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Sample records for rna structures including

  1. Identifying complete RNA structural ensembles including pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Rahman, Reazur; Li, Kejie; Gribskov, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The close relationship between RNA structure and function underlines the significance of accurately predicting RNA structures from sequence information. Structural topologies such as pseudoknots are of particular interest due to their ubiquity and direct involvement in RNA function, but identifying pseudoknots is a computationally challenging problem and existing heuristic approaches usually perform poorly for RNA sequences of even a few hundred bases. We survey the performance of pseudoknot prediction methods on a data set of full-length RNA sequences representing varied sequence lengths, and biological RNA classes such as RNase P RNA, Group I Intron, tmRNA and tRNA. Pseudoknot prediction methods are compared with minimum free energy and suboptimal secondary structure prediction methods in terms of correct base-pairs, stems and pseudoknots and we find that the ensemble of suboptimal structure predictions succeeds in identifying correct structural elements in RNA that are usually missed in MFE and pseudoknot predictions. We propose a strategy to identify a comprehensive set of non-redundant stems in the suboptimal structure space of a RNA molecule by applying heuristics that reduce the structural redundancy of the predicted suboptimal structures by merging slightly varying stems that are predicted to form in local sequence regions. This reduced-redundancy set of structural elements consistently outperforms more specialized approaches.in data sets. Thus, the suboptimal folding space can be used to represent the structural diversity of an RNA molecule more comprehensively than optimal structure prediction approaches alone.

  2. SimulFold: simultaneously inferring RNA structures including pseudoknots, alignments, and trees using a Bayesian MCMC framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmtraud M Meyer

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods for predicting evolutionarily conserved rather than thermodynamic RNA structures have recently attracted increased interest. These methods are indispensable not only for elucidating the regulatory roles of known RNA transcripts, but also for predicting RNA genes. It has been notoriously difficult to devise them to make the best use of the available data and to predict high-quality RNA structures that may also contain pseudoknots. We introduce a novel theoretical framework for co-estimating an RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots, a multiple sequence alignment, and an evolutionary tree, given several RNA input sequences. We also present an implementation of the framework in a new computer program, called SimulFold, which employs a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample from the joint posterior distribution of RNA structures, alignments, and trees. We use the new framework to predict RNA structures, and comprehensively evaluate the quality of our predictions by comparing our results to those of several other programs. We also present preliminary data that show SimulFold's potential as an alignment and phylogeny prediction method. SimulFold overcomes many conceptual limitations that current RNA structure prediction methods face, introduces several new theoretical techniques, and generates high-quality predictions of conserved RNA structures that may include pseudoknots. It is thus likely to have a strong impact, both on the field of RNA structure prediction and on a wide range of data analyses.

  3. The phylogeny of archaebacteria, including novel anaerobic thermoacidophiles in the light of RNA polymerase structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillig, Wolfram; Schnabel, Ralf; Tu, Jenn; Stetter, Karl Otto

    1982-05-01

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of archaebacteria are distinct from those of eubacteria both in structure and in function. They show similarities to those of the eukaryotic cytoplasm. Extremely thermophilic anaerobic sulfur-respiring archaebacteria isolated from solfataric waters represent four different families, the Thermoproteaceae, the “stiff filaments”, the Desulfurococcaceae and the Thermococcaceae, of a novel order, Thermoproteales. Together with the Sulfolobales, they form the second branch of the urkingdom of the archaebacteria besides that of the methanogens and extreme halophiles. Thermoplasma appears isolated.

  4. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  5. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  6. Structural Dynamics of the GW182 Silencing Domain Including its RNA Recognition motif (RRM) Revealed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak-Rotowska, Maja K.; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Rubin, Marcin; Fabian, Marc R.; Sonenberg, Nahum; Dadlez, Michal; Niedzwiecka, Anna

    2017-10-01

    The human GW182 protein plays an essential role in micro(mi)RNA-dependent gene silencing. miRNA silencing is mediated, in part, by a GW182 C-terminal region called the silencing domain, which interacts with the poly(A) binding protein and the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex to repress protein synthesis. Structural studies of this GW182 fragment are challenging due to its predicted intrinsically disordered character, except for its RRM domain. However, detailed insights into the properties of proteins containing disordered regions can be provided by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX/MS). In this work, we applied HDX/MS to define the structural state of the GW182 silencing domain. HDX/MS analysis revealed that this domain is clearly divided into a natively unstructured part, including the CCR4-NOT interacting motif 1, and a distinct RRM domain. The GW182 RRM has a very dynamic structure, since water molecules can penetrate the whole domain in 2 h. The finding of this high structural dynamics sheds new light on the RRM structure. Though this domain is one of the most frequently occurring canonical protein domains in eukaryotes, these results are - to our knowledge - the first HDX/MS characteristics of an RRM. The HDX/MS studies show also that the α2 helix of the RRM can display EX1 behavior after a freezing-thawing cycle. This means that the RRM structure is sensitive to environmental conditions and can change its conformation, which suggests that the state of the RRM containing proteins should be checked by HDX/MS in regard of the conformational uniformity. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exis...... complexity, this grammar for genus zero interaction structures provides not only minimum free energy solutions but also the complete partition function and base pairing probabilities.......Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  8. Inverse folding of RNA pseudoknot structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, James Zm; Li, Linda Ym; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-06-23

    RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and G-U-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, RNAinverse, RNA-SSD as well as INFO-RNA are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm Inv which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm Inv. We give a detailed analysis of Inv, including pseudocodes. We show that Inv allows to design in particular 3-noncrossing nonplanar RNA pseudoknot 3-noncrossing RNA structures-a class which is difficult to construct via dynamic programming routines. Inv is freely available at http://www.combinatorics.cn/cbpc/inv.html. The algorithm Inv extends inverse folding capabilities to RNA pseudoknot structures. In comparison with RNAinverse it uses new ideas, for instance by considering sets of competing structures. As a result, Inv is not only able to find novel sequences even for RNA secondary structures, it does so in the context of competing structures that potentially exhibit cross-serial interactions.

  9. RNA Structural Alignments, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous alignment and secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences is often referred to as "RNA structural alignment." A class of the methods for structural alignment is based on the principles proposed by Sankoff more than 25 years ago. The Sankoff algorithm simultaneously folds and aligns...

  10. Predicting RNA Structure Using Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freyhult, E.; Moulton, V.; Gardner, P. P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: With the ever-increasing number of sequenced RNAs and the establishment of new RNA databases, such as the Comparative RNA Web Site and Rfam, there is a growing need for accurately and automatically predicting RNA structures from multiple alignments. Since RNA secondary structure...... is often conserved in evolution, the well known, but underused, mutual information measure for identifying covarying sites in an alignment can be useful for identifying structural elements. This article presents MIfold, a MATLAB(R) toolbox that employs mutual information, or a related covariation measure......, to display and predict conserved RNA secondary structure (including pseudoknots) from an alignment. Results: We show that MIfold can be used to predict simple pseudoknots, and that the performance can be adjusted to make it either more sensitive or more selective. We also demonstrate that the overall...

  11. Topological classification of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bon, Michael; Vernizzi, Graziano; Orland, Henri; Zee, A

    2008-06-13

    We present a novel topological classification of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. It is based on the topological genus of the circular diagram associated to the RNA base-pair structure. The genus is a positive integer number whose value quantifies the topological complexity of the folded RNA structure. In such a representation, planar diagrams correspond to pure RNA secondary structures and have zero genus, whereas non-planar diagrams correspond to pseudoknotted structures and have higher genus. The topological genus allows for the definition of topological folding motifs, similar in spirit to those introduced and commonly used in protein folding. We analyze real RNA structures from the databases Worldwide Protein Data Bank and Pseudobase and classify them according to their topological genus. For simplicity, we limit our analysis by considering only Watson-Crick complementary base pairs and G-U wobble base pairs. We compare the results of our statistical survey with existing theoretical and numerical models. We also discuss possible applications of this classification and show how it can be used for identifying new RNA structural motifs.

  12. Fatgraph models of RNA structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fenix

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review paper we discuss fatgraphs as a conceptual framework for RNA structures. We discuss various notions of coarse-grained RNA structures and relate them to fatgraphs.We motivate and discuss the main intuition behind the fatgraph model and showcase its applicability to canonical as well as noncanonical base pairs. Recent discoveries regarding novel recursions of pseudoknotted (pk configurations as well as their translation into context-free grammars for pk-structures are discussed. This is shown to allow for extending the concept of partition functions of sequences w.r.t. a fixed structure having non-crossing arcs to pk-structures. We discuss minimum free energy folding of pk-structures and combine these above results outlining how to obtain an inverse folding algorithm for PK structures.

  13. RNA structures regulating nidovirus RNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Erwin van den

    2006-01-01

    Viruses depend on their host cell for the production of their progeny. The genetic information that is required to regulate this process is contained in the viral genome. In the case of plus-stranded RNA viruses, like nidoviruses, the RNA genome is directly involved in translation (resulting in the

  14. Combinatorics of RNA structures with pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Emma Y; Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the generating function of RNA structures with pseudoknots. We enumerate all k-noncrossing RNA pseudoknot structures categorized by their maximal sets of mutually intersecting arcs. In addition, we enumerate pseudoknot structures over circular RNA. For 3-noncrossing RNA structures and RNA secondary structures we present a novel 4-term recursion formula and a 2-term recursion, respectively. Furthermore, we enumerate for arbitrary k all k-noncrossing, restricted RNA structures i.e. k-noncrossing RNA structures without 2-arcs i.e. arcs of the form (i,i+2), for 1< or =i< or =n-2.

  15. Accelerated probabilistic inference of RNA structure evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Ian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairwise stochastic context-free grammars (Pair SCFGs are powerful tools for evolutionary analysis of RNA, including simultaneous RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction, but the associated algorithms are intensive in both CPU and memory usage. The same problem is faced by other RNA alignment-and-folding algorithms based on Sankoff's 1985 algorithm. It is therefore desirable to constrain such algorithms, by pre-processing the sequences and using this first pass to limit the range of structures and/or alignments that can be considered. Results We demonstrate how flexible classes of constraint can be imposed, greatly reducing the computational costs while maintaining a high quality of structural homology prediction. Any score-attributed context-free grammar (e.g. energy-based scoring schemes, or conditionally normalized Pair SCFGs is amenable to this treatment. It is now possible to combine independent structural and alignment constraints of unprecedented general flexibility in Pair SCFG alignment algorithms. We outline several applications to the bioinformatics of RNA sequence and structure, including Waterman-Eggert N-best alignments and progressive multiple alignment. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on test examples from the RFAM database. Conclusion A program, Stemloc, that implements these algorithms for efficient RNA sequence alignment and structure prediction is available under the GNU General Public License.

  16. Accelerated probabilistic inference of RNA structure evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ian

    2005-03-24

    Pairwise stochastic context-free grammars (Pair SCFGs) are powerful tools for evolutionary analysis of RNA, including simultaneous RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction, but the associated algorithms are intensive in both CPU and memory usage. The same problem is faced by other RNA alignment-and-folding algorithms based on Sankoff's 1985 algorithm. It is therefore desirable to constrain such algorithms, by pre-processing the sequences and using this first pass to limit the range of structures and/or alignments that can be considered. We demonstrate how flexible classes of constraint can be imposed, greatly reducing the computational costs while maintaining a high quality of structural homology prediction. Any score-attributed context-free grammar (e.g. energy-based scoring schemes, or conditionally normalized Pair SCFGs) is amenable to this treatment. It is now possible to combine independent structural and alignment constraints of unprecedented general flexibility in Pair SCFG alignment algorithms. We outline several applications to the bioinformatics of RNA sequence and structure, including Waterman-Eggert N-best alignments and progressive multiple alignment. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on test examples from the RFAM database. A program, Stemloc, that implements these algorithms for efficient RNA sequence alignment and structure prediction is available under the GNU General Public License.

  17. RNAmute: RNA secondary structure mutation analysis tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barash Danny

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNAMute is an interactive Java application that calculates the secondary structure of all single point mutations, given an RNA sequence, and organizes them into categories according to their similarity with respect to the wild type predicted structure. The secondary structure predictions are performed using the Vienna RNA package. Several alternatives are used for the categorization of single point mutations: Vienna's RNAdistance based on dot-bracket representation, as well as tree edit distance and second eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix based on Shapiro's coarse grain tree graph representation. Results Selecting a category in each one of the processed tables lists all single point mutations belonging to that category. Selecting a mutation displays a graphical drawing of the single point mutation and the wild type, and includes basic information such as associated energies, representations and distances. RNAMute can be used successfully with very little previous experience and without choosing any parameter value alongside the initial RNA sequence. The package runs under LINUX operating system. Conclusion RNAMute is a user friendly tool that can be used to predict single point mutations leading to conformational rearrangements in the secondary structure of RNAs. In several cases of substantial interest, notably in virology, a point mutation may lead to a loss of important functionality such as the RNA virus replication and translation initiation because of a conformational rearrangement in the secondary structure.

  18. Drawing and editing the secondary structure(s) of RNA.

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    Ponty, Yann; Leclerc, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Secondary structure diagrams are essential, in RNA biology, to communicate functional hypotheses and summarize structural data, and communicate them visually as drafts or finalized publication-ready figures. While many tools are currently available to automate the production of such diagrams, their capacities are usually partial, making it hard for a user to decide which to use in a given context. In this chapter, we guide the reader through the steps involved in the production of expressive publication-quality illustrations featuring the RNA secondary structure. We present major existing representations and layouts, and give precise instructions to produce them using available free software, including jViz.RNA, the PseudoViewer, RILogo, R-chie, RNAplot, R2R, and VARNA. We describe the file formats and structural descriptions accepted by popular RNA visualization tools. We also provide command lines and Python scripts to ease the user's access to advanced features. Finally, we discuss and illustrate alternative approaches to visualize the secondary structure in the presence of probing data, pseudoknots, RNA-RNA interactions, and comparative data.

  19. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs. For more exact

  20. VfoldCPX Server: Predicting RNA-RNA Complex Structure and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Shi-Jie

    RNA-RNA interactions are essential for genomic RNA dimerization, mRNA splicing, and many RNA-related gene expression and regulation processes. The prediction of the structure and folding stability of RNA-RNA complexes is a problem of significant biological importance and receives substantial interest in the biological community. The VfoldCPX server provides a new web interface to predict the two-dimensional (2D) structures of RNA-RNA complexes from the nucleotide sequences. The VfoldCPX server has several novel advantages including the ability to treat RNAs with tertiary contacts (crossing base pairs) such as loop-loop kissing interactions and the use of physical loop entropy parameters. Based on a partition function-based algorithm, the server enables prediction for structure with and without tertiary contacts. Furthermore, the server outputs a set of energetically stable structures, ranked by their stabilities. The results allow users to gain extensive physical insights into RNA-RNA interactions and their roles in RNA function. The web server is freely accessible at "http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/vfoldCPX".

  1. Characteristics and Prediction of RNA Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengwu Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is NP-hard. Most RNAs fold during transcription from DNA into RNA through a hierarchical pathway wherein secondary structures form prior to tertiary structures. Real RNA secondary structures often have local instead of global optimization because of kinetic reasons. The performance of RNA structure prediction may be improved by considering dynamic and hierarchical folding mechanisms. This study is a novel report on RNA folding that accords with the golden mean characteristic based on the statistical analysis of the real RNA secondary structures of all 480 sequences from RNA STRAND, which are validated by NMR or X-ray. The length ratios of domains in these sequences are approximately 0.382L, 0.5L, 0.618L, and L, where L is the sequence length. These points are just the important golden sections of sequence. With this characteristic, an algorithm is designed to predict RNA hierarchical structures and simulate RNA folding by dynamically folding RNA structures according to the above golden section points. The sensitivity and number of predicted pseudoknots of our algorithm are better than those of the Mfold, HotKnots, McQfold, ProbKnot, and Lhw-Zhu algorithms. Experimental results reflect the folding rules of RNA from a new angle that is close to natural folding.

  2. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

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    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. © 2014 Desai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. RNA Structural Analysis by Evolving SHAPE Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C.; Flynn, Ryan A.; Torre, Eduardo A.; Kool, Eric T.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2017-01-01

    RNA is central to the flow of biological information. From transcription to splicing, RNA localization, translation, and decay, RNA is intimately involved in regulating every step of the gene expression program, and is thus essential for health and understanding disease. RNA has the unique ability to base-pair with itself and other nucleic acids to form complex structures. Hence the information content in RNA is not simply its linear sequence of bases, but is also encoded in complex folding of RNA molecules. A general chemical functionality that all RNAs have is a 2’-hydroxyl group in the ribose ring, and the reactivity of the 2'-hydroxyl in RNA is gated by local nucleotide flexibility. In other words, the 2'-hydroxyl is reactive at single-stranded and conformationally flexible positions but is unreactive at nucleotides constrained by base pairing. Recent efforts have been focused on developing reagents that modify RNA as a function of RNA 2’ hydroxyl group flexibility. Such RNA structure probing techniques can be read out by primer extension in experiments termed RNA SHAPE (Selective 2’ Hydroxyl Acylation and Primer Extension). Herein we describe the efforts devoted to the design and utilization of SHAPE probes for characterizing RNA structure. We also describe current technological advances that are being used to utilize SHAPE chemistry with deep sequencing to probe many RNAs in parallel. The merger of chemistry with genomics is sure to open the door to genome-wide exploration of RNA structure and function. PMID:25132067

  4. RNA folding: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhijie; Zhang, Wenbing; Shi, Yazhou; Wang, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Beyond the "traditional" functions such as gene storage, transport and protein synthesis, recent discoveries reveal that RNAs have important "new" biological functions including the RNA silence and gene regulation of riboswitch. Such functions of noncoding RNAs are strongly coupled to the RNA structures and proper structure change, which naturally leads to the RNA folding problem including structure prediction and folding kinetics. Due to the polyanionic nature of RNAs, RNA folding structure, stability and kinetics are strongly coupled to the ion condition of solution. The main focus of this chapter is to review the recent progress in the three major aspects in RNA folding problem: structure prediction, folding kinetics and ion electrostatics. This chapter will introduce both the recent experimental and theoretical progress, while emphasize the theoretical modelling on the three aspects in RNA folding.

  5. How do ADARs bind RNA? New protein-RNA structures illuminate substrate recognition by the RNA editing ADARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin M; Beal, Peter A

    2017-04-01

    Deamination of adenosine in RNA to form inosine has wide ranging consequences on RNA function including amino acid substitution to give proteins not encoded in the genome. What determines which adenosines in an mRNA are subject to this modification reaction? The answer lies in an understanding of the mechanism and substrate recognition properties of adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). Our recent publication of X-ray crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to RNA editing substrates shed considerable light on how the catalytic domains of these enzymes bind RNA and promote adenosine deamination. Here we review in detail the deaminase domain-RNA contact surfaces and present models of how full length ADARs, bearing double stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) and deaminase domains, could process naturally occurring substrate RNAs. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Dynamic Analyses Including Joints Of Truss Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    Method for mathematically modeling joints to assess influences of joints on dynamic response of truss structures developed in study. Only structures with low-frequency oscillations considered; only Coulomb friction and viscous damping included in analysis. Focus of effort to obtain finite-element mathematical models of joints exhibiting load-vs.-deflection behavior similar to measured load-vs.-deflection behavior of real joints. Experiments performed to determine stiffness and damping nonlinearities typical of joint hardware. Algorithm for computing coefficients of analytical joint models based on test data developed to enable study of linear and nonlinear effects of joints on global structural response. Besides intended application to large space structures, applications in nonaerospace community include ground-based antennas and earthquake-resistant steel-framed buildings.

  7. Visualization of RNA structure models within the Integrative Genomics Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busan, Steven; Weeks, Kevin M

    2017-07-01

    Analyses of the interrelationships between RNA structure and function are increasingly important components of genomic studies. The SHAPE-MaP strategy enables accurate RNA structure probing and realistic structure modeling of kilobase-length noncoding RNAs and mRNAs. Existing tools for visualizing RNA structure models are not suitable for efficient analysis of long, structurally heterogeneous RNAs. In addition, structure models are often advantageously interpreted in the context of other experimental data and gene annotation information, for which few tools currently exist. We have developed a module within the widely used and well supported open-source Integrative Genomics Viewer (IGV) that allows visualization of SHAPE and other chemical probing data, including raw reactivities, data-driven structural entropies, and data-constrained base-pair secondary structure models, in context with linear genomic data tracks. We illustrate the usefulness of visualizing RNA structure in the IGV by exploring structure models for a large viral RNA genome, comparing bacterial mRNA structure in cells with its structure under cell- and protein-free conditions, and comparing a noncoding RNA structure modeled using SHAPE data with a base-pairing model inferred through sequence covariation analysis. © 2017 Busan and Weeks; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Base pairing in RNA structures: A computational analysis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The base pairing patterns in RNA structures are more versatile and completely different as compared to DNA. We present here results of ab-initio studies of structures and interaction energies of eight selected RNA base pairs reported in literature. Interaction energies, including BSSE correction, of hydrogen added crystal ...

  9. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  10. Statistics of canonical RNA pseudoknot structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fenix W D; Reidys, Christian M

    2008-08-07

    In this paper we study canonical RNA pseudoknot structures. We prove central limit theorems for the distributions of the arc-numbers of k-noncrossing RNA structures with given minimum stack-size tau over n nucleotides. Furthermore we compare the space of all canonical structures with canonical minimum free energy pseudoknot structures. Our results generalize the analysis of Schuster et al. obtained for RNA secondary structures [Hofacker, I.L., Schuster, P., Stadler, P.F., 1998. Combinatorics of RNA secondary structures. Discrete Appl. Math. 88, 207-237; Jin, E.Y., Reidys, C.M., 2007b. Central and local limit theorems for RNA structures. J. Theor. Biol. 250 (2008), 547-559; 2007a. Asymptotic enumeration of RNA structures with pseudoknots. Bull. Math. Biol., 70 (4), 951-970] to k-noncrossing RNA structures. Here k2 and tau are arbitrary natural numbers. We compare canonical pseudoknot structures to arbitrary structures and show that canonical pseudoknot structures exhibit significantly smaller exponential growth rates. We then compute the asymptotic distribution of their arc-numbers. Finally, we analyze how the minimum stack-size and crossing number factor into the distributions.

  11. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  12. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  13. A novel approach to represent and compare RNA secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Eugenio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Structural information is crucial in ribonucleic acid (RNA) analysis and functional annotation; nevertheless, how to include such structural data is still a debated problem. Dot-bracket notation is the most common and simple representation for RNA secondary structures but its simplicity leads also to ambiguity requiring further processing steps to dissolve. Here we present BEAR (Brand nEw Alphabet for RNA), a new context-aware structural encoding represented by a string of characters. Each character in BEAR encodes for a specific secondary structure element (loop, stem, bulge and internal loop) with specific length. Furthermore, exploiting this informative and yet simple encoding in multiple alignments of related RNAs, we captured how much structural variation is tolerated in RNA families and convert it into transition rates among secondary structure elements. This allowed us to compute a substitution matrix for secondary structure elements called MBR (Matrix of BEAR-encoded RNA secondary structures), of which we tested the ability in aligning RNA secondary structures. We propose BEAR and the MBR as powerful resources for the RNA secondary structure analysis, comparison and classification, motif finding and phylogeny. PMID:24753415

  14. RNAstructure: software for RNA secondary structure prediction and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews David H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand an RNA sequence's mechanism of action, the structure must be known. Furthermore, target RNA structure is an important consideration in the design of small interfering RNAs and antisense DNA oligonucleotides. RNA secondary structure prediction, using thermodynamics, can be used to develop hypotheses about the structure of an RNA sequence. Results RNAstructure is a software package for RNA secondary structure prediction and analysis. It uses thermodynamics and utilizes the most recent set of nearest neighbor parameters from the Turner group. It includes methods for secondary structure prediction (using several algorithms, prediction of base pair probabilities, bimolecular structure prediction, and prediction of a structure common to two sequences. This contribution describes new extensions to the package, including a library of C++ classes for incorporation into other programs, a user-friendly graphical user interface written in JAVA, and new Unix-style text interfaces. The original graphical user interface for Microsoft Windows is still maintained. Conclusion The extensions to RNAstructure serve to make RNA secondary structure prediction user-friendly. The package is available for download from the Mathews lab homepage at http://rna.urmc.rochester.edu/RNAstructure.html.

  15. RNA Secondary Structure Analysis Using RNAstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David H

    2014-06-17

    RNAstructure is a user-friendly program for the prediction and analysis of RNA secondary structure. It is available as a Web server, as a program with a graphical user interface, or as a set of command-line tools. The programs are available for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, or Linux. This unit provides protocols for RNA secondary structure prediction (using the Web server or the graphical user interface) and prediction of high-affinity oligonucleotide biding sites to a structured RNA target (using the graphical user interface). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. The art of editing RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    Manual editing of RNA structural alignments may be considered more art than science, since it still requires an expert biologist to take multiple levels of information into account and be slightly creative when constructing high-quality alignments. Even though the task is rather tedious, it is re......Manual editing of RNA structural alignments may be considered more art than science, since it still requires an expert biologist to take multiple levels of information into account and be slightly creative when constructing high-quality alignments. Even though the task is rather tedious......, it is rewarded by great insight into the evolution of structure and function of your favorite RNA molecule. In this chapter I will review the methods and considerations that go into constructing RNA structural alignments at the secondary and tertiary structure level; introduce software, databases, and algorithms...

  17. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  18. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. In silico methods for co-transcriptional RNA secondary structure prediction and for investigating alternative RNA structure expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2017-05-01

    RNA transcripts are the primary products of active genes in any living organism, including many viruses. Their cellular destiny not only depends on primary sequence signals, but can also be determined by RNA structure. Recent experimental evidence shows that many transcripts can be assigned more than a single functional RNA structure throughout their cellular life and that structure formation happens co-transcriptionally, i.e. as the transcript is synthesised in the cell. Moreover, functional RNA structures are not limited to non-coding transcripts, but can also feature in coding transcripts. The picture that now emerges is that RNA structures constitute an additional layer of information that can be encoded in any RNA transcript (and on top of other layers of information such as protein-context) in order to exert a wide range of functional roles. Moreover, different encoded RNA structures can be expressed at different stages of a transcript's life in order to alter the transcript's behaviour depending on its actual cellular context. Similar to the concept of alternative splicing for protein-coding genes, where a single transcript can yield different proteins depending on cellular context, it is thus appropriate to propose the notion of alternative RNA structure expression for any given transcript. This review introduces several computational strategies that my group developed to detect different aspects of RNA structure expression in vivo. Two aspects are of particular interest to us: (1) RNA secondary structure features that emerge during co-transcriptional folding and (2) functional RNA structure features that are expressed at different times of a transcript's life and potentially mutually exclusive. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Potyvirus virion structure shows conserved protein fold and RNA binding site in ssRNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Miguel; Méndez-López, Eduardo; Agirrezabala, Xabier; Cuesta, Rebeca; Lavín, José L; Sánchez-Pina, M Amelia; Aranda, Miguel A; Valle, Mikel

    2017-09-01

    Potyviruses constitute the second largest genus of plant viruses and cause important economic losses in a large variety of crops; however, the atomic structure of their particles remains unknown. Infective potyvirus virions are long flexuous filaments where coat protein (CP) subunits assemble in helical mode bound to a monopartite positive-sense single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] genome. We present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of the potyvirus watermelon mosaic virus at a resolution of 4.0 Å. The atomic model shows a conserved fold for the CPs of flexible filamentous plant viruses, including a universally conserved RNA binding pocket, which is a potential target for antiviral compounds. This conserved fold of the CP is widely distributed in eukaryotic viruses and is also shared by nucleoproteins of enveloped viruses with segmented (-)ssRNA (negative-sense ssRNA) genomes, including influenza viruses.

  1. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  2. Structure and Function of Caliciviral RNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hye Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Caliciviruses are a leading agent of human and animal gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections, which are growing concerns in immunocompromised individuals. However, no vaccines or therapeutics are yet available. Since the rapid rate of genetic evolution of caliciviruses is mainly due to the error-prone nature of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, this article focuses on recent studies of the structures and functions of RdRp from caliciviruses. It also provides recent advances in the interactions of RdRp with virion protein genome-linked (VPg and RNA and the structural and functional features of its precursor.

  3. Probing Xist RNA Structure in Cells Using Targeted Structure-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Rui; Moss, Walter N; Rutenberg-Schoenberg, Michael; Simon, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) Xist is a master regulator of X-chromosome inactivation in mammalian cells. Models for how Xist and other lncRNAs function depend on thermodynamically stable secondary and higher-order structures that RNAs can form in the context of a cell. Probing accessible RNA bases can provide data to build models of RNA conformation that provide insight into RNA function, molecular evolution, and modularity. To study the structure of Xist in cells, we built upon recent advances in RNA secondary structure mapping and modeling to develop Targeted Structure-Seq, which combines chemical probing of RNA structure in cells with target-specific massively parallel sequencing. By enriching for signals from the RNA of interest, Targeted Structure-Seq achieves high coverage of the target RNA with relatively few sequencing reads, thus providing a targeted and scalable approach to analyze RNA conformation in cells. We use this approach to probe the full-length Xist lncRNA to develop new models for functional elements within Xist, including the repeat A element in the 5'-end of Xist. This analysis also identified new structural elements in Xist that are evolutionarily conserved, including a new element proximal to the C repeats that is important for Xist function.

  4. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned.

  5. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  6. Soil-structure interaction including nonlinear soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gicev, Vlado

    2008-01-01

    There are two types of models of soil-structure system depending upon the rigidity of foundation: models with rigid and models with flexible foundation. Main features of the soil-structure interaction phenomenon: -wave scattering, -radiation damping, -reduction of the system frequencies. In this presentation, the influence of interaction on the development of nonlinear zones in the soil is studied.

  7. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puton, Tomasz; Kozlowski, Lukasz P.; Rother, Kristian M.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative performance of RNA secondary structure prediction methods on RNAs of different size and with respect to different types of structure. According to our tests, on the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by a comparative approach are generated by CentroidAlifold, MXScarna, RNAalifold and TurboFold. On the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by single-sequence analyses are generated by CentroidFold, ContextFold and IPknot. The best comparative methods typically outperform the best single-sequence methods if an alignment of homologous RNA sequences is available. This article presents the results of our benchmarks as of 3 October 2012, whereas the rankings presented online are continuously updated. We will gladly include new prediction methods and new measures of accuracy in the new editions of CompaRNA benchmarks. PMID:23435231

  8. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  9. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far.

  10. Novel conformation of an RNA structural switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott D; Kierzek, Ryszard; Turner, Douglas H

    2012-11-20

    The RNA duplex, (5'GACGAGUGUCA)(2), has two conformations in equilibrium. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure reveals that the major conformation of the loop, 5'GAGU/3'UGAG, is novel and contains two unusual Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen GG pairs with G residues in the syn conformation, two A residues stacked on each other in the center of the helix with inverted sugars, and two bulged-out U residues. The structure provides a benchmark for testing approaches for predicting local RNA structure and a sequence that allows the design of a unique arrangement of functional groups and/or a conformational switch into nucleic acids.

  11. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-07-31

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded in three dimensions (3D) and used as building blocks assembled manually during a bioinformatic interactive process. Comparing the models to the corresponding crystal structures has validated the method as being powerful to predict the RNA topology and architecture while being less accurate regarding the prediction of base-base interactions. These aspects as well as the necessary steps towards automation will be discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  13. Electrochemical cell structure including an ionomeric barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Timothy N.; Hibbs, Michael

    2017-06-20

    An apparatus includes an electrochemical half-cell comprising: an electrolyte, an anode; and an ionomeric barrier positioned between the electrolyte and the anode. The anode may comprise a multi-electron vanadium phosphorous alloy, such as VP.sub.x, wherein x is 1-5. The electrochemical half-cell is configured to oxidize the vanadium and phosphorous alloy to release electrons. A method of mitigating corrosion in an electrochemical cell includes disposing an ionomeric barrier in a path of electrolyte or ion flow to an anode and mitigating anion accumulation on the surface of the anode.

  14. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-06-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5-3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson-Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/. © 2015 Miao et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  15. Parameterisation of clastic sediments including benthic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobertz, B.; Harff, J.; Bohling, B.

    2009-02-01

    The sediment transport processes in the south-western Baltic Sea are predicted by means of a numerical model in the project DYNAS. There are two sediment parameters that influence the results of modelling remarkably: critical shear stress velocity and bottom roughness. This paper presents the way how to parameterise these factors and extrapolate them into the investigation area. The critical shear stress velocity is parameterised basing on grain size data, combining approximations after Hjulström [Hjulström, F., 1935: Studies in the morphological activity of rivers as illustrated by the river Fyris. Geological Institution of University of Uppsala: Bulletin (25): 221-528.], Shields [Shields, A., 1936: Anwendung der Ähnlichkeits-Mechanik und der Turbulenzforschung auf die Geschiebebewegung. Mitteilungen der Preussischen Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau und Schiffahrt (26): 26 pp.] and Bohling [Bohling, B., 2003: Untersuchungen zur Mobilität natürlicher und anthropogener Sedimente in der Mecklenburger Bucht. unpublished doctoral thesis, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald/Germany, 156 pp.]. The roughness length, in the case of absence of macro zoo-benthos and their structures, is parameterised basing on grain size too employing Soulsby [Soulsby, R.L., 1997: Dynamics of Marine Sands: a Manual for Practical Applications. London, Thomas Telford Publications. 249 pp.], Nielsen [Nielsen, P., 1983: Analytical determination of nearshore wave height variation due to refraction shoaling and friction. Coastal Engineering 7, 233-251.] and Yalin [Yalin, M.S., 1977: Mechanics of Sediment Transport. Pergamon Press, New York. 298 pp.]. No equivalent simple parameterisations for biologically caused bed roughness exist. Here, findings of Friedrichs [Friedrichs, M., 2004: Flow-induced effects of macro zoo-benthic structures on the near-bed sediment transport. Dissertation, Universität Rostock, 80 S.] and estimations by the DYNAS

  16. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    in three dimensions (3D) and used as building blocks assembled manually during a bioinformatic interactive process. Comparing the models to the corresponding crystal structures has validated the method as being powerful to predict the RNA topology and architecture while being less accurate regarding...... the prediction of base-base interactions. These aspects as well as the necessary steps towards automation will be discussed....

  17. General combinatorics of RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo; Wang, Tian-ming

    2004-09-01

    The total number of RNA secondary structures of a given length with minimal hairpin loop length m(m>0) and with minimal stack length l(l>0) is computed, under the assumption that all base pairs can occur. Asymptotics are derived from the determination of recurrence relations of decomposition properties.

  18. Phylogeny and evolution of RNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Tanja; Schuster, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Darwin's conviction that all living beings on Earth are related and the graph of relatedness is tree-shaped has been essentially confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction first from morphology and later from data obtained by molecular sequencing. Limitations of the phylogenetic tree concept were recognized as more and more sequence information became available. The other path-breaking idea of Darwin, natural selection of fitter variants in populations, is cast into simple mathematical form and extended to mutation-selection dynamics. In this form the theory is directly applicable to RNA evolution in vitro and to virus evolution. Phylogeny and population dynamics of RNA provide complementary insights into evolution and the interplay between the two concepts will be pursued throughout this chapter. The two strategies for understanding evolution are ultimately related through the central paradigm of structural biology: sequence ⇒ structure ⇒ function. We elaborate on the state of the art in modeling both phylogeny and evolution of RNA driven by reproduction and mutation. Thereby the focus will be laid on models for phylogenetic sequence evolution as well as evolution and design of RNA structures with selected examples and notes on simulation methods. In the perspectives an attempt is made to combine molecular structure, population dynamics, and phylogeny in modeling evolution.

  19. RNA-Puzzles Round II: assessment of RNA structure prediction programs applied to three large RNA structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhichao; Adamiak, Ryszard W.; Blanchet, Marc-Frédérick; Boniecki, Michal; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Chen, Shi-Jie; Cheng, Clarence; Chojnowski, Grzegorz; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Cordero, Pablo; Cruz, José Almeida; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R.; Das, Rhiju; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Kladwang, Wipapat; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lach, Grzegorz; Magnus, Marcin; Major, François; Mann, Thomas H.; Masquida, Benoît; Matelska, Dorota; Meyer, Mélanie; Peselis, Alla; Popenda, Mariusz; Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Serganov, Alexander; Stasiewicz, Juliusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Tandon, Arpit; Tian, Siqi; Wang, Jian; Xiao, Yi; Xu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jinwei; Zhao, Peinan; Zok, Tomasz; Westhof, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a report of a second round of RNA-Puzzles, a collective and blind experiment in three-dimensional (3D) RNA structure prediction. Three puzzles, Puzzles 5, 6, and 10, represented sequences of three large RNA structures with limited or no homology with previously solved RNA molecules. A lariat-capping ribozyme, as well as riboswitches complexed to adenosylcobalamin and tRNA, were predicted by seven groups using RNAComposer, ModeRNA/SimRNA, Vfold, Rosetta, DMD, MC-Fold, 3dRNA, and AMBER refinement. Some groups derived models using data from state-of-the-art chemical-mapping methods (SHAPE, DMS, CMCT, and mutate-and-map). The comparisons between the predictions and the three subsequently released crystallographic structures, solved at diffraction resolutions of 2.5–3.2 Å, were carried out automatically using various sets of quality indicators. The comparisons clearly demonstrate the state of present-day de novo prediction abilities as well as the limitations of these state-of-the-art methods. All of the best prediction models have similar topologies to the native structures, which suggests that computational methods for RNA structure prediction can already provide useful structural information for biological problems. However, the prediction accuracy for non-Watson–Crick interactions, key to proper folding of RNAs, is low and some predicted models had high Clash Scores. These two difficulties point to some of the continuing bottlenecks in RNA structure prediction. All submitted models are available for download at http://ahsoka.u-strasbg.fr/rnapuzzles/. PMID:25883046

  20. RNA Regulations and Functions Decoded by Transcriptome-wide RNA Structure Probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Piao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA folds into intricate structures that are crucial for its functions and regulations. To date, a multitude of approaches for probing structures of the whole transcriptome, i.e., RNA structuromes, have been developed. Applications of these approaches to different cell lines and tissues have generated a rich resource for the study of RNA structure–function relationships at a systems biology level. In this review, we first introduce the designs of these methods and their applications to study different RNA structuromes. We emphasize their technological differences especially their unique advantages and caveats. We then summarize the structural insights in RNA functions and regulations obtained from the studies of RNA structuromes. And finally, we propose potential directions for future improvements and studies. Keywords: RNA structure probing, RNA structurome, RNA secondary structure, Structure–function relationship, RNA regulation

  1. Solving the RNA polymerase I structural puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Morcillo, María [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Taylor, Nicholas M. I. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Gruene, Tim [Georg-August-University, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Legrand, Pierre [SOLEIL Synchrotron, L’Orme de Merisiers, Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Rashid, Umar J. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruiz, Federico M. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Steuerwald, Ulrich; Müller, Christoph W. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fernández-Tornero, Carlos, E-mail: cftornero@cib.csic.es [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    Details of the RNA polymerase I crystal structure determination provide a framework for solution of the structures of other multi-subunit complexes. Simple crystallographic experiments are described to extract relevant biological information such as the location of the enzyme active site. Knowing the structure of multi-subunit complexes is critical to understand basic cellular functions. However, when crystals of these complexes can be obtained they rarely diffract beyond 3 Å resolution, which complicates X-ray structure determination and refinement. The crystal structure of RNA polymerase I, an essential cellular machine that synthesizes the precursor of ribosomal RNA in the nucleolus of eukaryotic cells, has recently been solved. Here, the crucial steps that were undertaken to build the atomic model of this multi-subunit enzyme are reported, emphasizing how simple crystallographic experiments can be used to extract relevant biological information. In particular, this report discusses the combination of poor molecular replacement and experimental phases, the application of multi-crystal averaging and the use of anomalous scatterers as sequence markers to guide tracing and to locate the active site. The methods outlined here will likely serve as a reference for future structural determination of large complexes at low resolution.

  2. A fast structural multiple alignment method for long RNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Taishin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aligning multiple RNA sequences is essential for analyzing non-coding RNAs. Although many alignment methods for non-coding RNAs, including Sankoff's algorithm for strict structural alignments, have been proposed, they are either inaccurate or computationally too expensive. Faster methods with reasonable accuracies are required for genome-scale analyses. Results We propose a fast algorithm for multiple structural alignments of RNA sequences that is an extension of our pairwise structural alignment method (implemented in SCARNA. The accuracies of the implemented software, MXSCARNA, are at least as favorable as those of state-of-art algorithms that are computationally much more expensive in time and memory. Conclusion The proposed method for structural alignment of multiple RNA sequences is fast enough for large-scale analyses with accuracies at least comparable to those of existing algorithms. The source code of MXSCARNA and its web server are available at http://mxscarna.ncrna.org.

  3. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  4. Initiation of RNA Synthesis by the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase Is Affected by the Structure of the RNA Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B is a central enzyme of the intracellular replication of the viral (+)RNA genome. Here, we studied the individual steps of NS5B-catalyzed RNA synthesis by a combination of biophysical methods, including real-time 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy. NS5B was found to bind to a nonstructured and a structured RNA template in different modes. Following NTP binding and conversion to the catalysis-competent ternary complex, the polymerase revealed an improved affinity for the template. By monitoring the folding/unfolding of 3′(−)SL by 1H NMR, the base pair at the stem’s edge was identified as the most stable component of the structure. 1H NMR real-time analysis of NS5B-catalyzed RNA synthesis on 3′(−)SL showed that a pronounced lag phase preceded the processive polymerization reaction. The presence of the double-stranded stem with the edge base pair acting as the main energy barrier impaired RNA synthesis catalyzed by NS5B. Our observations suggest a crucial role of RNA-modulating factors in the HCV replication process. PMID:25310724

  5. Strategies for measuring evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofacker Ivo L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structure is a typical feature of many functional non-coding RNAs. Since almost all of the available methods used for prediction and annotation of non-coding RNA genes rely on this evolutionary signature, accurate measures for structural conservation are essential. Results We systematically assessed the ability of various measures to detect conserved RNA structures in multiple sequence alignments. We tested three existing and eight novel strategies that are based on metrics of folding energies, metrics of single optimal structure predictions, and metrics of structure ensembles. We find that the folding energy based SCI score used in the RNAz program and a simple base-pair distance metric are by far the most accurate. The use of more complex metrics like for example tree editing does not improve performance. A variant of the SCI performed particularly well on highly conserved alignments and is thus a viable alternative when only little evolutionary information is available. Surprisingly, ensemble based methods that, in principle, could benefit from the additional information contained in sub-optimal structures, perform particularly poorly. As a general trend, we observed that methods that include a consensus structure prediction outperformed equivalent methods that only consider pairwise comparisons. Conclusion Structural conservation can be measured accurately with relatively simple and intuitive metrics. They have the potential to form the basis of future RNA gene finders, that face new challenges like finding lineage specific structures or detecting mis-aligned sequences.

  6. RNA structural motif recognition based on least-squares distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying; Wong, Hau-San; Zhang, Shaohong; Zhang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent structural elements occurring in RNA molecules. RNA structural motif recognition aims to find RNA substructures that are similar to a query motif, and it is important for RNA structure analysis and RNA function prediction. In view of this, we propose a new method known as RNA Structural Motif Recognition based on Least-Squares distance (LS-RSMR) to effectively recognize RNA structural motifs. A test set consisting of five types of RNA structural motifs occurring in Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA is compiled by us. Experiments are conducted for recognizing these five types of motifs. The experimental results fully reveal the superiority of the proposed LS-RSMR compared with four other state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Optimized guide RNA structure for genome editing via Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianyong; Lian, Wei; Jia, Yuning; Li, Lingyun; Huang, Zhong

    2017-11-07

    The genome editing tool Cas9-gRNA (guide RNA) has been successfully applied in different cell types and organisms with high efficiency. However, more efforts need to be made to enhance both efficiency and specificity. In the current study, we optimized the guide RNA structure of Streptococcus pyogenes CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) system to improve its genome editing efficiency. Comparing with the original functional structure of guide RNA, which is composed of crRNA and tracrRNA, the widely used chimeric gRNA has shorter crRNA and tracrRNA sequence. The deleted RNA sequence could form extra loop structure, which might enhance the stability of the guide RNA structure and subsequently the genome editing efficiency. Thus the genome editing efficiency of different forms of guide RNA was tested. And we found that the chimeric structure of gRNA with original full length of crRNA and tracrRNA showed higher genome editing efficiency than the conventional chimeric structure or other types of gRNA we tested. Therefore our data here uncovered the new type of gRNA structure with higher genome editing efficiency.

  8. Temporal Translational Control by a Metastable RNA Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Franch, Thomas; Gerdes, Kenn

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death by the hok/sok locus of plasmid R1 relies on a complex translational control mechanism. The highly stable hok mRNA is activated by 3'-end exonucleolytical processing. Removal of the mRNA 3' end releases a 5'-end sequence that triggers refolding of the mRNA. The refolded hok mRNA...... is translatable but can also bind the inhibitory Sok antisense RNA. Binding of Sok RNA leads to irreversible mRNA inactivation by an RNase III-dependent mechanism. A coherent model predicts that during transcription hok mRNA must be refractory to translation and antisense RNA binding. Here we provide genetic...... evidence for the existence of a 5' metastable structure in hok mRNA that locks the nascent transcript in an inactive configuration in vivo. Consistently, the metastable structure reduces the rate of Sok RNA binding and completely blocks hok translation in vitro. Structural analyses of native RNAs strongly...

  9. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. © 2014 Gu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. RNA2DMut: A web tool for the design and analysis of RNA structure mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N

    2017-11-28

    With the wide-spread application of high-throughput sequencing, novel RNA sequences are being discovered at an astonishing rate. The analysis of function, however, lags behind. In both the cis- and trans-regulatory functions of RNA, secondary structure (2D base pairing) plays essential regulatory roles. In order to test RNA function, it is essential to be able to design and analyze mutations that can affect structure. This was the motivation for the creation of the RNA2DMut web tool. With RNA2DMut, users can enter in RNA sequences to analyze, constrain mutations to specific residues or limit changes to purines/pyrimidines. The sequence is analyzed at each base to determine the effect of every possible point mutation on 2D. The metrics used in RNA2DMut rely on the calculation of the Boltzmann structure ensemble and do not require a robust 2D model of RNA structure for designing mutations. This tool can facilitate a wide array of uses involving RNA: for example, in designing and evaluating mutants for biological assays, interrogating RNA-protein interactions, identifying key regions to alter in SELEX experiments, and improving RNA folding and crystallization properties for structural biology. Additional tools are available to help users introduce other mutations (e.g. indels and substitutions) and evaluate their effects on RNA structure. Example calculations are shown for five RNAs that require 2D structure for their function: the MALAT1 mascRNA, an influenza virus splicing regulatory motif, the EBER2 viral noncoding RNA, the Xist lncRNA repA region, and human Y RNA 5. RNA2DMut can be accessed at: https://rna2dmut.bb.iastate.edu/. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Structure and function of echinoderm telomerase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Li, Yang; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme that requires an integral telomerase RNA (TR) subunit, in addition to the catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), for enzymatic function. The secondary structures of TRs from the three major groups of species, ciliates, fungi, and vertebrates, have been studied extensively and demonstrate dramatic diversity. Herein, we report the first comprehensive secondary structure of TR from echinoderms-marine invertebrates closely related to vertebrates-determined by phylogenetic comparative analysis of 16 TR sequences from three separate echinoderm classes. Similar to vertebrate TR, echinoderm TR contains the highly conserved template/pseudoknot and H/ACA domains. However, echinoderm TR lacks the ancestral CR4/5 structural domain found throughout vertebrate and fungal TRs. Instead, echinoderm TR contains a distinct simple helical region, termed eCR4/5, that is functionally equivalent to the CR4/5 domain. The urchin and brittle star eCR4/5 domains bind specifically to their respective TERT proteins and stimulate telomerase activity. Distinct from vertebrate telomerase, the echinoderm TR template/pseudoknot domain with the TERT protein is sufficient to reconstitute significant telomerase activity. This gain-of-function of the echinoderm template/pseudoknot domain for conferring telomerase activity presumably facilitated the rapid structural evolution of the eCR4/5 domain throughout the echinoderm lineage. Additionally, echinoderm TR utilizes the template-adjacent P1.1 helix as a physical template boundary element to prevent nontelomeric DNA synthesis, a mechanism used by ciliate and fungal TRs. Thus, the chimeric and eccentric structural features of echinoderm TR provide unparalleled insights into the rapid evolution of telomerase RNP structure and function. © 2016 Podlevsky et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. BPS: a database of RNA base-pair structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yurong; Olson, Wilma K

    2009-01-01

    The BPS (http://bps.rutgers.edu) is a database of RNA base-pair structures, higher-order base interactions and isosteric pairs (base pairs with similar shape). The main functions of the BPS are to find and annotate the structural and chemical features of the Watson-Crick and non-Watson-Crick (noncanonical) base pairs in high-resolution RNA structures, and to provide a user-friendly interface to browse and search for the base pairs. The current database contains 91,265 bp and 3386 higher-order base interactions from 426 RNA crystal structures and 61,819 bp that fall into one of 17 different isosteric classes. The base-pair data can be accessed by searches of base-pair patterns, structure identifiers (IDs) and structural types. The BPS also includes an Atlas with representative images of the various base pairs, higher-order base interactions and isosteric pairs and links to statistical information about these groups of structures.

