may be a primary transcription deficiency.

  7. Cooperative RNA polymerase molecules behavior on a stochastic sequence-dependent model for transcription elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Rafael Costa

    Full Text Available The transcription process is crucial to life and the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP is the major component of the transcription machinery. The development of single-molecule techniques, such as magnetic and optical tweezers, atomic-force microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence, increased our understanding of the transcription process and complements traditional biochemical studies. Based on these studies, theoretical models have been proposed to explain and predict the kinetics of the RNAP during the polymerization, highlighting the results achieved by models based on the thermodynamic stability of the transcription elongation complex. However, experiments showed that if more than one RNAP initiates from the same promoter, the transcription behavior slightly changes and new phenomenona are observed. We proposed and implemented a theoretical model that considers collisions between RNAPs and predicts their cooperative behavior during multi-round transcription generalizing the Bai et al. stochastic sequence-dependent model. In our approach, collisions between elongating enzymes modify their transcription rate values. We performed the simulations in Mathematica® and compared the results of the single and the multiple-molecule transcription with experimental results and other theoretical models. Our multi-round approach can recover several expected behaviors, showing that the transcription process for the studied sequences can be accelerated up to 48% when collisions are allowed: the dwell times on pause sites are reduced as well as the distance that the RNAPs backtracked from backtracking sites.

  8. Local regulation of gene expression by lncRNA promoters, transcription and splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Haines, Jenna E; Perez, Elizabeth M; Munson, Glen; Chen, Jenny; Kane, Michael; McDonel, Patrick E; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S

    2016-11-17

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed to produce thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). A few of these lncRNAs have been shown to recruit regulatory complexes through RNA-protein interactions to influence the expression of nearby genes, and it has been suggested that many other lncRNAs can also act as local regulators. Such local functions could explain the observation that lncRNA expression is often correlated with the expression of nearby genes. However, these correlations have been challenging to dissect and could alternatively result from processes that are not mediated by the lncRNA transcripts themselves. For example, some gene promoters have been proposed to have dual functions as enhancers, and the process of transcription itself may contribute to gene regulation by recruiting activating factors or remodelling nucleosomes. Here we use genetic manipulation in mouse cell lines to dissect 12 genomic loci that produce lncRNAs and find that 5 of these loci influence the expression of a neighbouring gene in cis. Notably, none of these effects requires the specific lncRNA transcripts themselves and instead involves general processes associated with their production, including enhancer-like activity of gene promoters, the process of transcription, and the splicing of the transcript. Furthermore, such effects are not limited to lncRNA loci: we find that four out of six protein-coding loci also influence the expression of a neighbour. These results demonstrate that cross-talk among neighbouring genes is a prevalent phenomenon that can involve multiple mechanisms and cis-regulatory signals, including a role for RNA splice sites. These mechanisms may explain the function and evolution of some genomic loci that produce lncRNAs and broadly contribute to the regulation of both coding and non-coding genes.

  9. Post-transcriptional generation of miRNA variants by multiple nucleotidyl transferases contributes to miRNA transcriptome complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Stacia K.; Knouf, Emily C.; Parkin, Rachael K.; Fritz, Brian R.; Lin, Daniel W.; Dennis, Lucas M.; Krouse, Michael A.; Webster, Philippa J.; Tewari, Muneesh

    2011-01-01

    Modification of microRNA sequences by the 3′ addition of nucleotides to generate so-called “isomiRs” adds to the complexity of miRNA function, with recent reports showing that 3′ modifications can influence miRNA stability and efficiency of target repression. Here, we show that the 3′ modification of miRNAs is a physiological and common post-transcriptional event that shows selectivity for specific miRNAs and is observed across species ranging from C. elegans to human. The modifications result predominantly from adenylation and uridylation and are seen across tissue types, disease states, and developmental stages. To quantitatively profile 3′ nucleotide additions, we developed and validated a novel assay based on NanoString Technologies' nCounter platform. For certain miRNAs, the frequency of modification was altered by processes such as cell differentiation, indicating that 3′ modification is a biologically regulated process. To investigate the mechanism of 3′ nucleotide additions, we used RNA interference to screen a panel of eight candidate miRNA nucleotidyl transferases for 3′ miRNA modification activity in human cells. Multiple enzymes, including MTPAP, PAPD4, PAPD5, ZCCHC6, ZCCHC11, and TUT1, were found to govern 3′ nucleotide addition to miRNAs in a miRNA-specific manner. Three of these enzymes–MTPAP, ZCCHC6, and TUT1–have not previously been known to modify miRNAs. Collectively, our results indicate that 3′ modification observed in next-generation small RNA sequencing data is a biologically relevant process, and identify enzymatic mechanisms that may lead to new approaches for modulating miRNA activity in vivo. PMID:21813625

  10. Efficient Reverse Transcription Using Locked Nucleic Acid Nucleotides towards the Evolution of Nuclease Resistant RNA Aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Edwards, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    Modified nucleotides are increasingly being utilized in the de novo selection of aptamers for enhancing their drug-like character and abolishing the need for time consuming trial-and-error based post-selection modifications. Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is one of the most prominent and successful...... nucleic acid analogues because of its remarkable properties, and widely explored as building blocks in therapeutic oligonucleotides. Evolution of LNA-modified RNA aptamers requires an efficient reverse transcription method for PCR enrichment of the selected RNA aptamer candidates. Establishing this key...... step is a pre-requisite for performing LNA-modified RNA aptamer selection....

  11. lncRNA-Induced Nucleosome Repositioning Reinforces Transcriptional Repression of rRNA Genes upon Hypotonic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rRNA genes (rDNA is regulated by pathways that target the transcription machinery or alter the epigenetic state of rDNA. Previous work has established that downregulation of rRNA synthesis in quiescent cells is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA that recruits the histone methyltransferase Suv4-20h2 to rDNA, thus triggering trimethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me3 and chromatin compaction. Here, we show that upregulation of PAPAS in response to hypoosmotic stress does not increase H4K20me3 because of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of Suv4-20h2. Loss of Suv4-20h2 enables PAPAS to interact with CHD4, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD, which shifts the promoter-bound nucleosome into the transcriptional “off” position. Thus, PAPAS exerts a “stress-tailored” dual function in rDNA silencing, facilitating either Suv4-20h2-dependent chromatin compaction or NuRD-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

  12. Transcription pattern of UL131A-128 mRNA in clinical strains of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mean while, clones containing UL131A-128 transcripts in an HCMV cDNA library of a clinical strain were selected and sequenced. It was demonstrated that UL131A-128 mRNA was expressed with immediately early, early and late kinetics. Sequences obtained by RT-PCR showed that the UL131A gene consisted of two ...

  13. Kinetic competition during the transcription cycle results in stochastic RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulon, Antoine; Ferguson, Matthew L; de Turris, Valeria; Palangat, Murali; Chow, Carson C; Larson, Daniel R

    2014-10-01

    Synthesis of mRNA in eukaryotes involves the coordinated action of many enzymatic processes, including initiation, elongation, splicing, and cleavage. Kinetic competition between these processes has been proposed to determine RNA fate, yet such coupling has never been observed in vivo on single transcripts. In this study, we use dual-color single-molecule RNA imaging in living human cells to construct a complete kinetic profile of transcription and splicing of the β-globin gene. We find that kinetic competition results in multiple competing pathways for pre-mRNA splicing. Splicing of the terminal intron occurs stochastically both before and after transcript release, indicating there is not a strict quality control checkpoint. The majority of pre-mRNAs are spliced after release, while diffusing away from the site of transcription. A single missense point mutation (S34F) in the essential splicing factor U2AF1 which occurs in human cancers perturbs this kinetic balance and defers splicing to occur entirely post-release.

  14. The splicing machinery promotes RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Zhou, Jin-Xing; Liu, Jun; Ma, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Su-Wei; Dou, Kun; Huang, Huan-Wei; Cai, Tao; Liu, Renyi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; He, Xin-Jian

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation in transposons and other DNA repeats is conserved in plants as well as in animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, an RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway directs de novo DNA methylation. We performed a forward genetic screen for suppressors of the DNA demethylase mutant ros1 and identified a novel Zinc-finger and OCRE domain-containing Protein 1 (ZOP1) that promotes Pol IV-dependent siRNA accumulation, DNA methylation, and transcriptional silencing. Whole-genome methods disclosed the genome-wide effects of zop1 on Pol IV-dependent siRNA accumulation and DNA methylation, suggesting that ZOP1 has both RdDM-dependent and -independent roles in transcriptional silencing. We demonstrated that ZOP1 is a pre-mRNA splicing factor that associates with several typical components of the splicing machinery as well as with Pol II. Immunofluorescence assay revealed that ZOP1 overlaps with Cajal body and is partially colocalized with NRPE1 and DRM2. Moreover, we found that the other development-defective splicing mutants tested including mac3a3b, mos4, mos12 and mos14 show defects in RdDM and transcriptional silencing. We propose that the splicing machinery rather than specific splicing factors is involved in promoting RdDM and transcriptional silencing. PMID:23524848

  15. Ribosomal RNA and protein transcripts persist in the cysts of Entamoeba invadens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Sandeep; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-06-01

    In most organisms rDNA transcription ceases under conditions of growth stress. However, we have earlier shown that pre-rRNA accumulates during encystation in Entamoeba invadens. We labeled newly-synthesized rRNA during encystation, with [methyl-(3)H] methionine in the presence of chitinase to enable uptake of isotope. Incorporation rate reduced after 24h, and then increased to reach levels comparable with normal cells. The label was rapidly chased to the ribosomal pellet in dividing cells, while at late stages of encystation the ratio of counts going to the pellet dropped 3-fold. The transcript levels of selected ribosomal protein genes also went down initially but went up again at later stages of encystation. This suggested that rRNA and ribosomal protein transcription may be coordinately regulated. Our data shows that encysting E. invadens cells accumulate transcripts of both the RNA and protein components of the ribosome, which may ensure rapid synthesis of new ribosomes when growth resumes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of FOXO3 mediated transcription regulation through RNA polymerase II profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelenboom, A.; Mokry, M.; de Wit, E.; Smits, L.M.; Polderman, P.E.; van Triest, M.H.; van Boxtel, R.; Schulze, A.; de Laat, W.; Cuppen, E.; Burgering, B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are key players in diverse cellular processes affecting tumorigenesis, stem cell maintenance and lifespan. To gain insight into the mechanisms of FOXO-regulated target gene expression, we studied genome-wide effects of FOXO3 activation. Profiling RNA

  17. Regulation of transcriptional pausing through the secondary channel of RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esyunina, Daria; Agapov, Aleksei; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2016-08-02

    Transcriptional pausing has emerged as an essential mechanism of genetic regulation in both bacteria and eukaryotes, where it serves to coordinate transcription with other cellular processes and to activate or halt gene expression rapidly in response to external stimuli. Deinococcus radiodurans, a highly radioresistant and stress-resistant bacterium, encodes three members of the Gre family of transcription factors: GreA and two Gre factor homologs, Gfh1 and Gfh2. Whereas GreA is a universal bacterial factor that stimulates RNA cleavage by RNA polymerase (RNAP), the functions of lineage-specific Gfh proteins remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that these proteins, which bind within the RNAP secondary channel, strongly enhance site-specific transcriptional pausing and intrinsic termination. Uniquely, the pause-stimulatory activity of Gfh proteins depends on the nature of divalent ions (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)) present in the reaction and is also modulated by the nascent RNA structure and the trigger loop in the RNAP active site. Our data reveal remarkable plasticity of the RNAP active site in response to various regulatory stimuli and highlight functional diversity of transcription factors that bind inside the secondary channel of RNAP.

  18. Site-Specific Incorporation of Functional Components into RNA by an Unnatural Base Pair Transcription System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Kawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, an unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa functions as a third base pair in replication and transcription, and provides a useful tool for the site-specific, enzymatic incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids. We have synthesized several modified-Pa substrates, such as alkylamino-, biotin-, TAMRA-, FAM-, and digoxigenin-linked PaTPs, and examined their transcription by T7 RNA polymerase using Ds-containing DNA templates with various sequences. The Pa substrates modified with relatively small functional groups, such as alkylamino and biotin, were efficiently incorporated into RNA transcripts at the internal positions, except for those less than 10 bases from the 3′-terminus. We found that the efficient incorporation into a position close to the 3′-terminus of a transcript depended on the natural base contexts neighboring the unnatural base, and that pyrimidine-Ds-pyrimidine sequences in templates were generally favorable, relative to purine-Ds-purine sequences. The unnatural base pair transcription system provides a method for the site-specific functionalization of large RNA molecules.

  19. Analysis of ribosomal RNA transcription termination and 3' end processing in Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Blanco, María Teresa; Ramírez, José Luís; Pinto-Santini, Delia María; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Guevara, Palmira

    2010-02-01

    The control of gene expression in the human parasite Leishmania occurs mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Nevertheless, basic cell processes such as ribosome biogenesis seem to be conserved. Mature ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are synthesized from typical RNA polymerase I (Pol I) promoters and processed by pathways analogous to other eukaryotes. To further understand Pol I transcription control in these parasites, we have analyzed transcription termination and processing of the rDNA in Leishmania amazonensis. 3'-end S1 mapping of rRNA precursors identified three termini, one corresponding to the mature 28S rRNA and two to the rDNA intergenic spacer (IGS), termed T1 and T2, for precursors which are 185 and 576 nucleotides longer, respectively. Both T1 and T2 are associated with conserved G + C rich elements that have the potential to form hairpin structures and T-rich clusters. We found that two fragments of 423 bp and 233 bp, flanking sites T1 and T2 respectively when placed upstream of the green fluorescent protein gene (GFP), negatively affected the Pol I-driven transcription of this gene, which suggests the presence of a transcription terminator element in these regions. Deletion analysis pointed to a CCCTTTT heptamer as part of the putative terminator and suggested that the hairpins are processing signals.

  20. A universal test to determine the integrity of RNA, and its suitability for reverse transcription, in animal tissue laboratory specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakey, H Jane

    2007-09-01

    Degradation of RNA in diagnostic specimens can cause false-negative test results and potential misdiagnosis when tests rely on the detection of specific RNA sequence. Current molecular methods of checking RNA integrity tend to be host species or group specific, necessitating libraries of primers and reaction conditions. The objective here was to develop a universal (multi-species) quality assurance tool for determining the integrity of RNA in animal tissues submitted to a laboratory for analyses. Ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) transcribed from the mitochondrial 16S rDNA was used as template material for reverse transcription to cDNA and was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). As mitochondrial DNA has a high level of conservation, the primers used were shown to reverse transcribe and amplify RNA from every animal species tested. Deliberate degradation of rRNA template through temperature abuse of samples resulted in no reverse transcription and amplification. Samples spiked with viruses showed that single-stranded viral RNA and rRNA in the same sample degraded at similar rates, hence reverse transcription and PCR amplification of 16S rRNA could be used as a test of sample integrity and suitability for analysis that required the sample's RNA, including viral RNA. This test will be an invaluable quality assurance tool for determination of RNA integrity from tissue samples, thus avoiding erroneous test results that might occur if degraded target RNA is used unknowingly as template material for reverse transcription and subsequent PCR amplification.

  1. Deep sequencing analysis of small noncoding RNA and mRNA targets of the global post-transcriptional regulator, Hfq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Sittka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in high-throughput pyrosequencing (HTPS technology now allow a thorough analysis of RNA bound to cellular proteins, and, therefore, of post-transcriptional regulons. We used HTPS to discover the Salmonella RNAs that are targeted by the common bacterial Sm-like protein, Hfq. Initial transcriptomic analysis revealed that Hfq controls the expression of almost a fifth of all Salmonella genes, including several horizontally acquired pathogenicity islands (SPI-1, -2, -4, -5, two sigma factor regulons, and the flagellar gene cascade. Subsequent HTPS analysis of 350,000 cDNAs, derived from RNA co-immunoprecipitation (coIP with epitope-tagged Hfq or control coIP, identified 727 mRNAs that are Hfq-bound in vivo. The cDNA analysis discovered new, small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs and more than doubled the number of sRNAs known to be expressed in Salmonella to 64; about half of these are associated with Hfq. Our analysis explained aspects of the pleiotropic effects of Hfq loss-of-function. Specifically, we found that the mRNAs of hilD (master regulator of the SPI-1 invasion genes and flhDC (flagellar master regulator were bound by Hfq. We predicted that defective SPI-1 secretion and flagellar phenotypes of the hfq mutant would be rescued by overexpression of HilD and FlhDC, and we proved this to be correct. The combination of epitope-tagging and HTPS of immunoprecipitated RNA detected the expression of many intergenic chromosomal regions of Salmonella. Our approach overcomes the limited availability of high-density microarrays that have impeded expression-based sRNA discovery in microorganisms. We present a generic strategy that is ideal for the systems-level analysis of the post-transcriptional regulons of RNA-binding proteins and for sRNA discovery in a wide range of bacteria.

  2. Transcriptional reprogramming in yeast using dCas9 and combinatorial gRNA strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Jensen, Emil; Ferreira, Raphael; Jakociunas, Tadas

    2017-01-01

    on developing synthetic biology tools for orthogonal control of transcription. Most recently, the nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) has emerged as a flexible tool for controlling activation and repression of target genes, by the simple RNA-guided positioning of dCas9 in the vicinity of the target gene...... transcription start site. In this study we compared two different systems of dCas9-mediated transcriptional reprogramming, and applied them to genes controlling two biosynthetic pathways for biobased production of isoprenoids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By testing 101...... production and increases in TAG. Taken together, we show similar performance for a constitutive and an inducible dCas9 approach, and identify multiplex gRNA designs that can significantly perturb isoprenoid production and TAG profiles in yeast without editing the genomic context of the target genes. We also...

  3. Long Open Reading Frame Transcripts Escape Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Decourty

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD destabilizes eukaryotic transcripts with long 3′ UTRs. To investigate whether other transcript features affect NMD, we generated yeast strains expressing chromosomal-derived mRNAs with 979 different promoter and open reading frame (ORF regions and with the same long, destabilizing 3′ UTR. We developed a barcode-based DNA microarray strategy to compare the levels of each reporter mRNA in strains with or without active NMD. The size of the coding region had a significant negative effect on NMD efficiency. This effect was not specific to the tested 3′ UTR because two other different NMD reporters became less sensitive to NMD when ORF length was increased. Inefficient NMD was not due to a lack of association of Upf1 to long ORF transcripts. In conclusion, in addition to a long 3′ UTR, short translation length is an important feature of NMD substrates in yeast.

  4. Noncoding transcription by alternative rna polymerases dynamically regulates an auxin-driven chromatin loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico D.

    2014-08-01

    The eukaryotic epigenome is shaped by the genome topology in three-dimensional space. Dynamic reversible variations in this epigenome structure directly influence the transcriptional responses to developmental cues. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) APOLO is transcribed by RNA polymerases II and V in response to auxin, a phytohormone controlling numerous facets of plant development. This dual APOLO transcription regulates the formation of a chromatin loop encompassing the promoter of its neighboring gene PID, a key regulator of polar auxin transport. Altering APOLO expression affects chromatin loop formation, whereas RNA-dependent DNA methylation, active DNA demethylation, and Polycomb complexes control loop dynamics. This dynamic chromatin topology determines PID expression patterns. Hence, the dual transcription of a lincRNA influences local chromatin topology and directs dynamic auxin-controlled developmental outputs on neighboring genes. This mechanism likely underscores the adaptive success of plants in diverse environments and may be widespread in eukaryotes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  5. KSHV SOX mediated host shutoff: the molecular mechanism underlying mRNA transcript processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunah; Patschull, Anathe O M; Bagnéris, Claire; Ryan, Hannah; Sanderson, Christopher M; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Nobeli, Irene; Barrett, Tracey E

    2017-05-05

    Onset of the lytic phase in the KSHV life cycle is accompanied by the rapid, global degradation of host (and viral) mRNA transcripts in a process termed host shutoff. Key to this destruction is the virally encoded alkaline exonuclease SOX. While SOX has been shown to possess an intrinsic RNase activity and a potential consensus sequence for endonucleolytic cleavage identified, the structures of the RNA substrates targeted remained unclear. Based on an analysis of three reported target transcripts, we were able to identify common structures and confirm that these are indeed degraded by SOX in vitro as well as predict the presence of such elements in the KSHV pre-microRNA transcript K12-2. From these studies, we were able to determine the crystal structure of SOX productively bound to a 31 nucleotide K12-2 fragment. This complex not only reveals the structural determinants required for RNA recognition and degradation but, together with biochemical and biophysical studies, reveals distinct roles for residues implicated in host shutoff. Our results further confirm that SOX and the host exoribonuclease Xrn1 act in concert to elicit the rapid degradation of mRNA substrates observed in vivo, and that the activities of the two ribonucleases are co-ordinated. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression from transcription to RNA processing to translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Pingping; Han, Joonhee; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-07-10

    SR proteins have been studied extensively as a family of RNA-binding proteins that participate in both constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing in mammalian cells. However, SR proteins were first discovered as factors that interact with transcriptionally active chromatin. Recent studies have now uncovered properties that connect these once apparently disparate functions, showing that a subset of SR proteins seem to bind directly to the histone 3 tail, play an active role in transcriptional elongation, and colocalize with genes that are engaged in specific intra- and interchromosome interactions for coordinated regulation of gene expression in the nucleus. These transcription-related activities are also coupled with a further expansion of putative functions of specific SR protein family members in RNA metabolism downstream of mRNA splicing, from RNA export to stability control to translation. These findings, therefore, highlight the broader roles of SR proteins in vertical integration of gene expression and provide mechanistic insights into their contributions to genome stability and proper cell-cycle progression in higher eukaryotic cells.

  7. Epidrug mediated re-expression of miRNA targeting the HMGA transcripts in pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Mark O; Yacqub-Usman, Kiren; Emes, Richard D; Richardson, Alan; Clayton, Richard N; Farrell, William E

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing the high mobility group A (HMGA) genes, Hmga1 or Hmga2 develop pituitary tumours and their overexpression is also a frequent finding in human pituitary adenomas. In some cases, increased expression of HMGA2 but not that of HMGA1 is consequent to genetic perturbations. However, recent studies show that down-regulation of microRNA (miRNA), that contemporaneously target the HMGA1 and HMGA2 transcripts, are associated with their overexpression. In a cohort of primary pituitary adenoma we determine the impact of epigenetic modifications on the expression of HMGA-targeting miRNA. For these miRNAs, chromatin immunoprecipitations showed that transcript down-regulation is correlated with histone tail modifications associated with condensed silenced genes. The functional impact of epigenetic modification on miRNA expression was determined in the rodent pituitary cell line, GH3. In these cells, histone tail, miRNA-associated, modifications were similar to those apparent in human adenoma and likely account for their repression. Indeed, challenge of GH3 cells with the epidrugs, zebularine and TSA, led to enrichment of the histone modification, H3K9Ac, associated with active genes, and depletion of the modification, H3K27me3, associated with silent genes and re-expression of HMGA-targeting miRNA. Moreover, epidrugs challenges were also associated with a concomitant decrease in hmga1 transcript and protein levels and concurrent increase in bmp-4 expression. These findings show that the inverse relationship between HMGA expression and targeting miRNA is reversible through epidrug interventions. In addition to showing a mechanistic link between epigenetic modifications and miRNA expression these findings underscore their potential as therapeutic targets in this and other diseases.

  8. Common fusion transcripts identified in colorectal cancer cell lines by high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard Os; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%-28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated.

  9. Common Fusion Transcripts Identified in Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines by High-Throughput RNA Sequencing12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nome, Torfinn; Thomassen, Gard OS; Bruun, Jarle; Ahlquist, Terje; Bakken, Anne C; Hoff, Andreas M; Rognum, Torleiv; Nesbakken, Arild; Lorenz, Susanne; Sun, Jinchang; Barros-Silva, João Diogo; Lind, Guro E; Myklebost, Ola; Teixeira, Manuel R; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer disease in the Western world, and about 40% of the patients die from this disease. The cancer cells are commonly genetically unstable, but only a few low-frequency recurrent fusion genes have so far been reported for this disease. In this study, we present a thorough search for novel fusion transcripts in CRC using high-throughput RNA sequencing. From altogether 220 million paired-end sequence reads from seven CRC cell lines, we identified 3391 candidate fused transcripts. By stringent requirements, we nominated 11 candidate fusion transcripts for further experimental validation, of which 10 were positive by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Six were intrachromosomal fusion transcripts, and interestingly, three of these, AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2, were present in, respectively, 18, 18, and 20 of 21 analyzed cell lines and in, respectively, 18, 61, and 48 (17%-58%) of 106 primary cancer tissues. These three fusion transcripts were also detected in 2 to 4 of 14 normal colonic mucosa samples (14%–28%). Whole-genome sequencing identified a specific genomic breakpoint in COMMD10-AP3S1 and further indicates that both the COMMD10-AP3S1 and AKAP13-PDE8A fusion transcripts are due to genomic duplications in specific cell lines. In conclusion, we have identified AKAP13-PDE8A, COMMD10-AP3S1, and CTB-35F21.1-PSD2 as novel intrachromosomal fusion transcripts and the most highly recurring chimeric transcripts described for CRC to date. The functional and clinical relevance of these chimeric RNA molecules remains to be elucidated. PMID:24151535

  10. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-12-12

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Rational design of chemical genetic probes of RNA function and lead therapeutics targeting repeating transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D

    2013-12-01

    RNA is an important yet vastly underexploited target for small molecule chemical probes or lead therapeutics. Small molecules have been used successfully to modulate the function of the bacterial ribosome, viral RNAs and riboswitches. These RNAs are either highly expressed or can be targeted using substrate mimicry, a mainstay in the design of enzyme inhibitors. However, most cellular RNAs are neither highly expressed nor have a lead small molecule inhibitor, a significant challenge for drug discovery efforts. Herein, I describe the design of small molecules targeting expanded repeating transcripts that cause myotonic muscular dystrophy (DM). These test cases illustrate the challenges of designing small molecules that target RNA and the advantages of targeting repeating transcripts. Lastly, I discuss how small molecules might be more advantageous than oligonucleotides for targeting RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emerging role of transcription factor-microRNA-target gene feed-forward loops in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Qin, Hua; Zhao, Qiu; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-09-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks are biological network motifs that act in accordance with each other to play decisive roles in the pathological processes of cancer. One of the most common types, the feed-forward loop (FFL), has recently attracted interest. Three connected deregulated nodes, a transcription factor (TF), its downstream microRNA (miRNA) and their shared target gene can make up a class of cancer-involved FFLs as ≥1 of the 3 can act individually as a bona fide oncogene or a tumor suppressor. Numerous notable elements, such as p53, miR-17-92 cluster and cyclins, are proven members of their respective FFLs. Databases of interaction prediction, verification of experimental methods and confirmation of loops have been continually emerging during recent years. Development of TF-miRNA-target loops may help understand the mechanism of tumorgenesis at a higher level and explain the discovery and screening of the therapeutic target for drug exploitation.

  13. Computational design of RNA parts, devices, and transcripts with kinetic folding algorithms implemented on multiprocessor clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmaiah, Tim; Voje, William E; Carothers, James M

    2015-01-01

    With progress toward inexpensive, large-scale DNA assembly, the demand for simulation tools that allow the rapid construction of synthetic biological devices with predictable behaviors continues to increase. By combining engineered transcript components, such as ribosome binding sites, transcriptional terminators, ligand-binding aptamers, catalytic ribozymes, and aptamer-controlled ribozymes (aptazymes), gene expression in bacteria can be fine-tuned, with many corollaries and applications in yeast and mammalian cells. The successful design of genetic constructs that implement these kinds of RNA-based control mechanisms requires modeling and analyzing kinetically determined co-transcriptional folding pathways. Transcript design methods using stochastic kinetic folding simulations to search spacer sequence libraries for motifs enabling the assembly of RNA component parts into static ribozyme- and dynamic aptazyme-regulated expression devices with quantitatively predictable functions (rREDs and aREDs, respectively) have been described (Carothers et al., Science 334:1716-1719, 2011). Here, we provide a detailed practical procedure for computational transcript design by illustrating a high throughput, multiprocessor approach for evaluating spacer sequences and generating functional rREDs. This chapter is written as a tutorial, complete with pseudo-code and step-by-step instructions for setting up a computational cluster with an Amazon, Inc. web server and performing the large numbers of kinefold-based stochastic kinetic co-transcriptional folding simulations needed to design functional rREDs and aREDs. The method described here should be broadly applicable for designing and analyzing a variety of synthetic RNA parts, devices and transcripts.

  14. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  15. In vitro transcription of Sonchus yellow net virus RNA by a virus-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flore, P.H.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the investigation presented in this thesis was to elucidate the nature of the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase, thought to be associated with Sonchus yellow net virus (SYNV), a rhabdovirus infecting plants. This research was initiated to shed light on the

  16. Alterations in ZENK and glucagon RNA transcript expression during increased ocular growth in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Regan; Kozulin, Peter; Megaw, Pam L; Morgan, Ian G

    2010-04-13

    To examine in detail the time-course of changes in Zif268, Egr-1, NGFI-A, and Krox-24 (ZENK) and pre-proglucagon (PPG) RNA transcript levels in the chick retina during periods of increased ocular growth induced by form-deprivation and negative-lens wear. To further elucidate the role of ZENK in the modulation of ocular growth, we investigated the effect of intravitreal injections of the muscarinic antagonist atropine and the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (ADTN), both of which block the development of experimental myopia, on the expression of ZENK in eyes fitted with negative-lenses. Myopia was induced by fitting translucent diffusers or -10D polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) lenses over one eye of the chicken. At times from 1 h to 10 days after fitting of the diffusers or negative lenses, retinal RNA transcript levels of the selected genes were determined by semi-quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). For the pharmacology experiments, -10D lenses were fitted over the left eye of chicks for a period of 1h. Intravitreal injections of atropine (10 mul-25 mM), ADTN (10 mul-10 mM), or a vehicle solution were made immediately before fitting of the lenses. ZENK RNA transcript levels were rapidly and persistently down-regulated following the attachment of the optical devices over the eye. With a delay relative to ZENK, PPG transcript levels were also down-regulated. Induced changes in gene expression were similar for both form-deprivation and negative-lens wear. When atropine or ADTN were administered immediately before lens attachment, the rapid down-regulation in ZENK RNA transcript levels normally seen following 1 h of negative-lens wear was not seen, and ZENK transcript levels rose above those values seen in control eyes. However, injection of atropine or ADTN into untreated eyes had no effect on ZENK transcript levels. Both form-deprivation and negative-lens wear modulated the

  17. The peptidyl prolyl isomerase Rrd1 regulates the elongation of RNA polymerase II during transcriptional stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremie Poschmann

    Full Text Available Rapamycin is an anticancer agent and immunosuppressant that acts by inhibiting the TOR signaling pathway. In yeast, rapamycin mediates a profound transcriptional response for which the RRD1 gene is required. To further investigate this connection, we performed genome-wide location analysis of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII and Rrd1 in response to rapamycin and found that Rrd1 colocalizes with RNAPII on actively transcribed genes and that both are recruited to rapamycin responsive genes. Strikingly, when Rrd1 is lacking, RNAPII remains inappropriately associated to ribosomal genes and fails to be recruited to rapamycin responsive genes. This occurs independently of TATA box binding protein recruitment but involves the modulation of the phosphorylation status of RNAPII CTD by Rrd1. Further, we demonstrate that Rrd1 is also involved in various other transcriptional stress responses besides rapamycin. We propose that Rrd1 is a novel transcription elongation factor that fine-tunes the transcriptional stress response of RNAPII.

  18. Localization of RNA transcription sites in insect oocytes using microinjections of 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Bogolyubov

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we used 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate (BrUTP microinjections to localize the transcription sites in oocytes of insects with different types of the ovarium structure: panoistic, meroistic polytrophic, and meroistic telotrophic. We found that in an insect with panoistic ovaries (Acheta domesticus, oocyte nuclei maintain their transcription activity during the long period of oocyte growth. In insects with meroistic ovaries (Tenebrio molitor and Panorpa communis, early oocyte chromosomes were found to be transcriptionally active, and some transcription activity still persist while the karyosphere, a compact structure formed by all condensed oocyte chromosomes, begins to develop. At the latest stages of karyosphere development, no anti-Br-RNA signal was registered in the karyosphere.

  19. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-04

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.

    2010-05-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tinkering evolution of post-transcriptional RNA regulons: puf3p in fungi as an example.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huifeng Jiang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide studies of post-transcriptional mRNA regulation in model organisms indicate a "post-transcriptional RNA regulon" model, in which a set of functionally related genes is regulated by mRNA-binding RNAs or proteins. One well-studied post-transcriptional regulon by Puf3p functions in mitochondrial biogenesis in budding yeast. The evolution of the Puf3p regulon remains unclear because previous studies have shown functional divergence of Puf3p regulon targets among yeast, fruit fly, and humans. By analyzing evolutionary patterns of Puf3p and its targeted genes in forty-two sequenced fungi, we demonstrated that, although the Puf3p regulon is conserved among all of the studied fungi, the dedicated regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis by Puf3p emerged only in the Saccharomycotina clade. Moreover, the evolution of the Puf3p regulon was coupled with evolution of codon usage bias in down-regulating expression of genes that function in mitochondria in yeast species after genome duplication. Our results provide a scenario for how evolution like a tinker exploits pre-existing materials of a conserved post-transcriptional regulon to regulate gene expression for novel functional roles.

  2. A Wearable EEG-HEG-HRV Multimodal System With Simultaneous Monitoring of tES for Mental Health Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Unsoo; Lee, Yongsu; Kim, Hyunki; Roh, Taehwan; Bae, Joonsung; Kim, Changhyeon; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2015-12-01

    A multimodal mental management system in the shape of the wearable headband and earplugs is proposed to monitor electroencephalography (EEG), hemoencephalography (HEG) and heart rate variability (HRV) for accurate mental health monitoring. It enables simultaneous transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) together with real-time monitoring. The total weight of the proposed system is less than 200 g. The multi-loop low-noise amplifier (MLLNA) achieves over 130 dB CMRR for EEG sensing and the capacitive correlated-double sampling transimpedance amplifier (CCTIA) has low-noise characteristics for HEG and HRV sensing. Measured three-physiology domains such as neural, vascular and autonomic domain signals are combined with canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and temporal kernel canonical correlation analysis (tkCCA) algorithm to find the neural-vascular-autonomic coupling. It supports highly accurate classification with the 19% maximum improvement with multimodal monitoring. For the multi-channel stimulation functionality, after-effects maximization monitoring and sympathetic nerve disorder monitoring, the stimulator is designed as reconfigurable. The 3.37 × 2.25 mm(2) chip has 2-channel EEG sensor front-end, 2-channel NIRS sensor front-end, NIRS current driver to drive dual-wavelength VCSEL and 6-b DAC current source for tES mode. It dissipates 24 mW with 2 mA stimulation current and 5 mA NIRS driver current.

  3. Transcript levels, alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage of TFIIIA control 5S rRNA accumulation during Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layat, Elodie; Cotterell, Sylviane; Vaillant, Isabelle; Yukawa, Yasushi; Tutois, Sylvie; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2012-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is critical for eukaryotic cells and requires coordinated synthesis of the protein and rRNA moieties of the ribosome, which are therefore highly regulated. 5S ribosomal RNA, an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and specifically requires transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA). To obtain insight into the regulation of 5S rRNA transcription, we have investigated the expression of 5S rRNA and the exon-skipped (ES) and exon-including (EI) TFIIIA transcripts, two transcript isoforms that result from alternative splicing of the TFIIIA gene, and TFIIIA protein amounts with respect to requirements for 5S rRNA during development. We show that 5S rRNA quantities are regulated through distinct but complementary mechanisms operating through transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of TFIIIA transcripts as well as at the post-translational level through proteolytic cleavage of the TFIIIA protein. During the reproductive phase, high expression of the TFIIIA gene together with low proteolytic cleavage contributes to accumulation of functional, full-length TFIIIA protein, and results in 5S rRNA accumulation in the seed. In contrast, just after germination, the levels of TFIIIA-encoding transcripts are low and stable. Full-length TFIIIA protein is undetectable, and the level of 5S rRNA stored in the embryo progressively decreases. After day 4, in correlation with the reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin to a mature state, full-length TFIIIA protein with transcriptional activity accumulates and permits de novo transcription of 5S rRNA. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Dynamic microRNA gene transcription and processing during T cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigin, Francis F.; Lindstedt, Kenneth; Sellars, Maclean; Ciofani, Maria; Low, Siao Li; Jones, Lachlan; Bell, Fiona; Pauli, Florencia; Bonneau, Richard; Myers, Richard M.; Littman, Dan R.; Chong, Mark M.W.

    2014-01-01

    By disrupting microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, we previously showed that this pathway is critical for the differentiation and function of T cells. While various cloning studies have shown that many miRNAs are expressed during T cell development, and in a dynamic manner, it was unclear how comprehensive these earlier analyses were. We therefore decided to profile miRNA expression by means of Next Generation Sequencing. Furthermore, we profiled miRNA expression starting from the hematopoietic stem cell. This analysis revealed that miRNA expression during T cell development is extremely dynamic, with 645 miRNAs sequenced, and the expression of some varying by as much as 3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, changes in precursor processing led to altered mature miRNA sequences. We also analyzed the structures of the primary miRNA transcripts expressed in T cells, and found that many were extremely long. The longest was pri-mir-29b-1/29a at ~168kb. All the long pri-miRNAs also displayed extensive splicing. Our findings indicate that miRNA expression during T cell development is both a highly dynamic and a highly regulated process. PMID:22379031

  5. RNA Binding Protein-Mediated Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Rebecca; Vogel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children, is a disease whose mechanisms are now beginning to be uncovered by high-throughput studies of somatic mutations, mRNA expression patterns, and epigenetic profiles of patient tumors. One emerging theme from studies that sequenced the tumor genomes of large cohorts of medulloblastoma patients is frequent mutation of RNA binding proteins. Proteins which bind multiple RNA targets can act as master regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level to co-ordinate cellular processes and alter the phenotype of the cell. Identification of the target genes of RNA binding proteins may highlight essential pathways of medulloblastomagenesis that cannot be detected by study of transcriptomics alone. Furthermore, a subset of RNA binding proteins are attractive drug targets. For example, compounds that are under development as anti-viral targets due to their ability to inhibit RNA helicases could also be tested in novel approaches to medulloblastoma therapy by targeting key RNA binding proteins. In this review, we discuss a number of RNA binding proteins, including Musashi1 (MSI1), DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box helicase 3 X-linked (DDX3X), DDX31, and cell division cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1), which play potentially critical roles in the growth and/or maintenance of medulloblastoma. PMID:24608801

  6. The role of RNA polymerase I transcription and embryonic genome activation in nucleolar development in bovine preimplantation embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østrup, Olga; Strejcek, F.; Petrovicova, I.

    2008-01-01

    was lacking and clustering of nucleolar proteins was hampered. In conclusion, rDNA transcription is not required for targeting of rRNA processing proteins, rRNA is maternally inherited and target to rDNA independent of transcription, and de novo transcription is required for proper nucleologenesis in cattle.......The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of RNA polymerase I (RPI) transcription in nucleolar development during major transcriptional activation (MTA) in cattle. Late eight-cell embryos were cultured in the absence (control group) or presence of actinomycin D (AD) (RPI inhibition......, Ad 0.2 µg/ml; total transcriptional inhibition, AD 2.0 µg/ml). Late four-cell embryos were cultured to late eight-cell stage in 0.2 µg/ml AD (MTA prevention, ADLT (long-term total transcriptional inhibition group). Embryos were processed for autoradiography, transmission electron microscopy...

