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Sample records for rna phosphodiester backbone

  1. Formation of RNA phosphodiester bond by histidine-containing dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Rafal; Dörr, Mark; Chotera, Agata;

    2013-01-01

    A new scenario for prebiotic formation of nucleic acid oligomers is presented. Peptide catalysis is applied to achieve condensation of activated RNA monomers into short RNA chains. As catalysts, L-dipeptides containing a histidine residue, primarily Ser-His, were used. Reactions were carried out....... Details of the mechanism and kinetics, which were elucidated with a set of control experiments, further establish that the imidazole side chain of a histidine at the carboxyl end of the dipeptide plays a crucial role in the catalysis. These results suggest that this oligomerisation catalysis occurs...

  2. High resolution 4D HPCH experiment for sequential assignment of {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs via phosphodiester backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh; Stanek, Jan [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland); Cevec, Mirko; Plavec, Janez [National Institute of Chemistry, Slovenian NMR Centre (Slovenia); Koźmiński, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland)

    2015-11-15

    The three-dimensional structure determination of RNAs by NMR spectroscopy requires sequential resonance assignment, often hampered by assignment ambiguities and limited dispersion of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts, especially of C4′/H4′. Here we present a novel through-bond 4D HPCH NMR experiment involving phosphate backbone where C4′–H4′ correlations are resolved along the {sup 1}H3′–{sup 31}P spectral planes. The experiment provides high peak resolution and effectively removes ambiguities encountered during assignments. Enhanced peak dispersion is provided by the inclusion of additional {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H3′ dimensions and constant-time evolution of chemical shifts. High spectral resolution is obtained by using non-uniform sampling in three indirect dimensions. The experiment fully utilizes the isotopic {sup 13}C-labeling with evolution of C4′ carbons. Band selective {sup 13}C inversion pulses are used to achieve selectivity and prevent signal dephasing due to the C4′–C3′ and C4′–C5′ homonuclear couplings. Multiple quantum line narrowing is employed to minimize sensitivity loses. The 4D HPCH experiment is verified and successfully applied to a non-coding 34-nt RNA consisting typical structure elements and a 14-nt RNA hairpin capped by cUUCGg tetraloop.

  3. Mechanism of general acid-base catalysis in transesterification of an RNA model phosphodiester studied with strongly basic catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona-Martínez, David O; Taran, Olga; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2010-02-21

    Using 80% vol aqueous DMSO as the reaction medium for transesterification of an RNA model substrate 2-hydroxypropyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate allows one to observe catalysis in buffer mixtures composed of highly basic components such as guanidines, amidines or alkylamines, which provide up to 10(3)-fold accelerations over the background reaction in the 0.01-0.1 M concentration range. The rate law k(obs) = k(1)[B] + k(2)[B][BH(+)] was established indicating contributions from both simple general base catalysis and the reaction involving concerted action of neutral (B) and protonated (BH(+)) forms of the buffer. The catalytic efficiency of guanidinium and amidinium cations is 10 times larger than that of more acidic ammonium cations. Rate constants k(1) and k(2) obey the Brønsted equations with the slopes 0.77 and 0.69 respectively. Proton inventory for k(2) (B = guanidine) in D(2)O/H(2)O mixtures gives two fractionation factors phi(1) = 0.48 and phi(2) = 1.26 for normal and inverse isotope effects respectively. The former results from the proton transfer to B and the latter from the binding of guanidinium cation to the phosphate group as follows from observation of an inverse solvent isotope effect for the binding of guanidinium and amidinium cations to a phosphodiester anion. The results of kinetic studies together with analysis of transition state stabilization free energies for guanidinium and amidinium cations show that the protonated buffer component acts via electrostatic transition state stabilization rather than proton transfer, which may be possible for a guanidinium assisted hydroxide catalyzed reaction.

  4. Mutational analysis of bacteriophage T4 RNA ligase 1. Different functional groups are required for the nucleotidyl transfer and phosphodiester bond formation steps of the ligation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Kai; Ho, C Kiong; Pei, Yi; Shuman, Stewart

    2003-08-08

    T4 RNA ligase 1 (Rnl1) exemplifies an ATP-dependent RNA ligase family that includes fungal tRNA ligase (Trl1) and a putative baculovirus RNA ligase. Rnl1 acts via a covalent enzyme-AMP intermediate generated by attack of Lys-99 N zeta on the alpha phosphorus of ATP. Mutation of Lys-99 abolishes ligase activity. Here we tested the effects of alanine mutations at 19 conserved positions in Rnl1 and thereby identified 9 new residues essential for ligase activity: Arg-54, Lys-75, Phe-77, Gly-102, Lys-119, Glu-227, Gly-228, Lys-240, and Lys-242. Seven of the essential residues are located within counterparts of conserved nucleotidyltransferase motifs I (99KEDG102), Ia (118SK119), IV (227EGYVA231), and V (238HFKIK242) that comprise the active sites of DNA ligases, RNA capping enzymes, and T4 RNA ligase 2. Three other essential residues, Arg-54, Lys-75 and Phe-77, are located upstream of the AMP attachment site within a conserved domain unique to the Rnl1-like ligase family. We infer a shared evolutionary history and active site architecture in Rnl1 (a tRNA repair enzyme) and Trl1 (a tRNA splicing enzyme). We determined structure-activity relationships via conservative substitutions and examined mutational effects on the isolated steps of Rnl1 adenylylation (step 1) and phosphodiester bond formation (step 3). Lys-75, Lys-240, and Lys-242 were found to be essential for step 1 and overall ligation of 5'-phosphorylated RNA but not for phosphodiester bond formation. These results suggest that the composition of the Rnl1 active site is different during steps 1 and 3. Mutations at Arg-54 and Lys-119 abolished the overall RNA ligation reaction without affecting steps 1 and 3. Arg-54 and Lys-119 are thereby implicated as specific catalysts of the RNA adenylation reaction (step 2) of the ligation pathway.

  5. RNA-Redesign: a web server for fixed-backbone 3D design of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesselman, Joseph D; Das, Rhiju

    2015-07-01

    RNA is rising in importance as a design medium for interrogating fundamental biology and for developing therapeutic and bioengineering applications. While there are several online servers for design of RNA secondary structure, there are no tools available for the rational design of 3D RNA structure. Here we present RNA-Redesign (http://rnaredesign.stanford.edu), an online 3D design tool for RNA. This resource utilizes fixed-backbone design to optimize the sequence identity and nucleobase conformations of an RNA to match a desired backbone, analogous to fundamental tools that underlie rational protein engineering. The resulting sequences suggest thermostabilizing mutations that can be experimentally verified. Further, sequence preferences that differ between natural and computationally designed sequences can suggest whether natural sequences possess functional constraints besides folding stability, such as cofactor binding or conformational switching. Finally, for biochemical studies, the designed sequences can suggest experimental tests of 3D models, including concomitant mutation of base triples. In addition to the designs generated, detailed graphical analysis is presented through an integrated and user-friendly environment.