  13. Fast alignment and comparison of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegels, Tim; Bienert, Stefan; Torda, Andrew E

    2013-03-01

    To recognize remote relationships between RNA molecules, one must be able to align structures without regard to sequence similarity. We have implemented a method, which is swift [O(n(2))], sensitive and tolerant of large gaps and insertions. Molecules are broken into overlapping fragments, which are characterized by their memberships in a probabilistic classification based on local geometry and H-bonding descriptors. This leads to a probabilistic similarity measure that is used in a conventional dynamic programming method. Examples are given of database searching, the detection of structural similarities, which would not be found using sequence based methods, and comparisons with a previously published approach. Source code (C and perl) and binaries for linux are freely available at www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/fries.

  14. Biochemical and Structural Studies of RNA Modification and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chio Mui

    2009-01-01

    RNA modification, RNA interference, and RNA repair are important events in the cell. This thesis presents three projects related to these three fields. By using both biochemical and structural methods, we characterized enzymatic activities of pseudouridine synthase TruD, solved the structure of "A. aeolicus" GidA, and reconstituted a novel…

  15. Osmium tetroxide as a probe of RNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Danbin; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Dongrong; Murchie, Alastair I H

    2017-04-01

    Structured RNAs have a central role in cellular function. The capability of structured RNAs to adopt fixed architectural structures or undergo dynamic conformational changes contributes to their diverse role in the regulation of gene expression. Although numerous biophysical and biochemical tools have been developed to study structured RNAs, there is a continuing need for the development of new methods for the investigation of RNA structures, especially methods that allow RNA structure to be studied in solution close to its native cellular conditions. Here we use osmium tetroxide (OsO4) as a chemical probe of RNA structure. In this method, we have used fluorescence-based sequencing technologies to detect OsO4 modified RNA. We characterized the requirements for OsO4 modification of RNA by investigating three known structured RNAs: the M-box, glycine riboswitch RNAs, and tRNAasp Our results show that OsO4 predominantly modifies RNA at uracils that are conformationally exposed on the surface of the RNA. We also show that changes in OsO4 reactivity at flexible positions in the RNA correlate with ligand-driven conformational changes in the RNA structure. Osmium tetroxide modification of RNA will provide insights into the structural features of RNAs that are relevant to their underlying biological functions. © 2017 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Analysis of sequencing data for probing RNA secondary structures and protein-RNA binding in studying posttranscriptional regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xihao; Wu, Yang; Lu, Zhi John; Yip, Kevin Y

    2016-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been used to study posttranscriptional regulations, where the identification of protein-RNA binding is a major and fast-developing sub-area, which is in turn benefited by the sequencing methods for whole-transcriptome probing of RNA secondary structures. In the study of RNA secondary structures using high-throughput sequencing, bases are modified or cleaved according to their structural features, which alter the resulting composition of sequencing reads. In the study of protein-RNA binding, methods have been proposed to immuno-precipitate (IP) protein-bound RNA transcripts in vitro or in vivo By sequencing these transcripts, the protein-RNA interactions and the binding locations can be identified. For both types of data, read counts are affected by a combination of confounding factors, including expression levels of transcripts, sequence biases, mapping errors and the probing or IP efficiency of the experimental protocols. Careful processing of the sequencing data and proper extraction of important features are fundamentally important to a successful analysis. Here we review and compare different experimental methods for probing RNA secondary structures and binding sites of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), and the computational methods proposed for analyzing the corresponding sequencing data. We suggest how these two types of data should be integrated to study the structural properties of RBP binding sites as a systematic way to better understand posttranscriptional regulations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Directed acyclic graph kernels for structural RNA analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mituyama Toutai; Sato Kengo; Asai Kiyoshi; Sakakibara Yasubumi

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent discoveries of a large variety of important roles for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been reported by numerous researchers. In order to analyze ncRNAs by kernel methods including support vector machines, we propose stem kernels as an extension of string kernels for measuring the similarities between two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures. However, applying stem kernels directly to large data sets of ncRNAs is impractical due to their computation...

  18. A systematic analysis of the effect of target RNA structure on RNA interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, Ellen M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    RNAi efficiency is influenced by local RNA structure of the target sequence. We studied this structure-based resistance in detail by targeting a perfect RNA hairpin and subsequently destabilized its tight structure by mutation, thereby gradually exposing the target sequence. Although the tightest

  19. Structure modeling of RNA using sparse NMR constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Benfeard; Zhao, Bo; Tandon, Arpit; Ding, Feng; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract RNAs fold into distinct molecular conformations that are often essential for their functions. Accurate structure modeling of complex RNA motifs, including ubiquitous non-canonical base pairs and pseudoknots, remains a challenge. Here, we present an NMR-guided all-atom discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) platform, iFoldNMR, for rapid and accurate structure modeling of complex RNAs. We show that sparse distance constraints from imino resonances, which can be readily obtained from routine NMR experiments and easier to compile than laborious assignments of non-solvent-exchangeable protons, are sufficient to direct a DMD search for low-energy RNA conformers. Benchmarking on a set of RNAs with complex folds spanning up to 56 nucleotides in length yields structural models that recapitulate experimentally determined structures with all-heavy-atom RMSDs ranging from 2.4 to 6.5 Å. This platform represents an efficient approach for high-throughput RNA structure modeling and will facilitate analysis of diverse, newly discovered functional RNAs. PMID:29165648

  20. Vfold: a web server for RNA structure and folding thermodynamics prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Peinan; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The ever increasing discovery of non-coding RNAs leads to unprecedented demand for the accurate modeling of RNA folding, including the predictions of two-dimensional (base pair) and three-dimensional all-atom structures and folding stabilities. Accurate modeling of RNA structure and stability has far-reaching impact on our understanding of RNA functions in human health and our ability to design RNA-based therapeutic strategies. The Vfold server offers a web interface to predict (a) RNA two-dimensional structure from the nucleotide sequence, (b) three-dimensional structure from the two-dimensional structure and the sequence, and (c) folding thermodynamics (heat capacity melting curve) from the sequence. To predict the two-dimensional structure (base pairs), the server generates an ensemble of structures, including loop structures with the different intra-loop mismatches, and evaluates the free energies using the experimental parameters for the base stacks and the loop entropy parameters given by a coarse-grained RNA folding model (the Vfold model) for the loops. To predict the three-dimensional structure, the server assembles the motif scaffolds using structure templates extracted from the known PDB structures and refines the structure using all-atom energy minimization. The Vfold-based web server provides a user friendly tool for the prediction of RNA structure and stability. The web server and the source codes are freely accessible for public use at "http://rna.physics.missouri.edu".

  1. The crystal structure of tRNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    However, my attention was soon captured by the 'strange'. tRNA, shown to be formylmethionyl-tRNA (fMet-tRNA), recently discovered by Kjeld Marcker and Fred Sanger. I was able to put my experience of decoding and cell-free protein synthesis to good use in a close collaboration with. Marcker over the next six years.

  2. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D. [MSKCC

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  3. Crystal structure of the RNA component of bacterial ribonuclease P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K.; Krasilnikov, Andrey S.; Pan, Tao; Mondragon, Alfonso (NWU); (UC)

    2010-03-08

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) is produced as a precursor molecule that needs to be processed at its 3' and 5' ends. Ribonuclease P is the sole endonuclease responsible for processing the 5' end of tRNA by cleaving the precursor and leading to tRNA maturation. It was one of the first catalytic RNA molecules identified and consists of a single RNA component in all organisms and only one protein component in bacteria. It is a true multi-turnover ribozyme and one of only two ribozymes (the other being the ribosome) that are conserved in all kingdoms of life. Here we show the crystal structure at 3.85 {angstrom} resolution of the RNA component of Thermotoga maritima ribonuclease P. The entire RNA catalytic component is revealed, as well as the arrangement of the two structural domains. The structure shows the general architecture of the RNA molecule, the inter- and intra-domain interactions, the location of the universally conserved regions, the regions involved in pre-tRNA recognition and the location of the active site. A model with bound tRNA is in agreement with all existing data and suggests the general basis for RNA-RNA recognition by this ribozyme.

  4. On the importance of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel; Proctor, Jeff R.; Meyer, Irmtraud M.

    2013-01-01

    The expression of genes, both coding and noncoding, can be significantly influenced by RNA structural features of their corresponding transcripts. There is by now mounting experimental and some theoretical evidence that structure formation in vivo starts during transcription and that this cotranscriptional folding determines the functional RNA structural features that are being formed. Several decades of research in bioinformatics have resulted in a wide range of computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Almost all state-of-the-art methods in terms of prediction accuracy, however, completely ignore the process of structure formation and focus exclusively on the final RNA structure. This review hopes to bridge this gap. We summarize the existing evidence for cotranscriptional folding and then review the different, currently used strategies for RNA secondary-structure prediction. Finally, we propose a range of ideas on how state-of-the-art methods could be potentially improved by explicitly capturing the process of cotranscriptional structure formation. PMID:24131802

  5. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  6. The TAL effector PthA4 interacts with nuclear factors involved in RNA-dependent processes including a HMG protein that selectively binds poly(U RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Antonio de Souza

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic bacteria utilize an array of effector proteins to cause disease. Among them, transcriptional activator-like (TAL effectors are unusual in the sense that they modulate transcription in the host. Although target genes and DNA specificity of TAL effectors have been elucidated, how TAL proteins control host transcription is poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the Xanthomonas citri TAL effectors, PthAs 2 and 3, preferentially targeted a citrus protein complex associated with transcription control and DNA repair. To extend our knowledge on the mode of action of PthAs, we have identified new protein targets of the PthA4 variant, required to elicit canker on citrus. Here we show that all the PthA4-interacting proteins are DNA and/or RNA-binding factors implicated in chromatin remodeling and repair, gene regulation and mRNA stabilization/modification. The majority of these proteins, including a structural maintenance of chromosomes protein (CsSMC, a translin-associated factor X (CsTRAX, a VirE2-interacting protein (CsVIP2, a high mobility group (CsHMG and two poly(A-binding proteins (CsPABP1 and 2, interacted with each other, suggesting that they assemble into a multiprotein complex. CsHMG was shown to bind DNA and to interact with the invariable leucine-rich repeat region of PthAs. Surprisingly, both CsHMG and PthA4 interacted with PABP1 and 2 and showed selective binding to poly(U RNA, a property that is novel among HMGs and TAL effectors. Given that homologs of CsHMG, CsPABP1, CsPABP2, CsSMC and CsTRAX in other organisms assemble into protein complexes to regulate mRNA stability and translation, we suggest a novel role of TAL effectors in mRNA processing and translational control.

  7. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  8. NoFold: RNA structure clustering without folding or alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sarah A; Kim, Junhyong

    2014-11-01

    Structures that recur across multiple different transcripts, called structure motifs, often perform a similar function-for example, recruiting a specific RNA-binding protein that then regulates translation, splicing, or subcellular localization. Identifying common motifs between coregulated transcripts may therefore yield significant insight into their binding partners and mechanism of regulation. However, as most methods for clustering structures are based on folding individual sequences or doing many pairwise alignments, this results in a tradeoff between speed and accuracy that can be problematic for large-scale data sets. Here we describe a novel method for comparing and characterizing RNA secondary structures that does not require folding or pairwise alignment of the input sequences. Our method uses the idea of constructing a distance function between two objects by their respective distances to a collection of empirical examples or models, which in our case consists of 1973 Rfam family covariance models. Using this as a basis for measuring structural similarity, we developed a clustering pipeline called NoFold to automatically identify and annotate structure motifs within large sequence data sets. We demonstrate that NoFold can simultaneously identify multiple structure motifs with an average sensitivity of 0.80 and precision of 0.98 and generally exceeds the performance of existing methods. We also perform a cross-validation analysis of the entire set of Rfam families, achieving an average sensitivity of 0.57. We apply NoFold to identify motifs enriched in dendritically localized transcripts and report 213 enriched motifs, including both known and novel structures. © 2014 Middleton and Kim; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  9. Structure-based prediction of RNA-binding domains and RNA-binding sites and application to structural genomics targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2011-04-01

    Mechanistic understanding of many key cellular processes often involves identification of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and RNA binding sites in two separate steps. Here, they are predicted simultaneously by structural alignment to known protein-RNA complex structures followed by binding assessment with a DFIRE-based statistical energy function. This method achieves 98% accuracy and 91% precision for predicting RBPs and 93% accuracy and 78% precision for predicting RNA-binding amino-acid residues for a large benchmark of 212 RNA binding and 6761 non-RNA binding domains (leave-one-out cross-validation). Additional tests revealed that the method makes no false positive prediction from 311 DNA binding domains but correctly detects six domains binding with both DNA and RNA. In addition, it correctly identified 31 of 75 unbound RNA-binding domains with 92% accuracy and 65% precision for predicted binding residues and achieved 86% success rate in its application to SCOP RNA binding domain superfamily (Structural Classification Of Proteins). It further predicts 25 targets as RBPs in 2076 structural genomics targets: 20 of 25 predicted ones (80%) are putatively RNA binding. The superior performance over existing methods indicates the importance of dividing structures into domains, using a Z-score to measure relative structural similarity, and a statistical energy function to measure protein-RNA binding affinity.

  10. Predicting 3D Structure, Flexibility, and Stability of RNA Hairpins in Monovalent and Divalent Ion Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Jin, Lei; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    A full understanding of RNA-mediated biology would require the knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures, structural flexibility, and stability of RNAs. To predict RNA 3D structures and stability, we have previously proposed a three-bead coarse-grained predictive model with implicit salt/solvent potentials. In this study, we further develop the model by improving the implicit-salt electrostatic potential and including a sequence-dependent coaxial stacking potential to enable the model to simulate RNA 3D structure folding in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. The model presented here can predict 3D structures of RNA hairpins with bulges/internal loops (RNA hairpins with bulge loops of different lengths at several divalent/monovalent ion conditions. In addition, the model successfully predicts the stability of RNA hairpins with various loops/stems in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. PMID:26682822

  11. RNA 3D modules in genome-wide predictions of RNA 2D structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Zirbel, Craig L; Zu Siederdissen, Christian Höner

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational progress has revealed a large potential for RNA structure in the genome. This has been driven by computational strategies that exploit multiple genomes of related organisms to identify common sequences and secondary structures. However, these computational...... approaches have two main challenges: they are computationally expensive and they have a relatively high false discovery rate (FDR). Simultaneously, RNA 3D structure analysis has revealed modules composed of non-canonical base pairs which occur in non-homologous positions, apparently by independent evolution....... These modules can, for example, occur inside structural elements which in RNA 2D predictions appear as internal loops. Hence one question is if the use of such RNA 3D information can improve the prediction accuracy of RNA secondary structure at a genome-wide level. Here, we use RNAz in combination with 3D...

  12. The 5'-3' Distance of RNA Secondary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recently, Yoffe and colleagues observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals....... In this article, we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite n. Furthermore, we compute the limit distribution and show that for n = 30 the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary...... structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences....

  13. Flaviviral methyltransferase/RNA interaction: structural basis for enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Mario; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Bollati, Michela; Selisko, Barbara; Decroly, Etienne; Bouvet, Mickaël; Canard, Bruno; Bolognesi, Martino

    2009-07-01

    Flaviviruses are the causative agents of severe diseases such as Dengue or Yellow fever. The replicative machinery used by the virus is based on few enzymes including a methyltransferase, located in the N-terminal domain of the NS5 protein. Flaviviral methyltransferases are involved in the last two steps of the mRNA capping process, transferring a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine onto the N7 position of the cap guanine (guanine-N7 methyltransferase) and the ribose 2'O position of the first nucleotide following the cap guanine (nucleoside-2'O methyltransferase). The RNA capping process is crucial for mRNA stability, protein synthesis and virus replication. Such an essential function makes methyltransferases attractive targets for the design of antiviral drugs. In this context, starting from the crystal structure of Wesselsbron flavivirus methyltransferase, we elaborated a mechanistic model describing protein/RNA interaction during N7 methyl transfer. Next we used an in silico docking procedure to identify commercially available compounds that would display high affinity for the methyltransferase active site. The best candidates selected were tested in vitro to assay their effective inhibition on 2'O and N7 methyltransferase activities on Wesselsbron and Dengue virus (Dv) methyltransferases. The results of such combined computational and experimental screening approach led to the identification of a high-potency inhibitor.

  14. Targeting Membrane-Bound Viral RNA Synthesis Reveals Potent Inhibition of Diverse Coronaviruses Including the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Tomas; Kann, Nina; Adamiak, Beata; Hannoun, Charles; Kindler, Eveline; Jónsdóttir, Hulda R.; Muth, Doreen; Kint, Joeri; Forlenza, Maria; Müller, Marcel A.; Drosten, Christian; Thiel, Volker; Trybala, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses raise serious concerns as emerging zoonotic viruses without specific antiviral drugs available. Here we screened a collection of 16671 diverse compounds for anti-human coronavirus 229E activity and identified an inhibitor, designated K22, that specifically targets membrane-bound coronaviral RNA synthesis. K22 exerts most potent antiviral activity after virus entry during an early step of the viral life cycle. Specifically, the formation of double membrane vesicles (DMVs), a hallmark of coronavirus replication, was greatly impaired upon K22 treatment accompanied by near-complete inhibition of viral RNA synthesis. K22-resistant viruses contained substitutions in non-structural protein 6 (nsp6), a membrane-spanning integral component of the viral replication complex implicated in DMV formation, corroborating that K22 targets membrane bound viral RNA synthesis. Besides K22 resistance, the nsp6 mutants induced a reduced number of DMVs, displayed decreased specific infectivity, while RNA synthesis was not affected. Importantly, K22 inhibits a broad range of coronaviruses, including Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS–CoV), and efficient inhibition was achieved in primary human epithelia cultures representing the entry port of human coronavirus infection. Collectively, this study proposes an evolutionary conserved step in the life cycle of positive-stranded RNA viruses, the recruitment of cellular membranes for viral replication, as vulnerable and, most importantly, druggable target for antiviral intervention. We expect this mode of action to serve as a paradigm for the development of potent antiviral drugs to combat many animal and human virus infections. PMID:24874215

  15. Energy profile and secondary structure impact shRNA efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is a cellular mechanism in which a short/small double stranded RNA induces the degradation of its sequence specific target mRNA, leading to specific gene silencing. Since its discovery, RNAi has become a powerful biological technique for gene function studies and drug discovery. The very first requirement of applying RNAi is to design functional small interfering RNA (siRNA that can uniquely induce the degradation of the targeted mRNA. It has been shown that many functional synthetic siRNAs share some common characteristics, such as GC content limitation and free energy preferences at both terminals, etc. Results Our three-phase algorithm was developed to design siRNA on a whole-genome scale based on those identified characteristics of functional siRNA. When this algorithm was applied to design short hairpin RNA (shRNA, the validated success rate of shRNAs was over 70%, which was almost double the rate reported for TRC library. This indicates that the designs of siRNA and shRNA may share the same concerns. Further analysis of the shRNA dataset of 444 designs reveals that the high free energy states of the two terminals have the largest positive impact on the shRNA efficacy. Enforcing these energy characteristics of both terminals can further improve the shRNA design success rate to 83.1%. We also found that functional shRNAs have less probability for their 3' terminals to be involved in mRNA secondary structure formation. Conclusion Functional shRNAs prefer high free energy states at both terminals. High free energy states of the two terminals were found to be the largest positive impact factor on shRNA efficacy. In addition, the accessibility of the 3' terminal is another key factor to shRNA efficacy.

  16. DNA structure in human RNA polymerase II promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Baldi, Pierre; Chauvin, Yves

    1998-01-01

    The fact that DNA three-dimensional structure is important for transcriptional regulation begs the question of whether eukaryotic promoters contain general structural features independently of what genes they control. We present an analysis of a large set of human RNA polymerase II promoters...... with a very low level of sequence similarity. The sequences, which include both TATA-containing and TATA-less promoters, are aligned by hidden Markov models. Using three different models of sequence-derived DNA bendability, the aligned promoters display a common structural profile with bendability being low...... in a region upstream of the transcriptional start point and significantly higher downstream. Investigation of the sequence composition in the two regions shows that the bendability profile originates from the sequential structure of the DNA, rather than the general nucleotide composition...

  17. RNA FRABASE 2.0: an advanced web-accessible database with the capacity to search the three-dimensional fragments within RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popenda, Mariusz; Szachniuk, Marta; Blazewicz, Marek; Wasik, Szymon; Burke, Edmund K; Blazewicz, Jacek; Adamiak, Ryszard W

    2010-05-06

    Recent discoveries concerning novel functions of RNA, such as RNA interference, have contributed towards the growing importance of the field. In this respect, a deeper knowledge of complex three-dimensional RNA structures is essential to understand their new biological functions. A number of bioinformatic tools have been proposed to explore two major structural databases (PDB, NDB) in order to analyze various aspects of RNA tertiary structures. One of these tools is RNA FRABASE 1.0, the first web-accessible database with an engine for automatic search of 3D fragments within PDB-derived RNA structures. This search is based upon the user-defined RNA secondary structure pattern. In this paper, we present and discuss RNA FRABASE 2.0. This second version of the system represents a major extension of this tool in terms of providing new data and a wide spectrum of novel functionalities. An intuitionally operated web server platform enables very fast user-tailored search of three-dimensional RNA fragments, their multi-parameter conformational analysis and visualization. RNA FRABASE 2.0 has stored information on 1565 PDB-deposited RNA structures, including all NMR models. The RNA FRABASE 2.0 search engine algorithms operate on the database of the RNA sequences and the new library of RNA secondary structures, coded in the dot-bracket format extended to hold multi-stranded structures and to cover residues whose coordinates are missing in the PDB files. The library of RNA secondary structures (and their graphics) is made available. A high level of efficiency of the 3D search has been achieved by introducing novel tools to formulate advanced searching patterns and to screen highly populated tertiary structure elements. RNA FRABASE 2.0 also stores data and conformational parameters in order to provide "on the spot" structural filters to explore the three-dimensional RNA structures. An instant visualization of the 3D RNA structures is provided. RNA FRABASE 2.0 is freely available

  18. RNA FRABASE 2.0: an advanced web-accessible database with the capacity to search the three-dimensional fragments within RNA structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasik Szymon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries concerning novel functions of RNA, such as RNA interference, have contributed towards the growing importance of the field. In this respect, a deeper knowledge of complex three-dimensional RNA structures is essential to understand their new biological functions. A number of bioinformatic tools have been proposed to explore two major structural databases (PDB, NDB in order to analyze various aspects of RNA tertiary structures. One of these tools is RNA FRABASE 1.0, the first web-accessible database with an engine for automatic search of 3D fragments within PDB-derived RNA structures. This search is based upon the user-defined RNA secondary structure pattern. In this paper, we present and discuss RNA FRABASE 2.0. This second version of the system represents a major extension of this tool in terms of providing new data and a wide spectrum of novel functionalities. An intuitionally operated web server platform enables very fast user-tailored search of three-dimensional RNA fragments, their multi-parameter conformational analysis and visualization. Description RNA FRABASE 2.0 has stored information on 1565 PDB-deposited RNA structures, including all NMR models. The RNA FRABASE 2.0 search engine algorithms operate on the database of the RNA sequences and the new library of RNA secondary structures, coded in the dot-bracket format extended to hold multi-stranded structures and to cover residues whose coordinates are missing in the PDB files. The library of RNA secondary structures (and their graphics is made available. A high level of efficiency of the 3D search has been achieved by introducing novel tools to formulate advanced searching patterns and to screen highly populated tertiary structure elements. RNA FRABASE 2.0 also stores data and conformational parameters in order to provide "on the spot" structural filters to explore the three-dimensional RNA structures. An instant visualization of the 3D RNA

  19. A combinatorial enumeration problem of RNA secondary structures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... In 1978, M.S. Waterman firstly gave a mathematical definition of RNA secondary structures (Stein and. Waterman 1978). And in order to satisfy the need of research, RNA secondary structures are usually modeled by some discrete mathematic objects, which establish a connection between Discrete ...

  20. RNAVLab: A virtual laboratory for studying RNA secondary structures based on grid computing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying; Solorio, Thamar; Licon, Abel; Mireles, David; Araiza, Roberto; Johnson, Kyle L

    2008-11-01

    As ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation, their secondary structures have been the focus of many recent studies. Despite the computing power of supercomputers, computationally predicting secondary structures with thermodynamic methods is still not feasible when the RNA molecules have long nucleotide sequences and include complex motifs such as pseudoknots. This paper presents RNAVLab (RNA Virtual Laboratory), a virtual laboratory for studying RNA secondary structures including pseudoknots that allows scientists to address this challenge. Two important case studies show the versatility and functionalities of RNAVLab. The first study quantifies its capability to rebuild longer secondary structures from motifs found in systematically sampled nucleotide segments. The extensive sampling and predictions are made feasible in a short turnaround time because of the grid technology used. The second study shows how RNAVLab allows scientists to study the viral RNA genome replication mechanisms used by members of the virus family Nodaviridae.

  1. A comprehensive comparison of comparative RNA structure prediction approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, P. P.; Giegerich, R.

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing number of researchers have released novel RNA structure analysis and prediction algorithms for comparative approaches to structure prediction. Yet, independent benchmarking of these algorithms is rarely performed as is now common practice for protein-folding, gene...

  2. Displaying the information contents of structural RNA alignments: the structure logos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, L.J.; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    We extend the standard `Sequence Logo' method of Schneider and Stevens to incorporate prior frequencies on the bases, allow for gaps in the alignments, and indicate the mutual information of base-paired regions in RNA. Given an alignment of RNA sequences with the base pairings indicated, the prog......We extend the standard `Sequence Logo' method of Schneider and Stevens to incorporate prior frequencies on the bases, allow for gaps in the alignments, and indicate the mutual information of base-paired regions in RNA. Given an alignment of RNA sequences with the base pairings indicated......, the program will calculate the information at each position, including the mutual information of the base pairs, and display the results in a `Structure Logo'. Alignments without base pairing can also be displayed in a `Sequence Logo', but still allowing gaps and incorporating prior frequencies if desired...

  3. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-05-11

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize—and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies.

  4. Structure of a bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme open promoter complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Brian [Laboratory for Molecular Biophysics, The Rockefeller University, New York, United States; Feklistov, Andrey [Laboratory for Molecular Biophysics, The Rockefeller University, New York, United States; Lass-Napiorkowska, Agnieszka [Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, United States; Landick, Robert [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-madison, Madison, United States; Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, United States; Darst, Seth A. [Laboratory for Molecular Biophysics, The Rockefeller University, New York, United States

    2015-09-08

    Initiation of transcription is a primary means for controlling gene expression. In bacteria, the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds and unwinds promoter DNA, forming the transcription bubble of the open promoter complex (RPo). We have determined crystal structures, refined to 4.14 Å-resolution, of RPo containing Thermus aquaticus RNAP holoenzyme and promoter DNA that includes the full transcription bubble. The structures, combined with biochemical analyses, reveal key features supporting the formation and maintenance of the double-strand/single-strand DNA junction at the upstream edge of the −10 element where bubble formation initiates. The results also reveal RNAP interactions with duplex DNA just upstream of the −10 element and potential protein/DNA interactions that direct the DNA template strand into the RNAP active site. Addition of an RNA primer to yield a 4 base-pair post-translocated RNA:DNA hybrid mimics an initially transcribing complex at the point where steric clash initiates abortive initiation and σA dissociation.

  5. Directed acyclic graph kernels for structural RNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mituyama Toutai

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries of a large variety of important roles for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have been reported by numerous researchers. In order to analyze ncRNAs by kernel methods including support vector machines, we propose stem kernels as an extension of string kernels for measuring the similarities between two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures. However, applying stem kernels directly to large data sets of ncRNAs is impractical due to their computational complexity. Results We have developed a new technique based on directed acyclic graphs (DAGs derived from base-pairing probability matrices of RNA sequences that significantly increases the computation speed of stem kernels. Furthermore, we propose profile-profile stem kernels for multiple alignments of RNA sequences which utilize base-pairing probability matrices for multiple alignments instead of those for individual sequences. Our kernels outperformed the existing methods with respect to the detection of known ncRNAs and kernel hierarchical clustering. Conclusion Stem kernels can be utilized as a reliable similarity measure of structural RNAs, and can be used in various kernel-based applications.

  6. Directed acyclic graph kernels for structural RNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Mituyama, Toutai; Asai, Kiyoshi; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2008-07-22

    Recent discoveries of a large variety of important roles for non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been reported by numerous researchers. In order to analyze ncRNAs by kernel methods including support vector machines, we propose stem kernels as an extension of string kernels for measuring the similarities between two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures. However, applying stem kernels directly to large data sets of ncRNAs is impractical due to their computational complexity. We have developed a new technique based on directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) derived from base-pairing probability matrices of RNA sequences that significantly increases the computation speed of stem kernels. Furthermore, we propose profile-profile stem kernels for multiple alignments of RNA sequences which utilize base-pairing probability matrices for multiple alignments instead of those for individual sequences. Our kernels outperformed the existing methods with respect to the detection of known ncRNAs and kernel hierarchical clustering. Stem kernels can be utilized as a reliable similarity measure of structural RNAs, and can be used in various kernel-based applications.

  7. pre-mRNA processing includes N6 methylation of adenosine residues that are retained in mRNA exons and the fallacy of "RNA epigenetics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Robert B; Ke, Shengdong; Darnell, James E

    2017-12-08

    By using a cell fraction technique that separates chromatin associated nascent RNA, newly completed nucleoplasmic mRNA and cytoplasmic mRNA, we have shown that residues in exons are methylated (m6A) in nascent pre-mRNA and remain methylated in the same exonic residues in nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic mRNA. Thus, there is no evidence of a substantial degree of demethylation in mRNA exons that would correspond to so-called "epigenetic" demethylation. The turnover rate of mRNA molecules is faster depending on m6A content in HeLa cell mRNA suggesting specification of mRNA stability may be the major role of m6A exon modification. In mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) lacking Mettl3, the major mRNA methylase, the cells continue to grow, making the same mRNAs with unchanged splicing profiles in the absence (>90%) of m6A in mRNA suggesting no common obligatory role of m6A in splicing. All these data argue strongly against a commonly used "reversible dynamic methylation/demethylation" of mRNA, calling into question the concept of "RNA epigenetics" that parallels the well-established role of dynamic DNA epigenetics. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. RNA-Pareto: interactive analysis of Pareto-optimal RNA sequence-structure alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnattinger, Thomas; Schöning, Uwe; Marchfelder, Anita; Kestler, Hans A

    2013-12-01

    Incorporating secondary structure information into the alignment process improves the quality of RNA sequence alignments. Instead of using fixed weighting parameters, sequence and structure components can be treated as different objectives and optimized simultaneously. The result is not a single, but a Pareto-set of equally optimal solutions, which all represent different possible weighting parameters. We now provide the interactive graphical software tool RNA-Pareto, which allows a direct inspection of all feasible results to the pairwise RNA sequence-structure alignment problem and greatly facilitates the exploration of the optimal solution set.

  9. Predicting RNA secondary structures from sequence and probing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ronny; Wolfinger, Michael T; Tanzer, Andrea; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2016-07-01

    RNA secondary structures have proven essential for understanding the regulatory functions performed by RNA such as microRNAs, bacterial small RNAs, or riboswitches. This success is in part due to the availability of efficient computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Recent advances focus on dealing with the inherent uncertainty of prediction by considering the ensemble of possible structures rather than the single most stable one. Moreover, the advent of high-throughput structural probing has spurred the development of computational methods that incorporate such experimental data as auxiliary information. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. BEAM web server: A tool for structural RNA motif discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosanto, Marco; Adinolfi, Marta; Casula, Riccardo; Ausiello, Gabriele; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2017-10-31

    RNA structural motif finding is a relevant problem that becomes computationally hard when working on high-throughput data (e.g. eCLIP, PAR-CLIP), often represented by thousands of RNA molecules. Currently, the BEAM server is the only web tool capable to handle tens of thousands of RNA in input with a motif discovery procedure that is only limited by the current secondary structure prediction accuracies. The recently developed method BEAM (BEAr Motifs finder) can analyze tens of thousands of RNA molecules and identify RNA secondary structure motifs associated to a measure of their statistical significance. BEAM is extremely fast thanks to the BEAR encoding that transforms each RNA secondary structure in a string of characters. BEAM also exploits the evolutionary knowledge contained in a substitution matrix of secondary structure elements, extracted from the RFAM database of families of homologous RNAs. The BEAM web server has been designed to streamline data pre-processing by automatically handling folding and encoding of RNA sequences, giving users a choice for the preferred folding program. The server provides an intuitive and informative results page with the list of secondary structure motifs identified, the logo of each motif, its significance, graphic representation and information about its position in the RNA molecules sharing it. The web server is freely available at http://beam.uniroma2.it/and it is implemented in NodeJS and Python with all major browsers supported. marco.pietrosanto@uniroma2.it.

  11. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the last decade a large number of noncoding RNA genes have been identified, but this may only be the tip of the iceberg. Using comparative genomics a large number of sequences that have signals concordant with conserved RNA secondary structures have been discovered in the human...

  12. Investigation of RNA Structure by High-Throughput SHAPE-Based Probing Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl

    of highthroughput SHAPE-based approaches to investigate RNA structure based on novel SHAPE reagents that permit selection of full-length cDNAs. The SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) method is applied to the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) plus strand RNA genome, and the data is used to construct a genome-wide structural...... map of the virus. I have used the data to discover stable structures de novo, including previously characterized structural elements, such as the internal ribosome entry site (IRES), and I show that three of the novel structures have been conserved through evolution, indicating...... that they are functional. The SHAPES method is further applied to the hepatitis C virus (HCV), where the data is used to refine known and predicted structures. Over the past years, the interest of studying RNA structure in their native environment has been increased, and to allow studying RNA structure inside living cells...

  13. DMPD: TLR3: interferon induction by double-stranded RNA including poly(I:C). [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18262679 TLR3: interferon induction by double-stranded RNA including poly(I:C). Mat...l) Show TLR3: interferon induction by double-stranded RNA including poly(I:C). PubmedID 18262679 Title TLR3: interferon induction

  14. Meta-structure and tunable optical device including the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seunghoon; Papadakis, Georgia Theano; Atwater, Harry

    2017-12-26

    A meta-structure and a tunable optical device including the same are provided. The meta-structure includes a plurality of metal layers spaced apart from one another, an active layer spaced apart from the plurality of metal layers and having a carrier concentration that is tuned according to an electric signal applied to the active layer and the plurality of metal layers, and a plurality of dielectric layers spaced apart from one another and each having one surface contacting a metal layer among the plurality of metal layers and another surface contacting the active layer.

  15. MultiSETTER: web server for multiple RNA structure comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čech, Petr; Hoksza, David; Svozil, Daniel

    2015-08-12

    Understanding the architecture and function of RNA molecules requires methods for comparing and analyzing their tertiary and quaternary structures. While structural superposition of short RNAs is achievable in a reasonable time, large structures represent much bigger challenge. Therefore, we have developed a fast and accurate algorithm for RNA pairwise structure superposition called SETTER and implemented it in the SETTER web server. However, though biological relationships can be inferred by a pairwise structure alignment, key features preserved by evolution can be identified only from a multiple structure alignment. Thus, we extended the SETTER algorithm to the alignment of multiple RNA structures and developed the MultiSETTER algorithm. In this paper, we present the updated version of the SETTER web server that implements a user friendly interface to the MultiSETTER algorithm. The server accepts RNA structures either as the list of PDB IDs or as user-defined PDB files. After the superposition is computed, structures are visualized in 3D and several reports and statistics are generated. To the best of our knowledge, the MultiSETTER web server is the first publicly available tool for a multiple RNA structure alignment. The MultiSETTER server offers the visual inspection of an alignment in 3D space which may reveal structural and functional relationships not captured by other multiple alignment methods based either on a sequence or on secondary structure motifs.

  16. The structure of a rigorously conserved RNA element within the SARS virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90 degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  17. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either by facilitat...

  18. RNA secondary structure image - fRNAdb | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00452-005 Description of data contents RNA secondary structure images - png.zip: RNA secondary structure images... (PNG) - pdf.zip: RNA secondary structure images (PDF) - thumbnail.zip: Thumbnails of... RNA secondary structure images Data file File name: RNA_secondary_structure_imag

  19. Advances in RNA Structure Determination | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent years have witnessed a revolution in the field of RNA structure and function. Until recently the main contribution of RNA in cellular and disease functions was considered to be a role defined by the central dogma, namely DNA codes for mRNAs, which in turn encode for proteins, a notion facilitated by non-coding ribosomal RNA and tRNA. It was also assumed at the time that less than 2% of DNA in the human genome was used to encode genes, the remainder considered “junk”.

  20. De Novo Discovery of Structured ncRNA Motifs in Genomic Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzzo, Walter L; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphas...... on an approach based on the CMfinder CMfinder program as a case study. Applications to genomic screens for novel de novo structured ncRNA ncRNA s, including structured RNA elements in untranslated portions of protein-coding genes, are presented.......De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphasis...

  1. The tRNA Elbow in Structure, Recognition and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prominent in the L-shaped three-dimensional structure of tRNAs is the “elbow” where their two orthogonal helical stacks meet. It has a conserved structure arising from the interaction of the terminal loops of the D- and T-stem-loops, and presents to solution a flat face of a tertiary base pair between the D- and T-loops. In addition to the ribosome, which interacts with the elbow in all three of its tRNA binding sites, several cellular RNAs and many proteins are known to recognize the elbow. At least three classes of non-coding RNAs, namely 23S rRNA, ribonuclease P, and the T-box riboswitches, recognize the tRNA elbow employing an identical structural motif consisting of two interdigitated T-loops. In contrast, structural solutions to tRNA-elbow recognition by proteins are varied. Some enzymes responsible for post-transcriptional tRNA modification even disrupt the elbow structure in order to access their substrate nucleotides. The evolutionary origin of the elbow is mysterious, but, because it does not explicitly participate in the flow of genetic information, it has been proposed to be a late innovation. Regardless, it is biologically essential. Even some viruses that hijack the cellular machinery using tRNA decoys have convergently evolved near-perfect mimics of the tRNA elbow.

  2. Structure of RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Kevin K.; Bingman, Craig A.; Cheng, Chin L.; Phillips, George N.

    2014-01-01

    RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3′-phosphate to form a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA–AMP and RNA(3′)pp(5′)A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3′-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3′-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3′-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P–N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to Nε of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3′-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3′-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. PMID:25161314

  3. Structural landscape of base pairs containing post-transcriptional modifications in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelam, Preethi P; Sharma, Purshotam; Mitra, Abhijit

    2017-06-01

    Base pairs involving post-transcriptionally modified nucleobases are believed to play important roles in a wide variety of functional RNAs. Here we present our attempts toward understanding the structural and functional role of naturally occurring modified base pairs using a combination of X-ray crystal structure database analysis, sequence analysis, and advanced quantum chemical methods. Our bioinformatics analysis reveals that despite their presence in all major secondary structural elements, modified base pairs are most prevalent in tRNA crystal structures and most commonly involve guanine or uridine modifications. Further, analysis of tRNA sequences reveals additional examples of modified base pairs at structurally conserved tRNA regions and highlights the conservation patterns of these base pairs in three domains of life. Comparison of structures and binding energies of modified base pairs with their unmodified counterparts, using quantum chemical methods, allowed us to classify the base modifications in terms of the nature of their electronic structure effects on base-pairing. Analysis of specific structural contexts of modified base pairs in RNA crystal structures revealed several interesting scenarios, including those at the tRNA:rRNA interface, antibiotic-binding sites on the ribosome, and the three-way junctions within tRNA. These scenarios, when analyzed in the context of available experimental data, allowed us to correlate the occurrence and strength of modified base pairs with their specific functional roles. Overall, our study highlights the structural importance of modified base pairs in RNA and points toward the need for greater appreciation of the role of modified bases and their interactions, in the context of many biological processes involving RNA. © 2017 Seelam et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Salt Contribution to RNA Tertiary Structure Folding Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Accurate quantification of the ionic contribution to RNA folding stability could greatly enhance our ability to understand and predict RNA functions. Recently, motivated by the potential importance of ion correlation and fluctuation in RNA folding, we developed the tightly bound ion (TBI) model. Extensive experimental tests showed that the TBI model can lead to better treatment of multivalent ions than the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. In this study, we use the model to quantify the contribution of salt (Na+ and Mg2+) to the RNA tertiary structure folding free energy. Folding of the RNA tertiary structure often involves intermediates. We focus on the folding transition from an intermediate state to the native state, and compute the electrostatic folding free energy of the RNA. Based on systematic calculations for a variety of RNA molecules, we derive a set of formulas for the electrostatic free energy for tertiary structural folding as a function of the sequence length and compactness of the RNA and the Na+ and Mg2+ concentrations. Extensive comparisons with experimental data suggest that our model and the extracted empirical formulas are quite reliable. PMID:21723828

  5. Ensemble-based prediction of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Hoos, Holger H

    2013-04-24

    Accurate structure prediction methods play an important role for the understanding of RNA function. Energy-based, pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction is one of the most widely used and versatile approaches, and improved methods for this task have received much attention over the past five years. Despite the impressive progress that as been achieved in this area, existing evaluations of the prediction accuracy achieved by various algorithms do not provide a comprehensive, statistically sound assessment. Furthermore, while there is increasing evidence that no prediction algorithm consistently outperforms all others, no work has been done to exploit the complementary strengths of multiple approaches. In this work, we present two contributions to the area of RNA secondary structure prediction. Firstly, we use state-of-the-art, resampling-based statistical methods together with a previously published and increasingly widely used dataset of high-quality RNA structures to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of existing RNA secondary structure prediction procedures. The results from this evaluation clarify the performance relationship between ten well-known existing energy-based pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction methods and clearly demonstrate the progress that has been achieved in recent years. Secondly, we introduce AveRNA, a generic and powerful method for combining a set of existing secondary structure prediction procedures into an ensemble-based method that achieves significantly higher prediction accuracies than obtained from any of its component procedures. Our new, ensemble-based method, AveRNA, improves the state of the art for energy-based, pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction by exploiting the complementary strengths of multiple existing prediction procedures, as demonstrated using a state-of-the-art statistical resampling approach. In addition, AveRNA allows an intuitive and effective control of the trade-off between

  6. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas (UCSD)

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  7. InterRNA: a database of base interactions in RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appasamy, Sri Devan; Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2016-01-04

    A major component of RNA structure stabilization are the hydrogen bonded interactions between the base residues. The importance and biological relevance for large clusters of base interactions can be much more easily investigated when their occurrences have been systematically detected, catalogued and compared. In this paper, we describe the database InterRNA (INTERactions in RNA structures database-http://mfrlab.org/interrna/) that contains records of known RNA 3D motifs as well as records for clusters of bases that are interconnected by hydrogen bonds. The contents of the database were compiled from RNA structural annotations carried out by the NASSAM (http://mfrlab.org/grafss/nassam) and COGNAC (http://mfrlab.org/grafss/cognac) computer programs. An analysis of the database content and comparisons with the existing corpus of knowledge regarding RNA 3D motifs clearly show that InterRNA is able to provide an extension of the annotations for known motifs as well as able to provide novel interactions for further investigations. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Dynamic Analysis of Wind Turbines Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harte, M.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2012-01-01

    blades and includes the effect of centrifugal stiffening due to rotation. The foundation of the structure is modeled as a rigid gravity based foundation with two DOF whose movement is related to the surrounding soil by means of complex impedance functions generated using cone model. Transfer functions...... for displacement of the turbine system are obtained and the modal frequencies of the combined turbine-foundation system are estimated. Simulations are presented for the MDOF turbine structure subjected to wind loading for different soil stiffness conditions. Steady state and turbulent wind loading, developed using...... blade element momentum theory and the Kaimal spectrum, have been considered. Soil stiffness and damping properties acquired from DNV/Risø standards are used as a comparison. The soil-structure interaction is shown to affect the response of the wind turbine. This is examined in terms of the turbine...

  9. SCOR: Structural classification of RNA, Version 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K.; Klosterman, Peter

    2003-01-01

    SCOR (http://scor.lbl.gov), the Structural Classification of RNA, is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure,function, tertiary interactions, and their relationships.SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a wholly new classification system. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to th...

  10. SCOR: Structural Classification of RNA, version 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K.; Klosterman, Peter S.; Schimmelman, Nancy R. B.; Steven E Brenner; Holbrook, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    SCOR, the Structural Classification of RNA (http://scor.lbl.gov), is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a new classification organization. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the str...

  11. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  12. Comprehensive processing of high-throughput small RNA sequencing data including quality checking, normalization, and differential expression analysis using the UEA sRNA Workbench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Matthew; Mohorianu, Irina; Stocks, Matthew; Applegate, Christopher; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) has revealed compelling details about the small RNA (sRNA) population in eukaryotes. These 20 to 25 nt noncoding RNAs can influence gene expression by acting as guides for the sequence-specific regulatory mechanism known as RNA silencing. The increase in sequencing depth and number of samples per project enables a better understanding of the role sRNAs play by facilitating the study of expression patterns. However, the intricacy of the biological hypotheses coupled with a lack of appropriate tools often leads to inadequate mining of the available data and thus, an incomplete description of the biological mechanisms involved. To enable a comprehensive study of differential expression in sRNA data sets, we present a new interactive pipeline that guides researchers through the various stages of data preprocessing and analysis. This includes various tools, some of which we specifically developed for sRNA analysis, for quality checking and normalization of sRNA samples as well as tools for the detection of differentially expressed sRNAs and identification of the resulting expression patterns. The pipeline is available within the UEA sRNA Workbench, a user-friendly software package for the processing of sRNA data sets. We demonstrate the use of the pipeline on a H. sapiens data set; additional examples on a B. terrestris data set and on an A. thaliana data set are described in the Supplemental Information A comparison with existing approaches is also included, which exemplifies some of the issues that need to be addressed for sRNA analysis and how the new pipeline may be used to do this. © 2017 Beckers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. BRASERO: A Resource for Benchmarking RNA Secondary Structure Comparison Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Allali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pairwise comparison of RNA secondary structures is a fundamental problem, with direct application in mining databases for annotating putative noncoding RNA candidates in newly sequenced genomes. An increasing number of software tools are available for comparing RNA secondary structures, based on different models (such as ordered trees or forests, arc annotated sequences, and multilevel trees and computational principles (edit distance, alignment. We describe here the website BRASERO that offers tools for evaluating such software tools on real and synthetic datasets.

  14. Topological classification and enumeration of RNA structures by genus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Penner, Robert; Reidys, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    To an RNA pseudoknot structure is naturally associated a topological surface, which has its associated genus, and structures can thus be classified by the genus. Based on earlier work of Harer-Zagier, we compute the generating function for the number of those structures of fixed genus and minimum...

  15. Structure-seq2: sensitive and accurate genome-wide profiling of RNA structure in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Laura E; Su, Zhao; Tang, Yin; Tack, David C; Assmann, Sarah M; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2017-08-21

    RNA serves many functions in biology such as splicing, temperature sensing, and innate immunity. These functions are often determined by the structure of RNA. There is thus a pressing need to understand RNA structure and how it changes during diverse biological processes both in vivo and genome-wide. Here, we present Structure-seq2, which provides nucleotide-resolution RNA structural information in vivo and genome-wide. This optimized version of our original Structure-seq method increases sensitivity by at least 4-fold and improves data quality by minimizing formation of a deleterious by-product, reducing ligation bias, and improving read coverage. We also present a variation of Structure-seq2 in which a biotinylated nucleotide is incorporated during reverse transcription, which greatly facilitates the protocol by eliminating two PAGE purification steps. We benchmark Structure-seq2 on both mRNA and rRNA structure in rice (Oryza sativa). We demonstrate that Structure-seq2 can lead to new biological insights. Our Structure-seq2 datasets uncover hidden breaks in chloroplast rRNA and identify a previously unreported N1-methyladenosine (m1A) in a nuclear-encoded Oryza sativa rRNA. Overall, Structure-seq2 is a rapid, sensitive, and unbiased method to probe RNA in vivo and genome-wide that facilitates new insights into RNA biology. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. HD-RNAS: An automated hierarchical database of RNA structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhra Sankar eRay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the important goals of most biological investigations is to classify and organize the experimental findings so that they are readily useful for deriving generalized rules. Although there is a huge amount of information on RNA structures in PDB, there are redundant files, ambiguous synthetic sequences etc. Moreover, a systematic hierarchical organization, reflecting RNA classification, is missing in PDB. In this investigation, we have classified all the available RNA crystal structures from PDB through a programmatic approach. Hence, it would be now a simple assignment to regularly update the classification as and when new structures are released. The classification can further determine (i a non-redundant set of RNA structures and (ii if available, a set of structures of identical sequence and function, which can highlight structural polymorphism, ligand-induced conformational alterations etc. Presently, we have classified the available structures (2095 PDB entries having RNA chain longer than 9 nucleotides solved by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy into nine functional classes. The structures of same function and same source are mostly seen to be similar with subtle differences depending on their functional complexation. The web-server is available online at http://www.saha.ac.in/biop/www/HD-RNAS.html and is updated regularly.

  17. The identification and functional annotation of RNA structures conserved in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Hansen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Structured elements of RNA molecules are essential in, e.g., RNA stabilization, localization and protein interaction, and their conservation across species suggests a common functional role. We computationally screened vertebrate genomes for Conserved RNA Structures (CRSs), leveraging structure...