  7. Cloning of the sea urchin mitochondrial RNA polymerase and reconstitution of the transcription termination system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Deceglie, Stefania; Falkenberg, Maria; Roberti, Marina; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2007-01-01

    Termination of transcription is a key process in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression in animal cells. To investigate transcription termination in sea urchin mitochondria, we cloned the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) of Paracentrotus lividus and used a recombinant form of the enzyme in a reconstituted transcription system, in the presence of the DNA-binding protein mtDBP. Cloning of mtRNAP was performed by a combination of PCR with degenerate primers and library screening. The enzyme contains 10 phage-like conserved motifs, two pentatricopeptide motifs and a serine-rich stretch. The protein expressed in insect cells supports transcription elongation in a promoter-independent assay. Addition of recombinant mtDBP caused arrest of the transcribing mtRNAP when the enzyme approached the mtDBP-binding site in the direction of transcription of mtDNA l-strand. When the polymerase encountered the protein-binding site in the opposite direction, termination occurred in a protein-independent manner, inside the mtDBP-binding site. Pulse-chase experiments show that mtDBP caused true transcription termination rather than pausing. These data indicate that mtDBP acts as polar termination factor and suggest that transcription termination in sea urchin mitochondria could take place by two alternative modes based on protein-mediated or sequence-dependent mechanisms. PMID:17392338

  8. Investigating microRNA-mediated regulation of the nascent nuclear transcripts in plants: a bioinformatics workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongliang; Tang, Zhonghai; Shao, Chaogang; Ma, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Taihe; Fan, Zhihong; Wang, Huizhong; Meng, Yijun

    2017-06-14

    Most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) play their regulatory roles through posttranscriptional target decay or translational inhibition. For both plants and animals, these regulatory events were previously considered to take place in cytoplasm, as mature miRNAs were observed to be exported to the cytoplasm for Argonaute (AGO) loading and subsequent target binding. Recently, this notion was challenged by increasing pieces of evidence in the animal cells that uncovered the nuclear importation and action of the AGO-associated miRNAs. The nuclear-localized regulatory mode was also reported for the plant miRNAs. However, evidence is still lacking to show the universality and conservation of the miRNA-mediated regulation in the plant nuclei. Here, we introduced a bioinformatics workflow for genome-wide investigation of miRNA-guided, cleavage-based regulation of the nascent nuclear transcripts. Facilitated by the tool package PmiRNTSA (Plant microRNA-mediated nascent transcript slicing analyzer), plant biologists could perform a comprehensive search for the miRNA slicing sites located within the introns or the exon-intron/intron-exon junctions of the target transcripts, which are supported by degradome sequencing data. The results enable the researchers to examine the co-transcriptional regulatory model of the miRNAs for a specific plant species. Moreover, a case study was performed to search for the slicing sites located within the exon-intron/intron-exon junctions in two model plants. A case study was performed to show the feasibility and reliability of our workflow. Together, we hope that this work could inspire much more innovative research efforts to expand the current understanding of the miRNA action modes in plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Stimulation of Pol III-dependent 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA gene expression by AP-1 transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Richa; Kumar, Vijay

    2017-07-01

    RNA polymerase III transcribes structurally diverse group of essential noncoding RNAs including 5S ribosomal RNA (5SrRNA) and U6 snRNA. These noncoding RNAs are involved in RNA processing and ribosome biogenesis, thus, coupling Pol III activity to the rate of protein synthesis, cell growth, and proliferation. Even though a few Pol II-associated transcription factors have been reported to participate in Pol III-dependent transcription, its activation by activator protein 1 (AP-1) factors, c-Fos and c-Jun, has remained unexplored. Here, we show that c-Fos and c-Jun bind to specific sites in the regulatory regions of 5S rRNA (type I) and U6 snRNA (type III) gene promoters and stimulate their transcription. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation studies suggested that endogenous AP-1 factors bind to their cognate promoter elements during the G1/S transition of cell cycle apparently synchronous with Pol III transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the interaction of c-Jun with histone acetyltransferase p300 promoted the recruitment of p300/CBP complex on the promoters and facilitated the occupancy of Pol III transcriptional machinery via histone acetylation and chromatin remodeling. The findings of our study, together, suggest that AP-1 factors are novel regulators of Pol III-driven 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA expression with a potential role in cell proliferation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Integrated mRNA and microRNA analysis identifies genes and small miRNA molecules associated with transcriptional and post-transcriptional-level responses to both drought stress and re-watering treatment in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiansi; Li, Meng; Zhang, Zhongchun; Tie, Weiwei; Chen, Xia; Jin, Lifeng; Zhai, Niu; Zheng, Qingxia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Wang, Ran; Xu, Guoyun; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Pingping; Zhou, Huina

    2017-01-10

    Drought stress is one of the most severe problem limited agricultural productivity worldwide. It has been reported that plants response to drought-stress by sophisticated mechanisms at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. However, the precise molecular mechanisms governing the responses of tobacco leaves to drought stress and water status are not well understood. To identify genes and miRNAs involved in drought-stress responses in tobacco, we performed both mRNA and small RNA sequencing on tobacco leaf samples from the following three treatments: untreated-control (CL), drought stress (DL), and re-watering (WL). In total, we identified 798 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the DL and CL (DL vs. CL) treatments and identified 571 DEGs between the WL and DL (WL vs. DL) treatments. Further analysis revealed 443 overlapping DEGs between the DL vs. CL and WL vs. DL comparisons, and, strikingly, all of these genes exhibited opposing expression trends between these two comparisons, strongly suggesting that these overlapping DEGs are somehow involved in the responses of tobacco leaves to drought stress. Functional annotation analysis showed significant up-regulation of genes annotated to be involved in responses to stimulus and stress, (e.g., late embryogenesis abundant proteins and heat-shock proteins) antioxidant defense (e.g., peroxidases and glutathione S-transferases), down regulation of genes related to the cell cycle pathway, and photosynthesis processes. We also found 69 and 56 transcription factors (TFs) among the DEGs in, respectively, the DL vs. CL and the WL vs. DL comparisons. In addition, small RNA sequencing revealed 63 known microRNAs (miRNA) from 32 families and 368 novel miRNA candidates in tobacco. We also found that five known miRNA families (miR398, miR390, miR162, miR166, and miR168) showed differential regulation under drought conditions. Analysis to identify negative correlations between the differentially expressed mi

  11. Catching RNA Polymerase in the act of Binding: Intermediates in Transcription Illuminated by Synchrotron Footprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenowitz,M.; Erie, D.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    The article by Sclavi et al. in this issue of PNAS addresses 'initiation, ' the first step in transcription. Gene transcription is catalyzed in cells by large multisubunit proteins called RNA polymerases (RNAP). The eubacteria holoenzyme of RNAP is composed of five core subunits ({alpha}, {alpha}2, {beta}, {beta}', and {omega}) that contain the amino acid residues required for the enzyme's catalytic activity. A sixth subunit ({sigma}) guides RNAP to specific sequences on the genomic DNA (promoters) that mark the beginning of a gene or group of genes.

  12. RNA-seq detects pharmacological inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus late transcription during spontaneous reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An T. Phan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The stepwise and sequential expression of viral genes underlies progression of the infectious life cycle. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is both a tractable model for elucidating principles of transcription as well as a global health threat. We describe an experimental protocol and bioinformatics pipeline for functional identification of EBV true late genes, the last step of transcription prior to virion packaging and egress. All data have been uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession code GSE96689. The key improvement over previous approaches is leveraging the sensitivity of RNA-seq to detect gene expression changes during spontaneous reactivation.

  13. RSEM: accurate transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data with or without a reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewey Colin N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-Seq is revolutionizing the way transcript abundances are measured. A key challenge in transcript quantification from RNA-Seq data is the handling of reads that map to multiple genes or isoforms. This issue is particularly important for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies in the absence of sequenced genomes, as it is difficult to determine which transcripts are isoforms of the same gene. A second significant issue is the design of RNA-Seq experiments, in terms of the number of reads, read length, and whether reads come from one or both ends of cDNA fragments. Results We present RSEM, an user-friendly software package for quantifying gene and isoform abundances from single-end or paired-end RNA-Seq data. RSEM outputs abundance estimates, 95% credibility intervals, and visualization files and can also simulate RNA-Seq data. In contrast to other existing tools, the software does not require a reference genome. Thus, in combination with a de novo transcriptome assembler, RSEM enables accurate transcript quantification for species without sequenced genomes. On simulated and real data sets, RSEM has superior or comparable performance to quantification methods that rely on a reference genome. Taking advantage of RSEM's ability to effectively use ambiguously-mapping reads, we show that accurate gene-level abundance estimates are best obtained with large numbers of short single-end reads. On the other hand, estimates of the relative frequencies of isoforms within single genes may be improved through the use of paired-end reads, depending on the number of possible splice forms for each gene. Conclusions RSEM is an accurate and user-friendly software tool for quantifying transcript abundances from RNA-Seq data. As it does not rely on the existence of a reference genome, it is particularly useful for quantification with de novo transcriptome assemblies. In addition, RSEM has enabled valuable guidance for cost

  14. RNA polymerases IV and V influence the 3' boundaries of Polymerase II transcription units in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Anastasia; Podicheti, Ram; Wendte, Jered M; Cocklin, Ross; Rusch, Douglas B

    2017-12-21

    Nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V (Pol IV and Pol V) evolved in plants as specialized forms of Pol II. Their functions are best understood in the context of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), a process in which Pol IV-dependent 24 nt siRNAs direct the de novo cytosine methylation of regions transcribed by Pol V. Pol V has additional functions, independent of Pol IV and 24 nt siRNA biogenesis, in maintaining the repression of transposons and genomic repeats whose silencing depends on maintenance cytosine methylation. Here we report that Pol IV and Pol V play unexpected roles in defining the 3' boundaries of Pol II transcription units. Nuclear run-on assays reveal that in the absence of Pol IV or Pol V, Pol II occupancy downstream of poly A sites increases for approximately 12% of protein-coding genes. This effect is most pronounced for convergently transcribed gene pairs. Although Pols IV and V are detected near transcript ends of the affected Pol II - transcribed genes, their role in limiting Pol II read-through is independent of siRNA biogenesis or cytosine methylation for the majority of these genes. Interestingly, we observed that splicing was less efficient in pol IV or pol V mutant plants, compared to wild-type plants, suggesting that Pol IV or Pol V might affect pre-mRNA processing. We speculate that Pols IV and V (and/or their associated factors) play roles in Pol II transcription termination and pre-mRNA splicing by influencing polymerase elongation rates and/or release at collision sites for convergent genes.

  15. Karyopherin alpha2 is essential for rRNA transcription and protein synthesis in proliferative keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Umegaki-Arao

    Full Text Available Karyopherin proteins mediate nucleocytoplasmic trafficking and are critical for protein and RNA subcellular localization. Recent studies suggest KPNA2 expression is induced in tumor cells and is strongly associated with prognosis, although the precise roles and mechanisms of KPNA2 overexpression in proliferative disorders have not been defined. We found that KPNA2 expression is induced in various proliferative disorders of the skin such as psoriasis, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, Paget's disease, Merkel cell carcinoma, and mycosis fungoides. siRNA-mediated KPNA suppression revealed that KPNA2 is essential for significant suppression of HaCaT proliferation under starvation conditions. Ribosomal RNA transcription and protein synthesis were suppressed by starvation combined with knockdown of KPNA (including KPNA2 expression. KPNA2 localized to the nucleolus and interacted with proteins associated with mRNA processing, ribonucleoprotein complex biogenesis, chromatin modification, and transcription, as demonstrated by tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry. KPNA2 may be an important promoter of ribosomal RNA and protein synthesis in tumor cells.

  16. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation.

  17. Physiological and Pathological Transcriptional Activation of Endogenous Retroelements Assessed by RNA-Sequencing of B Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Attig

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to evolutionarily-accrued sequence mutation or deletion, endogenous retroelements (EREs in eukaryotic genomes are subject to epigenetic silencing, preventing or reducing their transcription, particularly in the germplasm. Nevertheless, transcriptional activation of EREs, including endogenous retroviruses (ERVs and long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs, is observed in somatic cells, variably upon cellular differentiation and frequently upon cellular transformation. ERE transcription is modulated during physiological and pathological immune cell activation, as well as in immune cell cancers. However, our understanding of the potential consequences of such modulation remains incomplete, partly due to the relative scarcity of information regarding genome-wide ERE transcriptional patterns in immune cells. Here, we describe a methodology that allows probing RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq data for genome-wide expression of EREs in murine and human cells. Our analysis of B cells reveals that their transcriptional response during immune activation is dominated by induction of gene transcription, and that EREs respond to a much lesser extent. The transcriptional activity of the majority of EREs is either unaffected or reduced by B cell activation both in mice and humans, albeit LINEs appear considerably more responsive in the latter host. Nevertheless, a small number of highly distinct ERVs are strongly and consistently induced during B cell activation. Importantly, this pattern contrasts starkly with B cell transformation, which exhibits widespread induction of EREs, including ERVs that minimally overlap with those responsive to immune stimulation. The distinctive patterns of ERE induction suggest different underlying mechanisms and will help separate physiological from pathological expression.

  18. Global Analysis of mRNA Half-Lives and de novo Transcription in a Dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Jeanine S.; Van Dolah, Frances M.

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates possess many physiological processes that appear to be under post-transcriptional control. However, the extent to which their genes are regulated post-transcriptionally remains unresolved. To gain insight into the roles of differential mRNA stability and de novo transcription in dinoflagellates, we biosynthetically labeled RNA with 4-thiouracil to isolate newly transcribed and pre-existing RNA pools in Karenia brevis. These isolated fractions were then used for analysis of global mRNA stability and de novo transcription by hybridization to a K. brevis microarray. Global K. brevis mRNA half-lives were calculated from the ratio of newly transcribed to pre-existing RNA for 7086 array features using the online software HALO (Half-life Organizer). Overall, mRNA half-lives were substantially longer than reported in other organisms studied at the global level, ranging from 42 minutes to greater than 144 h, with a median of 33 hours. Consistent with well-documented trends observed in other organisms, housekeeping processes, including energy metabolism and transport, were significantly enriched in the most highly stable messages. Shorter-lived transcripts included a higher proportion of transcriptional regulation, stress response, and other response/regulatory processes. One such family of proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in chloroplasts and mitochondria, the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins, had dramatically shorter half-lives when compared to the arrayed transcriptome. As transcript abundances for PPR proteins were previously observed to rapidly increase in response to nutrient addition, we queried the newly synthesized RNA pools at 1 and 4 h following nitrate addition to N-depleted cultures. Transcriptome-wide there was little evidence of increases in the rate of de novo transcription during the first 4 h, relative to that in N-depleted cells, and no evidence for increased PPR protein transcription. These results lend support to

  19. Transcription and processing: multilayer controls of RNA biogenesis by the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fa-Xing; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2014-05-02

    The Hippo pathway plays a critical role in organ size control and tumorigenesis. YAP (and also its homologue TAZ) is a transcription co-activator that mediates the biological functions of the Hippo pathway. YAP activity is inhibited upon phosphorylation by the Lats kinases (reviewed in Yu & Guan, 2013). In a recent study in Cell, Mori et al (2014) uncover a new function of YAP in global microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis by the modulation of the Microprocessor machinery. The results also suggest that this novel YAP function may contribute to cell growth control and tumorigenesis.

  20. Function and control of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation in vertebrate transcription and RNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsin, Jing-Ping; Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L

    2014-07-01

    The C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit (the Rpb1 CTD) is composed of tandem heptad repeats of the consensus sequence Y(1)S(2)P(3)T(4)S(5)P(6)S(7). We reported previously that Thr 4 is phosphorylated and functions in histone mRNA 3'-end formation in chicken DT40 cells. Here, we have extended our studies on Thr 4 and to other CTD mutations by using these cells. We found that an Rpb1 derivative containing only the N-terminal half of the CTD, as well as a similar derivative containing all-consensus repeats (26r), conferred full viability, while the C-terminal half, with more-divergent repeats, did not, reflecting a strong and specific defect in snRNA 3'-end formation. Mutation in 26r of all Ser 2 (S2A) or Ser 5 (S5A) residues resulted in lethality, while Ser 7 (S7A) mutants were fully viable. While S2A and S5A cells displayed defects in transcription and RNA processing, S7A cells behaved identically to 26r cells in all respects. Finally, we found that Thr 4 was phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase 9 in cells and dephosphorylated both in vitro and in vivo by the phosphatase Fcp1. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Critical analysis of rhinovirus RNA load quantification by real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibler, Manuel; Yerly, Sabine; Vieille, Gaël; Docquier, Mylène; Turin, Lara; Kaiser, Laurent; Tapparel, Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Rhinoviruses are the most frequent cause of human respiratory infections, and quantitative rhinovirus diagnostic tools are needed for clinical investigations. Although results obtained by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) assays are frequently converted to viral RNA loads, this presents several limitations regarding accurate virus RNA quantification, particularly given the need to reliably quantify all known rhinovirus genotypes with a single assay. Using an internal extraction control and serial dilutions of an in vitro-transcribed rhinovirus RNA reference standard, we validated a quantitative one-step real-time PCR assay. We then used chimeric rhinovirus genomes with 5'-untranslated regions (5'UTRs) originating from the three rhinovirus species and from one enterovirus to estimate the impact of the 5'UTR diversity. Respiratory specimens from infected patients were then also analyzed. The assay quantification ability ranged from 4.10 to 9.10 log RNA copies/ml, with an estimated error margin of ±10%. This variation was mainly linked to target variability and interassay variability. Taken together, our results indicate that our assay can reliably estimate rhinovirus RNA load, provided that the appropriate error margin is used. In contrast, due to the lack of a universal rhinovirus RNA standard and the variability related to sample collection procedures, accurate absolute rhinovirus RNA quantification in respiratory specimens is currently hardly feasible.

  2. Zinc Finger-Containing Cellular Transcription Corepressor ZBTB25 Promotes Influenza Virus RNA Transcription and Is a Target for Zinc Ejector Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Jeng, King-Song; Lai, Michael M C

    2017-10-15

    Influenza A virus (IAV) replication relies on an intricate interaction between virus and host cells. How the cellular proteins are usurped for IAV replication remains largely obscure. The aim of this study was to search for novel and potential cellular factors that participate in IAV replication. ZBTB25, a transcription repressor of a variety of cellular genes, was identified by an RNA interference (RNAi) genomic library screen. Depletion of ZBTB25 significantly reduced IAV production. Conversely, overexpression of ZBTB25 enhanced it. ZBTB25 interacted with the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) protein and modulated its transcription activity. In addition, ZBTB25 also functioned as a viral RNA (vRNA)-binding protein, binding preferentially to the U-rich sequence within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of vRNA. Both protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions involving ZBTB25 facilitated viral RNA transcription and replication. In addition, ZBTB25 suppressed interferon production, further enhancing viral replication. ZBTB25-associated functions required an intact zinc finger domain and posttranslational SUMO-1 modification of ZBTB25. Furthermore, treatment with disulfiram (a zinc ejector) of ZBTB25-overexpressing cells showed significantly reduced IAV production as a result of reduced RNA synthesis. Our findings indicate that IAV usurps ZBTB25 for IAV RNA synthesis and serves as a novel and potential therapeutic antiviral target.IMPORTANCE IAV-induced seasonal influenza causes severe illness and death in high-risk populations. However, IAV has developed resistance to current antiviral drugs due to its high mutation rate. Therefore, development of drugs targeting cellular factors required for IAV replication is an attractive alternative for IAV therapy. Here, we discovered a cellular protein, ZBTB25, that enhances viral RdRp activity by binding to both viral RdRp and viral RNA to stimulate viral RNA synthesis. A unique feature of ZBTB25 in the regulation of

  3. RNA:DNA hybrids in the human genome have distinctive nucleotide characteristics, chromatin composition, and transcriptional relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadel, Julie; Athanasiadou, Rodoniki; Lemetre, Christophe; Wijetunga, N Ari; Ó Broin, Pilib; Sato, Hanae; Zhang, Zhengdong; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey; Montagna, Cristina; Golden, Aaron; Seoighe, Cathal; Greally, John M

    2015-01-01

    RNA:DNA hybrids represent a non-canonical nucleic acid structure that has been associated with a range of human diseases and potential transcriptional regulatory functions. Mapping of RNA:DNA hybrids in human cells reveals them to have a number of characteristics that give insights into their functions. We find RNA:DNA hybrids to occupy millions of base pairs in the human genome. A directional sequencing approach shows the RNA component of the RNA:DNA hybrid to be purine-rich, indicating a thermodynamic contribution to their in vivo stability. The RNA:DNA hybrids are enriched at loci with decreased DNA methylation and increased DNase hypersensitivity, and within larger domains with characteristics of heterochromatin formation, indicating potential transcriptional regulatory properties. Mass spectrometry studies of chromatin at RNA:DNA hybrids shows the presence of the ILF2 and ILF3 transcription factors, supporting a model of certain transcription factors binding preferentially to the RNA:DNA conformation. Overall, there is little to indicate a dependence for RNA:DNA hybrids forming co-transcriptionally, with results from the ribosomal DNA repeat unit instead supporting the intriguing model of RNA generating these structures in trans. The results of the study indicate heterogeneous functions of these genomic elements and new insights into their formation and stability in vivo.

  4. Structural landscape of base pairs containing post-transcriptional modifications in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelam, Preethi P; Sharma, Purshotam; Mitra, Abhijit

    2017-06-01

    Base pairs involving post-transcriptionally modified nucleobases are believed to play important roles in a wide variety of functional RNAs. Here we present our attempts toward understanding the structural and functional role of naturally occurring modified base pairs using a combination of X-ray crystal structure database analysis, sequence analysis, and advanced quantum chemical methods. Our bioinformatics analysis reveals that despite their presence in all major secondary structural elements, modified base pairs are most prevalent in tRNA crystal structures and most commonly involve guanine or uridine modifications. Further, analysis of tRNA sequences reveals additional examples of modified base pairs at structurally conserved tRNA regions and highlights the conservation patterns of these base pairs in three domains of life. Comparison of structures and binding energies of modified base pairs with their unmodified counterparts, using quantum chemical methods, allowed us to classify the base modifications in terms of the nature of their electronic structure effects on base-pairing. Analysis of specific structural contexts of modified base pairs in RNA crystal structures revealed several interesting scenarios, including those at the tRNA:rRNA interface, antibiotic-binding sites on the ribosome, and the three-way junctions within tRNA. These scenarios, when analyzed in the context of available experimental data, allowed us to correlate the occurrence and strength of modified base pairs with their specific functional roles. Overall, our study highlights the structural importance of modified base pairs in RNA and points toward the need for greater appreciation of the role of modified bases and their interactions, in the context of many biological processes involving RNA. © 2017 Seelam et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. De novo transcript sequence reconstruction from RNA-Seq: reference generation and analysis with Trinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassour, Moran; Grabherr, Manfred; Blood, Philip D.; Bowden, Joshua; Couger, Matthew Brian; Eccles, David; Li, Bo; Lieber, Matthias; MacManes, Matthew D.; Ott, Michael; Orvis, Joshua; Pochet, Nathalie; Strozzi, Francesco; Weeks, Nathan; Westerman, Rick; William, Thomas; Dewey, Colin N.; Henschel, Robert; LeDuc, Richard D.; Friedman, Nir; Regev, Aviv

    2013-01-01

    De novo assembly of RNA-Seq data allows us to study transcriptomes without the need for a genome sequence, such as in non-model organisms of ecological and evolutionary importance, cancer samples, or the microbiome. In this protocol, we describe the use of the Trinity platform for de novo transcriptome assembly from RNA-Seq data in non-model organisms. We also present Trinity’s supported companion utilities for downstream applications, including RSEM for transcript abundance estimation, R/Bioconductor packages for identifying differentially expressed transcripts across samples, and approaches to identify protein coding genes. In an included tutorial we provide a workflow for genome-independent transcriptome analysis leveraging the Trinity platform. The software, documentation and demonstrations are freely available from http://trinityrnaseq.sf.net. PMID:23845962

  6. Strawberry: Fast and accurate genome-guided transcript reconstruction and quantification from RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruolin Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method and software tool, Strawberry, for transcript reconstruction and quantification from RNA-Seq data under the guidance of genome alignment and independent of gene annotation. Strawberry consists of two modules: assembly and quantification. The novelty of Strawberry is that the two modules use different optimization frameworks but utilize the same data graph structure, which allows a highly efficient, expandable and accurate algorithm for dealing large data. The assembly module parses aligned reads into splicing graphs, and uses network flow algorithms to select the most likely transcripts. The quantification module uses a latent class model to assign read counts from the nodes of splicing graphs to transcripts. Strawberry simultaneously estimates the transcript abundances and corrects for sequencing bias through an EM algorithm. Based on simulations, Strawberry outperforms Cufflinks and StringTie in terms of both assembly and quantification accuracies. Under the evaluation of a real data set, the estimated transcript expression by Strawberry has the highest correlation with Nanostring probe counts, an independent experiment measure for transcript expression.Strawberry is written in C++14, and is available as open source software at https://github.com/ruolin/strawberry under the MIT license.

  7. Transcript specificity in yeast pre-mRNA splicing revealed by mutations in core spliceosomal components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Pleiss

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate expression of most eukaryotic genes requires the removal of introns from their pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs, a process catalyzed by the spliceosome. In higher eukaryotes a large family of auxiliary factors known as SR proteins can improve the splicing efficiency of transcripts containing suboptimal splice sites by interacting with distinct sequences present in those pre-mRNAs. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacks functional equivalents of most of these factors; thus, it has been unclear whether the spliceosome could effectively distinguish among transcripts. To address this question, we have used a microarray-based approach to examine the effects of mutations in 18 highly conserved core components of the spliceosomal machinery. The kinetic profiles reveal clear differences in the splicing defects of particular pre-mRNA substrates. Most notably, the behaviors of ribosomal protein gene transcripts are generally distinct from other intron-containing transcripts in response to several spliceosomal mutations. However, dramatically different behaviors can be seen for some pairs of transcripts encoding ribosomal protein gene paralogs, suggesting that the spliceosome can readily distinguish between otherwise highly similar pre-mRNAs. The ability of the spliceosome to distinguish among its different substrates may therefore offer an important opportunity for yeast to regulate gene expression in a transcript-dependent fashion. Given the high level of conservation of core spliceosomal components across eukaryotes, we expect that these results will significantly impact our understanding of how regulated splicing is controlled in higher eukaryotes as well.

  8. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong H Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  9. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong H; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G

    2016-08-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  10. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2009-12-10

    Background: Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs). Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results: We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF?miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF?miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1) have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92), we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process. 2009 Schmeier et al; licensee Bio

  11. Methylation of RNA polymerase II non-consensus Lysine residues marks early transcription in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João D; Rito, Tiago; Torlai Triglia, Elena; Kukalev, Alexander; Ferrai, Carmelo; Chotalia, Mita; Brookes, Emily; Kimura, Hiroshi; Pombo, Ana

    2015-12-19

    Dynamic post-translational modification of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) coordinates the co-transcriptional recruitment of enzymatic complexes that regulate chromatin states and processing of nascent RNA. Extensive phosphorylation of serine residues at the largest RNAPII subunit occurs at its structurally-disordered C-terminal domain (CTD), which is composed of multiple heptapeptide repeats with consensus sequence Y1-S2-P3-T4-S5-P6-S7. Serine-5 and Serine-7 phosphorylation mark transcription initiation, whereas Serine-2 phosphorylation coincides with productive elongation. In vertebrates, the CTD has eight non-canonical substitutions of Serine-7 into Lysine-7, which can be acetylated (K7ac). Here, we describe mono- and di-methylation of CTD Lysine-7 residues (K7me1 and K7me2). K7me1 and K7me2 are observed during the earliest transcription stages and precede or accompany Serine-5 and Serine-7 phosphorylation. In contrast, K7ac is associated with RNAPII elongation, Serine-2 phosphorylation and mRNA expression. We identify an unexpected balance between RNAPII K7 methylation and acetylation at gene promoters, which fine-tunes gene expression levels.

  12. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Gang, Yi [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Department of Infectious Diseases, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Honghong [No. 518 Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Xi’an 710043, Shaanxi Province (China); Wang, Jiayin [The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63108 (United States); Zhao, Lina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Xu, Li, E-mail: lxuhelen@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China); Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: liuzhiguo@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Xijing Hospital of Digestive Diseases, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710032, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  13. m6A RNA methylation promotes XIST-mediated transcriptional repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Deepak P.; Chen, Chun-Kan; Pickering, Brian F.; Chow, Amy; Jackson, Constanza; Guttman, Mitchell; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2017-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) mediates the transcriptional silencing of genes on the X chromosome. Here we show that in human cells XIST is highly methylated with at least 78 N6-methyladenosine (m6A) residues—a reversible base modification of unknown function in long non-coding RNAs. We show that m6A formation in XIST, as well as in cellular mRNAs, is mediated by RNA binding motif protein 15 (RBM15) and its paralogue RBM15B, which bind the m6A-methylation complex and recruit it to specific sites in RNA. This results in the methylation of adenosine nucleotides in adjacent m6A consensus motifs. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of RBM15 and RBM15B, or knockdown of methyltransferase like 3 (METTL3), an m6A methyltransferase, impairs XIST-mediated gene silencing. A systematic comparison of m6A-binding proteins shows that YTH domain containing 1 (YTHDC1) preferentially recognizes m6A residues on XIST and is required for XIST function. Additionally, artificial tethering of YTHDC1 to XIST rescues XIST-mediated silencing upon loss of m6A. These data reveal a pathway of m6A formation and recognition required for XIST-mediated transcriptional repression. PMID:27602518

  14. Cellular sensitivity to UV-irradiation is mediated by RNA polymerase I transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Assfalg

    Full Text Available The nucleolus has long been considered to be a pure ribosome factory. However, over the last two decades it became clear that the nucleolus is involved in numerous other functions besides ribosome biogenesis. Our experiments indicate that the activity of RNA polymerase I (Pol I transcription monitors the integrity of the DNA and influences the response to nucleolar stress as well as the rate of survival. Cells with a repressed ribosomal DNA (rDNA transcription activity showed an increased and prolonged p53 stabilisation after UVC-irradiation. Furthermore, p53 stabilisation after inhibition and especially after UVC-irradiation might be due to abrogation of the HDM2-p53 degradation pathway by ribosomal proteins (RPs. Apoptosis mediated by highly activated p53 is a typical hallmark of Cockayne syndrome cells and transcriptional abnormalities and the following activation of the RP-HDM2-p53 pathway would be a possible explanation.

  15. Cellular sensitivity to UV-irradiation is mediated by RNA polymerase I transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assfalg, Robin; Alupei, Marius Costel; Wagner, Maximilian; Koch, Sylvia; Gonzalez, Omar Garcia; Schelling, Adrian; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Iben, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The nucleolus has long been considered to be a pure ribosome factory. However, over the last two decades it became clear that the nucleolus is involved in numerous other functions besides ribosome biogenesis. Our experiments indicate that the activity of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription monitors the integrity of the DNA and influences the response to nucleolar stress as well as the rate of survival. Cells with a repressed ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription activity showed an increased and prolonged p53 stabilisation after UVC-irradiation. Furthermore, p53 stabilisation after inhibition and especially after UVC-irradiation might be due to abrogation of the HDM2-p53 degradation pathway by ribosomal proteins (RPs). Apoptosis mediated by highly activated p53 is a typical hallmark of Cockayne syndrome cells and transcriptional abnormalities and the following activation of the RP-HDM2-p53 pathway would be a possible explanation.

  16. Transcriptional interference by RNA polymerase III affects expression of the Polr3e gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh, Meghdad; Praz, Viviane; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2017-02-15

    Overlapping gene arrangements can potentially contribute to gene expression regulation. A mammalian interspersed repeat (MIR) nested in antisense orientation within the first intron of the Polr3e gene, encoding an RNA polymerase III (Pol III) subunit, is conserved in mammals and highly occupied by Pol III. Using a fluorescence assay, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the MIR in mouse embryonic stem cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we show that the MIR affects Polr3e expression through transcriptional interference. Our study reveals a mechanism by which a Pol II gene can be regulated at the transcription elongation level by transcription of an embedded antisense Pol III gene. © 2017 Yeganeh et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Super-resolution measurement of distance between transcription sites using RNA FISH with intronic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Joshua D; Cook, Peter R

    2016-04-01

    Nascent transcripts being copied from specific human genes can be detected using RNA FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) with intronic probes, and the distance between two different nascent transcripts is often measured when studying structure-function relationships. Such distance measurements are limited by the resolution of the light microscope. Here we describe methods for measuring these distances in cultured cells with a precision of a few tens of nanometers, using equipment found in most laboratories (i.e., a wide-field fluorescence microscope equipped with a charged-coupled-device camera). Using images of pairs of transcripts that are often co-transcribed, we discuss how selection of cell type, design of FISH probes, image acquisition, and image processing affect the precision that can be achieved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Making ends meet: coordination between RNA 3'-end processing and transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Pia K; Jensen, Torben Heick; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)-mediated gene transcription initiates at promoters and ends at terminators. Transcription termination is intimately connected to 3'-end processing of the produced RNA and already when loaded at the promoter, RNAPII starts to become configured for this downstream event. Conversely, RNAPII is 'reset' as part of the 3'-end processing/termination event, thus preparing the enzyme for its next round of transcription--possibly on the same gene. There is both direct and circumstantial evidence for preferential recycling of RNAPII from the gene terminator back to its own promoter, which supposedly increases the efficiency of the transcription process under conditions where RNAPII levels are rate limiting. Here, we review differences and commonalities between initiation and 3'-end processing/termination processes on various types of RNAPII transcribed genes. In doing so, we discuss the requirements for efficient 3'-end processing/termination and how these may relate to proper recycling of RNAPII. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. RNA 3' processing functions of Arabidopsis FCA and FPA limit intergenic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Cagla; Bäurle, Isabel; Magusin, Andreas; Dreos, Rene; Laubinger, Sascha; Weigel, Detlef; Dean, Caroline

    2011-05-17

    The RNA-binding proteins FCA and FPA were identified based on their repression of the flowering time regulator FLC but have since been shown to have widespread roles in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to show that a wide spectrum of genes and transposable elements are misexpressed in the fca-9 fpa-7 (fcafpa) double mutant at two stages of seedling development. There was a significant bias for misregulated genomic segments mapping to the 3' region of genes. In addition, the double mutant misexpressed a large number of previously unannotated genomic segments corresponding to intergenic regions. We characterized a subset of these misexpressed unannotated segments and established that they resulted from extensive transcriptional read-through, use of downstream polyadenylation sites, and alternative splicing. In some cases, the transcriptional read-through significantly reduced expression of the associated genes. FCA/FPA-dependent changes in DNA methylation were found at several loci, supporting previous associations of FCA/FPA function with chromatin modifications. Our data suggest that FCA and FPA play important roles in the A. thaliana genome in RNA 3' processing and transcription termination, thus limiting intergenic transcription.

  20. RNA processing factors Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize RNA Pol III-dependent transcription and the localization of condensin at Pol III genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Pénélope; Malapert, Amélie; Niinuma, Sho; Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Condensin-mediated chromosome condensation is essential for genome stability upon cell division. Genetic studies have indicated that the association of condensin with chromatin is intimately linked to gene transcription, but what transcription-associated feature(s) direct(s) the accumulation of condensin remains unclear. Here we show in fission yeast that condensin becomes strikingly enriched at RNA Pol III-transcribed genes when Swd2.2 and Sen1, two factors involved in the transcription process, are simultaneously deleted. Sen1 is an ATP-dependent helicase whose orthologue in Saccharomyces cerevisiae contributes both to terminate transcription of some RNA Pol II transcripts and to antagonize the formation of DNA:RNA hybrids in the genome. Using two independent mapping techniques, we show that DNA:RNA hybrids form in abundance at Pol III-transcribed genes in fission yeast but we demonstrate that they are unlikely to faciliate the recruitment of condensin. Instead, we show that Sen1 forms a stable and abundant complex with RNA Pol III and that Swd2.2 and Sen1 antagonize both the interaction of RNA Pol III with chromatin and RNA Pol III-dependent transcription. When Swd2.2 and Sen1 are lacking, the increased concentration of RNA Pol III and condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes is accompanied by the accumulation of topoisomerase I and II and by local nucleosome depletion, suggesting that Pol III-transcribed genes suffer topological stress. We provide evidence that this topological stress contributes to recruit and/or stabilize condensin at Pol III-transcribed genes in the absence of Swd2.2 and Sen1. Our data challenge the idea that a processive RNA polymerase hinders the binding of condensin and suggest that transcription-associated topological stress could in some circumstances facilitate the association of condensin.

  1. mRNA transcripts as molecular biomarkers in medicine and nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    In medicine, mRNA transcripts are being developed as molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of a number of diseases. These biomarkers offer early and more accurate prediction and diagnosis of disease and disease progression, and ability to identify individuals at risk. Use of microarrays also offers opportunity to identify orthogonal (uncorrelated) biomarkers not known to be linked with conventional biomarkers. Investigators are increasingly using blood as a surrogate tissue for biopsy and analysis; total RNA isolated from whole blood is predominantly from erythroid cells, and whole blood mRNA share more than 80% of the transcriptome with major tissues. Thus blood mRNA biomarkers for individualized disease prediction and diagnosis are an exciting area in medicine; mRNA biomarkers in nutrition have potential application that parallel these opportunities. Assessment of selenium (Se) status and requirements is one area where tissue mRNA levels have been used successfully. Selenoprotein-H and selenoprotein-W as well as glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx1) mRNAs are highly down-regulated in Se deficiency in rat liver, and the minimum dietary Se requirement is 0.06–0.07 μg Se/g based on these biomarkers, similar to requirements determined using conventional biomarkers. Blood Gpx1 mRNA can also be used to determine Se requirements in rats, showing that blood mRNA has potential for assessment of nutrient status. Future research is needed to develop mRNA biomarker panels for all nutrients that will discriminate between deficient, marginal, adequate, and supernutritional individuals and populations, and differentiate between individuals that will benefit versus be adversely affected by nutrient supplementation. PMID:20303730

  2. A Nucleolar Protein, Ribosomal RNA Processing 1 Homolog B (RRP1B), Enhances the Recruitment of Cellular mRNA in Influenza Virus Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Shih-Feng; Lee, Yi-Yuan; Jeng, King-Song; Lai, Michael M C

    2015-11-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) undergoes RNA transcription by a unique capped-mRNA-dependent transcription, which is carried out by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), consisting of the viral PA, PB1, and PB2 proteins. However, how the viral RdRp utilizes cellular factors for virus transcription is not clear. Previously, we conducted a genome-wide pooled short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen to identify host factors important for influenza A virus replication. Ribosomal RNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) was identified as one of the candidates. RRP1B is a nucleolar protein involved in ribosomal biogenesis. Upon IAV infection, part of RRP1B was translocated from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, where viral RNA synthesis likely takes place. The depletion of RRP1B significantly reduced IAV mRNA transcription in a minireplicon assay and in virus-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that RRP1B interacted with PB1 and PB2 of the RdRp and formed a coimmunoprecipitable complex with RdRp. The depletion of RRP1B reduced the amount of capped mRNA in the RdRp complex. Taken together, these findings indicate that RRP1B is a host factor essential for IAV transcription and provide a target for new antivirals. Influenza virus is an important human pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality and threatens the human population with epidemics and pandemics every year. Due to the high mutation rate of the virus, antiviral drugs targeting viral proteins might ultimately lose their effectiveness. An alternative strategy that explores the genetic stability of host factors indispensable for influenza virus replication would thus be desirable. Here, we characterized the rRNA processing 1 homolog B (RRP1B) protein as an important cellular factor for influenza A virus transcription. We showed that silencing RRP1B hampered viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity, which is responsible for virus transcription and replication. Furthermore, we reported that RRP1B is

  3. Abundance of specific mRNA transcripts impacts hatching success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozenfeld, Christoffer; Butts, Ian A.E.; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    2016-01-01

    MaternalmRNA governs earlyembryonic development in fish and variation in abundance of maternal transcripts may contribute to variation in embryonic survival and hatch success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Previous studies have shown that quantities of the maternal gene products β-tubulin, i......MaternalmRNA governs earlyembryonic development in fish and variation in abundance of maternal transcripts may contribute to variation in embryonic survival and hatch success in European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Previous studies have shown that quantities of the maternal gene products β......-tubulin, insulin-like growth factor 2 (igf2), nucleoplasmin (npm2), prohibitin 2 (phb2), phosphatidylinositol glycan biosynthesis class F protein 5 (pigf5), and carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase liver isoform-like 1 (cpt1) are associated with embryonic developmental competence in other teleosts. Here, the relations...... between relative mRNA abundance of these genes in eggs and/or embryos and egg quality, was studied and analyzed. We compared egg quality of the two groups: i) batches with hatching and ii) batches with no hatching. Results showed no significant differences in relative mRNA abundance between the hatch...