  6. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  7. Solvolysis mechanisms of RNA phosphodiester analogues promoted by mononuclear zinc(II) complexes: mechanisic determination upon solvent medium and ligand effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuepeng; Zhu, Yajie; Gao, Hui; Zhao, Cunyuan

    2014-11-17

    The solvolysis mechanisms of RNA phosphodiester model 2-(hydroxypropyl)-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HpPNP) catalyzed by mononuclear zinc(II) complexes are investigated in the paper via a theoretical approach. The general-base-catalyzed (GBC) and specific-base-catalyzed (SBC) mechanisms are thoroughly discussed in the paper, and the calculations indicate a SBC mechanism (also named as the direct nucleophilic attack mechanism) when the cyclization of HpPNP is promoted by the Zn:[12]aneN3 complex ([12]aneN3 = 1,5,9-triazacyclododecane). The ligand effect is considered by involving two different catalysts, and the results show that the increasing size catalyst provides a lower energy barrier and a significant mechanistic preference to the SBC mechanism. The solvent medium effect is also explored, and reduced polarity/dielectric constant solvents, such as light alcohols methanol and ethanol, are more favorable. Ethanol is proven to be a good solvent medium because of its low dielectric constant. The computational results are indicative of concerted pathways. Our theoretical results are consistent with and well interpret the experimental observations and, more importantly, provide practical suggestions on the catalyst design and selection of reaction conditions.

  8. RNABC: forward kinematics to reduce all-atom steric clashes in RNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyi; Kapral, Gary; Murray, Laura; Richardson, David; Richardson, Jane; Snoeyink, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Although accurate details in RNA structure are of great importance for understanding RNA function, the backbone conformation is difficult to determine, and most existing RNA structures show serious steric clashes (>or= 0.4 A overlap) when hydrogen atoms are taken into account. We have developed a program called RNABC (RNA Backbone Correction) that performs local perturbations to search for alternative conformations that avoid those steric clashes or other local geometry problems. Its input is an all-atom coordinate file for an RNA crystal structure (usually from the MolProbity web service), with problem areas specified. RNABC rebuilds a suite (the unit from sugar to sugar) by anchoring the phosphorus and base positions, which are clearest in crystallographic electron density, and reconstructing the other atoms using forward kinematics. Geometric parameters are constrained within user-specified tolerance of canonical or original values, and torsion angles are constrained to ranges defined through empirical database analyses. Several optimizations reduce the time required to search the many possible conformations. The output results are clustered and presented to the user, who can choose whether to accept one of the alternative conformations. Two test evaluations show the effectiveness of RNABC, first on the S-motifs from 42 RNA structures, and second on the worst problem suites (clusters of bad clashes, or serious sugar pucker outliers) in 25 unrelated RNA structures. Among the 101 S-motifs, 88 had diagnosed problems, and RNABC produced clash-free conformations with acceptable geometry for 71 of those (about 80%). For the 154 worst problem suites, RNABC proposed alternative conformations for 72. All but 8 of those were judged acceptable after examining electron density (where available) and local conformation. Thus, even for these worst cases, nearly half the time RNABC suggested corrections suitable to initiate further crystallographic refinement. The program is

  9. Polymers with Phosphodiester Bonds: from Models of Biopolymers to Liquid Membranes and Polymerinorganic Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanislaw Penczek

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The backbones of nucleic and teichoic acids are built on the poly (alkylene phosphate) chains i. e. macromolecules with phosphodiester repeating units with six atoms (nucleic acids) or five (1,2- glycerol teichoic acids). These can be visualized as follows:

  10. Marburg virus VP35 can both fully coat the backbone and cap the ends of dsRNA for interferon antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shridhar Bale

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses, including Marburg virus (MARV and Ebola virus (EBOV, cause fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. All filoviruses encode a unique multi-functional protein termed VP35. The C-terminal double-stranded (dsRNA-binding domain (RBD of VP35 has been implicated in interferon antagonism and immune evasion. Crystal structures of the VP35 RBD from two ebolaviruses have previously demonstrated that the viral protein caps the ends of dsRNA. However, it is not yet understood how the expanses of dsRNA backbone, between the ends, are masked from immune surveillance during filovirus infection. Here, we report the crystal structure of MARV VP35 RBD bound to dsRNA. In the crystal structure, molecules of dsRNA stack end-to-end to form a pseudo-continuous oligonucleotide. This oligonucleotide is continuously and completely coated along its sugar-phosphate backbone by the MARV VP35 RBD. Analysis of dsRNA binding by dot-blot and isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that multiple copies of MARV VP35 RBD can indeed bind the dsRNA sugar-phosphate backbone in a cooperative manner in solution. Further, MARV VP35 RBD can also cap the ends of the dsRNA in solution, although this arrangement was not captured in crystals. Together, these studies suggest that MARV VP35 can both coat the backbone and cap the ends, and that for MARV, coating of the dsRNA backbone may be an essential mechanism by which dsRNA is masked from backbone-sensing immune surveillance molecules.

  11. Molecular Simulations of RNA 2’-O-Transesterification Reaction Models in Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Radak, Brian K.; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2012-01-01

    We employ quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical umbrella sampling simulations to probe the free energy surfaces of a series of increasingly complex reaction models of RNA 2’-O-transesterification in aqueous solution under alkaline conditions. Such models are valuable for understanding the uncatalyzed processes underlying catalytic cleavage of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA, a reaction of fundamental importance in biology. The chemically reactive atoms are modeled by the AM1/d-PhoT quant...

  12. Folding of RNA tertiary structure: Linkages between backbone phosphates, ions, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, David E

    2013-12-01

    The functional forms of many RNAs have compact architectures. The placement of phosphates within such structures must be influenced not only by the strong electrostatic repulsion between phosphates, but also by networks of interactions between phosphates, water, and mobile ions. This review first explores what has been learned of the basic thermodynamic constraints on these arrangements from studies of hydration and ions in simple DNA molecules, and then gives an overview of what is known about ion and water interactions with RNA structures. A brief survey of RNA crystal structures identifies several interesting architectures in which closely spaced phosphates share hydration shells or phosphates are buried in environments that provide intramolecular hydrogen bonds or site-bound cations. Formation of these structures must require strong coupling between the uptake of ions and release of water.

  13. Synthesis of acetylene-substituted probes with benzene-phosphate backbones for RNA labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Ueno, Yoshihito; Kitade, Yukio

    2014-06-24

    Conversion of dimethyl 5-aminoisophthalate into the iodoarene via the corresponding diazonium intermediate, followed by Sonogashira coupling with trimethylsilylacetylene afford the alkynylarene, which is reduced with LiAlH4 to give 5-ethynyl-1,3-benzenedimethanol (B(E)). One hydroxyl group is protected with a 4,4'-dimethoxytrityl (DMTr) group and subsequently another hydroxyl group is phosphitylated to produce the phosphoramidite. The mono-DMTr compound is also modified to afford the corresponding succinate, which is then reacted with controlled pore glass (CPG) to provide the solid support. Either the phosphoramidite or the solid support is employed in solid-phase synthesis of RNA containing B(E). RNA oligomers bearing B(E) rapidly react with 4-fluorobenzylazide to produce the cycloaddition products in good to excellent yield.