  18. miRNA-dis: microRNA precursor identification based on distance structure status pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Fang, Longyun; Chen, Junjie; Liu, Fule; Wang, Xiaolong

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNA precursor identification is an important task in bioinformatics. Support Vector Machine (SVM) is one of the most effective machine learning methods used in this field. The performance of SVM-based methods depends on the vector representations of RNAs. However, the discriminative power of the existing feature vectors is limited, and many methods lack an interpretable model for analysis of characteristic sequence features. Prior studies have demonstrated that sequence or structure order effects were relevant for discrimination, but little work has explored how to use this kind of information for human pre-microRNA identification. In this study, in order to incorporate the structure-order information into the prediction, a method called "miRNA-dis" was proposed, in which the feature vector was constructed by the occurrence frequency of the "distance structure status pair" or just the "distance-pair". Rigorous cross-validations on a much larger and more stringent newly constructed benchmark dataset showed that the miRNA-dis outperformed some state-of-the-art predictors in this area. Remarkably, miRNA-dis trained with human data can correctly predict 87.02% of the 4022 pre-miRNAs from 11 different species ranging from animals, plants and viruses. miRNA-dis would be a useful high throughput tool for large-scale analysis of microRNA precursors. In addition, the learnt model can be easily analyzed in terms of discriminative features, and some interesting patterns were discovered, which could reflect the characteristics of microRNAs. A user-friendly web-server of miRNA-dis was constructed, which is freely accessible to the public at the web-site on http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/miRNA-dis/.

  19. Formation of RNA Beads from Various DNA Nanoring Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-05-01

    By taking advantages of rolling circle transcription, one of the powerful methods to overcome the instability of RNA, we successfully synthesized RNA particles having high copy numbers of RNA strands. To examine dependence of RNA particle formation to template circular DNA strands, we synthesized RNA beads with 65-nt, 92-nt and 200-nt DNA nanoring structures as template circular DNA. Our conclusion is that characteristics of RNA beads could be controlled with various template circular DNA for RCT. It is feasible that our RNA beads could be used for RNAzyme-based metal sensors such as aqueous lead ion sensing. In this case, we expect that multi-metal ion detection would be possible by using 200-nt circular DNA bearing multiple desired functions as a template for RNA bead formation. Furthermore, certain features of RNA beads such as sensitivity to nuclease digestion and maximum loading amount of drugs when used as a carrier are expected to be further adjusted by choosing appropriate porosity and size.

  20. High-Throughput Sequencing Based Methods of RNA Structure Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental and comp......In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental...... with known priming sites....

  1. RNA-TVcurve: a Web server for RNA secondary structure comparison based on a multi-scale similarity of its triple vector curve representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Shi, Xiaohu; Liang, Yanchun; Xie, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Qin

    2017-01-21

    RNAs have been found to carry diverse functionalities in nature. Inferring the similarity between two given RNAs is a fundamental step to understand and interpret their functional relationship. The majority of functional RNAs show conserved secondary structures, rather than sequence conservation. Those algorithms relying on sequence-based features usually have limitations in their prediction performance. Hence, integrating RNA structure features is very critical for RNA analysis. Existing algorithms mainly fall into two categories: alignment-based and alignment-free. The alignment-free algorithms of RNA comparison usually have lower time complexity than alignment-based algorithms. An alignment-free RNA comparison algorithm was proposed, in which novel numerical representations RNA-TVcurve (triple vector curve representation) of RNA sequence and corresponding secondary structure features are provided. Then a multi-scale similarity score of two given RNAs was designed based on wavelet decomposition of their numerical representation. In support of RNA mutation and phylogenetic analysis, a web server (RNA-TVcurve) was designed based on this alignment-free RNA comparison algorithm. It provides three functional modules: 1) visualization of numerical representation of RNA secondary structure; 2) detection of single-point mutation based on secondary structure; and 3) comparison of pairwise and multiple RNA secondary structures. The inputs of the web server require RNA primary sequences, while corresponding secondary structures are optional. For the primary sequences alone, the web server can compute the secondary structures using free energy minimization algorithm in terms of RNAfold tool from Vienna RNA package. RNA-TVcurve is the first integrated web server, based on an alignment-free method, to deliver a suite of RNA analysis functions, including visualization, mutation analysis and multiple RNAs structure comparison. The comparison results with two popular RNA

  2. Structures of coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and poliovirus polymerase elongation complexes solved by engineering RNA mediated crystal contacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gong

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases play a vital role in the growth of RNA viruses where they are responsible for genome replication, but do so with rather low fidelity that allows for the rapid adaptation to different host cell environments. These polymerases are also a target for antiviral drug development. However, both drug discovery efforts and our understanding of fidelity determinants have been hampered by a lack of detailed structural information about functional polymerase-RNA complexes and the structural changes that take place during the elongation cycle. Many of the molecular details associated with nucleotide selection and catalysis were revealed in our recent structure of the poliovirus polymerase-RNA complex solved by first purifying and then crystallizing stalled elongation complexes. In the work presented here we extend that basic methodology to determine nine new structures of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus elongation complexes at 2.2-2.9 Å resolution. The structures highlight conserved features of picornaviral polymerases and the interactions they make with the template and product RNA strands, including a tight grip on eight basepairs of the nascent duplex, a fully pre-positioned templating nucleotide, and a conserved binding pocket for the +2 position template strand base. At the active site we see a pre-bound magnesium ion and there is conservation of a non-standard backbone conformation of the template strand in an interaction that may aid in triggering RNA translocation via contact with the conserved polymerase motif B. Moreover, by engineering plasticity into RNA-RNA contacts, we obtain crystal forms that are capable of multiple rounds of in-crystal catalysis and RNA translocation. Together, the data demonstrate that engineering flexible RNA contacts to promote crystal lattice formation is a versatile platform that can be used to solve the structures of viral RdRP elongation complexes and their catalytic cycle

  3. Evolutionary rate variation and RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, B; Andersen, E S; Damgaard, Christian Kroun

    2004-01-01

    of approach. Determining these rates can be hard to do reliably without a large and accurate initial alignment, which ideally also has structural annotation. Hence, one must often apply rates extracted from other RNA families with trusted alignments and structures. Here, we investigate this problem......Predicting RNA secondary structure using evolutionary history can be carried out by using an alignment of related RNA sequences with conserved structure. Accurately determining evolutionary substitution rates for base pairs and single stranded nucleotides is a concern for methods based on this type....... In addition we obtained an alignment of the 5' HIV-1 region that is more consistent with the structure than that currently in the database. We added randomized noise to the original values of the rates to investigate the stability of predictions to rate matrix deviations. We find that changes within a fairly...

  4. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  5. Web-Beagle: a web server for the alignment of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Eugenio; Pietrosanto, Marco; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    Web-Beagle (http://beagle.bio.uniroma2.it) is a web server for the pairwise global or local alignment of RNA secondary structures. The server exploits a new encoding for RNA secondary structure and a substitution matrix of RNA structural elements to perform RNA structural alignments. The web server allows the user to compute up to 10 000 alignments in a single run, taking as input sets of RNA sequences and structures or primary sequences alone. In the latter case, the server computes the secondary structure prediction for the RNAs on-the-fly using RNAfold (free energy minimization). The user can also compare a set of input RNAs to one of five pre-compiled RNA datasets including lncRNAs and 3' UTRs. All types of comparison produce in output the pairwise alignments along with structural similarity and statistical significance measures for each resulting alignment. A graphical color-coded representation of the alignments allows the user to easily identify structural similarities between RNAs. Web-Beagle can be used for finding structurally related regions in two or more RNAs, for the identification of homologous regions or for functional annotation. Benchmark tests show that Web-Beagle has lower computational complexity, running time and better performances than other available methods. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The structure of the SOLE element of oskar mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bernd; Masiewicz, Pawel; Ephrussi, Anne; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-08-01

    mRNA localization by active transport is a regulated process that requires association of mRNPs with protein motors for transport along either the microtubule or the actin cytoskeleton. oskar mRNA localization at the posterior pole of the Drosophila oocyte requires a specific mRNA sequence, termed the SOLE, which comprises nucleotides of both exon 1 and exon 2 and is assembled upon splicing. The SOLE folds into a stem-loop structure. Both SOLE RNA and the exon junction complex (EJC) are required for oskar mRNA transport along the microtubules by kinesin. The SOLE RNA likely constitutes a recognition element for a yet unknown protein, which either belongs to the EJC or functions as a bridge between the EJC and the mRNA. Here, we determine the solution structure of the SOLE RNA by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. We show that the SOLE forms a continuous helical structure, including a few noncanonical base pairs, capped by a pentanucleotide loop. The helix displays a widened major groove, which could accommodate a protein partner. In addition, the apical helical segment undergoes complex dynamics, with potential functional significance. © 2015 Simon et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  7. Reconstruction of ancestral RNA sequences under multiple structural constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Tremblay-Savard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary structures form the scaffold of multiple sequence alignment of non-coding RNA (ncRNA families. An accurate reconstruction of ancestral ncRNAs must use this structural signal. However, the inference of ancestors of a single ncRNA family with a single consensus structure may bias the results towards sequences with high affinity to this structure, which are far from the true ancestors. Methods In this paper, we introduce achARNement, a maximum parsimony approach that, given two alignments of homologous ncRNA families with consensus secondary structures and a phylogenetic tree, simultaneously calculates ancestral RNA sequences for these two families. Results We test our methodology on simulated data sets, and show that achARNement outperforms classical maximum parsimony approaches in terms of accuracy, but also reduces by several orders of magnitude the number of candidate sequences. To conclude this study, we apply our algorithms on the Glm clan and the FinP-traJ clan from the Rfam database. Conclusions Our results show that our methods reconstruct small sets of high-quality candidate ancestors with better agreement to the two target structures than with classical approaches. Our program is freely available at: http://csb.cs.mcgill.ca/acharnement .

  8. The History of Bordetella pertussis Genome Evolution Includes Structural Rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Michael R; Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E; Burroughs, Mark; Cassiday, Pamela K; Davis, Jamie K; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Knipe, Kristen; Mathis, Marsenia H; Pruitt, Andrea M; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M Lucia; Williams, Margaret M

    2017-04-15

    Despite high pertussis vaccine coverage, reported cases of whooping cough (pertussis) have increased over the last decade in the United States and other developed countries. Although Bordetella pertussis is well known for its limited gene sequence variation, recent advances in long-read sequencing technology have begun to reveal genomic structural heterogeneity among otherwise indistinguishable isolates, even within geographically or temporally defined epidemics. We have compared rearrangements among complete genome assemblies from 257 B. pertussis isolates to examine the potential evolution of the chromosomal structure in a pathogen with minimal gene nucleotide sequence diversity. Discrete changes in gene order were identified that differentiated genomes from vaccine reference strains and clinical isolates of various genotypes, frequently along phylogenetic boundaries defined by single nucleotide polymorphisms. The observed rearrangements were primarily large inversions centered on the replication origin or terminus and flanked by IS481, a mobile genetic element with >240 copies per genome and previously suspected to mediate rearrangements and deletions by homologous recombination. These data illustrate that structural genome evolution in B. pertussis is not limited to reduction but also includes rearrangement. Therefore, although genomes of clinical isolates are structurally diverse, specific changes in gene order are conserved, perhaps due to positive selection, providing novel information for investigating disease resurgence and molecular epidemiology.IMPORTANCE Whooping cough, primarily caused by Bordetella pertussis, has resurged in the United States even though the coverage with pertussis-containing vaccines remains high. The rise in reported cases has included increased disease rates among all vaccinated age groups, provoking questions about the pathogen's evolution. The chromosome of B. pertussis includes a large number of repetitive mobile genetic

  9. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  10. RNA secondary structure diagrams for very large molecules: RNAfdl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Wiegels, Tim; Torda, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    There are many programs that can read the secondary structure of an RNA molecule and draw a diagram, but hardly any that can cope with 10 3 bases. RNAfdl is slow but capable of producing intersection-free diagrams for ribosome-sized structures, has a graphical user interface for adjustments and p...

  11. Hepatitis delta antigen requires a flexible quasi-double-stranded RNA structure to bind and condense hepatitis delta virus RNA in a ribonucleoprotein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brittany L; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Casey, John L

    2014-07-01

    The circular genome and antigenome RNAs of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) form characteristic unbranched, quasi-double-stranded RNA secondary structures in which short double-stranded helical segments are interspersed with internal loops and bulges. The ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) formed by these RNAs with the virus-encoded protein hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) perform essential roles in the viral life cycle, including viral replication and virion formation. Little is understood about the formation and structure of these complexes and how they function in these key processes. Here, the specific RNA features required for HDAg binding and the topology of the complexes formed were investigated. Selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) applied to free and HDAg-bound HDV RNAs indicated that the characteristic secondary structure of the RNA is preserved when bound to HDAg. Notably, the analysis indicated that predicted unpaired positions in the RNA remained dynamic in the RNP. Analysis of the in vitro binding activity of RNAs in which internal loops and bulges were mutated and of synthetically designed RNAs demonstrated that the distinctive secondary structure, not the primary RNA sequence, is the major determinant of HDAg RNA binding specificity. Atomic force microscopy analysis of RNPs formed in vitro revealed complexes in which the HDV RNA is substantially condensed by bending or wrapping. Our results support a model in which the internal loops and bulges in HDV RNA contribute flexibility to the quasi-double-stranded structure that allows RNA bending and condensing by HDAg. RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) formed by the hepatitis delta virus RNAs and protein, HDAg, perform critical roles in virus replication. Neither the structures of these RNPs nor the RNA features required to form them have been characterized. HDV RNA is unusual in that it forms an unbranched quasi-double-stranded structure in which short base-paired segments are interspersed

  12. RNA structure: merging chemistry and genomics for a holistic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Miles; Chan, Dalen; Spitale, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    The advent of deep sequencing technology has unexpectedly advanced our structural understanding of molecules composed of nucleic acids. A significant amount of progress has been made recently extrapolating the chemical methods to probe RNA structure into sequencing methods. Herein we review some of the canonical methods to analyze RNA structure, and then we outline how these have been used to probe the structure of many RNAs in parallel. The key is the transformation of structural biology problems into sequencing problems, whereby sequencing power can be interpreted to understand nucleic acid proximity, nucleic acid conformation, or nucleic acid-protein interactions. Utilizing such technologies in this way has the promise to provide novel structural insights into the mechanisms that control normal cellular physiology and provide insight into how structure could be perturbed in disease. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Widespread purifying selection on RNA structure in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin A; Gesell, Tanja; Stadler, Peter F; Mattick, John S

    2013-09-01

    Evolutionarily conserved RNA secondary structures are a robust indicator of purifying selection and, consequently, molecular function. Evaluating their genome-wide occurrence through comparative genomics has consistently been plagued by high false-positive rates and divergent predictions. We present a novel benchmarking pipeline aimed at calibrating the precision of genome-wide scans for consensus RNA structure prediction. The benchmarking data obtained from two refined structure prediction algorithms, RNAz and SISSIz, were then analyzed to fine-tune the parameters of an optimized workflow for genomic sliding window screens. When applied to consistency-based multiple genome alignments of 35 mammals, our approach confidently identifies >4 million evolutionarily constrained RNA structures using a conservative sensitivity threshold that entails historically low false discovery rates for such analyses (5-22%). These predictions comprise 13.6% of the human genome, 88% of which fall outside any known sequence-constrained element, suggesting that a large proportion of the mammalian genome is functional. As an example, our findings identify both known and novel conserved RNA structure motifs in the long noncoding RNA MALAT1. This study provides an extensive set of functional transcriptomic annotations that will assist researchers in uncovering the precise mechanisms underlying the developmental ontologies of higher eukaryotes.

  14. Protein-RNA interactions: structural biology and computational modeling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Susan

    2016-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins are functionally diverse within cells, being involved in RNA-metabolism, translation, DNA damage repair, and gene regulation at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Much has been learnt about their interactions with RNAs through structure determination techniques and computational modeling. This review gives an overview of the structural data currently available for protein-RNA complexes, and discusses the technical issues facing structural biologists working to solve their structures. The review focuses on three techniques used to solve the 3-dimensional structure of protein-RNA complexes at atomic resolution, namely X-ray crystallography, solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). The review then focuses on the main computational modeling techniques that use these atomic resolution data: discussing the prediction of RNA-binding sites on unbound proteins, docking proteins, and RNAs, and modeling the molecular dynamics of the systems. In conclusion, the review looks at the future directions this field of research might take.

  15. Structure and RNA recognition of ribosome assembly factor Utp30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianfei; Zhu, Xing; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-12-01

    The 90S preribosomes are gigantic early assembly intermediates of small ribosomal subunits. Cryo-EM structures of 90S were recently determined, but many of its components have not been accurately modeled. Here we determine the crystal structure of yeast Utp30, a ribosomal L1 domain-containing protein in 90S, at 2.65 Å resolution, revealing a classic two-domain fold. The structure of Utp30 fits well into the cryo-EM density of 90S, confirming its previously assigned location. Utp30 binds to the rearranged helix 41 of 18S rRNA and helix 4 of 5' external transcribed spacer in 90S. Comparison of RNA-binding modes of different L1 domains illustrates that they consistently recognize a short RNA duplex with the concaved surface of domain I, but are versatile in RNA recognition outside the core interface. Cic1 is a paralog of Utp30 associating with large subunit preribosomes. Utp30 and Cic1 share similar RNA-binding modes, suggesting that their distinct functions may be executed by a single protein in other organisms. Deletion of Utp30 does not affect the composition of 90S. The nonessential role of Utp30 could be ascribed to its peripheral localization and redundant interactions in 90S. © 2017 Hu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. RNA Structure Refinement Using the ERRASER-Phenix Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Das, Rhiju

    2016-01-01

    The final step of RNA crystallography involves the fitting of coordinates into electron density maps. The large number of backbone atoms in RNA presents a difficult and tedious challenge, particularly when experimental density is poor. The ERRASER-Phenix pipeline can improve an initial set of RNA coordinates automatically based on a physically realistic model of atomic-level RNA interactions. The pipeline couples diffraction-based refinement in Phenix with the Rosetta-based real-space refinement protocol ERRASER (Enumerative Real-Space Refinement ASsisted by Electron density under Rosetta). The combination of ERRASER and Phenix can improve the geometrical quality of RNA crystallographic models while maintaining or improving the fit to the diffraction data (as measured by R free). Here we present a complete tutorial for running ERRASER-Phenix through the Phenix GUI, from the command-line, and via an application in the Rosetta On-line Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE).

  17. Targeting structural dynamics of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for anti-viral strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehr, David D; Liu, Xinran; Yang, Xiaorong

    2014-12-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is responsible for genome replication of RNA viruses. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have indicated that efficient and faithful polymerase function requires highly coordinated internal protein motions. Interference with these motions, either through amino acid substitutions or small molecule binding, can disrupt polymerase and virus function. In particular, these studies have pointed toward highly conserved structural elements, like the motif-D active-site loop, that can be modified to generate polymerases with desired properties. Viruses encoding engineered polymerases might serve as live, attenuated vaccine strains. Further elucidation of polymerase structural dynamics will also provide new avenues for anti-viral drug design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Disease-associated mutations that alter the RNA structural ensemble.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Halvorsen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of all known disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs from the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD that map to the untranslated regions (UTRs of a gene. Rather than using minimum free energy approaches (e.g. mFold, we use a partition function calculation that takes into consideration the ensemble of possible RNA conformations for a given sequence. We identified in the human genome disease-associated SNPs that significantly alter the global conformation of the UTR to which they map. For six disease-states (Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome, beta-Thalassemia, Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, Retinoblastoma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, and Hypertension, we identified multiple SNPs in UTRs that alter the mRNA structural ensemble of the associated genes. Using a Boltzmann sampling procedure for sub-optimal RNA structures, we are able to characterize and visualize the nature of the conformational changes induced by the disease-associated mutations in the structural ensemble. We observe in several cases (specifically the 5' UTRs of FTL and RB1 SNP-induced conformational changes analogous to those observed in bacterial regulatory Riboswitches when specific ligands bind. We propose that the UTR and SNP combinations we identify constitute a "RiboSNitch," that is a regulatory RNA in which a specific SNP has a structural consequence that results in a disease phenotype. Our SNPfold algorithm can help identify RiboSNitches by leveraging GWAS data and an analysis of the mRNA structural ensemble.

  19. Deformable registration of multi-modal data including rigid structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Klein, Gregory J.; Kimdon, Joey A.; Kuo, Chaincy; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2003-05-02

    Multi-modality imaging studies are becoming more widely utilized in the analysis of medical data. Anatomical data from CT and MRI are useful for analyzing or further processing functional data from techniques such as PET and SPECT. When data are not acquired simultaneously, even when these data are acquired on a dual-imaging device using the same bed, motion can occur that requires registration between the reconstructed image volumes. As the human torso can allow non-rigid motion, this type of motion should be estimated and corrected. We report a deformation registration technique that utilizes rigid registration for bony structures, while allowing elastic transformation of soft tissue to more accurately register the entire image volume. The technique is applied to the registration of CT and MR images of the lumbar spine. First a global rigid registration is performed to approximately align features. Bony structures are then segmented from the CT data using semi-automated process, and bounding boxes for each vertebra are established. Each CT subvolume is then individually registered to the MRI data using a piece-wise rigid registration algorithm and a mutual information image similarity measure. The resulting set of rigid transformations allows for accurate registration of the parts of the CT and MRI data representing the vertebrae, but not the adjacent soft tissue. To align the soft tissue, a smoothly-varying deformation is computed using a thin platespline(TPS) algorithm. The TPS technique requires a sparse set of landmarks that are to be brought into correspondence. These landmarks are automatically obtained from the segmented data using simple edge-detection techniques and random sampling from the edge candidates. A smoothness parameter is also included in the TPS formulation for characterization of the stiffness of the soft tissue. Estimation of an appropriate stiffness factor is obtained iteratively by using the mutual information cost function on the result

  20. Structure of the Leanyer orthobunyavirus nucleoprotein-RNA complex reveals unique architecture for RNA encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fengfeng; Shaw, Neil; Wang, Yao E; Jiao, Lianying; Ding, Wei; Li, Xiaomin; Zhu, Ping; Upur, Halmurat; Ouyang, Songying; Cheng, Genhong; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2013-05-28

    Negative-stranded RNA viruses cover their genome with nucleoprotein (N) to protect it from the human innate immune system. Abrogation of the function of N offers a unique opportunity to combat the spread of the viruses. Here, we describe a unique fold of N from Leanyer virus (LEAV, Orthobunyavirus genus, Bunyaviridae family) in complex with single-stranded RNA refined to 2.78 Å resolution as well as a 2.68 Å resolution structure of LEAV N-ssDNA complex. LEAV N is made up of an N- and a C-terminal lobe, with the RNA binding site located at the junction of these lobes. The LEAV N tetramer binds a 44-nucleotide-long single-stranded RNA chain. Hence, oligomerization of N is essential for encapsidation of the entire genome and is accomplished by using extensions at the N and C terminus. Molecular details of the oligomerization of N are illustrated in the structure where a circular ring-like tertiary assembly of a tetramer of LEAV N is observed tethering the RNA in a positively charged cavity running along the inner edge. Hydrogen bonds between N and the C2 hydroxyl group of ribose sugar explain the specificity of LEAV N for RNA over DNA. In addition, base-specific hydrogen bonds suggest that some regions of RNA bind N more tightly than others. Hinge movements around F20 and V125 assist in the reversal of capsidation during transcription and replication of the virus. Electron microscopic images of the ribonucleoprotein complexes of LEAV N reveal a filamentous assembly similar to those found in phleboviruses.

  1. Metal dependence and branched RNA cocrystal structures of the RNA lariat debranching enzyme Dbr1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Nathaniel E.; Katolik, Adam; Roberts, Kenneth M.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Montemayor, Eric J.; Stevens, Scott W.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Damha, Masad J.; Hart, P. John (UW); (Texas); (McGill); (UTSMC); (Cornell); (SC)

    2016-12-06

    Intron lariats are circular, branched RNAs (bRNAs) produced during pre-mRNA splicing. Their unusual chemical and topological properties arise from branch-point nucleotides harboring vicinal 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. The 2',5'-bonds must be hydrolyzed by the RNA debranching enzyme Dbr1 before spliced introns can be degraded or processed into small nucleolar RNA and microRNA derived from intronic RNA. Here, we measure the activity of Dbr1 from Entamoeba histolytica by using a synthetic, dark-quenched bRNA substrate that fluoresces upon hydrolysis. Purified enzyme contains nearly stoichiometric equivalents of Fe and Zn per polypeptide and demonstrates turnover rates of ~3 s-1. Similar rates are observed when apo-Dbr1 is reconstituted with Fe(II)+Zn(II) under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, a rate of ~4.0 s-1 is observed when apoenzyme is reconstituted with Fe(II). In contrast, apo-Dbr1 reconstituted with Mn(II) or Fe(II) under aerobic conditions is inactive. Diffraction data from crystals of purified enzyme using X-rays tuned to the Fe absorption edge show Fe partitions primarily to the β-pocket and Zn to the α-pocket. Structures of the catalytic mutant H91A in complex with 7-mer and 16-mer synthetic bRNAs reveal bona fide RNA branchpoints in the Dbr1 active site. A bridging hydroxide is in optimal position for nucleophilic attack of the scissile phosphate. The results clarify uncertainties regarding structure/function relationships in Dbr1 enzymes, and the fluorogenic probe permits high-throughput screening for inhibitors that may hold promise as treatments for retroviral infections and neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  3. RNA secondary structure prediction using highly parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, A; Yamamoto, K; Yonezawa, A

    1995-12-01

    An RNA secondary structure prediction method using a highly parallel computer is reported. We focus on finding thermodynamically stable structures of a single-stranded RNA molecule. Our approach is based on a parallel combinatorial method which calculates the free energy of a molecule as the sum of the free energies of all the physically possible hydrogen bonds. Our parallel algorithm finds many highly stable structures all at once, while most of the conventional prediction methods find only the most stable structure. The important idea in our algorithm is search tree pruning, with dynamic load balancing across the processor elements in a parallel computer. Software tools for visualization and classification of secondary structures are also presented using the sequence of cadang-cadang coconut viroid as an example. Our software system runs on CM-5.

  4. Topological classification and enumeration of RNA structures by genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J E; Penner, R C; Reidys, C M; Waterman, M S

    2013-11-01

    To an RNA pseudoknot structure is naturally associated a topological surface, which has its associated genus, and structures can thus be classified by the genus. Based on earlier work of Harer-Zagier, we compute the generating function Dg,σ (z) = ∑n dg,σ (n)zn for the number dg,σ (n) of those structures of fixed genus g and minimum stack size σ with n nucleotides so that no two consecutive nucleotides are basepaired and show that Dg,σ (z) is algebraic. In particular, we prove that dg,2(n) ∼ kg n3(g−1/2 )γ n2, where γ2 ≈ 1.9685. Thus, for stack size at least two, the genus only enters through the sub-exponential factor, and the slow growth rate compared to the number of RNA molecules implies the existence of neutral networks of distinct molecules with the same structure of any genus. Certain RNA structures called shapes are shown to be in natural one-to-one correspondence with the cells in the Penner-Strebel decomposition of Riemann's moduli space of a surface of genus g with one boundary component, thus providing a link between RNA enumerative problems and the geometry of Riemann's moduli space.

  5. Identification of consensus RNA secondary structures using suffix arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Truong

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of a consensus RNA motif often consists in finding a conserved secondary structure with minimum free energy in an ensemble of aligned sequences. However, an alignment is often difficult to obtain without prior structural information. Thus the need for tools to automate this process. Results We present an algorithm called Seed to identify all the conserved RNA secondary structure motifs in a set of unaligned sequences. The search space is defined as the set of all the secondary structure motifs inducible from a seed sequence. A general-to-specific search allows finding all the motifs that are conserved. Suffix arrays are used to enumerate efficiently all the biological palindromes as well as for the matching of RNA secondary structure expressions. We assessed the ability of this approach to uncover known structures using four datasets. The enumeration of the motifs relies only on the secondary structure definition and conservation only, therefore allowing for the independent evaluation of scoring schemes. Twelve simple objective functions based on free energy were evaluated for their potential to discriminate native folds from the rest. Conclusion Our evaluation shows that 1 support and exclusion constraints are sufficient to make an exhaustive search of the secondary structure space feasible. 2 The search space induced from a seed sequence contains known motifs. 3 Simple objective functions, consisting of a combination of the free energy of matching sequences, can generally identify motifs with high positive predictive value and sensitivity to known motifs.

  6. The modeled structure of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase of GBV-C virus suggests a role for motif E in Flaviviridae RNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, François; Bussetta, Cécile; Dutartre, Hélène; Canard, Bruno

    2005-10-14

    The Flaviviridae virus family includes major human and animal pathogens. The RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) plays a central role in the replication process, and thus is a validated target for antiviral drugs. Despite the increasing structural and enzymatic characterization of viral RdRps, detailed molecular replication mechanisms remain unclear. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major human pathogen difficult to study in cultured cells. The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is often used as a surrogate model to screen antiviral drugs against HCV. The structure of BVDV RdRp has been recently published. It presents several differences relative to HCV RdRp. These differences raise questions about the relevance of BVDV as a surrogate model, and cast novel interest on the "GB" virus C (GBV-C). Indeed, GBV-C is genetically closer to HCV than BVDV, and can lead to productive infection of cultured cells. There is no structural data for the GBV-C RdRp yet. We show in this study that the GBV-C RdRp is closest to the HCV RdRp. We report a 3D model of the GBV-C RdRp, developed using sequence-to-structure threading and comparative modeling based on the atomic coordinates of the HCV RdRp structure. Analysis of the predicted structural features in the phylogenetic context of the RNA polymerase family allows rationalizing most of the experimental data available. Both available structures and our model are explored to examine the catalytic cleft, allosteric and substrate binding sites. Computational methods were used to infer evolutionary relationships and to predict the structure of a viral RNA polymerase. Docking a GTP molecule into the structure allows defining a GTP binding pocket in the GBV-C RdRp, such as that of BVDV. The resulting model suggests a new proposition for the mechanism of RNA synthesis, and may prove useful to design new experiments to implement our knowledge on the initiation mechanism of RNA polymerases.

  7. The modeled structure of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase of GBV-C Virus suggests a role for motif E in Flaviviridae RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutartre Hélène

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Flaviviridae virus family includes major human and animal pathogens. The RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp plays a central role in the replication process, and thus is a validated target for antiviral drugs. Despite the increasing structural and enzymatic characterization of viral RdRps, detailed molecular replication mechanisms remain unclear. The hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major human pathogen difficult to study in cultured cells. The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is often used as a surrogate model to screen antiviral drugs against HCV. The structure of BVDV RdRp has been recently published. It presents several differences relative to HCV RdRp. These differences raise questions about the relevance of BVDV as a surrogate model, and cast novel interest on the "GB" virus C (GBV-C. Indeed, GBV-C is genetically closer to HCV than BVDV, and can lead to productive infection of cultured cells. There is no structural data for the GBV-C RdRp yet. Results We show in this study that the GBV-C RdRp is closest to the HCV RdRp. We report a 3D model of the GBV-C RdRp, developed using sequence-to-structure threading and comparative modeling based on the atomic coordinates of the HCV RdRp structure. Analysis of the predicted structural features in the phylogenetic context of the RNA polymerase family allows rationalizing most of the experimental data available. Both available structures and our model are explored to examine the catalytic cleft, allosteric and substrate binding sites. Conclusion Computational methods were used to infer evolutionary relationships and to predict the structure of a viral RNA polymerase. Docking a GTP molecule into the structure allows defining a GTP binding pocket in the GBV-C RdRp, such as that of BVDV. The resulting model suggests a new proposition for the mechanism of RNA synthesis, and may prove useful to design new experiments to implement our knowledge on the initiation mechanism of RNA

  8. Structural basis of RNA recognition and activation by innate immune receptor RIG-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fuguo; Ramanathan, Anand; Miller, Matthew T.; Tang, Guo-Qing; Gale, Jr., Michael; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph (Rutgers); (RWJ-Med); (UW-MED)

    2012-05-29

    Retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I; also known as DDX58) is a cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motifs to differentiate between viral and cellular RNAs. RIG-I is activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNA with or without a 5'-triphosphate (ppp), by single-stranded RNA marked by a 5'-ppp and by polyuridine sequences. Upon binding to such PAMP motifs, RIG-I initiates a signalling cascade that induces innate immune defences and inflammatory cytokines to establish an antiviral state. The RIG-I pathway is highly regulated and aberrant signalling leads to apoptosis, altered cell differentiation, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The helicase and repressor domains (RD) of RIG-I recognize dsRNA and 5'-ppp RNA to activate the two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) for signalling. Here, to understand the synergy between the helicase and the RD for RNA binding, and the contribution of ATP hydrolysis to RIG-I activation, we determined the structure of human RIG-I helicase-RD in complex with dsRNA and an ATP analogue. The helicase-RD organizes into a ring around dsRNA, capping one end, while contacting both strands using previously uncharacterized motifs to recognize dsRNA. Small-angle X-ray scattering, limited proteolysis and differential scanning fluorimetry indicate that RIG-I is in an extended and flexible conformation that compacts upon binding RNA. These results provide a detailed view of the role of helicase in dsRNA recognition, the synergy between the RD and the helicase for RNA binding and the organization of full-length RIG-I bound to dsRNA, and provide evidence of a conformational change upon RNA binding. The RIG-I helicase-RD structure is consistent with dsRNA translocation without unwinding and cooperative binding to RNA. The structure yields unprecedented insight into innate immunity and has a broader impact on other areas of biology, including

  9. SCOR: Structural Classification of RNA, version 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K; Klosterman, Peter S; Schimmelman, Nancy R B; Brenner, Steven E; Holbrook, Stephen R

    2004-01-01

    SCOR, the Structural Classification of RNA (http://scor.lbl.gov), is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a new classification organization. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511 RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5880 secondary structural elements are classified: 2104 hairpin loops and 3776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as 'Kink turn' and 'GNRA loops', are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  10. Quaternion representation of RNA sequences and tertiary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarshak, Y

    1993-01-01

    A quaternion representation of nucleotides is proposed, with representation of RNA sequences by vectors whose elements are quaternions. Structure and transition matrices in quaternion representation are defined. Correspondence between diagrammatic technique in complex-number and quaternion representation of nucleotides is delineated.

  11. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary Siwei; reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe str...

  12. SCOR: Structural classification of RNA, Version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Makio; Hendrix, Donna K.; Klosterman, Peter

    2003-10-03

    SCOR (http://scor.lbl.gov), the Structural Classification of RNA, is a database designed to provide a comprehensive perspective and understanding of RNA motif three-dimensional structure, function, tertiary interactions, and their relationships. SCOR 2.0 represents a major expansion and introduces a wholly new classification system. The new version represents the classification as a Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), which allows a classification node to have multiple parents, in contrast to the strictly hierarchical classification used in SCOR 1.2. SCOR 2.0 supports three types of query terms in the updated search engine: PDB or NDB identifier, nucleotide sequence, and keyword. We also provide parseable XML files for all information. This new release contains 511RNA entries from the PDB as of 15 May 2003. A total of 5,880 secondary structural elements are classified; 2,104 hairpin loops and 3,776 internal loops. RNA motifs reported in the literature, such as ''Kinkturn'' and ''GNRA loops,'' are now incorporated into the structural classification along with definitions and descriptions.

  13. Selective small-molecule inhibition of an RNA structural element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, John A.; Wang, Hao; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Balibar, Carl J.; Xiao, Li; Galgoci, Andrew M.; Malinverni, Juliana C.; Mayhood, Todd; Villafania, Artjohn; Nahvi, Ali; Murgolo, Nicholas; Barbieri, Christopher M.; Mann, Paul A.; Carr, Donna; Xia, Ellen; Zuck, Paul; Riley, Dan; Painter, Ronald E.; Walker, Scott S.; Sherborne, Brad; de Jesus, Reynalda; Pan, Weidong; Plotkin, Michael A.; Wu, Jin; Rindgen, Diane; Cummings, John; Garlisi, Charles G.; Zhang, Rumin; Sheth, Payal R.; Gill, Charles J.; Tang, Haifeng; Roemer , Terry (Merck)

    2015-09-30

    Riboswitches are non-coding RNA structures located in messenger RNAs that bind endogenous ligands, such as a specific metabolite or ion, to regulate gene expression. As such, riboswitches serve as a novel, yet largely unexploited, class of emerging drug targets. Demonstrating this potential, however, has proven difficult and is restricted to structurally similar antimetabolites and semi-synthetic analogues of their cognate ligand, thus greatly restricting the chemical space and selectivity sought for such inhibitors. Here we report the discovery and characterization of ribocil, a highly selective chemical modulator of bacterial riboflavin riboswitches, which was identified in a phenotypic screen and acts as a structurally distinct synthetic mimic of the natural ligand, flavin mononucleotide, to repress riboswitch-mediated ribB gene expression and inhibit bacterial cell growth. Our findings indicate that non-coding RNA structural elements may be more broadly targeted by synthetic small molecules than previously expected.

  14. Secondary structural entropy in RNA switch (Riboswitch) identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzourolajdad, Amirhossein; Arnold, Jonathan

    2015-04-28

    RNA regulatory elements play a significant role in gene regulation. Riboswitches, a widespread group of regulatory RNAs, are vital components of many bacterial genomes. These regulatory elements generally function by forming a ligand-induced alternative fold that controls access to ribosome binding sites or other regulatory sites in RNA. Riboswitch-mediated mechanisms are ubiquitous across bacterial genomes. A typical class of riboswitch has its own unique structural and biological complexity, making de novo riboswitch identification a formidable task. Traditionally, riboswitches have been identified through comparative genomics based on sequence and structural homology. The limitations of structural-homology-based approaches, coupled with the assumption that there is a great diversity of undiscovered riboswitches, suggests the need for alternative methods for riboswitch identification, possibly based on features intrinsic to their structure. As of yet, no such reliable method has been proposed. We used structural entropy of riboswitch sequences as a measure of their secondary structural dynamics. Entropy values of a diverse set of riboswitches were compared to that of their mutants, their dinucleotide shuffles, and their reverse complement sequences under different stochastic context-free grammar folding models. Significance of our results was evaluated by comparison to other approaches, such as the base-pairing entropy and energy landscapes dynamics. Classifiers based on structural entropy optimized via sequence and structural features were devised as riboswitch identifiers and tested on Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Synechococcus elongatus as an exploration of structural entropy based approaches. The unusually long untranslated region of the cotH in Bacillus subtilis, as well as upstream regions of certain genes, such as the sucC genes were associated with significant structural entropy values in genome-wide examinations. Various tests show that there

  15. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length.

  16. The RNA helicase Aquarius exhibits structural adaptations mediating its recruitment to spliceosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Inessa; Bessonov, Sergey; Hofele, Romina; dos Santos, Karine; Will, Cindy L; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Pena, Vladimir

    2015-02-01

    Aquarius is a multifunctional putative RNA helicase that binds precursor-mRNA introns at a defined position. Here we report the crystal structure of human Aquarius, revealing a central RNA helicase core and several unique accessory domains, including an ARM-repeat domain. We show that Aquarius is integrated into spliceosomes as part of a pentameric intron-binding complex (IBC) that, together with the ARM domain, cross-links to U2 snRNP proteins within activated spliceosomes; this suggests that the latter aid in positioning Aquarius on the intron. Aquarius's ARM domain is essential for IBC formation, thus indicating that it has a key protein-protein-scaffolding role. Finally, we provide evidence that Aquarius is required for efficient precursor-mRNA splicing in vitro. Our findings highlight the remarkable structural adaptations of a helicase to achieve position-specific recruitment to a ribonucleoprotein complex and reveal a new building block of the human spliceosome.

  17. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebel Markus E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. Results In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure. Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2 for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2. Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with

  18. Crowdsourcing RNA structural alignments with an online computer game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; Kam, Arthur; Gardner, Paul P

    2015-01-01

    The annotation and classification of ncRNAs is essential to decipher molecular mechanisms of gene regulation in normal and disease states. A database such as Rfam maintains alignments, consensus secondary structures, and corresponding annotations for RNA families. Its primary purpose is the automated, accurate annotation of non-coding RNAs in genomic sequences. However, the alignment of RNAs is computationally challenging, and the data stored in this database are often subject to improvements. Here, we design and evaluate Ribo, a human-computing game that aims to improve the accuracy of RNA alignments already stored in Rfam. We demonstrate the potential of our techniques and discuss the feasibility of large scale collaborative annotation and classification of RNA families.

  19. Interactions between the structural domains of the RNA replication proteins of plant-infecting RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, E K; Wang, Z; French, R; Kao, C C

    1998-09-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, encodes two replication proteins: the 2a protein, which contains polymerase-like sequences, and the 1a protein, with N-terminal putative capping and C-terminal helicase-like sequences. These two proteins are part of a multisubunit complex which is necessary for viral RNA replication. We have previously shown that the yeast two-hybrid assay consistently duplicated results obtained from in vivo RNA replication assays and biochemical assays of protein-protein interaction, thus permitting the identification of additional interacting domains. We now map an interaction found to take place between two 1a proteins. Using previously characterized 1a mutants, a perfect correlation was found between the in vivo phenotypes of these mutants and their abilities to interact with wild-type 1a (wt1a) and each other. Western blot analysis revealed that the stabilities of many of the noninteracting mutant proteins were similar to that of wt1a. Deletion analysis of 1a revealed that the N-terminal 515 residues of the 1a protein are required and sufficient for 1a-1a interaction. This intermolecular interaction between the putative capping domain and itself was detected in another tripartite RNA virus, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), suggesting that the 1a-1a interaction is a feature necessary for the replication of tripartite RNA viruses. The boundaries for various activities are placed in the context of the predicted secondary structures of several 1a-like proteins of members of the alphavirus-like superfamily. Additionally, we found a novel interaction between the putative capping and helicase-like portions of the BMV and CMV 1a proteins. Our cumulative data suggest a working model for the assembly of the BMV RNA replicase.

  20. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam

    2011-01-01

    a comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein...... identify tens of new families supported by strong evolutionary evidence and other statistical evidence, such as GO term enrichments. For some of these, detailed analysis has led to the formulation of specific functional hypotheses. Examples include two hypothesized auto-regulatory feedback mechanisms: one...... involving six long hairpins in the 3'-UTR of MAT2A, a key metabolic gene that produces the primary human methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine; the other involving a tRNA-like structure in the intron of the tRNA maturation gene POP1. We experimentally validate the predicted MAT2A structures. Finally, we...

  1. DSSR: an integrated software tool for dissecting the spatial structure of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang-Jun; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Olson, Wilma K

    2015-12-02

    Insight into the three-dimensional architecture of RNA is essential for understanding its cellular functions. However, even the classic transfer RNA structure contains features that are overlooked by existing bioinformatics tools. Here we present DSSR (Dissecting the Spatial Structure of RNA), an integrated and automated tool for analyzing and annotating RNA tertiary structures. The software identifies canonical and noncanonical base pairs, including those with modified nucleotides, in any tautomeric or protonation state. DSSR detects higher-order coplanar base associations, termed multiplets. It finds arrays of stacked pairs, classifies them by base-pair identity and backbone connectivity, and distinguishes a stem of covalently connected canonical pairs from a helix of stacked pairs of arbitrary type/linkage. DSSR identifies coaxial stacking of multiple stems within a single helix and lists isolated canonical pairs that lie outside of a stem. The program characterizes 'closed' loops of various types (hairpin, bulge, internal, and junction loops) and pseudoknots of arbitrary complexity. Notably, DSSR employs isolated pairs and the ends of stems, whether pseudoknotted or not, to define junction loops. This new, inclusive definition provides a novel perspective on the spatial organization of RNA. Tests on all nucleic acid structures in the Protein Data Bank confirm the efficiency and robustness of the software, and applications to representative RNA molecules illustrate its unique features. DSSR and related materials are freely available at http://x3dna.org/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Model-Free RNA Sequence and Structure Alignment Informed by SHAPE Probing Reveals a Conserved Alternate Secondary Structure for 16S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Christopher A; Lorenz, Ronny; Zhang, Ge; Tamayo, Rita; Hofacker, Ivo L; Weeks, Kevin M

    2015-05-01

    Discovery and characterization of functional RNA structures remains challenging due to deficiencies in de novo secondary structure modeling. Here we describe a dynamic programming approach for model-free sequence comparison that incorporates high-throughput chemical probing data. Based on SHAPE probing data alone, ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) from three diverse organisms--the eubacteria E. coli and C. difficile and the archeon H. volcanii--could be aligned with accuracies comparable to alignments based on actual sequence identity. When both base sequence identity and chemical probing reactivities were considered together, accuracies improved further. Derived sequence alignments and chemical probing data from protein-free RNAs were then used as pseudo-free energy constraints to model consensus secondary structures for the 16S and 23S rRNAs. There are critical differences between these experimentally-informed models and currently accepted models, including in the functionally important neck and decoding regions of the 16S rRNA. We infer that the 16S rRNA has evolved to undergo large-scale changes in base pairing as part of ribosome function. As high-quality RNA probing data become widely available, structurally-informed sequence alignment will become broadly useful for de novo motif and function discovery.

  3. Model-Free RNA Sequence and Structure Alignment Informed by SHAPE Probing Reveals a Conserved Alternate Secondary Structure for 16S rRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Lavender

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Discovery and characterization of functional RNA structures remains challenging due to deficiencies in de novo secondary structure modeling. Here we describe a dynamic programming approach for model-free sequence comparison that incorporates high-throughput chemical probing data. Based on SHAPE probing data alone, ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs from three diverse organisms--the eubacteria E. coli and C. difficile and the archeon H. volcanii--could be aligned with accuracies comparable to alignments based on actual sequence identity. When both base sequence identity and chemical probing reactivities were considered together, accuracies improved further. Derived sequence alignments and chemical probing data from protein-free RNAs were then used as pseudo-free energy constraints to model consensus secondary structures for the 16S and 23S rRNAs. There are critical differences between these experimentally-informed models and currently accepted models, including in the functionally important neck and decoding regions of the 16S rRNA. We infer that the 16S rRNA has evolved to undergo large-scale changes in base pairing as part of ribosome function. As high-quality RNA probing data become widely available, structurally-informed sequence alignment will become broadly useful for de novo motif and function discovery.

  4. Crystal structures of two eukaryotic nucleases involved in RNA metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    as well as the controlled turnover of these in response to changing surrounding conditions is of vital importance to ensure optimal fitness of a cell. Central to both these processes is the degradation of RNA, either as a means of decreasing the level of particular RNAs or as a way to get rid of aberrant...... form the 3'-end of mRNA, is normally the first and also rate-limiting step in cellular mRNA degradation and therefore a key process in the control of eukaryotic mRNA turnover. Since Ccr4p is believed to be the main deadenylase the precise role of Pop2p in the complex is less clear. Nevertheless, Pop2p....... In the nucleus Rrp6p associates with the exosome and participates in the degradation of improperly processed precursor mRNAs and trimming of stable RNAs. The crystal structure of S. cerevisiae Rrp6p presented here displays a conserved DEDD nuclease core with a flanking HRDC domain believed to be involved in RNA...

  5. Visualization of RNA secondary structures using highly parallel computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, A; Taura, K; Yamamoto, K; Yonezawa, A

    1996-06-01

    Results of RNA secondary structure prediction algorithm are usually given as a set of hydrogen bonds between bases. However, we cannot know the precise structure of an RNA molecule by only knowing which bases form hydrogen bonds. One way to understand the structure of an RNA molecule is to visualize it using a planar graph so that we can easily know the geometric relations among the substructures such as stacking regions and loops. To do this, we consider bases to be particles on a plane and introduce a repulsive force and an attractive force among these particles and determine their positions according to these forces. A naive algorithm requires O(N2) time but we can reduce it to O(NlogN) with an approximation algorithm which is often used in the area of N-body simulation. Our program is written in parallel object-oriented language 'Schematic' which is recently developed. Efficiency of our implementation on a parallel computer and results of visualization of secondary structures are presented using cadang-cadang coconut viroid as an example.

  6. nRC: non-coding RNA Classifier based on structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiannaca, Antonino; La Rosa, Massimo; La Paglia, Laura; Rizzo, Riccardo; Urso, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) are small non-coding sequences involved in gene expression regulation of many biological processes and diseases. The recent discovery of a large set of different ncRNAs with biologically relevant roles has opened the way to develop methods able to discriminate between the different ncRNA classes. Moreover, the lack of knowledge about the complete mechanisms in regulative processes, together with the development of high-throughput technologies, has required the help of bioinformatics tools in addressing biologists and clinicians with a deeper comprehension of the functional roles of ncRNAs. In this work, we introduce a new ncRNA classification tool, nRC (non-coding RNA Classifier). Our approach is based on features extraction from the ncRNA secondary structure together with a supervised classification algorithm implementing a deep learning architecture based on convolutional neural networks. We tested our approach for the classification of 13 different ncRNA classes. We obtained classification scores, using the most common statistical measures. In particular, we reach an accuracy and sensitivity score of about 74%. The proposed method outperforms other similar classification methods based on secondary structure features and machine learning algorithms, including the RNAcon tool that, to date, is the reference classifier. nRC tool is freely available as a docker image at https://hub.docker.com/r/tblab/nrc/. The source code of nRC tool is also available at https://github.com/IcarPA-TBlab/nrc.

  7. Structural bases of norovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibition by novel suramin-related compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Croci

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (NV are +ssRNA viruses responsible for severe gastroenteritis; no effective vaccines/antivirals are currently available. We previously identified Suramin (9 as a potent inhibitor of NV-RNA dependent RNA polymerase (NV-RdRp. Despite significant in vitro activities versus several pharmacological targets, Suramin clinical use is hampered by pharmacokinetics/toxicity problems. To improve Suramin access to NV-RdRp in vivo, a Suramin-derivative, 8, devoid of two sulphonate groups, was synthesized, achieving significant anti-human-NV-RdRp activity (IC50 = 28 nM; the compound inhibits also murine NV (mNV RdRp. The synthesis process led to the isolation/characterization of lower molecular weight intermediates (3-7 hosting only one sulphonate head. The crystal structures of both hNV/mNV-RdRps in complex with 6, were analyzed, providing new knowledge on the interactions that a small fragment can establish with NV-RdRps, and establishing a platform for structure-guided optimization of potency, selectivity and drugability.