  4. Transcriptional landscape of ncRNA and Repeat elements in somatic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of Nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) sequencing technology has enabled many projects targeted towards the identification of genome structure and transcriptome complexity of organisms. The first conclusions of the human and mouse projects have underscored two important, yet unexpected, findings. First, while almost the entire genome is transcribed, only 5% of it encodes for proteins. Thereby, most transcripts are noncoding RNA. This includes both short RNA (<200 nucleotides (nt)) comprising piRNAs; microRNAs (miRNAs); endogenous Short Interfering RNAs (siRNAs) among others, and includes lncRNA (>200nt). Second, a significant portion of the mammalian genome (45%) is composed of Repeat Elements (REs). RE are mostly relics of ancestral viruses that during evolution have invaded the host genome by producing thousands of copies. Their roles within their host genomes have yet to be fully explored considering that they sometimes produce lncRNA, and have been shown to influence expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Moreover, because some REs can still mobilize within host genomes, host genomes have evolved mechanisms, mainly epigenetic, to maintain REs under tight control. Recent reports indicate that REs activity is regulated in somatic cells, particularily in the brain, suggesting a physiological role of RE mobilization during normal development. In this thesis, I focus on the analysis of ncRNAs, specifically REs; piRNAs; lncRNAs in human and mouse post-mitotic somatic cells. The main aspects of this analysis are: Using sRNA-Seq, I show that piRNAs, a class of ncRNAs responsible for the silencing of Transposable elements (TEs) in testes, are present also in adult mouse brain. Furthermore, their regulation shows only a subset of testes piRNAs are expressed in the brain and may be controlled by known neurogenesis factors. To investigate the dynamics of the transcriptome during cellular differentiation, I examined deep RNA-Seq and Cap

  5. Rrp6: Integrated roles in nuclear RNA metabolism and transcription termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    The yeast RNA exosome is a eukaryotic ribonuclease complex essential for RNA processing, surveillance and turnover. It is comprised of a barrel-shaped core and cap as well as a 3’–5’ ribonuclease known as Dis3 which contains both endo- and exonuclease domains. A second exonuclease, Rrp6, is added in the nucleus. Dis3 and Rrp6 have both shared and distinct roles in RNA metabolism, and this review will focus primarily on Rrp6 and the roles of the RNA exosome in the nucleus. The functions of the nuclear exosome are modulated by cofactors and interacting partners specific to each type of substrate. Generally, the cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air2/1-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex helps unwind unstable RNAs, RNAs requiring processing such as rRNAs, tRNAs, or snRNAs or improperly processed RNAs and direct it toward the exosome. In yeast, Rrp6 interacts with Nrd1, the cap binding complex (CBC), and RNA Polymerase II to aid in nascent RNA processing, termination, and polyA tail length regulation. Recent studies have shown that proper termination and processing of short, non-coding RNAs by Rrp6 is particularly important for transcription regulation across the genome and has important implications for regulation of diverse processes at the cellular level. Loss of proper Rrp6 and exosome activity may contribute to various pathologies such as autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, and cancer. PMID:26612606

  6. Stochastic theory of protein synthesis and polysome: ribosome profile on a single mRNA transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajeet K; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2011-11-21

    The process of polymerizing a protein by a ribosome, using a messenger RNA (mRNA) as the corresponding template, is called translation. Ribosome may be regarded as a molecular motor for which the mRNA template serves also as the track. Often several ribosomes may translate the same (mRNA) simultaneously. The ribosomes bound simultaneously to a single mRNA transcript are the members of a polyribosome (or, simply, polysome). Experimentally measured polysome profile gives the distribution of polysome sizes. Recently a breakthrough in determining the instantaneous positions of the ribosomes on a given mRNA track has been achieved and the technique is called ribosome profiling (Ingolia et al., 2009; Guo et al., 2010). Motivated by the success of these techniques, we have studied the spatio-temporal organization of ribosomes by extending a theoretical model that we have reported elsewhere (Sharma and Chowdhury, 2011). This extended version of our model incorporates not only (i) mechano-chemical cycle of individual ribomes, and (ii) their steric interactions, but also (iii) the effects of (a) kinetic proofreading, (b) translational infidelity, (c) ribosome recycling, and (d) sequence inhomogeneities. The theoretical framework developed here will serve in guiding further experiments and in analyzing the data to gain deep insight into various kinetic processes involved in translation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanopore Logic Operation with DNA to RNA Transcription in a Droplet System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Masayuki; Takinoue, Masahiro; Kawano, Ryuji

    2017-07-21

    This paper describes an AND logic operation with amplification and transcription from DNA to RNA, using T7 RNA polymerase. All four operations, (0 0) to (1 1), with an enzyme reaction can be performed simultaneously, using four-droplet devices that are directly connected to a patch-clamp amplifier. The output RNA molecule is detected using a biological nanopore with single-molecule translocation. Channel current recordings can be obtained using the enzyme solution. The integration of DNA logic gates into electrochemical devices is necessary to obtain output information in a human-recognizable form. Our method will be useful for rapid and confined DNA computing applications, including the development of programmable diagnostic devices.

  8. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient...... recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identify TCOF1 (also known as Treacle), a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1......, and demonstrate that NBS1 translocation and accumulation in the nucleoli is Treacle dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that Treacle-mediated NBS1 recruitment into the nucleoli regulates rRNA silencing in trans in the presence of distant chromosome breaks....

  9. Robust transcriptional signatures for low-input RNA samples based on relative expression orderings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaping; Li, Yawei; He, Jun; Guan, Qingzhou; Chen, Rou; Yan, Haidan; Zheng, Weicheng; Song, Kai; Cai, Hao; Guo, You; Wang, Xianlong; Guo, Zheng

    2017-11-28

    It is often difficult to obtain sufficient quantity of RNA molecules for gene expression profiling under many practical situations. Amplification from low-input samples may induce artificial signals. We compared the expression measurements of low-input mRNA samples, from 25 pg to 1000 pg mRNA, which were amplified and profiled by Smart-seq, DP-seq and CEL-seq techniques using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform, with those of the paired high-input (50 ng) mRNA samples. Even with 1000 pg mRNA input, we found that thousands of genes had at least 2 folds-change of expression levels in the low-input samples compared with the corresponding paired high-input samples. Consequently, a transcriptional signature based on quantitative expression values and determined from high-input RNA samples cannot be applied to low-input samples, and vice versa. In contrast, the within-sample relative expression orderings (REOs) of approximately 90% of all the gene pairs in the high-input samples were maintained in the paired low-input samples with 1000 pg input mRNA molecules. Similar results were observed in the low-input total RNA samples amplified and profiled by the Whole-Genome DASL technique using the Illumina HumanRef-8 v3.0 platform. As a proof of principle, we developed REOs-based signatures from high-input RNA samples for discriminating cancer tissues and showed that they can be robustly applied to low-input RNA samples. REOs-based signatures determined from the high-input RNA samples can be robustly applied to samples profiled with the low-input RNA samples, as low as the 1000 pg and 250 pg input samples but no longer stable in samples with less than 250 pg RNA input to a certain degree.

  10. MicroRNA-dependent regulation of transcription in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Pastor, Maria Dolores; Hergueta, Marta; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; García-Carbonero, Rocío; Nogal, Ana; Suárez, Rocío; Salinas, Ana; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Agulló-Ortuño, Maria Teresa; Ferrer, Irene; Perpiñá, Asunción; Palacios, José; Carnero, Amancio; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA)-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA)) and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent) was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708) and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1) were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies.

  11. MicroRNA-dependent regulation of transcription in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Molina-Pinelo

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708 and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1 were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies.

  12. Widespread Polycistronic Transcripts in Fungi Revealed by Single-Molecule mRNA Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Gordon

    Full Text Available Genes in prokaryotic genomes are often arranged into clusters and co-transcribed into polycistronic RNAs. Isolated examples of polycistronic RNAs were also reported in some higher eukaryotes but their presence was generally considered rare. Here we developed a long-read sequencing strategy to identify polycistronic transcripts in several mushroom forming fungal species including Plicaturopsis crispa, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, and Gloeophyllum trabeum. We found genome-wide prevalence of polycistronic transcription in these Agaricomycetes, involving up to 8% of the transcribed genes. Unlike polycistronic mRNAs in prokaryotes, these co-transcribed genes are also independently transcribed. We show that polycistronic transcription may interfere with expression of the downstream tandem gene. Further comparative genomic analysis indicates that polycistronic transcription is conserved among a wide range of mushroom forming fungi. In summary, our study revealed, for the first time, the genome prevalence of polycistronic transcription in a phylogenetic range of higher fungi. Furthermore, we systematically show that our long-read sequencing approach and combined bioinformatics pipeline is a generic powerful tool for precise characterization of complex transcriptomes that enables identification of mRNA isoforms not recovered via short-read assembly.

  13. MHC I-associated peptides preferentially derive from transcripts bearing miRNA response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Diana Paola; Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Laumont, Céline M; Daouda, Tariq; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara L; Côté, Caroline; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2012-06-28

    MHC I-associated peptides (MIPs) play an essential role in normal homeostasis and diverse pathologic conditions. MIPs derive mainly from defective ribosomal products (DRiPs), a subset of nascent proteins that fail to achieve a proper conformation and the physical nature of which remains elusive. In the present study, we used high-throughput proteomic and transcriptomic methods to unravel the structure and biogenesis of MIPs presented by HLA-A and HLA-B molecules on human EBV-infected B lymphocytes from 4 patients. We found that although HLA-different subjects present distinctive MIPs derived from different proteins, these MIPs originate from proteins that are functionally interconnected and implicated in similar biologic pathways. Secondly, the MIP repertoire of human B cells showed no bias toward conserved versus polymorphic genomic sequences, were derived preferentially from abundant transcripts, and conveyed to the cell surface a cell-type-specific signature. Finally, we discovered that MIPs derive preferentially from transcripts bearing miRNA response elements. Furthermore, whereas MIPs of HLA-disparate subjects are coded by different sets of transcripts, these transcripts are regulated by mostly similar miRNAs. Our data support an emerging model in which the generation of MIPs by a transcript depends on its abundance and DRiP rate, which is regulated to a large extent by miRNAs.

  14. Identification and Analysis of RNA Editing Sites in the Chloroplast Transcripts of Aegilops tauschii L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengxing; Liu, Hui; Ge, Lingqiao; Xing, Guangwei; Wang, Meng; Weining, Song; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-12-30

    RNA editing is an important way to convert cytidine (C) to uridine (U) at specific sites within RNA molecules at a post-transcriptional level in the chloroplasts of higher plants. Although it has been systematically studied in many plants, little is known about RNA editing in the wheat D genome donor Aegilops tauschii L. Here, we investigated the chloroplast RNA editing of Ae. tauschii and compared it with other wheat relatives to trace the evolution of wheat. Through bioinformatics prediction, a total of 34 C-to-U editing sites were identified, 17 of which were validated using RT-PCR product sequencing. Furthermore, 60 sites were found by the RNA-Seq read mapping approach, 24 of which agreed with the prediction and six were validated experimentally. The editing sites were biased toward tCn or nCa trinucleotides and 5'-pyrimidines, which were consistent with the flanking bases of editing sites of other seed plants. Furthermore, the editing events could result in the alteration of the secondary structures and topologies of the corresponding proteins, suggesting that RNA editing might impact the function of target genes. Finally, comparative analysis found some evolutionarily conserved editing sites in wheat and two species-specific sites were also obtained. This study is the first to report on RNA editing in Aegilops tauschii L, which not only sheds light on the evolution of wheat from the point of view of RNA editing, but also lays a foundation for further studies to identify the mechanisms of C-to-U alterations.

  15. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G1, S, and G2), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. RNA-Seq for gene identification and transcript profiling of three Stevia rebaudiana genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Hou, Kai; Qin, Peng; Liu, Hongchang; Yi, Bin; Yang, Wenting; Wu, Wei

    2014-07-07

    Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) is an important medicinal plant that yields diterpenoid steviol glycosides (SGs). SGs are currently used in the preparation of medicines, food products and neutraceuticals because of its sweetening property (zero calories and about 300 times sweeter than sugar). Recently, some progress has been made in understanding the biosynthesis of SGs in Stevia, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this process. Additionally, the genomics of Stevia, a non-model species, remains uncharacterized. The recent advent of RNA-Seq, a next generation sequencing technology, provides an opportunity to expand the identification of Stevia genes through in-depth transcript profiling. We present a comprehensive landscape of the transcriptome profiles of three genotypes of Stevia with divergent SG compositions characterized using RNA-seq. 191,590,282 high-quality reads were generated and then assembled into 171,837 transcripts with an average sequence length of 969 base pairs. A total of 80,160 unigenes were annotated, and 14,211 of the unique sequences were assigned to specific metabolic pathways by the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Gene sequences of all enzymes known to be involved in SG synthesis were examined. A total of 143 UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT) unigenes were identified, some of which might be involved in SG biosynthesis. The expression patterns of eight of these genes were further confirmed by RT-QPCR. RNA-seq analysis identified candidate genes encoding enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of SGs in Stevia, a non-model plant without a reference genome. The transcriptome data from this study yielded new insights into the process of SG accumulation in Stevia. Our results demonstrate that RNA-Seq can be successfully used for gene identification and transcript profiling in a non-model species.

  17. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  18. PRC2 regulates RNA polymerase III transcribed non-translated RNA gene transcription through EZH2 and SUZ12 interaction with TFIIIC complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Shuai; Dai, Xiaoyan; Ma, Ji; Wan, Junhu; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Peng; Liu, Zhaoli; Zhang, Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repression complex 2 (PRC2) component EZH2 tri-methylates H3K27 and exerts epigenetic repression on target gene expression. EZH2-mediated epigenetic control of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcribed coding gene transcription has been well established. However, little is known about EZH2-mediated epigenetic regulation of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription. Here we present a paradigm that EZH2 is involved in the repression of Pol III transcription via interaction with transcriptional factor complex IIIC (TFIIIC). EZH2 and H3K27me3 co-occupy the promoter of tRNATyr, 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes. Depletion of EZH2 or inhibition of EZH2 methyltransferase activity led to upregulation of Pol III target gene transcription. EZH2-mediated repression of Pol III transcribed gene expression requires presence of SUZ12. SUZ12 was able to interact with TFIIIC complex and knockdown of SUZ12 decreased occupancy of EZH2 and H3K27me3 at the promoter of Pol III target genes. Our findings pointed out a previously unidentified role of PRC2 complex in suppressing transcription of Pol III transcribed non-translated RNA genes, putting Pol III on a new layer of epigenetic regulation. PMID:26038315

  19. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. © 2016 Takahashi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Systematically frameshifting by deletion of every 4th or 4th and 5th nucleotides during mitochondrial transcription: RNA self-hybridization regulates delRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligmann, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, secondary structures punctuate post-transcriptional RNA processing. Recently described transcripts match the human mitogenome after systematic deletions of every 4th, respectively every 4th and 5th nucleotides, called delRNAs. Here I explore predicted stem-loop hairpin formation by delRNAs, and their associations with delRNA transcription and detected peptides matching their translation. Despite missing 25, respectively 40% of the nucleotides in the original sequence, del-transformed sequences form significantly more secondary structures than corresponding randomly shuffled sequences, indicating biological function, independently of, and in combination with, previously detected delRNA and thereof translated peptides. Self-hybridization decreases delRNA abundances, indicating downregulation. Systematic deletions of the human mitogenome reveal new, unsuspected coding and structural informations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A freeze frame view of vesicular stomatitis virus transcription defines a minimal length of RNA for 5' processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Gergely; Rahmeh, Amal A; Whelan, Sean P J

    2011-06-01

    The RNA synthesis machinery of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) comprises the genomic RNA encapsidated by the viral nucleocapsid protein (N) and associated with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase, the viral components of which are a large protein (L) and an accessory phosphoprotein (P). The 241 kDa L protein contains all the enzymatic activities necessary for synthesis of the viral mRNAs, including capping, cap methylation and polyadenylation. Those RNA processing reactions are intimately coordinated with nucleotide polymerization such that failure to cap results in termination of transcription and failure to methylate can result in hyper polyadenylation. The mRNA processing reactions thus serve as a critical check point in viral RNA synthesis which may control the synthesis of incorrectly modified RNAs. Here, we report the length at which viral transcripts first gain access to the capping machinery during synthesis. By reconstitution of transcription in vitro with highly purified recombinant polymerase and engineered templates in which we omitted sites for incorporation of UTP, we found that transcripts that were 30-nucleotides in length were uncapped, whereas those that were 31-nucleotides in length contained a cap structure. The minimal RNA length required for mRNA cap addition was also sufficient for methylation since the 31-nucleotide long transcripts were methylated at both ribose-2'-O and guanine-N-7 positions. This work provides insights into the spatial relationship between the active sites for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase and polyribonucleotidyltransferase responsible for capping of the viral RNA. We combine the present findings with our recently described electron microscopic structure of the VSV polymerase and propose a model of how the spatial arrangement of the capping activities of L may influence nucleotide polymerization.

  2. An essential nuclear protein in trypanosomes is a component of mRNA transcription/export pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Serpeloni

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, different RNA species are exported from the nucleus via specialized pathways. The mRNA export machinery is highly integrated with mRNA processing, and includes a different set of nuclear transport adaptors as well as other mRNA binding proteins, RNA helicases, and NPC-associated proteins. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a widespread and neglected human disease which is endemic to Latin America. Gene expression in Trypanosoma has unique characteristics, such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-encoding genes and mRNA processing by trans-splicing. In general, post-transcriptional events are the major points for regulation of gene expression in these parasites. However, the export pathway of mRNA from the nucleus is poorly understood. The present study investigated the function of TcSub2, which is a highly conserved protein ortholog to Sub2/ UAP56, a component of the Transcription/Export (TREX multiprotein complex connecting transcription with mRNA export in yeast/human. Similar to its orthologs, TcSub2 is a nuclear protein, localized in dispersed foci all over the nuclei -except the fibrillar center of nucleolus- and at the interface between dense and non-dense chromatin areas, proposing the association of TcSub2 with transcription/processing sites. These findings were analyzed further by BrUTP incorporation assays and confirmed that TcSub2 is physically associated with active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II, but not RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I or Spliced Leader (SL transcription, demonstrating participation particularly in nuclear mRNA metabolism in T. cruzi. The double knockout of the TcSub2 gene is lethal in T. cruzi, suggesting it has an essential function. Alternatively, RNA interference assays were performed in Trypanosoma brucei. It allowed demonstrating that besides being an essential protein, its knockdown causes mRNA accumulation in the nucleus and

  3. Cockayne syndrome protein A is a transcription factor of RNA polymerase I and stimulates ribosomal biogenesis and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sylvia; Garcia Gonzalez, Omar; Assfalg, Robin; Schelling, Adrian; Schäfer, Patrick; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the Cockayne syndrome A (CSA) protein account for 20% of Cockayne syndrome (CS) cases, a childhood disorder of premature aging and early death. Hitherto, CSA has exclusively been described as DNA repair factor of the transcription-coupled branch of nucleotide excision repair. Here we show a novel function of CSA as transcription factor of RNA polymerase I in the nucleolus. Knockdown of CSA reduces pre-rRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase I. CSA associates with RNA polymerase I and the active fraction of the rDNA and stimulates re-initiation of rDNA transcription by recruiting the Cockayne syndrome proteins TFIIH and CSB. Moreover, compared with CSA deficient parental CS cells, CSA transfected CS cells reveal significantly more rRNA with induced growth and enhanced global translation. A previously unknown global dysregulation of ribosomal biogenesis most likely contributes to the reduced growth and premature aging of CS patients.

  4. Transcription Factor YY1 Modulates Lung Cancer Progression by Activating lncRNA-PVT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tonghai; Wang, Guangsuo; Yang, Lin; Peng, Bin; Wen, Yuxin; Ding, Guanggui; Wang, Zheng

    2017-11-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite the advancement in surgery and chemotherapy, the prognosis of patients with advanced lung cancer is still poor. Yin Yang-1 (YY1) is a multifunctional transcription factor that exhibits positive and negative control on a large number of cellular and viral genes. In this study, we showed that the expression of YY1 is upregulated in lung cancer tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. Patients with higher expression of YY1 had larger tumor size, poor differentiation, higher TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis. Ectopic expression of YY1 in lung cancer cells promoted cell proliferation and invasion. Inversely, siRNA-mediated silencing of YY1 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. These results suggested that YY1 may function as an oncogene in lung cancer. Moreover, through luciferase reporter assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we showed that YY1 could directly bind to the promoter region of (long noncoding RNA-plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 [lncRNA-PVT1]) and activated its transcription through the consensus YY1 motif. Knockdown of the expression of YY1 reduced cell proliferation in vivo, consistent with the results obtained from silencing the expression of YY1 in lung cancer cells. Collectively, our study showed a critical role of YY1 in the regulation of tumorigenesis, partly through its downstream target PVT1.

  5. Reprogramming of human fibroblasts to pluripotent stem cells using mRNA of four transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakubov, Eduard [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Rechavi, Gidi [Cancer Research Center, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Rozenblatt, Shmuel [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Givol, David, E-mail: david.givol@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2010-03-26

    Reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent cells (iPS) was accomplished in 2006 by expressing four, or less, embryonic stem cell (ESC)-specific transcription factors. Due to the possible danger of DNA damage and the potential tumorigenicity associated with such DNA damage, attempts were made to minimize DNA integration by the vectors involved in this process without complete success. Here we present a method of using RNA transfection as a tool for reprogramming human fibroblasts to iPS. We used RNA synthesized in vitro from cDNA of the same reprogramming four transcription factors. After transfection of the RNA, we show intracellular expression and nuclear localization of the respective proteins in at least 70% of the cells. We used five consecutive transfections to support continuous protein expression resulting in the formation of iPS colonies that express alkaline phosphatase and several ESC markers and that can be expanded. This method completely avoids DNA integration and may be developed to replace the use of DNA vectors in the formation of iPS.

  6. A Novel RNA-Binding Protein Involves ABA Signaling by Post-transcriptionally Repressing ABI2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianwen; Chen, Yihan; Qian, Luofeng; Mu, Rong; Yuan, Xi; Fang, Huimin; Huang, Xi; Xu, Enshun; Zhang, Hongsheng; Huang, Ji

    2017-01-01

    The Stress Associated RNA-binding protein 1 (SRP1) repressed by ABA, salt and cold encodes a C2C2-type zinc finger protein in Arabidopsis. The knock-out mutation in srp1 reduced the sensitivity of seed to ABA and salt stress during germination and post-germinative growth stages. In contrast, SRP1-overexpressing seedlings were more sensitive to ABA and salt compared to wild type plants. In the presence of ABA, the transcript levels of ABA signaling and germination-related genes including ABI3. ABI5. EM1 and EM6 were less induced in srp1 compared to WT. Interestingly, expression of ABI2 encoding a protein phosphatase 2C protein were significantly up-regulated in srp1 mutants. By in vitro analysis, SRP1 was identified as a novel RNA-binding protein directly binding to 3'UTR of ABI2 mRNA. Moreover, transient expression assay proved the function of SRP1 in reducing the activity of luciferase whose coding sequence was fused with the ABI2 3'UTR. Together, it is suggested that SRP1 is involved in the ABA signaling by post-transcriptionally repressing ABI2 expression in Arabidopsis.

  7. Transcriptional evidence for small RNA regulation of pupal diapause in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Julie A; Clark, Jennifer; Diakoff, Stephen J; Denlinger, David L

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of diapause, a phenotypically plastic, alternative developmental pathway, is key to predicting the seasonal distribution of economically and medically important insect species. Small regulatory RNAs, including piwi-related RNAs, small-interfering RNAs, and miRNAs, represent one type of epigenetic process that can alter the phenotype of organisms independent of changes in genome sequence. We hypothesize that small RNAs regulate pupal diapause and a maternal block of diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata. We assessed the relative abundance of eight genes related to small RNA biogenesis and function using qRT-PCR in pre-diapause and diapause stages compared to their non-diapause counterparts. Elevated mRNA expression of piwi and spindle-E, as well as argonaute2 and r2d2, in photosensitive 1st instar larvae reared in diapause-inducing conditions indicate involvement of the piwi-associated RNA and small-interfering RNA pathways, respectively, in programming the switch from direct development to a developmental pathway that includes diapause. Two genes, related to the microRNA pathway, argonaute1 and loquacious, are upregulated during pupal diapause, suggesting a role for this pathway in maintaining diapause. Substantial reduction in transcript abundance of small RNA-related genes in photosensitive 1st instar larvae from mothers with a diapause history compared to those from mothers with no diapause history also suggest a role for small RNA pathways in regulating a diapause maternal effect in S. bullata. Together, the results point to a role for small RNAs in regulating the developmental trajectory in this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rrp6: Integrated roles in nuclear RNA metabolism and transcription termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Melanie J; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-01-01

    The yeast RNA exosome is a eukaryotic ribonuclease complex essential for RNA processing, surveillance, and turnover. It is comprised of a barrel-shaped core and cap as well as a 3'-5' ribonuclease known as Dis3 that contains both endo- and exonuclease domains. A second exonuclease, Rrp6, is added in the nucleus. Dis3 and Rrp6 have both shared and distinct roles in RNA metabolism, and this review will focus primarily on Rrp6 and the roles of the RNA exosome in the nucleus. The functions of the nuclear exosome are modulated by cofactors and interacting partners specific to each type of substrate. Generally, the cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air2/1-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex helps unwind unstable RNAs, RNAs requiring processing such as rRNAs, tRNAs, or snRNAs or improperly processed RNAs and direct it toward the exosome. In yeast, Rrp6 interacts with Nrd1, the cap-binding complex, and RNA polymerase II to aid in nascent RNA processing, termination, and polyA tail length regulation. Recent studies have shown that proper termination and processing of short, noncoding RNAs by Rrp6 is particularly important for transcription regulation across the genome and has important implications for regulation of diverse processes at the cellular level. Loss of proper Rrp6 and exosome activity may contribute to various pathologies such as autoimmune disease, neurological disorders, and cancer. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:91-104. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1317 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. RNA-seq Transcriptional Profiling of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes from Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Kirsten E.; Nalpas, Nicolas C.; Rue-Albrecht, Kévin; Browne, John A.; Magee, David A.; Killick, Kate E.; Park, Stephen D. E.; Hokamp, Karsten; Meade, Kieran G.; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Gormley, Eamonn; Gordon, Stephen V.; MacHugh, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis, is a major endemic disease affecting cattle populations worldwide, despite the implementation of stringent surveillance and control programs in many countries. The development of high-throughput functional genomics technologies, including gene expression microarrays and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), has enabled detailed analysis of the host transcriptome to M. bovis infection, particularly at the macrophage and peripheral blood level. In the present study, we have analyzed the peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) transcriptome of eight natural M. bovis-infected and eight age- and sex-matched non-infected control Holstein-Friesian animals using RNA-seq. In addition, we compared gene expression profiles generated using RNA-seq with those previously generated using the high-density Affymetrix® GeneChip® Bovine Genome Array platform from the same PBL-extracted RNA. A total of 3,250 differentially expressed (DE) annotated genes were detected in the M. bovis-infected samples relative to the controls (adjusted P-value ≤0.05), with the number of genes displaying decreased relative expression (1,671) exceeding those with increased relative expression (1,579). Ingenuity® Systems Pathway Analysis (IPA) of all DE genes revealed enrichment for genes with immune function. Notably, transcriptional suppression was observed among several of the top-ranking canonical pathways including Leukocyte Extravasation Signaling. Comparative platform analysis demonstrated that RNA-seq detected a larger number of annotated DE genes (3,250) relative to the microarray (1,398), of which 917 genes were common to both technologies and displayed the same direction of expression. Finally, we show that RNA-seq had an increased dynamic range compared to the microarray for estimating differential gene expression. PMID:25206354

  10. Mammalian Rrn3 is required for the formation of a transcription competent preinitiation complex containing RNA polymerase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Alice H; Evans, Ann; Rothblum, Lawrence I

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian Rrn3, an essential, polymerase-associated protein, is inactivated when cells are treated with cycloheximide, resulting in the inhibition of transcription by RNA polymerase I. Although Rrn3 is essential for transcription, its function in rDNA transcription has not been determined. For example, it is unclear whether Rrn3 is required for initiation or elongation by RNA polymerase I. Rrn3 has been shown to interact with the 43-kDa subunit of RNA polymerase I and with two of the subunits of SL1. In the current model for transcription, Rrn3 functions to recruit RNA polymerase I to the committed complex formed by SL1 and the rDNA promoter. To examine the question as to whether Rrn3 is required for the recruitment of RNA polymerase I to the template, we developed a novel assay similar to chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We found that RNA polymerase I can be recruited to a template in the absence of active Rrn3. However, that complex will not initiate transcription, even after Rrn3 is added to the reaction. Interestingly, the complex that forms in the presence of active Rrn3 is biochemically distinguishable from that which forms in the absence of active Rrn3. For example, the functional complex is fivefold more resistant to heparin than that which forms in the absence of Rrn3. Our data demonstrate that Rrn3 must be present when the committed template complex is forming for transcription to occur.

  11. Mycobacterial RNA isolation optimized for non-coding RNA: high fidelity isolation of 5S rRNA from Mycobacterium bovis BCG reveals novel post-transcriptional processing and a complete spectrum of modified ribonucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hia, Fabian; Chionh, Yok Hian; Pang, Yan Ling Joy; DeMott, Michael S; McBee, Megan E; Dedon, Peter C

    2015-03-11

    A major challenge in the study of mycobacterial RNA biology is the lack of a comprehensive RNA isolation method that overcomes the unusual cell wall to faithfully yield the full spectrum of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) species. Here, we describe a simple and robust procedure optimized for the isolation of total ncRNA, including 5S, 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and tRNA, from mycobacteria, using Mycobacterium bovis BCG to illustrate the method. Based on a combination of mechanical disruption and liquid and solid-phase technologies, the method produces all major species of ncRNA in high yield and with high integrity, enabling direct chemical and sequence analysis of the ncRNA species. The reproducibility of the method with BCG was evident in bioanalyzer electrophoretic analysis of isolated RNA, which revealed quantitatively significant differences in the ncRNA profiles of exponentially growing and non-replicating hypoxic bacilli. The method also overcame an historical inconsistency in 5S rRNA isolation, with direct sequencing revealing a novel post-transcriptional processing of 5S rRNA to its functional form and with chemical analysis revealing seven post-transcriptional ribonucleoside modifications in the 5S rRNA. This optimized RNA isolation procedure thus provides a means to more rigorously explore the biology of ncRNA species in mycobacteria. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Cdk-related kinase 9 regulates RNA polymerase II mediated transcription in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhijit S; Mitra, Pallabi; Kolagani, Ashok; Gurupwar, Rajkumar

    2018-02-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are an essential part of eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. In Apicomplexan parasites, the role and relevance of the kinases in the multistep process of transcription seeks more attention given the absence of full repertoire of canonical Cdks and cognate cyclin partners. In this study, we functionally characterize T. gondii Cdk-related kinase 9 (TgCrk9) showing maximal homology to eukaryotic Cdk9. An uncanonical cyclin, TgCyclin L, colocalizes with TgCrk9 in the parasite nucleus and co-immunoprecipitate, could activate the kinase in-vitro. We identify two threonines in conserved T-loop domain of TgCrk9 that are important for its activity. The activated TgCrk9 phosphorylates C-terminal domain (CTD) of TgRpb1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II highlighting its role in transcription. Selective chemical inhibition of TgCrk9 affected serine 2 phosphorylation in the heptapeptide repeats of TgRpb1-CTD towards 3' end of genes consistent with a role in transcription elongation. Interestingly, TgCrk9 kinase activity is regulated by the upstream TgCrk7 based CAK complex. TgCrk9 was found to functionally complement the role of its yeast counterpart Bur1 establishing its role as an important transcriptional kinase. In this study, we provide robust evidence that TgCrk9 is an important part of transcription machinery regulating gene expression in T. gondii. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Discontinuous transcription or RNA processing of vaccinia virus late messengers results in a 5' poly(A) leader

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwer, B; Visca, P.; Vos, J C; Stunnenberg, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    We have demonstrated by primer elongation and cap analysis that mature vaccinia virus late transcripts are discontinuously synthesized. We have shown that RNA transcripts from a translocated 11K and from the authentic 11K and 4b late promoters are extended by approximately 35 nucleotides beyond the

  14. Isolation and characterization of RNA polymerase rpoB mutations that alter transcription slippage during elongation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Ning; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Hui, Monica; Court, Carolyn; Chen, Shuo; Court, Donald L; Strathern, Jeffrey; Jin, Ding Jun; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2013-01-25

    Transcription fidelity is critical for maintaining the accurate flow of genetic information. The study of transcription fidelity has been limited because the intrinsic error rate of transcription is obscured by the higher error rate of translation, making identification of phenotypes associated with transcription infidelity challenging. Slippage of elongating RNA polymerase (RNAP) on homopolymeric A/T tracts in DNA represents a special type of transcription error leading to disruption of open reading frames in Escherichia coli mRNA. However, the regions in RNAP involved in elongation slippage and its molecular mechanism are unknown. We constructed an A/T tract that is out of frame relative to a downstream lacZ gene on the chromosome to examine transcriptional slippage during elongation. Further, we developed a genetic system that enabled us for the first time to isolate and characterize E. coli RNAP mutants with altered transcriptional slippage in vivo. We identified several amino acid residues in the β subunit of RNAP that affect slippage in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, these highly clustered residues are located near the RNA strand of the RNA-DNA hybrid in the elongation complex. Our E. coli study complements an accompanying study of slippage by yeast RNAP II and provides the basis for future studies on the mechanism of transcription fidelity.

  15. Identification of Alternative Splicing and Fusion Transcripts in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer by RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoonki; Kim, Woo Jin; Bang, Chi Young; Lee, Jae Cheol; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death. Alterations in gene sequence, structure, and expression have an important role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer. Fusion genes and alternative splicing of cancer-related genes have the potential to be oncogenic. In the current study, we performed RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to investigate potential fusion genes and alternative splicing in non-small cell lung cancer. RNA was isolated from lung tissues obtained from 86 subjects with lung cancer. The RNA samples from lung cancer and normal tissues were processed with RNA-seq using the HiSeq 2000 system. Fusion genes were evaluated using Defuse and ChimeraScan. Candidate fusion transcripts were validated by Sanger sequencing. Alternative splicing was analyzed using multivariate analysis of transcript sequencing and validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. RNA-seq data identified oncogenic fusion genes EML4-ALK and SLC34A2-ROS1 in three of 86 normal-cancer paired samples. Nine distinct fusion transcripts were selected using DeFuse and ChimeraScan; of which, four fusion transcripts were validated by Sanger sequencing. In 33 squamous cell carcinoma, 29 tumor specific skipped exon events and six mutually exclusive exon events were identified. ITGB4 and PYCR1 were top genes that showed significant tumor specific splice variants. In conclusion, RNA-seq data identified novel potential fusion transcripts and splice variants. Further evaluation of their functional significance in the pathogenesis of lung cancer is required.

  16. RNA-Interference Components Are Dispensable for Transcriptional Silencing of the Drosophila Bithorax-Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Cernilogar, Filippo M.

    2013-06-13

    Background:Beyond their role in post-transcriptional gene silencing, Dicer and Argonaute, two components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, were shown to be involved in epigenetic regulation of centromeric heterochromatin and transcriptional gene silencing. In particular, RNAi mechanisms appear to play a role in repeat induced silencing and some aspects of Polycomb-mediated gene silencing. However, the functional interplay of RNAi mechanisms and Polycomb group (PcG) pathways at endogenous loci remains to be elucidated.Principal Findings:Here we show that the endogenous Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway is dispensable for the PcG mediated silencing of the homeotic Bithorax Complex (BX-C). Although Dicer-2 depletion triggers mild transcriptional activation at Polycomb Response Elements (PREs), this does not induce transcriptional changes at PcG-repressed genes. Moreover, Dicer-2 is not needed to maintain global levels of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 and does not affect PRE-mediated higher order chromatin structures within the BX-C. Finally bioinformatic analysis, comparing published data sets of PcG targets with Argonaute-2-bound small RNAs reveals no enrichment of these small RNAs at promoter regions associated with PcG proteins.Conclusions:We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila. © 2013 Cernilogar et al.

  17. Connections between Transcription Downstream of Genes and cis-SAGe Chimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalenia, Katarzyna; Qin, Fujun; Singh, Sandeep; Tangtrongstittikul, Panjapon; Li, Hui

    2017-11-22

    cis-Splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) is being recognized as one way to produce chimeric fusion RNAs. However, its detail mechanism is not clear. Recent study revealed induction of transcriptions downstream of genes (DoGs) under osmotic stress. Here, we investigated the influence of osmotic stress on cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs and their connection to DoGs. We found,the absence of induction of at least some cis-SAGe fusions and/or their corresponding DoGs at early time point(s). In fact, these DoGs and their cis-SAGe fusions are inversely correlated. This negative correlation was changed to positive at a later time point. These results suggest a direct competition between the two categories of transcripts when total pool of readthrough transcripts is limited at an early time point. At a later time point, DoGs and corresponding cis-SAGe fusions are both induced, indicating that total readthrough transcripts become more abundant. Finally, we observed overall enhancement of cis-SAGe chimeric RNAs in KCl-treated samples by RNA-Seq analysis.

  18. CLIFinder: identification of LINE-1 chimeric transcripts in RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinson, Marie-Elisa; Pogorelcnik, Romain; Court, Franck; Arnaud, Philippe; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Hofacker, Ivo

    2018-02-15

    L1 Chimeric Transcripts (LCTs) are initiated by repeated LINE-1 element antisense promoters and include the L1 5'UTR sequence in antisense orientation followed by the adjacent genomic region. LCTs have been characterized mainly using bioinformatics approaches to query dbEST. To take advantage of NGS data to unravel the transcriptome composition, we developed Chimeric LIne Finder (CLIFinder), a new bioinformatics tool. Using stranded paired-end RNA-seq data, we demonstrated that CLIFinder can identify genome-wide transcribed chimera sequences corresponding to potential LCTs. Moreover, CLIFinder can be adapted to study transcription from other repeat types. The code is available at: https://github.com/GReD-Clermont/CLIFinder; and for Galaxy users, it is directly accessible in the tool shed at: https://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/clifinder/clifinder/. catherine.barriere@uca.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Deep sequencing analysis of small noncoding RNA and mRNA targets of the global post-transcriptional regulator, Hfq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittka, A; Lucchini, S; Papenfort, K

    2008-01-01

    -immunoprecipitation (coIP) with epitope-tagged Hfq or control coIP, identified 727 mRNAs that are Hfq-bound in vivo. The cDNA analysis discovered new, small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and more than doubled the number of sRNAs known to be expressed in Salmonella to 64; about half of these are associated with Hfq. Our analysis......Recent advances in high-throughput pyrosequencing (HTPS) technology now allow a thorough analysis of RNA bound to cellular proteins, and, therefore, of post-transcriptional regulons. We used HTPS to discover the Salmonella RNAs that are targeted by the common bacterial Sm-like protein, Hfq. Initial...... transcriptomic analysis revealed that Hfq controls the expression of almost a fifth of all Salmonella genes, including several horizontally acquired pathogenicity islands (SPI-1, -2, -4, -5), two sigma factor regulons, and the flagellar gene cascade. Subsequent HTPS analysis of 350,000 cDNAs, derived from RNA co...

  20. Associating transcription factors and conserved RNA structures with gene regulation in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Seemann, Stefan E.; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical subdivisions of the human brain can be associated with different neuronal functions. This functional diversification is reflected by differences in gene expression. By analyzing post-mortem gene expression data from the Allen Brain Atlas, we investigated the impact of transcription...... factors (TF) and RNA secondary structures on the regulation of gene expression in the human brain. First, we modeled the expression of a gene as a linear combination of the expression of TFs. We devised an approach to select robust TF-gene interactions and to determine localized contributions to gene...