  14. Tri- and tetra-substituted cyclen based lanthanide(III) ion complexes as ribonuclease mimics: a study into the effect of log Ka, hydration and hydrophobicity on phosphodiester hydrolysis of the RNA-model 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Ann-Marie; Plush, Sally E; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-05-28

    A series of tetra-substituted 'pseudo' dipeptide ligands of cyclen (1,4,7,10,-tetraazacyclododecane) and a tri-substituted 3'-pyridine ligand of cyclen, and the corresponding lanthanide(III) complexes were synthesised and characterised as metallo-ribonuclease mimics. All complexes were shown to promote hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP, τ1/2 = 5.87 × 10(3) h), a well known RNA mimic. The La(III) and Eu(III) tri-substituted 3'-pyridine lanthanide(III) complexes being the most efficient in promoting such hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and at 37 °C; with τ1/2 = 1.67 h for La(III) and 1.74 h for Eu(III). The series was developed to provide the opportunity to investigate the consequences of altering the lanthanide(III) ion, coordination ability and hydrophobicity of a metallo-cavity on the rate of hydrolysis using the model phosphodiester, HPNP, at 37 °C. To further provide information on the role that the log Ka of the metal bound water plays in phosphodiester hydrolysis the protonation constants and the metal ion stability constants of both a tri and tetra-substituted 3'pyridine complex were determined. Our results highlighted several key features for the design of lanthanide(III) ribonucelase mimics; the presence of two metal bound water molecules are vital for pH dependent rate constants for Eu(III) complexes, optimal pH activity approximating physiological pH (∼7.4) may be achieved if the log Ka values for both MLOH and ML(OH)2 species occur in this region, small changes to hydrophobicity within the metallo cavity influence the rate of hydrolysis greatly and an amide adjacent to the metal ion capable of forming hydrogen bonds with the substrate is required for achieving fast hydrolysis.

  15. Energies and 2'-Hydroxyl Group Orientations of RNA Backbone Conformations. Benchmark CCSD(T)/CBS Database, Electronic Analysis, and Assessment of DFT Methods and MD Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mládek, Arnošt; Banáš, Pavel; Jurečka, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Zgarbová, Marie; Šponer, Jiří

    2014-01-14

    Sugar-phosphate backbone is an electronically complex molecular segment imparting RNA molecules high flexibility and architectonic heterogeneity necessary for their biological functions. The structural variability of RNA molecules is amplified by the presence of the 2'-hydroxyl group, capable of forming multitude of intra- and intermolecular interactions. Bioinformatics studies based on X-ray structure database revealed that RNA backbone samples at least 46 substates known as rotameric families. The present study provides a comprehensive analysis of RNA backbone conformational preferences and 2'-hydroxyl group orientations. First, we create a benchmark database of estimated CCSD(T)/CBS relative energies of all rotameric families and test performance of dispersion-corrected DFT-D3 methods and molecular mechanics in vacuum and in continuum solvent. The performance of the DFT-D3 methods is in general quite satisfactory. The B-LYP-D3 method provides the best trade-off between accuracy and computational demands. B3-LYP-D3 slightly outperforms the new PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 and is the second most accurate density functional of the study. The best agreement with CCSD(T)/CBS is provided by DSD-B-LYP-D3 double-hybrid functional, although its large-scale applications may be limited by high computational costs. Molecular mechanics does not reproduce the fine energy differences between the RNA backbone substates. We also demonstrate that the differences in the magnitude of the hyperconjugation effect do not correlate with the energy ranking of the backbone conformations. Further, we investigated the 2'-hydroxyl group orientation preferences. For all families, we conducted a QM and MM hydroxyl group rigid scan in gas phase and solvent. We then carried out set of explicit solvent MD simulations of folded RNAs and analyze 2'-hydroxyl group orientations of different backbone families in MD. The solvent energy profiles determined primarily by the sugar pucker match well with the

  16. Ribosomal proteins L11 and L10.(L12)4 and the antibiotic thiostrepton interact with overlapping regions of the 23 S rRNA backbone in the ribosomal GTPase centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, G; Douthwaite, S

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ribosomal protein (r-protein) L11 and its binding site on 23 S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) are associated with ribosomal hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP). We have used hydroxyl radical footprinting to map the contacts between L11 and the backbone riboses in 23 S rRNA, a...

  17. Sulfolobus acidocaldarius UDG Can Remove dU from the RNA Backbone: Insight into the Specific Recognition of Uracil Linked with Deoxyribose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Shun Yi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encodes family 4 and 5 uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG. Two recombinant S. acidocaldarius UDGs (SacUDG were prepared and biochemically characterized using oligonucleotides carrying a deaminated base. Both SacUDGs can remove deoxyuracil (dU base from both double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA. Interestingly, they can remove U linked with deoxyribose from single-stranded RNA backbone, suggesting that the riboses on the backbone have less effect on the recognition of dU and hydrolysis of the C-N glycosidic bond. However, the removal of rU from DNA backbone is inefficient, suggesting strong steric hindrance comes from the 2′ hydroxyl of ribose linked to uracil. Both SacUDGs cannot remove 2,2′-anhydro uridine, hypoxanthine, and 7-deazaxanthine from single-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA. Compared with the family 2 MUG, other family UDGs have an extra N-terminal structure consisting of about 50 residues. Removal of the 46 N-terminal residues of family 5 SacUDG resulted in only a 40% decrease in activity, indicating that the [4Fe-4S] cluster and truncated secondary structure are not the key elements in hydrolyzing the glycosidic bond. Combining our biochemical and structural results with those of other groups, we discussed the UDGs’ catalytic mechanism and the possible repair reactions of deaminated bases in prokaryotes.

  18. Sulfolobus acidocaldarius UDG Can Remove dU from the RNA Backbone: Insight into the Specific Recognition of Uracil Linked with Deoxyribose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Gang-Shun; Wang, Wei-Wei; Cao, Wei-Guo; Wang, Feng-Ping; Liu, Xi-Peng

    2017-01-18

    Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encodes family 4 and 5 uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG). Two recombinant S. acidocaldarius UDGs (SacUDG) were prepared and biochemically characterized using oligonucleotides carrying a deaminated base. Both SacUDGs can remove deoxyuracil (dU) base from both double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA. Interestingly, they can remove U linked with deoxyribose from single-stranded RNA backbone, suggesting that the riboses on the backbone have less effect on the recognition of dU and hydrolysis of the C-N glycosidic bond. However, the removal of rU from DNA backbone is inefficient, suggesting strong steric hindrance comes from the 2' hydroxyl of ribose linked to uracil. Both SacUDGs cannot remove 2,2'-anhydro uridine, hypoxanthine, and 7-deazaxanthine from single-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA. Compared with the family 2 MUG, other family UDGs have an extra N-terminal structure consisting of about 50 residues. Removal of the 46 N-terminal residues of family 5 SacUDG resulted in only a 40% decrease in activity, indicating that the [4Fe-4S] cluster and truncated secondary structure are not the key elements in hydrolyzing the glycosidic bond. Combining our biochemical and structural results with those of other groups, we discussed the UDGs' catalytic mechanism and the possible repair reactions of deaminated bases in prokaryotes.

  19. Kinetics of T3-DNA Ligase-Catalyzed Phosphodiester Bond Formation Measured Using the α-Hemolysin Nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cherie S; Riedl, Jan; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J; White, Henry S

    2016-12-27

    The latch region of the wild-type α-hemolysin (α-HL) protein channel can be used to distinguish single base modifications in double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) via ion channel measurements upon electrophoretic capture of dsDNA in the vestibule of α-HL. Herein, we investigated the use of the latch region to detect a nick in the phosphodiester DNA backbone. The presence of a nick in the phosphodiester backbone of one strand of the duplex results in a significant increase in both the blockade current and noise level relative to the intact duplex. Differentiation between the nicked and intact duplexes based on blockade current or noise, with near baseline resolution, allows real-time monitoring of the rate of T3-DNA ligase-catalyzed phosphodiester bond formation. Under low ionic strength conditions containing divalent cations and a molecular crowding agent (75 mg mL(-1) PEG), the rate of enzyme-catalyzed reaction in the bulk solution was continuously monitored by electrophoretically capturing reaction substrate or product dsDNA in the α-HL protein channel vestibule. Enzyme kinetic results obtained from the nanopore experiments match those from gel electrophoresis under the same reaction conditions, indicating the α-HL nanopore measurement provides a viable approach for monitoring enzymatic DNA repair activity.