  8. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristou, C.; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment of buildings with a second "skin" and semi-outdoor space is examined in the present study. A literature review was conducted on similar structures and only a few studies were found focusing on the thermal environment. Two different building case studies were chosen...... with different building and shield geometry, different levels of insulation but same shield material; Dome of Visions (DoV) and EMBRACE. Both buildings were modelled in IDA ICE 4.6.2 simulation software in order to assess the thermal environment of the building and assess how long the semi outdoor space of each...... building can be used by the occupants. The study was based on weather data for Copenhagen. In addition to the simulations, physical measurements were performed in DoV to assess the thermal environment in the semi-outdoor space. Since existing standards are not applicable for semi-outdoor spaces...

  9. Probing RNA native conformational ensembles with structural constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; van den Bedem, Henry; Bernauer, Julie

    2016-01-01

    substates, which are difficult to characterize experimentally and computationally. Here, we present an innovative, entirely kinematic computational procedure to efficiently explore the native ensemble of RNA molecules. Our procedure projects degrees of freedom onto a subspace of conformation space defined...... by distance constraints in the tertiary structure. The dimensionality reduction enables efficient exploration of conformational space. We show that the conformational distributions obtained with our method broadly sample the conformational landscape observed in NMR experiments. Compared to normal mode...

  10. Analysis of secondary structural elements in human microRNA hairpin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Biao; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Znosko, Brent M; Wang, Dan; Fallahi, Mohammad; Gallo, Steven M; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by targeting complementary mRNAs for destruction or translational repression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been associated with various diseases including cancer, thus making them interesting therapeutic targets. The composite of secondary structural elements that comprise miRNAs could aid the design of small molecules that modulate their function. We analyzed the secondary structural elements, or motifs, present in all human miRNA hairpin precursors and compared them to highly expressed human RNAs with known structures and other RNAs from various organisms. Amongst human miRNAs, there are 3808 are unique motifs, many residing in processing sites. Further, we identified motifs in miRNAs that are not present in other highly expressed human RNAs, desirable targets for small molecules. MiRNA motifs were incorporated into a searchable database that is freely available. We also analyzed the most frequently occurring bulges and internal loops for each RNA class and found that the smallest loops possible prevail. However, the distribution of loops and the preferred closing base pairs were unique to each class. Collectively, we have completed a broad survey of motifs found in human miRNA precursors, highly expressed human RNAs, and RNAs from other organisms. Interestingly, unique motifs were identified in human miRNA processing sites, binding to which could inhibit miRNA maturation and hence function.

  11. Two distinct 18S rRNA secondary structures in Dipodascus (Hemiascomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda-Nishimura, K; Mikata, K

    2000-05-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 18S rRNA gene from ascomycetous yeast-like fungi in the genera Dipodascus, Galactomyces and Geotrichum were determined and the tested strains were separated into two groups by sequence length. In group 1, the length and secondary structure of 18S rRNA corresponded to those of typical eukaryotes. In group 2, the 18S rRNA gene sequences were about 150 nt shorter than those of most other eukaryotes and the predicted secondary structure lacked helices 10 and E21-5. Many substitutions and some deletions in group 2 18S rRNA gene were not only found in variable regions, but also in regions that are highly conserved among ascomycetes. Despite the considerable differences in 18S rRNA gene sequence and secondary structure between group 2 and other fungi, including group 1, phylogenetic analysis revealed that groups 1 and 2 are closely related. These findings suggest that a number of deletions occurred in the 18S rRNA of the common ancestor of group 2 strains.

  12. Single-Molecule Spectroscopic Investigations of RNA Structural Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Julie L.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2007-03-01

    To function properly, catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) fold into specific three-dimensional shapes stabilized by multiple tertiary interactions. However, only limited information is available on the contributions of individual tertiary contacts to RNA conformational dynamics. The Tetrahymena ribozymes's P4--P6 domain forms a hinged, ``candy-cane'' structure with parallel helices clamped by two motifs, the GAAA tetraloop-tetraloop receptor and adenosine (A)-rich bulge--P4 helix interactions. Previously, we characterized RNA folding due to a tetraloop-receptor interaction. In this study, we employ time-resolved single-molecule FRET methods to probe A-rich bulge induced structural dynamics. Specifically, fluorescently labeled RNA constructs excited by a pulsed 532 nm laser are detected in the confocal region of an inverted microscope, with each photon sorted by arrival time, color and polarization. We resolve the kinetic dependence of A-rich bulge-P4 helix docking/undocking on cationic environment (e.g. Na^+ and Mg^2+ concentration.) At saturating [Mg^2+], the docked structure appears only weakly stabilized, while only 50% of the molecules exhibit efficient folding.

  13. Protein Structure and the Sequential Structure of mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Engelbrecht, Jacob

    1996-01-01

    protein, The degeneracy of the genetic code allows for a biased selection of codons which may control the translational rate of the ribosome, and may thus in vivo have a catalyzing effect on the folding of the polypeptide chain, A complete search for GenBank nucleotide sequences coding for structural...

  14. The identification and functional annotation of RNA structures conserved in vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Mirza, Aashiq Hussain; Hansen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    -based, rather than sequence-based, alignments. After careful correction for sequence identity and GC content, we predict ~516k human genomic regions containing CRSs. We find that a substantial fraction of human-mouse CRS regions (i) co-localize consistently with binding sites of the same RNA binding proteins...... (RBPs) or (ii) are transcribed in corresponding tissues. Additionally, a CaptureSeq experiment revealed expression of many of our CRS regions in human fetal brain, including 662 novel ones. For selected human and mouse candidate pairs, qRT-PCR and in vitro RNA structure probing supported both shared...... expression and shared structure despite low abundance and low sequence identity. About 30k CRS regions are located near coding or long non-coding RNA genes or within enhancers. Structured (CRS overlapping) enhancer RNAs and extended 3' ends have significantly increased expression levels over their non...

  15. Fine-tuning structural RNA alignments in the twilight zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirmer Stefanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A widely used method to find conserved secondary structure in RNA is to first construct a multiple sequence alignment, and then fold the alignment, optimizing a score based on thermodynamics and covariance. This method works best around 75% sequence similarity. However, in a "twilight zone" below 55% similarity, the sequence alignment tends to obscure the covariance signal used in the second phase. Therefore, while the overall shape of the consensus structure may still be found, the degree of conservation cannot be estimated reliably. Results Based on a combination of available methods, we present a method named planACstar for improving structure conservation in structural alignments in the twilight zone. After constructing a consensus structure by alignment folding, planACstar abandons the original sequence alignment, refolds the sequences individually, but consistent with the consensus, aligns the structures, irrespective of sequence, by a pure structure alignment method, and derives an improved sequence alignment from the alignment of structures, to be re-submitted to alignment folding, etc.. This circle may be iterated as long as structural conservation improves, but normally, one step suffices. Conclusions Employing the tools ClustalW, RNAalifold, and RNAforester, we find that for sequences with 30-55% sequence identity, structural conservation can be improved by 10% on average, with a large variation, measured in terms of RNAalifold's own criterion, the structure conservation index.

  16. A probabilistic model for the evolution of RNA structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Ian

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the purposes of finding and aligning noncoding RNA gene- and cis-regulatory elements in multiple-genome datasets, it is useful to be able to derive multi-sequence stochastic grammars (and hence multiple alignment algorithms systematically, starting from hypotheses about the various kinds of random mutation event and their rates. Results Here, we consider a highly simplified evolutionary model for RNA, called "The TKF91 Structure Tree" (following Thorne, Kishino and Felsenstein's 1991 model of sequence evolution with indels, which we have implemented for pairwise alignment as proof of principle for such an approach. The model, its strengths and its weaknesses are discussed with reference to four examples of functional ncRNA sequences: a riboswitch (guanine, a zipcode (nanos, a splicing factor (U4 and a ribozyme (RNase P. As shown by our visualisations of posterior probability matrices, the selected examples illustrate three different signatures of natural selection that are highly characteristic of ncRNA: (i co-ordinated basepair substitutions, (ii co-ordinated basepair indels and (iii whole-stem indels. Conclusions Although all three types of mutation "event" are built into our model, events of type (i and (ii are found to be better modeled than events of type (iii. Nevertheless, we hypothesise from the model's performance on pairwise alignments that it would form an adequate basis for a prototype multiple alignment and genefinding tool.

  17. Structural and functional basis for RNA cleavage by Ire1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroud Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR controls the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Central to this signaling pathway is the ER-resident bifunctional transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1. The endoribonuclease (RNase domain of Ire1 initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, leading to the production of a transcription factor that controls UPR target genes. The mRNA splicing reaction is an obligatory step of Ire1 signaling, yet its mechanism has remained poorly understood due to the absence of substrate-bound crystal structures of Ire1, the lack of structural similarity between Ire1 and other RNases, and a scarcity of quantitative enzymological data. Here, we experimentally define the active site of Ire1 RNase and quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the key active site residues to catalysis. Results This analysis and two new crystal structures suggest that Ire1 RNase uses histidine H1061 and tyrosine Y1043 as the general acid-general base pair contributing ≥ 7.6 kcal/mol and 1.4 kcal/mol to transition state stabilization, respectively, and asparagine N1057 and arginine R1056 for coordination of the scissile phosphate. Investigation of the stem-loop recognition revealed that additionally to the stem-loops derived from the classic Ire1 substrates HAC1 and Xbp1 mRNA, Ire1 can site-specifically and rapidly cleave anticodon stem-loop (ASL of unmodified tRNAPhe, extending known substrate specificity of Ire1 RNase. Conclusions Our data define the catalytic center of Ire1 RNase and suggest a mechanism of RNA cleavage: each RNase monomer apparently contains a separate catalytic apparatus for RNA cleavage, whereas two RNase subunits contribute to RNA stem-loop docking. Conservation of the key residues among Ire1 homologues suggests that the mechanism elucidated here for yeast Ire1 applies to Ire1 in metazoan cells, and to the only known Ire1 homologue RNase L.

  18. A comparative method for finding and folding RNA secondary structures within protein-coding regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret; Forsberg, Roald

    2004-01-01

    Existing computational methods for RNA secondary-structure prediction tacitly assume RNA to only encode functional RNA structures. However, experimental studies have revealed that some RNA sequences, e.g. compact viral genomes, can simultaneously encode functional RNA structures as well as proteins...... that RNA-DECODER's parameters can be automatically trained to successfully fold known secondary structures within the HCV genome. We scan the genomes of HCV and polio virus for conserved secondary-structure elements, and analyze performance as a function of available evolutionary information. On known...... secondary structures, RNA-DECODER shows a sensitivity similar to the programs MFOLD, PFOLD and RNAALIFOLD. When scanning the entire genomes of HCV and polio virus for structure elements, RNA-DECODER's results indicate a markedly higher specificity than MFOLD, PFOLD and RNAALIFOLD....

  19. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  20. Prediction of RNA binding residues: an extensive analysis based on structure and function to select the best predictor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nagarajan

    Full Text Available Protein-RNA complexes play key roles in several cellular processes by the interactions of amino acids with RNA. To understand the recognition mechanism, it is important to identify the specific amino acids involved in RNA binding. Various computational methods have been developed for predicting RNA binding residues from protein sequence. However, their performances mainly depend on the training dataset, feature selection for developing a model and learning capacity of the model. Hence, it is important to reveal the correspondence between the performance of methods and properties of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. In this work, we have collected all available RNA binding residues prediction methods and revealed their performances on unbiased, stringent and diverse datasets for RBPs with less than 25% sequence identity based on structural class, fold, superfamily, family, protein function, RNA type, RNA strand and RNA conformation. The best methods for each type of RBPs and the type of RBPs, which require further refinement in prediction, have been brought out. We also analyzed the performance of these methods for the disordered regions, structures which are not included in the training dataset and recently solved structures. The reliability of prediction is better than randomly choosing any method or combination of methods. This approach would be a valuable resource for biologists to choose the best method based on the type of RBPs for designing their experiments and the tool is freely accessible online at www.iitm.ac.in/bioinfo/RNA-protein/.

  1. Nucleosome Positioning and NDR Structure at RNA Polymerase III Promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Lay, Fides D; Jones, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin is structurally involved in the transcriptional regulation of all genes. While the nucleosome positioning at RNA polymerase II (pol II) promoters has been extensively studied, less is known about the chromatin structure at pol III promoters in human cells. We use a high......-resolution analysis to show substantial differences in chromatin structure of pol II and pol III promoters, and between subtypes of pol III genes. Notably, the nucleosome depleted region at the transcription start site of pol III genes extends past the termination sequences, resulting in nucleosome free gene bodies...... the first high-resolution map of nucleosome positioning and occupancy at human pol III promoters at specific loci and genome wide....

  2. Recombinant Thermus aquaticus RNA Polymerase for Structural Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juznedelov,K.; Lamour, V.; Patikoglou, G.; Chlenov, M.; Darst, S.; Severinov, K.

    2006-01-01

    Advances in the structural biology of bacterial transcription have come from studies of RNA polymerases (RNAPs) from the thermophilic eubacteria Thermus aquaticus (Taq) and Thermus thermophilus (Tth). These structural studies have been limited by the fact that only endogenous Taq or Tth RNAP, laboriously purified from large quantities of Taq or Tth cell paste and offering few options for genetic modification, is suitable for structural studies. Recombinant systems for the preparation of Taq RNAP by co-overexpression and assembly in the heterologous host, Escherichia coli, have been described, but these did not yield enzyme suitable for crystallographic studies. Here we describe recombinant systems for the preparation of Taq RNAP harboring full or partial deletions of the Taq {beta}' non-conserved domain (NCD), yielding enzyme suitable for crystallographic studies. This opens the way for structural studies of genetically manipulated enzymes, allowing the preparation of more crystallizable enzymes and facilitating detailed structure/function analysis. Characterization of the Taq{beta}'NCD deletion mutants generated in this study showed that the {beta}'NCD is important for the efficient binding of the s subunit, confirming previous hypotheses. Finally, preliminary structural analysis (at 4.1 Angstroms resolution) of one of the recombinant mutants revealed a previously unobserved conformation of the {beta}-flap, further defining the range of conformations accessible to this flexible structural element.

  3. A structure-based flexible search method for motifs in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Barash, Danny; Kedem, Klara

    2007-09-01

    The discovery of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) motifs and their role in regulating gene expression has recently attracted considerable attention. The goal is to discover these motifs in a sequence database. Current RNA motif search methods start from the primary sequence and only then take into account secondary structure considerations. One can think of developing a flexible structure-based motif search method that will filter datasets based on secondary structure first, while allowing extensive primary sequence factors and additional factors such as potential pseudoknots as constraints. Since different motifs vary in structure rigidity and in local sequence constraints, there is a need for algorithms and tools that can be fine-tuned according to the searched RNA motif, but differ in their approach from the RNAMotif descriptor language. We present an RNA motif search tool called STRMS (Structural RNA Motif Search), which takes as input the secondary structure of the query, including local sequence and structure constraints, and a target sequence database. It reports all occurrences of the query in the target, ranked by their similarity to the query, and produces an html file that displays graphical images of the predicted structures for both the query and the candidate hits. Our tool is flexible and takes into account a large number of sequence options and existence of potential pseudoknots as dictated by specific queries. Our approach combines pre-folding and an O(m n) RNA pattern matching algorithm based on subtree homeomorphism for ordered, rooted trees. An O(n(2) log n) extension is described that allows the search engine to take into account the pseudoknots typical to riboswitches. We employed STRMS in search for both new and known RNA motifs (riboswitches and tRNAs) in large target databases. Our results point to a number of additional purine bacterial riboswitch candidates in newly sequenced bacteria, and demonstrate high sensitivity on known riboswitches and t

  4. Key Labeling Technologies to Tackle Sizeable Problems in RNA Structural Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaku T. Dayie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adopt complex three-dimensional (3D structures that can rapidly interconvert between multiple functional states (folding and dynamics is vital for the proper functioning of RNAs. Consequently, RNA structure and dynamics necessarily determine their biological function. In the post-genomic era, it is clear that RNAs comprise a larger proportion (>50% of the transcribed genome compared to proteins (≤ 2%. Yet the determination of the 3D structures of RNAs lags considerably behind those of proteins and to date there are even fewer investigations of dynamics in RNAs compared to proteins. Site specific incorporation of various structural and dynamic probes into nucleic acids would likely transform RNA structural biology. Therefore, various methods for introducing probes for structural, functional, and biotechnological applications are critically assessed here. These probes include stable isotopes such as 2H, 13C, 15N, and 19F. Incorporation of these probes using improved RNA ligation strategies promises to change the landscape of structural biology of supramacromolecules probed by biophysical tools such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, some of the structural and dynamic problems that can be addressed using these technological advances are outlined.

  5. Nonsegmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses-Structural Data Bring New Insights Into Nucleocapsid Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, M; Yabukarski, F

    2017-01-01

    Viruses with a nonsegmented negative-sense RNA genome (NNVs) include important human pathogens as well as life-threatening zoonotic viruses. These viruses share a common RNA replication complex, including the genomic RNA and three proteins, the nucleoprotein (N), the phosphoprotein (P), and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L). During genome replication, the RNA polymerase complex first synthesizes positive-sense antigenomes, which in turn serve as template for the production of negative-sense progeny genomes. These newly synthesized antigenomic and genomic RNAs must be encapsidated by N, and the source of soluble, RNA-free N, competent for the encapsidation is a complex between N and P, named the N0-P complex. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in the structural characterization of the different components of this peculiar RNA polymerase machinery. We discuss common features and replication strategies and highlight idiosyncrasies encountered in different viruses, along with the key role of the dual ordered/disordered architecture of protein components and the dynamics of the viral polymerase machinery. In particular, we focus on the N0-P complex and its role in the nucleocapsid assembly process. These new results provide evidence that the mechanism of NC assembly is conserved between the different families and thus support a divergent evolution from a common ancestor. In addition, the successful inhibition of infection due to different NNVs by peptides derived from P suggests that the mechanism of NC assembly is a potential target for antiviral development. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  7. Single-molecule FRET-Rosetta reveals RNA structural rearrangements during human telomerase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Joseph W; Kappel, Kalli; Das, Rhiju; Stone, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of telomeres by telomerase permits continuous proliferation of rapidly dividing cells, including the majority of human cancers. Despite its direct biomedical significance, the architecture of the human telomerase complex remains unknown. Generating homogeneous telomerase samples has presented a significant barrier to developing improved structural models. Here we pair single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements with Rosetta modeling to map the conformations of the essential telomerase RNA core domain within the active ribonucleoprotein. FRET-guided modeling places the essential pseudoknot fold distal to the active site on a protein surface comprising the C-terminal element, a domain that shares structural homology with canonical polymerase thumb domains. An independently solved medium-resolution structure of Tetrahymena telomerase provides a blind test of our modeling methodology and sheds light on the structural homology of this domain across diverse organisms. Our smFRET-Rosetta models reveal nanometer-scale rearrangements within the RNA core domain during catalysis. Taken together, our FRET data and pseudoatomic molecular models permit us to propose a possible mechanism for how RNA core domain rearrangement is coupled to template hybrid elongation. © 2017 Parks et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  8. Metrics for rapid quality control in RNA structure probing experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Krishna; Shih, Nathan P; Deng, Fei; Ledda, Mirko; Li, Bo; Aviran, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    The diverse functionalities of RNA can be attributed to its capacity to form complex and varied structures. The recent proliferation of new structure probing techniques coupled with high-throughput sequencing has helped RNA studies expand in both scope and depth. Despite differences in techniques, most experiments face similar challenges in reproducibility due to the stochastic nature of chemical probing and sequencing. As these protocols expand to transcriptome-wide studies, quality control becomes a more daunting task. General and efficient methodologies are needed to quantify variability and quality in the wide range of current and emerging structure probing experiments. We develop metrics to rapidly and quantitatively evaluate data quality from structure probing experiments, demonstrating their efficacy on both small synthetic libraries and transcriptome-wide datasets. We use a signal-to-noise ratio concept to evaluate replicate agreement, which has the capacity to identify high-quality data. We also consider and compare two methods to assess variability inherent in probing experiments, which we then utilize to evaluate the coverage adjustments needed to meet desired quality. The developed metrics and tools will be useful in summarizing large-scale datasets and will help standardize quality control in the field. The data and methods used in this article are freely available at: http://bme.ucdavis.edu/aviranlab/SPEQC_software CONTACT: saviran@ucdavis.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. URS DataBase: universe of RNA structures and their motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Baulin, Eugene; Yacovlev, Victor; Khachko, Denis; Spirin, Sergei; Roytberg, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Universe of RNA Structures DataBase (URSDB) stores information obtained from all RNA-containing PDB entries (2935 entries in October 2015). The content of the database is updated regularly. The database consists of 51 tables containing indexed data on various elements of the RNA structures. The database provides a web interface allowing user to select a subset of structures with desired features and to obtain various statistical data for a selected subset of structures or for all structur...

  10. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.; (NIH); (UW)

    2010-08-19

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  11. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M. (NIH); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  12. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Coch

    Full Text Available Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR or RIG-I like helicases (RLH are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4 was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  13. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Christoph; Lück, Christian; Schwickart, Anna; Putschli, Bastian; Renn, Marcel; Höller, Tobias; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR) or RIG-I like helicases (RLH) are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA) that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4) was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand) in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  14. Thermodynamic and structural consensus principle predicts mature miRNA location and structure, categorizes conserved interspecies miRNA subgroups, and hints new possible mechanisms of miRNA maturization

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Molei

    2007-01-01

    Although conservation of thermodynamics is much less studied than of sequences and structures, thermodynamic details are biophysical features different from but as important as structural features. As a succession of previous research which revealed the important relationships between thermodynamic features and miRNA maturization, this article applies interspecies conservation of miRNA thermodynamics and structures to study miRNA maturization. According to a thermodynamic and structural conse...

  15. Secondary Structure Predictions for Long RNA Sequences Based on Inversion Excursions and MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehdego, Daniel T; Zhang, Boyu; Kodimala, Vikram K R; Johnson, Kyle L; Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2013-05-01

    Secondary structures of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Experimental observations and computing limitations suggest that we can approach the secondary structure prediction problem for long RNA sequences by segmenting them into shorter chunks, predicting the secondary structures of each chunk individually using existing prediction programs, and then assembling the results to give the structure of the original sequence. The selection of cutting points is a crucial component of the segmenting step. Noting that stem-loops and pseudoknots always contain an inversion, i.e., a stretch of nucleotides followed closely by its inverse complementary sequence, we developed two cutting methods for segmenting long RNA sequences based on inversion excursions: the centered and optimized method. Each step of searching for inversions, chunking, and predictions can be performed in parallel. In this paper we use a MapReduce framework, i.e., Hadoop, to extensively explore meaningful inversion stem lengths and gap sizes for the segmentation and identify correlations between chunking methods and prediction accuracy. We show that for a set of long RNA sequences in the RFAM database, whose secondary structures are known to contain pseudoknots, our approach predicts secondary structures more accurately than methods that do not segment the sequence, when the latter predictions are possible computationally. We also show that, as sequences exceed certain lengths, some programs cannot computationally predict pseudoknots while our chunking methods can. Overall, our predicted structures still retain the accuracy level of the original prediction programs when compared with known experimental secondary structure.

  16. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Genetic alphabet expansion transcription generating functional RNA molecules containing a five-letter alphabet including modified unnatural and natural base nucleotides by thermostable T7 RNA polymerase variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Michiko; Meyer, Adam J; Hirao, Ichiro; Ellington, Andrew D

    2017-11-14

    Thermostable T7 RNA polymerase variants were explored for genetic alphabet expansion transcription involving the unnatural Ds-Pa pair. One variant exhibited high incorporation efficiencies of functionally modified Pa substrates and enabled the simultaneous incorporation of 2'-fluoro-nucleoside triphosphates of pyrimidines into transcripts, allowing the generation of novel, highly functional RNA molecules.

  18. Predicting Consensus Structures for RNA Alignments Via Pseudo-Energy Minimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junilda Spirollari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic processes with free energy parameters are often used in algorithms that solve the free energy minimization problem to predict secondary structures of single RNA sequences. While results from these algorithms are promising, an observation is that single sequence-based methods have moderate accuracy and more information is needed to improve on RNA secondary structure prediction, such as covariance scores obtained from multiple sequence alignments. We present in this paper a new approach to predicting the consensus secondary structure of a set of aligned RNA sequences via pseudo-energy minimization. Our tool, called RSpredict, takes into account sequence covariation and employs effective heuristics for accuracy improvement. RSpredict accepts, as input data, a multiple sequence alignment in FASTA or ClustalW format and outputs the consensus secondary structure of the input sequences in both the Vienna style Dot Bracket format and the Connectivity Table format. Our method was compared with some widely used tools including KNetFold, Pfold and RNAalifold. A comprehensive test on different datasets including Rfam sequence alignments and a multiple sequence alignment obtained from our study on the Drosophila X chromosome reveals that RSpredict is competitive with the existing tools on the tested datasets. RSpredict is freely available online as a web server and also as a jar file for download at http:// datalab.njit.edu/biology/RSpredict.

  19. Using RNA Sequence and Structure for the Prediction of Riboswitch Aptamer: A Comprehensive Review of Available Software and Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Antunes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA molecules are essential players in many fundamental biological processes. Prokaryotes and eukaryotes have distinct RNA classes with specific structural features and functional roles. Computational prediction of protein structures is a research field in which high confidence three-dimensional protein models can be proposed based on the sequence alignment between target and templates. However, to date, only a few approaches have been developed for the computational prediction of RNA structures. Similar to proteins, RNA structures may be altered due to the interaction with various ligands, including proteins, other RNAs, and metabolites. A riboswitch is a molecular mechanism, found in the three kingdoms of life, in which the RNA structure is modified by the binding of a metabolite. It can regulate multiple gene expression mechanisms, such as transcription, translation initiation, and mRNA splicing and processing. Due to their nature, these entities also act on the regulation of gene expression and detection of small metabolites and have the potential to helping in the discovery of new classes of antimicrobial agents. In this review, we describe software and web servers currently available for riboswitch aptamer identification and secondary and tertiary structure prediction, including applications.

  20. RNAcontext: a new method for learning the sequence and structure binding preferences of RNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Kazan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. These proteins regulate post-transcriptional gene expression and have critical roles in numerous cellular processes including mRNA splicing, export, stability and translation. Despite their ubiquity and importance, the binding preferences for most RBPs are not well characterized. In vitro and in vivo studies, using affinity selection-based approaches, have successfully identified RNA sequence associated with specific RBPs; however, it is difficult to infer RBP sequence and structural preferences without specifically designed motif finding methods. In this study, we introduce a new motif-finding method, RNAcontext, designed to elucidate RBP-specific sequence and structural preferences with greater accuracy than existing approaches. We evaluated RNAcontext on recently published in vitro and in vivo RNA affinity selected data and demonstrate that RNAcontext identifies known binding preferences for several control proteins including HuR, PTB, and Vts1p and predicts new RNA structure preferences for SF2/ASF, RBM4, FUSIP1 and SLM2. The predicted preferences for SF2/ASF are consistent with its recently reported in vivo binding sites. RNAcontext is an accurate and efficient motif finding method ideally suited for using large-scale RNA-binding affinity datasets to determine the relative binding preferences of RBPs for a wide range of RNA sequences and structures.

  1. The solution structure of REF2-I reveals interdomain interactions and regions involved in binding mRNA export factors and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, Alexander P; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Tintaru, Aura M; Lian, Lu-Yun; Wilson, Stuart A

    2006-11-01

    The RNA binding and export factor (REF) family of mRNA export adaptors are found in several nuclear protein complexes including the spliceosome, TREX, and exon junction complexes. They bind RNA, interact with the helicase UAP56/DDX39, and are thought to bridge the interaction between the export factor TAP/NXF1 and mRNA. REF2-I consists of three domains, with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain positioned in the middle. Here we dissect the interdomain interactions of REF2-I and present the solution structure of a functionally competent double domain (NM; residues 1-155). The N-terminal domain comprises a transient helix (N-helix) linked to the RRM by a flexible arm that includes an Arg-rich region. The N-helix, which is required for REF2-I function in vivo, overlaps the highly conserved REF-N motif and, together with the adjacent Arg-rich region, interacts transiently with the RRM. RNA interacts with REF2-I through arginine-rich regions in its N- and C-terminal domains, but we show that it also interacts weakly with the RRM. The mode of interaction is unusual for an RRM since it involves loops L1 and L5. NMR signal mapping and biochemical analysis with NM indicate that DDX39 and TAP interact with both the N and RRM domains of REF2-I and show that binding of these proteins and RNA will favor an open conformation for the two domains. The proximity of the RNA, TAP, and DDX39 binding sites on REF2-I suggests their binding may be mutually exclusive, which would lead to successive ligand binding events in the course of mRNA export.

  2. Structural bases of norovirus RNA dependent RNA polymerase inhibition by novel suramin-related compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Croci, R.; Pezzullo, M.; Tarantino, D.; Milani, M.; Tsay, S.C.; Sureshbabu, R.; Tsai, Y.J.; Mastrangelo, E.; Rohayem, J.; Bolognesi, M.; Hwu, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NV) are +ssRNA viruses responsible for severe gastroenteritis; no effective vaccines/antivirals are currently available. We previously identified Suramin (9) as a potent inhibitor of NV-RNA dependent RNA polymerase (NV-RdRp). Despite significant in vitro activities versus several pharmacological targets, Suramin clinical use is hampered by pharmacokinetics/toxicity problems. To improve Suramin access to NV-RdRp in vivo, a Suramin-derivative, 8, devoid of two sulphonate groups, wa...

  3. Interactions between the Structural Domains of the RNA Replication Proteins of Plant-Infecting RNA Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    O’Reilly, Erin K.; Wang, Zhaohui; French, Roy; Kao, C. Cheng

    1998-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, encodes two replication proteins: the 2a protein, which contains polymerase-like sequences, and the 1a protein, with N-terminal putative capping and C-terminal helicase-like sequences. These two proteins are part of a multisubunit complex which is necessary for viral RNA replication. We have previously shown that the yeast two-hybrid assay consistently duplicated results obtained from in vivo RNA replication assays and biochemical assays ...

  4. Review of the RNA Interference Pathway in Molluscs Including Some Possibilities for Use in Bivalves in Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Owens

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Generalised reviews of RNA interference (RNAi in invertebrates, and for use in aquaculture, have taken for granted that RNAi pathways operate in molluscs, but inspection of such reviews show little specific evidence of such activity in molluscs. This review was to understand what specific research had been conducted on RNAi in molluscs, particularly with regard to aquaculture. There were questions of whether RNAi in molluscs functions similarly to the paradigm established for most eukaryotes or, alternatively, was it more similar to the ecdozoa and how RNAi may relate to disease control in aquaculture? RNAi in molluscs appears to have been only investigated in about 14 species, mostly as a gene silencing phenomenon. We can infer that microRNAs including let-7 are functional in molluscs. The genes/proteins involved in the actual RNAi pathways have only been rudimentarily investigated, so how homologous the genes and proteins are to other metazoa is unknown. Furthermore, how many different genes for each activity in the RNAi pathway are also unknown? The cephalopods have been greatly overlooked with only a single RNAi gene-silencing study found. The long dsRNA-linked interferon pathways seem to be present in molluscs, unlike some other invertebrates and could be used to reduce disease states in aquaculture. In particular, interferon regulatory factor genes have been found in molluscs of aquacultural importance such as Crassostrea, Mytilus, Pinctada and Haliotis. Two possible aquaculture scenarios are discussed, zoonotic norovirus and ostreid herpesvirus 1 to illustrate the possibilities. The entire field of RNAi in molluscs looks ripe for scientific exploitation and practical application.

  5. Genome-scale characterization of RNA tertiary structures and their functional impact by RNA solvent accessibility prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuedong; Li, Xiaomei; Zhao, Huiying; Zhan, Jian; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-01-01

    As most RNA structures are elusive to structure determination, obtaining solvent accessible surface areas (ASAs) of nucleotides in an RNA structure is an important first step to characterize potential functional sites and core structural regions. Here, we developed RNAsnap, the first machine-learning method trained on protein-bound RNA structures for solvent accessibility prediction. Built on sequence profiles from multiple sequence alignment (RNAsnap-prof), the method provided robust prediction in fivefold cross-validation and an independent test (Pearson correlation coefficients, r, between predicted and actual ASA values are 0.66 and 0.63, respectively). Application of the method to 6178 mRNAs revealed its positive correlation to mRNA accessibility by dimethyl sulphate (DMS) experimentally measured in vivo (r = 0.37) but not in vitro (r = 0.07), despite the lack of training on mRNAs and the fact that DMS accessibility is only an approximation to solvent accessibility. We further found strong association across coding and noncoding regions between predicted solvent accessibility of the mutation site of a single nucleotide variant (SNV) and the frequency of that variant in the population for 2.2 million SNVs obtained in the 1000 Genomes Project. Moreover, mapping solvent accessibility of RNAs to the human genome indicated that introns, 5' cap of 5' and 3' cap of 3' untranslated regions, are more solvent accessible, consistent with their respective functional roles. These results support conformational selections as the mechanism for the formation of RNA-protein complexes and highlight the utility of genome-scale characterization of RNA tertiary structures by RNAsnap. The server and its stand-alone downloadable version are available at http://sparks-lab.org. © 2016 Yang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. R-CHIE: a web server and R package for visualizing RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Daniel; Proctor, Jeff R; Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2012-07-01

    Visually examining RNA structures can greatly aid in understanding their potential functional roles and in evaluating the performance of structure prediction algorithms. As many functional roles of RNA structures can already be studied given the secondary structure of the RNA, various methods have been devised for visualizing RNA secondary structures. Most of these methods depict a given RNA secondary structure as a planar graph consisting of base-paired stems interconnected by roundish loops. In this article, we present an alternative method of depicting RNA secondary structure as arc diagrams. This is well suited for structures that are difficult or impossible to represent as planar stem-loop diagrams. Arc diagrams can intuitively display pseudo-knotted structures, as well as transient and alternative structural features. In addition, they facilitate the comparison of known and predicted RNA secondary structures. An added benefit is that structure information can be displayed in conjunction with a corresponding multiple sequence alignments, thereby highlighting structure and primary sequence conservation and variation. We have implemented the visualization algorithm as a web server R-chie as well as a corresponding R package called R4RNA, which allows users to run the software locally and across a range of common operating systems.

  7. Transcription inactivation through local refolding of the RNA polymerase structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Vassylyeva, Marina N.; Sevostyanova, Anastasiya; Appleman, James R.; Xiang, Alan X.; Lira, Ricardo; Webber, Stephen E.; Klyuyev, Sergiy; Nudler, Evgeny; Artsimovitch, Irina; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; (OSU); (UAB); (Anadys); (NYUSM)

    2009-02-12

    Structural studies of antibiotics not only provide a shortcut to medicine allowing for rational structure-based drug design, but may also capture snapshots of dynamic intermediates that become 'frozen' after inhibitor binding. Myxopyronin inhibits bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) by an unknown mechanism. Here we report the structure of dMyx - a desmethyl derivative of myxopyronin B - complexed with a Thermus thermophilus RNAP holoenzyme. The antibiotic binds to a pocket deep inside the RNAP clamp head domain, which interacts with the DNA template in the transcription bubble. Notably, binding of dMyx stabilizes refolding of the {beta}'-subunit switch-2 segment, resulting in a configuration that might indirectly compromise binding to, or directly clash with, the melted template DNA strand. Consistently, footprinting data show that the antibiotic binding does not prevent nucleation of the promoter DNA melting but instead blocks its propagation towards the active site. Myxopyronins are thus, to our knowledge, a first structurally characterized class of antibiotics that target formation of the pre-catalytic transcription initiation complex - the decisive step in gene expression control. Notably, mutations designed in switch-2 mimic the dMyx effects on promoter complexes in the absence of antibiotic. Overall, our results indicate a plausible mechanism of the dMyx action and a stepwise pathway of open complex formation in which core enzyme mediates the final stage of DNA melting near the transcription start site, and that switch-2 might act as a molecular checkpoint for DNA loading in response to regulatory signals or antibiotics. The universally conserved switch-2 may have the same role in all multisubunit RNAPs.

  8. Non-Watson Crick base pairs might stabilize RNA structural motifs in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Watson Crick base pairs, internal loops and pseudoknots have been the highlighting feature of recent structural determination of RNAs. The recent crystal structure of group-I introns has demonstrated that these might constitute RNA structural ...

  9. Structures of riboswitch RNA reaction states by mix-and-inject XFEL serial crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagno, J. R.; Liu, Y.; Bhandari, Y. R.; Conrad, C. E.; Panja, S.; Swain, M.; Fan, L.; Nelson, G.; Li, C.; Wendel, D. R.; White, T. A.; Coe, J. D.; Wiedorn, M. O.; Knoska, J.; Oberthuer, D.; Tuckey, R. A.; Yu, P.; Dyba, M.; Tarasov, S. G.; Weierstall, U.; Grant, T. D.; Schwieters, C. D.; Zhang, J.; Ferré-D'Amaré, A. R.; Fromme, P.; Draper, D. E.; Liang, M.; Hunter, M. S.; Boutet, S.; Tan, K.; Zuo, X.; Ji, X.; Barty, A.; Zatsepin, N. A.; Chapman, H. N.; Spence, J. C. H.; Woodson, S. A.; Wang, Y.-X.

    2017-01-01

    Riboswitches are structural RNA elements that are generally located in the 5‧ untranslated region of messenger RNA. During regulation of gene expression, ligand binding to the aptamer domain of a riboswitch triggers a signal to the downstream expression platform. A complete understanding of the structural basis of this mechanism requires the ability to study structural changes over time. Here we use femtosecond X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) pulses to obtain structural measurements from crystals so small that diffusion of a ligand can be timed to initiate a reaction before diffraction. We demonstrate this approach by determining four structures of the adenine riboswitch aptamer domain during the course of a reaction, involving two unbound apo structures, one ligand-bound intermediate, and the final ligand-bound conformation. These structures support a reaction mechanism model with at least four states and illustrate the structural basis of signal transmission. The three-way junction and the P1 switch helix of the two apo conformers are notably different from those in the ligand-bound conformation. Our time-resolved crystallographic measurements with a 10-second delay captured the structure of an intermediate with changes in the binding pocket that accommodate the ligand. With at least a 10-minute delay, the RNA molecules were fully converted to the ligand-bound state, in which the substantial conformational changes resulted in conversion of the space group. Such notable changes in crystallo highlight the important opportunities that micro- and nanocrystals may offer in these and similar time-resolved diffraction studies. Together, these results demonstrate the potential of ‘mix-and-inject’ time-resolved serial crystallography to study biochemically important interactions between biomacromolecules and ligands, including those that involve large conformational changes.

  10. PETcofold: predicting conserved interactions and structures of two multiple alignments of RNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Stefan E; Richter, Andreas S; Gesell, Tanja; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan

    2011-01-15

    Predicting RNA-RNA interactions is essential for determining the function of putative non-coding RNAs. Existing methods for the prediction of interactions are all based on single sequences. Since comparative methods have already been useful in RNA structure determination, we assume that conserved RNA-RNA interactions also imply conserved function. Of these, we further assume that a non-negligible amount of the existing RNA-RNA interactions have also acquired compensating base changes throughout evolution. We implement a method, PETcofold, that can take covariance information in intra-molecular and inter-molecular base pairs into account to predict interactions and secondary structures of two multiple alignments of RNA sequences. PETcofold's ability to predict RNA-RNA interactions was evaluated on a carefully curated dataset of 32 bacterial small RNAs and their targets, which was manually extracted from the literature. For evaluation of both RNA-RNA interaction and structure prediction, we were able to extract only a few high-quality examples: one vertebrate small nucleolar RNA and four bacterial small RNAs. For these we show that the prediction can be improved by our comparative approach. Furthermore, PETcofold was evaluated on controlled data with phylogenetically simulated sequences enriched for covariance patterns at the interaction sites. We observed increased performance with increased amounts of covariance. The program PETcofold is available as source code and can be downloaded from http://rth.dk/resources/petcofold.

  11. Transcriptome landscape of Lactococcus lactis reveals many novel RNAs including a small regulatory RNA involved in carbon uptake and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meulen, Sjoerd B; de Jong, Anne; Kok, Jan

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing has revolutionized genome-wide transcriptome analyses, and the identification of non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria has thus increased concurrently. Here we reveal the transcriptome map of the lactic acid bacterial paradigm Lactococcus lactis MG1363 by employing differential RNA

  12. R3D Align web server for global nucleotide to nucleotide alignments of RNA 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahrig, Ryan R; Petrov, Anton I; Leontis, Neocles B; Zirbel, Craig L

    2013-07-01

    The R3D Align web server provides online access to 'RNA 3D Align' (R3D Align), a method for producing accurate nucleotide-level structural alignments of RNA 3D structures. The web server provides a streamlined and intuitive interface, input data validation and output that is more extensive and easier to read and interpret than related servers. The R3D Align web server offers a unique Gallery of Featured Alignments, providing immediate access to pre-computed alignments of large RNA 3D structures, including all ribosomal RNAs, as well as guidance on effective use of the server and interpretation of the output. By accessing the non-redundant lists of RNA 3D structures provided by the Bowling Green State University RNA group, R3D Align connects users to structure files in the same equivalence class and the best-modeled representative structure from each group. The R3D Align web server is freely accessible at http://rna.bgsu.edu/r3dalign/.

  13. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  14. HIV-1 can escape from RNA interference by evolving an alternative structure in its RNA genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, Ellen M.; Ooms, Marcel; Vink, Monique; Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 replication can be efficiently inhibited by intracellular expression of an siRNA targeting the viral RNA. However, HIV-1 escape variants emerged after prolonged culturing. These RNAi-resistant viruses contain nucleotide substitutions or deletions in or near the targeted sequence. We observed

  15. Evolution of the RNase P RNA structural domain in Leptospira spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravishankar, Vigneshwaran; Ahmed, Ahmed; Sivagnanam, Ulaganathan; Muthuraman, Krishnaraja; Karthikaichamy, Anbarasu; Wilson, Herald A.; Devendran, Ajay; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Raj, Stephen M. L.

    2014-01-01

    We have employed the RNase P RNA (RPR) gene, which is present as single copy in chromosome I of Leptospira spp. to investigate the phylogeny of structural domains present in the RNA subunit of the tRNA processing enzyme, RNase P. RPR gene sequences of 150 strains derived from NCBI database along

  16. Quantifying the relationship between sequence and three-dimensional structure conservation in RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capriotti Emidio

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the number of available RNA structures has rapidly grown reflecting the increased interest on RNA biology. Similarly to the studies carried out two decades ago for proteins, which gave the fundamental grounds for developing comparative protein structure prediction methods, we are now able to quantify the relationship between sequence and structure conservation in RNA. Results Here we introduce an all-against-all sequence- and three-dimensional (3D structure-based comparison of a representative set of RNA structures, which have allowed us to quantitatively confirm that: (i there is a measurable relationship between sequence and structure conservation that weakens for alignments resulting in below 60% sequence identity, (ii evolution tends to conserve more RNA structure than sequence, and (iii there is a twilight zone for RNA homology detection. Discussion The computational analysis here presented quantitatively describes the relationship between sequence and structure for RNA molecules and defines a twilight zone region for detecting RNA homology. Our work could represent the theoretical basis and limitations for future developments in comparative RNA 3D structure prediction.

  17. Fine-grained parallelism accelerating for RNA secondary structure prediction with pseudoknots based on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    PKNOTS is a most famous benchmark program and has been widely used to predict RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots. It adopts the standard four-dimensional (4D) dynamic programming (DP) method and is the basis of many variants and improved algorithms. Unfortunately, the O(N(6)) computing requirements and complicated data dependency greatly limits the usefulness of PKNOTS package with the explosion in gene database size. In this paper, we present a fine-grained parallel PKNOTS package and prototype system for accelerating RNA folding application based on FPGA chip. We adopted a series of storage optimization strategies to resolve the "Memory Wall" problem. We aggressively exploit parallel computing strategies to improve computational efficiency. We also propose several methods that collectively reduce the storage requirements for FPGA on-chip memory. To the best of our knowledge, our design is the first FPGA implementation for accelerating 4D DP problem for RNA folding application including pseudoknots. The experimental results show a factor of more than 50x average speedup over the PKNOTS-1.08 software running on a PC platform with Intel Core2 Q9400 Quad CPU for input RNA sequences. However, the power consumption of our FPGA accelerator is only about 50% of the general-purpose micro-processors.

  18. The Structure of the RNA m5C Methyltransferase YebU from Escherichia coli Reveals a C-terminal RNA-recruiting PUA Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallberg, B. Martin; Ericsson, Ulrika B.; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    Nucleotide methylations are the most common type of rRNA modification in bacteria, and are introduced post-transcriptionally by a wide variety of site-specific enzymes. Three 5-methylcytidine (m(5)C) bases are found in the rRNAs of Escherichia coli and one of these, at nucleotide 1407 in 16 S r...... by X-ray crystallography, and we present a molecular model for how YebU specifically recognizes, binds and methylates its ribosomal substrate. The YebU protein has an N-terminal SAM-binding catalytic domain with structural similarity to the equivalent domains in several other m(5)C RNA MTases including...

  19. RStrucFam: a web server to associate structure and cognate RNA for RNA-binding proteins from sequence information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pritha; Mathew, Oommen K; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-10-07

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with their cognate RNA(s) to form large biomolecular assemblies. They are versatile in their functionality and are involved in a myriad of processes inside the cell. RBPs with similar structural features and common biological functions are grouped together into families and superfamilies. It will be useful to obtain an early understanding and association of RNA-binding property of sequences of gene products. Here, we report a web server, RStrucFam, to predict the structure, type of cognate RNA(s) and function(s) of proteins, where possible, from mere sequence information. The web server employs Hidden Markov Model scan (hmmscan) to enable association to a back-end database of structural and sequence families. The database (HMMRBP) comprises of 437 HMMs of RBP families of known structure that have been generated using structure-based sequence alignments and 746 sequence-centric RBP family HMMs. The input protein sequence is associated with structural or sequence domain families, if structure or sequence signatures exist. In case of association of the protein with a family of known structures, output features like, multiple structure-based sequence alignment (MSSA) of the query with all others members of that family is provided. Further, cognate RNA partner(s) for that protein, Gene Ontology (GO) annotations, if any and a homology model of the protein can be obtained. The users can also browse through the database for details pertaining to each family, protein or RNA and their related information based on keyword search or RNA motif search. RStrucFam is a web server that exploits structurally conserved features of RBPs, derived from known family members and imprinted in mathematical profiles, to predict putative RBPs from sequence information. Proteins that fail to associate with such structure-centric families are further queried against the sequence-centric RBP family HMMs in the HMMRBP database. Further, all other essential

  20. Chromatin structure and pre-mRNA processing work together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Reyes, José C

    2016-05-26

    Chromatin is the natural context for transcription elongation. However, the elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is forced to pause by the positioned nucleosomes present in gene bodies. Here, we briefly discuss the current results suggesting that those pauses could serve as a mechanism to coordinate transcription elongation with pre-mRNA processing. Further, histone post-translational modifications have been found to regulate the recruitment of factors involved in pre-mRNA processing. This view highlights the important regulatory role of the chromatin context in the whole process of the mature mRNA synthesis.

  1. Improving small-angle X-ray scattering data for structural analyses of the RNA world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Robert P; Tainer, John A

    2010-03-01

    Defining the shape, conformation, or assembly state of an RNA in solution often requires multiple investigative tools ranging from nucleotide analog interference mapping to X-ray crystallography. A key addition to this toolbox is small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). SAXS provides direct structural information regarding the size, shape, and flexibility of the particle in solution and has proven powerful for analyses of RNA structures with minimal requirements for sample concentration and volumes. In principle, SAXS can provide reliable data on small and large RNA molecules. In practice, SAXS investigations of RNA samples can show inconsistencies that suggest limitations in the SAXS experimental analyses or problems with the samples. Here, we show through investigations on the SAM-I riboswitch, the Group I intron P4-P6 domain, 30S ribosomal subunit from Sulfolobus solfataricus (30S), brome mosaic virus tRNA-like structure (BMV TLS), Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch, the recombinant tRNA(val), and yeast tRNA(phe) that many problems with SAXS experiments on RNA samples derive from heterogeneity of the folded RNA. Furthermore, we propose and test a general approach to reducing these sample limitations for accurate SAXS analyses of RNA. Together our method and results show that SAXS with synchrotron radiation has great potential to provide accurate RNA shapes, conformations, and assembly states in solution that inform RNA biological functions in fundamental ways.

  2. A reduced-coordinate approach to modeling RNA 3-D structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Chang-Shung

    1997-09-01

    With the realization of RNA molecules capable of performing very specific functions (e.g., catalytic RNAs and RNAs that bind ligand with affinity and specificity of an anti-body) and contrary to the traditional view that structure of RNA molecules being functionally passive, it has become clear that studying the 3-dimensional (3-D) folding of RNA molecules is a very important task. In the absence of sufficient number of experimentally determined RNA structures available up-to-date, folding of RNA structures computationally provides an alternative approach in studying the 3-D structure of RNA molecules. We have developed a computational approach for folding RNA 3-D structures. The method is conceptually simple and general. It consists of two major components. The first being the arrangement of all helices in space. Once the helices are positioned and oriented in space, structures of the connecting loops are modeled and inserted between the helices. Any number of structural constraints derived either experimentally or theoretically can be used to guide the folding processes. A conformational sampling approach is developed with structural equilibration using the Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation. The lengths of various loop sizes (ranging from 1 base to 7 bases) are calculated based on a set of RNA structures deposited in PDB as well as a set of loop structures constructed using our method. The validity of using the averaged loop lengths of the connecting loops as distance constraints for arranging the helices in space is studied.