  1. The Sites of Transcription and Translation for Euglena Chloroplastic Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, L. I.; Egan, J.; Reynolds, R. J.; Nix, C. E.; Schiff, J. A.; Barnett, W. Edgar

    1974-01-01

    We find that cycloheximide completely blocks the light-induced apearance of Euglena chloroplastic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in dark-grown cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris. Streptomycin, on the other hand, has no effect on the light-induction of these organellar enzymes. These observations, together with the finding that an aplastidic mutant (strain W3BUL, which has neither significant plastid structure nor detectable chloroplast DNA) contains low levels of the chloroplastic synthetases, indicate that the chloroplastic synthetases are transcriptional products of nuclear genes and are translated on cytoplasmic ribosomes prior to compartmentalization within the chloroplasts. PMID:4525469

  2. Transcription Profiling of Bacillus subtilis Cells Infected with AR9, a Giant Phage Encoding Two Multisubunit RNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavysh, Daria; Sokolova, Maria; Slashcheva, Marina; Förstner, Konrad U; Severinov, Konstantin

    2017-02-14

    Bacteriophage AR9 is a recently sequenced jumbo phage that encodes two multisubunit RNA polymerases. Here we investigated the AR9 transcription strategy and the effect of AR9 infection on the transcription of its host, Bacillus subtilis Analysis of whole-genome transcription revealed early, late, and continuously expressed AR9 genes. Alignment of sequences upstream of the 5' ends of AR9 transcripts revealed consensus sequences that define early and late phage promoters. Continuously expressed AR9 genes have both early and late promoters in front of them. Early AR9 transcription is independent of protein synthesis and must be determined by virion RNA polymerase injected together with viral DNA. During infection, the overall amount of host mRNAs is significantly decreased. Analysis of relative amounts of host transcripts revealed notable differences in the levels of some mRNAs. The physiological significance of up- or downregulation of host genes for AR9 phage infection remains to be established. AR9 infection is significantly affected by rifampin, an inhibitor of host RNA polymerase transcription. The effect is likely caused by the antibiotic-induced killing of host cells, while phage genome transcription is solely performed by viral RNA polymerases.IMPORTANCE Phages regulate the timing of the expression of their own genes to coordinate processes in the infected cell and maximize the release of viral progeny. Phages also alter the levels of host transcripts. Here we present the results of a temporal analysis of the host and viral transcriptomes of Bacillus subtilis infected with a giant phage, AR9. We identify viral promoters recognized by two virus-encoded RNA polymerases that are a unique feature of the phiKZ-related group of phages to which AR9 belongs. Our results set the stage for future analyses of highly unusual RNA polymerases encoded by AR9 and other phiKZ-related phages. Copyright © 2017 Lavysh et al.

  3. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure–function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K.; Watters, Kyle E.; Gasper, Paul M.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Carlson, Paul D.; Chen, Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure–function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure–function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. PMID:27103533

  4. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; DeMaster, L.K.; Kootstra, N.A.; Reiss, P.; O'Doherty, U.; Berkhout, B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent

  5. Transcriptional Slippage and RNA Editing Increase the Diversity of Transcripts in Chloroplasts: Insight from Deep Sequencing of Vigna radiata Genome and Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ping Lin

    Full Text Available We performed deep sequencing of the nuclear and organellar genomes of three mungbean genotypes: Vigna radiata ssp. sublobata TC1966, V. radiata var. radiata NM92 and the recombinant inbred line RIL59 derived from a cross between TC1966 and NM92. Moreover, we performed deep sequencing of the RIL59 transcriptome to investigate transcript variability. The mungbean chloroplast genome has a quadripartite structure including a pair of inverted repeats separated by two single copy regions. A total of 213 simple sequence repeats were identified in the chloroplast genomes of NM92 and RIL59; 78 single nucleotide variants and nine indels were discovered in comparing the chloroplast genomes of TC1966 and NM92. Analysis of the mungbean chloroplast transcriptome revealed mRNAs that were affected by transcriptional slippage and RNA editing. Transcriptional slippage frequency was positively correlated with the length of simple sequence repeats of the mungbean chloroplast genome (R2=0.9911. In total, 41 C-to-U editing sites were found in 23 chloroplast genes and in one intergenic spacer. No editing site that swapped U to C was found. A combination of bioinformatics and experimental methods revealed that the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase-transcribed genes psbF and ndhA are affected by transcriptional slippage in mungbean and in main lineages of land plants, including three dicots (Glycine max, Brassica rapa, and Nicotiana tabacum, two monocots (Oryza sativa and Zea mays, two gymnosperms (Pinus taeda and Ginkgo biloba and one moss (Physcomitrella patens. Transcript analysis of the rps2 gene showed that transcriptional slippage could affect transcripts at single sequence repeat regions with poly-A runs. It showed that transcriptional slippage together with incomplete RNA editing may cause sequence diversity of transcripts in chloroplasts of land plants.

  6. Intracellular ribonucleases involved in transcript processing and decay: precision tools for RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arraiano, Cecília Maria; Mauxion, Fabienne; Viegas, Sandra Cristina; Matos, Rute Gonçalves; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    In order to adapt to changing environmental conditions and regulate intracellular events such as division, cells are constantly producing new RNAs while discarding old or defective transcripts. These functions require the coordination of numerous ribonucleases that precisely cleave and trim newly made transcripts to produce functional molecules, and rapidly destroy unnecessary cellular RNAs. In recent years our knowledge of the nature, functions and structures of these enzymes in bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes has dramatically expanded. We present here a synthetic overview of the recent development in this dynamic area which has seen the identification of many new endoribonucleases and exoribonucleases. Moreover, the increasing pace at which the structures of these enzymes, or of their catalytic domains, have been solved has provided atomic level detail into their mechanisms of action. Based on sequence conservation and structural data, these proteins have been grouped into families, some of which contain only ribonuclease members, others including a variety of nucleolytic enzymes that act upon DNA and/or RNA. At the other extreme some ribonucleases belong to families of proteins involved in a wide variety of enzymatic reactions. Functional characterization of these fascinating enzymes has provided evidence for the extreme diversity of their biological functions that include, for example, removal of poly(A) tails (deadenylation) or poly(U) tails from eukaryotic RNAs, processing of tRNA and mRNA 3' ends, maturation of rRNAs and destruction of unnecessary mRNAs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor: Key Players in Plant Regulatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Abdul F. A.; Sajad, Muhammad; Nazaruddin, Nazaruddin; Fauzi, Izzat A.; Murad, Abdul M. A.; Zainal, Zamri; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2017-01-01

    Recent achievements in plant microRNA (miRNA), a large class of small and non-coding RNAs, are very exciting. A wide array of techniques involving forward genetic, molecular cloning, bioinformatic analysis, and the latest technology, deep sequencing have greatly advanced miRNA discovery. A tiny miRNA sequence has the ability to target single/multiple mRNA targets. Most of the miRNA targets are transcription factors (TFs) which have paramount importance in regulating the plant growth and development. Various families of TFs, which have regulated a range of regulatory networks, may assist plants to grow under normal and stress environmental conditions. This present review focuses on the regulatory relationships between miRNAs and different families of TFs like; NF-Y, MYB, AP2, TCP, WRKY, NAC, GRF, and SPL. For instance NF-Y play important role during drought tolerance and flower development, MYB are involved in signal transduction and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, AP2 regulate the floral development and nodule formation, TCP direct leaf development and growth hormones signaling. WRKY have known roles in multiple stress tolerances, NAC regulate lateral root formation, GRF are involved in root growth, flower, and seed development, and SPL regulate plant transition from juvenile to adult. We also studied the relation between miRNAs and TFs by consolidating the research findings from different plant species which will help plant scientists in understanding the mechanism of action and interaction between these regulators in the plant growth and development under normal and stress environmental conditions. PMID:28446918

  8. Effects of Modification of the Transcription Initiation Site Context on Citrus Tristeza Virus Subgenomic RNA Synthesis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayllón, María A.; Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Karasev, Alexander V.; Adkins, Scott; Mawassi, Munir; Guerri, José; Moreno, Pedro; Dawson, William O.

    2003-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a member of the Closteroviridae, has a positive-sense RNA genome of about 20 kb organized into 12 open reading frames (ORFs). The last 10 ORFs are expressed through 3′-coterminal subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) regulated in both amounts and timing. Additionally, relatively large amounts of complementary sgRNAs are produced. We have been unable to determine whether these sgRNAs are produced by internal promotion from the full-length template minus strand or by transcription from the minus-stranded sgRNAs. Understanding the regulation of 10 sgRNAs is a conceptual challenge. In analyzing commonalities of a replicase complex in producing so many sgRNAs, we examined initiating nucleotides of the sgRNAs. We mapped the 5′ termini of intermediate- (CP and p13) and low- (p18) produced sgRNAs that, like the two highly abundant sgRNAs (p20 and p23) previously mapped, all initiate with an adenylate. We then examined modifications of the initiation site, which has been shown to be useful in defining mechanisms of sgRNA synthesis. Surprisingly, mutation of the initiating nucleotide of the CTV sgRNAs did not prevent sgRNA accumulation. Based on our results, the CTV replication complex appears to initiate sgRNA synthesis with purines, preferably with adenylates, and is able to initiate synthesis using a nucleotide a few positions 5′ or 3′ of the native initiation nucleotide. Furthermore, the context of the initiation site appears to be a regulatory mechanism for levels of sgRNA production. These data do not support either of the established mechanisms for synthesis of sgRNAs, suggesting that CTV sgRNA production utilizes a different mechanism. PMID:12915539

  9. A MicroRNA-Transcription Factor Blueprint for Early Atrial Arrhythmogenic Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Torrado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous self-terminating atrial fibrillation (AF is one of the most common heart rhythm disorders, yet the regulatory molecular mechanisms underlying this syndrome are rather unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA transcriptome and expression of candidate transcription factors (TFs with potential roles in arrhythmogenesis, such as Pitx2, Tbx5, and myocardin (Myocd, were analyzed by microarray, qRT-PCR, and Western blotting in left atrial (LA samples from pigs with transitory AF established by right atrial tachypacing. Induced ectopic tachyarrhythmia caused rapid and substantial miRNA remodeling associated with a marked downregulation of Pitx2, Tbx5, and Myocd expression in atrial myocardium. The downregulation of Pitx2, Tbx5, and Myocd was inversely correlated with upregulation of the corresponding targeting miRNAs (miR-21, miR-10a/10b, and miR-1, resp. in the LA of paced animals. Through in vitro transient transfections of HL-1 atrial myocytes, we further showed that upregulation of miR-21 did result in downregulation of Pitx2 in cardiomyocyte background. The results suggest that immediate-early miRNA remodeling coupled with deregulation of TF expression underlies the onset of AF.

  10. Global transcript profiling of transgenic plants constitutively overexpressing the RNA-binding protein AtGRP7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig Lars

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clock-controlled RNA-binding protein AtGRP7 influences circadian oscillations of its own transcript at the post-transcriptional level. To identify additional targets that are regulated by AtGRP7, transcript profiles of transgenic plants constitutively overexpressing AtGRP7 (AtGRP7-ox and wild type plants were compared. Results Approximately 1.4% of the transcripts represented on the Affymetrix ATH1 microarray showed changes in steady-state abundance upon AtGRP7 overexpression. One third of the differentially expressed genes are controlled by the circadian clock, and they show a distinct bias of their phase: The up-regulated genes preferentially peak around dawn, roughly opposite to the AtGRP7 peak abundance whereas the down-regulated genes preferentially peak at the end of the day. Further, transcripts responsive to abiotic and biotic stimuli were enriched among AtGRP7 targets. Transcripts encoding the pathogenesis-related PR1 and PR2 proteins were elevated in AtGRP7-ox plants but not in plants overexpressing AtGRP7 with a point mutation in the RNA-binding domain, indicating that the regulation involves RNA binding activity of AtGRP7. Gene set enrichment analysis uncovered components involved in ribosome function and RNA metabolism among groups of genes upregulated in AtGRP7-ox plants, consistent with its role in post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusion Apart from regulating a suite of circadian transcripts in a time-of-day dependent manner AtGRP7, both directly and indirectly, affects other transcripts including transcripts responsive to abiotic and biotic stimuli. This suggests a regulatory role of AtGRP7 in the output of the endogenous clock and a complex network of transcripts responsive to external stimuli downstream of the AtGRP7 autoregulatory circuit.

  11. Site-specific labeling of RNA by combining genetic alphabet expansion transcription and copper-free click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Ando, Ami; Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2015-08-18

    Site-specific labeling of long-chain RNAs with desired molecular probes is an imperative technique to facilitate studies of functional RNA molecules. By genetic alphabet expansion using an artificial third base pair, called an unnatural base pair, we present a post-transcriptional modification method for RNA transcripts containing an incorporated azide-linked unnatural base at specific positions, using a copper-free click reaction. The unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa) functions in transcription. Thus, we chemically synthesized a triphosphate substrate of 4-(4-azidopentyl)-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (N3-PaTP), which can be site-specifically introduced into RNA, opposite Ds in templates by T7 transcription. The N3-Pa incorporated in the transcripts was modified with dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO) derivatives. We demonstrated the transcription of 17-, 76- and 260-mer RNA molecules and their site-specific labeling with Alexa 488, Alexa 594 and biotin. This method will be useful for preparing RNA molecules labeled with any functional groups of interest, toward in vivo experiments. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. A transcription fork model for Pol IV and Pol V-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaard, C S; Haag, J R; Pontes, O M F; Blevins, T; Cocklin, R

    2012-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (RDR2) are required for the biogenesis of 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that direct DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing at target loci transcribed by nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerase V (Pol V). Pol IV and RDR2 physically associate and RDR2's polymerase activity in vitro is dependent on Pol IV. RDR2 transcription of nascent Pol IV transcripts might result in discontinuous second strands, analogous to lagging-strand Okazaki fragments generated during DNA replication. In vitro, Pol V is unable to displace nontemplate DNA during transcriptional elongation. This suggests a need for DNA duplex unwinding by helper proteins, perhaps analogous to the helicase-mediated duplex unwinding that occurs at replication forks to enable leading strand synthesis by DNA polymerase ε. A multiprotein complex (DRD1, DMS3, DMS11, RDM1) known to enable Pol V transcription might facilitate duplex unwinding via ATP-dependent DNA translocase, single-stranded DNA binding, and cohesin-like strand capture activities. These considerations are discussed and incorporated into a "transcription fork" model for Pol IV and Pol V-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation.

  13. Transcriptional role of androgen receptor in the expression of long non-coding RNA Sox2OT in neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Tosetti

    Full Text Available The complex architecture of adult brain derives from tightly regulated migration and differentiation of precursor cells generated during embryonic neurogenesis. Changes at transcriptional level of genes that regulate migration and differentiation may lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. Androgen receptor (AR is a transcription factor that is already expressed during early embryonic days. However, AR role in the regulation of gene expression at early embryonic stage is yet to be determinate. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA Sox2 overlapping transcript (Sox2OT plays a crucial role in gene expression control during development but its transcriptional regulation is still to be clearly defined. Here, using Bicalutamide in order to pharmacologically inactivated AR, we investigated whether AR participates in the regulation of the transcription of the lncRNASox2OTat early embryonic stage. We identified a new DNA binding region upstream of Sox2 locus containing three androgen response elements (ARE, and found that AR binds such a sequence in embryonic neural stem cells and in mouse embryonic brain. Our data suggest that through this binding, AR can promote the RNA polymerase II dependent transcription of Sox2OT. Our findings also suggest that AR participates in embryonic neurogenesis through transcriptional control of the long non-coding RNA Sox2OT.

  14. Transcriptional role of androgen receptor in the expression of long non-coding RNA Sox2OT in neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosetti, Valentina; Sassone, Jenny; Ferri, Anna L M; Taiana, Michela; Bedini, Gloria; Nava, Sara; Brenna, Greta; Di Resta, Chiara; Pareyson, Davide; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Carelli, Stephana; Parati, Eugenio A; Gorio, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The complex architecture of adult brain derives from tightly regulated migration and differentiation of precursor cells generated during embryonic neurogenesis. Changes at transcriptional level of genes that regulate migration and differentiation may lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. Androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor that is already expressed during early embryonic days. However, AR role in the regulation of gene expression at early embryonic stage is yet to be determinate. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) Sox2 overlapping transcript (Sox2OT) plays a crucial role in gene expression control during development but its transcriptional regulation is still to be clearly defined. Here, using Bicalutamide in order to pharmacologically inactivated AR, we investigated whether AR participates in the regulation of the transcription of the lncRNASox2OTat early embryonic stage. We identified a new DNA binding region upstream of Sox2 locus containing three androgen response elements (ARE), and found that AR binds such a sequence in embryonic neural stem cells and in mouse embryonic brain. Our data suggest that through this binding, AR can promote the RNA polymerase II dependent transcription of Sox2OT. Our findings also suggest that AR participates in embryonic neurogenesis through transcriptional control of the long non-coding RNA Sox2OT.

  15. Bacterial Transcription Inhibitor of RNA Polymerase Holoenzyme Formation by Structure-Based Drug Design: From in Silico Screening to Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-01-08

    Bacterial transcription is a proven target for antibacterial research. However, most of the known inhibitors targeting transcription are from natural extracts or are hits from screens where the binding site remains unidentified. Using an RNA polymerase holoenzyme homology structure from the model Gram-positive organism Bacillus subtilis, we created a pharmacophore model and used it for in silico screening of a publicly available library for compounds able to inhibit holoenzyme formation. The hits demonstrated specific affinity to bacterial RNA polymerase and excellent activity using in vitro assays and showed no binding to the equivalent structure from human RNA polymerase II. The target specificity in live cells and antibacterial activity was demonstrated in microscopy and growth inhibition experiments. This is the first example of targeted inhibitor development for a bacterial RNA polymerase, outlining a complete discovery process from virtual screening to biochemical validation. This approach could serve as an appropriate platform for the future identification of inhibitors of bacterial transcription.

  16. Multiple transcripts regulate glucose-triggered mRNA decay of the lactate transporter JEN1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Raquel P.; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Casal, Margarida

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae JEN1 gene encoding the lactate transporter undergoes strong catabolic repression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. JEN1 mRNA decay is greatly accelerated upon the addition of a pulse of glucose, fructose or mannose to induced cell cultures. Mapping of the 5´UTRs and 3´UTRs of JEN1 transcripts revealed multiple transcription start-sites located at position -51, +391 or +972, depending on the cell culture conditions. The presence of t...

  17. MicroRNA-101 regulated transcriptional modulator SUB1 plays a role in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, B V S K; Goswami, M T; Pathi, S S; Robinson, A D; Cieślik, M; Chandrashekar, D S; Agarwal, S; Siddiqui, J; Daignault, S; Carskadon, S L; Jing, X; Chinnaiyan, A M; Kunju, L P; Palanisamy, N; Varambally, S

    2016-12-08

    MicroRNA-101, a tumor suppressor microRNA (miR), is often downregulated in cancer and is known to target multiple oncogenes. Some of the genes that are negatively regulated by miR-101 expression include histone methyltransferase EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), COX2 (cyclooxygenase-2), POMP (proteasome maturation protein), CERS6, STMN1, MCL-1 and ROCK2, among others. In the present study, we show that miR-101 targets transcriptional coactivator SUB1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)/PC4 (positive cofactor 4) and regulates its expression. SUB1 is known to have diverse role in vital cell processes such as DNA replication, repair and heterochromatinization. SUB1 is known to modulate transcription and acts as a mediator between the upstream activators and general transcription machinery. Expression profiling in several cancers revealed SUB1 overexpression, suggesting a potential role in tumorigenesis. However, detailed regulation and function of SUB1 has not been elucidated. In this study, we show elevated expression of SUB1 in aggressive prostate cancer. Knockdown of SUB1 in prostate cancer cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Gene expression analyses coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that SUB1 binds to the promoter regions of several oncogenes such as PLK1 (Polo-like kinase 1), C-MYC, serine-threonine kinase BUB1B and regulates their expression. Additionally, we observed SUB1 downregulated CDKN1B expression. PLK1 knockdown or use of PLK1 inhibitor can mitigate oncogenic function of SUB1 in benign prostate cancer cells. Thus, our study suggests that miR-101 loss results in increased SUB1 expression and subsequent activation of known oncogenes driving prostate cancer progression and metastasis. This study therefore demonstrates functional role of SUB1 in prostate cancer, and identifies its regulation and potential downstream therapeutic targets of SUB1 in prostate

  18. Inhibition of post-transcriptional RNA processing by CDK inhibitors and its implication in anti-viral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Holcakova

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are key regulators of the cell cycle and RNA polymerase II mediated transcription. Several pharmacological CDK inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as potential cancer therapeutics and some of them also exhibit antiviral effects. Olomoucine II and roscovitine, purine-based inhibitors of CDKs, were described as effective antiviral agents that inhibit replication of a broad range of wild type human viruses. Olomoucine II and roscovitine show high selectivity for CDK7 and CDK9, with important functions in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription. RNA polymerase II is necessary for viral transcription and following replication in cells. We analyzed the effect of inhibition of CDKs by olomoucine II on gene expression from viral promoters and compared its effect to widely-used roscovitine. We found that both roscovitine and olomoucine II blocked the phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. However the repression of genes regulated by viral promoters was strongly dependent on gene localization. Both roscovitine and olomoucine II inhibited expression only when the viral promoter was not integrated into chromosomal DNA. In contrast, treatment of cells with genome-integrated viral promoters increased their expression even though there was decreased phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. To define the mechanism responsible for decreased gene expression after pharmacological CDK inhibitor treatment, the level of mRNA transcription from extrachromosomal DNA was determined. Interestingly, our results showed that inhibition of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphorylation increased the number of transcribed mRNAs. However, some of these mRNAs were truncated and lacked polyadenylation, which resulted in decreased translation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain is critical for linking transcription and posttrancriptional

  19. The differential processing of telomeres in response to increased telomeric transcription and RNA-DNA hybrid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Bettina; Dees, Martina; Bender, Katharina; Luke, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres are protective nucleoprotein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Despite the heterochromatic state of telomeres they are transcribed, generating non-coding telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA). Strongly induced TERRA transcription has been shown to cause telomere shortening and accelerated senescence in the absence of both telomerase and homology-directed repair (HDR). Moreover, it has recently been demonstrated that TERRA forms RNA-DNA hybrids at chromosome ends. The accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids at telomeres also leads to rapid senescence and telomere loss in the absence of telomerase and HDR. Conversely, in the presence of HDR, telomeric RNA-DNA hybrid accumulation and increased telomere transcription promote telomere recombination, and hence, delayed senescence. Here, we demonstrate that despite these similar phenotypic outcomes, telomeres that are highly transcribed are not processed in the same manner as those that accumulate RNA-DNA hybrids.

  20. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C

    2002-01-01

    Reverse transcription of a retroviral genome takes place in the cytoplasm of an infected cell by a process primed by a producer-cell-derived tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer-binding site (PBS). By an assay involving primer complementation of PBS-mutated vectors we analyzed whether tRNA...... primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven...... by cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus...

  1. The Composition of the Arabidopsis RNA Polymerase II Transcript Elongation Complex Reveals the Interplay between Elongation and mRNA Processing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosz, Wojciech; Pfab, Alexander; Ehrnsberger, Hans F; Holzinger, Philipp; Köllen, Karin; Mortensen, Simon A; Bruckmann, Astrid; Schubert, Thomas; Längst, Gernot; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Schubert, Veit; Grasser, Marion; Grasser, Klaus D

    2017-04-01

    Transcript elongation factors (TEFs) are a heterogeneous group of proteins that control the efficiency of transcript elongation of subsets of genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in the chromatin context. Using reciprocal tagging in combination with affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis thaliana , the TEFs SPT4/SPT5, SPT6, FACT, PAF1-C, and TFIIS copurified with each other and with elongating RNAPII, while P-TEFb was not among the interactors. Additionally, NAP1 histone chaperones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors, and some histone-modifying enzymes including Elongator were repeatedly found associated with TEFs. Analysis of double mutant plants defective in different combinations of TEFs revealed genetic interactions between genes encoding subunits of PAF1-C, FACT, and TFIIS, resulting in synergistic/epistatic effects on plant growth/development. Analysis of subnuclear localization, gene expression, and chromatin association did not provide evidence for an involvement of the TEFs in transcription by RNAPI (or RNAPIII). Proteomics analyses also revealed multiple interactions between the transcript elongation complex and factors involved in mRNA splicing and polyadenylation, including an association of PAF1-C with the polyadenylation factor CstF. Therefore, the RNAPII transcript elongation complex represents a platform for interactions among different TEFs, as well as for coordinating ongoing transcription with mRNA processing. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  2. The rhino-deadlock-cutoff complex licenses noncanonical transcription of dual-strand piRNA clusters in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Fabio; Sienski, Grzegorz; Handler, Dominik; Brennecke, Julius

    2014-06-05

    Argonaute proteins of the PIWI clade are central to transposon silencing in animal gonads. Their target specificity is defined by 23-30 nt PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs), which mostly originate from discrete genomic loci termed piRNA clusters. Here, we show that a complex composed of Rhino, Deadlock, and Cutoff (RDC) defines dual-strand piRNA clusters genome-wide in Drosophila ovaries. The RDC is anchored to H3K9me3-marked chromatin in part via Rhino's chromodomain. Depletion of Piwi results in loss of the RDC and small RNAs at a subset of piRNA clusters, demonstrating a feedback loop between Piwi and piRNA source loci. Intriguingly, profiles of RNA polymerase II occupancy, nascent transcription, and steady-state RNA levels reveal that the RDC licenses noncanonical transcription of dual-strand piRNA clusters. Likely, this process involves 5' end protection of nascent RNAs and suppression of transcription termination. Our data provide key insight into the regulation and evolution of piRNA clusters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. mRNA transcript quantification in archival samples using multiplexed, color-coded probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullane Patrick

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recently developed probe-based technology, the NanoString nCounter™ gene expression system, has been shown to allow accurate mRNA transcript quantification using low amounts of total RNA. We assessed the ability of this technology for mRNA expression quantification in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE oral carcinoma samples. Results We measured the mRNA transcript abundance of 20 genes (COL3A1, COL4A1, COL5A1, COL5A2, CTHRC1, CXCL1, CXCL13, MMP1, P4HA2, PDPN, PLOD2, POSTN, SDHA, SERPINE1, SERPINE2, SERPINH1, THBS2, TNC, GAPDH, RPS18 in 38 samples (19 paired fresh-frozen and FFPE oral carcinoma tissues, archived from 1997-2008 by both NanoString and SYBR Green I fluorescent dye-based quantitative real-time PCR (RQ-PCR. We compared gene expression data obtained by NanoString vs. RQ-PCR in both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples. Fresh-frozen samples showed a good overall Pearson correlation of 0.78, and FFPE samples showed a lower overall correlation coefficient of 0.59, which is likely due to sample quality. We found a higher correlation coefficient between fresh-frozen and FFPE samples analyzed by NanoString (r = 0.90 compared to fresh-frozen and FFPE samples analyzed by RQ-PCR (r = 0.50. In addition, NanoString data showed a higher mean correlation (r = 0.94 between individual fresh-frozen and FFPE sample pairs compared to RQ-PCR (r = 0.53. Conclusions Based on our results, we conclude that both technologies are useful for gene expression quantification in fresh-frozen or FFPE tissues; however, the probe-based NanoString method achieved superior gene expression quantification results when compared to RQ-PCR in archived FFPE samples. We believe that this newly developed technique is optimal for large-scale validation studies using total RNA isolated from archived, FFPE samples.

  4. mRNA transcript quantification in archival samples using multiplexed, color-coded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Patricia P; Waldron, Levi; Goswami, Rashmi S; Xu, Wei; Xuan, Yali; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Gullane, Patrick; Irish, Jonathan; Jurisica, Igor; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne

    2011-05-09

    A recently developed probe-based technology, the NanoString nCounter™ gene expression system, has been shown to allow accurate mRNA transcript quantification using low amounts of total RNA. We assessed the ability of this technology for mRNA expression quantification in archived formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) oral carcinoma samples. We measured the mRNA transcript abundance of 20 genes (COL3A1, COL4A1, COL5A1, COL5A2, CTHRC1, CXCL1, CXCL13, MMP1, P4HA2, PDPN, PLOD2, POSTN, SDHA, SERPINE1, SERPINE2, SERPINH1, THBS2, TNC, GAPDH, RPS18) in 38 samples (19 paired fresh-frozen and FFPE oral carcinoma tissues, archived from 1997-2008) by both NanoString and SYBR Green I fluorescent dye-based quantitative real-time PCR (RQ-PCR). We compared gene expression data obtained by NanoString vs. RQ-PCR in both fresh-frozen and FFPE samples. Fresh-frozen samples showed a good overall Pearson correlation of 0.78, and FFPE samples showed a lower overall correlation coefficient of 0.59, which is likely due to sample quality. We found a higher correlation coefficient between fresh-frozen and FFPE samples analyzed by NanoString (r = 0.90) compared to fresh-frozen and FFPE samples analyzed by RQ-PCR (r = 0.50). In addition, NanoString data showed a higher mean correlation (r = 0.94) between individual fresh-frozen and FFPE sample pairs compared to RQ-PCR (r = 0.53). Based on our results, we conclude that both technologies are useful for gene expression quantification in fresh-frozen or FFPE tissues; however, the probe-based NanoString method achieved superior gene expression quantification results when compared to RQ-PCR in archived FFPE samples. We believe that this newly developed technique is optimal for large-scale validation studies using total RNA isolated from archived, FFPE samples.

  5. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A Rachid

    2011-04-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery.

  6. BRCA2 Regulates Transcription Elongation by RNA Polymerase II to Prevent R-Loop Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud K.K. Shivji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The controlled release of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII from promoter-proximal pausing (PPP sites is critical for transcription elongation in metazoans. We show that the human tumor suppressor BRCA2 interacts with RNAPII to regulate PPP release, thereby preventing unscheduled RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops implicated in genomic instability and carcinogenesis. BRCA2 inactivation by depletion or cancer-causing mutations instigates RNAPII accumulation and R-loop accrual at PPP sites in actively transcribed genes, accompanied by γH2AX formation marking DNA breakage, which is reduced by ERCC4 endonuclease depletion. BRCA2 inactivation decreases RNAPII-associated factor 1 (PAF1 recruitment (which normally promotes RNAPII release and diminishes H2B Lys120 ubiquitination, impeding nascent RNA synthesis. PAF1 depletion phenocopies, while its overexpression ameliorates, R-loop accumulation after BRCA2 inactivation. Thus, an unrecognized role for BRCA2 in the transition from promoter-proximal pausing to productive elongation via augmented PAF1 recruitment to RNAPII is subverted by disease-causing mutations, provoking R-loop-mediated DNA breakage in BRCA2-deficient cells.

  7. Systematic dissection of dysregulated transcription factor-miRNA feed-forward loops across tumor types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Lin, Chen-Ching; Wang, Quan; Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-11-01

    Transcription factor and microRNA (miRNA) can mutually regulate each other and jointly regulate their shared target genes to form feed-forward loops (FFLs). While there are many studies of dysregulated FFLs in a specific cancer, a systematic investigation of dysregulated FFLs across multiple tumor types (pan-cancer FFLs) has not been performed yet. In this study, using The Cancer Genome Atlas data, we identified 26 pan-cancer FFLs, which were dysregulated in at least five tumor types. These pan-cancer FFLs could communicate with each other and form functionally consistent subnetworks, such as epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related subnetwork. Many proteins and miRNAs in each subnetwork belong to the same protein and miRNA family, respectively. Importantly, cancer-associated genes and drug targets were enriched in these pan-cancer FFLs, in which the genes and miRNAs also tended to be hubs and bottlenecks. Finally, we identified potential anticancer indications for existing drugs with novel mechanism of action. Collectively, this study highlights the potential of pan-cancer FFLs as a novel paradigm in elucidating pathogenesis of cancer and developing anticancer drugs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Spatial Organization and Dynamics of Transcription Elongation and Pre-mRNA Processing in Live Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Sánchez-Álvarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last 30 years, systematic biochemical and functional studies have significantly expanded our knowledge of the transcriptional molecular components and the pre-mRNA processing machinery of the cell. However, our current understanding of how these functions take place spatiotemporally within the highly compartmentalized eukaryotic nucleus remains limited. Moreover, it is increasingly clear that “the whole is more than the sum of its parts” and that an understanding of the dynamic coregulation of genes is essential for fully characterizing complex biological phenomena and underlying diseases. Recent technological advances in light microscopy in addition to novel cell and molecular biology approaches have led to the development of new tools, which are being used to address these questions and may contribute to achieving an integrated and global understanding of how the genome works at a cellular level. Here, we review major hallmarks and novel insights in RNA polymerase II activity and pre-mRNA processing in the context of nuclear organization, as well as new concepts and challenges arising from our ability to gather extensive dynamic information at the single-cell resolution.

  9. MicroRNA filters Hox temporal transcription noise to confer boundary formation in the spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chung-Jung; Hong, Tian; Tung, Ying-Tsen; Yen, Ya-Ping; Hsu, Ho-Chiang; Lu, Ya-Lin; Chang, Mien; Nie, Qing; Chen, Jun-An

    2017-03-01

    The initial rostrocaudal patterning of the neural tube leads to differential expression of Hox genes that contribute to the specification of motor neuron (MN) subtype identity. Although several 3' Hox mRNAs are expressed in progenitors in a noisy manner, these Hox proteins are not expressed in the progenitors and only become detectable in postmitotic MNs. MicroRNA biogenesis impairment leads to precocious expression and propagates the noise of Hoxa5 at the protein level, resulting in an imprecise Hoxa5-Hoxc8 boundary. Here we uncover, using in silico simulation, two feed-forward Hox-miRNA loops accounting for the precocious and noisy Hoxa5 expression, as well as an ill-defined boundary phenotype in Dicer mutants. Finally, we identify mir-27 as a major regulator coordinating the temporal delay and spatial boundary of Hox protein expression. Our results provide a novel trans Hox-miRNA circuit filtering transcription noise and controlling the timing of protein expression to confer robust individual MN identity.

  10. Evidence for novel processing of the anaerobically inducible dicistronic focA-pfl mRNA transcript in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawers, R Gary

    2005-12-01

    The anaerobically inducible dicistronic focA-pfl operon is transcribed from three co-ordinately regulated promoters that are located 5' of the operon. Remarkably, the 5' ends of four further highly abundant operon-internal transcripts are located within the focA gene, with a fifth transcript mapping in the intergenic region between focA and pfl. The findings of this study demonstrate that the bulk of these five operon-internal transcripts are the result of processing. Processing was independent of the broad-spectrum endoribonucleases associated with mRNA turnover and still occurred when the upstream regulatory region of the operon was replaced with two different heterologous promoters recognized by Escherichia coli core RNA polymerase, including the tetP promoter. However, when the T7Phi10 promoter was introduced upstream of the focA-pfl operon, mainly full-length transcript and a minor amount of two processing products were observed. T7 RNA polymerase mutants that exhibit reduced elongation speed did not restore the wild-type transcript-processing pattern. Moreover, processing was independent of focA translation. Taken together, these data suggest that processing of the focA-pfl transcripts occurs by a novel mechanism that might require the action of E. coli core RNA polymerase.

  11. 5′-Deoxy-5′-hydrazinylguanosine as an initiator of T7 RNA polymerase-catalyzed transcriptions for the preparation of labeling-ready RNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    Skipsey, M.; G Hack; Hooper, T. A.; Shankey, M. C.; Conway, L.P.; Schröder, M.; Hodgson, D. R. W.

    2013-01-01

    5′-deoxy-5′-hydrazinylguanosine was incorporated into the 5′-termini of RNA transcripts using T7 RNA polymerase. Transcriptions provided 5′-hydrazinyl-RNA that was readily labeled and purified. The use of fluorophore-labeled material was validated in an endoribonuclease activity assay.

  12. Characterization of a Novel Class I Transcription Factor A (CITFA) Subunit That Is Indispensable for Transcription by the Multifunctional RNA Polymerase I of Trypanosoma brucei

    KAUST Repository

    Nguyen, T. N.

    2012-10-26

    Trypanosoma brucei is the only organism known to have evolved a multifunctional RNA polymerase I (pol I) system that is used to express the parasite\\'s ribosomal RNAs, as well as its major cell surface antigens, namely, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) and procyclin, which are vital for establishing successful infections in the mammalian host and the tsetse vector, respectively. Thus far, biochemical analyses of the T. brucei RNA pol I transcription machinery have elucidated the subunit structure of the enzyme and identified the class I transcription factor A (CITFA). CITFA binds to RNA pol I promoters, and its CITFA-2 subunit was shown to be absolutely essential for RNA pol I transcription in the parasite. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) of CITFA revealed the subunits CITFA-1 to -6, which are conserved only among kinetoplastid organisms, plus the dynein light chain DYNLL1. Here, by tagging CITFA-6 instead of CITFA-2, a complex was purified that contained all known CITFA subunits, as well as a novel proline-rich protein. Functional studies carried out in vivo and in vitro, as well as a colocalization study, unequivocally demonstrated that this protein is a bona fide CITFA subunit, essential for parasite viability and indispensable for RNA pol I transcription of ribosomal gene units and the active VSG expression site in the mammalian-infective life cycle stage of the parasite. Interestingly, CITFA-7 function appears to be species specific, because expression of an RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant CITFA-7 transgene from Trypanosoma cruzi could not rescue the lethal phenotype of silencing endogenous CITFA-7.

  13. RNA Helicases DDX5 and DDX17 Dynamically Orchestrate Transcription, miRNA, and Splicing Programs in Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Dardenne

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The RNA helicases DDX5 and DDX17 are members of a large family of highly conserved proteins that are involved in gene-expression regulation; however, their in vivo targets and activities in biological processes such as cell differentiation, which requires reprogramming of gene-expression programs at multiple levels, are not well characterized. Here, we uncovered a mechanism by which DDX5 and DDX17 cooperate with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP H/F splicing factors to define epithelial- and myoblast-specific splicing subprograms. We then observed that downregulation of DDX5 and DDX17 protein expression during myogenesis and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation contributes to the switching of splicing programs during these processes. Remarkably, this downregulation is mediated by the production of miRNAs induced upon differentiation in a DDX5/DDX17-dependent manner. Since DDX5 and DDX17 also function as coregulators of master transcriptional regulators of differentiation, we propose to name these proteins “master orchestrators” of differentiation that dynamically orchestrate several layers of gene expression.

  14. Rapid Genome-wide Recruitment of RNA Polymerase II Drives Transcription, Splicing, and Translation Events during T Cell Responses

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    Kathrin Davari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation of immune cells results in rapid functional changes, but how such fast changes are accomplished remains enigmatic. By combining time courses of 4sU-seq, RNA-seq, ribosome profiling (RP, and RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II ChIP-seq during T cell activation, we illustrate genome-wide temporal dynamics for ∼10,000 genes. This approach reveals not only immediate-early and posttranscriptionally regulated genes but also coupled changes in transcription and translation for >90% of genes. Recruitment, rather than release of paused RNA Pol II, primarily mediates transcriptional changes. This coincides with a genome-wide temporary slowdown in cotranscriptional splicing, even for polyadenylated mRNAs that are localized at the chromatin. Subsequent splicing optimization correlates with increasing Ser-2 phosphorylation of the RNA Pol II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD and activation of the positive transcription elongation factor (pTEFb. Thus, rapid de novo recruitment of RNA Pol II dictates the course of events during T cell activation, particularly transcription, splicing, and consequently translation.

  15. A multiplex assay to measure RNA transcripts of prostate cancer in urine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Ing Quek

    Full Text Available The serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA test has a high false positive rate. As a single marker, PSA provides limited diagnostic information. A multi-marker test capable of detecting not only tumors but also the potentially lethal ones provides an unmet clinical need. Using the nanoString nCounter gene expression system, a 20-gene multiplex test was developed based on digital gene counting of RNA transcripts in urine as a means to detect prostate cancer. In this test, voided urine is centrifuged to pellet cells and the purified RNA is amplified for hybridization to preselected probesets. Amplification of test cell line RNA appeared not to introduce significant bias, and the counts matched well with gene abundance levels as measured by DNA microarrays. For data analysis, the individual counts were compared to that of β2 microglobulin, a housekeeping gene. Urine samples of 5 pre-operative cases and 2 non-cancer were analyzed. Pathology information was then retrieved. Signals for a majority of the genes were low for non-cancer and low Gleason scores, and 6/6 known prostate cancer markers were positive in the cases. One case of Gleason 4+5 showed, in contrast, strong signals for all cancer-associated markers, including CD24. One non-cancer also showed signals for all 6 cancer markers, and this man might harbor an undiagnosed cancer. This multiplex test assaying a natural waste product can potentially be used for screening, early cancer detection and patient stratification. Diagnostic information is gained from the RNA signatures that are associated with cell types of prostate tumors.