  20. Mini-ribozymes and freezing environment: a new scenario for the early RNA world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vlassov

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World hypothesis states that the present-day life, which is based on DNA genomes and protein enzymes, was preceded by a simpler life form based primarily on RNA. During this era, the genetic information resided in the sequence of RNA molecules and the phenotype derived from the catalytic properties of RNA. Though it is a widely accepted scenario, a number of problems remain unsolved. One of the biggest questions is how complex RNAs could evolve, survive and replicate under typically assumed ''warm and wet'' conditions, taking into account that the RNA phosphodiester backbone is chemically unstable under these conditions. We suggest that prebiotic conditions associated with freezing could have been of key importance in the early RNA World, and discuss the role of primitive catalytic RNA in the evolution of RNA size and complexity.

  1. Visualizing phosphodiester-bond hydrolysis by an endonuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Stella, Stefano; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    . This third metal ion has a crucial role, triggering the consecutive hydrolysis of the targeted phosphodiester bonds in the DNA strands and leaving its position once the DSB is generated. The multiple structures show the orchestrated conformational changes in the protein residues, nucleotides and metals......The enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA phosphodiester bonds has been widely studied, but the chemical reaction has not yet been observed. Here we follow the generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by the Desulfurococcus mobilis homing endonuclease I-DmoI, trapping sequential stages of a two...

  2. Testing Backbone.js

    CERN Document Server

    Roemer, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This book is packed with the step by step tutorial and instructions in recipe format helping you setup test infrastructure and gradually advance your skills to plan, develop, and test your backbone applications.If you are a JavaScript developer looking for recipes to create and implement test support for your backbone application, then this book is ideal for you.

  3. Assembly of the U1 snRNP involves interactions with the backbone of the terminal stem of U1 snRNA

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Timothy S.; Lokken, R. Peter; Steitz, Joan A.

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide analog interference mapping (NAIM) is a powerful method for identifying RNA functional groups involved in protein–RNA interactions. We examined particles assembled on modified U1 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) in vitro and detected two categories of interferences. The first class affects the stability of two higher-order complexes and comprises changes in two adenosines, A65 and A70, in the loop region previously identified as the binding site for the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotei...

  4. A model for the origin of life through rearrangements among prebiotic phosphodiester polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnin, Alexander V

    2013-02-01

    This model proposes that the origin of life on Earth occurred as a result of a process of alteration of the chemical composition of prebiotic macromolecules. The stability of organic compounds assembled into polymers generally exceeded the stability of the same compounds as free monomers. This difference in stability stimulated accumulation of prebiotic macromolecules. The prebiotic circulation of matter included constant formation and decomposition of polymers. Spontaneous chemical reactions between macromolecules with phosphodiester backbones resulted in a non-Darwinian selection for chemical stability, while formation of strong structures provided an advantage in the struggle for stability. Intermolecular structures between nucleotide-containing polymers were further stabilized by occasional acquisition of complementary nucleotides. Less stable macromolecules provided the source of nucleotides. This process resulted first in the enrichment of nucleotide content in prebiotic polymers, and subsequently in the accumulation of complementary oligonucleotides. Finally, the role of complementary copy molecules changed from the stabilization of the original templates to the de novo production of template-like molecules. I associate this stage with the origin of life in the form of cell-free molecular colonies. Original life acquired ready-to-use substrates from constantly forming prebiotic polymers. Metabolism started to develop when life began to consume more substrates than the prebiotic cycling produced. The developing utilization of non-polymeric compounds stimulated the formation of the first membrane-enveloped cells that held small soluble molecules. Cells "digested" the nucleotide-containing prebiotic macromolecules to nucleotide monomers and switched the mode of replication to the polymerization of nucleotide triphosphates.

  5. Template switching between PNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, C.; Nielsen, P. E.; Orgel, L. E.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The origin of the RNA world is not easily understood, as effective prebiotic syntheses of the components of RNA, the beta-ribofuranoside-5'-phosphates, are hard to envisage. Recognition of this difficulty has led to the proposal that other genetic systems, the components of which are more easily formed, may have preceded RNA. This raises the question of how transitions between one genetic system and another could occur. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) resembles RNA in its ability to form double-helical complexes stabilized by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between adenine and thymine and between cytosine and guanine, but has a backbone that is held together by amide rather than by phosphodiester bonds. Oligonucleotides bases on RNA are known to act as templates that catalyse the non-enzymatic synthesis of their complements from activated mononucleotides, we now show that RNA oligonucleotides facilitate the synthesis of complementary PNA strands and vice versa. This suggests that a transition between different genetic systems can occur without loss of information.

  6. Sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA and enhanced cellular uptake of cationic nucleobase and backbone-modified peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Karamitas, Yannis A; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-01-01

    Sequence-selective recognition of complex RNAs in live cells could find broad applications in biology, biomedical research, and biotechnology. However, specific recognition of structured RNA is challenging, and generally applicable and effective methods are lacking. Recently, we found that peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) were unusually well-suited ligands for recognition of double-stranded RNAs. Herein, we report that 2-aminopyridine (M) modified PNAs and their conjugates with lysine and arginine tripeptides form strong (Ka = 9.4 to 17 × 10(7) M(-1)) and sequence-selective triple helices with RNA hairpins at physiological pH and salt concentration. The affinity of PNA-peptide conjugates for the matched RNA hairpins was unusually high compared to the much lower affinity for DNA hairpins of the same sequence (Ka = 0.05 to 1.1 × 10(7) M(-1)). The binding of double-stranded RNA by M-modified PNA-peptide conjugates was a relatively fast process (kon = 2.9 × 10(4) M(-1) sec(-1)) compared to the notoriously slow triple helix formation by oligodeoxynucleotides (kon ∼ 10(3) M(-1) sec(-1)). M-modified PNA-peptide conjugates were not cytotoxic and were efficiently delivered in the cytosol of HEK293 cells at 10 µM. Surprisingly, M-modified PNAs without peptide conjugation were also taken up by HEK293 cells, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first example of heterocyclic base modification that enhances the cellular uptake of PNA. Our results suggest that M-modified PNA-peptide conjugates are promising probes for sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA in live cells and other biological systems.

  7. Theoretical Study of Phosphodiester Hydrolysis and Transesterification Catalyzed by an Unsymmetric Biomimetic Dizinc Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daver, Henrik; Das, Biswanath; Nordlander, Ebbe; Himo, Fahmi

    2016-02-15

    Density functional theory calculations have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms of phosphodiester hydrolysis and transesterification catalyzed by a dinuclear zinc complex of the 2-(N-isopropyl-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)aminomethyl)-6-(N-(carboxylmethyl)-N-((2-pyridyl)methyl)amino-methyl)-4-methylphenol (IPCPMP) ligand, mimicking the active site of zinc phosphotriesterase. The substrates bis(2,4)-dinitrophenyl phosphate (BDNPP) and 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNP) were employed as analogues of DNA and RNA, respectively. A number of different mechanistic proposals were considered, with the active catalyst harboring either one or two hydroxide ions. It is concluded that for both reactions the catalyst has only one hydroxide bound, as this option yields lower overall energy barriers. For BDNPP hydrolysis, it is suggested that the hydroxide acts as the nucleophile in the reaction, attacking the phosphorus center of the substrate. For HPNP transesterification, on the other hand, the hydroxide is proposed to act as a Brønsted base, deprotonating the alcohol moiety of the substrate, which in turn performs the nucleophilic attack. The calculated overall barriers are in good agreement with measured rates. Both reactions are found to proceed by essentially concerted associative mechanisms, and it is demonstrated that two consecutive catalytic cycles need to be considered in order to determine the rate-determining free energy barrier.