  3. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of vaginal formulations including siRNA and paclitaxel-loaded SLNs for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükköroğlu, Gülay; Şenel, Behiye; Başaran, Ebru; Yenilmez, Evrim; Yazan, Yasemin

    2016-12-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most life threatening types of cancer among women and is generally resistant to chemotherapy. The objective of this study was to prepare a vaginal suppository containing a chemotherapeutic agent and a genetic material that can be applied locally for cervical cancer. Paclitaxel was selected as the chemotherapeutic agent and siRNA which inhibits BCL-2 oncogene was selected as the genetic material. Bcl-2 siRNA, paclitaxel and paclitaxel/Bcl-2 siRNA combination were incorporated into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and were dispersed separately in vaginal suppositories prepared with PEG 6000. Physicochemical properties of SLNs, their cytotoxicities on HeLa cell lines and also the effect of SLNs on the total protein amount of the cells were examined followed by the investigation of release rates of the active materials from the SLNs prepared. Average diameters of all SLNs prepared were below 180nm with a positive zeta potential value between +22.20 and +48.16mV at the pH range of 4.2 and 7.4. The release of Bcl-2 siRNA from SLNs incorporated Bcl-2 siRNA and the release of paclitaxel (PTX) from PTX incorporated SLNs were completed within 12h and 36h. SLNs incorporating Bcl-2 siRNA and paclitaxel/Bcl-2 siRNA were found to be more toxic when compared to paclitaxel incorporated SLN and placebo SLN. The disintegration of the vaginal suppositories as well as the release of the SLNs was completed within 2 h. This study indicates that vaginal suppository containing SLNs can bring the advantages of the simultaneous delivery of paclitaxel and siRNA via vaginal route with no help from professionals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xianyang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; Stagno, Jason R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Bhandari, Yuba R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Wang, Yun-Xing [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  5. Crystal structure of the Lassa virus nucleoprotein-RNA complex reveals a gating mechanism for RNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; King, Liam B; Ngo, Nhi; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Woods, Virgil L; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2011-11-29

    Arenaviruses cause disease in industrialized and developing nations alike. Among them, the hemorrhagic fever virus Lassa is responsible for ~300,000-500,000 infections/y in Western Africa. The arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) forms the protein scaffold of the genomic ribonucleoprotein complexes and is critical for transcription and replication of the viral genome. Here, we present crystal structures of the RNA-binding domain of Lassa virus NP in complex with ssRNA. This structure shows, in contrast to the predicted model, that RNA binds in a deep, basic crevice located entirely within the N-terminal domain. Furthermore, the NP-ssRNA structures presented here, combined with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/MS and functional studies, suggest a gating mechanism by which NP opens to accept RNA. Directed mutagenesis and functional studies provide a unique look into how the arenavirus NPs bind to and protect the viral genome and also suggest the likely assembly by which viral ribonucleoprotein complexes are organized.

  6. mRNA pseudoknot structures can act as ribosomal roadblocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Tholstrup; Oddershede, Lene Broeng; Sørensen, Michael Askvad

    2012-01-01

    Several viruses utilize programmed ribosomal frameshifting mediated by mRNA pseudoknots in combination with a slippery sequence to produce a well defined stochiometric ratio of the upstream encoded to the downstream-encoded protein. A correlation between the mechanical strength of mRNA pseudoknots...

  7. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swenson, M Shel; Anderson, Joshua; Ash, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction remains an important open problem in computational molecular biology. Historically, advances in computing technology have enabled faster and more accurate RNA secondary structure predictions. Previous parallelized prediction programs...... achieved significant improvements in runtime, but their implementations were not portable from niche high-performance computers or easily accessible to most RNA researchers. With the increasing prevalence of multi-core desktop machines, a new parallel prediction program is needed to take full advantage......, on machines with four or more cores. Conclusions GTfold supports advances in RNA structural biology by reducing the timescales for secondary structure prediction. The difference will be particularly valuable to researchers working with lengthy RNA sequences, such as RNA viral genomes....

  8. GARN: Sampling RNA 3D Structure Space with Game Theory and Knowledge-Based Scoring Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudard, Mélanie; Bernauer, Julie; Barth, Dominique; Cohen, Johanne; Denise, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes involve large numbers of RNA molecules. The functions of these RNA molecules and their binding to molecular machines are highly dependent on their 3D structures. One of the key challenges in RNA structure prediction and modeling is predicting the spatial arrangement of the various structural elements of RNA. As RNA folding is generally hierarchical, methods involving coarse-grained models hold great promise for this purpose. We present here a novel coarse-grained method for sampling, based on game theory and knowledge-based potentials. This strategy, GARN (Game Algorithm for RNa sampling), is often much faster than previously described techniques and generates large sets of solutions closely resembling the native structure. GARN is thus a suitable starting point for the molecular modeling of large RNAs, particularly those with experimental constraints. GARN is available from: http://garn.lri.fr/.

  9. RNA FRABASE version 1.0: an engine with a database to search for the three-dimensional fragments within RNA structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popenda, Mariusz; Błażewicz, Marek; Szachniuk, Marta; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2008-01-01

    The RNA FRABASE is a web-accessible engine with a relational database, which allows for the automatic search of user-defined, 3D RNA fragments within a set of RNA structures. This is a new tool to search and analyse RNA structures, directed at the 3D structure modelling. The user needs to input either RNA sequence(s) and/or secondary structure(s) given in a ‘dot-bracket’ notation. The algorithm searching for the requested 3D RNA fragments is very efficient. As of August 2007, the database contains: (i) RNA sequences and secondary structures, in the ‘dot-bracket’ notation, derived from 1065 protein data bank (PDB)-deposited RNA structures and their complexes, (ii) a collection of atom coordinates of unmodified and modified nucleotide residues occurring in RNA structures, (iii) calculated RNA torsion angles and sugar pucker parameters and (iv) information about base pairs. Advanced query involves filters sensitive to: modified residue contents, experimental method used and limits of conformational parameters. The output list of query-matching RNA fragments gives access to their coordinates in the PDB-format files, ready for direct download and visualization, conformational parameters and information about base pairs. The RNA FRABASE is automatically, monthly updated and is freely accessible at http://rnafrabase.ibch.poznan.pl (mirror at http://cerber.cs.put.poznan.pl/rnadb). PMID:17921499

  10. Identification and classification of conserved RNA secondary structures in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Skou Pedersen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of microRNAs and riboswitches, among others, have shown functional RNAs to be biologically more important and genomically more prevalent than previously anticipated. We have developed a general comparative genomics method based on phylogenetic stochastic context-free grammars for identifying functional RNAs encoded in the human genome and used it to survey an eight-way genome-wide alignment of the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebra-fish, and puffer-fish genomes for deeply conserved functional RNAs. At a loose threshold for acceptance, this search resulted in a set of 48,479 candidate RNA structures. This screen finds a large number of known functional RNAs, including 195 miRNAs, 62 histone 3'UTR stem loops, and various types of known genetic recoding elements. Among the highest-scoring new predictions are 169 new miRNA candidates, as well as new candidate selenocysteine insertion sites, RNA editing hairpins, RNAs involved in transcript auto regulation, and many folds that form singletons or small functional RNA families of completely unknown function. While the rate of false positives in the overall set is difficult to estimate and is likely to be substantial, the results nevertheless provide evidence for many new human functional RNAs and present specific predictions to facilitate their further characterization.

  11. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  12. Asymptotic structural properties of quasi-random saturated structures of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background RNA folding depends on the distribution of kinetic traps in the landscape of all secondary structures. Kinetic traps in the Nussinov energy model are precisely those secondary structures that are saturated, meaning that no base pair can be added without introducing either a pseudoknot or base triple. In previous work, we investigated asymptotic combinatorics of both random saturated structures and of quasi-random saturated structures, where the latter are constructed by a natural stochastic process. Results We prove that for quasi-random saturated structures with the uniform distribution, the asymptotic expected number of external loops is O(logn) and the asymptotic expected maximum stem length is O(logn), while under the Zipf distribution, the asymptotic expected number of external loops is O(log2n) and the asymptotic expected maximum stem length is O(logn/log logn). Conclusions Quasi-random saturated structures are generated by a stochastic greedy method, which is simple to implement. Structural features of random saturated structures appear to resemble those of quasi-random saturated structures, and the latter appear to constitute a class for which both the generation of sampled structures as well as a combinatorial investigation of structural features may be simpler to undertake. PMID:24156624

  13. N6-methyladenosine alters RNA structure to regulate binding of a low-complexity protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nian; Zhou, Katherine I; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Diatchenko, Luda; Pan, Tao

    2017-06-02

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), and affects almost every stage of the mRNA life cycle. The YTH-domain proteins can specifically recognize m6A modification to control mRNA maturation, translation and decay. m6A can also alter RNA structures to affect RNA-protein interactions in cells. Here, we show that m6A increases the accessibility of its surrounding RNA sequence to bind heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein G (HNRNPG). Furthermore, HNRNPG binds m6A-methylated RNAs through its C-terminal low-complexity region, which self-assembles into large particles in vitro. The Arg-Gly-Gly repeats within the low-complexity region are required for binding to the RNA motif exposed by m6A methylation. We identified 13,191 m6A sites in the transcriptome that regulate RNA-HNRNPG interaction and thereby alter the expression and alternative splicing pattern of target mRNAs. Low-complexity regions are pervasive among mRNA binding proteins. Our results show that m6A-dependent RNA structural alterations can promote direct binding of m6A-modified RNAs to low-complexity regions in RNA binding proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Reconstitution and structure of a bacterial Pnkp1RnlHen1 RNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei; Selvadurai, Kiruthika; Huang , Raven H. (UIUC)

    2016-01-22

    Ribotoxins cleave essential RNAs for cell killing, and RNA repair neutralizes the damage inflicted by ribotoxins for cell survival. We report a new bacterial RNA repair complex that performs RNA repair linked to immunity. This new RNA repair complex is a 270-kDa heterohexamer composed of three proteins—Pnkp1, Rnl and Hen1—that are required to repair ribotoxin-cleaved RNA in vitro. The crystal structure of the complex reveals the molecular architecture of the heterohexamer as two rhomboid-shaped ring structures of Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterotrimer fused at the Pnkp1 dimer interface. The four active sites required for RNA repair are located on the inner rim of each ring. Furthermore, the architecture and the locations of the active sites of the Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterohexamer suggest an ordered series of repair reactions at the broken RNA ends that confer immunity to recurrent damage.

  15. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering enhanced by Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiang; Xu, Kun; Xing, Jiani; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Xin; Wei, Zehui; Ren, Chonghua; Liu, Zhongtian; Shao, Simin; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-12-12

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has recently been developed into a powerful genome-editing technology, as it requires only two key components (Cas9 protein and sgRNA) to function and further enables multiplex genome targeting and homology-directed repair (HDR) based precise genome editing in a wide variety of organisms. Here, we report a novel and interesting strategy by using the Drosha-mediated sgRNA-shRNA structure to direct Cas9 for multiplex genome targeting and precise genome editing. For multiplex genome targeting assay, we achieved more than 9% simultaneous mutant efficiency for 3 genomic loci among the puromycin-selected cell clones. By introducing the shRNA against DNA ligase IV gene (LIG4) into the sgRNA-shRNA construct, the HDR-based precise genome editing efficiency was improved as more than 2-fold. Our works provide a useful tool for multiplex and precise genome modifying in mammalian cells.

  16. Integrated sequence-structure motifs suffice to identify microRNA precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuqin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upwards of 1200 miRNA loci have hitherto been annotated in the human genome. The specific features defining a miRNA precursor and deciding its recognition and subsequent processing are not yet exhaustively described and miRNA loci can thus not be computationally identified with sufficient confidence. RESULTS: We rendered pre-miRNA and non-pre-miRNA hairpins as strings of integrated sequence-structure information, and used the software Teiresias to identify sequence-structure motifs (ss-motifs of variable length in these data sets. Using only ss-motifs as features in a Support Vector Machine (SVM algorithm for pre-miRNA identification achieved 99.2% specificity and 97.6% sensitivity on a human test data set, which is comparable to previously published algorithms employing combinations of sequence-structure and additional features. Further analysis of the ss-motif information contents revealed strongly significant deviations from those of the respective training sets, revealing important potential clues as to how the sequence and structural information of RNA hairpins are utilized by the miRNA processing apparatus. CONCLUSION: Integrated sequence-structure motifs of variable length apparently capture nearly all information required to distinguish miRNA precursors from other stem-loop structures.

  17. Differential accumulation of nif structural gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandii with defined deletions in the nif structural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth.

  18. Enhancement of accuracy and efficiency for RNA secondary structure prediction by sequence segmentation and MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Boyu; Yehdego, Daniel T; Johnson, Kyle L; Leung, Ming-Ying; Taufer, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Their secondary structures are crucial for the RNA functionality, and the prediction of the secondary structures is widely studied. Our previous research shows that cutting long sequences into shorter chunks, predicting secondary structures of the chunks independently using thermodynamic methods, and reconstructing the entire secondary structure from the predicted chunk structures can yield better accuracy than predicting the secondary structure using the RNA sequence as a whole. The chunking, prediction, and reconstruction processes can use different methods and parameters, some of which produce more accurate predictions than others. In this paper, we study the prediction accuracy and efficiency of three different chunking methods using seven popular secondary structure prediction programs that apply to two datasets of RNA with known secondary structures, which include both pseudoknotted and non-pseudoknotted sequences, as well as a family of viral genome RNAs whose structures have not been predicted before. Our modularized MapReduce framework based on Hadoop allows us to study the problem in a parallel and robust environment. On average, the maximum accuracy retention values are larger than one for our chunking methods and the seven prediction programs over 50 non-pseudoknotted sequences, meaning that the secondary structure predicted using chunking is more similar to the real structure than the secondary structure predicted by using the whole sequence. We observe similar results for the 23 pseudoknotted sequences, except for the NUPACK program using the centered chunking method. The performance analysis for 14 long RNA sequences from the Nodaviridae virus family outlines how the coarse-grained mapping of chunking and predictions in the MapReduce framework exhibits shorter turnaround times for short RNA sequences. However, as the lengths of

  19. The chemical structure of DNA sequence signals for RNA transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D. G.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed recognition sites for RNA transcription for E. coli NRA polymerase, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase, and eukaryotic RNA polymerase Pol II are evaluated in the light of the requirements for efficient recognition. It is shown that although there is good experimental evidence that specific nucleic acid sequence patterns are involved in transcriptional regulation in bacteria and bacterial viruses, among the sequences now available, only in the case of the promoters recognized by bacteriophage T7 polymerase does it seem likely that the pattern is sufficient. It is concluded that the eukaryotic pattern that is investigated is not restrictive enough to serve as a recognition site.

  20. Structural basis for the modular recognition of single-stranded RNA by PPR proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Liu, Ying; Liu, Junjie; Yu, Feng; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; He, Jianhua; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Shi, Yigong; Yan, Nieng

    2013-12-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins represent a large family of sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins that are involved in multiple aspects of RNA metabolism. PPR proteins, which are found in exceptionally large numbers in the mitochondria and chloroplasts of terrestrial plants, recognize single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in a modular fashion. The maize chloroplast protein PPR10 binds to two similar RNA sequences from the ATPI-ATPH and PSAJ-RPL33 intergenic regions, referred to as ATPH and PSAJ, respectively. By protecting the target RNA elements from 5' or 3' exonucleases, PPR10 defines the corresponding 5' and 3' messenger RNA termini. Despite rigorous functional characterizations, the structural basis of sequence-specific ssRNA recognition by PPR proteins remains to be elucidated. Here we report the crystal structures of PPR10 in RNA-free and RNA-bound states at resolutions of 2.85 and 2.45Å, respectively. In the absence of RNA binding, the nineteen repeats of PPR10 are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral. PPR10 forms an antiparallel, intertwined homodimer and exhibits considerable conformational changes upon binding to its target ssRNA, an 18-nucleotide PSAJ element. Six nucleotides of PSAJ are specifically recognized by six corresponding PPR10 repeats following the predicted code. The molecular basis for the specific and modular recognition of RNA bases A, G and U is revealed. The structural elucidation of RNA recognition by PPR proteins provides an important framework for potential biotechnological applications of PPR proteins in RNA-related research areas.

  1. Structure and Dynamics of the tRNA-like Structure Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieweger, Mario; Nesbitt, David

    2014-03-01

    Conformational switching is widely accepted as regulatory mechanism in gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar regulation mechanisms are emerging for viral systems. One of the most abundant and best studied systems is the tRNA-like structure domain that is found in a number of plant viruses across eight genera. In this work, the folding dynamics of the tRNA-like structure domain of Brome Mosaic Virus are investigated using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer techniques. In particular, Burst fluorescence is applied to observe metal-ion induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the 3'-terminal 169nt of BMV RNA3. Histograms of EFRET probabilities reveal a complex equilibrium of three distinct populations. A step-wise kinetic model for TLS folding is developed in accord with the evolution of conformational populations and structural information in the literature. In this mechanism, formation of functional TLS domains from unfolded RNAs requires two consecutive steps; 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction followed by 2) formation of a 3' pseudoknot. This three-state equilibrium is well described by step-wise dissociation constants K1(328(30) μM) and K2(1092(183) μM) for [Mg2+] and K1(74(6) mM) and K2(243(52) mM) for [Na+]-induced folding. The kinetic model is validated by oligo competition with the STEM interaction. Implications of this conformational folding mechanism are discussed in regards to regulation of virus replication.

  2. RNA Bind-n-Seq: quantitative assessment of the sequence and structural binding specificity of RNA binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Nicole; Robertson, Alex; Jangi, Mohini; McGeary, Sean; Sharp, Phillip A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Specific protein-RNA interactions guide post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we describe RNA Bind-n-Seq (RBNS), a method that comprehensively characterizes sequence and structural specificity of RNA binding proteins (RBPs), and its application to the developmental alternative splicing factors RBFOX2, CELF1/CUGBP1 and MBNL1. For each factor, we recovered both canonical motifs and additional near-optimal binding motifs. RNA secondary structure inhibits binding of RBFOX2 and CELF1, while MBNL1 favors unpaired Us but tolerates C/G pairing in motifs containing UGC and/or GCU. Dissociation constants calculated from RBNS data using a novel algorithm correlated highly with values measured by surface plasmon resonance. Motifs identified by RBNS were conserved, were bound and active in vivo, and distinguished the subset of motifs enriched by CLIP-Seq that had regulatory activity. Together, our data demonstrate that RBNS complements crosslinking-based methods and show that in vivo binding and activity of these splicing factors is driven largely by intrinsic RNA affinity. PMID:24837674

  3. Structural fidelity and NMR relaxation analysis in a prototype RNA hairpin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambaşu, George M; York, Darrin M; Case, David A

    2015-05-01

    RNA hairpins are widespread and very stable motifs that contribute decisively to RNA folding and biological function. The GTP1G2C3A4C5U6U7C8G9G10U11G12C13C14 construct (with a central UUCG tetraloop) has been extensively studied by solution NMR, and offers and excellent opportunity to evaluate the structure and dynamical description afforded by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Here, we compare average structural parameters and NMR relaxation rates estimated from a series of multiple independent explicit solvent MD simulations using the two most recent RNA AMBER force fields (ff99 and ff10). Predicted overall tumbling times are ∼20% faster than those inferred from analysis of NMR data and follow the same trend when temperature and ionic strength is varied. The Watson-Crick stem and the "canonical" UUCG loop structure are maintained in most simulations including the characteristic syn conformation along the glycosidic bond of G9, although some key hydrogen bonds in the loop are partially disrupted. Our analysis pinpoints G9-G10 backbone conformations as a locus of discrepancies between experiment and simulation. In general the results for the more recent force-field parameters (ff10) are closer to experiment than those for the older ones (ff99). This work provides a comprehensive and detailed comparison of state of the art MD simulations against a wide variety of solution NMR measurements. © 2015 Giambaşu et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Functional expansion of human tRNA synthetases achieved by structural inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Schimmel, Paul; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2010-01-21

    Known as an essential component of the translational apparatus, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase family catalyzes the first step reaction in protein synthesis, that is, to specifically attach each amino acid to its cognate tRNA. While preserving this essential role, tRNA synthetases developed other roles during evolution. Human tRNA synthetases, in particular, have diverse functions in different pathways involving angiogenesis, inflammation and apoptosis. The functional diversity is further illustrated in the association with various diseases through genetic mutations that do not affect aminoacylation or protein synthesis. Here we review the accumulated knowledge on how human tRNA synthetases used structural inventions to achieve functional expansions.

  5. Structural comparisons of the nucleoprotein from three negative strand RNA virus families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsao Jun

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Structures of the nucleoprotein of three negative strand RNA virus families, borna disease virus, rhabdovirus and influenza A virus, are now available. Structural comparisons showed that the topology of the RNA binding region from the three proteins is very similar. The RNA was shown to fit into a cavity formed by the two distinct domains of the RNA binding region in the rhabdovirus nucleoprotein. Two helices connecting the two domains characterize the center of the cavity. The nucleoproteins contain at least 5 conserved helices in the N-terminal domain and 3 conserved helices in the C-terminal domain. Since all negative strand RNA viruses are required to have the ribonucleoprotein complex as their active genomic templates, it is perceivable that the (5H+3H structure is a common motif in the nucleoprotein of negative strand RNA viruses.

  6. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Yang, Yu; Chen, Chun; Bu, Jiajun; Zhang, Yin; Ye, Xiuzi

    2008-03-31

    With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1) present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2) design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers) compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool for academic users. Extensive tests have shown that

  7. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1 present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2 design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool

  8. Rclick: a web server for comparison of RNA 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh N; Verma, Chandra

    2015-03-15

    RNA molecules play important roles in key biological processes in the cell and are becoming attractive for developing therapeutic applications. Since the function of RNA depends on its structure and dynamics, comparing and classifying the RNA 3D structures is of crucial importance to molecular biology. In this study, we have developed Rclick, a web server that is capable of superimposing RNA 3D structures by using clique matching and 3D least-squares fitting. Our server Rclick has been benchmarked and compared with other popular servers and methods for RNA structural alignments. In most cases, Rclick alignments were better in terms of structure overlap. Our server also recognizes conformational changes between structures. For this purpose, the server produces complementary alignments to maximize the extent of detectable similarity. Various examples showcase the utility of our web server for comparison of RNA, RNA-protein complexes and RNA-ligand structures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Structural principles of RNA catalysis in a 2'-5' lariat-forming ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Teresa; Amata, Irene; Codutti, Luca; Falb, Melanie; Fohrer, Jörg; Masiewicz, Pawel; Simon, Bernd

    2013-03-20

    RNA-catalyzed lariat formation is present in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. To date we lack structural insights into the catalytic mechanism of lariat-forming ribozymes. Here, we study an artificial 2'-5' AG1 lariat-forming ribozyme that shares the sequence specificity of lariat formation with the pre-mRNA splicing reaction. Using NMR, we solve the structure of the inactive state of the ribozyme in the absence of magnesium. The reaction center 5'-guanosine appears to be part of a helix with an exceptionally widened major groove, while the lariat-forming A48 is looped out at the apex of a pseudoknot. The model of the active state built by mutational analysis, molecular modeling, and small-angle X-ray scattering suggests that A48 is recognized by a conserved adenosine, juxtaposed to the 5'-guanosine in one base-pair step distance, while the G1-N7 coordinates a magnesium ion essential for the activation of the nucleophile. Our findings offer implications for lariat formation in RNA enzymes including the mechanism of the recognition of the branch-site adenosine.

  10. JNSViewer-A JavaScript-based Nucleotide Sequence Viewer for DNA/RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jieming; Li, Xi; Dong, Min; Graham, Mitchell; Yadav, Nehul; Liang, Chun

    2017-01-01

    Many tools are available for visualizing RNA or DNA secondary structures, but there is scarce implementation in JavaScript that provides seamless integration with the increasingly popular web computational platforms. We have developed JNSViewer, a highly interactive web service, which is bundled with several popular tools for DNA/RNA secondary structure prediction and can provide precise and interactive correspondence among nucleotides, dot-bracket data, secondary structure graphs, and genic annotations. In JNSViewer, users can perform RNA secondary structure predictions with different programs and settings, add customized genic annotations in GFF format to structure graphs, search for specific linear motifs, and extract relevant structure graphs of sub-sequences. JNSViewer also allows users to choose a transcript or specific segment of Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequences and predict the corresponding secondary structure. Popular genome browsers (i.e., JBrowse and BrowserGenome) were integrated into JNSViewer to provide powerful visualizations of chromosomal locations, genic annotations, and secondary structures. In addition, we used StructureFold with default settings to predict some RNA structures for Arabidopsis by incorporating in vivo high-throughput RNA structure profiling data and stored the results in our web server, which might be a useful resource for RNA secondary structure studies in plants. JNSViewer is available at http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/jnsviewer/index.html.

  11. JNSViewer-A JavaScript-based Nucleotide Sequence Viewer for DNA/RNA secondary structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieming Shi

    Full Text Available Many tools are available for visualizing RNA or DNA secondary structures, but there is scarce implementation in JavaScript that provides seamless integration with the increasingly popular web computational platforms. We have developed JNSViewer, a highly interactive web service, which is bundled with several popular tools for DNA/RNA secondary structure prediction and can provide precise and interactive correspondence among nucleotides, dot-bracket data, secondary structure graphs, and genic annotations. In JNSViewer, users can perform RNA secondary structure predictions with different programs and settings, add customized genic annotations in GFF format to structure graphs, search for specific linear motifs, and extract relevant structure graphs of sub-sequences. JNSViewer also allows users to choose a transcript or specific segment of Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequences and predict the corresponding secondary structure. Popular genome browsers (i.e., JBrowse and BrowserGenome were integrated into JNSViewer to provide powerful visualizations of chromosomal locations, genic annotations, and secondary structures. In addition, we used StructureFold with default settings to predict some RNA structures for Arabidopsis by incorporating in vivo high-throughput RNA structure profiling data and stored the results in our web server, which might be a useful resource for RNA secondary structure studies in plants. JNSViewer is available at http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/jnsviewer/index.html.

  12. JNSViewer—A JavaScript-based Nucleotide Sequence Viewer for DNA/RNA secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Min; Graham, Mitchell; Yadav, Nehul

    2017-01-01

    Many tools are available for visualizing RNA or DNA secondary structures, but there is scarce implementation in JavaScript that provides seamless integration with the increasingly popular web computational platforms. We have developed JNSViewer, a highly interactive web service, which is bundled with several popular tools for DNA/RNA secondary structure prediction and can provide precise and interactive correspondence among nucleotides, dot-bracket data, secondary structure graphs, and genic annotations. In JNSViewer, users can perform RNA secondary structure predictions with different programs and settings, add customized genic annotations in GFF format to structure graphs, search for specific linear motifs, and extract relevant structure graphs of sub-sequences. JNSViewer also allows users to choose a transcript or specific segment of Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequences and predict the corresponding secondary structure. Popular genome browsers (i.e., JBrowse and BrowserGenome) were integrated into JNSViewer to provide powerful visualizations of chromosomal locations, genic annotations, and secondary structures. In addition, we used StructureFold with default settings to predict some RNA structures for Arabidopsis by incorporating in vivo high-throughput RNA structure profiling data and stored the results in our web server, which might be a useful resource for RNA secondary structure studies in plants. JNSViewer is available at http://bioinfolab.miamioh.edu/jnsviewer/index.html. PMID:28582416

  13. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  14. Complete Structural Model of Escherichia coli RNA Polymerase from a Hybrid Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opalka, N.; Brown, J; Lane, W; Twist, K; Landick, R; Asturias, F; Darst, S

    2010-01-01

    The Escherichia coli transcription system is the best characterized from a biochemical and genetic point of view and has served as a model system. Nevertheless, a molecular understanding of the details of E. coli transcription and its regulation, and therefore its full exploitation as a model system, has been hampered by the absence of high-resolution structural information on E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP). We use a combination of approaches, including high-resolution X-ray crystallography, ab initio structural prediction, homology modeling, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy, to generate complete atomic models of E. coli core RNAP and an E. coli RNAP ternary elongation complex. The detailed and comprehensive structural descriptions can be used to help interpret previous biochemical and genetic data in a new light and provide a structural framework for designing experiments to understand the function of the E. coli lineage-specific insertions and their role in the E. coli transcription program. Transcription, or the synthesis of RNA from DNA, is one of the most important processes in the cell. The central enzyme of transcription is the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), a large, macromolecular assembly consisting of at least five subunits. Historically, much of our fundamental information on the process of transcription has come from genetic and biochemical studies of RNAP from the model bacterium Escherichia coli. More recently, major breakthroughs in our understanding of the mechanism of action of RNAP have come from high resolution crystal structures of various bacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic enzymes. However, all of our high-resolution bacterial RNAP structures are of enzymes from the thermophiles Thermus aquaticus or T. thermophilus, organisms with poorly characterized transcription systems. It has thus far proven impossible to obtain a high-resolution structure of E. coli RNAP, which has made it difficult to relate the large collection

  15. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Gamache

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5′ terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT. To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1, a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2 that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging.

  16. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L.; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary (2°) structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we employ single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem loop or pseudoknot mRNAstructures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% G-C base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit (E) site. Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both G-C and A-U pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, unfolding of mRNAstructures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation. PMID:23542154

  17. MCTBI: a web server for predicting metal ion effects in RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Zhen; Zhang, Jing-Xiang; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2017-08-01

    Metal ions play critical roles in RNA structure and function. However, web servers and software packages for predicting ion effects in RNA structures are notably scarce. Furthermore, the existing web servers and software packages mainly neglect ion correlation and fluctuation effects, which are potentially important for RNAs. We here report a new web server, the MCTBI server (http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/MCTBI), for the prediction of ion effects for RNA structures. This server is based on the recently developed MCTBI, a model that can account for ion correlation and fluctuation effects for nucleic acid structures and can provide improved predictions for the effects of metal ions, especially for multivalent ions such as Mg2+ effects, as shown by extensive theory-experiment test results. The MCTBI web server predicts metal ion binding fractions, the most probable bound ion distribution, the electrostatic free energy of the system, and the free energy components. The results provide mechanistic insights into the role of metal ions in RNA structure formation and folding stability, which is important for understanding RNA functions and the rational design of RNA structures. © 2017 Sun et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. Hierarchical folding of multiple sequence alignments for the prediction of structures and RNA-RNA interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Richter, Andreas S.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through complementary binding with mRNAs or other ncRNAs, e.g., microRNAs, snoRNAs and bacterial sRNAs. Predicting these RNA interactions is essential for functional studies of putative ncRNAs or for the design of artificial RNAs. Many...... pairs. As a proof of concept, we show an example and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the approach....

  19. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses discrete mathematical techniques and identifies specified base pairs as parameters. The goal of the REU was to introduce upper-level undergraduate students to the principles and challenges of interdisciplinary research in molecular biology and discrete mathematics. At the beginning of the project, students from the biology and mathematics departments of a mid-sized university received instruction on the role of secondary structure in the function of eukaryotic RNAs and RNA viruses, RNA related to combinatorics, and the National Center for Biotechnology Information resources. The student research projects focused on RNA secondary structure prediction on a regulatory region of the yellow fever virus RNA genome and on an untranslated region of an mRNA of a gene associated with the neurological disorder epilepsy. At the end of the project, the REU students gave poster and oral presentations, and they submitted written final project reports to the program director. The outcome of the REU was that the students gained transferable knowledge and skills in bioinformatics and an awareness of the applications of discrete mathematics to biological research problems. PMID:20810968

  20. RNA Structures as Mediators of Neurological Diseases and as Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this Review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate the study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Exact calculation of loop formation probability identifies folding motifs in RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Michael F; Mathews, David H

    2016-12-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction is widely used to analyze RNA sequences. In an RNA partition function calculation, free energy nearest neighbor parameters are used in a dynamic programming algorithm to estimate statistical properties of the secondary structure ensemble. Previously, partition functions have largely been used to estimate the probability that a given pair of nucleotides form a base pair, the conditional stacking probability, the accessibility to binding of a continuous stretch of nucleotides, or a representative sample of RNA structures. Here it is demonstrated that an RNA partition function can also be used to calculate the exact probability of formation of hairpin loops, internal loops, bulge loops, or multibranch loops at a given position. This calculation can also be used to estimate the probability of formation of specific helices. Benchmarking on a set of RNA sequences with known secondary structures indicated that loops that were calculated to be more probable were more likely to be present in the known structure than less probable loops. Furthermore, highly probable loops are more likely to be in the known structure than the set of loops predicted in the lowest free energy structures. © 2016 Sloma and Mathews; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially but exchange rapidly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth M Mahen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RNAs adopt defined structures to perform biological activities, and conformational transitions among alternative structures are critical to virtually all RNA-mediated processes ranging from metabolite-activation of bacterial riboswitches to pre-mRNA splicing and viral replication in eukaryotes. Mechanistic analysis of an RNA folding reaction in a biological context is challenging because many steps usually intervene between assembly of a functional RNA structure and execution of a biological function. We developed a system to probe mechanisms of secondary structure folding and exchange directly in vivo using self-cleavage to monitor competition between mutually exclusive structures that promote or inhibit ribozyme assembly. In previous work, upstream structures were more effective than downstream structures in blocking ribozyme assembly during transcription in vitro, consistent with a sequential folding mechanism. However, upstream and downstream structures blocked ribozyme assembly equally well in vivo, suggesting that intracellular folding outcomes reflect thermodynamic equilibration or that annealing of contiguous sequences is favored kinetically. We have extended these studies to learn when, if ever, thermodynamic stability becomes an impediment to rapid equilibration among alternative RNA structures in vivo. We find that a narrow thermodynamic threshold determines whether kinetics or thermodynamics govern RNA folding outcomes in vivo. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially in vivo, but exchange between adjacent secondary structures is much faster in vivo than it is in vitro. Previous work showed that simple base-paired RNA helices dissociate at similar rates in vivo and in vitro so exchange between adjacent structures must occur through a different mechanism, one that likely involves facilitation of branch migration by proteins associated with nascent transcripts.

  3. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  4. Induction of vacuolar invertase inhibitor mRNA in potato tubers contributes to cold-induced sweetening resistance and includes spliced hybrid mRNA variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummell, David A; Chen, Ronan K Y; Harris, John C; Zhang, Huaibi; Hamiaux, Cyril; Kralicek, Andrew V; McKenzie, Marian J

    2011-06-01

    Cold storage of tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) compromises tuber quality in many cultivars by the accumulation of hexose sugars in a process called cold-induced sweetening. This is caused by the breakdown of starch to sucrose, which is cleaved to glucose and fructose by vacuolar acid invertase. During processing of affected tubers, the high temperatures involved in baking and frying cause the Maillard reaction between reducing sugars and free amino acids, resulting in the accumulation of acrylamide. cDNA clones with deduced proteins homologous to known invertase inhibitors were isolated and the two most abundant forms, termed INH1 and INH2, were shown to possess apoplastic and vacuolar localization, respectively. The INH2 gene showed developmentally regulated alternative splicing, so, in addition to the INH2α transcript encoding the full-length protein, two hybrid mRNAs (INH2β*A and INH2β*B) that encoded deduced vacuolar invertase inhibitors with divergent C-termini were detected, the result of mRNA splicing of an upstream region of INH2 to a downstream region of INH1. Hybrid RNAs are common in animals, where they may add to the diversity of the proteome, but are rarely described in plants. During cold storage, INH2α and the hybrid INH2β mRNAs accumulated to higher abundance in cultivars resistant to cold-induced sweetening than in susceptible cultivars. Increased amounts of invertase inhibitor may contribute to the suppression of acid invertase activity and prevent cleavage of sucrose. Evidence for increased RNA splicing activity was detected in several resistant lines, a mechanism that in some circumstances may generate a range of proteins with additional functional capacity to aid adaptability.

  5. RNA systems biology: uniting functional discoveries and structural tools to understand global roles of RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Eric J; Watters, Kyle E; Loughrey, David; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    RNAs assume sophisticated structures that are active in myriad cellular processes. In this review, we highlight newly identified ribozymes, riboswitches, and small RNAs, some of which control the function of cellular metabolic and gene expression networks. We then examine recent developments in genome-wide RNA structure probing technologies that are yielding new insights into the structural landscape of the transcriptome. Finally, we discuss how these RNA 'structomic' methods can address emerging questions in RNA systems biology, from the mechanisms behind long non-coding RNAs to new bases for human diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. EvoRSR: an integrated system for exploring evolution of RNA structural robustness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robustness, maintaining a constant phenotype despite perturbations, is a fundamental property of biological systems that is incorporated at various levels of biological complexity. Although robustness has been frequently observed in nature, its evolutionary origin remains unknown. Current hypotheses suggest that robustness originated as a direct consequence of natural selection, as an intrinsic property of adaptations, or as a congruent correlate of environment robustness. To elucidate the evolutionary origins of robustness, a convenient computational package is strongly needed. Results In this study, we developed the open-source integrated system EvoRSR (Evolution of RNA Structural Robustness to explore the evolution of robustness based on biologically important landscapes induced by RNA folding. EvoRSR is object-oriented, modular, and freely available at http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/EvoRSR under the GNU/GPL license. We present an overview of EvoRSR package and illustrate its features with the miRNA gene cel-mir-357. Conclusion EvoRSR is a novel and flexible package for exploring the evolution of robustness. Accordingly, EvoRSR can be used for future studies to investigate the evolution and origin of robustness and to address other common questions about robustness. While the current EvoRSR environment is a versatile analysis framework, future versions can include features to enhance evolutionary studies of robustness.

  7. EvoRSR: an integrated system for exploring evolution of RNA structural robustness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Ni, Ming; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2009-08-13

    Robustness, maintaining a constant phenotype despite perturbations, is a fundamental property of biological systems that is incorporated at various levels of biological complexity. Although robustness has been frequently observed in nature, its evolutionary origin remains unknown. Current hypotheses suggest that robustness originated as a direct consequence of natural selection, as an intrinsic property of adaptations, or as a congruent correlate of environment robustness. To elucidate the evolutionary origins of robustness, a convenient computational package is strongly needed. In this study, we developed the open-source integrated system EvoRSR (Evolution of RNA Structural Robustness) to explore the evolution of robustness based on biologically important landscapes induced by RNA folding. EvoRSR is object-oriented, modular, and freely available at http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/EvoRSR under the GNU/GPL license. We present an overview of EvoRSR package and illustrate its features with the miRNA gene cel-mir-357. EvoRSR is a novel and flexible package for exploring the evolution of robustness. Accordingly, EvoRSR can be used for future studies to investigate the evolution and origin of robustness and to address other common questions about robustness. While the current EvoRSR environment is a versatile analysis framework, future versions can include features to enhance evolutionary studies of robustness.

  8. Sequence and structure prediction of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of lily symptomless virus isolated from L. × 'Casablanca'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pinsan; Li, Huangai; Liu, Jiwen; Luan, Yushi; Yin, Yalei; Bai, Jianfang

    2011-06-01

    The DNA sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene of lily symptomless virus (LSV), a lily-infecting member of the genus Carlavirus, was determined from nine overlapping cDNA fragments of different sizes. The complete sequence of this RdRp gene (HM070294) consisted of 5,847 nucleotides coding for a protein of 220 kDa. It had 97-98% sequence identity with RdRps of other known isolates at both the DNA and the amino acid level. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this RdRp (designated as RdRp-DL) was closely related to the RdRp of the Korean isolate (AM516059), as well as to the RdRps from Passiflora latent virus (PLV) and Kalanchoe latent virus (KLV) of the genus Carlavirus. Hydrophobic analysis of RdRp-DL revealed a hydrophobic N-terminus and a hydrophilic C-terminus. Helices and Loops were the major secondary structures of RdRp-DL. In addition, RdRp-DL also had three coil structures. Four conserved domains were identified: typoviral methyltransferase, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, P-loop-containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases and carlavirus endopeptidase. A model of the tertiary structure predicted by I-TASSER was obtained for each of these conserved domains. This is the first report of a detailed phylogenetic analysis of LSV RdRp with those of other members of the genus Carlavirus, and the first to predict the domain structures of LSV RdRp.

  9. Finding Common Sequence and Structure Motifs in a set of RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, Laurie J.; Stormo, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to search for the most common motif, composed of a combination of sequence and structure constraints, among a collection of RNA sequences. The method uses a simplified version of the Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous folding and alignment of RNA sequences...

  10. Biochemical and Structures Studies of tRNA Modificaton and Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chun

    2009-01-01

    RNA hypermodifications near the anticodon of tRNA are fundamental for the efficiency and fidelity of protein synthesis. Dimethylallyltransferase (DMATase) catalyzes transfer of a dimethylallyl moiety from dimethylallyl pyrophosphate to N6 of A37 in certain tRNAs. We first determined the crystal structures of "Pseudomonas aeruginosa" DMATase.…

  11. Fine-grained parallel RNAalifold algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Dou, Yong; Zhou, Xingming; Yang, Xuejun; Xu, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yang

    2009-01-30

    In the field of RNA secondary structure prediction, the RNAalifold algorithm is one of the most popular methods using free energy minimization. However, general-purpose computers including parallel computers or multi-core computers exhibit parallel efficiency of no more than 50%. Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) chips provide a new approach to accelerate RNAalifold by exploiting fine-grained custom design. RNAalifold shows complicated data dependences, in which the dependence distance is variable, and the dependence direction is also across two dimensions. We propose a systolic array structure including one master Processing Element (PE) and multiple slave PEs for fine grain hardware implementation on FPGA. We exploit data reuse schemes to reduce the need to load energy matrices from external memory. We also propose several methods to reduce energy table parameter size by 80%. To our knowledge, our implementation with 16 PEs is the only FPGA accelerator implementing the complete RNAalifold algorithm. The experimental results show a factor of 12.2 speedup over the RNAalifold (ViennaPackage - 1.6.5) software for a group of aligned RNA sequences with 2981-residue running on a Personal Computer (PC) platform with Pentium 4 2.6 GHz CPU.

  12. Automated 3D RNA structure prediction using the RNAComposer method for riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purzycka, K J; Popenda, M; Szachniuk, M; Antczak, M; Lukasiak, P; Blazewicz, J; Adamiak, R W

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the numerous functions of RNAs depends critically on the knowledge of their three-dimensional (3D) structure. In contrast to the protein field, a much smaller number of RNA 3D structures have been assessed using X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryomicroscopy. This has led to a great demand to obtain the RNA 3D structures using prediction methods. The 3D structure prediction, especially of large RNAs, still remains a significant challenge and there is still a great demand for high-resolution structure prediction methods. In this chapter, we describe RNAComposer, a method and server for the automated prediction of RNA 3D structures based on the knowledge of secondary structure. Its applications are supported by other automated servers: RNA FRABASE and RNApdbee, developed to search and analyze secondary and 3D structures. Another method, RNAlyzer, offers new way to analyze and visualize quality of RNA 3D models. Scope and limitations of RNAComposer in application for an automated prediction of riboswitches' 3D structure will be presented and discussed. Analysis of the cyclic di-GMP-II riboswitch from Clostridium acetobutylicum (PDB ID 3Q3Z) as an example allows for 3D structure prediction of related riboswitches from Clostridium difficile 4, Bacillus halodurans 1, and Thermus aquaticus Y5.1 of yet unknown structures. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Statistical and dynamical analysis of RNA structures and complexes with applications to nanodevice design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Whitney Allen

    This dissertation combines rigid body motion kinematics and statistical analysis techniques to extract information from detailed dynamic simulations and large databases of biomolecular structures. This information is then used to quantify and elucidate structural patterns that could be used to design functional nano-structures or provide new targets for ligand-based drug design. In this regard, three particular classes of problems are examined. First, we propose new methods for estimating the stiffness of continuum filament models of helical nucleic acid structures. In this work, molecular dynamics is used to sample RNA helices consisting of several base-pairs fluctuating about an equilibrium position. At equilibrium, each base-pair has a tightly clustered probability distribution and so we can describe the rigid body motion of the helix as the convolution of highly concentrated probability densities on SE(3). Second, the structure and dynamics of a common RNA non-helical motif is classified. We examine several RNA bulges with varying sequences and helix curvature, and establish degrees of similarity (and dissimilarity) in the bulge motif according to the nucleic acid type of the bulge and surrounding base-pairs. Both the "static" X-ray-crystal and NMR structures and the dynamics generated from molecular dynamics simulations are used to quantify the flexibility and conservative aspects of the motif. The resulting classification scheme provides bulge motifs that could be included in a toolbox of "nanostructures" where one could pick the pieces to design a structure that has the needed shape and desired behavior. Finally, we analyze a large collection of adenosine binding sites, focusing on the functional region of the binding site. We provide a new analysis tool that finds spatial patterns in adenosine binding pockets by examining the relative pose (position and orientation) between the adenosine ligand and the amino acids at each binding site. The similarities of

  14. RNAalifold: improved consensus structure prediction for RNA alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Peter F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of a consensus structure for a set of related RNAs is an important first step for subsequent analyses. RNAalifold, which computes the minimum energy structure that is simultaneously formed by a set of aligned sequences, is one of the oldest and most widely used tools for this task. In recent years, several alternative approaches have been advocated, pointing to several shortcomings of the original RNAalifold approach. Results We show that the accuracy of RNAalifold predictions can be improved substantially by introducing a different, more rational handling of alignment gaps, and by replacing the rather simplistic model of covariance scoring with more sophisticated RIBOSUM-like scoring matrices. These improvements are achieved without compromising the computational efficiency of the algorithm. We show here that the new version of RNAalifold not only outperforms the old one, but also several other tools recently developed, on different datasets. Conclusion The new version of RNAalifold not only can replace the old one for almost any application but it is also competitive with other approaches including those based on SCFGs, maximum expected accuracy, or hierarchical nearest neighbor classifiers.

  15. Integrated structural biology to unravel molecular mechanisms of protein-RNA recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlundt, Andreas; Tants, Jan-Niklas; Sattler, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Recent advances in RNA sequencing technologies have greatly expanded our knowledge of the RNA landscape in cells, often with spatiotemporal resolution. These techniques identified many new (often non-coding) RNA molecules. Large-scale studies have also discovered novel RNA binding proteins (RBPs), which exhibit single or multiple RNA binding domains (RBDs) for recognition of specific sequence or structured motifs in RNA. Starting from these large-scale approaches it is crucial to unravel the molecular principles of protein-RNA recognition in ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) to understand the underlying mechanisms of gene regulation. Structural biology and biophysical studies at highest possible resolution are key to elucidate molecular mechanisms of RNA recognition by RBPs and how conformational dynamics, weak interactions and cooperative binding contribute to the formation of specific, context-dependent RNPs. While large compact RNPs can be well studied by X-ray crystallography and cryo-EM, analysis of dynamics and weak interaction necessitates the use of solution methods to capture these properties. Here, we illustrate methods to study the structure and conformational dynamics of protein-RNA complexes in solution starting from the identification of interaction partners in a given RNP. Biophysical and biochemical techniques support the characterization of a protein-RNA complex and identify regions relevant in structural analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful tool to gain information on folding, stability and dynamics of RNAs and characterize RNPs in solution. It provides crucial information that is complementary to the static pictures derived from other techniques. NMR can be readily combined with other solution techniques, such as small angle X-ray and/or neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), which provide information about overall shapes, internal domain

  16. Fast pairwise structural RNA alignments by pruning of the dynamical programming matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob H Havgaard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available It has become clear that noncoding RNAs (ncRNA play important roles in cells, and emerging studies indicate that there might be a large number of unknown ncRNAs in mammalian genomes. There exist computational methods that can be used to search for ncRNAs by comparing sequences from different genomes. One main problem with these methods is their computational complexity, and heuristics are therefore employed. Two heuristics are currently very popular: pre-folding and pre-aligning. However, these heuristics are not ideal, as pre-aligning is dependent on sequence similarity that may not be present and pre-folding ignores the comparative information. Here, pruning of the dynamical programming matrix is presented as an alternative novel heuristic constraint. All subalignments that do not exceed a length-dependent minimum score are discarded as the matrix is filled out, thus giving the advantage of providing the constraints dynamically. This has been included in a new implementation of the FOLDALIGN algorithm for pairwise local or global structural alignment of RNA sequences. It is shown that time and memory requirements are dramatically lowered while overall performance is maintained. Furthermore, a new divide and conquer method is introduced to limit the memory requirement during global alignment and backtrack of local alignment. All branch points in the computed RNA structure are found and used to divide the structure into smaller unbranched segments. Each segment is then realigned and backtracked in a normal fashion. Finally, the FOLDALIGN algorithm has also been updated with a better memory implementation and an improved energy model. With these improvements in the algorithm, the FOLDALIGN software package provides the molecular biologist with an efficient and user-friendly tool for searching for new ncRNAs. The software package is available for download at http://foldalign.ku.dk.

  17. 2-Aminopurine: A Probe of Structural Dynamics and Charge Transfer in DNA and DNA:RNA Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Melanie A.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2002-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques are employed to probe relationships between structural dynamics and charge transfer (CT) efficiency in DNA duplexes and DNA:RNA hybrids containing photoexcited 2-aminopurine (Ap*). To better understand the variety of interactions and reactions, including CT, between Ap* and DNA, the fluorescence behavior of Ap* is investigated in a full series of redox-inactive as well as redox-active assemblies. Thus, Ap* is developed as a dual reporter of structural dynamics and bas...