  16. miRNA signatures and transcriptional regulation of their target genes in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. We have earlier reported the skin miRNA expression profiling in patients with non-segmental vitiligo. In the present study, we show the expression of previously identified skin miRNAs signatures in blood and their target genes in whole blood and PBMCs as well as skin micro-environment of vitiligo patients and controls. miRNA expression profiling in whole blood was performed using customized TaqMan® Low Density Array. We predicted the potential targets of differentially expressed miRNAs and investigated their expression levels in skin, whole blood and PBMCs from patients and controls using Real-time PCR. Our results showed miR-1, miR-184, miR-328, miR-383 and miR-577 hold similar pattern of expression as of skin, suggesting their potent eminence for being putative markers for vitiligo. In silico target prediction revealed miR-1 targets EDN1, G6PD, HSP60, HSP70, SERP1, SIRT1 & TYR; miR-184 targets EZR & LAMP1; miR-328 targets IL1B, POLH & TRPM1; miR-383 targets EDN1 & TYRP1; and miR-577 targets PTPN22 & TYRP1 which were corroborated by our validation study. In conclusion, the present study for the first time provides new insights into the crucial role of miRNA regulated gene network involved in oxidative stress, autoimmunity and ER stress mediated pathogenesis of vitiligo. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Alternative splicing and extensive RNA editing of human TPH2 transcripts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Grohmann

    Full Text Available Brain serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission plays a key role in the regulation of mood and has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric conditions. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of 5-HT. Recently, we discovered a second TPH isoform (TPH2 in vertebrates, including man, which is predominantly expressed in brain, while the previously known TPH isoform (TPH1 is primarly a non-neuronal enzyme. Overwhelming evidence now points to TPH2 as a candidate gene for 5-HT-related psychiatric disorders. To assess the role of TPH2 gene variability in the etiology of psychiatric diseases we performed cDNA sequence analysis of TPH2 transcripts from human post mortem amygdala samples obtained from individuals with psychiatric disorders (drug abuse, schizophrenia, suicide and controls. Here we show that TPH2 exists in two alternatively spliced variants in the coding region, denoted TPH2a and TPH2b. Moreover, we found evidence that the pre-mRNAs of both splice variants are dynamically RNA-edited in a mutually exclusive manner. Kinetic studies with cell lines expressing recombinant TPH2 variants revealed a higher activity of the novel TPH2B protein compared with the previously known TPH2A, whereas RNA editing was shown to inhibit the enzymatic activity of both TPH2 splice variants. Therefore, our results strongly suggest a complex fine-tuning of central nervous system 5-HT biosynthesis by TPH2 alternative splicing and RNA editing. Finally, we present molecular and large-scale linkage data evidencing that deregulated alternative splicing and RNA editing is involved in the etiology of psychiatric diseases, such as suicidal behaviour.

  18. Nascent RNA sequencing reveals a dynamic global transcriptional response at genes and enhancers to the natural medicinal compound celastrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukler, Noah; Booth, Gregory T; Huang, Yi-Fei; Tippens, Nathaniel; Waters, Colin T; Danko, Charles G; Lis, John T; Siepel, Adam

    2017-10-12

    Most studies of responses to transcriptional stimuli measure changes in cellular mRNA concentrations. By sequencing nascent RNA instead, it is possible to detect changes in transcription in minutes rather than hours and thereby distinguish primary from secondary responses to regulatory signals. Here, we describe the use of PRO-seq to characterize the immediate transcriptional response in human cells to celastrol, a compound derived from traditional Chinese medicine that has potent anti-inflammatory, tumor-inhibitory, and obesity-controlling effects. Celastrol is known to elicit a cellular stress response resembling the response to heat shock, but the transcriptional basis of this response remains unclear. Our analysis of PRO-seq data for K562 cells reveals dramatic transcriptional effects soon after celastrol treatment at a broad collection of both coding and noncoding transcription units. This transcriptional response occurred in two major waves, one within 10 min, and a second 40-60 min after treatment. Transcriptional activity was generally repressed by celastrol, but one distinct group of genes, enriched for roles in the heat shock response, displayed strong activation. Using a regression approach, we identified key transcription factors that appear to drive these transcriptional responses, including members of the E2F and RFX families. We also found sequence-based evidence that particular transcription factors drive the activation of enhancers. We observed increased polymerase pausing at both genes and enhancers, suggesting that pause release may be widely inhibited during the celastrol response. Our study demonstrates that a careful analysis of PRO-seq time-course data can disentangle key aspects of a complex transcriptional response, and it provides new insights into the activity of a powerful pharmacological agent. © 2017 Dukler et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Inferential considerations for low-count RNA-seq transcripts: a case study on the dominant prairie grass Andropogon gerardii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Seth; Johnson, Loretta; Galliart, Matthew; Brown, Sue; Shelton, Jennifer; Herndon, Nicolae; Bello, Nora M

    2016-02-27

    Differential expression (DE) analysis of RNA-seq data still poses inferential challenges, such as handling of transcripts characterized by low expression levels. In this study, we use a plasmode-based approach to assess the relative performance of alternative inferential strategies on RNA-seq transcripts, with special emphasis on transcripts characterized by a small number of read counts, so-called low-count transcripts, as motivated by an ecological application in prairie grasses. Big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) is a wide-ranging dominant prairie grass of ecological and agricultural importance to the US Midwest while edaphic subspecies sand bluestem (A. gerardii ssp. Hallii) grows exclusively on sand dunes. Relative to big bluestem, sand bluestem exhibits qualitative phenotypic divergence consistent with enhanced drought tolerance, plausibly associated with transcripts of low expression levels. Our dataset consists of RNA-seq read counts for 25,582 transcripts (60% of which are classified as low-count) collected from leaf tissue of individual plants of big bluestem (n = 4) and sand bluestem (n = 4). Focused on low-count transcripts, we compare alternative ad-hoc data filtering techniques commonly used in RNA-seq pipelines and assess the inferential performance of recently developed statistical methods for DE analysis, namely DESeq2 and edgeR robust. These methods attempt to overcome the inherently noisy behavior of low-count transcripts by either shrinkage or differential weighting of observations, respectively. Both DE methods seemed to properly control family-wise type 1 error on low-count transcripts, whereas edgeR robust showed greater power and DESeq2 showed greater precision and accuracy. However, specification of the degree of freedom parameter under edgeR robust had a non-trivial impact on inference and should be handled carefully. When properly specified, both DE methods showed overall promising inferential performance on low-count transcripts

  20. Adaptation of Organisms by Resonance of RNA Transcription with the Cellular Redox Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Sequence variation in organisms differs across the genome and the majority of mutations are caused by oxidation, yet its origin is not fully understood. It has also been shown that the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle is the fundamental biochemical cycle that coordinates the timing of all biochemical processes in that cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. It is shown that the temporal resonance of transcriptome biosynthesis with the oscillating binary state of the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle serves as a basis for non-random sequence variation at specific genome-wide coordinates that change faster than by accumulation of chance mutations. This work demonstrates evidence for a universal, persistent and iterative feedback mechanism between the environment and heredity, whereby acquired variation between cell divisions can outweigh inherited variation.

  1. Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein: Linking Replication, Transcription, and RNA Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Sheila V

    2016-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is tightly linked to differentiation of the infected epithelium. This means that viral proteins must exert control over epithelial gene expression in order to optimize viral production. The HPV E2 protein controls replication, transcription, and viral genome partitioning during the viral infectious life cycle. It consists of a nucleic acid-binding domain and a protein-protein interaction domain separated by a flexible serine and arginine-rich hinge region. Over the last few years, mounting evidence has uncovered an important new role for E2 in viral and cellular RNA processing. This Gem discusses the role of E2 in controlling the epithelial cellular environment and how E2 might act to coordinate late events in the viral replication cycle. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Circadian transcription factor BMAL1 regulates innate immunity against select RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Tanmay; Dhar, Jayeeta; Patel, Sonal; Kondratov, Roman; Barik, Sailen

    2017-02-01

    BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1, also known as MOP3 or ARNT3) belongs to the family of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS domain-containing transcription factors, and is a key component of the molecular oscillator that generates circadian rhythms. Here, we report that BMAL1-deficient cells are significantly more susceptible to infection by two major respiratory viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family, namely RSV and PIV3. Embryonic fibroblasts from Bmal1-/- mice produced nearly 10-fold more progeny virus than their wild type controls. These results were supported by animal studies whereby pulmonary infection of RSV produced a more severe disease and morbidity in Bmal1-/-mice. These results show that BMAL1 can regulate cellular innate immunity against specific RNA viruses.

  3. mRNA Transcript abundance during plant growth and the influence of Li(+) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M C; Kuhne, W W; Halverson, N V; Chang, C-S; Kitamura, E; Hawthorn, L; Martinez, N E; Stafford, C; Milliken, C E; Caldwell, E F; Stieve-Caldwell, E

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li(+) concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li(+) focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li(+) exposure in Arabidopsis with Li(+) uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li(+)-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li(+) resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li(+) exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li(+) exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li(+)-sensitive genes and a gene-based "response plan" for acute and chronic Li(+) exposure are delineated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Messenger RNA levels and transcription rates of hepatic lipogenesis genes in genetically lean and fat chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaire Madeleine

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Levels of body fat content in commercial meat chickens have prompted research in order to control the development of this trait. Based on experimentally selected divergent lean and fat lines, many studies have shown that liver metabolism has a major role in the fatness variability. In order to identify which genes are involved in this variability, we investigated the expression of several genes implicated in the hepatic lipid metabolism. The studied genes code for enzymes of fatty acid synthesis [ATP citrate-lyase (ACL, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, fatty acid synthase (FAS, malic enzyme (ME, stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD1], for an apolipoprotein [apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1], and for the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα, which is a transcription factor implied in the regulation of several genes of lipid metabolism. The results show that the fat-line chickens display significantly higher hepatic transcription rates and mRNA levels than the lean-line chickens for the ACL, ME and APOA1 genes. This suggests that these genes could be responsible for the phenotypic fatness variability.

  5. RNA Sequencing Reveals Xyr1 as a Transcription Factor Regulating Gene Expression beyond Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xyr1 has been demonstrated to be the main transcription activator of (hemicellulases in the well-known cellulase producer Trichoderma reesei. This study comprehensively investigates the genes regulated by Xyr1 through RNA sequencing to produce the transcription profiles of T. reesei Rut-C30 and its xyr1 deletion mutant (Δxyr1, cultured on lignocellulose or glucose. xyr1 deletion resulted in 467 differentially expressed genes on inducing medium. Almost all functional genes involved in (hemicellulose degradation and many transporters belonging to the sugar porter family in the major facilitator superfamily (MFS were downregulated in Δxyr1. By contrast, all differentially expressed protease, lipase, chitinase, some ATP-binding cassette transporters, and heat shock protein-encoding genes were upregulated in Δxyr1. When cultured on glucose, a total of 281 genes were expressed differentially in Δxyr1, most of which were involved in energy, solute transport, lipid, amino acid, and monosaccharide as well as secondary metabolism. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the intracellular β-glucosidase bgl2, the putative nonenzymatic cellulose-attacking gene cip1, the MFS lactose transporter lp, the nmrA-like gene, endo T, the acid protease pepA, and the small heat shock protein hsp23 were probable Xyr1-targets. These results might help elucidate the regulation system for synthesis and secretion of (hemicellulases in T. reesei Rut-C30.

  6. AGO6 functions in RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Eun

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM is a small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated epigenetic modification that contributes to transposon silencing in plants. RdDM requires a complex transcriptional machinery that includes specialized RNA polymerases, named Pol IV and Pol V, as well as chromatin remodelling proteins, transcription factors, RNA binding proteins, and other plant-specific proteins whose functions are not yet clarified. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DICER-LIKE3 and members of the ARGONAUTE4 group of ARGONAUTE (AGO proteins are involved, respectively, in generating and using 24-nt siRNAs that trigger methylation and transcriptional gene silencing of homologous promoter sequences. AGO4 is the main AGO protein implicated in the RdDM pathway. Here we report the identification of the related AGO6 in a forward genetic screen for mutants defective in RdDM and transcriptional gene silencing in shoot and root apical meristems in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identification of AGO6, and not AGO4, in our screen is consistent with the primary expression of AGO6 in shoot and root growing points.

  7. Viral Ubiquitin Ligase Stimulates Selective Host MicroRNA Expression by Targeting ZEB Transcriptional Repressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Youn; Leader, Andrew; Stoller, Michelle L.; Coen, Donald M.; Wilson, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) brings numerous changes in cellular gene expression. Levels of most host mRNAs are reduced, limiting synthesis of host proteins, especially those involved in antiviral defenses. The impact of HSV-1 on host microRNAs (miRNAs), an extensive network of short non-coding RNAs that regulate mRNA stability/translation, remains largely unexplored. Here we show that transcription of the miR-183 cluster (miR-183, miR-96, and miR-182) is selectively induced by HSV-1 during productive infection of primary fibroblasts and neurons. ICP0, a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase expressed as an immediate-early protein, is both necessary and sufficient for this induction. Nuclear exclusion of ICP0 or removal of the RING (really interesting new gene) finger domain that is required for E3 ligase activity prevents induction. ICP0 promotes the degradation of numerous host proteins and for the most part, the downstream consequences are unknown. Induction of the miR-183 cluster can be mimicked by depletion of host transcriptional repressors zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1)/δ-crystallin enhancer binding factor 1 (δEF1) and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 (ZEB2)/Smad-interacting protein 1 (SIP1), which we establish as new substrates for ICP0-mediated degradation. Thus, HSV-1 selectively stimulates expression of the miR-183 cluster by ICP0-mediated degradation of ZEB transcriptional repressors. PMID:28783105

  8. RNA-guided transcriptional activation via CRISPR/dCas9 mimics overexpression phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Jin Park

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR and the CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9 system allows effective gene modification through RNA-guided DNA targeting. The Cas9 has undergone a series of functional alterations from the original active endonuclease to partially or completely deactivated Cas9. The catalytically deactivated Cas9 (dCas9 offers a platform to regulate transcriptional expression with the addition of activator or repressor domains. We redesigned a CRISPR/Cas9 activation system by adding the p65 transactivating subunit of NF-kappa B and a heat-shock factor 1 (HSF activation domain to dCas9 bound with the VP64 (tetramer of VP16 activation domain for application in plants. The redesigned CRISPR/Cas9 activation system was tested in Arabidopsis to increase endogenous transcriptional levels of production of anthocyanin pigment 1 (PAP1 and Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (AVP1. The expression of PAP1 was increased two- to three-fold and the activated plants exhibited purple leaves similar to that of PAP1 overexpressors. The AVP1 gene expression was increased two- to five-fold in transgenic plants. In comparison to the wild type, AVP1 activated plants had increased leaf numbers, larger single-leaf areas and improved tolerance to drought stress. The AVP1 activated plants showed similar phenotypes to AVP1 overexpressors. Therefore, the redesigned CRISPR/Cas9 activation system containing modified p65-HSF provides a simple approach for producing activated plants by upregulating endogenous transcriptional levels.

  9. RNA-guided transcriptional activation via CRISPR/dCas9 mimics overexpression phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Jin; Dempewolf, Emma; Zhang, Wenzheng; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and the CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system allows effective gene modification through RNA-guided DNA targeting. The Cas9 has undergone a series of functional alterations from the original active endonuclease to partially or completely deactivated Cas9. The catalytically deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) offers a platform to regulate transcriptional expression with the addition of activator or repressor domains. We redesigned a CRISPR/Cas9 activation system by adding the p65 transactivating subunit of NF-kappa B and a heat-shock factor 1 (HSF) activation domain to dCas9 bound with the VP64 (tetramer of VP16) activation domain for application in plants. The redesigned CRISPR/Cas9 activation system was tested in Arabidopsis to increase endogenous transcriptional levels of production of anthocyanin pigment 1 (PAP1) and Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (AVP1). The expression of PAP1 was increased two- to three-fold and the activated plants exhibited purple leaves similar to that of PAP1 overexpressors. The AVP1 gene expression was increased two- to five-fold in transgenic plants. In comparison to the wild type, AVP1 activated plants had increased leaf numbers, larger single-leaf areas and improved tolerance to drought stress. The AVP1 activated plants showed similar phenotypes to AVP1 overexpressors. Therefore, the redesigned CRISPR/Cas9 activation system containing modified p65-HSF provides a simple approach for producing activated plants by upregulating endogenous transcriptional levels.

  10. TERRA transcripts are bound by a complex array of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Silanes, Isabel; Stagno d'Alcontres, Martina; Blasco, Maria A

    2010-06-29

    Telomeres are transcribed from the telomeric C-rich strand, giving rise to UUAGGG repeat-containing telomeric transcripts or TERRA, which are novel structural components of telomeres. TERRA abundance is highly dependent on developmental status (including nuclear reprogramming), telomere length, cellular stresses, tumour stage and chromatin structure. However, the molecular mechanisms and factors controlling TERRA levels are still largely unknown. In this study, we identify a set of RNA-binding proteins, which endogenously bind and regulate TERRA in the context of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The identification was carried out by biotin pull-down assays followed by LC-MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Different members of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family are among the ribonucleoprotein family that bind more abundantly to TERRA. Downregulation of TERRA-bound RBPs by small interfering RNA further shows that they can impact on TERRA abundance, their location and telomere lengthening. These findings anticipate an impact of TERRA-associated RBPs on telomere biology and telomeres diseases, such as cancer and aging.

  11. Transcriptional Responses in Root and Leaf of Prunus persica under Drought Stress Using RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Najla; Jiménez, Sergio; Wells, Christina E; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Gogorcena, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Prunus persica L. Batsch, or peach, is one of the most important crops and it is widely established in irrigated arid and semi-arid regions. However, due to variations in the climate and the increased aridity, drought has become a major constraint, causing crop losses worldwide. The use of drought-tolerant rootstocks in modern fruit production appears to be a useful method of alleviating water deficit problems. However, the transcriptomic variation and the major molecular mechanisms that underlie the adaptation of drought-tolerant rootstocks to water shortage remain unclear. Hence, in this study, high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to assess the transcriptomic changes and the key genes involved in the response to drought in root tissues (GF677 rootstock) and leaf tissues (graft, var. Catherina) subjected to 16 days of drought stress. In total, 12 RNA libraries were constructed and sequenced. This generated a total of 315 M raw reads from both tissues, which allowed the assembly of 22,079 and 17,854 genes associated with the root and leaf tissues, respectively. Subsets of 500 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in roots and 236 in leaves were identified and functionally annotated with 56 gene ontology (GO) terms and 99 metabolic pathways, which were mostly associated with aminobenzoate degradation and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. The GO analysis highlighted the biological functions that were exclusive to the root tissue, such as "locomotion," "hormone metabolic process," and "detection of stimulus," indicating the stress-buffering role of the GF677 rootstock. Furthermore, the complex regulatory network involved in the drought response was revealed, involving proteins that are associated with signaling transduction, transcription and hormone regulation, redox homeostasis, and frontline barriers. We identified two poorly characterized genes in P. persica: growth-regulating factor 5 (GRF5), which may be involved in cellular expansion, and AtHB12

  12. The mechanism of nucleosome traversal by RNA polymerase II: roles for template uncoiling and transcript elongation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luse, Donal S; Studitsky, Vasily M

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase II traverses nucleosomes rapidly and efficiently in the cell but it has not been possible to duplicate this process in the test tube. A single nucleosome has generally been found to provide a strong barrier to transcript elongation in vitro. Recent studies have shown that effective transcript elongation can occur on nucleosomal templates in vitro, but this depends on both facilitated uncoiling of DNA from the octamer surface and the presence of transcription factors that maintain polymerase in the transcriptionally competent state. These findings indicate that the efficiency and rate of transcription through chromatin could be regulated through controlled DNA uncoiling. These studies also demonstrate that nucleosome traversal need not result in nucleosome displacement.

  13. A role for the Cajal-body-associated SUMO isopeptidase USPL1 in snRNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutten, Saskia; Chachami, Georgia; Winter, Ulrike; Melchior, Frauke; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-03-01

    Cajal bodies are nuclear structures that are involved in biogenesis of snRNPs and snoRNPs, maintenance of telomeres and processing of histone mRNA. Recently, the SUMO isopeptidase USPL1 was identified as a component of Cajal bodies that is essential for cellular growth and Cajal body integrity. However, a cellular function for USPL1 is so far unknown. Here, we use RNAi-mediated knockdown in human cells in combination with biochemical and fluorescence microscopy approaches to investigate the function of USPL1 and its link to Cajal bodies. We demonstrate that levels of snRNAs transcribed by RNA polymerase (RNAP) II are reduced upon knockdown of USPL1 and that downstream processes such as snRNP assembly and pre-mRNA splicing are compromised. Importantly, we find that USPL1 associates directly with U snRNA loci and that it interacts and colocalises with components of the Little Elongation Complex, which is involved in RNAPII-mediated snRNA transcription. Thus, our data indicate that USPL1 plays a key role in RNAPII-mediated snRNA transcription.

  14. Transcriptional activity of HPV in inverted papilloma demonstrated by in situ hybridization for E6/E7 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, David G; Keeney, Michael G; Gao, Ge; Smith, David I; García, Joaquín J; O'Brien, Erin K

    2015-04-01

    Assess human papilloma virus (HPV) transcriptional activity in inverted Schneiderian papillomas (IPs). Case series with chart review. Academic tertiary care center. Retrospective clinicopathologic review of 19 cases of IP in patients undergoing surgical excision from 1995 to 2013 at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Surgical pathology archival material was histopathologically reviewed using hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material from each case was evaluated for p16 expression using immunohistochemistry as well as HPV DNA and E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization (via RNAscope technology), respectively. Eight patients were female (42%), with an average age of 53 years (range, 23-82 years). Three demonstrated malignancy, and 5 subsequently recurred. Average follow-up was 49 months (range, 0-200 months), and 1 patient died from squamous cell carcinoma arising from the IP. RNAscope detected HPV mRNA transcripts exclusively within IP in 100% of cases; however, in 11 patients (58%), less than 1% of cells exhibited transcriptional activity. Only 2 of 19 cases (11%) demonstrated mRNA activity in 50% or more cells. HPV DNA was detected in only 2 specimens by PCR. This study reveals wide prevalence but limited transcriptional activity of HPV in IP. No correlation between HPV transcriptional activity and progression, recurrence, or malignant transformation was identified. These data suggest that transcription of HPV may contribute to the pathogenesis of IP, but prospective data are needed to definitively demonstrate this connection. These results also suggest that RNAscope may be more sensitive than PCR in detecting HPV activity in IP. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  15. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of Leishmania amazonensis reveals an arginase-dependent gene expression regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ide Aoki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that alternates its life cycle between the sand-fly vector and the mammalian host. This alternation involves environmental changes and leads the parasite to dynamic modifications in morphology, metabolism, cellular signaling and regulation of gene expression to allow for a rapid adaptation to new conditions. The L-arginine pathway in L. amazonensis is important during the parasite life cycle and interferes in the establishment and maintenance of the infection in mammalian macrophages. Host arginase is an immune-regulatory enzyme that can reduce the production of nitric oxide by activated macrophages, directing the availability of L-arginine to the polyamine pathway, resulting in parasite replication. In this work, we performed transcriptional profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in L. amazonensis wild-type (La-WT versus L. amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes.A total of 8253 transcripts were identified in La-WT and La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes, about 60% of them codifying hypothetical proteins and 443 novel transcripts, which did not match any previously annotated genes. Our RNA-seq data revealed that 85% of genes were constitutively expressed. The comparison of transcriptome and metabolome data showed lower levels of arginase and higher levels of glutamate-5-kinase in La-WT axenic amastigotes compared to promastigotes. The absence of arginase activity in promastigotes increased the levels of pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase, but decreased the levels of arginosuccinate synthase, pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, acetylornithine deacetylase and spermidine synthase transcripts levels. These observations can explain previous metabolomic data pointing to the increase of L-arginine, citrulline and L-glutamate and reduction of aspartate, proline, ornithine and putrescine. Altogether, these results indicate that arginase activity is important

  16. RNA-seq transcriptional profiling of Leishmania amazonensis reveals an arginase-dependent gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Juliana Ide; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; Zampieri, Ricardo Andrade; Laranjeira-Silva, Maria Fernanda; Müller, Karl Erik; Nerland, Audun Helge; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria

    2017-10-01

    Leishmania is a protozoan parasite that alternates its life cycle between the sand-fly vector and the mammalian host. This alternation involves environmental changes and leads the parasite to dynamic modifications in morphology, metabolism, cellular signaling and regulation of gene expression to allow for a rapid adaptation to new conditions. The L-arginine pathway in L. amazonensis is important during the parasite life cycle and interferes in the establishment and maintenance of the infection in mammalian macrophages. Host arginase is an immune-regulatory enzyme that can reduce the production of nitric oxide by activated macrophages, directing the availability of L-arginine to the polyamine pathway, resulting in parasite replication. In this work, we performed transcriptional profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in L. amazonensis wild-type (La-WT) versus L. amazonensis arginase knockout (La-arg-) promastigotes and axenic amastigotes. A total of 8253 transcripts were identified in La-WT and La-arg- promastigotes and axenic amastigotes, about 60% of them codifying hypothetical proteins and 443 novel transcripts, which did not match any previously annotated genes. Our RNA-seq data revealed that 85% of genes were constitutively expressed. The comparison of transcriptome and metabolome data showed lower levels of arginase and higher levels of glutamate-5-kinase in La-WT axenic amastigotes compared to promastigotes. The absence of arginase activity in promastigotes increased the levels of pyrroline 5-carboxylate reductase, but decreased the levels of arginosuccinate synthase, pyrroline 5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, acetylornithine deacetylase and spermidine synthase transcripts levels. These observations can explain previous metabolomic data pointing to the increase of L-arginine, citrulline and L-glutamate and reduction of aspartate, proline, ornithine and putrescine. Altogether, these results indicate that arginase activity is important in Leishmania

  17. CMA33/XCT Regulates Small RNA Production through Modulating the Transcription of Dicer-Like Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiaofeng; Shi, Yupeng; Lu, Xiuli; Chen, Zulong; Qi, Yijun

    2015-08-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) play important regulatory roles in various aspects of plant biology. They are processed from double-stranded RNA precursors by Dicer-like (DCL) proteins. There are three major classes of sRNAs in Arabidopsis: DCL1-dependent microRNA (miRNA), DCL3-dependent heterochromatic siRNA (hc-siRNA), and DCL4-dependent trans-acting siRNA (ta-siRNA). We have previously isolated a mutant with compromised miRNA activity, cma33. Here we show that CMA33 encodes a nuclear localized protein, XAP5 CIRCADIAN TIMEKEEPER (XCT). The cma33/xct mutation led to reduced accumulation of not only miRNAs but also hc-siRNAs and ta-siRNAs. Intriguingly, we found that the expression of DCL1, DCL3, and DCL4, but not other genes in the sRNA biogenesis pathways, was decreased in cma33/xct. Consistent with this, the occupancy of Pol II at DCL1, DCL3, and DCL4 genes was reduced upon the loss of CMA33/XCT. Collectively, our data suggest that CMA33/XCT modulates sRNA production through regulating the transcription of DCLs. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Doubly Spliced RNA of Hepatitis B Virus Suppresses Viral Transcription via TATA-Binding Protein and Induces Stress Granule Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuen-Nan; Chong, Chin-Liew; Chou, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chien-Chiao; Wang, Yi-Ling; Wang, Shao-Win; Chen, Mong-Liang; Chen, Chun-Hong; Chang, Chungming

    2015-11-01

    The risk of liver cancer in patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their clinical response to interferon alpha therapy vary based on the HBV genotype. The mechanisms underlying these differences in HBV pathogenesis remain unclear. In HepG2 cells transfected with a mutant HBV(G2335A) expression plasmid that does not transcribe the 2.2-kb doubly spliced RNA (2.2DS-RNA) expressed by wild-type HBV genotype A, the level of HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) was higher than that in cells transfected with an HBV genotype A expression plasmid. By using cotransfection with HBV genotype D and 2.2DS-RNA expression plasmids, we found that a reduction of pgRNA was observed in the cells even in the presence of small amounts of the 2.2DS-RNA plasmid. Moreover, ectopic expression of 2.2DS-RNA in the HBV-producing cell line 1.3ES2 reduced the expression of pgRNA. Further analysis showed that exogenously transcribed 2.2DS-RNA inhibited a reconstituted transcription in vitro. In Huh7 cells ectopically expressing 2.2DS-RNA, RNA immunoprecipitation revealed that 2.2DS-RNA interacted with the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and that nucleotides 432 to 832 of 2.2DS-RNA were required for efficient TBP binding. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that 2.2DS-RNA colocalized with cytoplasmic TBP and the stress granule components, G3BP and poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that 2.2DS-RNA acts as a repressor of HBV transcription through an interaction with TBP that induces stress granule formation. The expression of 2.2DS-RNA may be one of the viral factors involved in viral replication, which may underlie differences in clinical outcomes of liver disease and responses to interferon alpha therapy between patients infected with different HBV genotypes. Patients infected with certain genotypes of HBV have a lower risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and exhibit a more favorable response to antiviral therapy than patients infected with other HBV

  19. Recognition of RNA Polymerase II and Transcription Bubbles by XPG,CSB and TFIIH: Insights for Transcription-Coupled Repair and CockayneSyndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Altaf H.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Kostek, Seth; Ng, Cliff; Shin, David S.; Peris, Marian; Campeau, Eric; Tainer, John A.; Nogales,Eva; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2005-10-21

    Loss of a non-enzymatic function of XPG results in defective transcription-coupled repair (TCR), Cockayne syndrome (CS) and early death, but the molecular basis for these phenotypes is unknown. Mutation of CSB, CSA, or the TFIIH helicases XPB and XPD can also cause defective TCR and CS. We show that XPG interacts with elongating RNA polymerase II(RNAPII) in the cell and binds stalled RNAPII ternary complexes in vitro both independently and cooperatively with CSB. XPG binds transcription-sized DNA bubbles through two domains not required for incision and functionally interacts with CSB on these bubbles to stimulate its ATPase activity. Bound RNAPII blocks bubble incision by XPG, but an ATP hydrolysis-dependent process involving TFIIH creates access to the junction, allowing incision. Together, these results implicate coordinated recognition of stalled transcription by XPG and CSB in TCR initiation and suggest that TFIIH-dependent remodeling of stalled RNAPII without release may be sufficient to allow repair.

  20. Association of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) Messenger RNA Level, Food Intake, and Growth in Channel Catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocaine-and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) is a potent hypothalamic anorectic peptide in mammals and fish. We hypothesized that increased food intake is associated with changes in expression of CART mRNA within the brain of channel catfish. Objectives were to clone the CART gene, examine ...

  1. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms mRNA transcripts in the temporalis muscle of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurana, Neus; Artells, Rosa; Muñoz, Carmen; Arias-Martorell, Júlia; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Casado, Aroa; Cuesta, Elisabeth; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Pastor, Juan Francisco; Potau, Josep Maria

    2017-11-01

    The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is the primate that is phylogenetically most closely related to humans (Homo sapiens). In order to shed light on the anatomy and function of the temporalis muscle in the chimpanzee, we have analyzed the expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in different parts of the muscle. We dissected the superficial, deep and sphenomandibularis portions of the temporalis muscle in five adult P. troglodytes and quantified the expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in each portion using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed significant differences in the patterns of expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC-IIM isoform between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior superficial temporalis (33.6% vs 47.0%; P=0.032) and between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior deep temporalis (33.6% vs 43.0; P=0.016). We also observed non-significant differences between the patterns of expression in the anterior and posterior superficial temporalis. The differential expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in the temporalis muscle in P. troglodytes may be related to the functional differences that have been observed in electromyographic studies in other species of primates. Our findings can be applicable to the fields of comparative anatomy, evolutionary anatomy, and anthropology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Suppression of sterol 27-hydroxylase mRNA and transcriptional activity by bile acids in cultured rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, J.; Wit, E.C.M. de; Princen, H.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    In previous work we have demonstrated suppression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase by bile acids at the level of mRNA and transcription, resulting in a similar decline in bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes. In view of the substantial contribution of the 'alternative' or '27-hydroxylase'

  3. Integration of maternal genome into the neonate genome through breast milk mRNA transcripts and reverse transcriptase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmak M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human milk samples contain microvesicles similar to the retroviruses. These microvesicles contain mRNA transcripts and possess reverse transcriptase activity. They contain about 14,000 transcripts representing the milk transcriptome. Microvesicles are also enriched with proteins related to “caveolar-mediated endocytosis signaling” pathway. It has recently been reported that microvesicles could be transferred to other cells by endocytosis and their RNA content can be translated and be functional in their new location. A significant percentage of the mammalian genome appears to be the product of reverse transcription, containing sequences whose characteristics point to RNA as a template precursor. These are mobile elements that move by way of transposition and are called retrotransposons. We thought that retrotransposons may stem from about 14,000 transcriptome of breast milk microvesicles, and reviewed the literature. The enhanced acceptance of maternal allografts in children who were breast-fed and tolerance to the maternal MHC antigens after breastfeeding may stem from RNAs of the breast milk microvesicles that can be taken up by the breastfed infant and receiving maternal genomic information. We conclude that milk microvesicles may transfer genetic signals from mother to neonate during breastfeeding. Moreover, transfer of wild type RNA from a healthy wet-nurse to the suckling neonate through the milk microvesicles and its subsequent reverse transcription and integration into the neonate genome could result in permanent correction of the clinical manifestations in genetic diseases.

  4. Specificity Protein (Sp) Transcription Factors and Metformin Regulate Expression of the Long Non-coding RNA HULC

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is evidence that specificity protein 1 (Sp1) transcription factor (TF) regulates expression of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. RNA interference (RNAi) studies showed that among several lncRNAs expressed in HepG2, SNU-449 and SK-Hep-1...

  5. Mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation: RNA polymerase - promoter binding, isomerization to initiation-competent open complexes, and initiation of RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saecker, Ruth M; Record, M Thomas; Dehaseth, Pieter L

    2011-10-07

    Initiation of RNA synthesis from DNA templates by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a multi-step process, in which initial recognition of promoter DNA by RNAP triggers a series of conformational changes in both RNAP and promoter DNA. The bacterial RNAP functions as a molecular isomerization machine, using binding free energy to remodel the initial recognition complex, placing downstream duplex DNA in the active site cleft and then separating the nontemplate and template strands in the region surrounding the start site of RNA synthesis. In this initial unstable "open" complex the template strand appears correctly positioned in the active site. Subsequently, the nontemplate strand is repositioned and a clamp is assembled on duplex DNA downstream of the open region to form the highly stable open complex, RP(o). The transcription initiation factor, σ(70), plays critical roles in promoter recognition and RP(o) formation as well as in early steps of RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A simple in vitro RNA editing assay for chloroplast transcripts using fluorescent dideoxynucleotides: distinct types of sequence elements required for editing of ndh transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tadamasa; Yukawa, Yasushi; Wakasugi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Kyoji; Sugiura, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    RNA editing is found in various transcripts from land plant chloroplasts. In tobacco chloroplasts, C-to-U conversion occurs at 36 specific sites including two sites identified in this work. Our RNA editing assay system using chloroplast extracts facilitated biochemical analyses of editing reactions but required mRNAs labeled with (32)P at specific sites. Here, we have improved the in vitro system using fluorescence-labeled chain terminators, ddGTP and ddATP, and have measured the editing activity at 19 sites in ndh transcripts. Editing activities varied from site to site. It has been reported that one editing site in ndhA mRNAs is present in spinach but absent in tobacco, but a corresponding editing capacity had been found in vivo in tobacco using biolistic transformation. We confirmed biochemically the existence of this activity in tobacco extracts. Using the non-radioactive assay, we examined sequences essential for editing within a 50-nt mRNA region encompassing an editing site. Editing of the ndhB-2 site requires a short sequence in front of the editing site, while that of the ndhF mRNA requires two separate regions, a sequence surrounding the editing site and a 5' distal sequence. These results suggest that distinct editing mechanisms are present in chloroplasts.

  7. Recruitment of TREX to the transcription machinery by its direct binding to the phospho-CTD of RNA polymerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik M Meinel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Messenger RNA (mRNA synthesis and export are tightly linked, but the molecular mechanisms of this coupling are largely unknown. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conserved TREX complex couples transcription to mRNA export and mediates mRNP formation. Here, we show that TREX is recruited to the transcription machinery by direct interaction of its subcomplex THO with the serine 2-serine 5 (S2/S5 diphosphorylated CTD of RNA polymerase II. S2 and/or tyrosine 1 (Y1 phosphorylation of the CTD is required for TREX occupancy in vivo, establishing a second interaction platform necessary for TREX recruitment in addition to RNA. Genome-wide analyses show that the occupancy of THO and the TREX components Sub2 and Yra1 increases from the 5' to the 3' end of the gene in accordance with the CTD S2 phosphorylation pattern. Importantly, in a mutant strain, in which TREX is recruited to genes but does not increase towards the 3' end, the expression of long transcripts is specifically impaired. Thus, we show for the first time that a 5'-3' increase of a protein complex is essential for correct expression of the genome. In summary, we provide insight into how the phospho-code of the CTD directs mRNP formation and export through TREX recruitment.

  8. Using RNA-seq to determine the transcriptional landscape and the hypoxic response of the pathogenic yeast Candida parapsilosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guida, Alessandro

    2011-12-22

    Abstract Background Candida parapsilosis is one of the most common causes of Candida infection worldwide. However, the genome sequence annotation was made without experimental validation and little is known about the transcriptional landscape. The transcriptional response of C. parapsilosis to hypoxic (low oxygen) conditions, such as those encountered in the host, is also relatively unexplored. Results We used next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) to determine the transcriptional profile of C. parapsilosis growing in several conditions including different media, temperatures and oxygen concentrations. We identified 395 novel protein-coding sequences that had not previously been annotated. We removed > 300 unsupported gene models, and corrected approximately 900. We mapped the 5\\' and 3\\' UTR for thousands of genes. We also identified 422 introns, including two introns in the 3\\' UTR of one gene. This is the first report of 3\\' UTR introns in the Saccharomycotina. Comparing the introns in coding sequences with other species shows that small numbers have been gained and lost throughout evolution. Our analysis also identified a number of novel transcriptional active regions (nTARs). We used both RNA-seq and microarray analysis to determine the transcriptional profile of cells grown in normoxic and hypoxic conditions in rich media, and we showed that there was a high correlation between the approaches. We also generated a knockout of the UPC2 transcriptional regulator, and we found that similar to C. albicans, Upc2 is required for conferring resistance to azole drugs, and for regulation of expression of the ergosterol pathway in hypoxia. Conclusion We provide the first detailed annotation of the C. parapsilosis genome, based on gene predictions and transcriptional analysis. We identified a number of novel ORFs and other transcribed regions, and detected transcripts from approximately 90% of the annotated protein coding genes. We found that the transcription factor

  9. RNA-SEQ reveals transcriptional level changes of poplar roots in different forms of nitrogen treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunpu eQu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poplar has emerged as a model plant for understanding molecular mechanisms of tree growth, development and response to environment. Long-term application of different forms of nitrogen (such as NO3--N and NH4+-N may cause morphological changes of poplar roots; however, the molecular level changes are still not well known. In this study, we analyzed the expression profiling of poplar roots treated by three forms of nitrogen: S1 (NH4+, S2 (NH4NO3 and S3 (NO3- by using RNA-SEQ technique. We found 463 genes significantly differentially expressed in roots by different N treatments, of which a total of 116 genes were found to differentially express between S1 and S2, 173 genes between S2 and S3, and 327 genes between S1 and S3. A cluster analysis shows significant difference in many transcription factor families and functional genes family under different N forms. Through an analysis of Mapman metabolic pathway, we found that the significantly differentially expressed genes are associated with fermentation, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, secondary metabolism, hormone metabolism, and transport processing. Interestingly, we did not find significantly differentially expressed genes in N metabolism pathway, mitochondrial electron transport / ATP synthesis and mineral nutrition. We also found abundant candidate genes (20 transcription factors and 30 functional genes regulating morphology changes of poplar roots under the three N forms. The results obtained are beneficial to a better understanding of the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating root morphology changes under different N treatments.