  8. Specific DNA-RNA Hybrid Recognition by TAL Effectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The transcription activator-like (TAL effector targets specific host promoter through its central DNA-binding domain, which comprises multiple tandem repeats (TALE repeats. Recent structural analyses revealed that the TALE repeats form a superhelical structure that tracks along the forward strand of the DNA duplex. Here, we demonstrate that TALE repeats specifically recognize a DNA-RNA hybrid where the DNA strand determines the binding specificity. The crystal structure of a designed TALE in complex with the DNA-RNA hybrid was determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å. Although TALE repeats are in direct contact with only the DNA strand, the phosphodiester backbone of the RNA strand is inaccessible by macromolecules such as RNases. Consistent with this observation, sequence-specific recognition of an HIV-derived DNA-RNA hybrid by an engineered TALE efficiently blocked RNase H-mediated degradation of the RNA strand. Our study broadens the utility of TALE repeats and suggests potential applications in processes involving DNA replication and retroviral infections.

  9. Interactions of protein side chains with RNA defined with REDOR solid state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Wei; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P., E-mail: drobny@chem.washington.edu [University of Washington, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Formation of the complex between human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Tat protein and the transactivation response region (TAR) RNA is vital for transcriptional elongation, yet the structure of the Tat-TAR complex remains to be established. The NMR structures of free TAR, and TAR bound to Tat-derived peptides have been obtained by solution NMR, but only a small number of intermolecular NOEs could be identified unambiguously, preventing the determination of a complete structure. Here we show that a combination of multiple solid state NMR REDOR experiments can be used to obtain multiple distance constraints from {sup 15}N to {sup 13}C spins within the backbone and side chain guanidinium groups of arginine in a Tat-derived peptide, using {sup 19}F spins incorporated into the base of U23 in TAR and {sup 31}P spins in the P22 and P23 phosphate groups. Distances between the side chain of Arg52 and the base and phosphodiester backbone near U23 measured by REDOR NMR are comparable to distances observed in solution NMR-derived structural models, indicating that interactions of TAR RNA with key amino acid side chains in Tat are the same in the amorphous solid state as in solution. This method is generally applicable to other protein-RNA complexes where crystallization or solution NMR has failed to provide high resolution structural information.

  10. Molecular simulations of RNA 2'-O-transesterification reaction models in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radak, Brian K; Harris, Michael E; York, Darrin M

    2013-01-10

    We employ quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical umbrella sampling simulations to probe the free energy surfaces of a series of increasingly complex reaction models of RNA 2'-O-transesterification in aqueous solution under alkaline conditions. Such models are valuable for understanding the uncatalyzed processes underlying catalytic cleavage of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA, a reaction of fundamental importance in biology. The chemically reactive atoms are modeled by the AM1/d-PhoT quantum model for phosphoryl transfer, whereas the aqueous solvation environment is modeled with a molecular mechanics force field. Several simulation protocols were compared that used different ionic conditions and force field models. The results provide insight into how variation of the structural environment of the nucleophile and leaving group affects the free energy profile for the transesterification reaction. Results for a simple RNA backbone model are compared with recent experiments by Harris et al. on the specific base-catalyzed cleavage of a UpG dinucleotide. The calculated and measured free energies of activation match extremely well (ΔF(‡) = 19.9-20.8 vs 19.9 kcal/mol). Solvation is seen to play a crucial role and is characterized by a network of hydrogen bonds that envelopes the pentacoordinate dianionic phosphorane transition state and provides preferential stabilization relative to the reactant state.

  11. Visualizing ATP-dependent RNA translocation by the NS3 helicase from HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Todd C; Anderson, Robert; Fedorova, Olga; Pyle, Anna M; Wang, Ruth; Liu, Xiaohong; Brendza, Katherine M; Somoza, John R

    2011-02-04

    The structural mechanism by which nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) translocates along RNA is currently unknown. HCV NS3 is an ATP-dependent motor protein essential for viral replication and a member of the superfamily 2 helicases. Crystallographic analysis using a labeled RNA oligonucleotide allowed us to unambiguously track the positional changes of RNA bound to full-length HCV NS3 during two discrete steps of the ATP hydrolytic cycle. The crystal structures of HCV NS3, NS3 bound to bromine-labeled RNA, and a tertiary complex of NS3 bound to labeled RNA and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog provide a direct view of how large domain movements resulting from ATP binding and hydrolysis allow the enzyme to translocate along the phosphodiester backbone. While directional translocation of HCV NS3 by a single base pair per ATP hydrolyzed is observed, the 3' end of the RNA does not shift register with respect to a conserved tryptophan residue, supporting a "spring-loading" mechanism that leads to larger steps by the enzyme as it moves along a nucleic acid substrate.

  12. N-cyanoimidazole and diimidazole imine: water-soluble condensing agents for the formation of the phosphodiester bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Huang, C. H.; Hagan, W. J. Jr

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of BrCN with imidazole results in the formation of N-cyanoimidazole and diimidazole imine. These compounds were shown to be useful condensing agents for the formation of the phosphodiester bound in aqueous solution.

  13. Nonuniform backbone conformation of deoxyribonucleic acid indicated by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, H; Wooten, J B; Pheiffer, B H; Zimmerman, S B

    1980-02-05

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance of highly oriented DNA fibers has been observed for three different conformations, namely, the A, B, and C forms of DNA. At a parallel orientation of the fiber axis with respect to the magnetic field, DNA fibers in both the A and B forms exhibit a single, abnormally broad resonance; in contrast, fibers in the C form show almost the full span of the chemical shift anisotropy (170 ppm). The spectra of the fibers oriented perpendicular indicate that the DNA molecules undergo a considerable rotational motion about the helical axis, with a rate of greater than 2 x 10(3) s-1 for the B-form DNA. Theoretical considerations indicate that the 31P chemical shift data for the B-form DNA fibers are consistent with the atomic coordinates of the phosphodiester group proposed by Langridge et al. [Langridge, R., Wilson, H. R. Hooper, C. W., Wilkins, M. H. F., & Hamilton, L. D. (1960) J. Mol. Biol. 2, 19--37] but not with the corresponding coordinates proposed by Arnott and Hukins [Arnott, S., & Hukins, D. W. L. (1972) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Coomun. 47, 1504--1509], and also lead to the conclusion that the phosphodiester orientation must vary significantly along the DNA molecule. The latter result suggests that DNA has significant variations in its backbone conformation along the molecule.

  14. Future High Capacity Backbone Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jiayuan

    This thesis - Future High Capacity Backbone Networks - deals with the energy efficiency problems associated with the development of future optical networks. In the first half of the thesis, novel approaches for using multiple/single alternative energy sources for improving energy efficiency...... the context of the integrated control plane structure. Results show improvements of energy efficiency over three types of traffic, while still keeping acceptable QoS levels for high priority traffic....