  18. The PETfold and PETcofold web servers for intra- and intermolecular structures of multiple RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Menzel, Karl Peter; Backofen, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    gene. We present web servers to analyze multiple RNA sequences for common RNA structure and for RNA interaction sites. The web servers are based on the recent PET (Probabilistic Evolutionary and Thermodynamic) models PETfold and PETcofold, but add user friendly features ranging from a graphical layer...... to interactive usage of the predictors. Additionally, the web servers provide direct access to annotated RNA alignments, such as the Rfam 10.0 database and multiple alignments of 16 vertebrate genomes with human. The web servers are freely available at: http://rth.dk/resources/petfold/...

  19. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  20. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  1. URS DataBase: universe of RNA structures and their motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulin, Eugene; Yacovlev, Victor; Khachko, Denis; Spirin, Sergei; Roytberg, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The Universe of RNA Structures DataBase (URSDB) stores information obtained from all RNA-containing PDB entries (2935 entries in October 2015). The content of the database is updated regularly. The database consists of 51 tables containing indexed data on various elements of the RNA structures. The database provides a web interface allowing user to select a subset of structures with desired features and to obtain various statistical data for a selected subset of structures or for all structures. In particular, one can easily obtain statistics on geometric parameters of base pairs, on structural motifs (stems, loops, etc.) or on different types of pseudoknots. The user can also view and get information on an individual structure or its selected parts, e.g. RNA-protein hydrogen bonds. URSDB employs a new original definition of loops in RNA structures. That definition fits both pseudoknot-free and pseudoknotted secondary structures and coincides with the classical definition in case of pseudoknot-free structures. To our knowledge, URSDB is the first database supporting searches based on topological classification of pseudoknots and on extended loop classification.Database URL: http://server3.lpm.org.ru/urs/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron–sulfur cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang-Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E.; Krishna, S. Sri; Rife, Christopher L.; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M.; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron–sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron–sulfur [4Fe–­4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an l-­tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe–4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x 22-C-x 6-C-x 2-C). It is speculated that the iron–sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon. PMID:20944229

  3. Structure of a tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase containing an iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Yang, Xiang Lei; McMullan, Daniel; Chong, Yeeting E; Krishna, S Sri; Rife, Christopher L; Weekes, Dana; Brittain, Scott M; Abdubek, Polat; Ambing, Eileen; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Carlton, Dennis; Caruthers, Jonathan; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Miller, Mitchell D; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; van den Bedem, Henry; White, Aprilfawn; Wolf, Guenter; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Elsliger, Marc André; Schimmel, Paul; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    A novel aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase that contains an iron-sulfur cluster in the tRNA anticodon-binding region and efficiently charges tRNA with tryptophan has been found in Thermotoga maritima. The crystal structure of TmTrpRS (tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase; TrpRS; EC 6.1.1.2) reveals an iron-sulfur [4Fe-4S] cluster bound to the tRNA anticodon-binding (TAB) domain and an L-tryptophan ligand in the active site. None of the other T. maritima aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) contain this [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding motif (C-x₂₂-C-x₆-C-x₂-C). It is speculated that the iron-sulfur cluster contributes to the stability of TmTrpRS and could play a role in the recognition of the anticodon.

  4. Electrostatic interactions guide the active site face of a structure-specific ribonuclease to its RNA substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Matthew J; Korennykh, Alexei V; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Correll, Carl C

    2008-08-26

    Restrictocin, a member of the alpha-sarcin family of site-specific endoribonucleases, uses electrostatic interactions to bind to the ribosome and to RNA oligonucleotides, including the minimal specific substrate, the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 23S-28S rRNA. Restrictocin binds to the SRL by forming a ground-state E:S complex that is stabilized predominantly by Coulomb interactions and depends on neither the sequence nor structure of the RNA, suggesting a nonspecific complex. The 22 cationic residues of restrictocin are dispersed throughout this protein surface, complicating a priori identification of a Coulomb interacting surface. Structural studies have identified an enzyme-substrate interface, which is expected to overlap with the electrostatic E:S interface. Here, we identified restrictocin residues that contribute to binding in the E:S complex by determining the salt dependence [partial differential log(k 2/ K 1/2)/ partial differential log[KCl

  5. Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Avci, Recep [Bozeman, MT; Groenewold, Gary S [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-12-06

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  6. The ITS2 Database II: homology modelling RNA structure for molecular systematics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selig, Christian; Wolf, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Dandekar, Thomas; Schultz, Jörg

    .... To overcome this hindrance for a wider application of the ITS2, we have developed a homology modelling approach to predict the structure of RNA and present the results of modelling the ITS2 in the ITS2 Database...

  7. Fast online and index-based algorithms for approximate search of RNA sequence-structure patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer, Fernando; Kurtz, Stefan; Beckstette, Michael

    2013-01-01

    .... However, current tools for searching with RNA sequence-structure patterns cannot fully handle mutations occurring on both these levels or are simply not fast enough for searching large sequence data...

  8. The crystal structure and RNA-binding of an orthomyxovirus nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome packaging for viruses with segmented genomes is often a complex problem. This is particularly true for influenza viruses and other orthomyxoviruses, whose genome consists of multiple negative-sense RNAs encapsidated as ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. To better understand the structural features of orthomyxovirus RNPs that allow them to be packaged, we determined the crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (NP of a fish orthomyxovirus, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV (genus Isavirus. As the major protein component of the RNPs, ISAV-NP possesses a bi-lobular structure similar to the influenza virus NP. Because both RNA-free and RNA-bound ISAV NP forms stable dimers in solution, we were able to measure the NP RNA binding affinity as well as the stoichiometry using recombinant proteins and synthetic oligos. Our RNA binding analysis revealed that each ISAV-NP binds ~12 nts of RNA, shorter than the 24-28 nts originally estimated for the influenza A virus NP based on population average. The 12-nt stoichiometry was further confirmed by results from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Considering that RNPs of ISAV and the influenza viruses have similar morphologies and dimensions, our findings suggest that NP-free RNA may exist on orthomyxovirus RNPs, and selective RNP packaging may be accomplished through direct RNA-RNA interactions.

  9. Advancing viral RNA structure prediction: measuring the thermodynamics of pyrimidine-rich internal loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Andy; Mailey, Katherine; Saeki, Jessica; Gu, Xiaobo; Schroeder, Susan J

    2017-05-01

    Accurate thermodynamic parameters improve RNA structure predictions and thus accelerate understanding of RNA function and the identification of RNA drug binding sites. Many viral RNA structures, such as internal ribosome entry sites, have internal loops and bulges that are potential drug target sites. Current models used to predict internal loops are biased toward small, symmetric purine loops, and thus poorly predict asymmetric, pyrimidine-rich loops with >6 nucleotides (nt) that occur frequently in viral RNA. This article presents new thermodynamic data for 40 pyrimidine loops, many of which can form UU or protonated CC base pairs. Uracil and protonated cytosine base pairs stabilize asymmetric internal loops. Accurate prediction rules are presented that account for all thermodynamic measurements of RNA asymmetric internal loops. New loop initiation terms for loops with >6 nt are presented that do not follow previous assumptions that increasing asymmetry destabilizes loops. Since the last 2004 update, 126 new loops with asymmetry or sizes greater than 2 × 2 have been measured. These new measurements significantly deepen and diversify the thermodynamic database for RNA. These results will help better predict internal loops that are larger, pyrimidine-rich, and occur within viral structures such as internal ribosome entry sites. © 2017 Phan et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Some Recent Advances of Ultrasonic Diagnostic Methods Applied to Materials and Structures (Including Biological Ones)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Lucio; Nobile, Stefano

    This paper gives an overview of some recent advances of ultrasonic methods applied to materials and structures (including biological ones), exploring typical applications of these emerging inspection technologies to civil engineering and medicine. In confirmation of this trend, some results of an experimental research carried out involving both destructive and non-destructive testing methods for the evaluation of structural performance of existing reinforced concrete (RC) structures are discussed in terms of reliability. As a result, Ultrasonic testing can usefully supplement coring thus permitting less expensive and more representative evaluation of the concrete strength throughout the whole structure under examination.

  11. Large deviations for random trees and the branching of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtin, Yuri; Heitsch, Christine E

    2009-01-01

    We give a Large Deviation Principle (LDP) with explicit rate function for the distribution of vertex degrees in plane trees, a combinatorial model of RNA secondary structures. We calculate the typical degree distributions based on nearest neighbor free energies, and compare our results with the branching configurations found in two sets of large RNA secondary structures. We find substantial agreement overall, with some interesting deviations which merit further study.

  12. Automated identification of RNA 3D modules with discriminative power in RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2013-01-01

    interest in matching structural modules known from one molecule to other molecules for which the 3D structure is not known yet. We have created a pipeline, metaRNAmodules, which completely automates extracting putative modules from the FR3D database and mapping of such modules to Rfam alignments to obtain...

  13. MicroRNA prediction using a fixed-order Markov model based on the secondary structure pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    Full Text Available Predicting miRNAs is an arduous task, due to the diversity of the precursors and complexity of enzyme processes. Although several prediction approaches have reached impressive performances, few of them could achieve a full-function recognition of mature miRNA directly from the candidate hairpins across species. Therefore, researchers continue to seek a more powerful model close to biological recognition to miRNA structure. In this report, we describe a novel miRNA prediction algorithm, known as FOMmiR, using a fixed-order Markov model based on the secondary structural pattern. For a training dataset containing 809 human pre-miRNAs and 6441 human pseudo-miRNA hairpins, the model's parameters were defined and evaluated. The results showed that FOMmiR reached 91% accuracy on the human dataset through 5-fold cross-validation. Moreover, for the independent test datasets, the FOMmiR presented an outstanding prediction in human and other species including vertebrates, Drosophila, worms and viruses, even plants, in contrast to the well-known algorithms and models. Especially, the FOMmiR was not only able to distinguish the miRNA precursors from the hairpins, but also locate the position and strand of the mature miRNA. Therefore, this study provides a new generation of miRNA prediction algorithm, which successfully realizes a full-function recognition of the mature miRNAs directly from the hairpin sequences. And it presents a new understanding of the biological recognition based on the strongest signal's location detected by FOMmiR, which might be closely associated with the enzyme cleavage mechanism during the miRNA maturation.

  14. Prediction of viral microRNA precursors based on human microRNA precursor sequence and structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shiva; Ansari, Faraz A; Scaria, Vinod

    2009-08-20

    MicroRNAs (small approximately 22 nucleotide long non-coding endogenous RNAs) have recently attracted immense attention as critical regulators of gene expression in multi-cellular eukaryotes, especially in humans. Recent studies have proved that viruses also express microRNAs, which are thought to contribute to the intricate mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions. Computational predictions have greatly accelerated the discovery of microRNAs. However, most of these widely used tools are dependent on structural features and sequence conservation which limits their use in discovering novel virus expressed microRNAs and non-conserved eukaryotic microRNAs. In this work an efficient prediction method is developed based on the hypothesis that sequence and structure features which discriminate between host microRNA precursor hairpins and pseudo microRNAs are shared by viral microRNA as they depend on host machinery for the processing of microRNA precursors. The proposed method has been found to be more efficient than recently reported ab-initio methods for predicting viral microRNAs and microRNAs expressed by mammals.

  15. Structural Studies of RNA Helicases Involved in Eukaryotic Pre-mRNA Splicing, Ribosome Biogenesis, and Translation Initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yangzi

    Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) take centre stage in gene expression. In eukaryotes, most RNAs are transcribed as precursors, and these precursors are co- or post-transcriptionally processed and assemble with particular proteins to form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). Mature RNPs participate in various gene...... and ligates the neighbouring exons to generate mature mRNAs. Prp43 is an RNA helicase of the DEAH/RHA family. In yeast, once mRNAs are released, Prp43 catalyzes the disassembly of spliceosomes. The 18S, 5.8S and 25S rRNAs are transcribed as a single polycistronic transcript—the 35S pre-rRNA....... It is nucleolytically cleaved and chemically modified to generate mature rRNAs, which assemble with ribosomal proteins to form the ribosome. Prp43 is required for the processing of the 18S rRNA. Using X-ray crystallography, I determined a high resolution structure of Prp43 bound to ADP, the first structure of a DEAH...

  16. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  17. The FOLDALIGN web server for pairwise structural RNA alignment and mutual motif search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Lyngsø, Rune B.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2005-01-01

    FOLDALIGN is a Sankoff-based algorithm for making structural alignments of RNA sequences. Here, we present a web server for making pairwise alignments between two RNA sequences, using the recently updated version of FOLDALIGN. The server can be used to scan two sequences for a common structural RNA...... motif of limited size, or the entire sequences can be aligned locally or globally. The web server offers a graphical interface, which makes it simple to make alignments and manually browse the results. the web server can be accessed at http://foldalign.kvl.dk...

  18. A memory efficient method for structure-based RNA multiple alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlasio, Daniel; Bruand, Jocelyne; Zhang, Shaojie

    2012-01-01

    Structure-based RNA multiple alignment is particularly challenging because covarying mutations make sequence information alone insufficient. Existing tools for RNA multiple alignment first generate pairwise RNA structure alignments and then build the multiple alignment using only sequence information. Here we present PMFastR, an algorithm which iteratively uses a sequence-structure alignment procedure to build a structure-based RNA multiple alignment from one sequence with known structure and a database of sequences from the same family. PMFastR also has low memory consumption allowing for the alignment of large sequences such as 16S and 23S rRNA. The algorithm also provides a method to utilize a multicore environment. We present results on benchmark data sets from BRAliBase, which shows PMFastR performs comparably to other state-of-the-art programs. Finally, we regenerate 607 Rfam seed alignments and show that our automated process creates multiple alignments similar to the manually curated Rfam seed alignments. Thus, the techniques presented in this paper allow for the generation of multiple alignments using sequence-structure guidance, while limiting memory consumption. As a result, multiple alignments of long RNA sequences, such as 16S and 23S rRNAs, can easily be generated locally on a personal computer. The software and supplementary data are available at http://genome.ucf.edu/PMFastR.

  19. Structural basis of the RNase H1 activity on stereo regular borano phosphonate DNA/RNA hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher N; Spring, Alexander M; Sergueev, Dimitri; Shaw, Barbara R; Germann, Markus W

    2011-05-17

    Numerous DNA chemistries for improving oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN)-based RNA targeting have been explored. The majority of the modifications render the ODN/RNA target insensitive to RNase H1. Borano phosphonate ODN's are among the few modifications that are tolerated by RNase H1. To understand the effect of the stereochemistry of the BH(3) modification on the nucleic acid structure and RNase H1 enzyme activity, we have investigated two DNA/RNA hybrids containing either a R(P) or S(P) BH(3) modification by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. T(M) studies show that the stabilities of R(P) and S(P) modified DNA/RNA hybrids are essentially identical (313.8 K) and similar to that of an unmodified control (312.9 K). The similarity is also reflected in the imino proton spectra. To characterize such similar structures, we used a large number of NMR restraints (including dipolar couplings and backbone torsion angles) to determine structural features that were important for RNase H1 activity. The final NMR structures exhibit excellent agreement with the data (total R(x) values of DNA near the modification, while the RNA strands are relatively unperturbed. In the case of the S(P) modification, for which more perturbations are recorded, a slightly narrower minor groove is also obtained. Unique NOE base contacts localize the S(P) BH(3) group in the major groove while the R(P) BH(3) group points away from the DNA. However, this creates a potential clash of the R(P) BH(3) groups with important RNase H1 residues in a complex, while the S(P) BH(3) groups could be tolerated. We therefore predict that on the basis of our NMR structures a fully R(P) BH(3) DNA/RNA hybrid would not be a substrate for RNase H1.

  20. Crystal structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complex with a polypurine tract RNA:DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Das, Kalyan; Tantillo, Chris; Clark, Arthur D.; Ding, Jianping; Whitcomb, Jeannette M.; Boyer, Paul L.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Arnold, Edward

    2001-01-01

    We have determined the 3.0 Å resolution structure of wild-type HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in complex with an RNA:DNA oligonucleotide whose sequence includes a purine-rich segment from the HIV-1 genome called the polypurine tract (PPT). The PPT is resistant to ribonuclease H (RNase H) cleavage and is used as a primer for second DNA strand synthesis. The ‘RNase H primer grip’, consisting of amino acids that interact with the DNA primer strand, may contribute to RNase H catalysis and cleavage specificity. Cleavage specificity is also controlled by the width of the minor groove and the trajectory of the RNA:DNA, both of which are sequence dependent. An unusual ‘unzipping’ of 7 bp occurs in the adenine stretch of the PPT: an unpaired base on the template strand takes the base pairing out of register and then, following two offset base pairs, an unpaired base on the primer strand re-establishes the normal register. The structural aberration extends to the RNase H active site and may play a role in the resistance of PPT to RNase H cleavage. PMID:11250910

  1. FlexStem: improving predictions of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots by reducing the search space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; He, Si-Min; Bu, Dongbo; Zhang, Fa; Wang, Zhiyong; Chen, Runsheng; Gao, Wen

    2008-09-15

    RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is proved to be NP-hard. Due to kinetic reasons the real RNA secondary structure often has local instead of global minimum free energy. This implies that we may improve the performance of RNA secondary structure prediction by taking kinetics into account and minimize free energy in a local area. we propose a novel algorithm named FlexStem to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. Still based on MFE criterion, FlexStem adopts comprehensive energy models that allow complex pseudoknots. Unlike classical thermodynamic methods, our approach aims to simulate the RNA folding process by successive addition of maximal stems, reducing the search space while maintaining or even improving the prediction accuracy. This reduced space is constructed by our maximal stem strategy and stem-adding rule induced from elaborate statistical experiments on real RNA secondary structures. The strategy and the rule also reflect the folding characteristic of RNA from a new angle and help compensate for the deficiency of merely relying on MFE in RNA structure prediction. We validate FlexStem by applying it to tRNAs, 5SrRNAs and a large number of pseudoknotted structures and compare it with the well-known algorithms such as RNAfold, PKNOTS, PknotsRG, HotKnots and ILM according to their overall sensitivities and specificities, as well as positive and negative controls on pseudoknots. The results show that FlexStem significantly increases the prediction accuracy through its local search strategy. Software is available at http://pfind.ict.ac.cn/FlexStem/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  3. Structural basis for activation of an archaeal ribonuclease P RNA by protein cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Makoto

    2017-09-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is an endoribonuclease that catalyzes the processing of the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNA (pre-tRNA) in all phylogenetic domains. We have found that RNase P in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 consists of RNase P RNA (PhopRNA) and five protein cofactors designated PhoPop5, PhoRpp21, PhoRpp29, PhoRpp30, and PhoRpp38. Biochemical characterizations over the past 10 years have revealed that PhoPop5 and PhoRpp30 fold into a heterotetramer and cooperate to activate a catalytic domain (C-domain) in PhopRNA, whereas PhoRpp21 and PhoRpp29 form a heterodimer and function together to activate a specificity domain (S-domain) in PhopRNA. PhoRpp38 plays a role in elevation of the optimum temperature of RNase P activity, binding to kink-turn (K-turn) motifs in two stem-loops in PhopRNA. This review describes the structural and functional information on P. horikoshii RNase P, focusing on the structural basis for the PhopRNA activation by the five RNase P proteins.

  4. Structure-mediated modulation of mRNA abundance by A-to-I editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmer, Anneke; Yang, Yun; Chan, Tracey W; Xiao, Xinshu

    2017-11-02

    RNA editing introduces single nucleotide changes to RNA, thus potentially diversifying gene expression. Recent studies have reported significant changes in RNA editing profiles in disease and development. The functional consequences of these widespread alterations remain elusive because of the unknown function of most RNA editing sites. Here, we carry out a comprehensive analysis of A-to-I editomes in human populations. Surprisingly, we observe highly similar editing profiles across populations despite striking differences in the expression levels of ADAR genes. Striving to explain this discrepancy, we uncover a functional mechanism of A-to-I editing in regulating mRNA abundance. We show that A-to-I editing stabilizes RNA secondary structures and reduces the accessibility of AGO2-miRNA to target sites in mRNAs. The editing-dependent stabilization of mRNAs in turn alters the observed editing levels in the stable RNA repertoire. Our study provides valuable insights into the functional impact of RNA editing in human cells.

  5. Detection of RNA structures in porcine EST data and related mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Gilchrist, Michael J.; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2007-01-01

    -Danish PigEST resource http://pigest.ku.dk which also contains expression information distributed on 97 non-normalized cDNA libraries. RESULTS: We constructed a pipeline, EST2ncRNA, to search for known and novel ncRNAs. The pipeline utilises sequence similarity to ncRNA databases (blast), structure...... similarity to Rfam (RaveNnA) as well as multiple alignments to predict conserved novel putative RNA structures (RNAz). EST2ncRNA was fed with 48,000 contigs and 73,000 singletons available from the PigEST resource. Using the pipeline we identified known RNA structures in 137 contigs and single reads...... (conreads), and predicted high confidence RNA structures in non-protein coding regions of additional 1,262 conreads. Of these, structures in 270 conreads overlap with existing predictions in human. To sum up, the PigEST resource comprises trans-acting elements (ncRNAs) in 715 contigs and 340 singletons...

  6. Avian reovirus L2 genome segment sequences and predicted structure/function of the encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wanhong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The orthoreoviruses are infectious agents that possess a genome comprised of 10 double-stranded RNA segments encased in two concentric protein capsids. Like virtually all RNA viruses, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp enzyme is required for viral propagation. RdRp sequences have been determined for the prototype mammalian orthoreoviruses and for several other closely-related reoviruses, including aquareoviruses, but have not yet been reported for any avian orthoreoviruses. Results We determined the L2 genome segment nucleotide sequences, which encode the RdRp proteins, of two different avian reoviruses, strains ARV138 and ARV176 in order to define conserved and variable regions within reovirus RdRp proteins and to better delineate structure/function of this important enzyme. The ARV138 L2 genome segment was 3829 base pairs long, whereas the ARV176 L2 segment was 3830 nucleotides long. Both segments were predicted to encode λB RdRp proteins 1259 amino acids in length. Alignments of these newly-determined ARV genome segments, and their corresponding proteins, were performed with all currently available homologous mammalian reovirus (MRV and aquareovirus (AqRV genome segment and protein sequences. There was ~55% amino acid identity between ARV λB and MRV λ3 proteins, making the RdRp protein the most highly conserved of currently known orthoreovirus proteins, and there was ~28% identity between ARV λB and homologous MRV and AqRV RdRp proteins. Predictive structure/function mapping of identical and conserved residues within the known MRV λ3 atomic structure indicated most identical amino acids and conservative substitutions were located near and within predicted catalytic domains and lining RdRp channels, whereas non-identical amino acids were generally located on the molecule's surfaces. Conclusion The ARV λB and MRV λ3 proteins showed the highest ARV:MRV identity values (~55% amongst all currently known ARV and MRV

  7. Using the T-Coffee package to build multiple sequence alignments of protein, RNA, DNA sequences and 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taly, Jean-Francois; Magis, Cedrik; Bussotti, Giovanni; Chang, Jia-Ming; Di Tommaso, Paolo; Erb, Ionas; Espinosa-Carrasco, Jose; Kemena, Carsten; Notredame, Cedric

    2011-11-01

    T-Coffee (Tree-based consistency objective function for alignment evaluation) is a versatile multiple sequence alignment (MSA) method suitable for aligning most types of biological sequences. The main strength of T-Coffee is its ability to combine third party aligners and to integrate structural (or homology) information when building MSAs. The series of protocols presented here show how the package can be used to multiply align proteins, RNA and DNA sequences. The protein section shows how users can select the most suitable T-Coffee mode for their data set. Detailed protocols include T-Coffee, the default mode, M-Coffee, a meta version able to combine several third party aligners into one, PSI (position-specific iterated)-Coffee, the homology extended mode suitable for remote homologs and Expresso, the structure-based multiple aligner. We then also show how the T-RMSD (tree based on root mean square deviation) option can be used to produce a functionally informative structure-based clustering. RNA alignment procedures are described for using R-Coffee, a mode able to use predicted RNA secondary structures when aligning RNA sequences. DNA alignments are illustrated with Pro-Coffee, a multiple aligner specific of promoter regions. We also present some of the many reformatting utilities bundled with T-Coffee. The package is an open-source freeware available from http://www.tcoffee.org/.

  8. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghayi, Monir; Condon, Anne; Hoos, Holger H

    2012-02-01

    RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE) predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andronescu et al. Some recently proposed alternatives that leverage partition function calculations find the structure with maximum expected accuracy (MEA) or pseudo-expected accuracy (pseudo-MEA) methods. Advances in prediction methods are typically benchmarked using sensitivity, positive predictive value and their harmonic mean, namely F-measure, on datasets of known reference structures. Since such benchmarks document progress in improving accuracy of computational prediction methods, it is important to understand how measures of accuracy vary as a function of the reference datasets and whether advances in algorithms or thermodynamic parameters yield statistically significant improvements. Our work advances such understanding for the MFE and (pseudo-)MEA-based methods, with respect to the latest datasets and energy parameters. We present three main findings. First, using the bootstrap percentile method, we show that the average F-measure accuracy of the MFE and (pseudo-)MEA-based algorithms, as measured on our largest datasets with over 2000 RNAs from diverse families, is a reliable estimate (within a 2% range with high confidence) of the accuracy of a population of RNA molecules represented by this set. However, average accuracy on smaller classes of RNAs such as a class of 89 Group I introns used previously in benchmarking algorithm accuracy is not reliable enough to draw meaningful conclusions about the relative merits of the MFE and MEA-based algorithms. Second, on our large datasets, the

  9. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...... means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including...

  10. RNArchitecture: a database and a classification system of RNA families, with a focus on structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccaletto, Pietro; Magnus, Marcin; Almeida, Catarina; Zyla, Adriana; Astha, Astha; Pluta, Radoslaw; Baginski, Blazej; Jankowska, Elzbieta; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Wirecki, Tomasz K; Boniecki, Michal J; Stefaniak, Filip; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2018-01-04

    RNArchitecture is a database that provides a comprehensive description of relationships between known families of structured non-coding RNAs, with a focus on structural similarities. The classification is hierarchical and similar to the system used in the SCOP and CATH databases of protein structures. Its central level is Family, which builds on the Rfam catalog and gathers closely related RNAs. Consensus structures of Families are described with a reduced secondary structure representation. Evolutionarily related Families are grouped into Superfamilies. Similar structures are further grouped into Architectures. The highest level, Class, organizes families into very broad structural categories, such as simple or complex structured RNAs. Some groups at different levels of the hierarchy are currently labeled as 'unclassified'. The classification is expected to evolve as new data become available. For each Family with an experimentally determined three-diemsional (3D) structure(s), a representative one is provided. RNArchitecture also presents theoretical models of RNA 3D structure and is open for submission of structural models by users. Compared to other databases, RNArchitecture is unique in its focus on structure-based RNA classification, and in providing a platform for storing RNA 3D structure predictions. RNArchitecture can be accessed at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/RNArchitecture/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. 2-D structure of the A region of Xist RNA and its implication for PRC2 association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Maenner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In placental mammals, inactivation of one of the X chromosomes in female cells ensures sex chromosome dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding Xist RNA is crucial to this process and accumulates on the future inactive X chromosome. The most conserved Xist RNA region, the A region, contains eight or nine repeats separated by U-rich spacers. It is implicated in the recruitment of late inactivated X genes to the silencing compartment and likely in the recruitment of complex PRC2. Little is known about the structure of the A region and more generally about Xist RNA structure. Knowledge of its structure is restricted to an NMR study of a single A repeat element. Our study is the first experimental analysis of the structure of the entire A region in solution. By the use of chemical and enzymatic probes and FRET experiments, using oligonucleotides carrying fluorescent dyes, we resolved problems linked to sequence redundancies and established a 2-D structure for the A region that contains two long stem-loop structures each including four repeats. Interactions formed between repeats and between repeats and spacers stabilize these structures. Conservation of the spacer terminal sequences allows formation of such structures in all sequenced Xist RNAs. By combination of RNP affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation assays, mass spectrometry, and Western blot analysis, we demonstrate that the A region can associate with components of the PRC2 complex in mouse ES cell nuclear extracts. Whilst a single four-repeat motif is able to associate with components of this complex, recruitment of Suz12 is clearly more efficient when the entire A region is present. Our data with their emphasis on the importance of inter-repeat pairing change fundamentally our conception of the 2-D structure of the A region of Xist RNA and support its possible implication in recruitment of the PRC2 complex.

  12. Comparative analysis of mt LSU rRNA secondary structures of Odonates: structural variability and phylogenetic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misof, B; Fleck, G

    2003-12-01

    Secondary structures of the most conserved part of the mt 16S rRNA gene, domains IV and V, have been recently analysed in a comparative study. However, full secondary structures of the mt LSU rRNA molecule are published for only a few insect species. The present study presents full secondary structures of domains I, II, IV and V of Odonates and one representative of mayflies, Ephemera sp. The reconstructions are based on a comparative approach and minimal consensus structures derived from sequence alignments. The inferred structures exhibit remarkable similarities to the published Drosophila melanogaster model, which increases confidence in these structures. Structural variance within Odonates is homoplastic, and neighbour-joining trees based on tree edit distances do not correspond to any of the phylogenetically expected patterns. However, despite homoplastic quantitative structural variation, many similarities between Odonates and Ephemera sp. suggest promising character sets for higher order insect systematics that merit further investigations.

  13. A universal RNA structural motif docking the elbow of tRNA in the ribosome, RNAse P and T-box leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jean; Jossinet, Fabrice; Gautheret, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The structure and function of conserved motifs constituting the apex of Stem I in T-box mRNA leaders are investigated. We point out that this apex shares striking similarities with the L1 stalk (helices 76-78) of the ribosome. A sequence and structure analysis of both elements shows that, similarly to the head of the L1 stalk, the function of the apex of Stem I lies in the docking of tRNA through a stacking interaction with the conserved G19:C56 base pair platform. The inferred structure in the apex of Stem I consists of a module of two T-loops bound together head to tail, a module that is also present in the head of the L1 stalk, but went unnoticed. Supporting the analysis, we show that a highly conserved structure in RNAse P formerly described as the J11/12-J12/11 module, which is precisely known to bind the elbow of tRNA, constitutes a third instance of this T-loop module. A structural analysis explains why six nucleotides constituting the core of this module are highly invariant among all three types of RNA. Our finding that major RNA partners of tRNA bind the elbow with a same RNA structure suggests an explanation for the origin of the tRNA L-shape.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of a protozoal double-stranded RNA virus that infects the enteric pathogen Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mandy E W; Takagi, Yuko; Parent, Kristin N; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2015-01-15

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small, nonenveloped, nonsegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus infecting Giardia lamblia, the most common protozoan pathogen of the human intestine and a major agent of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. GLV (genus Giardiavirus) is a member of family Totiviridae, along with several other groups of protozoal or fungal viruses, including Leishmania RNA viruses and Trichomonas vaginalis viruses. Interestingly, GLV is more closely related than other Totiviridae members to a group of recently discovered metazoan viruses that includes penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Moreover, GLV is the only known protozoal dsRNA virus that can transmit efficiently by extracellular means, also like IMNV. In this study, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction to examine the GLV virion at an estimated resolution of 6.0 Å. Its outermost diameter is 485 Å, making it the largest totivirus capsid analyzed to date. Structural comparisons of GLV and other totiviruses highlighted a related "T=2" capsid organization and a conserved helix-rich fold in the capsid subunits. In agreement with its unique capacity as a protozoal dsRNA virus to survive and transmit through extracellular environments, GLV was found to be more thermoresistant than Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1, but no specific protein machinery to mediate cell entry, such as the fiber complexes in IMNV, could be localized. These and other structural and biochemical findings provide a basis for future work to dissect the cell entry mechanism of GLV into a "primitive" (early-branching) eukaryotic host and an important enteric pathogen of humans. Numerous pathogenic bacteria, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Salmonella enterica, and Vibrio cholerae, are infected with lysogenic bacteriophages that contribute significantly to bacterial virulence. In line with this phenomenon, several pathogenic protozoa, including Giardia lamblia

  15. Sparse RNA folding revisited: space-efficient minimum free energy structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Sebastian; Jabbari, Hosna

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction by energy minimization is the central computational tool for the analysis of structural non-coding RNAs and their interactions. Sparsification has been successfully applied to improve the time efficiency of various structure prediction algorithms while guaranteeing the same result; however, for many such folding problems, space efficiency is of even greater concern, particularly for long RNA sequences. So far, space-efficient sparsified RNA folding with fold reconstruction was solved only for simple base-pair-based pseudo-energy models. Here, we revisit the problem of space-efficient free energy minimization. Whereas the space-efficient minimization of the free energy has been sketched before, the reconstruction of the optimum structure has not even been discussed. We show that this reconstruction is not possible in trivial extension of the method for simple energy models. Then, we present the time- and space-efficient sparsified free energy minimization algorithm SparseMFEFold that guarantees MFE structure prediction. In particular, this novel algorithm provides efficient fold reconstruction based on dynamically garbage-collected trace arrows. The complexity of our algorithm depends on two parameters, the number of candidates Z and the number of trace arrows T; both are bounded by [Formula: see text], but are typically much smaller. The time complexity of RNA folding is reduced from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]; the space complexity, from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. Our empirical results show more than 80 % space savings over RNAfold [Vienna RNA package] on the long RNAs from the RNA STRAND database (≥2500 bases). The presented technique is intentionally generalizable to complex prediction algorithms; due to their high space demands, algorithms like pseudoknot prediction and RNA-RNA-interaction prediction are expected to profit even stronger than "standard" MFE folding. SparseMFEFold is free

  16. Visualizing the global secondary structure of a viral RNA genome with cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmann, Rees F; Gopal, Ajaykumar; Athavale, Shreyas S; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M; Harvey, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    The lifecycle, and therefore the virulence, of single-stranded (ss)-RNA viruses is regulated not only by their particular protein gene products, but also by the secondary and tertiary structure of their genomes. The secondary structure of the entire genomic RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was recently determined by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). The SHAPE analysis suggested a single highly extended secondary structure with much less branching than occurs in the ensemble of structures predicted by purely thermodynamic algorithms. Here we examine the solution-equilibrated STMV genome by direct visualization with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), using an RNA of similar length transcribed from the yeast genome as a control. The cryo-EM data reveal an ensemble of branching patterns that are collectively consistent with the SHAPE-derived secondary structure model. Thus, our results both elucidate the statistical nature of the secondary structure of large ss-RNAs and give visual support for modern RNA structure determination methods. Additionally, this work introduces cryo-EM as a means to distinguish between competing secondary structure models if the models differ significantly in terms of the number and/or length of branches. Furthermore, with the latest advances in cryo-EM technology, we suggest the possibility of developing methods that incorporate restraints from cryo-EM into the next generation of algorithms for the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structures. © 2015 Garmann et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  18. Predicting transmission of structure-borne sound power from machines by including terminal cross-coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlrich, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Structure-borne sound generated by audible vibration of machines in vehicles, equipment and house-hold appliances is often a major cause of noise. Such vibration of complex machines is mostly determined and quantified by measurements. It has been found that characterization of the vibratory source...... strength and the prediction of power transmission to a supporting structure or the machine casing itself can be greatly simplified if all mobility cross-terms and spatial cross-coupling of source velocities can be neglected in the analysis. In many cases this gives an acceptable engineering accuracy......, especially at mid- and high-frequencies. For structurally compact machines, however, the influence of cross-coupling cannot always be ignored. The present paper addresses this problem and examines the transmission of structure-borne sound power by including spatial cross-coupling between pairs...

  19. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  20. Structure and Dynamics of RNA Repeat Expansions That Cause Huntington's Disease and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; VanEtten, Damian M; Fountain, Matthew A; Yildirim, Ilyas; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-07-11

    RNA repeat expansions cause a host of incurable, genetically defined diseases. The most common class of RNA repeats consists of trinucleotide repeats. These long, repeating transcripts fold into hairpins containing 1 × 1 internal loops that can mediate disease via a variety of mechanism(s) in which RNA is the central player. Two of these disorders are Huntington's disease and myotonic dystrophy type 1, which are caused by r(CAG) and r(CUG) repeats, respectively. We report the structures of two RNA constructs containing three copies of a r(CAG) [r(3×CAG)] or r(CUG) [r(3×CUG)] motif that were modeled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and simulated annealing with restrained molecular dynamics. The 1 × 1 internal loops of r(3×CAG) are stabilized by one-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) AA pairs, while those of r(3×CUG) prefer one- or two-hydrogen bond (cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick) UU pairs. Assigned chemical shifts for the residues depended on the identity of neighbors or next nearest neighbors. Additional insights into the dynamics of these RNA constructs were gained by molecular dynamics simulations and a discrete path sampling method. Results indicate that the global structures of the RNA are A-form and that the loop regions are dynamic. The results will be useful for understanding the dynamic trajectory of these RNA repeats but also may aid in the development of therapeutics.

  1. The structure of the box C/D enzyme reveals regulation of RNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinaite, Audrone; Simon, Bernd; Skjaerven, Lars; Rakwalska-Bange, Magdalena; Gabel, Frank; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2013-10-24

    Post-transcriptional modifications are essential to the cell life cycle, as they affect both pre-ribosomal RNA processing and ribosome assembly. The box C/D ribonucleoprotein enzyme that methylates ribosomal RNA at the 2'-O-ribose uses a multitude of guide RNAs as templates for the recognition of rRNA target sites. Two methylation guide sequences are combined on each guide RNA, the significance of which has remained unclear. Here we use a powerful combination of NMR spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering to solve the structure of the 390 kDa archaeal RNP enzyme bound to substrate RNA. We show that the two methylation guide sequences are located in different environments in the complex and that the methylation of physiological substrates targeted by the same guide RNA occurs sequentially. This structure provides a means for differential control of methylation levels at the two sites and at the same time offers an unexpected regulatory mechanism for rRNA folding.

  2. Evolving stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, James WJ; Tataru, Paula Cristina; Stains, Joe

    2012-01-01

    with quite different structure could have very similar predictive ability. Many ambiguous grammars were found which were at least as effective as the best current unambiguous grammars. Conclusions Overall the method of evolving SCFGs for RNA secondary structure prediction proved effective in finding many...... grammars that had strong predictive accuracy, as good or slightly better than those designed manually. Furthermore, several of the best grammars found were ambiguous, demonstrating that such grammars should not be disregarded.......Background Stochastic Context-Free Grammars (SCFGs) were applied successfully to RNA secondary structure prediction in the early 90s, and used in combination with comparative methods in the late 90s. The set of SCFGs potentially useful for RNA secondary structure prediction is very large, but a few...

  3. An evolutionary model for protein-coding regions with conserved RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Forsberg, Roald; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret

    2004-01-01

    components of traditional phylogenetic models. We applied this to a data set of full-genome sequences from the hepatitis C virus where five RNA structures are mapped within the coding region. This allowed us to partition the effects of selection on different structural elements and to test various hypotheses...... concerning the relation of these effects. Of particular interest, we found evidence of a functional role of loop and bulge regions, as these were shown to evolve according to a different and more constrained selective regime than the nonpairing regions outside the RNA structures. Other potential applications......Here we present a model of nucleotide substitution in protein-coding regions that also encode the formation of conserved RNA structures. In such regions, apparent evolutionary context dependencies exist, both between nucleotides occupying the same codon and between nucleotides forming a base pair...

  4. Conformational flexibility in the RNA stem-loop structures formed by CAG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pei; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin; Lam, Sik Lok

    2017-06-01

    The expansion of CAG repeats has been found to be associated with at least nine human genetic disorders. In these disorders, the full-length expanded CAG RNA transcripts are cleaved into small CAG-repeated RNAs which are cytotoxic and known to be capable of forming hairpins. To better understand the RNA pathogenic mechanism, in this study we have performed high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance structural investigations on the RNA hairpins formed by CAG repeats. Our results show the formation of a type III AGCA tetraloop and reveal the effect of stem rigidity on the loop conformational flexibility. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. DMS-MaPseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Rouskin, Silvi

    2017-01-01

    Coupling of structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structure studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduce biases and necessitate population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate (DMS) mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-MaPseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase. DMS-MaPseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low-abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-MaPseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in noncanonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-MaPseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs with their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-MaPseq's capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure.

  6. RNAsnp: efficient detection of local RNA secondary structure changes induced by SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Structural characteristics are essential for the functioning of many noncoding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements of mRNAs. SNPs may disrupt these structures, interfere with their molecular function, and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNA folding algorithms can provide detailed insights into stru...

  7. Determination of low-energy structures of a small RNA hairpin using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy landscape of RNA is known to be extremely rugged, and hence finding low-energy structures starting from a random structure is a challenging task for any optimization algorithm. In the current work, we have investigated the ability of one Monte Carlo–based optimization algorithm, Temperature Basin Paving, ...

  8. Non-Watson Crick base pairs might stabilize RNA structural motifs in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Chandrasekhar K and Malathi R 2003 Non-Watson Crick base pairs might stabilize RNA structural motifs in ribozymes – A comparative study of group-I intron structures; ... recognition sites for proteins, metal ions and small mole- cules (Jeffrey et al 1999; ..... From the sequence analysis (table 1, figure 1) we find an extreme ...

  9. DMS-MaPseq for genome-wide or targeted RNA structure probing in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubradt, Meghan; Gupta, Paromita; Persad, Sitara; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Rouskin, Silvi

    2017-01-01

    Coupling structure-specific in vivo chemical modification to next-generation sequencing is transforming RNA secondary structural studies in living cells. The dominant strategy for detecting in vivo chemical modifications uses reverse transcriptase truncation products, which introduces biases and necessitates population-average assessments of RNA structure. Here we present dimethyl sulfate mutational profiling with sequencing (DMS-MaPseq), which encodes DMS modifications as mismatches using a thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase (TGIRT). DMS-MaPseq yields a high signal-to-noise ratio, can report multiple structural features per molecule, and allows both genome-wide studies and focused in vivo investigations of even low abundance RNAs. We apply DMS-MaPseq for the first analysis of RNA structure within an animal tissue and to identify a functional structure involved in non-canonical translation initiation. Additionally, we use DMS-MaPseq to compare the in vivo structure of pre-mRNAs to their mature isoforms. These applications illustrate DMS-MaPseq’s capacity to dramatically expand in vivo analysis of RNA structure. PMID:27819661

  10. Homology Modeling and Analysis of Structure Predictions of the Bovine Rhinitis B Virus RNA Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K. Rai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Rhinitis B Virus (BRBV is a picornavirus responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle. It is probably the least characterized among the aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV with a ~43% identical polyprotein sequence and as much as 67% identical sequence for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is also known as 3D polymerase (3Dpol. In the present study we carried out phylogenetic analysis, structure based sequence alignment and prediction of three-dimensional structure of BRBV 3Dpol using a combination of different computational tools. Model structures of BRBV 3Dpol were verified for their stereochemical quality and accuracy. The BRBV 3Dpol structure predicted by SWISS-MODEL exhibited highest scores in terms of stereochemical quality and accuracy, which were in the range of 2Å resolution crystal structures. The active site, nucleic acid binding site and overall structure were observed to be in agreement with the crystal structure of unliganded as well as template/primer (T/P, nucleotide tri-phosphate (NTP and pyrophosphate (PPi bound FMDV 3Dpol (PDB, 1U09 and 2E9Z. The closest proximity of BRBV and FMDV 3Dpol as compared to human rhinovirus type 16 (HRV-16 and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV 3Dpols is also substantiated by phylogeny analysis and root-mean square deviation (RMSD between C-α traces of the polymerase structures. The absence of positively charged α-helix at C terminal, significant differences in non-covalent interactions especially salt bridges and CH-pi interactions around T/P channel of BRBV 3Dpol compared to FMDV 3Dpol, indicate that despite a very high homology to FMDV 3Dpol, BRBV 3Dpol may adopt a different mechanism for handling its substrates and adapting to physiological requirements. Our findings will be valuable in the

  11. Analysis of the Tomato spotted wilt virus ambisense S RNA-encoded hairpin structure in translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Geerts-Dimitriadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intergenic region (IR of ambisense RNA segments from animal- and plant-infecting (-RNA viruses functions as a bidirectional transcription terminator. The IR sequence of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV ambisense S RNA contains stretches that are highly rich in A-residues and U-residues and is predicted to fold into a stable hairpin structure. The presence of this hairpin structure sequence in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of TSWV mRNAs implies a possible role in translation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyse the role of the predicted hairpin structure in translation, various Renilla luciferase constructs containing modified 3' and/or 5' UTR sequences of the TSWV S RNA encoded nucleocapsid (N gene were analyzed for expression. While good luciferase expression levels were obtained from constructs containing the 5' UTR and the 3' UTR, luciferase expression was lost when the hairpin structure sequence was removed from the 3' UTR. Constructs that only lacked the 5' UTR, still rendered good expression levels. When in addition the entire 3' UTR was exchanged for that of the S RNA encoded non-structural (NSs gene transcript, containing the complementary hairpin folding sequence, the loss of luciferase expression could only be recovered by providing the 5' UTR sequence of the NSs transcript. Luciferase activity remained unaltered when the hairpin structure sequence was swapped for the analogous one from Tomato yellow ring virus, another distinct tospovirus. The addition of N and NSs proteins further increased luciferase expression levels from hairpin structure containing constructs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest a role for the predicted hairpin structure in translation in concert with the viral N and NSs proteins. The presence of stretches highly rich in A-residues does not rule out a concerted action with a poly(A-tail-binding protein. A common transcription termination and translation strategy for plant

  12. Structural profiles of human miRNA families from pairwise clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Þórarinsson, Elfar; Reiche, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    of obtained clusters by WAR. As a result, the common secondary structure was successfully determined for four FOLDALIGN clusters: the RF00027 structural family of the Rfam database and three clusters with previously undescribed consensus structures. Availability: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/mirclust......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small, approximately 21 nt long, riboregulators inhibiting gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. Their most distinctive structural feature is the foldback hairpin of their precursor pre-miRNAs. Even though each pre-miRNA deposited in miRBase has its...... secondary structure already predicted, little is known about the patterns of structural conservation among pre-miRNAs. We address this issue by clustering the human pre-miRNA sequences based on pairwise, sequence and secondary structure alignment using FOLDALIGN, followed by global multiple alignment...

  13. Mathematical and Biological Modelling of RNA Secondary Structure and Its Effects on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary structures within the 5′ untranslated regions of messenger RNAs can have profound effects on the efficiency of translation of their messages and thereby on gene expression. Consequently they can act as important regulatory motifs in both physiological and pathological settings. Current approaches to predicting the secondary structure of these RNA sequences find the structure with the global-minimum free energy. However, since RNA folds progressively from the 5′ end when synthesised or released from the translational machinery, this may not be the most probable structure. We discuss secondary structure prediction based on local-minimisation of free energy with thermodynamic fluctuations as nucleotides are added to the 3′ end and show that these can result in different secondary structures. We also discuss approaches for studying the extent of the translational inhibition specified by structures within the 5′ untranslated region.

  14. Structure of the K-turn U4 RNA: a combined NMR and SANS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falb, Melanie; Amata, Irene; Gabel, Frank; Simon, Bernd; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2010-10-01

    K-turn motifs are universal RNA structural elements providing a binding platform for proteins in several cellular contexts. Their characteristic is a sharp kink in the phosphate backbone that puts the two helical stems of the protein-bound RNA at an angle of 60°. However, to date no high-resolution structure of a naked K-turn motif is available. Here, we present the first structural investigation at atomic resolution of an unbound K-turn RNA (the spliceosomal U4-Kt RNA) by a combination of NMR and small-angle neutron scattering data. With this study, we wish to address the question whether the K-turn structural motif assumes the sharply kinked conformation in the absence of protein binders and divalent cations. Previous studies have addressed this question by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulations, suggesting that the K-turn RNAs exist in equilibrium between a kinked conformation, which is competent for protein binding, and a more extended conformation, with the population distribution depending on the concentration of divalent cations. Our data shows that the U4-Kt RNA predominantly assumes the more extended conformation in the absence of proteins and divalent cations. The internal loop region is well structured but adopts a different conformation from the one observed in complex with proteins. Our data suggests that the K-turn consensus sequence does not per se code for the kinked conformation; instead the sharp backbone kink requires to be stabilized by protein binders.

  15. Extending the Intermediate Data Structure (IDS for longitudinal historical databases to include geographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Hedefalk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Intermediate Data Structure (IDS is a standardised database structure for longitudinal historical databases. Such a common structure facilitates data sharing and comparative research. In this study, we propose an extended version of IDS, named IDS-Geo, that also includes geographic data. The geographic data that will be stored in IDS-Geo are primarily buildings and/or property units, and the purpose of these geographic data is mainly to link individuals to places in space. When we want to assign such detailed spatial locations to individuals (in times before there were any detailed house addresses available, we often have to create tailored geographic datasets. In those cases, there are benefits of storing geographic data in the same structure as the demographic data. Moreover, we propose the export of data from IDS-Geo using an eXtensible Markup Language (XML Schema. IDS-Geo is implemented in a case study using historical property units, for the period 1804 to 1913, stored in a geographically extended version of the Scanian Economic Demographic Database (SEDD. To fit into the IDS-Geo data structure, we included an object lifeline representation of all of the property units (based on the snapshot time representation of single historical maps and poll-tax registers. The case study verifies that the IDS-Geo model is capable of handling geographic data that can be linked to demographic data.