  10. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. PMID:24746923

  11. The contribution of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures to DNA damage and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-07-01

    Accurate DNA replication and DNA repair are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability, and it is generally accepted that failure of these processes is a major source of DNA damage in cells. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that DNA damage is more likely to occur at genomic loci with high transcriptional activity. Furthermore, loss of certain RNA processing factors in eukaryotic cells is associated with increased formation of co-transcriptional RNA:DNA hybrid structures known as R-loops, resulting in double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which R-loop structures ultimately lead to DNA breaks and genome instability is not well understood. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the formation, recognition and processing of RNA:DNA hybrids, and discuss possible mechanisms by which these structures contribute to DNA damage and genome instability in the cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduction of DNA contamination in RNA samples for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using selective precipitation by compaction agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Añez-Lingerfelt, Mariaclara; Fox, George E; Willson, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    An important problem in measurement of messenger RNA (mRNA) levels by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is DNA contamination, which can produce artifactually increased mRNA concentration. Current methods to eliminate contaminating DNA can compromise the integrity of the RNA, are time-consuming, and/or are hazardous. We present a rapid, nuclease-free, and cost-effective method of eliminating contaminating DNA in RNA samples using selective precipitation by compaction agents. Compaction agents are cationic molecules that bind to double-stranded nucleic acids, driven by electrostatic interactions and steric complementarity. The effectiveness and DNA selectivity of six compaction agents were investigated: trivalent spermidine, Triquat A, and Triquat 7; tetravalent spermine and Quatro-quat; and hexavalent Quatro-diquat. Effectiveness was measured initially by supernatant UV absorbance after precipitation of salmon sperm DNA. Effectiveness and selectivity were then investigated using differences in RT-PCR C(t) values with synthetic mixtures of human genomic DNA and total RNA and with total RNA isolated from cells. With 500 microM spermidine or Triquat A, the supernatant DNA could not be detected up to 40 cycles of PCR (C(t)12.6), whereas the C(t) for the mRNA was increased by only five cycles. Therefore, spermidine and Triquat A each show strong DNA selectivity and could be used to eliminate contaminating DNA in measurements of mRNA.

  13. Noncoding RNA in the Transcriptional Landscape of Human Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eHecht

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that noncoding RNAs play key roles in cellular processes, particularly in the brain. The present study used RNA sequencing to identify the transcriptional landscape of two human neural progenitor cell lines, SK-N-SH and ReNcell CX, as they differentiate into human cortical projection neurons. Protein coding genes were found to account for 54.8% and 57.0% of expressed genes, respectively, and alignment of RNA sequencing reads revealed that only 25.5-28.1% mapped to exonic regions of the genome. Differential expression analysis in the two cell lines identified altered gene expression in both protein coding and noncoding RNAs as they undergo neural differentiation with 222 differentially expressed genes observed in SK-N-SH cells and 19 differentially expressed genes in ReNcell CX. Interestingly, genes showing differential expression in SK-N-SH cells are enriched in genes implicated in autism spectrum disorder, but not in gene sets related to cancer or Alzheimer’s disease. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA was used to detect modules of co-expressed protein coding and noncoding RNAs in SK-N-SH cells and found four modules to be associated with neural differentiation. These modules contain varying levels of noncoding RNAs ranging from 10.7% to 49.7% with gene ontology suggesting roles in numerous cellular processes important for differentiation. These results indicate that noncoding RNAs are highly expressed in human neural progenitor cells and likely hold key regulatory roles in gene networks underlying neural differentiation and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. Quantitation of Epstein-Barr virus mRNA using reverse transcription and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Birgit; Plentz, Annelie; Weinberger, Klaus M; Hahn, Joachim; Holler, Ernst; Jilg, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    Monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and reactivation in immunocompromized patients (e.g., after organ or bone-marrow transplantation) is based mainly on serological assays and detection of viral DNA. For further characterization of virus reactivation and monitoring of viral transcription we established real-time RT-PCR assays using TaqMan technology to sensitively quantify viral transcripts expressed at different times of the lytic cycle: for BZLF1, an immediate early transactivator initiating the transition from latency to lytic replication, for the DNA-polymerase BALF5 and for the major viral glycoprotein gp350/220 (BLLF1). RNA-isolation was optimized to eliminate contaminating DNA. Preparations were shown to be virtually DNA-free for up to 10(6) copies of RNA. With our PCR systems, it is possible to detect 10 copies of DNA or 100 copies of RNA per reaction as shown with serial dilutions of DNA-plasmids or in vitro transcribed RNA, respectively. This corresponds to a detection limit of 8 x 10(2) copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Evaluation of this system showed that even in healthy carriers borderline levels of BLLF1 mRNA were sometimes detectable. In patients with acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) viral transcripts were regularly found in varying concentrations. Extremely high levels of all three mRNA species could be seen in a patient after bone-marrow transplantation monitored during an episode of lymphoproliferation which regressed during treatment with acyclovir and transfusion of donor T-cells. This sensitive and reproducible method to detect and quantify different transcripts of EBV can be used to closely monitor reactivation of EBV, e.g., in immunocompromized patients. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Stars and Symbiosis: MicroRNA- and MicroRNA*-Mediated Transcript Cleavage Involved in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devers, Emanuel A.; Branscheid, Anja; May, Patrick; Krajinski, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    The majority of plants are able to form the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in association with AM fungi. During symbiosis development, plant cells undergo a complex reprogramming resulting in profound morphological and physiological changes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important components of the regulatory network of plant cells. To unravel the impact of miRNAs and miRNA-mediated mRNA cleavage on root cell reprogramming during AM symbiosis, we carried out high-throughput (Illumina) sequencing of small RNAs and degradome tags of Medicago truncatula roots. This led to the annotation of 243 novel miRNAs. An increased accumulation of several novel and conserved miRNAs in mycorrhizal roots suggest a role of these miRNAs during AM symbiosis. The degradome analysis led to the identification of 185 root transcripts as mature miRNA and also miRNA*-mediated mRNA cleavage targets. Several of the identified miRNA targets are known to be involved in root symbioses. In summary, the increased accumulation of specific miRNAs and the miRNA-mediated cleavage of symbiosis-relevant genes indicate that miRNAs are an important part of the regulatory network leading to symbiosis development. PMID:21571671

  16. Transcription elongation regulator 1 (TCERG1) regulates competent RNA polymerase II-mediated elongation of HIV-1 transcription and facilitates efficient viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiras, Mayte; Montes, Marta; Montanuy, Immaculada; López-Huertas, María Rosa; Mateos, Elena; Le Sommer, Caroline; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Alcamí, José; Suñé, Carlos

    2013-10-28

    Control of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) release from pausing has been proposed as a checkpoint mechanism to ensure optimal RNAPII activity, especially in large, highly regulated genes. HIV-1 gene expression is highly regulated at the level of elongation, which includes transcriptional pausing that is mediated by both viral and cellular factors. Here, we present evidence for a specific role of the elongation-related factor TCERG1 in regulating the extent of HIV-1 elongation and viral replication in vivo. We show that TCERG1 depletion diminishes the basal and viral Tat-activated transcription from the HIV-1 LTR. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of HIV-1, we found that TCERG1 modifies the levels of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of HIV-1. Most importantly, TCERG1 directly affects the elongation rate of RNAPII transcription in vivo. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcription by increasing the rate of RNAPII elongation through the phosphorylation of serine 2 within the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII and suggest a mechanism for the involvement of TCERG1 in relieving pausing. Finally, we show that TCERG1 is required for HIV-1 replication. Our study reveals that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcriptional elongation by increasing the elongation rate of RNAPII and phosphorylation of Ser 2 within the CTD. Based on our data, we propose a general mechanism for TCERG1 acting on genes that are regulated at the level of elongation by increasing the rate of RNAPII transcription through the phosphorylation of Ser2. In the case of HIV-1, our evidence provides the basis for further investigation of TCERG1 as a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication.

  17. Transcription Impacts the Efficiency of mRNA Translation via Co-transcriptional N6-adenosine Methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Slobodin (Boris); R. Han (Ruiqi); Calderone, V. (Vittorio); Vrielink, J.A.F.O. (Joachim A.F. Oude); F. Loayza-Puch (Fabricio); R. Elkon (Ran); R. Agami (Reuven)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractTranscription and translation are two main pillars of gene expression. Due to the different timings, spots of action, and mechanisms of regulation, these processes are mainly regarded as distinct and generally uncoupled, despite serving a common purpose. Here, we sought for a possible

  18. Transcriptional Responses in root and leaf of Prunus persica Under Drought Stress Using RNA Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najla Ksouri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prunus persica L. Batch, or peach, is one of the most important crops and it is widely established in irrigated arid and semi-arid regions. However, due to variations in the climate and the increased aridity, drought has become a major constraint, causing crop losses worldwide. The use of drought-tolerant rootstocks in modern fruit production appears to be a useful method of alleviating water deficit problems. However, the transcriptomic variation and the major molecular mechanisms that underlie the adaptation of drought-tolerant rootstocks to water shortage remain unclear. Hence, in this study, high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq was performed to assess the transcriptomic changes and the key genes involved in the response to drought in root tissues (GF677 rootstock and leaf tissues (graft, var. Catherina subjected to 16 days of drought stress. In total, 12 RNA libraries were constructed and sequenced. This generated a total of 315M raw reads from both tissues, which allowed the assembly of 22,079 and 17,854 genes associated with the root and leaf tissues, respectively. Subsets of 500 differentially expressed genes (DEGs in roots and 236 in leaves were identified and functionally annotated with 56 gene ontology (GO terms and 99 metabolic pathways, which were mostly associated with aminobenzoate degradation and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. The GO analysis highlighted the biological functions that were exclusive to the root tissue, such as locomotion, hormone metabolic process, and detection of stimulus, indicating the stress-buffering role of the GF677 rootstock. Furthermore, the complex regulatory network involved in the drought response was revealed, involving proteins that are associated with signaling transduction, transcription and hormone regulation, redox homeostasis, and frontline barriers. We identified two poorly characterized genes in P. persica: growth-regulating factor 5 (GRF5, which may be involved in cellular expansion, and AtHB12

  19. Discovery of transcription start sites in the Chinese hamster genome by next-generation RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobi, Tobias; Brinkrolf, Karina; Tauch, Andreas; Noll, Thomas; Stoye, Jens; Pühler, Alfred; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-11-20

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines are one of the major production tools for monoclonal antibodies, recombinant proteins, and therapeutics. Although many efforts have significantly improved the availability of sequence information for CHO cells in the last years, forthcoming draft genomes still lack the information depth known from the mouse or human genomes. Many genes annotated for CHO cells and the Chinese hamster reference genome still are in silico predictions, only insufficiently verified by biological experiments. The correct annotation of transcription start sites (TSSs) is of special interest for CHO cells, as these directly define the location of the eukaryotic core promoter. Our study aims to elucidate these largely unexplored regions, trying to shed light on promoter landscapes in the Chinese hamster genome. Based on a 5' enriched dual library RNA sequencing approach 6547 TSSs were identified, of which over 90% were assigned to known genes. These TSSs were used to perform extensive promoter studies using a novel, modular bioinformatics pipeline, incorporating analyses of important regulatory elements of the eukaryotic core promoter on per-gene level and on genomic scale. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-07-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense-antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. © 2013 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Role of Ess1 in growth, morphogenetic switching, and RNA polymerase II transcription in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanushki Samaranayake

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a fungal pathogen that causes potentially fatal infections among immune-compromised individuals. The emergence of drug resistant C. albicans strains makes it important to identify new antifungal drug targets. Among potential targets are enzymes known as peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases that catalyze isomerization of peptide bonds preceding proline. We are investigating a PPIase called Ess1, which is conserved in all major human pathogenic fungi. Previously, we reported that C. albicans Ess1 is essential for growth and morphogenetic switching. In the present study, we re-evaluated these findings using more rigorous genetic analyses, including the use of additional CaESS1 mutant alleles, distinct marker genes, and the engineering of suitably-matched isogenic control strains. The results confirm that CaEss1 is essential for growth in C. albicans, but show that reduction of CaESS1 gene dosage by half (δ/+ does not interfere with morphogenetic switching. However, further reduction of CaEss1 levels using a conditional allele does reduce morphogenetic switching. We also examine the role of the linker α-helix that distinguishes C. albicans Ess1 from the human Pin1 enzyme, and present results of a genome-wide transcriptome analysis. The latter analysis indicates that CaEss1 has a conserved role in regulation of RNA polymerase II function, and is required for efficient termination of small nucleolar RNAs and repression of cryptic transcription in C. albicans.

  2. C/EBPβ mediates RNA polymerase III-driven transcription of oncomiR-138 in malignant gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pascale, Federica; Nama, Srikanth; Muhuri, Manish; Quah, Shan; Ismail, Hisyam M; Chan, Xin Hui Derryn; Sundaram, Gopinath M; Ramalingam, Rajkumar; Burke, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNA-138 (miR-138) is a pro-survival oncomiR for glioma stem cells. In malignant gliomas, dysregulated expression of microRNAs, such as miR-138, promotes Tumour initiation and progression. Here, we identify the ancillary role of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) as a transcriptional activator of miR-138. We demonstrate that a short 158 bp DNA sequence encoding the precursor of miR-138-2 is essential and sufficient for transcription of miR-138. This short sequence includes the A-box and B-box elements characteristic of RNA Polymerase III (Pol III) promoters, and is also directly bound by C/EBPβ via an embedded ‘C/EBPβ responsive element’ (CRE). CRE and the Pol III B-box element overlap, suggesting that C/EBPβ and transcription factor 3C (TFIIIC) interact at the miR-138-2 locus. We propose that this interaction is essential for the recruitment of the RNA Pol III initiation complex and associated transcription of the oncomiR, miR-138 in malignant gliomas. PMID:29136251

  3. Tiling Assembly: a new tool for reference annotation-independent transcript assembly and novel gene identification by RNA-sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenneth A.; Homayouni, Arielle; Tufano, Tara; Lopez, Jennifer; Ringler, Patricia; Rushton, Paul; Shen, Qingxi J.

    2015-01-01

    Annotation of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome has evolved significantly since release of its draft sequence, but it is far from complete. Several published transcript assembly programmes were tested on RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data to determine their effectiveness in identifying novel genes to improve the rice genome annotation. Cufflinks, a popular assembly software, did not identify all transcripts suggested by the RNA-seq data. Other assembly software was CPU intensive, lacked documentation, or lacked software updates. To overcome these shortcomings, a heuristic ab initio transcript assembly algorithm, Tiling Assembly, was developed to identify genes based on short read and junction alignment. Tiling Assembly was compared with Cufflinks to evaluate its gene-finding capabilities. Additionally, a pipeline was developed to eliminate false-positive gene identification due to noise or repetitive regions in the genome. By combining Tiling Assembly and Cufflinks, 767 unannotated genes were identified in the rice genome, demonstrating that combining both programmes proved highly efficient for novel gene identification. We also demonstrated that Tiling Assembly can accurately determine transcription start sites by comparing the Tiling Assembly genes with their corresponding full-length cDNA. We applied our pipeline to additional organisms and identified numerous unannotated genes, demonstrating that Tiling Assembly is an organism-independent tool for genome annotation. PMID:26341416

  4. Messenger RNA delivery of a cartilage-anabolic transcription factor as a disease-modifying strategy for osteoarthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aini, Hailati; Itaka, Keiji; Fujisawa, Ayano; Uchida, Hirokuni; Uchida, Satoshi; Fukushima, Shigeto; Kataoka, Kazunori; Saito, Taku; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2016-01-05

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative joint disease and a major health problem in the elderly population. No disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD) has been made available for clinical use. Here we present a disease-modifying strategy for OA, focusing on messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery of a therapeutic transcription factor using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer-based polyplex nanomicelles. When polyplex nanomicelles carrying the cartilage-anabolic, runt-related transcription factor (RUNX) 1 mRNA were injected into mouse OA knee joints, OA progression was significantly suppressed compared with the non-treatment control. Expressions of cartilage-anabolic markers and proliferation were augmented in articular chondrocytes of the RUNX1-injected knees. Thus, this study provides a proof of concept of the treatment of degenerative diseases such as OA by the in situ mRNA delivery of therapeutic transcription factors; the presented approach will directly connect basic findings on disease-protective or tissue-regenerating factors to disease treatment.

  5. TSSer: an automated method to identify transcription start sites in prokaryotic genomes from differential RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorjani, Hadi; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2014-04-01

    Accurate identification of transcription start sites (TSSs) is an essential step in the analysis of transcription regulatory networks. In higher eukaryotes, the capped analysis of gene expression technology enabled comprehensive annotation of TSSs in genomes such as those of mice and humans. In bacteria, an equivalent approach, termed differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq), has recently been proposed, but the application of this approach to a large number of genomes is hindered by the paucity of computational analysis methods. With few exceptions, when the method has been used, annotation of TSSs has been largely done manually. In this work, we present a computational method called 'TSSer' that enables the automatic inference of TSSs from dRNA-seq data. The method rests on a probabilistic framework for identifying both genomic positions that are preferentially enriched in the dRNA-seq data as well as preferentially captured relative to neighboring genomic regions. Evaluating our approach for TSS calling on several publicly available datasets, we find that TSSer achieves high consistency with the curated lists of annotated TSSs, but identifies many additional TSSs. Therefore, TSSer can accelerate genome-wide identification of TSSs in bacterial genomes and can aid in further characterization of bacterial transcription regulatory networks. TSSer is freely available under GPL license at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch/TSSer/index.php

  6. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  7. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ye, Lihong [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: zhangxd@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-04-03

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro.

  8. Transcription and processing of mitochondrial RNA in the human pathogen Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accari, Jessica; Barth, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The size, structure, gene content and organisation of mitochondrial genomes can be highly diverse especially amongst the protists. We investigated the transcription and processing of the mitochondrial genome of the opportunistic pathogen Acanthamoeba castellanii and here we present a detailed transcription map of the 41.6 kb genome that encodes 33 proteins, 16 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs. Northern hybridisation studies identified six major polycistronic transcripts, most of which are co-transcriptionally processed into smaller mono-, di- and tricistronic RNAs. The maturation of the polycistronic transcripts is likely to involve endonucleolytic cleavage where tRNAs serve as processing signals. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions across the intervening regions between the six major polycistronic transcripts suggest that these transcripts were once part of an even larger transcript. Our findings indicate that the mitochondrial genome of A. castellanii is transcribed from only one or two promoters, very similar to the mode of transcription in the mitochondria of its close relative Dictyostelium discoideum, where transcription is known to occur from only a single transcription initiation site. Transcription initiation from a minimal number of promoters despite a large genome size may be an emerging trend in the mitochondria of protists. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Dynamics of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding influences the induction of dystrophin exon skipping by antisense oligonucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keng Boon Wee

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs mediated exon skipping offers potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the identification of effective AON target sites remains unsatisfactory for lack of a precise method to predict their binding accessibility. This study demonstrates the importance of co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding in determining the accessibility of AON target sites for AON induction of selective exon skipping in DMD. Because transcription and splicing occur in tandem, AONs must bind to their target sites before splicing factors. Furthermore, co-transcriptional pre-mRNA folding forms transient secondary structures, which redistributes accessible binding sites. In our analysis, to approximate transcription elongation, a "window of analysis" that included the entire targeted exon was shifted one nucleotide at a time along the pre-mRNA. Possible co-transcriptional secondary structures were predicted using the sequence in each step of transcriptional analysis. A nucleotide was considered "engaged" if it formed a complementary base pairing in all predicted secondary structures of a particular step. Correlation of frequency and localisation of engaged nucleotides in AON target sites accounted for the performance (efficacy and efficiency of 94% of 176 previously reported AONs. Four novel insights are inferred: (1 the lowest frequencies of engaged nucleotides are associated with the most efficient AONs; (2 engaged nucleotides at 3' or 5' ends of the target site attenuate AON performance more than at other sites; (3 the performance of longer AONs is less attenuated by engaged nucleotides at 3' or 5' ends of the target site compared to shorter AONs; (4 engaged nucleotides at 3' end of a short target site attenuates AON efficiency more than at 5' end.

  10. Reverse transcription-competitive multiplex PCR improves quantification of mRNA in clinical samples--application to the low abundance CFTR mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loitsch, S M; Kippenberger, S; Dauletbaev, N; Wagner, T O; Bargon, J

    1999-05-01

    To monitor gene therapy, we wished to quantify cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA. We developed a PCR-based method to measure CFTR mRNA in clinical samples. Expression was determined by reverse transcription-competitive multiplex PCR (RCMP) for CFTR and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) transcripts, and for serial dilutions of two internal cDNA standards consisting of CFTR and GAPDH mutants containing short deletions. The RCMP used simultaneous amplification of the gene of interest with a reporter gene in one reaction tube. The expression of CFTR was calculated with reference to the amount of GAPDH to correct for variations in initial RNA loading. Amplification of cDNAs derived from different amounts of RNA (1-4 microgram) gave similar GAPDH/CFTR ratios, with a coefficient of variation (CV) below 7.5%. RCMP was applied on nasal and bronchial brushings and shows a high variability of CFTR expression in non-cystic fibrosis donors. This method is precise and reproducible and advantageous for use with limited amounts of tissue, such as from biopsies or from nasal or bronchial brushings. Copyright 1999 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  11. Clustered organization, polycistronic transcription, and evolution of modification-guide snoRNA genes in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ashley N; Russell, Anthony G

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the eukaryotic microbe Euglena gracilis contains an unusually large assortment of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) modification sites. However, little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms contributing to this situation. In this study, we have examined the organization and evolution of snoRNA genes in Euglena with the additional objective of determining how these properties relate to the rRNA modification pattern in this protist. We have identified and extensively characterized a clustered pattern of genes encoding previously biochemically isolated snoRNA sequences in E. gracilis. We show that polycistronic transcription is a prevalent snoRNA gene expression strategy in this organism. Further, we have identified 121 new snoRNA coding regions through sequence analysis of these clusters. We have identified an E. gracilis U14 snoRNA homolog clustered with modification-guide snoRNA genes. The U14 snoRNAs in other eukaryotic organisms examined to date typically contain both a modification and a processing domain. E. gracilis U14 lacks the modification domain but retains the processing domain. Our analysis of U14 structure and evolution in Euglena and other eukaryotes allows us to propose a model for its evolution and suggest its processing role may be its more important function, explaining its conservation in many eukaryotes. The preponderance of apparent small and larger-scale duplication events in the genomic regions we have characterized in Euglena provides a mechanism for the generation of the unusually diverse collection and abundance of snoRNAs and modified rRNA sites. Our findings provide the framework for more extensive whole genome analysis to elucidate whether these snoRNA gene clusters are spread across multiple chromosomes and/or form dense "arrays" at a limited number of chromosomal loci.

  12. Integrative analysis of gene and miRNA expression profiles with transcription factor–miRNA feed-forward loops identifies regulators in human cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenyu; Shah, Parantu K.; Amin, Samir B.; Samur, Mehmet K.; Huang, Norman; Wang, Xujun; Misra, Vikas; Ji, Hongbin; Gabuzda, Dana; Li, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We describe here a novel method for integrating gene and miRNA expression profiles in cancer using feed-forward loops (FFLs) consisting of transcription factors (TFs), miRNAs and their common target genes. The dChip-GemiNI (Gene and miRNA Network-based Integration) method statistically ranks computationally predicted FFLs by their explanatory power to account for differential gene and miRNA expression between two biological conditions such as normal and cancer. GemiNI integrates not only gene and miRNA expression data but also computationally derived information about TF–target gene and miRNA–mRNA interactions. Literature validation shows that the integrated modeling of expression data and FFLs better identifies cancer-related TFs and miRNAs compared to existing approaches. We have utilized GemiNI for analyzing six data sets of solid cancers (liver, kidney, prostate, lung and germ cell) and found that top-ranked FFLs account for ∼20% of transcriptome changes between normal and cancer. We have identified common FFL regulators across multiple cancer types, such as known FFLs consisting of MYC and miR-15/miR-17 families, and novel FFLs consisting of ARNT, CREB1 and their miRNA partners. The results and analysis web server are available at http://www.canevolve.org/dChip-GemiNi. PMID:22645320

  13. The Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein can induce transcription termination in the leader region of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp operon independent of the trp attenuator RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie M McAdams

    Full Text Available In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the TRAP protein binds to the 5' leader region of the nascent trp mRNA and induces transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind and the operon is transcribed. Two competing RNA secondary structures termed the antiterminator and terminator (attenuator can form in the leader region RNA. In prior attenuation models, the only role of TRAP binding was to alter the RNA secondary structure to allow formation of the attenuator, which has been thought function as an intrinsic transcription terminator. However, recent studies have shown that the attenuator is not an effective intrinsic terminator. From these studies it was not clear whether TRAP functions independently or requires the presence of the attenuator RNA structure. Hence we have further examined the role of the attenuator RNA in TRAP-mediated transcription termination. TRAP was found to cause efficient transcription termination in the trp leader region in vivo when the attenuator was mutated or deleted. However, TRAP failed to induce transcription termination at these mutant attenuators in a minimal in vitro transcription system with B. subtilis RNA polymerase. Further studies using this system showed that NusA as well as the timing of TRAP binding to RNA play a role in the observed differences in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Assembly of proteins and 5 S rRNA to transcripts of the major structural domains of 23 S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, P; Phan, H; Johansen, L B

    1998-01-01

    The six major structural domains of 23 S rRNA from Escherichia coli, and all combinations thereof, were synthesized as separate T7 transcripts and reconstituted with total 50 S subunit proteins. Analysis by one and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis demonstrated the presence of at least one......+VI. This indicates that there are two major protein assembly centres located at the ends of the 23 S rRNA, which is consistent with an earlier view that in vitro protein assembly nucleates around proteins L24 and L3. Although similar protein assembly patterns were observed over a range of temperature and magnesium...... approach was used to map the putative binding regions on domain V of protein L9 and the 5 S RNA-L5-L18 complex....

  15. Principles for RNA metabolism and alternative transcription initiation within closely spaced promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun; Pai, Athma A; Herudek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian transcriptomes are complex and formed by extensive promoter activity. In addition, gene promoters are largely divergent and initiate transcription of reverse-oriented promoter upstream transcripts (PROMPTs). Although PROMPTs are commonly terminated early, influenced by polyadenylation s...

  16. The nuclear receptor ERβ engages AGO2 in regulation of gene transcription, RNA splicing and RISC loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarallo, Roberta; Giurato, Giorgio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Ravo, Maria; Rizzo, Francesca; Salvati, Annamaria; Ricciardi, Luca; Marchese, Giovanna; Cordella, Angela; Rocco, Teresa; Gigantino, Valerio; Pierri, Biancamaria; Cimmino, Giovanni; Milanesi, Luciano; Ambrosino, Concetta; Nyman, Tuula A; Nassa, Giovanni; Weisz, Alessandro

    2017-10-06

    The RNA-binding protein Argonaute 2 (AGO2) is a key effector of RNA-silencing pathways It exerts a pivotal role in microRNA maturation and activity and can modulate chromatin remodeling, transcriptional gene regulation and RNA splicing. Estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) is endowed with oncosuppressive activities, antagonizing hormone-induced carcinogenesis and inhibiting growth and oncogenic functions in luminal-like breast cancers (BCs), where its expression correlates with a better prognosis of the disease. Applying interaction proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry to characterize nuclear factors cooperating with ERβ in gene regulation, we identify AGO2 as a novel partner of ERβ in human BC cells. ERβ-AGO2 association was confirmed in vitro and in vivo in both the nucleus and cytoplasm and is shown to be RNA-mediated. ChIP-Seq demonstrates AGO2 association with a large number of ERβ binding sites, and total and nascent RNA-Seq in ERβ + vs ERβ - cells, and before and after AGO2 knock-down in ERβ + cells, reveals a widespread involvement of this factor in ERβ-mediated regulation of gene transcription rate and RNA splicing. Moreover, isolation and sequencing by RIP-Seq of ERβ-associated long and small RNAs in the cytoplasm suggests involvement of the nuclear receptor in RISC loading, indicating that it may also be able to directly control mRNA translation efficiency and stability. These results demonstrate that AGO2 can act as a pleiotropic functional partner of ERβ, indicating that both factors are endowed with multiple roles in the control of key cellular functions.

  17. In vitro transcription of the double-stranded RNA bacteriophage phi 6 is influenced by purine NTPs and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala, P M; Bamford, D H

    1995-03-10

    The double-stranded RNA bacteriophage phi 6 contains a virion-associated RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. Removal of the virus envelope and the nucleocapsid surface protein, P8, reveals a nucleocapsid core particle (proteins P1, P2, P4, P7) which is the viral polymerase complex, capable of synthesizing RNA strands of positive polarity. The in vitro plus strand synthesis (transcription) reaction of the particle obtained from the mature virion was optimized and its activation and inactivation were investigated. Purine nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), binding to a low-affinity binding site in the polymerase complex, activated plus strand synthesis. GTP was the preferred NTP, but dGTP, ddGTP, and the noncleavable analog GMP-PCP could also switch on transcription. This NTP-binding site is probably different from that of the unspecific viral NTPase found in protein P4 and also from that of the rNTP-specific RNA polymerase active site. Binding of purine NTPs was sufficient for the switch-on; hydrolysis of the NTP was not required. Besides nucleotides, divalent cations had an effect on phi 6 in vitro plus strand synthesis. Magnesium ions are required for the activity but calcium ions inhibit the reaction. Manganese ions are shown to dissipate the effect of magnesium and calcium ions, leading to uncontrolled, exceptionally high level plus strand synthesis.

  18. A-to-I RNA editing of the IGFBP7 transcript increases during aging in porcine brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Knud; Kristensen, Kaja Kjær; Momeni, Jamal; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2016-10-21

    The IGFBP7 gene encodes insulin-like growth factor protein 7. IGFPB7 is involved in diverse biological functions including cell growth regulation, senescence and apoptosis, and also acts as a tumor suppressor in multiple cancers. The IGFBP7 mRNA is subject to A-to-I RNA editing mediated by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA 1 and 2 (ADAR1 and ADAR2). In the current study we have examined molecular characteristics of the porcine IGFBP7 gene, and determined the mRNA editing in different tissues. The A-to-I RNA editing of human IGFBP7 in positions Arg78 and Lys95 was shown to be conserved in the porcine homologue. In addition, a novel editing site was discovered in position Lys97 in the porcine IGFBP7 transcript. A differential editing was demonstrated at the three positions in the IGFBP7 transcript with very high degrees of editing in frontal cortex, cerebellum and lung. Interestingly, the degree of editing increased during aging in porcine frontal cortex and cerebellum. The IGFBP7 gene was mapped to pig chromosome 8. The porcine IGFBP7 gene was found to be ubiquitously expressed in examined organs and tissues. The methylation status of the IGFBP gene was examined in brain and liver by bisulfate sequencing and a high degree of methylation was found in the two tissues, 52% and 54%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Columbia University: Computational Human High-grade Glioblastoma Multiforme Interactome - miRNA (Post-transcriptional) Layer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Human High-Grade Glioma Interactome (HGi) contains a genome-wide complement of molecular interactions that are Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)-specific. HGi v3 contains the post-transcriptional layer of the HGi, which includes the miRNA-target (RNA-RNA) layer of the interactome. Read the Abstract

  20. Transcriptional Organization and In Vivo Role of the Escherichia coli rsd Gene, Encoding the Regulator of RNA Polymerase Sigma D

    OpenAIRE

    Jishage, Miki; Ishihama, Akira

    1999-01-01

    The regulator of sigma D (Rsd) was identified as an RNA polymerase ς70-associated protein in stationary-phase Escherichia coli with the inhibitory activity of ς70-dependent transcription in vitro (M. Jishage and A. Ishihama, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:4953–4958, 1998). Primer extension analysis of rsd mRNA indicated the presence of two promoters, ςS-dependent P1 and ς70-dependent P2 with the gearbox sequence. To get insight into the in vivo role of Rsd, the expressi...

  1. Primary T-lymphocytes rescue the replication of HIV-1 DIS RNA mutants in part by facilitating reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kate L; Sonza, Secondo; Mak, Johnson

    2008-03-01

    The dimerization initiation site (DIS) stem-loop within the HIV-1 RNA genome is vital for the production of infectious virions in T-cell lines but not in primary cells. In comparison to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which can support the replication of both wild type and HIV-1 DIS RNA mutants, we have found that DIS RNA mutants are up to 100 000-fold less infectious than wild-type HIV-1 in T-cell lines. We have also found that the cell-type-dependent replication of HIV-1 DIS RNA mutants is largely producer cell-dependent, with mutants displaying a greater defect in viral cDNA synthesis when viruses were not derived from PBMCs. While many examples exist of host-pathogen interplays that are mediated via proteins, analogous examples which rely on nucleic acid triggers are limited. Our data provide evidence to illustrate that primary T-lymphocytes rescue, in part, the replication of HIV-1 DIS RNA mutants through mediating the reverse transcription process in a cell-type-dependent manner. Our data also suggest the presence of a host cell factor that acts within the virus producer cells. In addition to providing an example of an RNA-mediated cell-type-dependent block to viral replication, our data also provides evidence which help to resolve the dilemma of how HIV-1 genomes with mismatched DIS sequences can recombine to generate chimeric viral RNA genomes.

  2. In vitro transcription activities of Pol IV, Pol V and RDR2 reveal coupling of Pol IV and RDR2 for dsRNA synthesis in plant RNA silencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Ream, Thomas S.; Marasco, Michelle; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-12-14

    In Arabidopsis, RNA-dependent DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing involves three nuclear RNA polymerases that are biochemically undefined: the presumptive DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Pol IV and Pol V and the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2. Here, we demonstrate their RNA polymerase activities in vitro. Unlike Pol II, Pols IV and V require an RNA primer, are insensitive to alpha-amanitin and differ in their ability to displace non-template DNA during transcription. Biogenesis of 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires both Pol IV and RDR2, which physically associate in vivo. Pol IV does not require RDR2 for activity, but RDR2 is nonfunctional in the absence of associated Pol IV, suggesting that their coupling explains the channeling of Pol IV transcripts into double-stranded RNAs that are then diced into 24 nt siRNAs.

  3. RNA helicase DEAD box protein 5 regulates Polycomb repressive complex 2/Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA function in hepatitis B virus infection and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Xing, Zheng; Mani, Saravana Kumar Kailasam; Bancel, Brigitte; Durantel, David; Zoulim, Fabien; Tran, Elizabeth J; Merle, Philippe; Andrisani, Ourania

    2016-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major factor in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) pathogenesis by a mechanism not yet understood. Elucidating mechanisms of HBV-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis is needed to gain insights into classification and treatment of HCC. In HBV replicating cells, including virus-associated HCCs, suppressor of zeste 12 homolog (SUZ12), a core subunit of Polycomb repressive complex2 (PRC2), undergoes proteasomal degradation. This process requires the long noncoding RNA, Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR). Intriguingly, HOTAIR interacts with PRC2 and also binds RNA-binding E3 ligases, serving as a ubiquitination scaffold. Herein, we identified the RNA helicase, DEAD box protein 5 (DDX5), as a regulator of SUZ12 stability and PRC2-mediated gene repression, acting by regulating RNA-protein complexes formed with HOTAIR. Specifically, knockdown of DDX5 and/or HOTAIR enabled reexpression of PRC2-repressed genes epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and pluripotency genes. Also, knockdown of DDX5 enhanced transcription from the HBV minichromosome. The helicase activity of DDX5 stabilized SUZ12- and PRC2-mediated gene silencing, by displacing the RNA-binding E3 ligase, Mex-3 RNA-binding family member B (Mex3b), from HOTAIR. Conversely, ectopic expression of Mex3b ubiquitinated SUZ12, displaced DDX5 from HOTAIR, and induced SUZ12 down-regulation. In G2 phase of cells expressing the HBV X protein (HBx), SUZ12 preferentially associated with Mex3b, but not DDX5, resulting in de-repression of PRC2 targets, including EpCAM and pluripotency genes. Significantly, liver tumors from HBx/c-myc bitransgenic mice and chronically HBV-infected patients exhibited a strong negative correlation between DDX5 messenger RNA levels, pluripotency gene expression, and liver tumor differentiation. Notably, chronically infected HBV patients with HCC expressing reduced DDX5 exhibited poor prognosis after tumor resection, identifying DDX5 as an

  4. Identification of the sequences recognized by phage phi 29 transcriptional activator: possible interaction between the activator and the RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Barthelemy, I; Salas, M

    1991-05-11

    Expression of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 late genes requires the transcriptional activator protein p4. This activator binds to a region of the late A3 promoter spanning nucleotides -56 to -102 relative to the transcription start site, generating a strong bending Tin the DNA. In this work the target sequences recognized by protein p4 in the phage phi 29 late A3 promoter have been characterized. The binding of protein p4 to derivatives of the late A3 promoter harbouring deletions in the protein p4 binding site has been studied. When protein p4 recognition sequences were altered, the activator could only bind to the promoter in the presence of RNA polymerase. This strong cooperativity in the binding of protein p4 and RNA polymerase to the promoter suggests the presence of direct protein-protein contacts between them.

  5. RNA polymerase II is released from the DNA template during transcription-coupled repair in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yi-Ying; Hu, Jinchuan; Sancar, Aziz; Selby, Christopher P

    2018-02-16

    In mammalian cells, bulky DNA adducts located in the template but not the coding strand of genes block elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). The blocked RNAPII targets these transcription-blocking adducts to undergo more rapid excision repair than adducts located elsewhere in the genome. In excision repair, coupled incisions are made in the damaged DNA strand on both sides of the adduct. The fate of RNAPII in the course of this transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway is unclear. To address the fate of RNAPII, we used methods that control transcription to initiate a discrete "wave" of elongation complexes. Analyzing genome-wide transcription and repair by next-generation sequencing, we identified locations of elongation complexes and transcription-repair coupling events in genes throughout the genome. Using UV-exposed human skin fibroblasts, we found that, at the dose used, a single wave of elongation complexes was blocked within the first 25 kb of genes. TCR occurred where the elongation complexes were blocked, and repair was associated with the dissociation of these complexes. These results indicate that individual elongation complexes do not engage in multiple rounds of TCR with successive lesions. Our results are consistent with a model in which RNAPII is dissociated after the dual incision of the transcription-blocking lesion, perhaps by Cockayne syndrome group B translocase, or during the synthesis of a repair patch. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Yeast NC2 Associates with the RNA Polymerase II Preinitiation Complex and Selectively Affects Transcription In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisberg, Joseph V.; Holstege, Frank C.; Young, Richard A.; Struhl, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    NC2 (Dr1-Drap1 or Bur6-Ydr1) has been characterized in vitro as a general negative regulator of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription that interacts with TATA-binding protein (TBP) and inhibits its function. Here, we show that NC2 associates with promoters in vivo in a manner that correlates with transcriptional activity and with occupancy by basal transcription factors. NC2 rapidly associates with promoters in response to transcriptional activation, and it remains associated under conditions in which transcription is blocked after assembly of the Pol II preinitiation complex. NC2 positively and negatively affects approximately 17% of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes in a pattern that resembles the response to general environmental stress. Relative to TBP, NC2 occupancy is high at promoters where NC2 is positively required for normal levels of transcription. Thus, NC2 is associated with the Pol II preinitiation complex, and it can play a direct and positive role at certain promoters in vivo. PMID:11283253

  7. Casein kinase 2 associates with initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and has multiple roles in ribosomal DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panova, Tatiana B; Panov, Kostya I; Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian RNA polymerase I (Pol I) complexes contain a number of associated factors, some with undefined regulatory roles in transcription. We demonstrate that casein kinase 2 (CK2) in human cells is associated specifically only with the initiation-competent Pol Ibeta isoform and not with Pol Ialpha. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis places CK2 at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) promoter in vivo. Pol Ibeta-associated CK2 can phosphorylate topoisomerase IIalpha in Pol Ibeta, activator upstream binding factor (UBF), and selectivity factor 1 (SL1) subunit TAFI110. A potent and selective CK2 inhibitor, 3,8-dibromo-7-hydroxy-4-methylchromen-2-one, limits in vitro transcription to a single round, suggesting a role for CK2 in reinitiation. Phosphorylation of UBF by CK2 increases SL1-dependent stabilization of UBF at the rDNA promoter, providing a molecular mechanism for the stimulatory effect of CK2 on UBF activation of transcription. These positive effects of CK2 in Pol I transcription contrast to that wrought by CK2 phosphorylation of TAFI110, which prevents SL1 binding to rDNA, thereby abrogating the ability of SL1 to nucleate preinitiation complex (PIC) formation. Thus, CK2 has the potential to regulate Pol I transcription at multiple levels, in PIC formation, activation, and reinitiation of transcription.