  15. Cyclic GMP-AMP Containing Mixed Phosphodiester Linkages Is An Endogenous High Affinity Ligand for STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2′-OH of GMP and 5′-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3′-OH of AMP and 5′-phosphate of GMP. This molecule, termed 2′3′-cGAMP, is unique in that it binds to the adaptor protein STING with a much greater affinity than cGAMP molecules containing other combinations of phosphodiester linkages. The crystal structure of STING bound to 2′3′-cGAMP revealed the structural basis of this high-affinity binding and a ligand-induced conformational change in STING that may underlie its activation. PMID:23747010

  16. NMR-spectroscopic characterization of phosphodiester bond cleavage catalyzed by the minimal hammerhead ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürtig, Boris; Richter, Christian; Schell, Peter; Wenter, Philipp; Pitsch, Stefan; Schwalbe, Harald

    2008-01-01

    In order to relate the conformational dynamics of the hammerhead ribozyme to its biological function the cleavage reaction catalyzed by the hammerhead ribozyme was monitored by time-resolved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. For this purpose, the two nucleosides around the scissile phosphodiester bond were selectively (13)C labelled in multi-step organic syntheses starting from uniformly (13)C-labelled glucose. The phosphoamidites were incorporated using phosphoamidite chemistry in the hammerhead substrate strand. In addition, the 2'-OH group on the 5'-side of the hammerhead substrate strand was labelled with a photolabile protecting group. This labelling strategy enabled a detailed characterisation of the nucleotides around the scissile phosphodiester bond in the ground state conformation of the hammerhead ribozyme in the absence and presence of Mg(2+) ions as well as of the product state. Photochemical induction of the reaction in situ was further characterized by time-resolved NMR spectroscopy. The detailed structural and dynamic investigations revealed that the conformation of the hammerhead ribozyme is significantly affected by addition of Mg(2+) leading to an ensemble of conformations where dynamic transitions between energetically similar conformations occur on the ms-timescale in the presence of Mg(2+). The dynamic transitions are localized around the catalytic core. Cleavage from this ensemble cannot be described by mono-exponential kinetics but follows bi-exponential kinetics. A model is described to take into account these experimental data.

  17. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back About Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  18. Factor 390 chromophores: phosphodiester between AMP or GMP and methanogen factor 420.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausinger, R P; Orme-Johnson, W H; Walsh, C

    1985-03-26

    Two chromophores with absorbance maxima at 390 nm (factors 390) have been isolated from oxidized cells of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H. The isolation procedure included anion-exchange chromatography of the soluble cofactor pool followed by reverse-phase chromatography. The factor 390 species are novel derivatives of methanogen coenzyme factor 420 in which the 5-deazaflavin 8-hydroxy group is in a phosphodiester linkage to adenosine 5'-phosphate or guanosine 5'-phosphate. The structural assignments were based, in part, on the UV-visible and 1H NMR spectra. In addition, the results from amino acid analysis, phosphate determination, 31P NMR spectroscopy, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry were consistent with the proposed structures. Confirmation of the factor 390 structures was made following phosphodiesterase release of the nucleotide monophosphates from factor 420. The nucleotide monophosphates were identified as AMP and GMP by UV-visible spectra and based on elution position by using reverse-phase and anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. The presence of AMP was further demonstrated by using adenylate-5'-phosphate kinase which induced a spectral shift during conversion of the sample to IMP. In addition, the presence of GMP was established by a specific enzymatic assay.

  19. Analysis of solvent nucleophile isotope effects: evidence for concerted mechanisms and nucleophilic activation by metal coordination in nonenzymatic and ribozyme-catalyzed phosphodiester hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Adam G; Anderson, Vernon E; Harris, Michael E

    2004-08-17

    Heavy atom isotope effects are a valuable tool for probing chemical and enzymatic reaction mechanisms; yet, they are not widely applied to examine mechanisms of nucleophilic activation. We developed approaches for analyzing solvent (18)O nucleophile isotope effects ((18)k(nuc)) that allow, for the first time, their application to hydrolysis reactions of nucleotides and nucleic acids. Here, we report (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester hydrolysis catalyzed by Mg(2+) and by the Mg(2+)-dependent RNase P ribozyme and deamination by the Zn(2+)-dependent protein enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA). Because ADA incorporates a single solvent molecule into the product inosine, this reaction can be used to monitor solvent (18)O/(16)O ratios in complex reaction mixtures. This approach, combined with new methods for analysis of isotope ratios of nucleotide phosphates by whole molecule mass spectrometry, permitted determination of (18)k(nuc) for hydrolysis of thymidine 5'-p-nitrophenyl phosphate and RNA cleavage by the RNase P ribozyme. For ADA, an inverse (18)k(nuc) of 0.986 +/- 0.001 is observed, reflecting coordination of the nucleophile by an active site Zn(2+) ion and a stepwise mechanism. In contrast, the observed (18)k(nuc) for phosphodiester reactions were normal: 1.027 +/- 0.013 and 1.030 +/- 0.012 for the Mg(2+)- and ribozyme-catalyzed reactions, respectively. Such normal effects indicate that nucleophilic attack occurs in the rate-limiting step for these reactions, consistent with concerted mechanisms. However, these magnitudes are significantly less than the (18)k(nuc) observed for nucleophilic attack by hydroxide (1.068 +/- 0.007), indicating a "stiffer" bonding environment for the nucleophile in the transition state. Kinetic analysis of the Mg(2+)-catalyzed reaction indicates that a Mg(2+)-hydroxide complex is the catalytic species; thus, the lower (18)k(nuc), in large part, reflects direct metal ion coordination of the nucleophilic oxygen. A similar value for the RNase P

  20. A new RNA branching activity: the GIR1 ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Johansen, Steinar D

    2006-01-01

    ',5'-phosphodiester bonds in biology. We recently described a new ribozyme, the GIR1 branching ribozyme, which catalyzes the formation of a tiny lariat that caps an mRNA. This new example together with work on artificial branching ribozymes and deoxyribozymes shows that branching is facile and points...

  1. Green Network Planning Model for Optical Backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Jensen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Communication networks are becoming more essential for our daily lives and critically important for industry and governments. The intense growth in the backbone traffic implies an increment of the power demands of the transmission systems. This power usage might have a significant negative effect...... on the environment in general. In network planning there are existing planning models focused on QoS provisioning, investment minimization or combinations of both and other parameters. But there is a lack of a model for designing green optical backbones. This paper presents novel ideas to be able to define...

  2. Microsoft Operations Framework implementation for The Backbone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienhuis, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    Doel The Backbone ontwerpt, implementeert en beheert IT infrastructuren voor bedrijven en instellingen. Beheer wordt proactief uitgevoerd met behulp van Microsoft Operation Manager (MOM) 2005. MOM is een applicatie die de status en gebeurtenissen van systemen zichtbaar maakt vanuit één locatie. Om

  3. Characterization of RNA-Like Oligomers from Lipid-Assisted Nonenzymatic Synthesis: Implications for Origin of Informational Molecules on Early Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitanya V. Mungi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prebiotic polymerization had to be a nonenzymatic, chemically driven process. These processes would have been particularly favored in scenarios which push reaction regimes far from equilibrium. Dehydration-rehydration (DH-RH cycles are one such regime thought to have been prevalent on prebiotic Earth in niches like volcanic geothermal pools. The present study defines the optimum DH-RH reaction conditions for lipid-assisted polymerization of nucleotides. The resultant products were characterized to understand their chemical makeup. Primarily, our study demonstrates that the resultant RNA-like oligomers have abasic sites, which means these oligomers lack information-carrying capability because of losing most of their bases during the reaction process. This results from low pH and high temperature conditions, which, importantly, also allows the formation of sugar-phosphate oligomers when ribose 5'-monophosphates are used as the starting monomers instead. Formation of such oligomers would have permitted sampling of a large variety of bases on a preformed polymer backbone, resulting in “prebiotic phosphodiester polymers” prior to the emergence of modern RNA-like molecules. This suggests that primitive genetic polymers could have utilized bases that conferred greater N-glycosyl bond stability, a feature crucial for information propagation in low pH and high temperature regimes of early Earth.