  16. Crystal Structure and Activity of the Endoribonuclease Domain of the piRNA Pathway Factor Maelstrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Matsumoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs protect the genome from transposons in animal gonads. Maelstrom (Mael is an evolutionarily conserved protein, composed of a high-mobility group (HMG domain and a MAEL domain, and is essential for piRNA-mediated transcriptional transposon silencing in various species, such as Drosophila and mice. However, its structure and biochemical function have remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Drosophila melanogaster Mael, at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the MAEL domain has an RNase H-like fold but lacks canonical catalytic residues conserved among RNase H-like superfamily nucleases. Our biochemical analyses reveal that the MAEL domain exhibits single-stranded RNA (ssRNA-specific endonuclease activity. Our cell-based analyses further indicate that ssRNA cleavage activity appears dispensable for piRNA-mediated transcriptional transposon silencing in Drosophila. Our findings provide clues toward understanding the multiple roles of Mael in the piRNA pathway.

  17. Hydration sites of unpaired RNA bases: a statistical analysis of the PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carugo Oliviero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydration is crucial for RNA structure and function. X-ray crystallography is the most commonly used method to determine RNA structures and hydration and, therefore, statistical surveys are based on crystallographic results, the number of which is quickly increasing. Results A statistical analysis of the water molecule distribution in high-resolution X-ray structures of unpaired RNA nucleotides showed that: different bases have the same penchant to be surrounded by water molecules; clusters of water molecules indicate possible hydration sites, which, in some cases, match those of the major and minor grooves of RNA and DNA double helices; complex hydrogen bond networks characterize the solvation of the nucleotides, resulting in a significant rigidity of the base and its surrounding water molecules. Interestingly, the hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases do not match, in general, the positions that are occupied by the second nucleotide when the base-pair is formed. Conclusions The hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases were found. They do not replicate the atom positions of complementary bases in the Watson-Crick pairs.

  18. Structure of the Escherichia coli ProQ RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Grecia M; Hardwick, Steven W; Maslen, Sarah L; Skehel, J Mark; Holmqvist, Erik; Vogel, Jörg; Bateman, Alex; Luisi, Ben F; Broadhurst, R William

    2017-05-01

    The protein ProQ has recently been identified as a global small noncoding RNA-binding protein in Salmonella, and a similar role is anticipated for its numerous homologs in divergent bacterial species. We report the solution structure of Escherichia coli ProQ, revealing an N-terminal FinO-like domain, a C-terminal domain that unexpectedly has a Tudor domain fold commonly found in eukaryotes, and an elongated bridging intradomain linker that is flexible but nonetheless incompressible. Structure-based sequence analysis suggests that the Tudor domain was acquired through horizontal gene transfer and gene fusion to the ancestral FinO-like domain. Through a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have mapped putative RNA-binding surfaces on all three domains of ProQ and modeled the protein's conformation in the apo and RNA-bound forms. Taken together, these data suggest how the FinO, Tudor, and linker domains of ProQ cooperate to recognize complex RNA structures and serve to promote RNA-mediated regulation. © 2017 Gonzalez et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. High-throughput RNA structure probing reveals critical folding events during early 60S ribosome assembly in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlacu, Elena; Lackmann, Fredrik; Aguilar, Lisbeth-Carolina; Belikov, Sergey; Nues, Rob van; Trahan, Christian; Hector, Ralph D; Dominelli-Whiteley, Nicholas; Cockroft, Scott L; Wieslander, Lars; Oeffinger, Marlene; Granneman, Sander

    2017-09-28

    While the protein composition of various yeast 60S ribosomal subunit assembly intermediates has been studied in detail, little is known about ribosomal RNA (rRNA) structural rearrangements that take place during early 60S assembly steps. Using a high-throughput RNA structure probing method, we provide nucleotide resolution insights into rRNA structural rearrangements during nucleolar 60S assembly. Our results suggest that many rRNA-folding steps, such as folding of 5.8S rRNA, occur at a very specific stage of assembly, and propose that downstream nuclear assembly events can only continue once 5.8S folding has been completed. Our maps of nucleotide flexibility enable making predictions about the establishment of protein-rRNA interactions, providing intriguing insights into the temporal order of protein-rRNA as well as long-range inter-domain rRNA interactions. These data argue that many distant domains in the rRNA can assemble simultaneously during early 60S assembly and underscore the enormous complexity of 60S synthesis.Ribosome biogenesis is a dynamic process that involves the ordered assembly of ribosomal proteins and numerous RNA structural rearrangements. Here the authors apply ChemModSeq, a high-throughput RNA structure probing method, to quantitatively measure changes in RNA flexibility during the nucleolar stages of 60S assembly in yeast.

  20. General enumeration of RNA secondary structures based on new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crick base pairs between AU and GC. Based on the new representation, this paper also computes the number of various types of constrained secondary structures taking the minimum stack length 1 and minimum size m for each bonding loop as ...

  1. A structure zone diagram including plasma based deposition and ion etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-10-14

    An extended structure zone diagram is proposed that includes energetic deposition, characterized by a large flux of ions typical for deposition by filtered cathodic arcs and high power impulse magnetron sputtering. The axes are comprised of a generalized homologous temperature, the normalized kinetic energy flux, and the net film thickness, which can be negative due to ion etching. It is stressed that the number of primary physical parameters affecting growth by far exceeds the number of available axes in such a diagram and therefore it can only provide an approximate and simplified illustration of the growth condition?structure relationships.

  2. Crystal structure of RNA-DNA duplex provides insight into conformational changes induced by RNase H binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan R; Shaban, Nadine M; Perrino, Fred W; Hollis, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    RNA-DNA hybrids play essential roles in a variety of biological processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and viral integration. Ribonucleotides incorporated within DNA are hydrolyzed by RNase H enzymes in a removal process that is necessary for maintaining genomic stability. In order to understand the structural determinants involved in recognition of a hybrid substrate by RNase H we have determined the crystal structure of a dodecameric non-polypurine/polypyrimidine tract RNA-DNA duplex. A comparison to the same sequence bound to RNase H, reveals structural changes to the duplex that include widening of the major groove to 12.5 Å from 4.2 Å and decreasing the degree of bending along the axis which may play a crucial role in the ribonucleotide recognition and cleavage mechanism within RNase H. This structure allows a direct comparison to be made about the conformational changes induced in RNA-DNA hybrids upon binding to RNase H and may provide insight into how dysfunction in the endonuclease causes disease.

  3. Atomic-accuracy prediction of protein loop structures through an RNA-inspired Ansatz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rhiju

    2013-01-01

    Consistently predicting biopolymer structure at atomic resolution from sequence alone remains a difficult problem, even for small sub-segments of large proteins. Such loop prediction challenges, which arise frequently in comparative modeling and protein design, can become intractable as loop lengths exceed 10 residues and if surrounding side-chain conformations are erased. Current approaches, such as the protein local optimization protocol or kinematic inversion closure (KIC) Monte Carlo, involve stages that coarse-grain proteins, simplifying modeling but precluding a systematic search of all-atom configurations. This article introduces an alternative modeling strategy based on a 'stepwise ansatz', recently developed for RNA modeling, which posits that any realistic all-atom molecular conformation can be built up by residue-by-residue stepwise enumeration. When harnessed to a dynamic-programming-like recursion in the Rosetta framework, the resulting stepwise assembly (SWA) protocol enables enumerative sampling of a 12 residue loop at a significant but achievable cost of thousands of CPU-hours. In a previously established benchmark, SWA recovers crystallographic conformations with sub-Angstrom accuracy for 19 of 20 loops, compared to 14 of 20 by KIC modeling with a comparable expenditure of computational power. Furthermore, SWA gives high accuracy results on an additional set of 15 loops highlighted in the biological literature for their irregularity or unusual length. Successes include cis-Pro touch turns, loops that pass through tunnels of other side-chains, and loops of lengths up to 24 residues. Remaining problem cases are traced to inaccuracies in the Rosetta all-atom energy function. In five additional blind tests, SWA achieves sub-Angstrom accuracy models, including the first such success in a protein/RNA binding interface, the YbxF/kink-turn interaction in the fourth 'RNA-puzzle' competition. These results establish all-atom enumeration as an unusually

  4. Atomic-accuracy prediction of protein loop structures through an RNA-inspired Ansatz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiju Das

    Full Text Available Consistently predicting biopolymer structure at atomic resolution from sequence alone remains a difficult problem, even for small sub-segments of large proteins. Such loop prediction challenges, which arise frequently in comparative modeling and protein design, can become intractable as loop lengths exceed 10 residues and if surrounding side-chain conformations are erased. Current approaches, such as the protein local optimization protocol or kinematic inversion closure (KIC Monte Carlo, involve stages that coarse-grain proteins, simplifying modeling but precluding a systematic search of all-atom configurations. This article introduces an alternative modeling strategy based on a 'stepwise ansatz', recently developed for RNA modeling, which posits that any realistic all-atom molecular conformation can be built up by residue-by-residue stepwise enumeration. When harnessed to a dynamic-programming-like recursion in the Rosetta framework, the resulting stepwise assembly (SWA protocol enables enumerative sampling of a 12 residue loop at a significant but achievable cost of thousands of CPU-hours. In a previously established benchmark, SWA recovers crystallographic conformations with sub-Angstrom accuracy for 19 of 20 loops, compared to 14 of 20 by KIC modeling with a comparable expenditure of computational power. Furthermore, SWA gives high accuracy results on an additional set of 15 loops highlighted in the biological literature for their irregularity or unusual length. Successes include cis-Pro touch turns, loops that pass through tunnels of other side-chains, and loops of lengths up to 24 residues. Remaining problem cases are traced to inaccuracies in the Rosetta all-atom energy function. In five additional blind tests, SWA achieves sub-Angstrom accuracy models, including the first such success in a protein/RNA binding interface, the YbxF/kink-turn interaction in the fourth 'RNA-puzzle' competition. These results establish all-atom enumeration as

  5. SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R.; Krogh, Anders; Vinther, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Selective 2′ Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) is an accurate method for probing of RNA secondary structure. In existing SHAPE methods, the SHAPE probing signal is normalized to a no-reagent control to correct for the background caused by premature termination of the reverse transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES-based selection of cDNA–RNA hybrids on streptavidin beads effectively removes the large majority of background signal present in SHAPE probing data and that sequencing-based SHAPES data contain the same amount of RNA structure data as regular sequencing-based SHAPE data obtained through normalization to a no-reagent control. Moreover, the selection efficiently enriches for probed RNAs, suggesting that the SHAPES strategy will be useful for applications with high-background and low-probing signal such as in vivo RNA structure probing. PMID:25805860

  6. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.

  7. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora Lika, E-mail: dmakino@biochem.mpg.de; Conti, Elena [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented.

  8. Self containment, a property of modular RNA structures, distinguishes microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miler T Lee

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available RNA molecules will tend to adopt a folded conformation through the pairing of bases on a single strand; the resulting so-called secondary structure is critical to the function of many types of RNA. The secondary structure of a particular substring of functional RNA may depend on its surrounding sequence. Yet, some RNAs such as microRNAs retain their specific structures during biogenesis, which involves extraction of the substructure from a larger structural context, while other functional RNAs may be composed of a fusion of independent substructures. Such observations raise the question of whether particular functional RNA substructures may be selected for invariance of secondary structure to their surrounding nucleotide context. We define the property of self containment to be the tendency for an RNA sequence to robustly adopt the same optimal secondary structure regardless of whether it exists in isolation or is a substring of a longer sequence of arbitrary nucleotide content. We measured degree of self containment using a scoring method we call the self-containment index and found that miRNA stem loops exhibit high self containment, consistent with the requirement for structural invariance imposed by the miRNA biogenesis pathway, while most other structured RNAs do not. Further analysis revealed a trend toward higher self containment among clustered and conserved miRNAs, suggesting that high self containment may be a characteristic of novel miRNAs acquiring new genomic contexts. We found that miRNAs display significantly enhanced self containment compared to other functional RNAs, but we also found a trend toward natural selection for self containment in most functional RNA classes. We suggest that self containment arises out of selection for robustness against perturbations, invariance during biogenesis, and modular composition of structural function. Analysis of self containment will be important for both annotation and design of functional

  9. Efficient pairwise RNA structure prediction using probabilistic alignment constraints in Dynalign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Gaurav

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Joint alignment and secondary structure prediction of two RNA sequences can significantly improve the accuracy of the structural predictions. Methods addressing this problem, however, are forced to employ constraints that reduce computation by restricting the alignments and/or structures (i.e. folds that are permissible. In this paper, a new methodology is presented for the purpose of establishing alignment constraints based on nucleotide alignment and insertion posterior probabilities. Using a hidden Markov model, posterior probabilities of alignment and insertion are computed for all possible pairings of nucleotide positions from the two sequences. These alignment and insertion posterior probabilities are additively combined to obtain probabilities of co-incidence for nucleotide position pairs. A suitable alignment constraint is obtained by thresholding the co-incidence probabilities. The constraint is integrated with Dynalign, a free energy minimization algorithm for joint alignment and secondary structure prediction. The resulting method is benchmarked against the previous version of Dynalign and against other programs for pairwise RNA structure prediction. Results The proposed technique eliminates manual parameter selection in Dynalign and provides significant computational time savings in comparison to prior constraints in Dynalign while simultaneously providing a small improvement in the structural prediction accuracy. Savings are also realized in memory. In experiments over a 5S RNA dataset with average sequence length of approximately 120 nucleotides, the method reduces computation by a factor of 2. The method performs favorably in comparison to other programs for pairwise RNA structure prediction: yielding better accuracy, on average, and requiring significantly lesser computational resources. Conclusion Probabilistic analysis can be utilized in order to automate the determination of alignment constraints for

  10. Using sequence signatures and kink-turn motifs in knowledge-based statistical potentials for RNA structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, Cigdem Sevim; Kim, Namhee; Schlick, Tamar

    2017-05-19

    Kink turns are widely occurring motifs in RNA, located in internal loops and associated with many biological functions including translation, regulation and splicing. The associated sequence pattern, a 3-nt bulge and G-A, A-G base-pairs, generates an angle of ∼50° along the helical axis due to A-minor interactions. The conserved sequence and distinct secondary structures of kink-turns (k-turn) suggest computational folding rules to predict k-turn-like topologies from sequence. Here, we annotate observed k-turn motifs within a non-redundant RNA dataset based on sequence signatures and geometrical features, analyze bending and torsion angles, and determine distinct knowledge-based potentials with and without k-turn motifs. We apply these scoring potentials to our RAGTOP (RNA-As-Graph-Topologies) graph sampling protocol to construct and sample coarse-grained graph representations of RNAs from a given secondary structure. We present graph-sampling results for 35 RNAs, including 12 k-turn and 23 non k-turn internal loops, and compare the results to solved structures and to RAGTOP results without special k-turn potentials. Significant improvements are observed with the updated scoring potentials compared to the k-turn-free potentials. Because k-turns represent a classic example of sequence/structure motif, our study suggests that other such motifs with sequence signatures and unique geometrical features can similarly be utilized for RNA structure prediction and design. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Molecular evolution of rDNA in early diverging Metazoa: First comparative analysis and phylogenetic application of complete SSU rRNA secondary structures in Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wörheide Gert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoplasmic ribosomal small subunit (SSU, 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA is the most frequently-used gene for molecular phylogenetic studies. However, information regarding its secondary structure is neglected in most phylogenetic analyses. Incorporation of this information is essential in order to apply specific rRNA evolutionary models to overcome the problem of co-evolution of paired sites, which violates the basic assumption of the independent evolution of sites made by most phylogenetic methods. Information about secondary structure also supports the process of aligning rRNA sequences across taxa. Both aspects have been shown to increase the accuracy of phylogenetic reconstructions within various taxa. Here, we explore SSU rRNA secondary structures from the three extant classes of Phylum Porifera (Grant, 1836, a pivotal, but largely unresolved taxon of early branching Metazoa. This is the first phylogenetic study of poriferan SSU rRNA data to date that includes detailed comparative secondary structure information for all three sponge classes. Results We found base compositional and structural differences in SSU rRNA among Demospongiae, Hexactinellida (glass sponges and Calcarea (calcareous sponges. We showed that analyses of primary rRNA sequences, including secondary structure-specific evolutionary models, in combination with reconstruction of the evolution of unusual structural features, reveal a substantial amount of additional information. Of special note was the finding that the gene tree topologies of marine haplosclerid demosponges, which are inconsistent with the current morphology-based classification, are supported by our reconstructed evolution of secondary structure features. Therefore, these features can provide alternative support for sequence-based topologies and give insights into the evolution of the molecule itself. To encourage and facilitate the application of rRNA models in phylogenetics of early

  12. Structural and molecular basis of mismatch correction and ribavirin excision from coronavirus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, François; Subissi, Lorenzo; Silveira De Morais, Ana Theresa; Le, Nhung Thi Tuyet; Sevajol, Marion; Gluais, Laure; Decroly, Etienne; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gérard; Canard, Bruno; Imbert, Isabelle

    2018-01-09

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) stand out among RNA viruses because of their unusually large genomes (∼30 kb) associated with low mutation rates. CoVs code for nsp14, a bifunctional enzyme carrying RNA cap guanine N7-methyltransferase (MTase) and 3'-5' exoribonuclease (ExoN) activities. ExoN excises nucleotide mismatches at the RNA 3'-end in vitro, and its inactivation in vivo jeopardizes viral genetic stability. Here, we demonstrate for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV an RNA synthesis and proofreading pathway through association of nsp14 with the low-fidelity nsp12 viral RNA polymerase. Through this pathway, the antiviral compound ribavirin 5'-monophosphate is significantly incorporated but also readily excised from RNA, which may explain its limited efficacy in vivo. The crystal structure at 3.38 Å resolution of SARS-CoV nsp14 in complex with its cofactor nsp10 adds to the uniqueness of CoVs among RNA viruses: The MTase domain presents a new fold that differs sharply from the canonical Rossmann fold.

  13. Structural insights into mechanisms of the small RNA methyltransferase HEN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ying; Ji, Lijuan; Huang, Qichen; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Jin-Biao; (UAB); (UCR)

    2010-02-22

    RNA silencing is a conserved regulatory mechanism in fungi, plants and animals that regulates gene expression and defence against viruses and transgenes. Small silencing RNAs of {approx}20-30 nucleotides and their associated effector proteins, the Argonaute family proteins, are the central components in RNA silencing. A subset of small RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in plants, Piwi-interacting RNAs in animals and siRNAs in Drosophila, requires an additional crucial step for their maturation; that is, 2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal nucleotide. A conserved S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase, HUA ENHANCER 1 (HEN1), and its homologues are responsible for this specific modification. Here we report the 3.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of full-length HEN1 from Arabidopsis in complex with a 22-nucleotide small RNA duplex and cofactor product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. Highly cooperative recognition of the small RNA substrate by multiple RNA binding domains and the methyltransferase domain in HEN1 measures the length of the RNA duplex and determines the substrate specificity. Metal ion coordination by both 2' and 3' hydroxyls on the 3'-terminal nucleotide and four invariant residues in the active site of the methyltransferase domain suggests a novel Mg{sup 2+}-dependent 2'-O-methylation mechanism.

  14. Structural features important for the RNA chaperone activity of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins from wheat (Triticum avestivum) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Han, Ji Hoon; Kang, Hunseung

    2013-10-01

    Despite the increase in understanding of RNA chaperone activity of zinc finger-containing glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (RZs) during the cold adaptation process, the structural features relevant to the RNA chaperone activity of RZs still largely remain to be established. To investigate the structural determinants important for the RNA chaperone activity of RZs, domain-swapping and deletion analyses was carried out to assess the contribution of the N-terminal zinc finger RNA-recognition motif (RRM) domain and the C-terminal glycine-rich region of wheat (Triticum avestivum) and rice (Oryza sativa) RZs to RNA chaperone activity. Although the amino acid sequence similarity among wheat TaRZ2, wheat TaRZ3, and rice OsRZ1 was high, only TaRZ2 had RNA chaperone activity as evidenced by complementation ability in cold-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant cell under cold stress and in vivo and in vitro nucleic acid-melting activity. Domain-swapping and deletion analysis demonstrated that the overall folding of RZs governed by the N-terminal RRM domain and the C-terminal glycine-rich region, as well as the size of the disordered C-terminal glycine-rich region, are crucial for the RNA chaperone activity of RZs. Collectively, these results indicate that a specific modular arrangement of RRM domain and the disordered C-terminal region determines the RNA chaperone activity of RZs in cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Luo, Xiao; Deng, Binbin; Giancola, Jolynn B.; McComb, David W.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Dong, Yizhou

    2016-02-01

    Lipid-like nanoparticles (LLNs) have shown great potential for RNA delivery. Lipid-like compounds are key components in LLNs. In this study, we investigated the effects of local structural transformation of lipid-like compounds on delivery of messenger RNA. Our results showed that position change of functional groups on lipid-like compounds can dramatically improve delivery efficiency. We then optimized formulation ratios of TNT-b10 LLNs, a lead material, increasing delivery efficiency over 2-fold. More importantly, pegylated TNT-b10 LLNs is stable for over four weeks and is over 10-fold more efficient than that of its counterpart TNT-a10 LLNs. Additionally, the optimal formulation O-TNT-b10 LLNs is capable of delivering mRNA encoding luciferase in vivo. These results provide useful insights into the design of next generation LLNs for mRNA delivery.

  16. 13C-detection in RNA bases: revealing structure-chemical shift relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farès, Christophe; Amata, Irene; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2007-12-26

    The chemical shifts of the unprotonated carbons in the proton-deficient nucleobases of RNA are rarely reported, despite the valuable information that they contain about base-pairing and base-stacking. We have developed 13C-detected 2D-experiments to identify the unprotonated 13C in the RNA bases and have assigned all the base nuclei of uniformly 13C,15N-labeled HIV-2 TAR-RNA. The 13C chemical shift distributions revealed perturbations correlated with the base-pairing and base-stacking properties of all four base-types. From this work, we conclude that the information contained in the chemical shift perturbations within the base rings can provide valuable restraint information for solving RNA structures, especially in conformational averaged regions, where NOE-based information is not available.

  17. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz, E-mail: gchojnowski@genesilico.pl [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Waleń, Tomasz [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Bujnicki, Janusz M. [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  18. Evolution of the RNase P RNA structural domain in Leptospira spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Vigneshwaran; Ahmed, Ahmed; Sivagnanam, Ulaganathan; Muthuraman, Krishnaraja; Karthikaichamy, Anbarasu; Wilson, Herald A; Devendran, Ajay; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Raj, Stephen M L

    2014-12-01

    We have employed the RNase P RNA (RPR) gene, which is present as single copy in chromosome I of Leptospira spp. to investigate the phylogeny of structural domains present in the RNA subunit of the tRNA processing enzyme, RNase P. RPR gene sequences of 150 strains derived from NCBI database along with sequences determined from 8 reference strains were examined to fathom strain specific structural differences present in leptospiral RPR. Sequence variations in the RPR gene impacted on the configuration of loops, stems and bulges found in the RPR highlighting species and strain specific structural motifs. In vitro transcribed leptospiral RPR ribozymes are demonstrated to process pre-tRNA into mature tRNA in consonance with the positioning of Leptospira in the taxonomic domain of bacteria. RPR sequence datasets used to construct a phylogenetic tree exemplified the segregation of strains into their respective lineages with a (re)speciation of strain SH 9 to Leptospira borgpetersenii, strains Fiocruz LV 3954 and Fiocruz LV 4135 to Leptospira santarosai, strain CBC 613 to Leptospira kirschneri and strain HAI 1536 to Leptospira noguchii. Furthermore, it allowed characterization of an isolate P2653, presumptively characterized as either serovar Hebdomadis, Kremastos or Longnan to Leptospira weilii, serovar Longnan. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Structure-based energetics of mRNA decoding on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Sund, Johan; Aqvist, Johan

    2014-03-18

    The origin of high fidelity in bacterial protein synthesis on the ribosome remains a fundamental unsolved problem despite available three-dimensional structures of different stages of the translation process. However, these structures open up the possibility of directly computing the energetics of tRNA selection that is required for an authentic understanding of fidelity in decoding. Here, we report extensive computer simulations that allow us to quantitatively calculate tRNA discrimination and uncover the energetics underlying accuracy in code translation. We show that the tRNA-mRNA interaction energetics varies drastically along the path from initial selection to peptide bond formation. While the selection process is obviously controlled by kinetics, the underlying thermodynamics explains the origin of the high degree of accuracy. The existence of both low- and high-selectivity states provides an efficient mechanism for initial selection and proofreading that does not require codon-dependent long-range structural signaling within the ribosome. It is instead the distinctly unequal population of the high-selectivity states for cognate and noncognate substrates that is the key discriminatory factor. The simulations reveal the essential roles played both by the 30S subunit conformational switch and by the common tRNA modification at position 37 in amplifying the accuracy.

  20. The historic camphenyl cation: a detailed structure evaluation including solvation energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, P; Sorensen, T S; Taeschler, C

    2001-11-02

    The structure of the camphenyl cation 1 has been studied in detail, using both experimental and computational approaches. Like others, we find only one structure on the camphenyl-isobornyl cation PE surface, but this single structure shows some unusual features. These include a very soft PE surface for movement along the C2-C6 axis (a nonbonding distance in a classical description of the cation), and a result of this is that very high computational methods (optimization at MP4 or QCI levels) are required in order to get structural minima that "fit" the experimental data. This PE surface has been probed computationally using fixed C2-C6 distances, and when one also calculates chemical shifts for these "fixed" structures, one sees calculated (13)C NMR chemical shifts for the C2 carbon that are hugely dependent on this fixed distance value, giving near-linear slopes of ca. 25 ppm/0.1 A distance change. Since this distance can vary over at least 0.6 A with relatively small calculated energy changes, there is a total range of ca. 150 ppm involved here. In a second part of this work, and in response to a recent paper in which the historic Meerwein "carbocation intermediate" proposal was rejected, we have calculated solvation energies (SCI-PCM method) for four carbocation systems, including 1. We find carbocation solvation energies (epsilon = 10 "solvent") of 45-53 kcal/mol, and where comparison can be made, the data correlate well with the literature. On the basis of these results, we re-affirm the Meerwein "carbocation" mechanism, but in order to accommodate only a single carbocation intermediate, we offer a description that amounts to a subtle variation of both the nonclassical ion proposal and Meerwein's "two cation" mechanism, namely that the camphenyl cation, 1, as a ground-state structure, can be described as only very weakly interacting in the C2-C6 bridging sense, but that the PE surface along this "bond" is so shallow that an energy input of only 4-6 kcal

  1. A quantitative analysis of secondary RNA structure using domination based parameters on trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yue

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly apparent that a comprehensive database of RNA motifs is essential in order to achieve new goals in genomic and proteomic research. Secondary RNA structures have frequently been represented by various modeling methods as graph-theoretic trees. Using graph theory as a modeling tool allows the vast resources of graphical invariants to be utilized to numerically identify secondary RNA motifs. The domination number of a graph is a graphical invariant that is sensitive to even a slight change in the structure of a tree. The invariants selected in this study are variations of the domination number of a graph. These graphical invariants are partitioned into two classes, and we define two parameters based on each of these classes. These parameters are calculated for all small order trees and a statistical analysis of the resulting data is conducted to determine if the values of these parameters can be utilized to identify which trees of orders seven and eight are RNA-like in structure. Results The statistical analysis shows that the domination based parameters correctly distinguish between the trees that represent native structures and those that are not likely candidates to represent RNA. Some of the trees previously identified as candidate structures are found to be "very" RNA like, while others are not, thereby refining the space of structures likely to be found as representing secondary RNA structure. Conclusion Search algorithms are available that mine nucleotide sequence databases. However, the number of motifs identified can be quite large, making a further search for similar motif computationally difficult. Much of the work in the bioinformatics arena is toward the development of better algorithms to address the computational problem. This work, on the other hand, uses mathematical descriptors to more clearly characterize the RNA motifs and thereby reduce the corresponding search space. These

  2. Oligonucleotide Models of Telomeric DNA and RNA Form a Hybrid G-quadruplex Structure as a Potential Component of Telomeres*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Ishizuka, Takumi; Yang, Jie; Ito, Kenichiro; Katada, Hitoshi; Komiyama, Makoto; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA, a non-coding RNA molecule, has recently been found in mammalian cells. The detailed structural features and functions of the telomeric RNA at human chromosome ends remain unclear, although this RNA molecule may be a key component of the telomere machinery. In this study, using model human telomeric DNA and RNA sequences, we demonstrated that human telomeric RNA and DNA oligonucleotides form a DNA-RNA G-quadruplex. We next employed chemistry-based oligonucleotide probes to mimic the naturally formed telomeric DNA-RNA G-quadruplexes in living cells, suggesting that the process of DNA-RNA G-quadruplex formation with oligonucleotide models of telomeric DNA and RNA could occur in cells. Furthermore, we investigated the possible roles of this DNA-RNA G-quadruplex. The formation of the DNA-RNA G-quadruplex causes a significant increase in the clonogenic capacity of cells and has an effect on inhibition of cellular senescence. Here, we have used a model system to provide evidence about the formation of G-quadruplex structures involving telomeric DNA and RNA sequences that have the potential to provide a protective capping structure for telomere ends. PMID:23012368

  3. An ArcGIS approach to include tectonic structures in point data regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsow, Andreas; Schafmeister, Maria-Theresia; Hofmann, Thilo

    2009-01-01

    Point data derived from drilling logs must often be regionalized. However, aquifers may show discontinuous surface structures, such as the offset of an aquitard caused by tectonic faults. One main challenge has been to incorporate these structures into the regionalization process of point data. We combined ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation to account for neotectonic structures in the regionalization process. The study area chosen to test this approach is the largest porous aquifer in Austria. It consists of three basins formed by neotectonic events and delimited by steep faults with a vertical offset of the aquitard up to 70 m within very short distances. First, ordinary kriging was used to incorporate the characteristic spatial variability of the aquitard location by means of a variogram. The tectonic faults could be included into the regionalization process by using breaklines with buffer zones. All data points inside the buffer were deleted. Last, IDW was performed, resulting in an aquitard map representing the discontinuous surface structures. This approach enables one to account for such surfaces using the standard software package ArcGIS; therefore, it could be adopted in many practical applications.

  4. Thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation in the junctionless hairpin ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Neil A; Hoogstraten, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    The hairpin ribozyme consists of two RNA internal loops that interact to form the catalytically active structure. This docking transition is a rare example of intermolecular formation of RNA tertiary structure without coupling to helix annealing. We have used temperature-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation for the junctionless form of the ribozyme, in which loops A and B reside on separate molecules. We find docking to be strongly enthalpy-driven and to be accompanied by substantial activation barriers for association and dissociation, consistent with the structural reorganization of both internal loops upon complex formation. Comparisons with the parallel analysis of a ribozyme variant carrying a 2'-O-methyl modification at the self-cleavage site and with published data in other systems reveal a surprising diversity of thermodynamic signatures, emphasizing the delicate balance of contributions to the free energy of formation of RNA tertiary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. RNA is an integral component of chromatin that contributes to its structural organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez-Campos

    Full Text Available Chromatin structure is influenced by multiples factors, such as pH, temperature, nature and concentration of counterions, post-translational modifications of histones and binding of structural non-histone proteins. RNA is also known to contribute to the regulation of chromatin structure as chromatin-induced gene silencing was shown to depend on the RNAi machinery in S. pombe, plants and Drosophila. Moreover, both in Drosophila and mammals, dosage compensation requires the contribution of specific non-coding RNAs. However, whether RNA itself plays a direct structural role in chromatin is not known. Here, we report results that indicate a general structural role for RNA in eukaryotic chromatin. RNA is found associated to purified chromatin prepared from chicken liver, or cultured Drosophila S2 cells, and treatment with RNase A alters the structural properties of chromatin. Our results indicate that chromatin-associated RNAs, which account for 2%-5% of total chromatin-associated nucleic acids, are polyA(- and show a size similar to that of the DNA contained in the corresponding chromatin fragments. Chromatin-associated RNA(s are not likely to correspond to nascent transcripts as they are also found bound to chromatin when cells are treated with alpha-amanitin. After treatment with RNase A, chromatin fragments of molecular weight >3.000 bp of DNA showed reduced sedimentation through sucrose gradients and increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease digestion. This structural transition, which is observed both at euchromatic and heterochromatic regions, proceeds without loss of histone H1 or any significant change in core-histone composition and integrity.

  6. Multithreaded comparative RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Værum Morten

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of the structure of large RNAs remains a particular challenge in bioinformatics, due to the computational complexity and low levels of accuracy of state-of-the-art algorithms. The pfold model couples a stochastic context-free grammar to phylogenetic analysis for a high accuracy in predictions, but the time complexity of the algorithm and underflow errors have prevented its use for long alignments. Here we present PPfold, a multithreaded version of pfold, which is capable of predicting the structure of large RNA alignments accurately on practical timescales. Results We have distributed both the phylogenetic calculations and the inside-outside algorithm in PPfold, resulting in a significant reduction of runtime on multicore machines. We have addressed the floating-point underflow problems of pfold by implementing an extended-exponent datatype, enabling PPfold to be used for large-scale RNA structure predictions. We have also improved the user interface and portability: alongside standalone executable and Java source code of the program, PPfold is also available as a free plugin to the CLC Workbenches. We have evaluated the accuracy of PPfold using BRaliBase I tests, and demonstrated its practical use by predicting the secondary structure of an alignment of 24 complete HIV-1 genomes in 65 minutes on an 8-core machine and identifying several known structural elements in the prediction. Conclusions PPfold is the first parallelized comparative RNA structure prediction algorithm to date. Based on the pfold model, PPfold is capable of fast, high-quality predictions of large RNA secondary structures, such as the genomes of RNA viruses or long genomic transcripts. The techniques used in the parallelization of this algorithm may be of general applicability to other bioinformatics algorithms.

  7. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping...... protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential...

  8. Crystal Structure of the N-Terminal RNA Recognition Motif of mRNA Decay Regulator AUF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jun Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AU-rich element binding/degradation factor 1 (AUF1 plays a role in destabilizing mRNAs by forming complexes with AU-rich elements (ARE in the 3′-untranslated regions. Multiple AUF1-ARE complexes regulate the translation of encoded products related to the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation. AUF1 contains two tandem RNA recognition motifs (RRM and a Gln- (Q- rich domain in their C-terminal region. To observe how the two RRMs are involved in recognizing ARE, we obtained the AUF1-p37 protein covering the two RRMs. However, only N-terminal RRM (RRM1 was crystallized and its structure was determined at 1.7 Å resolution. It appears that the RRM1 and RRM2 separated before crystallization. To demonstrate which factors affect the separate RRM1-2, we performed limited proteolysis using trypsin. The results indicated that the intact proteins were cleaved by unknown proteases that were associated with them prior to crystallization. In comparison with each of the monomers, the conformations of the β2-β3 loops were highly variable. Furthermore, a comparison with the RRM1-2 structures of HuR and hnRNP A1 revealed that a dimer of RRM1 could be one of the possible conformations of RRM1-2. Our data may provide a guidance for further structural investigations of AUF1 tandem RRM repeat and its mode of ARE binding.

  9. Comparison of SHAPE reagents for mapping RNA structures inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byron; Flynn, Ryan A; Kadina, Anastasia; Guo, Jimmy K; Kool, Eric T; Chang, Howard Y

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in SHAPE technology have converted the classic primer extension method to next-generation sequencing platforms, allowing transcriptome-level analysis of RNA secondary structure. In particular, icSHAPE and SHAPE-MaP, using NAI-N3 and 1M7 reagents, respectively, are methods that claim to measure in vivo structure with high-throughput sequencing. However, these compounds have not been compared on an unbiased, raw-signal level. Here, we directly compare several in vivo SHAPE acylation reagents using the simple primer extension assay. We conclude that while multiple SHAPE technologies are effective at measuring purified RNAs in vitro, acylimidazole reagents NAI and NAI-N3 give markedly greater signals with lower background than 1M7 for in vivo measurement of the RNA structurome. © 2017 Lee et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Atomic resolution structure of CAG RNA repeats: structural insights and implications for the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Ryszard; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Rypniewski, Wojciech

    2010-12-01

    CAG repeats occur predominantly in the coding regions of human genes, which suggests their functional importance. In some genes, these sequences can undergo pathogenic expansions leading to neurodegenerative polyglutamine (poly-Q) diseases. The mutant transcripts containing expanded CAG repeats possibly contribute to pathogenesis in addition to the well-known pathogenic effects of mutant proteins. We have analysed two crystal forms of RNA duplexes containing CAG repeats: (GGCAGCAGCC)(2). One of the structures has been determined at atomic resolution (0.95 Å) and the other at 1.9 Å. The duplexes include non-canonical A-A pairs that fit remarkably well within a regular A-helix. All the adenosines are in the anti-conformation and the only interaction within each A-A pair is a single C2-H2···N1 hydrogen bond. Both adenosines in each A-A pair are shifted towards the major groove, although to different extents; the A which is the H-bond donor stands out more (the 'thumbs-up' conformation). The main effect on the helix conformation is a local unwinding. The CAG repeats and the previously examined CUG structures share a similar pattern of electrostatic charge distribution in the minor groove, which could explain their affinity for the pathogenesis-related MBNL1 protein.

  11. Solution structure of a reverse transcriptase recognition site of a LINE RNA from zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsu, Maina; Kajikawa, Masaki; Okada, Norihiro; Kawai, Gota

    2017-10-01

    Long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) is known to be transposed by reverse transcription using its RNA transcript. Recognition of the 3' stem-loop of LINE RNA by its reverse transcriptase (RT) is an important step of the retrotransposition. Our previous study revealed that the second G residue (G8) in the GGAUA loop of a 17mer LINE RNA from eel, UnaL2-17, is recognized by its RT and the U residue (U10) in the same loop is required to maintain the loop structure (Baba S, Kajikawa M, Okada N, Kawai G. Solution structure of an RNA stem-loop derived from the 3' conserved region of eel LINE UnaL2. RNA 2004;10:1380-1387). ZfL2-2, a LINE from zebrafish, has the same 3' stem-loop with UnaL2 and ZfL2-1 has similar but distinct 3' stem-loop with an insertion which can form an additional stem-loop. Here, we determined the solution structure of the 34mer RT recognition site of the LINE RNA (ZfL2-1-34). It was found that ZfL2-1-34 forms a hairpin with an internal loop, the tertiary structure of which is superimposed with that of ZfL2-2. It is noted that A10 and the inserted stem-loop, starting with A12, in ZfL2-1-34 located at the positions corresponding to those of G8 and U10, respectively, in UnaL2-17. These results strongly suggest that the two LINEs share the similar recognition mechanism and the A10 in ZfL2-1-34 is the determinant recognized by its RT. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Pseudoscorpion mitochondria show rearranged genes and genome-wide reductions of RNA gene sizes and inferred structures, yet typical nucleotide composition bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudoscorpions are chelicerates and have historically been viewed as being most closely related to solifuges, harvestmen, and scorpions. No mitochondrial genomes of pseudoscorpions have been published, but the mitochondrial genomes of some lineages of Chelicerata possess unusual features, including short rRNA genes and tRNA genes that lack sequence to encode arms of the canonical cloverleaf-shaped tRNA. Additionally, some chelicerates possess an atypical guanine-thymine nucleotide bias on the major coding strand of their mitochondrial genomes. Results We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of two divergent taxa from the chelicerate order Pseudoscorpiones. We find that these genomes possess unusually short tRNA genes that do not encode cloverleaf-shaped tRNA structures. Indeed, in one genome, all 22 tRNA genes lack sequence to encode canonical cloverleaf structures. We also find that the large ribosomal RNA genes are substantially shorter than those of most arthropods. We inferred secondary structures of the LSU rRNAs from both pseudoscorpions, and find that they have lost multiple helices. Based on comparisons with the crystal structure of the bacterial ribosome, two of these helices were likely contact points with tRNA T-arms or D-arms as they pass through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The mitochondrial gene arrangements of both pseudoscorpions differ from the ancestral chelicerate gene arrangement. One genome is rearranged with respect to the location of protein-coding genes, the small rRNA gene, and at least 8 tRNA genes. The other genome contains 6 tRNA genes in novel locations. Most chelicerates with rearranged mitochondrial genes show a genome-wide reversal of the CA nucleotide bias typical for arthropods on their major coding strand, and instead possess a GT bias. Yet despite their extensive rearrangement, these pseudoscorpion mitochondrial genomes possess a CA bias on the major coding strand. Phylogenetic analyses of all 13

  13. Determination of low-energy structures of a small RNA hairpin using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... In this method, the history of the simulation is used to increase the probability of states less visited in the ... structure of RNA has a long history due to the pioneering works of Zucker and Nussinov, among .... of the MC scheme to generate a proper statistical mechanical ensemble. However, here we have ...

  14. Bioinformatical approaches to RNA structure prediction & Sequencing of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Stinus

    Stinus Lindgreen has been working in two different fields during his Ph.D. The first part has been focused on computational approaches to predict the structure of non-coding RNA molecules at the base pairing level. This has resulted in the analysis of various measures of the base pairing potentia...

  15. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA-binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Hfq proteins are common in many species of enterobacteria, where they participate in RNA folding and translational regulation through pairing of small RNAs and messenger RNAs. Hfq proteins share the distinctive Sm fold, and form ring-shaped structures similar to those of the Sm/Lsm proteins...

  16. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...

  17. SHAPE selection (SHAPES) enrich for RNA structure signal in SHAPE sequencing-based probing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl; Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan; Salama, Sofie R

    2015-01-01

    transcriptase. Here, we introduce a SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) reagent, N-propanone isatoic anhydride (NPIA), which retains the ability of SHAPE reagents to accurately probe RNA structure, but also allows covalent coupling between the SHAPES reagent and a biotin molecule. We demonstrate that SHAPES...

  18. Crystal structure of the human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 RNA-recognition motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coburn, Katherine; Melville, Zephan; Aligholizadeh, Ehson; Roth, Braden M.; Varney, Kristen M.; Carrier, France; Pozharski, Edwin; Weber, David J.

    2017-03-22

    The heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) is upregulated in hypoxic regions of various solid tumors and promotes tumor growthviathe coordination of mRNA transcripts associated with pro-survival genes. Thus, hnRNP A18 represents an important therapeutic target in tumor cells. Presented here is the first X-ray crystal structure to be reported for the RNA-recognition motif of hnRNP A18. By comparing this structure with those of homologous RNA-binding proteins (i.e.hnRNP A1), three residues on one face of an antiparallel β-sheet (Arg48, Phe50 and Phe52) and one residue in an unstructured loop (Arg41) were identified as likely to be involved in protein–nucleic acid interactions. This structure helps to serve as a foundation for biophysical studies of this RNA-binding protein and structure-based drug-design efforts for targeting hnRNP A18 in cancer, such as malignant melanoma, where hnRNP A18 levels are elevated and contribute to disease progression.

  19. Structure of Escherichia coli Hfq bound to polyriboadenylate RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Link, Todd M; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Brennan, Richard G

    2009-01-01

    studies. Indeed, Hfq bound to the oligoribonucleotides (AGG)(8), (AGC)(8), and the shorter (A-R-N)(4) sequence, AACAACAAGAAG, with nanomolar affinities. The abundance of (A-R-N)(4) and (A-R-N)(5) triplet repeats in the E. coli genome suggests additional RNA targets for Hfq. Further, the structure provides...

  20. Role of RNA structure and RNA binding activity of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protein in VPg uridylylation and virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, A.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Woolaway, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The uridylylation of the VPg peptide primer is the first stage in the replication of picornavirus RNA. This process can be achieved in vitro using purified components, including 3B (VPg) with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), the precursor 3CD, and an RNA template containing the cre/bus...... within 3C are also essential for VPg uridylylation activity and efficient virus replication.......The uridylylation of the VPg peptide primer is the first stage in the replication of picornavirus RNA. This process can be achieved in vitro using purified components, including 3B (VPg) with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), the precursor 3CD, and an RNA template containing the cre....../bus. We show that certain RNA sequences within the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 5' untranslated region but outside of the cre/bus can enhance VPg uridylylation activity. Furthermore, we have shown that the FMDV X protein alone can substitute for 3CD, albeit less efficiently. In addition, the VPg...

  1. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2015-01-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sample tertiary structures given a secondary structure. It strikes a balance between the precision of an all-atom tertiary structure model and the simplicity and effectiveness of a secondary structure representation. It provides a simplified tool for exploring global arrangements of helices and loops within RNA structures. We provide an example of a novel energy function relying only on the positions of stems and loops. We show that coupling our model to this energy function produces predictions as good as or better than the current state of the art tools. We propose that given the wide range of conformational space that needs to be explored, a coarse-grain approach can explore more conformations in less iterations than an all-atom model coupled to a fine-grain energy function. Finally, we emphasize the overarching theme of providing an ensemble of predicted structures, something which our tool excels at, rather than providing a handful of the lowest energy structures. PMID:25904133

  2. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq and simulations to probe structure-function design principles of RNA transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Watters, Kyle E; Gasper, Paul M; Abbott, Timothy R; Carlson, Paul D; Chen, Alan A; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-06-01

    Antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators are powerful tools for controlling gene expression and creating synthetic gene networks. RNA transcriptional repressors derived from natural mechanisms called attenuators are particularly versatile, though their mechanistic complexity has made them difficult to engineer. Here we identify a new structure-function design principle for attenuators that enables the forward engineering of new RNA transcriptional repressors. Using in-cell SHAPE-Seq to characterize the structures of attenuator variants within Escherichia coli, we show that attenuator hairpins that facilitate interaction with antisense RNAs require interior loops for proper function. Molecular dynamics simulations of these attenuator variants suggest these interior loops impart structural flexibility. We further observe hairpin flexibility in the cellular structures of natural RNA mechanisms that use antisense RNA interactions to repress translation, confirming earlier results from in vitro studies. Finally, we design new transcriptional attenuators in silico using an interior loop as a structural requirement and show that they function as desired in vivo. This work establishes interior loops as an important structural element for designing synthetic RNA gene regulators. We anticipate that the coupling of experimental measurement of cellular RNA structure and function with computational modeling will enable rapid discovery of structure-function design principles for a diverse array of natural and synthetic RNA regulators. © 2016 Takahashi et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Structure-function relationship of substituted bromomethylcoumarins in nucleoside specificity of RNA alkylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Kellner

    Full Text Available Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions.

  4. Structure-function relationship of substituted bromomethylcoumarins in nucleoside specificity of RNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Stefanie; Kollar, Laura Bettina; Ochel, Antonia; Ghate, Manjunath; Helm, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Selective alkylation of RNA nucleotides is an important field of RNA biochemistry, e.g. in applications of fluorescent labeling or in structural probing experiments, yet detailed structure-function studies of labeling agents are rare. Here, bromomethylcoumarins as reactive compounds for fluorescent labeling of RNA are developed as an attractive scaffold on which electronic properties can be modulated by varying the substituents. Six different 4-bromomethyl-coumarins of various substitution patterns were tested for nucleotide specificity of RNA alkylation using tRNA from Escherichia coli as substrate. Using semi-quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis, reactions at mildly acidic and slightly alkaline pH were compared. For all tested compounds, coumarin conjugates with 4-thiouridine, pseudouridine, guanosine, and uridine were identified, with the latter largely dominating. This data set shows that selectivity of ribonucleotide alkylation depends on the substitution pattern of the reactive dye, and even more strongly on the modulation of the reaction conditions. The latter should be therefore carefully optimized when striving to achieve selectivity. Interestingly, the highest selectivity for labeling of a modified nucleoside, namely of 4-thiouridine, was achieved with a compound whose selectivity was somewhat less dependent on reaction conditions than the other compounds. In summary, bromomethylcoumarin derivatives are a highly interesting class of compounds, since their selectivity for 4-thiouridine can be efficiently tuned by variation of substitution pattern and reaction conditions.