  8. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals widespread occurrence of novel cis-natural antisense transcripts in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs are RNAs transcribed from the antisense strand of a gene locus, and are complementary to the RNA transcribed from the sense strand. Common techniques including microarray approach and analysis of transcriptome databases are the major ways to globally identify cis-NATs in various eukaryotic organisms. Genome-wide in silico analysis has identified a large number of cis-NATs that may generate endogenous short interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs, which participate in important biogenesis mechanisms for transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in rice. However, the transcriptomes are yet to be deeply sequenced to comprehensively investigate cis-NATs. Results We applied high-throughput strand-specific complementary DNA sequencing technology (ssRNA-seq to deeply sequence mRNA for assessing sense and antisense transcripts that were derived under salt, drought and cold stresses, and normal conditions, in the model plant rice (Oryza sativa. Combined with RAP-DB genome annotation (the Rice Annotation Project Database build-5 data set, 76,013 transcripts corresponding to 45,844 unique gene loci were assembled, in which 4873 gene loci were newly identified. Of 3819 putative rice cis-NATs, 2292 were detected as expressed and giving rise to small RNAs from their overlapping regions through integrated analysis of ssRNA-seq data and small RNA data. Among them, 503 cis-NATs seemed to be associated with specific conditions. The deep sequence data from isolated epidermal cells of rice seedlings further showed that 54.0% of cis-NATs were expressed simultaneously in a population of homogenous cells. Nearly 9.7% of rice transcripts were involved in one-to-one or many-to-many cis-NATs formation. Furthermore, only 17.4-34.7% of 223 many-to-many cis-NAT groups were all expressed and generated nat-siRNAs, indicating that only some cis-NAT groups may be involved in complex regulatory networks. Conclusions

  9. Drosophila Syncrip binds the gurken mRNA localisation signal and regulates localised transcripts during axis specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne M. McDermott

    2012-04-01

    In the Drosophila oocyte, mRNA transport and localised translation play a fundamental role in axis determination and germline formation of the future embryo. gurken mRNA encodes a secreted TGF-α signal that specifies dorsal structures, and is localised to the dorso-anterior corner of the oocyte via a cis-acting 64 nucleotide gurken localisation signal. Using GRNA chromatography, we characterised the biochemical composition of the ribonucleoprotein complexes that form around the gurken mRNA localisation signal in the oocyte. We identified a number of the factors already known to be involved in gurken localisation and translational regulation, such as Squid and Imp, in addition to a number of factors with known links to mRNA localisation, such as Me31B and Exu. We also identified previously uncharacterised Drosophila proteins, including the fly homologue of mammalian SYNCRIP/hnRNPQ, a component of RNA transport granules in the dendrites of mammalian hippocampal neurons. We show that Drosophila Syncrip binds specifically to gurken and oskar, but not bicoid transcripts. The loss-of-function and overexpression phenotypes of syncrip in Drosophila egg chambers show that the protein is required for correct grk and osk mRNA localisation and translational regulation. We conclude that Drosophila Syncrip is a new factor required for localisation and translational regulation of oskar and gurken mRNA in the oocyte. We propose that Syncrip/SYNCRIP is part of a conserved complex associated with localised transcripts and required for their correct translational regulation in flies and mammals.

  10. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Eric S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit; and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context.

  11. From seedling to mature plant: arabidopsis plastidial genome copy number, RNA accumulation and transcription are differentially regulated during leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoschke, Reimo; Liere, Karsten; Börner, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Little is known about DNA and RNA metabolism during leaf development and aging in the model organism Arabidopsis. Therefore we examined the nuclear and plastidial DNA content of tissue ranging in age from 2-day-old cotyledons to 37-day-old senescent rosette leaves. Flow-cytometric analysis showed an increase in nuclear DNA ploidy levels of up to 128 genome copies per nucleus in older leaves. The copy numbers of nuclear 18S-rRNA genes were determined to be 700 +/- 60 per haploid genome. Adjusted to the average level of nuclear DNA polyploidism per cell, plastome copy numbers varied from about 1000 to 1700 per cell without significant variation during development from young to old rosette leaves. The transcription activity of all studied plastid genes was significantly reduced in older rosette leaves in comparison to that in young leaves. In contrast, levels of plastidial transcript accumulation showed different patterns. In the case of psbA, transcripts accumulated to even higher levels in older leaves, indicating that differential regulation of plastidial gene expression occurs during leaf development. Examination of promoter activity from clpP and rrn16 genes by primer extension analyses revealed that two RNA polymerases (NEP and PEP) transcribe these genes in cotyledons as well as in young and senescent leaves. However, PEP may have a more prominent role in older rosette leaves than in young cotyledons. We conclude that in cotyledons or leaves of different ages plastidial gene expression is regulated at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, but not by plastome copy number.

  12. The DEAD-Box RNA Helicase DDX3 Interacts with NF-κB Subunit p65 and Suppresses p65-Mediated Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nian; He, Miao; Ishaq, Musarat; Gao, Yu; Song, Feifei; Guo, Liang; Ma, Li; Sun, Guihong; Liu, Dan; Guo, Deyin; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    RNA helicase family members exhibit diverse cellular functions, including in transcription, pre-mRNA processing, RNA decay, ribosome biogenesis, RNA export and translation. The RNA helicase DEAD-box family member DDX3 has been characterized as a tumour-associated factor and a transcriptional co-activator/regulator. Here, we demonstrate that DDX3 interacts with the nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit p65 and suppresses NF-κB (p65/p50)-mediated transcriptional activity. The downregulation of DDX3 by RNA interference induces the upregulation of NF-κB (p65/p50)-mediated transcription. The regulation of NF-κB (p65/p50)-mediated transcriptional activity was further confirmed by the expression levels of its downstream cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Moreover, the binding of the ATP-dependent RNA helicase domain of DDX3 to the N-terminal Rel homology domain (RHD) of p65 is involved in the inhibition of NF-κB-regulated gene transcription. In summary, the results suggest that DDX3 functions to suppress the transcriptional activity of the NF-κB subunit p65.

  13. Transcriptional organization and in vivo role of the Escherichia coli rsd gene, encoding the regulator of RNA polymerase sigma D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishage, M; Ishihama, A

    1999-06-01

    The regulator of sigma D (Rsd) was identified as an RNA polymerase sigma70-associated protein in stationary-phase Escherichia coli with the inhibitory activity of sigma70-dependent transcription in vitro (M. Jishage and A. Ishihama, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95:4953-4958, 1998). Primer extension analysis of rsd mRNA indicated the presence of two promoters, sigmaS-dependent P1 and sigma70-dependent P2 with the gearbox sequence. To get insight into the in vivo role of Rsd, the expression of a reporter gene fused to either the sigma70- or sigmaS-dependent promoter was analyzed in the absence of Rsd or the presence of overexpressed Rsd. In the rsd null mutant, the sigma70- and sigmaS-dependent gene expression was increased or decreased, respectively. On the other hand, the sigma70- or sigmaS-dependent transcription was reduced or enhanced, respectively, after overexpression of Rsd. The repression of the sigmaS-dependent transcription in the rsd mutant is overcome by increased production of the sigmaS subunit. Together these observations support the prediction that Rsd is involved in replacement of the RNA polymerase sigma subunit from sigma70 to sigmaS during the transition from exponential growth to the stationary phase.

  14. Transcription-factor occupancy at HOT regions quantitatively predicts RNA polymerase recruitment in five human cell lines.

    KAUST Repository

    Foley, Joseph W

    2013-10-20

    BACKGROUND: High-occupancy target (HOT) regions are compact genome loci occupied by many different transcription factors (TFs). HOT regions were initially defined in invertebrate model organisms, and we here show that they are a ubiquitous feature of the human gene-regulation landscape. RESULTS: We identified HOT regions by a comprehensive analysis of ChIP-seq data from 96 DNA-associated proteins in 5 human cell lines. Most HOT regions co-localize with RNA polymerase II binding sites, but many are not near the promoters of annotated genes. At HOT promoters, TF occupancy is strongly predictive of transcription preinitiation complex recruitment and moderately predictive of initiating Pol II recruitment, but only weakly predictive of elongating Pol II and RNA transcript abundance. TF occupancy varies quantitatively within human HOT regions; we used this variation to discover novel associations between TFs. The sequence motif associated with any given TF\\'s direct DNA binding is somewhat predictive of its empirical occupancy, but a great deal of occupancy occurs at sites without the TF\\'s motif, implying indirect recruitment by another TF whose motif is present. CONCLUSIONS: Mammalian HOT regions are regulatory hubs that integrate the signals from diverse regulatory pathways to quantitatively tune the promoter for RNA polymerase II recruitment.

  15. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Okonechnikov

    Full Text Available Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  16. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Imai-Matsushima, Aki; Paul, Lukas; Seitz, Alexander; Meyer, Thomas F; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  17. Nuclear myosin 1c facilitates the chromatin modifications required to activate rRNA gene transcription and cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishe Sarshad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Actin and nuclear myosin 1c (NM1 cooperate in RNA polymerase I (pol I transcription. NM1 is also part of a multiprotein assembly, B-WICH, which is involved in transcription. This assembly contains the chromatin remodeling complex WICH with its subunits WSTF and SNF2h. We report here that NM1 binds SNF2h with enhanced affinity upon impairment of the actin-binding function. ChIP analysis revealed that NM1, SNF2h, and actin gene occupancies are cell cycle-dependent and require intact motor function. At the onset of cell division, when transcription is temporarily blocked, B-WICH is disassembled due to WSTF phosphorylation, to be reassembled on the active gene at exit from mitosis. NM1 gene knockdown and motor function inhibition, or stable expression of NM1 mutants that do not interact with actin or chromatin, overall repressed rRNA synthesis by stalling pol I at the gene promoter, led to chromatin alterations by changing the state of H3K9 acetylation at gene promoter, and delayed cell cycle progression. These results suggest a unique structural role for NM1 in which the interaction with SNF2h stabilizes B-WICH at the gene promoter and facilitates recruitment of the HAT PCAF. This leads to a permissive chromatin structure required for transcription activation.

  18. Mixture models reveal multiple positional bias types in RNA-Seq data and lead to accurate transcript concentration estimates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Tuerk

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy of transcript quantification with RNA-Seq is negatively affected by positional fragment bias. This article introduces Mix2 (rd. "mixquare", a transcript quantification method which uses a mixture of probability distributions to model and thereby neutralize the effects of positional fragment bias. The parameters of Mix2 are trained by Expectation Maximization resulting in simultaneous transcript abundance and bias estimates. We compare Mix2 to Cufflinks, RSEM, eXpress and PennSeq; state-of-the-art quantification methods implementing some form of bias correction. On four synthetic biases we show that the accuracy of Mix2 overall exceeds the accuracy of the other methods and that its bias estimates converge to the correct solution. We further evaluate Mix2 on real RNA-Seq data from the Microarray and Sequencing Quality Control (MAQC, SEQC Consortia. On MAQC data, Mix2 achieves improved correlation to qPCR measurements with a relative increase in R2 between 4% and 50%. Mix2 also yields repeatable concentration estimates across technical replicates with a relative increase in R2 between 8% and 47% and reduced standard deviation across the full concentration range. We further observe more accurate detection of differential expression with a relative increase in true positives between 74% and 378% for 5% false positives. In addition, Mix2 reveals 5 dominant biases in MAQC data deviating from the common assumption of a uniform fragment distribution. On SEQC data, Mix2 yields higher consistency between measured and predicted concentration ratios. A relative error of 20% or less is obtained for 51% of transcripts by Mix2, 40% of transcripts by Cufflinks and RSEM and 30% by eXpress. Titration order consistency is correct for 47% of transcripts for Mix2, 41% for Cufflinks and RSEM and 34% for eXpress. We, further, observe improved repeatability across laboratory sites with a relative increase in R2 between 8% and 44% and reduced standard deviation.

  19. Identification and characterization of the trnS/pseudo-tRNA/nad3/rps12 gene cluster from Coix lacryma-jobi L: organization, transcription and RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias; Siqueira; Lejeune; de Souza AP

    2000-09-08

    During a study of mitochondrial sequence conservation between the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha and several Angiosperm species, as revealed by heterologous hybridization experiments, the trnS/pseudo-tRNA/nad3/rps12 gene cluster in Coix lacryma-jobi L., an Asian grass species from the Andropogoneae, was identified using the mitochondrial probe orf167 from M. polymorpha. The Coix gene cluster was cloned and sequenced, and its expression analyzed. The gene sequence and gene locus organization were found to be similar to the corresponding cluster in wheat and maize. Northern hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that nad3 and rps12 genes were co-transcribed as a 1.25 kb RNA molecule. The transcript displayed 20 and six RNA edition sites, in the nad3 and rps12 genes, respectively, that changed the codon identities to amino acids, which are better conserved in different organisms. Twenty-three cDNA clones were analysed for the edition process and revealed different partial editing patterns without apparent sequential processing.

  20. Lab-on-a-chip mRNA purification and reverse transcription via a solid-phase gene extraction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestorova, Gergana G; Hasenstein, Karl; Nguyen, Nam; DeCoster, Mark A; Crews, Niel D

    2017-03-14

    Extraction and purification of high quality RNA is a crucial initial step required for a variety of genomic assays. We report a solid phase gene extraction (SPGE) method for automated extraction, purification and reverse transcription of mRNA in a microfluidic device. This is performed using a 130 μm diameter stainless steel needle that is amino-linked to dT(15) oligonucleotides for selective hybridization of mRNA. By inserting this probe into the biological sample for only 30 seconds, mRNA is captured with high selectivity and a yield greater than 10 pg per mm of probe length. The probe is then inserted into a lab-on-a-chip device, where the bound poly-adenylated RNA is thermally released and immediately reverse transcribed for subsequent PCR amplification. The insertion of the probe into the microfluidic device is straightforward: the microchannel is formed with an elastomer (PDMS) that, when punctured, will seal around the probe. The specificity and RNA loading capacity of the probes were evaluated using conventional qPCR. This procedure was successfully used to extract, purify, and transcribe mRNA from rat glioblastoma cell spheroids in less than seven minutes. Analysis of the product confirmed that the SPGE technique selectively captures and inherently purifies high-quality mRNA directly from biological material with no need for additional pre-processing steps. Integrating this elegant sample preparation method into a complete lab-on-a-chip system will substantially enhance the speed and automation of mRNA assays for research and clinical diagnostics.

  1. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    of reverse transcription was obtained at approximately 6-fold molar excess of the bis-PNA with respect to the gag RNA. At this molar ratio we found no effect on in vitro translation of gag RNA. A 15mer duplex-forming PNA was also found to inhibit reverse transcription at very low molar ratios of PNA/ gag RNA...... that would indicate PNA-mediated RNase H activation of the tested RTs. In conclusion, PNA appears to have a potential to become a specific and efficient inhibitor of reverse transcription in vivo , provided sufficient intracellular levels are achievable....

  2. Data in support of transcriptional regulation and function of Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA during human erythropoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Villamizar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes data related to a research article titled, “Fas-antisense long noncoding RNA is differentially expressed during maturation of human erythrocytes and confers resistance to Fas-mediated cell death” [1]. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are increasingly appreciated for their capacity to regulate many steps of gene expression. While recent studies suggest that many lncRNAs are functional, the scope of their actions throughout human biology is largely undefined including human red blood cell development (erythropoiesis. Here we include expression data for 82 lncRNAs during early, intermediate and late stages of human erythropoiesis using a commercial qPCR Array. From these data, we identified lncRNA Fas-antisense 1 (Fas-AS1 or Saf described in the research article. Also included are 5′ untranslated sequences (UTR for lncRNA Saf with transcription factor target sequences identified. Quantitative RT-PCR data demonstrate relative levels of critical erythroid transcription factors, GATA-1 and KLF1, in K562 human erythroleukemia cells and maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34+ cells. End point and quantitative RT-PCR data for cDNA prepared using random hexamers versus oligo(dT18 revealed that lncRNA Saf is not effectively polyadenylated. Finally, we include flow cytometry histograms demonstrating Fas levels on maturing erythroblasts derived from human CD34+ cells transduced using mock conditions or with lentivirus particles encoding for Saf.

  3. Polyadenylation site selection: linking transcription and RNA processing via a conserved carboxy-terminal domain (CTD)-interacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larochelle, Marc; Hunyadkürti, Judit; Bachand, François

    2017-05-01

    Despite the fact that the process of mRNA polyadenylation has been known for more than 40 years, a detailed understating of the mechanism underlying polyadenylation site selection is still far from complete. As 3' end processing is intimately associated with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription, factors that can successively interact with the transcription machinery and recognize cis-acting sequences on the nascent pre-mRNA would be well suited to contribute to poly(A) site selection. Studies using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have recently identified Seb1, a protein that shares homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nrd1 and human SCAF4/8, and that is critical for poly(A) site selection. Seb1 binds to the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII via a conserved CTD-interaction domain and recognizes specific sequence motifs clustered downstream of the polyadenylation site on the uncleaved pre-mRNA. In this short review, we summarize insights into Seb1-dependent poly(A) site selection and discuss some unanswered questions regarding its molecular mechanism and conservation.

  4. Yeast DEAD Box Protein Mss116p Is a Transcription Elongation Factor That Modulates the Activity of Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, Ireneusz D.; Tessitore, Kassandra; Henderson, Simmone; McAllister, William T.

    2014-01-01

    DEAD box proteins have been widely implicated in regulation of gene expression. Here, we show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae DEAD box protein Mss116p, previously known as a mitochondrial splicing factor, also acts as a transcription factor that modulates the activity of the single-subunit mitochondrial RNA polymerase encoded by RPO41. Binding of Mss116p stabilizes paused mitochondrial RNA polymerase elongation complexes in vitro and favors the posttranslocated state of the enzyme, resulting in a lower concentration of nucleotide substrate required to escape the pause; this mechanism of action is similar to that of elongation factors that enhance the processivity of multisubunit RNA polymerases. In a yeast strain in which the RNA splicing-related functions of Mss116p are dispensable, overexpression of RPO41 or MSS116 increases cell survival from colonies that were exposed to low temperature, suggesting a role for Mss116p in enhancing the efficiency of mitochondrial transcription under stress conditions. PMID:24732805

  5. Stabilization of circulating thyroglobulin mRNA transcripts in patients treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Søren; Bastholt, Lars; Pedersen, Susanne Møller

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical utility of serum thyroglobulin (TG) in the follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) may be compromised by the presence of endogenous anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb). To prevent interference by TGAb several groups have developed real-time PCR...... (RT-PCR) based assays for quantification of blood TG mRNA levels. For accurate quantification of TG mRNA in blood preanalytical factors must be recognized and controlled. In this study we evaluate the effect of different blood RNA stabilizing systems - the Tempus(T) (M) Blood RNA system...... hours, and RNA yield, integrity and purity was determined. TG, GAPDH and ACTB mRNA levels were quantified by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. RESULTS: The RNA yield was significantly higher for blood collected in Tempus tubes compared to PAXgene tubes following storage for 72 hours at room temperature (p = 0...

  6. Integrated miRNA, mRNA and protein expression analysis reveals the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling CHO cell growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Colin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the role of microRNA (miRNA in the regulation of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell growth, qPCR, microarray and quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis were utilised for simultaneous expression profiling of miRNA, mRNA and protein. The sample set under investigation consisted of clones with variable cellular growth rates derived from the same population. In addition to providing a systems level perspective on cell growth, the integration of multiple profiling datasets can facilitate the identification of non-seed miRNA targets, complement computational prediction tools and reduce false positive and false negative rates. Results 51 miRNAs were associated with increased growth rate (35 miRNAs upregulated and 16 miRNAs downregulated. Gene ontology (GO analysis of genes (n=432 and proteins (n=285 found to be differentially expressed (DE identified biological processes driving proliferation including mRNA processing and translation. To investigate the influence of miRNA on these processes we combined the proteomic and transcriptomic data into two groups. The first set contained candidates where evidence of translational repression was observed (n=158. The second group was a mixture of proteins and mRNAs where evidence of translational repression was less clear (n=515. The TargetScan algorithm was utilised to predict potential targets within these two groups for anti-correlated DE miRNAs. Conclusions The evidence presented in this study indicates that biological processes such as mRNA processing and protein synthesis are correlated with growth rate in CHO cells. Through the integration of expression data from multiple levels of the biological system a number of proteins central to these processes including several hnRNPs and components of the ribosome were found to be post-transcriptionally regulated. We utilised the expression data in conjunction with in-silico tools to identify potential miRNA-mediated regulation of mRNA

  7. Resveratrol post-transcriptionally regulates pro-inflammatory gene expression via regulation of KSRP RNA binding activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Franziska; Art, Julia; Henke, Jenny; Schrick, Katharina; Besche, Verena; Bros, Matthias; Li, Huige; Siuda, Daniel; Handler, Norbert; Bauer, Florian; Erker, Thomas; Behnke, Felix; Mönch, Bettina; Härdle, Lorena; Hoffmann, Markus; Chen, Ching-Yi; Förstermann, Ulrich; Dirsch, Verena M.; Werz, Oliver; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol shows beneficial effects in inflammation-based diseases like cancer, cardiovascular and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory resveratrol effects deserve more attention. In human epithelial DLD-1 and monocytic Mono Mac 6 cells resveratrol decreased the expression of iNOS, IL-8 and TNF-α by reducing mRNA stability without inhibition of the promoter activity. Shown by pharmacological and siRNA-mediated inhibition, the observed effects are SIRT1-independent. Target-fishing and drug responsive target stability experiments showed selective binding of resveratrol to the RNA-binding protein KSRP, a central post-transcriptional regulator of pro-inflammatory gene expression. Knockdown of KSRP expression prevented resveratrol-induced mRNA destabilization in human and murine cells. Resveratrol did not change KSRP expression, but immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that resveratrol reduces the p38 MAPK-related inhibitory KSRP threonine phosphorylation, without blocking p38 MAPK activation or activity. Mutation of the p38 MAPK target site in KSRP blocked the resveratrol effect on pro-inflammatory gene expression. In addition, resveratrol incubation enhanced KSRP-exosome interaction, which is important for mRNA degradation. Finally, resveratrol incubation enhanced its intra-cellular binding to the IL-8, iNOS and TNF-α mRNA. Therefore, modulation of KSRP mRNA binding activity and, thereby, enhancement of mRNA degradation seems to be the common denominator of many anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol. PMID:25352548

  8. Noncanonical compensation of zygotic X transcription in early Drosophila melanogaster development revealed through single-embryo RNA-seq.

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    Susan E Lott

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available When Drosophila melanogaster embryos initiate zygotic transcription around mitotic cycle 10, the dose-sensitive expression of specialized genes on the X chromosome triggers a sex-determination cascade that, among other things, compensates for differences in sex chromosome dose by hypertranscribing the single X chromosome in males. However, there is an approximately 1 hour delay between the onset of zygotic transcription and the establishment of canonical dosage compensation near the end of mitotic cycle 14. During this time, zygotic transcription drives segmentation, cellularization, and other important developmental events. Since many of the genes involved in these processes are on the X chromosome, we wondered whether they are transcribed at higher levels in females and whether this might lead to sex-specific early embryonic patterning. To investigate this possibility, we developed methods to precisely stage, sex, and characterize the transcriptomes of individual embryos. We measured genome-wide mRNA abundance in male and female embryos at eight timepoints, spanning mitotic cycle 10 through late cycle 14, using polymorphisms between parental lines to distinguish maternal and zygotic transcription. We found limited sex-specific zygotic transcription, with a weak tendency for genes on the X to be expressed at higher levels in females. However, transcripts derived from the single X chromosome in males were more abundant that those derived from either X chromosome in females, demonstrating that there is widespread dosage compensation prior to the activation of the canonical MSL-mediated dosage compensation system. Crucially, this new system of early zygotic dosage compensation results in nearly identical transcript levels for key X-linked developmental regulators, including giant (gt, brinker (brk, buttonhead (btd, and short gastrulation (sog, in male and female embryos.

  9. Paraspeckle protein p54nrb links Sox9-mediated transcription with RNA processing during chondrogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kenji; Nishimura, Riko; Muramatsu, Shuji; Matsuda, Akio; Matsubara, Takuma; Amano, Katsuhiko; Ikeda, Fumiyo; Harley, Vincent R; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2008-09-01

    The Sox9 transcription factor plays an essential role in promoting chondrogenesis and regulating expression of chondrocyte extracellular-matrix genes. To identify genes that interact with Sox9 in promoting chondrocyte differentiation, we screened a cDNA library generated from the murine chondrogenic ATDC5 cell line to identify activators of the collagen, type II, alpha 1 (Col2a1) promoter. Here we have shown that paraspeckle regulatory protein 54-kDa nuclear RNA-binding protein (p54nrb) is an essential link between Sox9-regulated transcription and maturation of Sox9-target gene mRNA. We found that p54nrb physically interacted with Sox9 and enhanced Sox9-dependent transcriptional activation of the Col2a1 promoter. In ATDC5 cells, p54nrb colocalized with Sox9 protein in nuclear paraspeckle bodies, and knockdown of p54(nrb) suppressed Sox9-dependent Col2a1 expression and promoter activity. We generated a p54nrb mutant construct lacking RNA recognition motifs, and overexpression of mutant p54nrb in ATDC5 cells markedly altered the appearance of paraspeckle bodies and inhibited the maturation of Col2a1 mRNA. The mutant p54nrb inhibited chondrocyte differentiation of mesenchymal cells and mouse metatarsal explants. Furthermore, transgenic mice expressing the mutant p54nrb in the chondrocyte lineage exhibited dwarfism associated with impairment of chondrogenesis. These data suggest that p54nrb plays an important role in the regulation of Sox9 function and the formation of paraspeckle bodies during chondrogenesis.

  10. RNA-Seq for Enrichment and Analysis of IRF5 Transcript Expression in SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Rivka C.; Du, Peicheng; Feng, Di; Dhawan, Kopal; Rönnblom, Lars; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Donnelly, Robert; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) gene have been consistently replicated and shown to confer risk for or protection from the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). IRF5 expression is significantly upregulated in SLE patients and upregulation associates with IRF5-SLE risk haplotypes. IRF5 alternative splicing has also been shown to be elevated in SLE patients. Given that human IRF5 exists as multiple alternatively spliced transcripts with distinct function(s), it is important to determine whether the IRF5 transcript profile expressed in healthy donor immune cells is different from that expressed in SLE patients. Moreover, it is not currently known whether an IRF5-SLE risk haplotype defines the profile of IRF5 transcripts expressed. Using standard molecular cloning techniques, we identified and isolated 14 new differentially spliced IRF5 transcript variants from purified monocytes of healthy donors and SLE patients to generate an IRF5 variant transcriptome. Next-generation sequencing was then used to perform in-depth and quantitative analysis of full-length IRF5 transcript expression in primary immune cells of SLE patients and healthy donors by next-generation sequencing. Evidence for additional alternatively spliced transcripts was obtained from de novo junction discovery. Data from these studies support the overall complexity of IRF5 alternative splicing in SLE. Results from next-generation sequencing correlated with cloning and gave similar abundance rankings in SLE patients thus supporting the use of this new technology for in-depth single gene transcript profiling. Results from this study provide the first proof that 1) SLE patients express an IRF5 transcript signature that is distinct from healthy donors, 2) an IRF5-SLE risk haplotype defines the top four most abundant IRF5 transcripts expressed in SLE patients, and 3) an IRF5 transcript signature enables clustering of SLE patients with the H2 risk haplotype. PMID:23349905

  11. RNA-Seq for enrichment and analysis of IRF5 transcript expression in SLE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka C Stone

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in the interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5 gene have been consistently replicated and shown to confer risk for or protection from the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. IRF5 expression is significantly upregulated in SLE patients and upregulation associates with IRF5-SLE risk haplotypes. IRF5 alternative splicing has also been shown to be elevated in SLE patients. Given that human IRF5 exists as multiple alternatively spliced transcripts with distinct function(s, it is important to determine whether the IRF5 transcript profile expressed in healthy donor immune cells is different from that expressed in SLE patients. Moreover, it is not currently known whether an IRF5-SLE risk haplotype defines the profile of IRF5 transcripts expressed. Using standard molecular cloning techniques, we identified and isolated 14 new differentially spliced IRF5 transcript variants from purified monocytes of healthy donors and SLE patients to generate an IRF5 variant transcriptome. Next-generation sequencing was then used to perform in-depth and quantitative analysis of full-length IRF5 transcript expression in primary immune cells of SLE patients and healthy donors by next-generation sequencing. Evidence for additional alternatively spliced transcripts was obtained from de novo junction discovery. Data from these studies support the overall complexity of IRF5 alternative splicing in SLE. Results from next-generation sequencing correlated with cloning and gave similar abundance rankings in SLE patients thus supporting the use of this new technology for in-depth single gene transcript profiling. Results from this study provide the first proof that 1 SLE patients express an IRF5 transcript signature that is distinct from healthy donors, 2 an IRF5-SLE risk haplotype defines the top four most abundant IRF5 transcripts expressed in SLE patients, and 3 an IRF5 transcript signature enables clustering of SLE patients with the H2 risk haplotype.

  12. Applications of Recombinant Dna Technology in Gastrointestinal Medicine and Hepatology: Basic Paradigms of Molecular Cell Biology. Part B: Eukaryotic Gene Transcription and Post-Transcripional Rna Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Wild

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcription of DNA into RNA is the primary level at which gene expression is controlled in eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic gene transcription  involves several different RNA polymerases that interact with a host of transcription factors to initiate transcription. Genes that encode proteins are transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA by RNA polymerase II. Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs and transfer RNAs (tRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase I and III, respectively.  The production of each mRNA in human cells involves complex interactions of proteins (ie, trans-acting factors with specific sequences on the DNA (ie, cis-acting elements. Cis-acting elements are short base sequences adjacent to or within a particular gene. While the regulation of transcription is a pivotal step in the control of gene expression, a variety of molecular events, collectively known as ’RNA processing’  add an additional level of control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells.

  13. Sequence and Generation of Mature Ribosomal RNA Transcripts in Dictyostelium discoideum

    OpenAIRE

    Boesler, Carsten; Kruse, Janis; Söderbom, Fredrik; Hammann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a well established model organism for studying numerous aspects of cellular and developmental functions. Its ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is encoded in an extrachromosomal palindrome that exists in ∼100 copies in the cell. In this study, we have set out to investigate the sequence of the expressed rRNA. For this, we have ligated the rRNA ends and performed RT-PCR on these circular RNAs. Sequencing revealed that the mature 26 S, 17 S, 5.8 S, and 5 S rRNAs have si...

  14. A new link between transcriptional initiation and pre-mRNA splicing: The RNA binding histone variant H2A.B.

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    Tatiana A Soboleva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of histone H2A with its variant forms is critical for regulating all aspects of genome organisation and function. The histone variant H2A.B appeared late in evolution and is most highly expressed in the testis followed by the brain in mammals. This raises the question of what new function(s H2A.B might impart to chromatin in these important tissues. We have immunoprecipitated the mouse orthologue of H2A.B, H2A.B.3 (H2A.Lap1, from testis chromatin and found this variant to be associated with RNA processing factors and RNA Polymerase (Pol II. Most interestingly, many of these interactions with H2A.B.3 (Sf3b155, Spt6, DDX39A and RNA Pol II were inhibited by the presence of endogenous RNA. This histone variant can bind to RNA directly in vitro and in vivo, and associates with mRNA at intron-exon boundaries. This suggests that the ability of H2A.B to bind to RNA negatively regulates its capacity to bind to these factors (Sf3b155, Spt6, DDX39A and RNA Pol II. Unexpectedly, H2A.B.3 forms highly decompacted nuclear subdomains of active chromatin that co-localizes with splicing speckles in male germ cells. H2A.B.3 ChIP-Seq experiments revealed a unique chromatin organization at active genes being not only enriched at the transcription start site (TSS, but also at the beginning of the gene body (but being excluded from the +1 nucleosome compared to the end of the gene. We also uncover a general histone variant replacement process whereby H2A.B.3 replaces H2A.Z at intron-exon boundaries in the testis and the brain, which positively correlates with expression and exon inclusion. Taken together, we propose that a special mechanism of splicing may occur in the testis and brain whereby H2A.B.3 recruits RNA processing factors from splicing speckles to active genes following its replacement of H2A.Z.

  15. Efficient in vitro inhibition of HIV-1 gag reverse transcription by peptide nucleic acid (PNA) at minimal ratios of PNA/RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Zachar, Vladimir; Nielsen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    ) was investigated. We found that a bis-PNA (parallel antisense 10mer linked to antiparallel antisense 10mer) was superior to both the parallel antisense 10mer and antiparallel antisense 10mer in inhibiting reverse transcription of the gene, thus indicating triplex formation at the target sequence. A complete arrest......We have tested the inhibitory potential of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) on in vitro reverse transcription of the HIV-1 gag gene. PNA was designed to target different regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and the effect on reverse transcription by HIV-1, MMLV and AMV reverse transcriptases (RTs...... of reverse transcription was obtained at approximately 6-fold molar excess of the bis-PNA with respect to the gag RNA. At this molar ratio we found no effect on in vitro translation of gag RNA. A 15mer duplex-forming PNA was also found to inhibit reverse transcription at very low molar ratios of PNA/ gag RNA...

  16. The majority of transcripts in the squid nervous system are extensively recoded by A-to-I RNA editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Shahar; Garrett, Sandra C; Levanon, Erez Y; Olson, Sara; Graveley, Brenton R; Rosenthal, Joshua J C; Eisenberg, Eli

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deamination alters genetic information from the genomic blueprint. When it recodes mRNAs, it gives organisms the option to express diverse, functionally distinct, protein isoforms. All eumetazoans, from cnidarians to humans, express RNA editing enzymes. However, transcriptome-wide screens have only uncovered about 25 transcripts harboring conserved recoding RNA editing sites in mammals and several hundred recoding sites in Drosophila. These studies on few established models have led to the general assumption that recoding by RNA editing is extremely rare. Here we employ a novel bioinformatic approach with extensive validation to show that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii recodes proteins by RNA editing to an unprecedented extent. We identify 57,108 recoding sites in the nervous system, affecting the majority of the proteins studied. Recoding is tissue-dependent, and enriched in genes with neuronal and cytoskeletal functions, suggesting it plays an important role in brain physiology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05198.001 PMID:25569156

  17. The Cockayne syndrome B protein, involved in transcription-coupled DNA repair, resides in an RNA polymerase II-containing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, A J; Citterio, E; Rademakers, S; van Os, R; Vermeulen, W; Constantinou, A; Egly, J M; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1997-10-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) defective in Cockayne syndrome A and B (CSA and CSB), is responsible for the preferential removal of DNA lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes, permitting rapid resumption of blocked transcription. Here we demonstrate by microinjection of antibodies against CSB and CSA gene products into living primary fibroblasts, that both proteins are required for TCR and for recovery of RNA synthesis after UV damage in vivo but not for basal transcription itself. Furthermore, immunodepletion showed that CSB is not required for in vitro NER or transcription. Its central role in TCR suggests that CSB interacts with other repair and transcription proteins. Gel filtration of repair- and transcription-competent whole cell extracts provided evidence that CSB and CSA are part of large complexes of different sizes. Unexpectedly, there was no detectable association of CSB with several candidate NER and transcription proteins. However, a minor but significant portion (10-15%) of RNA polymerase II was found to be tightly associated with CSB. We conclude that within cell-free extracts, CSB is not stably associated with the majority of core NER or transcription components, but is part of a distinct complex involving RNA polymerase II. These findings suggest that CSB is implicated in, but not essential for, transcription, and support the idea that Cockayne syndrome is due to a combined repair and transcription deficiency.

  18. RNA polymerase III transcriptomes in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and relationships with pluripotency transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alla, Ravi K; Cairns, Bradley R

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic approaches have revealed that the repertoire of RNA Pol III-transcribed genes varies in different human cell types, and that this variation is likely determined by a combination of the chromatin landscape, cell-specific DNA-binding transcription factors, and collaboration with RNA Pol II. Although much is known about this regulation in differentiated human cells, there is presently little understanding of this aspect of the Pol III system in human ES cells. Here, we determine the occupancy profiles of Pol III components in human H1 ES cells, and also induced pluripotent cells, and compare to known profiles of chromatin, transcription factors, and RNA expression. We find a relatively large fraction of the Pol III repertoire occupied in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In ES cells we find clear correlations between Pol III occupancy and active chromatin. Interestingly, we find a highly significant fraction of Pol III-occupied genes with adjacent binding events by pluripotency factors in ES cells, especially NANOG. Notably, in human ES cells we find H3K27me3 adjacent to but not overlapping many active Pol III loci. We observe in all such cases, a peak of H3K4me3 and/or RNA Pol II, between the H3K27me3 and Pol III binding peaks, suggesting that H3K4me3 and Pol II activity may "insulate" Pol III from neighboring repressive H3K27me3. Further, we find iPSCs have a larger Pol III repertoire than their precursors. Finally, the active Pol III genome in iPSCs is not completely reprogrammed to a hESC like state and partially retains the transcriptional repertoire of the precursor. Together, our correlative results are consistent with Pol III binding and activity in human ES cells being enabled by active/permissive chromatin that is shaped in part by the pluripotency network of transcription factors and RNA Pol II activity.

  19. Transcript analysis at DGAT1 reveals different mRNA profiles in river buffaloes with extreme phenotypes for milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, M; Cosenza, G; Nicolae, I; Bota, A; Guo, Y; Di Stasio, L; Pauciullo, A

    2017-10-01

    Buffalo DGAT1 (diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1) was mainly investigated for the characterization of the gene itself and for the identification of the K232A polymorphism, similar to what has been accomplished in cattle, although no information has been reported so far at the mRNA level. The importance of DGAT1 for lipid metabolism led us to investigate the transcript profiles of lactating buffaloes characterized as high (9.13 ± 0.23) and low (7.94 ± 0.29) for milk fat percentage, and to explore the genetic diversity at the RNA and DNA level. A total of 336 positive clones for the DGAT1 cDNA were analyzed by PCR and chosen for sequencing according to the differences in length. The clone assembling revealed a very complex mRNA pattern with a total of 21 transcripts differently represented in the 2 groups of animals. Apart from the correct transcript (17 exons long), the skipping of exon 12 is the most significant in terms of distribution of clones with 11.6% difference between the 2 groups, whereas a totally different mRNA profile was found in approximately 12% of clones. The sequencing of genomic DNA allowed the identification of 10 polymorphic sites at the intron level, which clarify, at least partially, the genetic events behind the production of complex mRNA. Genetic diversity was found also at the exon level. The single nucleotide polymorphism c.1053C>T represents the first example of polymorphism in a coding region for the DGAT1 in the Italian Mediterranean breed. To establish whether this polymorphism is present in other buffalo breeds, a quick method based on PCR-RFLP was set up for allelic discrimination in the Italian Mediterranean and the Romanian Murrah (200 animals in total). The alleles were equally represented in the overall population, whereas the analysis of the 2 breeds showed different frequencies, likely indicating diverse genetic structure of the 2 breeds. The T allele might be considered as the ancestral condition of the DGAT1 gene, being

  20. Identification of new viral genes and transcript isoforms during Epstein-Barr virus reactivation using RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Monica; Wang, Xia; Cao, Subing; Baddoo, Melody; Fewell, Claire; Lin, Zhen; Hulme, William; Hedges, Dale; McBride, Jane; Flemington, Erik K

    2012-02-01

    Using an enhanced RNA-Seq pipeline to analyze Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transcriptomes, we investigated viral and cellular gene expression in the Akata cell line following B-cell-receptor-mediated reactivation. Robust induction of EBV gene expression was observed, with most viral genes induced >200-fold and with EBV transcripts accounting for 7% of all mapped reads within the cell. After induction, hundreds of candidate splicing events were detected using the junction mapper TopHat, including a novel nonproductive splicing event at the gp350/gp220 locus and several alternative splicing events at the LMP2 locus. A more detailed analysis of lytic LMP2 transcripts showed an overall lack of the prototypical type III latency splicing events. Analysis of nuclear versus cytoplasmic RNA-Seq data showed that the lytic forms of LMP2, EBNA-2, EBNA-LP, and EBNA-3A, -3B, and -3C have higher nuclear-to-cytoplasmic accumulation ratios than most lytic genes, including classic late genes. These data raise the possibility that at least some lytic transcripts derived from these latency gene loci may have unique, noncoding nuclear functions during reactivation. Our analysis also identified two previously unknown genes, BCLT1 and BCRT2, that map to the BamHI C-region of the EBV genome. Pathway analysis of cellular gene expression changes following B-cell receptor activation identified an inflammatory response as the top predicted function and ILK and TREM1 as the top predicted canonical pathways.