  4. Characterization of RNA-Like Oligomers from Lipid-Assisted Nonenzymatic Synthesis: Implications for Origin of Informational Molecules on Early Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungi, Chaitanya V; Rajamani, Sudha

    2015-01-05

    Prebiotic polymerization had to be a nonenzymatic, chemically driven process. These processes would have been particularly favored in scenarios which push reaction regimes far from equilibrium. Dehydration-rehydration (DH-RH) cycles are one such regime thought to have been prevalent on prebiotic Earth in niches like volcanic geothermal pools. The present study defines the optimum DH-RH reaction conditions for lipid-assisted polymerization of nucleotides. The resultant products were characterized to understand their chemical makeup. Primarily, our study demonstrates that the resultant RNA-like oligomers have abasic sites, which means these oligomers lack information-carrying capability because of losing most of their bases during the reaction process. This results from low pH and high temperature conditions, which, importantly, also allows the formation of sugar-phosphate oligomers when ribose 5'-monophosphates are used as the starting monomers instead. Formation of such oligomers would have permitted sampling of a large variety of bases on a preformed polymer backbone, resulting in "prebiotic phosphodiester polymers" prior to the emergence of modern RNA-like molecules. This suggests that primitive genetic polymers could have utilized bases that conferred greater N-glycosyl bond stability, a feature crucial for information propagation in low pH and high temperature regimes of early Earth.

  5. Orientation-dependent backbone-only residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordner Andrew J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical scoring functions have proven useful in protein structure modeling. Most such scoring functions depend on protein side chain conformations. However, backbone-only scoring functions do not require computationally intensive structure optimization and so are well suited to protein design, which requires fast score evaluation. Furthermore, scoring functions that account for the distinctive relative position and orientation preferences of residue pairs are expected to be more accurate than those that depend only on the separation distance. Results Residue pair scoring functions for fixed backbone protein design were derived using only backbone geometry. Unlike previous studies that used spherical harmonics to fit 2D angular distributions, Gaussian Mixture Models were used to fit the full 3D (position only and 6D (position and orientation distributions of residue pairs. The performance of the 1D (residue separation only, 3D, and 6D scoring functions were compared by their ability to identify correct threading solutions for a non-redundant benchmark set of protein backbone structures. The threading accuracy was found to steadily increase with increasing dimension, with the 6D scoring function achieving the highest accuracy. Furthermore, the 3D and 6D scoring functions were shown to outperform side chain-dependent empirical potentials from three other studies. Next, two computational methods that take advantage of the speed and pairwise form of these new backbone-only scoring functions were investigated. The first is a procedure that exploits available sequence data by averaging scores over threading solutions for homologs. This was evaluated by applying it to the challenging problem of identifying interacting transmembrane alpha-helices and found to further improve prediction accuracy. The second is a protein design method for determining the optimal sequence for a backbone structure by applying Belief Propagation

  6. Constructing backbone network by using tinker algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Zhan, Meng; Wang, Jianxiong; Yao, Chenggui

    2017-01-01

    Revealing how a biological network is organized to realize its function is one of the main topics in systems biology. The functional backbone network, defined as the primary structure of the biological network, is of great importance in maintaining the main function of the biological network. We propose a new algorithm, the tinker algorithm, to determine this core structure and apply it in the cell-cycle system. With this algorithm, the backbone network of the cell-cycle network can be determined accurately and efficiently in various models such as the Boolean model, stochastic model, and ordinary differential equation model. Results show that our algorithm is more efficient than that used in the previous research. We hope this method can be put into practical use in relevant future studies.

  7. Immunogenicity and safety of liposome-vaccine encapsulating hepatitis B surface antigen and phosphodiester CpG oligodeoxynucleotides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUN YAN HE; QING LIANG LIU

    2006-01-01

    CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN) as adjuvant have been extensively studied in recent years. Phosphodiester CpG ODN (PO CpG ODN) can perfectly mimic bacterial DNA in enhancing immune response but are vulnerable to nucleases in vivo. This study aimed to evaluate the immunostimu latory potential and safety of phosphodiester CpG ODN encapsulated in nonphospholipid liposomes.BALB/c mice were immunized intramuscularly with different formulations of liposomes, CpG ODN and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The results demonstrated that the encapsulated PO CpG ODN were protected against rapid degradation in vivo and retained their adjuvant activity. PO CpG ODN encapsulated with HBsAg in liposomes induced strong Th1-biased or Th1/Th2 mixed humoral immune response in mice with the magnitude similar to their phosphothioate equivalent in the same formulation.High IFN-gamma production induced by this formulation confirmed the generation of strong cellular immune response. Additionally, co-delivery of HBsAg and PO CpG ODN improved the immune response over that obtained with separate delivery. Safety experiment showed that liposome-encapsulaed PO CpG ODN and HBsAg caused mild systemic and moderate local adverse reaction. In conclusion, our data shows that PO CpG ODN encapsulated in liposomes fully exhibit their Th1-type adjuvant activity and act as a potential adjuvant for vaccines.

  8. Phosphodiester content measured in human liver by in vivo (31) P MR spectroscopy at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Lucian A B; Clarke, William T; Valkovič, Ladislav; Levick, Christina; Pavlides, Michael; Barnes, Eleanor; Cobbold, Jeremy F; Robson, Matthew D; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2017-02-28

    Phosphorus ((31) P) metabolites are emerging liver disease biomarkers. Of particular interest are phosphomonoester and phosphodiester (PDE) "peaks" that comprise multiple overlapping resonances in (31) P spectra. This study investigates the effect of improved spectral resolution at 7 Tesla (T) on quantifying hepatic metabolites in cirrhosis. Five volunteers were scanned to determine metabolite T1 s. Ten volunteers and 11 patients with liver cirrhosis were scanned at 7T. Liver spectra were acquired in 28 min using a 16-channel (31) P array and 3D chemical shift imaging. Concentrations were calculated using γ-adenosine-triphosphate (γ-ATP) = 2.65 mmol/L wet tissue. T1 means ± standard deviations: phosphatidylcholine 1.05 ± 0.28 s, nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD(+) ) 2.0 ± 1.0 s, uridine-diphosphoglucose (UDPG) 3.3 ± 1.4 s. Concentrations in healthy volunteers: α-ATP 2.74 ± 0.11 mmol/L wet tissue, inorganic phosphate 2.23 ± 0.20 mmol/L wet tissue, glycerophosphocholine 2.34 ± 0.46 mmol/L wet tissue, glycerophosphoethanolamine 1.50 ± 0.28 mmol/L wet tissue, phosphocholine 1.06 ± 0.16 mmol/L wet tissue, phosphoethanolamine 0.77 ± 0.14 mmol/L wet tissue, NAD(+) 2.37 ± 0.14 mmol/L wet tissue, UDPG 2.00 ± 0.22 mmol/L wet tissue, phosphatidylcholine 1.38 ± 0.31 mmol/L wet tissue. Inorganic phosphate and phosphatidylcholine concentrations were significantly lower in patients; glycerophosphoethanolamine concentrations were significantly higher (P < 0.05). We report human in vivo hepatic T1 s for phosphatidylcholine, NAD(+) , and UDPG for the first time at 7T. Our protocol allows high signal-to-noise, repeatable measurement of metabolite concentrations in human liver. The splitting of PDE into its constituent peaks at 7T may allow more insight into changes in metabolism. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  9. Porous solid backbone impregnation for electrochemical energy conversion systems

    KAUST Repository

    Boulfrad, Samir

    2013-09-19

    An apparatus and method for impregnating a porous solid backbone. The apparatus may include a platform for holding a porous solid backbone, an ink jet nozzle configured to dispense a liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone, a positioning mechanism configured to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to a plurality of locations of the porous solid backbone, and a control unit configured to control the positioning mechanism to position the ink jet nozzle proximate to the plurality of locations and cause the ink jet nozzle to dispense the liquid solution onto the porous solid backbone.