  5. Structural similarity of E. coli 5S rRNA in solution and within the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinska, Lidia; Banachowicz, Ewa; Gapiński, Jacek; Patkowski, Adam; Barciszewski, Jan

    2004-02-15

    The article presents translational and rotational diffusion coefficients of 5S rRNA determined experimentally by the method of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and its comparison with the values predicted for different models of this molecule. The tertiary structure of free 5S rRNA was proposed on the basis of the atomic structures of the 5S rRNA from E. coli and H. marismortui extracted from the ribosome. A comparison of the values of DT, tauR, and Rg predicted for different models with experimental results for the free molecule in solution suggests that free 5S rRNA is less compact than that in the complex with ribosomal proteins. In general, the molecules of 5S rRNA consist of three domains: a short one and two longer ones. As follows from a comparison of the results of our simulations with experimental values, in the molecule in solution the two closest helical fragments of the longer domains remain collinear, whereas the short domain takes a position significantly deviated from them. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Physics-based all-atom modeling of RNA energetics and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis G; Zhao, Jianbo; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2017-09-01

    The database of RNA sequences is exploding, but knowledge of energetics, structures, and dynamics lags behind. All-atom computational methods, such as molecular dynamics, hold promise for closing this gap. New algorithms and faster computers have accelerated progress in improving the reliability and accuracy of predictions. Currently, the methods can facilitate refinement of experimentally determined nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray structures, but are 'unreliable' for predictions based only on sequence. Much remains to be discovered, however, about the many molecular interactions driving RNA folding and the best way to approximate them quantitatively. The large number of parameters required means that a wide variety of experimental results will be required to benchmark force fields and different approaches. As computational methods become more reliable and accessible, they will be used by an increasing number of biologists, much as x-ray crystallography has expanded. Thus, many fundamental physical principles underlying the computational methods are described. This review presents a summary of the current state of molecular dynamics as applied to RNA. It is designed to be helpful to students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty who are considering or starting computational studies of RNA. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1422. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1422. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Advanced Deployable Shell-Based Composite Booms for Small Satellite Structural Applications Including Solar Sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    State of the art deployable structures are mainly being designed for medium to large size satellites. The lack of reliable deployable structural systems for low cost, small volume, rideshare-class spacecraft severely constrains the potential for using small satellite platforms for affordable deep space science and exploration precursor missions that could be realized with solar sails. There is thus a need for reliable, lightweight, high packaging efficiency deployable booms that can serve as the supporting structure for a wide range of small satellite systems including solar sails for propulsion. The National Air and Space Administration (NASA) is currently investing in the development of a new class of advanced deployable shell-based composite booms to support future deep space small satellite missions using solar sails. The concepts are being designed to: meet the unique requirements of small satellites, maximize ground testability, permit the use of low-cost manufacturing processes that will benefit scalability, be scalable for use as elements of hierarchical structures (e.g. trusses), allow long duration storage, have high deployment reliability, and have controlled deployment behavior and predictable deployed dynamics. This paper will present the various rollable boom concepts that are being developed for 5-20 m class size deployable structures that include solar sails with the so-called High Strain Composites (HSC) materials. The deployable composite booms to be presented are being developed to expand the portfolio of available rollable booms for small satellites and maximize their length for a given packaged volume. Given that solar sails are a great example of volume and mass optimization, the booms were designed to comply with nominal solar sail system requirements for 6U CubeSats, which are a good compromise between those of smaller form factors (1U, 2U and 3U CubeSats) and larger ones (12 U and 27 U future CubeSats, and ESPA-class microsatellites). Solar

  8. Molecular structure and thermodynamic predictions to create highly sensitive microRNA biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkey, Nicholas E.; Brucks, Corinne N.; Lansing, Shan S.; Le, Sophia D.; Smith, Natasha M.; Tran, Victoria; Zhang, Lulu; Burrows, Sean M., E-mail: sean.burrows@oregonstate.edu

    2016-02-25

    Many studies have established microRNAs (miRNAs) as post-transcriptional regulators in a variety of intracellular molecular processes. Abnormal changes in miRNA have been associated with several diseases. However, these changes are sometimes subtle and occur at nanomolar levels or lower. Several biosensing hurdles for in situ cellular/tissue analysis of miRNA limit detection of small amounts of miRNA. Of these limitations the most challenging are selectivity and sensor degradation creating high background signals and false signals. Recently we developed a reporter+probe biosensor for let-7a that showed potential to mitigate false signal from sensor degradation. Here we designed reporter+probe biosensors for miR-26a-2-3p and miR-27a-5p to better understand the effect of thermodynamics and molecular structures of the biosensor constituents on the analytical performance. Signal changes from interactions between Cy3 and Cy5 on the reporters were used to understand structural aspects of the reporter designs. Theoretical thermodynamic values, single stranded conformations, hetero- and homodimerization structures, and equilibrium concentrations of the reporters and probes were used to interpret the experimental observations. Studies of the sensitivity and selectivity revealed 5–9 nM detection limits in the presence and absence of interfering off-analyte miRNAs. These studies will aid in determining how to rationally design reporter+probe biosensors to overcome hurdles associated with highly sensitive miRNA biosensing. - Highlights: • Challenges facing highly sensitive miRNA biosensor designs are addressed. • Thermodynamic and molecular structure design metrics for reporter+probe biosensors are proposed. • The influence of ideal and non-ideal reporter hairpin structures on reporter+probe formation and signal change are discussed. • 5–9 nM limits of detection were observed with no interference from off-analytes.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Luteoviral RNA Pseudoknot and Model for a Minimal Ribosomal Frameshifting Motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Marshall, William S.; Harp, Joel; Jewett III, Frederic C.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Brown II, Bernard A.; Rich, Alexander; Egli, Martin (MIT); (Wake Forest); (Dharmacon); (Vanderbilt)

    2010-03-08

    To understand the role of structural elements of RNA pseudoknots in controlling the extent of -1-type ribosomal frameshifting, we determined the crystal structure of a high-efficiency frameshifting mutant of the pseudoknot from potato leaf roll virus (PLRV). Correlations of the structure with available in vitro frameshifting data for PLRV pseudoknot mutants implicate sequence and length of a stem-loop linker as modulators of frameshifting efficiency. Although the sequences and overall structures of the RNA pseudoknots from PLRV and beet western yellow virus (BWYV) are similar, nucleotide deletions in the linker and adjacent minor groove loop abolish frameshifting only with the latter. Conversely, mutant PLRV pseudoknots with up to four nucleotides deleted in this region exhibit nearly wild-type frameshifting efficiencies. The crystal structure helps rationalize the different tolerances for deletions in the PLRV and BWYV RNAs, and we have used it to build a three-dimensional model of the PRLV pseudoknot with a four-nucleotide deletion. The resulting structure defines a minimal RNA pseudoknot motif composed of 22 nucleotides capable of stimulating -1-type ribosomal frameshifts.

  10. Effects of short RNA structural analogues against hepatitis C virus genotypes 2, 3 and 4 in replicon cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshaffei, Ismail M; Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Catherine H; Wu, David C; Hammad, Lamiaa N; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Mesbah, Noha M; Wu, George Y

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether computer-predicted short RNA structural analogues could inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2a, 3a and 4a replication in cultured cells. Short RNA sequences, X12, X12a and X12b, designed to be identical in secondary structure to the X region in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the HCV 1b genome, as well as shorter stem-loop components of X region, were inserted into a plasmid and transfected into separate Huh7.5 human hepatoma cells stably transfected with subgenomic replicons for genotypes 2a, 3a and 4a. All replicons included a firefly luciferase reporter gene. After 48 h of plasmid transfection, the inhibition of HCV replication was determined by HCV RNA isolation and quantification by real-time polymerase chain reaction and luciferase assays. All the secondary structural analogues to genotype 1b X region cross-inhibited genotype 2a, 3a and 4a replicons. The maximum inhibition by genotype 1b X region structural analogues was obtained against genotype 2a cells in which X12, X12a and X12b inhibited replication by 30%, 63% and 72%, respectively (P < 0.05 for all), compared to an unrelated hepatitis B viral analogue. Despite substantial sequence dissimilarity, HCV RNA genotype 1b X region analogues cross-inhibited the replication of HCV genotypes 2a, 3a and 4a. Particular conformations and not the sequence of the stem-loops of the X region are involved in HCV replication. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2015-06-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sample tertiary structures given a secondary structure. It strikes a balance between the precision of an all-atom tertiary structure model and the simplicity and effectiveness of a secondary structure representation. It provides a simplified tool for exploring global arrangements of helices and loops within RNA structures. We provide an example of a novel energy function relying only on the positions of stems and loops. We show that coupling our model to this energy function produces predictions as good as or better than the current state of the art tools. We propose that given the wide range of conformational space that needs to be explored, a coarse-grain approach can explore more conformations in less iterations than an all-atom model coupled to a fine-grain energy function. Finally, we emphasize the overarching theme of providing an ensemble of predicted structures, something which our tool excels at, rather than providing a handful of the lowest energy structures. © 2015 Kerpedjiev et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. Glyoxals as in vivo RNA structural probes of guanine base-pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David; Ritchey, Laura E; Park, Hongmarn; Babitzke, Paul; Assmann, Sarah M; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2018-01-01

    Elucidation of the folded structures that RNA forms in vivo is vital to understanding its functions. Chemical reagents that modify the Watson-Crick (WC) face of unprotected nucleobases are particularly useful in structure elucidation. Dimethyl sulfate penetrates cell membranes and informs on RNA base-pairing and secondary structure but only modifies the WC face of adenines and cytosines. We present glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and phenylglyoxal as potent in vivo reagents that target the WC face of guanines as well as cytosines and adenines. Tests on rice (Oryza sativa) 5.8S rRNA in vitro read out by reverse transcription and gel electrophoresis demonstrate specific modification of almost all guanines in a time- and pH-dependent manner. Subsequent in vivo tests on rice, a eukaryote, and Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively, showed that all three reagents enter living cells without prior membrane permeabilization or pH adjustment of the surrounding media and specifically modify solvent-exposed guanine, cytosine, and adenine residues. © 2018 Mitchell et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Crystal structure and conformation of a DNA-RNA hybrid duplex with a polypurine RNA strand: d(TTCTTBr5CTTC)-r(GAAGAAGAA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Y; Sundaralingam, M

    1998-12-15

    . DNA-RNA hybrids are substrates for RNase H. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the RNA strand in the hybrid form. The polypurine tract (PPT) in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is a short stretch of purines ( approximately 15 bases) located at the 3'-end of the U3 region of the RNA genome. The PPT has the unique ability to resist digestion by RNase H and serves as a primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis. . The crystal structure of a DNA-RNA hybrid duplex containing a polypurine RNA strand, d(TTCTTBr5CTTC)-r(GAAGAAGAA), has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement methods and refined to a final R factor of 20.1% (R free 23.7%). The hybrid duplex adopts a standard A-form conformation. All of the sugar rings and glycosidic torsion angles are found in the standard C3'-endo/anti conformation, as seen in A-RNA or A-DNA. The crystal packing is dominated by the DNA strand, where the terminal base pairs of the hybrid abut the neighboring A-DNA sugar-phosphate backbone on the minor groove side. . The present DNA-RNA hybrid duplex containing a polypurine RNA strand exhibits standard A-form geometry. This observation might suggest that the RNA PPT resists the RNase H activity of HIV reverse transcriptase as a result of its A-form conformation. In addition, there appears to be a correlation between the percentage purine content of the RNA and the DNA backbone conformation.

  14. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule

    OpenAIRE

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molec...

  15. Crystal structure and RNA-binding properties of an Hfq homolog from the deep-branching Aquificae: conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, Kimberly A.; Patterson-West, Jennifer; Randolph, Peter S.; Mura, Cameron

    2017-03-31

    The host factor Hfq, as the bacterial branch of the Sm family, is an RNA-binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA expression and turnover. Hfq facilitates pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) and their corresponding mRNA targets by binding both RNAs and bringing them into close proximity. Hfq homologs self-assemble into homo-hexameric rings with at least two distinct surfaces that bind RNA. Recently, another binding site, dubbed the `lateral rim', has been implicated in sRNA·mRNA annealing; the RNA-binding properties of this site appear to be rather subtle, and its degree of evolutionary conservation is unknown. An Hfq homolog has been identified in the phylogenetically deep-branching thermophileAquifex aeolicus(Aae), but little is known about the structure and function of Hfq from basal bacterial lineages such as the Aquificae. Therefore,AaeHfq was cloned, overexpressed, purified, crystallized and biochemically characterized. Structures ofAaeHfq were determined in space groupsP1 andP6, both to 1.5 Å resolution, and nanomolar-scale binding affinities for uridine- and adenosine-rich RNAs were discovered. Co-crystallization with U6RNA reveals that the outer rim of theAaeHfq hexamer features a well defined binding pocket that is selective for uracil. ThisAaeHfq structure, combined with biochemical and biophysical characterization of the homolog, reveals deep evolutionary conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode, and lays a foundation for further studies of Hfq-associated RNA biology in ancient bacterial phyla.

  16. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J.; Pinsky, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. PMID:26156299

  17. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Health Promotion Behavior of Chinese International Students in Korea Including Acculturation Factors: A Structural Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Il Young

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain the health promotion behavior of Chinese international students in Korea using a structural equation model including acculturation factors. A survey using self-administered questionnaires was employed. Data were collected from 272 Chinese students who have resided in Korea for longer than 6 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The p value of final model is .31. The fitness parameters of the final model such as goodness of fit index, adjusted goodness of fit index, normed fit index, non-normed fit index, and comparative fit index were more than .95. Root mean square of residual and root mean square error of approximation also met the criteria. Self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturative stress and acculturation level had direct effects on health promotion behavior of the participants and the model explained 30.0% of variance. The Chinese students in Korea with higher self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturation level, and lower acculturative stress reported higher health promotion behavior. The findings can be applied to develop health promotion strategies for this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Topological structure of the space of phenotypes: the case of RNA neutral networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Aguirre

    Full Text Available The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 4(12 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described.

  20. Topological Structure of the Space of Phenotypes: The Case of RNA Neutral Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Buldú, Javier M.; Stich, Michael; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence) and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold) are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 412 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described. PMID:22028856

  1. Defining the structural requirements for a helix in 23 S ribosomal RNA that confers erythromycin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Powers, T; Lee, J Y

    1989-01-01

    The helix spanning nucleotides 1198 to 1247 (helix 1200-1250) in Escherichia coli 23 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is functionally important in protein synthesis, and deletions in this region confer erythromycin resistance. In order to define the structural requirements for resistance, we have dissected...... this region using in vitro mutagenesis. Erythromycin resistance is established after a minimal deletion of three bases, CAU1231 or AUG1232. The maximum deletion observed to confer resistance is 25 bases. The level of erythromycin resistance conferred by intermediate sized deletions is variable and some....... However, removal of either these or non-conserved nucleotides from helix 1200-1250 measurably reduces the efficiency of 23 S RNA in forming functional ribosomes. We have used chemical probing and a modified primer extension method to investigate erythromycin binding to wild-type and resistant ribosomes...

  2. Structure of Hepatitis E Virion-Sized Particle Reveals an RNA-Dependent Viral Assembly Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, L.; Wall, J.; Li, T.-C.; Mayazaki, N.; Simon, M. N.; Moore, M.; Wang, C.-Y.; Takeda, N.; Wakita, T.; Miyamura, T.; Cheng, R. H.

    2010-10-22

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) induces acute hepatitis in humans with a high fatality rate in pregnant women. There is a need for anti-HEV research to understand the assembly process of HEV native capsid. Here, we produced a large virion-sized and a small T=1 capsid by expressing the HEV capsid protein in insect cells with and without the N-terminal 111 residues, respectively, for comparative structural analysis. The virion-sized capsid demonstrates a T=3 icosahedral lattice and contains RNA fragment in contrast to the RNA-free T=1 capsid. However, both capsids shared common decameric organization. The in vitro assembly further demonstrated that HEV capsid protein had the intrinsic ability to form decameric intermediate. Our data suggest that RNA binding is the extrinsic factor essential for the assembly of HEV native capsids.

  3. RNAssess--a web server for quality assessment of RNA 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasiak, Piotr; Antczak, Maciej; Ratajczak, Tomasz; Szachniuk, Marta; Popenda, Mariusz; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2015-07-01

    Nowadays, various methodologies can be applied to model RNA 3D structure. Thus, the plausible quality assessment of 3D models has a fundamental impact on the progress of structural bioinformatics. Here, we present RNAssess server, a novel tool dedicated to visual evaluation of RNA 3D models in the context of the known reference structure for a wide range of accuracy levels (from atomic to the whole molecule perspective). The proposed server is based on the concept of local neighborhood, defined as a set of atoms observed within a sphere localized around a central atom of a particular residue. A distinctive feature of our server is the ability to perform simultaneous visual analysis of the model-reference structure coherence. RNAssess supports the quality assessment through delivering both static and interactive visualizations that allows an easy identification of native-like models and/or chosen structural regions of the analyzed molecule. A combination of results provided by RNAssess allows us to rank analyzed models. RNAssess offers new route to a fast and efficient 3D model evaluation suitable for the RNA-Puzzles challenge. The proposed automated tool is implemented as a free and open to all users web server with an user-friendly interface and can be accessed at: http://rnassess.cs.put.poznan.pl/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Topological constraints are major determinants of tRNA tertiary structure and dynamics and provide basis for tertiary folding cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustoe, Anthony M; Brooks, Charles L; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that basic steric and connectivity constraints encoded at the secondary structure level are key determinants of 3D structure and dynamics in simple two-way RNA junctions. However, the role of these topological constraints in higher order RNA junctions remains poorly understood. Here, we use a specialized coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to directly probe the thermodynamic contributions of topological constraints in defining the 3D architecture and dynamics of transfer RNA (tRNA). Topological constraints alone restrict tRNA's allowed conformational space by over an order of magnitude and strongly discriminate against formation of non-native tertiary contacts, providing a sequence independent source of folding specificity. Topological constraints also give rise to long-range correlations between the relative orientation of tRNA's helices, which in turn provides a mechanism for encoding thermodynamic cooperativity between distinct tertiary interactions. These aspects of topological constraints make it such that only several tertiary interactions are needed to confine tRNA to its native global structure and specify functionally important 3D dynamics. We further show that topological constraints are conserved across tRNA's different naturally occurring secondary structures. Taken together, our results emphasize the central role of secondary-structure-encoded topological constraints in defining RNA 3D structure, dynamics and folding. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Exploiting structural and topological information to improve prediction of RNA-protein binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-protein interactions are important for a wide range of biological processes. Current computational methods to predict interacting residues in RNA-protein interfaces predominately rely on sequence data. It is, however, known that interface residue propensity is closely correlated with structural properties. In this paper we systematically study information obtained from sequences and structures and compare their contributions in this prediction problem. Particularly, different geometrical and network topological properties of protein structures are evaluated to improve interface residue prediction accuracy. Results We have quantified the impact of structural information on the prediction accuracy in comparison to the purely sequence based approach using two machine learning techniques: Naïve Bayes classifiers and Support Vector Machines. The highest AUC of 0.83 was achieved by a Support Vector Machine, exploiting PSI-BLAST profile, accessible surface area, betweenness-centrality and retention coefficient as input features. Taking into account that our results are based on a larger non-redundant data set, the prediction accuracy is considerably higher than reported in previous, comparable studies. A protein-RNA interface predictor (PRIP and the data set have been made available at http://www.qfab.org/PRIP. Conclusion Graph-theoretic properties of residue contact maps derived from protein structures such as betweenness-centrality can supplement sequence or structure features to improve the prediction accuracy for binding residues in RNA-protein interactions. While Support Vector Machines perform better on this task, Naïve Bayes classifiers also have been found to achieve good prediction accuracies but require much less training time and are an attractive choice for large scale predictions.

  6. Monitoring equilibrium changes in RNA structure by 'peroxidative' and 'oxidative' hydroxyl radical footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachu, Ravichandra; Padlan, Frances-Camille S; Rouhanifard, Sara; Brenowitz, Michael; Schlatterer, Jörg C

    2011-10-17

    RNA molecules play an essential role in biology. In addition to transmitting genetic information, RNA can fold into unique tertiary structures fulfilling a specific biologic role as regulator, binder or catalyst. Information about tertiary contact formation is essential to understand the function of RNA molecules. Hydroxyl radicals (•OH) are unique probes of the structure of nucleic acids due to their high reactivity and small size. When used as a footprinting probe, hydroxyl radicals map the solvent accessible surface of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA and RNA with as fine as single nucleotide resolution. Hydroxyl radical footprinting can be used to identify the nucleotides within an intermolecular contact surface, e.g. in DNA-protein and RNA-protein complexes. Equilibrium and kinetic transitions can be determined by conducting hydroxyl radical footprinting as a function of a solution variable or time, respectively. A key feature of footprinting is that limited exposure to the probe (e.g., 'single-hit kinetics') results in the uniform sampling of each nucleotide of the polymer. In this video article, we use the P4-P6 domain of the Tetrahymena ribozyme to illustrate RNA sample preparation and the determination of a Mg(II)-mediated folding isotherms. We describe the use of the well known hydroxyl radical footprinting protocol that requires H(2)O(2) (we call this the 'peroxidative' protocol) and a valuable, but not widely known, alternative that uses naturally dissolved O(2)(we call this the 'oxidative' protocol). An overview of the data reduction, transformation and analysis procedures is presented.

  7. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation.

  8. Structural biology. Structures of the CRISPR-Cmr complex reveal mode of RNA target positioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, D.W.; Zhu, Y.; Staals, R.H.J.; Kornfeld, J.E.; Shinkai, A.; Oost, van der J.; Nogales, E.; Doudna, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in bacteria involves RNA-guided surveillance complexes that use CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-associated (Cas) proteins together with CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to target invasive nucleic acids for degradation. Whereas type I and type II CRISPR-Cas

  9. Structural Insights into Conformation Differences between DNA/TNA and RNA/TNA Chimeric Duplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A; Sisco, Nicholas J; Sau, Sujay; Liao, Jen-Yu; Bala, Saikat; Rozners, Eriks; Egli, Martin; Chaput, John C; Van Horn, Wade D

    2016-09-15

    Threose nucleic acid (TNA) is an artificial genetic polymer capable of heredity and evolution, and is studied in the context of RNA chemical etiology. It has a four-carbon threose backbone in place of the five-carbon ribose of natural nucleic acids, yet forms stable antiparallel complementary Watson-Crick homoduplexes and heteroduplexes with DNA and RNA. TNA base-pairs more favorably with RNA than with DNA but the reason is unknown. Here, we employed NMR, ITC, UV, and CD to probe the structural and dynamic properties of heteroduplexes of RNA/TNA and DNA/TNA. The results indicate that TNA templates the structure of heteroduplexes, thereby forcing an A-like helical geometry. NMR measurement of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual base pair opening events reveal unexpected asymmetric "breathing" fluctuations of the DNA/TNA helix. The results suggest that DNA is unable to fully adapt to the conformational constraints of the rigid TNA backbone and that nucleic acid breathing dynamics are determined from both backbone and base contributions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Structural characterization of antibiotic self-immunity tRNA synthetase in plant tumour biocontrol agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shaileja; Palencia, Andrés; Virus, Cornelia; Schulwitz, Sarah; Temple, Brenda R; Cusack, Stephen; Reader, John

    2016-10-07

    Antibiotic-producing microbes evolved self-resistance mechanisms to avoid suicide. The biocontrol Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 secretes the Trojan Horse antibiotic agrocin 84 that is selectively transported into the plant pathogen A. tumefaciens and processed into the toxin TM84. We previously showed that TM84 employs a unique tRNA-dependent mechanism to inhibit leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS), while the TM84-producer prevents self-poisoning by expressing a resistant LeuRS AgnB2. We now identify a mechanism by which the antibiotic-producing microbe resists its own toxin. Using a combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that AgnB2 evolved structural changes so as to resist the antibiotic by eliminating the tRNA-dependence of TM84 binding. Mutagenesis of key resistance determinants results in mutants adopting an antibiotic-sensitive phenotype. This study illuminates the evolution of resistance in self-immunity genes and provides mechanistic insights into a fascinating tRNA-dependent antibiotic with applications for the development of anti-infectives and the prevention of biocontrol emasculation.

  11. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-08-06

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Structure and function of the PWI motif: a novel nucleic acid-binding domain that facilitates pre-mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczyna, Blair R; Bowman, John; McCracken, Susan; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Lu, Ying; Cox, Brian; Lambermon, Mark; Graveley, Brenton R; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2003-02-15

    The PWI motif is a highly conserved domain of unknown function in the SRm160 splicing and 3'-end cleavage-stimulatory factor, as well as in several other known or putative pre-mRNA processing components. We show here that the PWI motif is a new type of RNA/DNA-binding domain that has an equal preference for single- and double-stranded nucleic acids. Deletion of the motif prevents SRm160 from binding RNA and stimulating 3'-end cleavage, and its substitution with a heterologous RNA-binding domain restores these functions. The NMR solution structure of the SRm160-PWI motif reveals a novel, four-helix bundle and represents the first example of an alpha-helical fold that can bind single-stranded (ss)RNA. Structure-guided mutagenesis indicates that the same surface is involved in RNA and DNA binding and requires the cooperative action of a highly conserved, adjacent basic region. Thus, the PWI motif is a novel type of nucleic acid-binding domain that likely has multiple important functions in pre-mRNA processing, including SRm160-dependent stimulation of 3'-end formation.

  13. G quadruplex RNA structures in PSD-95 mRNA: potential regulators of miR-125a seed binding site accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Snezana; Bassell, Gary J; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability caused by the CGG trinucleotide expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, that silences the expression of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to bind to a G-rich region within the PSD-95 mRNA which encodes for the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and together with the microRNA miR-125a, to play an important role in the reversible inhibition of the PSD-95 mRNA translation in neurons. The loss of FMRP in Fmr1 KO mice disables this translation control in the production of the PSD-95 protein. Interestingly, the miR-125a binding site on PSD-95 mRNA is embedded in the G-rich region bound by FMRP and postulated to adopt one or more G quadruplex structures. In this study, we have used different biophysical techniques to validate and characterize the formation of parallel G quadruplex structures and binding of miR-125a to its complementary sequence located within the 3' UTR of PSD-95 mRNA. Our results indicate that the PSD-95 mRNA G-rich region folds into alternate G quadruplex conformations that coexist in equilibrium. miR-125a forms a stable complex with PSD-95 mRNA, as evident by characteristic Watson-Crick base-pairing that coexists with one of the G quadruplex forms, suggesting a novel mechanism for G quadruplex structures to regulate the access of miR-125a to its binding site. © 2014 Stefanovic et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. 76 FR 13227 - Continental Structural Plastics, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Doepker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... Employment and Training Administration Continental Structural Plastics, Including On-Site Leased Workers From... 31, 2008, applicable to workers of Continental Structural Plastics, North Baltimore, Ohio. The... Continental Structural Plastics, including on- site leased workers from Kelly Services and Doepker Group, Inc...

  15. TurboFold: Iterative probabilistic estimation of secondary structures for multiple RNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Gaurav

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of secondary structure, i.e. the set of canonical base pairs between nucleotides, is a first step in developing an understanding of the function of an RNA sequence. The most accurate computational methods predict conserved structures for a set of homologous RNA sequences. These methods usually suffer from high computational complexity. In this paper, TurboFold, a novel and efficient method for secondary structure prediction for multiple RNA sequences, is presented. Results TurboFold takes, as input, a set of homologous RNA sequences and outputs estimates of the base pairing probabilities for each sequence. The base pairing probabilities for a sequence are estimated by combining intrinsic information, derived from the sequence itself via the nearest neighbor thermodynamic model, with extrinsic information, derived from the other sequences in the input set. For a given sequence, the extrinsic information is computed by using pairwise-sequence-alignment-based probabilities for co-incidence with each of the other sequences, along with estimated base pairing probabilities, from the previous iteration, for the other sequences. The extrinsic information is introduced as free energy modifications for base pairing in a partition function computation based on the nearest neighbor thermodynamic model. This process yields updated estimates of base pairing probability. The updated base pairing probabilities in turn are used to recompute extrinsic information, resulting in the overall iterative estimation procedure that defines TurboFold. TurboFold is benchmarked on a number of ncRNA datasets and compared against alternative secondary structure prediction methods. The iterative procedure in TurboFold is shown to improve estimates of base pairing probability with each iteration, though only small gains are obtained beyond three iterations. Secondary structures composed of base pairs with estimated probabilities higher than a

  16. Structural characterization of interactions between the double-stranded RNA-binding zinc finger protein JAZ and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burge, Russell G; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2014-03-11

    The interactions of the human double-stranded RNA-binding zinc finger protein JAZ with RNA or DNA were investigated using electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, isothermal calorimetry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Consistent with previous reports, JAZ has very low affinity for duplex DNA or single-stranded RNA, but it binds preferentially to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) with no detectable sequence specificity. The affinity of JAZ for dsRNA is unaffected by local structural features such as loops, overhangs, and bulges, provided a sufficient length of reasonably well-structured A-form RNA (about 18 bp for a single zinc finger) is present. Full-length JAZ contains four Cys2His2 zinc fingers (ZF1-4) and has the highest apparent affinity for dsRNA; two-finger constructs ZF12 and ZF23 have lower affinity, and ZF34 binds even more weakly. The fourth zinc finger, ZF4, has no measurable RNA-binding affinity. Single zinc finger constructs ZF1, ZF2, and ZF3 show evidence for multiple-site binding on the minimal RNA. Fitting of quantitative NMR titration and isothermal calorimetry data to a two-site binding model gave Kd1 ∼ 10 μM and Kd2 ∼ 100 μM. Models of JAZ-RNA complexes were generated using the high-ambiguity-driven biomolecular docking (HADDOCK) program. Single zinc fingers bind to the RNA backbone without sequence specificity, forming complexes with contacts between the RNA minor groove and residues in the N-terminal β strands and between the major groove and residues in the helix-kink-helix motif. We propose that the non-sequence-specific interaction between the zinc fingers of JAZ with dsRNA is dependent only on the overall shape of the A-form RNA.

  17. Structural disorder and the loss of RNA homeostasis in aging and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas eGray

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Whereas many cases of neurodegenerative disease feature the abnormal accumulationof protein, an abundance of recent literature highlights loss of RNA homeostasis as aubiquitous and central feature of pathological states. In some diseases expandedrepeats have been identified in non-coding regions of disease-associated transcripts,calling into question the relevance of protein in the disease mechanism. We review theliterature in support of a hypothesis that intrinsically disordered proteins (proteins thatlack a stable three dimensional conformation are particularly sensitive to an age-relateddecline in maintenance of protein homeostasis. The potential consequences forstructurally disordered RNA binding proteins are explored, including their aggregationinto complexes that could be transmitted through a prion-like mechanism. We proposethat the spread of ribonucleoprotein complexes through the nervous system couldpropagate a neuronal error catastrophe at the level of RNA metabolism.

  18. Reliability Analysis of Brittle Material Structures - Including MEMS(?) - With the CARES/Life Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.

    2002-01-01

    Brittle materials are being used, or considered, for a wide variety of high tech applications that operate in harsh environments, including static and rotating turbine parts. thermal protection systems, dental prosthetics, fuel cells, oxygen transport membranes, radomes, and MEMS. Designing components to sustain repeated load without fracturing while using the minimum amount of material requires the use of a probabilistic design methodology. The CARES/Life code provides a general-purpose analysis tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. For this presentation an interview of the CARES/Life program will be provided. Emphasis will be placed on describing the latest enhancements to the code for reliability analysis with time varying loads and temperatures (fully transient reliability analysis). Also, early efforts in investigating the validity of using Weibull statistics, the basis of the CARES/Life program, to characterize the strength of MEMS structures will be described as as well as the version of CARES/Life for MEMS (CARES/MEMS) being prepared which incorporates single crystal and edge flaw reliability analysis capability. It is hoped this talk will open a dialog for potential collaboration in the area of MEMS testing and life prediction.

  19. [The structure of the nucleolus during the inhibition of RNA-and protein synthesis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romen, W; Altmann, H W

    1977-06-15

    In cells treated with antimetabolites to inhibit RNA- and protein synthesis, electron microscopic studies reveal structural alterations of the nucleolus. The morphological appearance of the nucleolus differs depending of the inhibitor used. If transcription is prevented, segregation of nucleolar components is observed. Inhibition of processing of newly synthesized RNA results in a degranulation and an increase in the amount of nucleolar fibrils. A disturbance of the release of nucleolar ribonucleoproteins into the cytoplasm leads to an enlargement and a hypergranulation of the nucleolus. On the other hand interruption of translation of mRNAs has no immediate effect on the appearance of the nucleolar structure. Only after longer treatment of the cells with the translation inhibitor the nucleolus shrinks and becomes degranulated. The use of inhibitors with clearly defined mechanisms of action in a morphological study should make it possible to interpret similar nucleolar alterations seen in cancer cells and virus-infected cells on a molecular biological basis.

  20. Trans-translation exposed: understanding the structures and functions of tmRNA-SmpB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eGIUDICE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome stalling is a serious issue for cell survival. In bacteria, the primary rescue system is trans-translation, performed by tmRNA and its protein partner small protein B (SmpB. Since its discovery almost 20 years ago, biochemical, genetic, and structural studies have paved the way to a better understanding of how this sophisticated process takes place at the cellular and molecular levels. Here we describe the molecular details of trans-translation, with special mention of recent cryo-electron microscopy and crystal structures that have helped explain how the huge tmRNA-SmpB complex targets and delivers stalled ribosomes without interfering with canonical translation.

  1. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of microRNA with star trigon structure and endonuclease mediated signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Peng; Wang, Bidou; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Yuguo

    2015-01-15

    MicroRNAs play important roles in gene regulation. They can be used as effective biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of diseases like cancers. Due to their intrinsic properties of short length, low abundance and sequence homology among family members, it is difficult to realize sensitive and selective detection with economical use of time and cost. Herein, we report an ultrasensitive electrochemical method for microRNA analysis employing two oligonucleotides and one endonuclease. Generally, a glassy carbon electrode is first covered with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mediated by poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). Then, thiolated capture probe (CP) with methylene blue (MB) labeled at 5' end is modified on the pretreated electrode. Hybridization occurs among target microRNA, CP and auxiliary probe (AP), forming a star trigon structure on the electrode surface. Subsequently, endonuclease recognizes and cleaves CP on CP/AP duplex, releasing microRNA and AP back to the solution. The two regenerated elements can then form another star trigon with other CP molecules, initiating cycles of CP cleavage and MB departure. Significant decrease of electrochemical signals is thus observed, which can be used to reflect the concentration of microRNA. This proposed method has a linear response to microRNA in a wide range from 100 aM to 1 nM and the sensitivity of attomolar level can be achieved. Moreover, it has high selectivity against single-base mismatch sequences and can be used directly in serum samples. Therefore, this method shows great feasibility for the detection of microRNA and may have potential applications in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; King, Liam B; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-01-01

    Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  3. Structural basis for the dsRNA specificity of the Lassa virus NP exonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Hastie

    Full Text Available Lassa virus causes hemorrhagic fever characterized by immunosuppression. The nucleoprotein of Lassa virus, termed NP, binds the viral genome. It also has an additional enzymatic activity as an exonuclease that specifically digests double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. dsRNA is a strong signal to the innate immune system of viral infection. Digestion of dsRNA by the NP exonuclease activity appears to cause suppression of innate immune signaling in the infected cell. Although the fold of the NP enzyme is conserved and the active site completely conserved with other exonucleases in its DEDDh family, NP is atypical among exonucleases in its preference for dsRNA and its strict specificity for one substrate. Here, we present the crystal structure of Lassa virus NP in complex with dsRNA. We find that unlike the exonuclease in Klenow fragment, the double-stranded nucleic acid in complex with Lassa NP remains base-paired instead of splitting, and that binding of the paired complementary strand is achieved by "relocation" of a basic loop motif from its typical exonuclease position. Further, we find that just one single glycine that contacts the substrate strand and one single tyrosine that stacks with a base of the complementary, non-substrate strand are responsible for the unique substrate specificity. This work thus provides templates for development of antiviral drugs that would be specific for viral, rather than host exonucleases of similar fold and active site, and illustrates how a very few amino acid changes confer alternate specificity and biological phenotype to an enzyme.

  4. Small angle scattering study of the structure and organization of RNA and protein in Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Narayan C.; Warren, Garfield T.; Cheng, Si; Kao, C. Cheng; Ni, Peng; Dragnea, Bogdan; Sokol, Paul E.

    2012-02-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a small icosahedral of the alpha virus-like superfamily of RNA with a segmented positive-strand RNA genome and a mean diameter ˜ 268å that offers high levels of RNA synthesis and virus production in plants. BMV also tightly regulates the packaging of its four RNAs (RNA1 through RNA4) into three separate particles; RNA1 and RNA2 are encapsidated separately while one copy each of RNA3 and RNA4 are normally packaged together. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) were applied to study the size, shape and protein-RNA organization of BMV. D2O/H2O mixture was used to enhance contrast in SANS measurement. The radial distribution of BMV from the Fourier transform of scattering spectrum gives a clear indication of RNA packing, and distribution and their structure in the BMV. The result reveals that the virus is about 266 å in diameter and is composed of RNA inside the virion coated with a protein shell.

  5. Selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and mutational profiling (SHAPE-MaP) for direct, versatile, and accurate RNA structure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Matthew J.; Rice, Greggory M.; Busan, Steven; Siegfried, Nathan A.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    SHAPE chemistries exploit small electrophilic reagents that react with the 2′-hydroxyl group to interrogate RNA structure at single-nucleotide resolution. Mutational profiling (MaP) identifies modified residues based on the ability of reverse transcriptase to misread a SHAPE-modified nucleotide and then counting the resulting mutations by massively parallel sequencing. The SHAPE-MaP approach measures the structure of large and transcriptome-wide systems as accurately as for simple model RNAs. This protocol describes the experimental steps, implemented over three days, required to perform SHAPE probing and construct multiplexed SHAPE-MaP libraries suitable for deep sequencing. These steps include RNA folding and SHAPE structure probing, mutational profiling by reverse transcription, library construction, and sequencing. Automated processing of MaP sequencing data is accomplished using two software packages. ShapeMapper converts raw sequencing files into mutational profiles, creates SHAPE reactivity plots, and provides useful troubleshooting information, often within an hour. SuperFold uses these data to model RNA secondary structures, identify regions with well-defined structures, and visualize probable and alternative helices, often in under a day. We illustrate these algorithms with the E. coli thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch, E. coli 16S rRNA, and HIV-1 genomic RNAs. SHAPE-MaP can be used to make nucleotide-resolution biophysical measurements of individual RNA motifs, rare components of complex RNA ensembles, and entire transcriptomes. The straightforward MaP strategy greatly expands the number, length, and complexity of analyzable RNA structures. PMID:26426499

  6. Evaluation of the suitability of free-energy minimization using nearest-neighbor energy parameters for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobaugh Christian W

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed understanding of an RNA's correct secondary and tertiary structure is crucial to understanding its function and mechanism in the cell. Free energy minimization with energy parameters based on the nearest-neighbor model and comparative analysis are the primary methods for predicting an RNA's secondary structure from its sequence. Version 3.1 of Mfold has been available since 1999. This version contains an expanded sequence dependence of energy parameters and the ability to incorporate coaxial stacking into free energy calculations. We test Mfold 3.1 by performing the largest and most phylogenetically diverse comparison of rRNA and tRNA structures predicted by comparative analysis and Mfold, and we use the results of our tests on 16S and 23S rRNA sequences to assess the improvement between Mfold 2.3 and Mfold 3.1. Results The average prediction accuracy for a 16S or 23S rRNA sequence with Mfold 3.1 is 41%, while the prediction accuracies for the majority of 16S and 23S rRNA structures tested are between 20% and 60%, with some having less than 20% prediction accuracy. The average prediction accuracy was 71% for 5S rRNA and 69% for tRNA. The majority of the 5S rRNA and tRNA sequences have prediction accuracies greater than 60%. The prediction accuracy of 16S rRNA base-pairs decreases exponentially as the number of nucleotides intervening between the 5' and 3' halves of the base-pair increases. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that the current set of nearest-neighbor energy parameters in conjunction with the Mfold folding algorithm are unable to consistently and reliably predict an RNA's correct secondary structure. For 16S or 23S rRNA structure prediction, Mfold 3.1 offers little improvement over Mfold 2.3. However, the nearest-neighbor energy parameters do work well for shorter RNA sequences such as tRNA or 5S rRNA, or for larger rRNAs when the contact distance between the base-pairs is less than 100 nucleotides.

  7. Structural organization of the transfer RNA operon I of Vibrio cholerae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    restriction enzyme EcoRI at 37°C according to the in- structions of the manufacturer (New .... (b) Schematic representation of the EcoRI restriction map and the structural organization of tRNA operon I in V. cholerae El Tor/O139 and clas- ... MED/09/154/97 from the Department of Biotechnology,. New Delhi. Both AG and AM ...

  8. ssHMM: extracting intuitive sequence-structure motifs from high-throughput RNA-binding protein data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, David; Krestel, Ralf; Ohler, Uwe; Vingron, Martin; Marsico, Annalisa

    2017-11-02

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role in RNA post-transcriptional regulation and recognize target RNAs via sequence-structure motifs. The extent to which RNA structure influences protein binding in the presence or absence of a sequence motif is still poorly understood. Existing RNA motif finders either take the structure of the RNA only partially into account, or employ models which are not directly interpretable as sequence-structure motifs. We developed ssHMM, an RNA motif finder based on a hidden Markov model (HMM) and Gibbs sampling which fully captures the relationship between RNA sequence and secondary structure preference of a given RBP. Compared to previous methods which output separate logos for sequence and structure, it directly produces a combined sequence-structure motif when trained on a large set of sequences. ssHMM's model is visualized intuitively as a graph and facilitates biological interpretation. ssHMM can be used to find novel bona fide sequence-structure motifs of uncharacterized RBPs, such as the one presented here for the YY1 protein. ssHMM reaches a high motif recovery rate on synthetic data, it recovers known RBP motifs from CLIP-Seq data, and scales linearly on the input size, being considerably faster than MEMERIS and RNAcontext on large datasets while being on par with GraphProt. It is freely available on Github and as a Docker image. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Structure-activity relationships of fluorinated dendrimers in DNA and siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Cheng, Yiyun

    2016-12-01

    Fluorinated dendrimers have shown great promise in gene delivery due to their high transfection efficacy and low cytotoxicity, however, the structure-activity relationships of these polymers still remain unknown. Herein, we synthesized a library of fluorinated dendrimers with different dendrimer generations and fluorination degrees and investigated their behaviors in both DNA and siRNA delivery. The results show that fluorination significantly improves the transfection efficacy of G4-G7 polyamidoamine dendrimers in DNA and siRNA delivery. Fluorination on generation 5 dendrimer yields the most efficient polymers in gene delivery, and the transfection efficacy of fluorinated dendrimers depends on fluorination degree. All the fluorinated dendrimers cause minimal toxicity on the transfected cells at their optimal transfection conditions. This study provides a general and facile strategy to prepare high efficient and low cytotoxic gene carriers based on fluorinated polymers. The structure-activity relationships of fluorinated dendrimers in gene delivery is still unknown and the behavior of fluorinated dendrimers in siRNA delivery has not yet been investigated. Herein, we synthesized a library of fluorinated PAMAM dendrimers with different dendrimer generations and fluorination degrees and investigated their behaviors in both DNA and siRNA delivery. The results clearly indicate that fluorination significantly improves the transfection efficacy of dendrimers in both DNA and siRNA delivery without causing additional toxicity. G5 PAMAM dendrimer is best scaffold to synthesize fluorinated dendrimers and the transfection efficacy of fluorinated dendrimers depends on fluorination degree. This systematic study provides a general and facile strategy to prepare high efficient and low cytotoxic gene carriers based on fluorinated polymers. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  11. Crystal structure of the RNA 2'-phosphotransferase from Aeropyrum pernix K1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Murayama, Miyuki; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2005-04-29

    In the final step of tRNA splicing, the 2'-phosphotransferase catalyzes the transfer of the extra 2'-phosphate from the precursor-ligated tRNA to NAD. We have determined the crystal structure of the 2'-phosphotransferase protein from Aeropyrum pernix K1 at 2.8 Angstroms resolution. The structure of the 2'-phosphotransferase contains two globular domains (N and C-domains), which form a cleft in the center. The N-domain has the winged helix motif, a subfamily of the helix-turn-helix family, which is shared by many DNA-binding proteins. The C-domain of the 2'-phosphotransferase superimposes well on the NAD-binding fold of bacterial (diphtheria) toxins, which catalyze the transfer of ADP ribose from NAD to target proteins, indicating that the mode of NAD binding by the 2'-phosphotransferase could be similar to that of the bacterial toxins. The conserved basic residues are assembled at the periphery of the cleft and could participate in the enzyme contact with the sugar-phosphate backbones of tRNA. The modes by which the two functional domains recognize the two different substrates are clarified by the present crystal structure of the 2'-phosphotransferase.

  12. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Guoqing; Dou, Yong; Wan, Wen; Xia, Fei; Li, Rongchun; Ma, Meng; Zou, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Speedup of 15.93× over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications.

  13. Crystal structures of Nova-1 and Nova-2 K-homology RNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, H A; Chen, H; Edo, C; Buckanovich, R J; Yang, Y Y; Musunuru, K; Zhong, R; Darnell, R B; Burley, S K

    1999-02-15

    Nova-1 and Nova-2 are related neuronal proteins that were initially cloned using antisera obtained from patients with the autoimmune neurological disease paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus ataxia (POMA). Both of these disease gene products contain three RNA-binding motifs known as K-homology or KH domains, and their RNA ligands have been identified via binding-site selection experiments. The KH motif structure has been determined previously using NMR spectroscopy, but not using X-ray crystallography. Many proteins contain more than one KH domain, yet there is no published structural information regarding the behavior of such multimers. We have obtained the first X-ray crystallographic structures of KH-domain-containing proteins. Structures of the third KH domains (KH3) of Nova-1 and Nova-2 were determined by multiple isomorphous replacement and molecular replacement at 2.6 A and 2.0 A, respectively. These highly similar RNA-binding motifs form a compact protease-resistant domain resembling an open-faced sandwich, consisting of a three-stranded antiparallel beta sheet topped by three alpha helices. In both Nova crystals, the lattice is composed of symmetric tetramers of KH3 domains that are created by two dimer interfaces. The crystal structures of both Nova KH3 domains are similar to the previously determined NMR structures. The most significant differences among the KH domains involve changes in the positioning of one or more of the alpha helices with respect to the betasheet, particularly in the NMR structure of the KH1 domain of the Fragile X disease protein FMR-1. Loop regions in the KH domains are clearly visible in the crystal structure, unlike the NMR structures, revealing the conformation of the invariant Gly-X-X-Gly segment that is thought to participate in RNA-binding and of the variable region. The tetrameric arrangements of the Nova KH3 domains provide insights into how KH domains may interact with each other in proteins containing multiple KH motifs.

  14. JABAWS 2.2 Distributed Web Services for Bioinformatics: Protein Disorder, Conservation and RNA Secondary Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Peter V; Procter, James B; Sherstnev, Alexander; Barton, Daniel L; Madeira, Fábio; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2018-01-30

    JABAWS 2.2 is a computational framework that simplifies the deployment of web services for Bioinformatics. In addition to the five multiple sequence alignment (MSA) algorithms in JABAWS 1.0, JABAWS 2.2 includes three additional MSA programs (Clustal Omega, MSAprobs, GLprobs), four protein disorder prediction methods (DisEMBL, IUPred, Ronn, GlobPlot), 18 measures of protein conservation as implemented in AACon, and RNA secondary structure prediction by the RNAalifold program. JABAWS 2.2 can be deployed on a variety of in-house or hosted systems. JABAWS 2.2 web services may be accessed from the Jalview multiple sequence analysis workbench (Version 2.8 and later), as well as directly via the JABAWS command line interface (CLI) client. JABAWS 2.2 can be deployed on a local virtual server as a Virtual Appliance (VA) or simply as a Web Application Archive (WAR) for private use. Improvements in JABAWS 2.2 also include simplified installation and a range of utility tools for usage statistics collection, and web services querying and monitoring. The JABAWS CLI client has been updated to support all the new services and allow integration of JABAWS 2.2 services into conventional scripts. A public JABAWS 2 server has been in production since December 2011 and served over 800,000 analyses for users worldwide. JABAWS 2.2 is made freely available under the Apache 2 license and can be obtained from: http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jabaws. g.j.barton@dundee.ac.uk.

  15. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-02-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  16. Genomic mid-range inhomogeneity correlates with an abundance of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jun

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes possess different levels of non-randomness, in particular, an inhomogeneity in their nucleotide composition. Inhomogeneity is manifest from the short-range where neighboring nucleotides influence the choice of base at a site, to the long-range, commonly known as isochores, where a particular base composition can span millions of nucleotides. A separate genomic issue that has yet to be thoroughly elucidated is the role that RNA secondary structure (SS plays in gene expression. Results We present novel data and approaches that show that a mid-range inhomogeneity (~30 to 1000 nt not only exists in mammalian genomes but is also significantly associated with strong RNA SS. A whole-genome bioinformatics investigation of local SS in a set of 11,315 non-redundant human pre-mRNA sequences has been carried out. Four distinct components of these molecules (5'-UTRs, exons, introns and 3'-UTRs were considered separately, since they differ in overall nucleotide composition, sequence motifs and periodicities. For each pre-mRNA component, the abundance of strong local SS ( Conclusion We demonstrate that the excess of strong local SS in pre-mRNAs is linked to the little explored phenomenon of genomic mid-range inhomogeneity (MRI. MRI is an interdependence between nucleotide choice and base composition over a distance of 20–1000 nt. Additionally, we have created a public computational resource to support further study of genomic MRI.

  17. Crystal structure of the RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wanchun; Cheng, Jiahui; Zhou, Congli; Hua, Yuejin; Zhao, Ye

    2017-05-01

    2',3'-Cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase) homologues have been found in all domains of life and are involved in diverse RNA and nucleotide metabolisms. The CPDase from Deinococcus radiodurans was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution, which is the highest resolution currently known for a CPDase structure. Structural comparisons revealed that the enzyme is in an open conformation in the absence of substrate. Nevertheless, the active site is well formed, and the representative motifs interact with sulfate ion, which suggests a conserved catalytic mechanism.

  18. Finding the most significant common sequence and structure motifs in a set of RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, L.J.; Stormo, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to locally align a collection of RNA sequences using sequence and structure constraints, In addition, the method searches for the resulting alignments with the most significant common motifs, among all possible collections, The first part utilizes a simplified......, but the core algorithm assures that the pairwise alignments are optimized for both sequence and structure conservation. The choice of scoring system and the method of progressively constructing the final solution are important considerations that are discussed, Example solutions, and comparisons with other...

  19. In silico discovery and modeling of non-coding RNA structure in viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Walter N; Steitz, Joan A

    2015-12-01

    This review covers several computational methods for discovering structured non-coding RNAs in viruses and modeling their putative secondary structures. Here we will use examples from two target viruses to highlight these approaches: influenza A virus-a relatively small, segmented RNA virus; and Epstein-Barr virus-a relatively large DNA virus with a complex transcriptome. Each system has unique challenges to overcome and unique characteristics to exploit. From these particular cases, generically useful approaches can be derived for the study of additional viral targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  1. Voice, Post-Structural Representation and the Subjectivity of "Included" Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitburn, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Aligned with the broader movement from structuralism to the post-