  1. Structure of the DNA-binding and RNA-polymerase-binding region of transcription antitermination factor λQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, Sergey M; Gensler, Yocheved; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Su, Min; Huang, Janet Y; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Montelione, Gaetano T; Tong, Liang; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2014-03-04

    The bacteriophage λ Q protein is a transcription antitermination factor that controls expression of the phage late genes as a stable component of the transcription elongation complex. To join the elongation complex, λQ binds a specific DNA sequence element and interacts with RNA polymerase that is paused during early elongation. λQ binds to the paused early-elongation complex through interactions between λQ and two regions of RNA polymerase: region 4 of the σ(70) subunit and the flap region of the β subunit. We present the 2.1 Å resolution crystal structure of a portion of λQ containing determinants for interaction with DNA, interaction with region 4 of σ(70), and interaction with the β flap. The structure provides a framework for interpreting prior genetic and biochemical analysis and sets the stage for future structural studies to elucidate the mechanism by which λQ alters the functional properties of the transcription elongation complex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-02-17

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora.

  3. Human peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase transcripts derived by alternative mRNA splicing of an unreported exon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, M D; Jones, J E; Treston, A M

    1995-10-03

    We are characterizing the alternatively spliced human peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (hPAM)-encoding mRNA transcripts expressed by human cells. Reverse transcription coupled to the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been used to identify four alternatively spliced variants that differ in the region joining the two catalytic domains. Two of the transcripts represent previously reported splice variants differentiated by the presence (hPAM-A) or absence (hPAM-B) of a 321-nucleotide (nt) linker (optional exon A) which in the rat produce functionally distinct enzymes. Different mRNAs represent two splice variants, hPAM-C and hPAM-D, that show the presence of an exon unreported for PAM in any other species. This new exon, designated exon C, is 54 nt in length, encodes an 18-amino-acid (aa) peptide containing a conserved dibasic aa endoproteolytic processing motif, and is located 3' of exon A in human genomic DNA. We propose that cell-specific regulation of mRNA splicing would provide a mechanism for control of prohormone activation by these variants of the PAM enzyme.

  4. Telomeric Retrotransposon HeT-A Contains a Bidirectional Promoter that Initiates Divergent Transcription of piRNA Precursors in Drosophila Germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radion, Elizaveta; Ryazansky, Sergei; Akulenko, Natalia; Rozovsky, Yakov; Kwon, Dmitry; Morgunova, Valeriya; Olovnikov, Ivan; Kalmykova, Alla

    2017-10-27

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) provide the silencing of transposable elements in the germline. Drosophila telomeres are maintained by transpositions of specialized telomeric retroelements. piRNAs generated from sense and antisense transcripts of telomeric elements provide telomere length control in the germline. Previously, we have found that antisense transcription of the major telomeric retroelement HeT-A is initiated upstream of the HeT-A sense transcription start site. Here, we performed a deletion analysis of the HeT-A promoter and show that common regulatory elements are shared by sense and antisense promoters of HeT-A. Therefore, the HeT-A promoter is a bidirectional promoter capable of processive sense and antisense transcription. Ovarian small RNA data show that a solo HeT-A promoter within an euchromatic transgene initiates the divergent transcription of transgenic reporter genes and subsequent processing of these transcripts into piRNAs. These events lead to the formation of a divergent unistrand piRNA cluster at solo HeT-A promoters, in contrast to endogenous telomeres that represent strong dual-strand piRNA clusters. Solo HeT-A promoters are not immunoprecipitated with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) homolog Rhino, a marker of the dual-strand piRNA clusters, but are associated with HP1 itself, which provides piRNA-mediated transcriptional repression of the reporter genes. Unlike endogenous dual-strand piRNA clusters, the solo HeT-A promoter does not produce overlapping transcripts. In a telomeric context, however, bidirectional promoters of tandem HeT-A repeats provide a read-through transcription of both genomic strands, followed by Rhi binding. These data indicate that Drosophila telomeres share properties of unistrand and dual-strand piRNA clusters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Contemporary, Laboratory-Intensive Course on Messenger RNA Transcription and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Sue; Miller, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) plays a pivotal role in the central dogma of molecular biology. Importantly, molecular events occurring during and after mRNA synthesis have the potential to create multiple proteins from one gene, leading to some of the remarkable protein diversity that genomes hold. The North Carolina State University…

  6. The fidelity of reverse transcription differs in reactions primed with RNA versus DNA primers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Essink, B. B.; Berkhout, B.

    1999-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase enzymes (RT) convert single-stranded retroviral RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA. The RT enzyme can use both RNA and DNA primers, the former being used exclusively during initiation of minus- and plus-strand synthesis. Initiation of minus-strand DNA synthesis occurs by

  7. Transcription and translation of the rpsJ, rplN and rRNA operons of the tubercle bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Teresa; Cox, Robert Ashley

    2015-04-01

    Several species of the genus Mycobacterium are human pathogens, notably the tubercle bacillus (Mycobacterium tuberculosis). The rate of proliferation of a bacterium is reflected in the rate of ribosome synthesis. This report describes a quantitative analysis of the early stages of the synthesis of ribosomes of M. tuberculosis. Specifically, the roles of three large operons, namely: the rrn operon (1.7 microns) encoding rrs (16S rRNA), rrl (23S rRNA) and rrf (5S rRNA); the rpsJ operon (1.93 microns), which encodes 11 ribosomal proteins; and the rplN operon (1.45 microns), which encodes 10 ribosomal proteins. A mathematical framework based on properties of population-average cells was developed to identify the number of transcripts of the rpsJ and rplN operons needed to maintain exponential growth. The values obtained were supported by RNaseq data. The motif 5'-gcagac-3' was found close to 5' end of transcripts of mycobacterial rplN operons, suggesting it may form part of the RpsH feedback binding site because the same motif is present in the ribosome within the region of rrs that forms the binding site for RpsH. Medical Research Council.

  8. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED; (Keele); (Scripps)

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  9. RNA-seq of 272 gliomas revealed a novel, recurrent PTPRZ1-MET fusion transcript in secondary glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhao-Shi; Yang, Ming-Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Bao; Yu, Kai; Ye, Wan-Lu; Hu, Bo-Qiang; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Akers, Johnny; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Li, Jie; Carter, Bob; Liu, Yan-Wei; Hu, Hui-Min; Wang, Zheng; Li, Ming-Yang; Yao, Kun; Qiu, Xiao-Guang; Kang, Chun-Sheng; You, Yong-Ping; Fan, Xiao-Long; Song, Wei Sonya; Li, Rui-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene rearrangements and the consequent oncogenic fusion proteins have laid the foundation for targeted cancer therapy. To identify oncogenic fusions associated with glioma progression, we catalogued fusion transcripts by RNA-seq of 272 gliomas. Fusion transcripts were more frequently found in high-grade gliomas, in the classical subtype of gliomas, and in gliomas treated with radiation/temozolomide. Sixty-seven in-frame fusion transcripts were identified, including three recurrent fusion transcripts: FGFR3-TACC3, RNF213-SLC26A11, and PTPRZ1-MET (ZM). Interestingly, the ZM fusion was found only in grade III astrocytomas (1/13; 7.7%) or secondary GBMs (sGBMs, 3/20; 15.0%). In an independent cohort of sGBMs, the ZM fusion was found in three of 20 (15%) specimens. Genomic analysis revealed that the fusion arose from translocation events involving introns 3 or 8 of PTPRZ and intron 1 of MET. ZM fusion transcripts were found in GBMs irrespective of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation status. sGBMs harboring ZM fusion showed higher expression of genes required for PIK3CA signaling and lowered expression of genes that suppressed RB1 or TP53 function. Expression of the ZM fusion was mutually exclusive with EGFR overexpression in sGBMs. Exogenous expression of the ZM fusion in the U87MG glioblastoma line enhanced cell migration and invasion. Clinically, patients afflicted with ZM fusion harboring glioblastomas survived poorly relative to those afflicted with non-ZM-harboring sGBMs (P fusion transcript in sGBMs. PMID:25135958

  10. Strand-specific community RNA-seq reveals prevalent and dynamic antisense transcription in human gut microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanhui eBao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics and other metaomics approaches (including metatranscriptomics provide insights into the composition and function of microbial communities living in different environments or animal hosts. Metatranscriptomics research provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine gene regulation for many microbial species simultaneously, and more importantly, for the majority that are unculturable microbial species, in their natural environments (or hosts. Current analyses of metatranscriptomic datasets focus on the detection of gene expression levels and the study of the relationship between changes of gene expression and changes of environment. As a demonstration of utilizing metatranscriptomics beyond these common analyses, we developed a computational and statistical procedure to analyze the antisense transcripts in strand-specific metatranscriptomic datasets. Antisense RNAs encoded on the DNA strand opposite a gene’s CDS have the potential to form extensive base-pairing interactions with the corresponding sense RNA, and can have important regulatory functions. Most studies of antisense RNAs in bacteria are rather recent, are mostly based on transcriptome analysis, and have been applied mainly to single bacterial species. Application of our approaches to human gut-associated metatranscriptomic datasets allowed us to survey antisense transcription for a large number of bacterial species associated with human beings. The ratio of protein coding genes with antisense transcription ranges from zero to 35.8% (median = 10.0% among 47 species. Our results show that antisense transcription is dynamic, varying between human individuals. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a preference of certain gene functions for antisense transcription, and transposase genes are among the most prominent ones (but we also observed antisense transcription in bacterial house-keeping genes.

  11. Analysis of mRNA transcripts in chronic myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meissner Rosely de V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of BCR/ABL hybrid mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR in cells from 33 patients (22 males, 11 females with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. b3a2 mRNA was found in 14 cases, whereas 13 patients had b2a2 mRNA and six had both kinds of mRNA, with a predominance of the b3a2 type. The type of mRNA present showed no significant correlation with age, hemoglobin level, number of leukocytes and platelets, percentage of blasts or basophils or the presence of splenomegaly at diagnosis. There was also no correlation with sex or duration of the chronic phase. When these results were combined with those reported by other groups, a significant association (P = 0.029 was observed for mRNA type vs. sex, with a predominance of men in the groups expressing b2a2 (2.68:1 and b3a2 (1.33:1. We conclude that the classification of patients according to mRNA type does not homogenize the clinical and hematological data within groups, where variance is large, nor does it allow a differentiation between groups.

  12. Reduced RNA polymerase II transcription in extracts of cockayne syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum/Cockayne syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianov, G L; Houle, J F; Iyer, N; Bohr, V A; Friedberg, E C

    1997-09-15

    The hereditary disease Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a complex clinical syndrome characterized by arrested post-natal growth as well as neurological and other defects. The CSA and CSB genes are implicated in this disease. The clinical features of CS can also accompany the excision repair-defective hereditary disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) from genetic complementation groups B, D or G. The XPB and XPD proteins are subunits of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcription factor IIH (TFIIH). We show here that extracts of CS-A and CS-B cells, as well as those from XP-B/CS cells, support reduced levels of RNAP II transcription in vitro and that this feature is dependent on the state or quality of the template.

  13. UPF1, a conserved nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factor, regulates cyst wall protein transcripts in Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsiu Chen

    Full Text Available The Giardia lamblia cyst wall is required for survival outside the host and infection. Three cyst wall protein (cwp genes identified to date are highly up-regulated during encystation. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms governing their gene regulation. Messenger RNAs containing premature stop codons are rapidly degraded by a nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system to avoid production of non-functional proteins. In addition to RNA surveillance, NMD also regulates thousands of naturally occurring transcripts through a variety of mechanisms. It is interesting to know the NMD pathway in the primitive eukaryotes. Previously, we have found that the giardial homologue of a conserved NMD factor, UPF1, may be functionally conserved and involved in NMD and in preventing nonsense suppression. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NMD factors can regulate some naturally occurring transcripts in G. lamblia. We found that overexpression of UPF1 resulted in a significant decrease of the levels of CWP1 and cyst formation and of the endogenous cwp1-3, and myb2 mRNA levels and stability. This indicates that NMD could contribute to the regulation of the cwp1-3 and myb2 transcripts, which are key to G. lamblia differentiation into cyst. Interestingly, we also found that UPF1 may be involved in regulation of eight other endogenous genes, including up-regulation of the translation elongation factor gene, whose product increases translation which is required for NMD. Our results indicate that NMD factor could contribute to the regulation of not only nonsense containing mRNAs, but also mRNAs of the key encystation-induced genes and other endogenous genes in the early-diverging eukaryote, G. lamblia.

  14. A powerful method for transcriptional profiling of specific cell types in eukaryotes: laser-assisted microdissection and RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc W Schmid

    Full Text Available The acquisition of distinct cell fates is central to the development of multicellular organisms and is largely mediated by gene expression patterns specific to individual cells and tissues. A spatially and temporally resolved analysis of gene expression facilitates the elucidation of transcriptional networks linked to cellular identity and function. We present an approach that allows cell type-specific transcriptional profiling of distinct target cells, which are rare and difficult to access, with unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. We combined laser-assisted microdissection (LAM, linear amplification starting from <1 ng of total RNA, and RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq. As a model we used the central cell of the Arabidopsis thaliana female gametophyte, one of the female gametes harbored in the reproductive organs of the flower. We estimated the number of expressed genes to be more than twice the number reported previously in a study using LAM and ATH1 microarrays, and identified several classes of genes that were systematically underrepresented in the transcriptome measured with the ATH1 microarray. Among them are many genes that are likely to be important for developmental processes and specific cellular functions. In addition, we identified several intergenic regions, which are likely to be transcribed, and describe a considerable fraction of reads mapping to introns and regions flanking annotated loci, which may represent alternative transcript isoforms. Finally, we performed a de novo assembly of the transcriptome and show that the method is suitable for studying individual cell types of organisms lacking reference sequence information, demonstrating that this approach can be applied to most eukaryotic organisms.

  15. RNA-Seq derived identification of differential transcription in the chrysanthemum leaf following inoculation with Alternaria tenuissima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyun; Chen, Sumei; Song, Aiping; Wang, Haibin; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-04

    A major production constraint on the important ornamental species chrysanthemum is black spot which is caused by the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria tenuissima. The molecular basis of host resistance to A. tenuissima has not been studied as yet in any detail. Here, high throughput sequencing was taken to characterize the transcriptomic response of the chrysanthemum leaf to A. tenuissima inoculation. The transcriptomic data was acquired using RNA-Seq technology, based on the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. Four different libraries derived from two sets of leaves harvested from either inoculated or mock-inoculated plants were characterized. Over seven million clean reads were generated from each library, each corresponding to a coverage of >350,000 nt. About 70% of the reads could be mapped to a set of chrysanthemum unigenes. Read frequency was used as a measure of transcript abundance and therefore as an identifier of differential transcription in the four libraries. The differentially transcribed genes identified were involved in photosynthesis, pathogen recognition, reactive oxygen species generation, cell wall modification and phytohormone signalling; in addition, a number of varied transcription factors were identified. A selection of 23 of the genes was transcription-profiled using quantitative RT-PCR to validate the RNA-Seq output. A substantial body of chrysanthemum transcriptomic sequence was generated, which led to a number of insights into the molecular basis of the host response to A. tenuissima infection. Although most of the differentially transcribed genes were up-regulated by the presence of the pathogen, those involved in photosynthesis were down-regulated.

  16. Cooperation of p300 and PCAF in the control of microRNA 200c/141 transcription and epithelial characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Mizuguchi

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT not only occurs during embryonic development and in response to injury, but is an important element in cancer progression. EMT and its reverse process, mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET is controlled by a network of transcriptional regulators and can be influenced by posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications. EMT/MET involves many effectors that can activate and repress these transitions, often yielding a spectrum of cell phenotypes. Recent studies have shown that the miR-200 family and the transcriptional suppressor ZEB1 are important contributors to EMT. Our previous data showed that forced expression of SPRR2a was a powerful inducer of EMT and supports the findings by others that SPRR gene members are highly upregulated during epithelial remodeling in a variety of organs. Here, using SPRR2a cells, we characterize the role of acetyltransferases on the microRNA-200c/141 promoter and their effect on the epithelial/mesenchymal status of the cells. We show that the deacetylase inhibitor TSA as well as P300 and PCAF can cause a shift towards epithelial characteristics in HUCCT-1-SPRR2a cells. We demonstrate that both P300 and PCAF act as cofactors for ZEB1, forming a P300/PCAF/ZEB1 complex on the miR200c/141 promoter. This binding results in lysine acetylation of ZEB1 and a release of ZEB1 suppression on miR-200c/141 transcription. Furthermore, disruption of P300 and PCAF interactions dramatically down regulates miR-200c/141 promoter activity, indicating a PCAF/P300 cooperative function in regulating the transcriptional suppressor/activator role of ZEB1. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation in mediating cell phenotype.

  17. ChimPipe: accurate detection of fusion genes and transcription-induced chimeras from RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, Bernardo; Palumbo, Emilio; Marco-Sola, Santiago; Griebel, Thasso; Ribeca, Paolo; Alonso, Graciela; Rastrojo, Alberto; Aguado, Begoña; Guigó, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah

    2017-01-03

    Chimeric transcripts are commonly defined as transcripts linking two or more different genes in the genome, and can be explained by various biological mechanisms such as genomic rearrangement, read-through or trans-splicing, but also by technical or biological artefacts. Several studies have shown their importance in cancer, cell pluripotency and motility. Many programs have recently been developed to identify chimeras from Illumina RNA-seq data (mostly fusion genes in cancer). However outputs of different programs on the same dataset can be widely inconsistent, and tend to include many false positives. Other issues relate to simulated datasets restricted to fusion genes, real datasets with limited numbers of validated cases, result inconsistencies between simulated and real datasets, and gene rather than junction level assessment. Here we present ChimPipe, a modular and easy-to-use method to reliably identify fusion genes and transcription-induced chimeras from paired-end Illumina RNA-seq data. We have also produced realistic simulated datasets for three different read lengths, and enhanced two gold-standard cancer datasets by associating exact junction points to validated gene fusions. Benchmarking ChimPipe together with four other state-of-the-art tools on this data showed ChimPipe to be the top program at identifying exact junction coordinates for both kinds of datasets, and the one showing the best trade-off between sensitivity and precision. Applied to 106 ENCODE human RNA-seq datasets, ChimPipe identified 137 high confidence chimeras connecting the protein coding sequence of their parent genes. In subsequent experiments, three out of four predicted chimeras, two of which recurrently expressed in a large majority of the samples, could be validated. Cloning and sequencing of the three cases revealed several new chimeric transcript structures, 3 of which with the potential to encode a chimeric protein for which we hypothesized a new role. Applying ChimPipe to

  18. Reduced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants that use reverse transcription primers other than the natural tRNA(3Lys)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Klaver, B.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses involves reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a double-stranded DNA. This reaction is primed by the cellular tRNA(3Lys) molecule, which binds to a complementary sequence in the viral genome, referred

  19. RNA N6-methyladenosine methylation in post-transcriptional gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yanan; Liu, Jianzhao; He, Chuan

    2015-07-01

    N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is the most prevalent and internal modification that occurs in the messenger RNAs (mRNA) of most eukaryotes, although its functional relevance remained a mystery for decades. This modification is installed by the m(6)A methylation "writers" and can be reversed by demethylases that serve as "erasers." In this review, we mainly summarize recent progress in the study of the m(6)A mRNA methylation machineries across eukaryotes and discuss their newly uncovered biological functions. The broad roles of m(6)A in regulating cell fates and embryonic development highlight the existence of another layer of epigenetic regulation at the RNA level, where mRNA is subjected to chemical modifications that affect protein expression. © 2015 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Efficient reverse transcription using locked nucleic acid nucleotides towards the evolution of nuclease resistant RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouzier, Lucile; Dubois, Camille; Edwards, Stacey L

    2012-01-01

    We found that SuperScript® III Reverse Transcriptase is an efficient enzyme for the recognition of LNA nucleotides, making it a prime candidate to be used in de novo selection of LNA containing RNA aptamers.......We found that SuperScript® III Reverse Transcriptase is an efficient enzyme for the recognition of LNA nucleotides, making it a prime candidate to be used in de novo selection of LNA containing RNA aptamers....

  1. Characterizing the roles of Cryphonectria parasitica RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-like genes in antiviral defense, viral recombination and transposon transcript accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Xiu Zhang

    Full Text Available An inducible RNA-silencing pathway, involving a single Dicer protein, DCL2, and a single Argonaute protein, AGL2, was recently shown to serve as an effective antiviral defense response in the chestnut blight fungus Cryphonectria parasitica. Eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs are frequently involved in transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene silencing and antiviral defense. We report here the identification and characterization of four RdRP genes (rdr1-4 in the C. parasitica genome. Sequence relationships with other eukaryotic RdRPs indicated that RDR1 and RDR2 were closely related to QDE-1, an RdRP involved in RNA silencing ("quelling" in Neurospora crassa, whereas RDR3 was more closely related to the meiotic silencing gene SAD-1 in N. crassa. The RdRP domain of RDR4, related to N. crassa RRP-3 of unknown function, was truncated and showed evidence of alternative splicing. Similar to reports for dcl2 and agl2, the expression levels for rdr3 and rdr4 increased after hypovirus CHV-1/EP713 infection, while expression levels of rdr1 and rdr2 were unchanged. The virus-responsive induction patterns for rdr3 and rdr4 were altered in the Δdcl2 and Δagl2 strains, suggesting some level of interaction between rdr3 and rdr4 and the dcl2/agl2 silencing pathway. Single rdr gene knockouts Δrdr1-4, double knockouts Δrdr1/2, Δrdr2/3, Δrdr1/3, and a triple knockout, Δrdr1/2/3, were generated and evaluated for effects on fungal phenotype, the antiviral defense response, viral RNA recombination activity and transposon expression. None of the single or multiple rdr knockout strains displayed any phenotypic differences from the parental strains with or without viral infection or any significant changes in viral RNA accumulation or recombination activity or transposon RNA accumulation, indicating no detectable contribution by the C. parasitica rdr genes to these processes.

  2. Chromatin Dynamics and the RNA Exosome Function in Concert to Regulate Transcriptional Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuri Rege

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The histone variant H2A.Z is a hallmark of nucleosomes flanking promoters of protein-coding genes and is often found in nucleosomes that carry lysine 56-acetylated histone H3 (H3-K56Ac, a mark that promotes replication-independent nucleosome turnover. Here, we find that H3-K56Ac promotes RNA polymerase II occupancy at many protein-coding and noncoding loci, yet neither H3-K56Ac nor H2A.Z has a significant impact on steady-state mRNA levels in yeast. Instead, broad effects of H3-K56Ac or H2A.Z on RNA levels are revealed only in the absence of the nuclear RNA exosome. H2A.Z is also necessary for the expression of divergent, promoter-proximal noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs in mouse embryonic stem cells. Finally, we show that H2A.Z functions with H3-K56Ac to facilitate formation of chromosome interaction domains (CIDs. Our study suggests that H2A.Z and H3-K56Ac work in concert with the RNA exosome to control mRNA and ncRNA expression, perhaps in part by regulating higher-order chromatin structures.

  3. AtRTD2: A Reference Transcript Dataset for accurate quantification of alternative splicing and expression changes in Arabidopsis thaliana RNA-seq data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Runxuan

    2016-05-06

    Background Alternative splicing is the major post-transcriptional mechanism by which gene expression is regulated and affects a wide range of processes and responses in most eukaryotic organisms. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) can generate genome-wide quantification of individual transcript isoforms to identify changes in expression and alternative splicing. RNA-seq is an essential modern tool but its ability to accurately quantify transcript isoforms depends on the diversity, completeness and quality of the transcript information. Results We have developed a new Reference Transcript Dataset for Arabidopsis (AtRTD2) for RNA-seq analysis containing over 82k non-redundant transcripts, whereby 74,194 transcripts originate from 27,667 protein-coding genes. A total of 13,524 protein-coding genes have at least one alternatively spliced transcript in AtRTD2 such that about 60% of the 22,453 protein-coding, intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis undergo alternative splicing. More than 600 putative U12 introns were identified in more than 2,000 transcripts. AtRTD2 was generated from transcript assemblies of ca. 8.5 billion pairs of reads from 285 RNA-seq data sets obtained from 129 RNA-seq libraries and merged along with the previous version, AtRTD, and Araport11 transcript assemblies. AtRTD2 increases the diversity of transcripts and through application of stringent filters represents the most extensive and accurate transcript collection for Arabidopsis to date. We have demonstrated a generally good correlation of alternative splicing ratios from RNA-seq data analysed by Salmon and experimental data from high resolution RT-PCR. However, we have observed inaccurate quantification of transcript isoforms for genes with multiple transcripts which have variation in the lengths of their UTRs. This variation is not effectively corrected in RNA-seq analysis programmes and will therefore impact RNA-seq analyses generally. To address this, we have tested different genome

  4. MicroRNA genes preferentially expressed in dendritic cells contain sites for conserved transcription factor binding motifs in their promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a fundamental role in the regulation of gene expression by translational repression or target mRNA degradation. Regulatory elements in miRNA promoters are less well studied, but may reveal a link between their expression and a specific cell type. Results To explore this link in myeloid cells, miRNA expression profiles were generated from monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs. Differences in miRNA expression among monocytes, DCs and their stimulated progeny were observed. Furthermore, putative promoter regions of miRNAs that are significantly up-regulated in DCs were screened for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs based on TFBS motif matching score, the degree to which those TFBSs are over-represented in the promoters of the up-regulated miRNAs, and the extent of conservation of the TFBSs in mammals. Conclusions Analysis of evolutionarily conserved TFBSs in DC promoters revealed preferential clustering of sites within 500 bp upstream of the precursor miRNAs and that many mRNAs of cognate TFs of the conserved TFBSs were indeed expressed in the DCs. Taken together, our data provide evidence that selected miRNAs expressed in DCs have evolutionarily conserved TFBSs relevant to DC biology in their promoters.

  5. circTAIL-seq, a targeted method for deep analysis of RNA 3' tails, reveals transcript-specific differences by multiple metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Hampton, Marshall; Abrahante, Juan E; Salavati, Reza; Zimmer, Sara L

    2016-03-01

    Post-transcriptionally added RNA 3' nucleotide extensions, or tails, impose numerous regulatory effects on RNAs, including effects on RNA turnover and translation. However, efficient methods for in-depth tail profiling of a transcript of interest are still lacking, hindering available knowledge particularly of tail populations that are highly heterogeneous. Here, we developed a targeted approach, termed circTAIL-seq, to quantify both major and subtle differences of heterogeneous tail populations. As proof-of-principle, we show that circTAIL-seq quantifies the differences in tail qualities between two selected Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial transcripts. The results demonstrate the power of the developed method in identification, discrimination, and quantification of different tail states that the population of one transcript can possess. We further show that circTAIL-seq can detect the tail characteristics for variants of transcripts that are not easily detectable by conventional approaches, such as degradation intermediates. Our findings are not only well supported by previous knowledge, but they also expand this knowledge and provide experimental evidence for previous hypotheses. In the future, this approach can be used to determine changes in tail qualities in response to environmental or internal stimuli, or upon silencing of genes of interest in mRNA-processing pathways. In summary, circTAIL-seq is an effective tool for comparing nonencoded RNA tails, especially when the tails are extremely variable or transcript of interest is low abundance. © 2016 Gazestani et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing controls cathepsin S expression in atherosclerosis by enabling HuR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellos, Konstantinos; Gatsiou, Aikaterini; Stamatelopoulos, Kimon; Perisic Matic, Ljubica; John, David; Lunella, Federica Francesca; Jaé, Nicolas; Rossbach, Oliver; Amrhein, Carolin; Sigala, Frangiska; Boon, Reinier A; Fürtig, Boris; Manavski, Yosif; You, Xintian; Uchida, Shizuka; Keller, Till; Boeckel, Jes-Niels; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Maegdefessel, Lars; Chen, Wei; Schwalbe, Harald; Bindereif, Albrecht; Eriksson, Per; Hedin, Ulf; Zeiher, Andreas M; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, which is catalyzed by a family of adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes, is important in the epitranscriptomic regulation of RNA metabolism. However, the role of A-to-I RNA editing in vascular disease is unknown. Here we show that cathepsin S mRNA (CTSS), which encodes a cysteine protease associated with angiogenesis and atherosclerosis, is highly edited in human endothelial cells. The 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the CTSS transcript contains two inverted repeats, the AluJo and AluSx+ regions, which form a long stem-loop structure that is recognized by ADAR1 as a substrate for editing. RNA editing enables the recruitment of the stabilizing RNA-binding protein human antigen R (HuR; encoded by ELAVL1) to the 3' UTR of the CTSS transcript, thereby controlling CTSS mRNA stability and expression. In endothelial cells, ADAR1 overexpression or treatment of cells with hypoxia or with the inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and tumor-necrosis-factor-α induces CTSS RNA editing and consequently increases cathepsin S expression. ADAR1 levels and the extent of CTSS RNA editing are associated with changes in cathepsin S levels in patients with atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including subclinical atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, aortic aneurysms and advanced carotid atherosclerotic disease. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role of RNA editing in gene expression in human atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  7. Conceptual Model-based Systems Biology: mapping knowledge and discovering gaps in the mRNA transcription cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Somekh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a Conceptual Model-based Systems Biology framework for qualitative modeling, executing, and eliciting knowledge gaps in molecular biology systems. The framework is an adaptation of Object-Process Methodology (OPM, a graphical and textual executable modeling language. OPM enables concurrent representation of the system's structure-the objects that comprise the system, and behavior-how processes transform objects over time. Applying a top-down approach of recursively zooming into processes, we model a case in point-the mRNA transcription cycle. Starting with this high level cell function, we model increasingly detailed processes along with participating objects. Our modeling approach is capable of modeling molecular processes such as complex formation, localization and trafficking, molecular binding, enzymatic stimulation, and environmental intervention. At the lowest level, similar to the Gene Ontology, all biological processes boil down to three basic molecular functions: catalysis, binding/dissociation, and transporting. During modeling and execution of the mRNA transcription model, we discovered knowledge gaps, which we present and classify into various types. We also show how model execution enhances a coherent model construction. Identification and pinpointing knowledge gaps is an important feature of the framework, as it suggests where research should focus and whether conjectures about uncertain mechanisms fit into the already verified model.

  8. RNA-guided Transcriptional Regulation in Plants via dCas9 Chimeric Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Baazim, Hatoon

    2014-05-01

    Developing targeted genome regulation approaches holds much promise for accelerating trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs)/CRISPR associated (Cas) system provides bacteria and archaea with an adaptive molecular immunity mechanism against invading nucleic acids through phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing purposes across a variety of cell types and organisms. Recently, the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate the expression patterns in bacterial, yeast and human cells. Here, we employed this DNA-targeting system for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based activators and repressors. For example, we fused to the C-terminus of dCas9 with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors, respectively, to generate transcriptional activators, and the SRDX repression domain to generate transcriptional repressor. Our data demonstrate that the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators, guided by gRNAs complementary to promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on episomal targets in plant cells. Moreover, our data suggest that the dCas9:SRDX repressor and the dCas9:EDLL and dCas9:TAD activators are capable of markedly repressing or activating, respectively, the transcription of an endogenous genomic target. Our data indicate that the CRISPR/dCas9:TFs DNA targeting system can be used in plants as a functional genomic tool and for biotechnological applications.

  9. RNA polymerase-promoter interactions determining different stability of the Escherichia coli and Thermus aquaticus transcription initiation complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Mukhamedyarov, Damir; Severinov, Konstantin

    2012-12-01

    Transcription initiation complexes formed by bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAPs) exhibit dramatic species-specific differences in stability, leading to different strategies of transcription regulation. The molecular basis for this diversity is unclear. Promoter complexes formed by RNAP from Thermus aquaticus (Taq) are considerably less stable than Escherichia coli RNAP promoter complexes, particularly at temperatures below 37°C. Here, we used a fluorometric RNAP molecular beacon assay to discern partial RNAP-promoter interactions. We quantitatively compared the strength of E. coli and Taq RNAPs partial interactions with the -10, -35 and UP promoter elements; the TG motif of the extended -10 element; the discriminator and the downstream duplex promoter segments. We found that compared with Taq RNAP, E. coli RNAP has much higher affinity only to the UP element and the downstream promoter duplex. This result indicates that the difference in stability between E. coli and Taq promoter complexes is mainly determined by the differential strength of core RNAP-DNA contacts. We suggest that the relative weakness of Taq RNAP interactions with DNA downstream of the transcription start point is the major reason of low stability and temperature sensitivity of promoter complexes formed by this enzyme.

  10. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 regulates microRNA gene expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozovski, Uri; Calin, George A; Setoyama, Tetsuro; D'Abundo, Lucilla; Harris, David M; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Grgurevic, Srdana; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan A; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 1,000 microRNAs (miRs) are present in the human genome; however, little is known about the regulation of miR transcription. Because miR levels are deregulated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is constitutively activated in CLL, we sought to determine whether STAT3 affects the transcription of miR genes in CLL cells. We used publically available data from the ENCODE project to identify putative STAT3 binding sites in the promoters of miR genes. Then we transfected CLL cells with STAT3-shRNA or with an empty vector, and to determine which miRs are differentially expressed, we used a miR microarray approach followed by validation of the microarray results for 6 miRs using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). We identified putative STAT3 binding sites in 160 promoter regions of 200 miRs, including miR-21, miR-29, and miR-155, whose levels have been reported to be upregulated in CLL. Levels of 72 miRs were downregulated (n = 63) or upregulated (n = 9). qRT-PCR confirmed the array data in 5 of 6 miRs. The presence of activated STAT3 has a profound effect on miR expression in CLL cells.

  11. RNA sequencing analysis of transcriptional change in the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata after environmentally relevant sodium chloride exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura S.; Galbraith, Heather S.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Cornman, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    To identify potential biomarkers of salt stress in a freshwater sentinel species, we examined transcriptional responses of the common mussel Elliptio complanata to controlled sodium chloride (NaCl) exposures. Ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNA-Seq) of mantle tissue identified 481 transcripts differentially expressed in adult mussels exposed to 2 ppt NaCl (1.2 ppt chloride) for 7 d, of which 290 had nonoverlapping intervals. Differentially expressed gene categories included ion and transmembrane transport, oxidoreductase activity, maintenance of protein folding, and amino acid metabolism. The rate-limiting enzyme for synthesis of taurine, an amino acid frequently linked to osmotic stress in aquatic species, was upregulated, as was the transmembrane ion pump sodium/potassium adenosine 5′-triphosphatase. These patterns confirm a primary transcriptional response to the experimental dose, albeit likely overlapping with nonspecific secondary stress responses. Substantial involvement of the heat shock protein 70 chaperone family and the water-transporting aquaporin family was not detected, however, in contrast to some studies in other bivalves. A subset of the most significantly regulated genes was confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in an independent sample. Cluster analysis showed separation of mussels exposed to 2 ppt NaCl from control mussels in multivariate space, but mussels exposed to 1 ppt NaCl were largely indistinguishable from controls. Transcriptome-scale analysis of salt exposure under laboratory conditions efficiently identified candidate biomarkers for further functional analysis and field validation

  12. RNA Enrichment Method for Quantitative Transcriptional Analysis of Pathogens In Vivo Applied to the Fungus Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim-Vaz, Sara; Tran, Van Du T.; Pradervand, Sylvain; Pagni, Marco; Coste, Alix T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo transcriptional analyses of microbial pathogens are often hampered by low proportions of pathogen biomass in host organs, hindering the coverage of full pathogen transcriptome. We aimed to address the transcriptome profiles of Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen in systemically infected immunocompromised patients, during systemic infection in different hosts. We developed a strategy for high-resolution quantitative analysis of the C. albicans transcriptome directly from early and late stages of systemic infection in two different host models, mouse and the insect Galleria mellonella. Our results show that transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries were enriched for fungal transcripts up to 1,600-fold using biotinylated bait probes to capture C. albicans sequences. This enrichment biased the read counts of only ~3% of the genes, which can be identified and removed based on a priori criteria. This allowed an unprecedented resolution of C. albicans transcriptome in vivo, with detection of over 86% of its genes. The transcriptional response of the fungus was surprisingly similar during infection of the two hosts and at the two time points, although some host- and time point-specific genes could be identified. Genes that were highly induced during infection were involved, for instance, in stress response, adhesion, iron acquisition, and biofilm formation. Of the in vivo-regulated genes, 10% are still of unknown function, and their future study will be of great interest. The fungal RNA enrichment procedure used here will help a better characterization of the C. albicans response in infected hosts and may be applied to other microbial pathogens. PMID:26396240

  13. Alternative tRNA priming of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription explains sequence variation in the primer-binding site that has been attributed to APOBEC3G activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Vink, Monique; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uses exclusively the cellular tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a primer for reverse transcription. We demonstrate that HIV-1 uses not only tRNA(3)(Lys) but also an alternative tRNA primer. This tRNA was termed tRNA(5)(Lys), and the

  14. Prdm5 Regulates Collagen Gene Transcription by Association with RNA Polymerase II in Developing Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Honnens de Lichtenberg, Kristian; Carrara, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    and fibrillogenesis by binding inside the Col1a1 gene body and maintaining RNA polymerase II occupancy. In vivo, Prdm5 loss results in delayed ossification involving a pronounced impairment in the assembly of fibrillar collagens. Collectively, our results define a novel role for Prdm5 in sustaining...

  15. Global transcriptional and miRNA insights into bases of heterosis in hybridization of Cyprinidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Ren, Li; Xiao, Jun; Zhong, Huan; Wang, Jun; Hu, Jie; Yu, Fan; Tao, Min; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Yun; Liu, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid Megalobrama amblycephala × Culter alburnus represents a population newly formed by interspecific crossing between two different genera. Here we assessed the expression pattern of mRNA and small RNA in newly formed F1, F2 and their progenitors. Large amounts of nonadditively expressed protein-coding genes showed parental expression level dominance (ELD). Interestingly, the ELD pattern could inherit from F1 to F2, which guaranteed a stable appearance in progenies. The ELD-B genes were found to contribute to cell development, while the ELD-T genes were enriched in function of stress and adaptability. microRNAs (miRNA) also had similar expression patterns to genes. A high proportion of miRNAs showed nonadditive expression upon hybridization, and were found to target important genes with diverse roles potentially involved in stress adaption and development. Taken together, the gene and miRNA expression divergence contributes to heterosis in the newly formed hybrid, promising the successful existence of hybrid speciation. PMID:26346824

  16. De novo transcript sequence reconstruction from RNA-Seq: reference generation and analysis with Trinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De novo assembly of RNA-seq data enables researchers to study transcriptomes without the need for a genome sequence; this approach can be usefully applied, for instance, in research on 'non-model organisms' of ecological and evolutionary importance, cancer samples or the microbiome. In this protocol...

  17. Regulation of pri-microRNA BIC transcription and processing in Burkitt lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluiver, J.; van den Berg, Anke; de Jong, Doetje; Blokzijl, T.; Harms, G.; Bouwman, E.; Jacobs, Susan; Poppema, Sibrand; Kroesen, Bart-Jan

    2007-01-01

    BIC is a primary microRNA (pri-miR-155) that can be processed to mature miR-155. In this study, we show the crucial involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) in the regulation of BIC expression upon B-cell receptor triggering. Surprisingly, Northern blot analysis

  18. PIP2 epigenetically represses rRNA genes transcription interacting with PHF8

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uličná, Lívia; Kalendová, Alžběta; Kalasová, Ilona; Vacík, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 1863, č. 3 (2018), s. 266-275 ISSN 1388-1981 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-08738S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PIP2 * PHF8 * rDNA transcription * H3K9me2 * Nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.547, year: 2016

  19. Post-transcriptional control of chloroplast gene expression. Accumulation of stable psaC mRNA is due to downstream RNA cleavages in the ndhD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Eva M; Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2002-09-27

    Intergenic cleavages, intron splicing, and editing of primary transcripts of the plastid ndhH-D operon produce multiple overlapping RNAs, of which the most abundant by far is the monocistronic 400-nucleotide mRNA of psaC (encoding the PsaC protein of photosystem I), in contrast with the low level of transcripts of the six ndh genes. Like other plastid operons containing genes for functionally unrelated proteins, the contrasting accumulation of ndh and psaC transcripts provides a model to investigate the mechanisms of the post-transcriptional control of gene expression, a feature of chloroplast genetic machinery, with a minimum of interference by transcriptional control. In leek (Allium porrum L), the ndhD transcript (which follows the psaC gene and ends the ndhH-D operon) requires C --> U editing to restore its start codon and may be used as a marker for the processing of psaC and ndhD transcripts. By determining the editing state and 5' end sequences of specific transcripts, we demonstrated that stable monocistronic psaC mRNA results from downstream cleavages in the ndhD sequence, which renders non-functional ndhD transcripts as by-products. Alternative psaC-ndhD intergenic cleavages produce complete mRNAs for both genes, but only take pl