  10. Peptoid-Peptide hybrid backbone architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam

    2010-01-01

    -amino acids (alpha/beta-peptides) have been investigated in some detail as well. The present Minireview is a survey of the literature concerning hybrid structures of alpha-amino acids and peptoids, including beta-peptoids (N-alkyl-beta-alanine oligomers), and is intended to give an overview of this area......Peptidomimetic oligomers and foldamers have received considerable attention for over a decade, with beta-peptides and the so-called peptoids (N-alkylglycine oligomers) representing prominent examples of such architectures. Lately, hybrid or mixed backbones consisting of both alpha- and beta...

  11. Pyridoxamine Protects Protein Backbone from Oxidative Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetyrkin, Sergei; Mathis, Missy; McDonald, W. Hayes; Shackelford, Xavier; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins is one of the major pathogenic mechanisms in many chronic diseases. Therefore, inhibition of this oxidative damage can be an important part of therapeutic strategies. Pyridoxamine (PM), a prospective drug for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, has been previously shown to inhibit several oxidative and glycoxidative pathways, thus protecting amino acid side chains of the proteins from oxidative damage. Here, we demonstrated that PM can also protect protein backbone from fragmentation induced via different oxidative mechanisms including autoxidation of glucose. This protection was due to hydroxyl radical scavenging by PM and may contribute to PM therapeutic effects shown in clinical trials. PMID:21763683

  12. Instant Backbone.js application development

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is a practical, step-by-step tutorial that will teach you to build Backbone.js applications quickly and efficiently.This book is targeted towards developers. It is assumed that you have at least a basic understanding of JavaScript and jQuery selectors. If you are interested in building dynamic Single Page Applications that interact heavily with a backend server, then this is the book for you.

  13. Hydrolysis Activities of the Particle of Agarose-Ce4 + Complex for Compounds Containing Phosphodiester or Peptide Bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Lina; WANG Dongfeng; SU Lin; LUO Yi; SUN Liping; XUE Changhu

    2005-01-01

    Hydrolysis activities of PACC (particle of agarose-Ce4+ complex, newly made through double emulsification) for compounds containing phosphodiester or peptide bonds were studied. The results showed that PACC could hydrolyze organophosphorous pesticides not only in water but also in vegetable juice or tea extract. Hydrolysis rates of methamidophos,omethoate and chlorpyrifos in water are 32.39%, 27.12% and 46.62% respectively, those of chlorpyrifos and methamidophos in mung sprout juice 38.28% and 35.45% respectively, and that of chlorpyrifos in tea extract 59.76%. Hydrolysis rates of BSA (bovine serum albumin) in water and protein in tea extract by PACC increase by 54.30% and 86.46% respectively as compared with the control.

  14. Modulating anti-MicroRNA-21 activity and specificity using oligonucleotide derivatives and length optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munoz-Alarcon, Andres; Guterstam, Peter; Romero, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    but reduced specificity when incorporating locked nucleic acid monomers, whereas the opposite was observed when introducing unlocked nucleic acid monomers. Our data suggest that phosphorothioate anti-microRNA oligonucleotides yield a greater activity than their phosphodiester counterparts and that a moderate...... truncation of the anti-microRNA oligonucleotide improves specificity without significantly losing activity. These results provide useful insights for design of anti-microRNA oligonucleotides to achieve both high activity as well as efficient mismatch discrimination....

  15. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  16. Sofosbuvir as backbone of interferon free treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourlière, Marc; Oules, Valèrie; Ansaldi, Christelle; Adhoute, Xavier; Castellani, Paul

    2014-12-15

    Sofosbuvir is the first-in-class NS5B nucleotide analogues to be launched for hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment. Its viral potency, pangenotypic activity and high barrier to resistance make it the ideal candidate to become a backbone for several IFN-free regimens. Recent data demonstrated that sofosbuvir either with ribavirin alone or in combination with other direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) as daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir are able to cure HCV in at least 90% or over of patients. Treatment experienced genotype 3 population may remain the most difficult to treat population, but ongoing DAA combination studies will help to fill this gap. Safety profile of sofosbuvir or combination with other DAAs is good. Resistance to sofosbuvir did not appear as a significant issue. The rationale for using this class of drug and the available clinical data are reviewed.

  17. Extracting the information backbone in online system

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers mainly dedicated to improve the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improve both of...

  18. Evaluation of impact of backbone outages in IP networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Yaakov; Choudhury, Gagan L.; Tarapore, Percy

    2004-09-01

    Nationwide IP networks typically include nodes in major cities and the following elements: customer equipment, access routers, backbone routers, peering routers, access links connecting customer equipment to access routers, access routers to backbone routers, and backbone links interconnecting backbone routers. The part of this network consisting of backbone routers and related interconnecting links is referred to as the "backbone". We develop a new approach for accurately computing the Availability measure of IP networks by directly simulating each type of backbone outage event and its impact on traffic loss. We use this approach to quantify availability improvement as a result of introducing various technological changes in the network such as IGP tuning, high availability router architecture, MPLS-TE and Fast Reroute. A situation, where operational backbone links do not have enough spare capacity to carry additional traffic during the outage time, is referred to as bandwidth loss. We concentrate on one unidirectional backbone link and derive asymptotic approximations for the expected bandwidth loss in the framework of generalized Erlang and Engset models when the total number of resource units and request arrival rates are proportionally large. Simulation results demonstrate good accuracy of the approximations.

  19. Backbone analysis and algorithm design for the quadratic assignment problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG He; ZHANG XianChao; CHEN GuoLiang; LI MingChu

    2008-01-01

    As the hot line in NP-hard problems research in recent years, backbone analysis is crucial for phase transition, hardness, and algorithm design. Whereas theoretical analysis of backbone and its applications in algorithm design are still at a begin-ning state yet, this paper took the quadratic assignment problem (QAP) as a case study and proved by theoretical analysis that it is NP-hard to find the backbone, l.e., no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a QAP in polynomial time. Results of this paper showed that it is reasonable to acquire approximate backbone by inter-section of local optimal solutions. Furthermore, with the method of constructing biased instances, this paper proposed a new meta-heuristic - biased instance based approximate backbone (BI-AB), whose basic idea is as follows: firstly, con-struct a new biased instance for every QAP instance (the optimal solution of the new instance is also optimal for the original one); secondly, the approximate backbone is obtained by intersection of multiple local optimal solutions computed by some existing algorithm; finally, search for the optimal solutions in the reduced space by fixing the approximate backbone. Work of the paper enhanced the re-search area of theoretical analysis of backbone. The meta-heuristic proposed in this paper provided a new way for general algorithm design of NP-hard problems as well.

  20. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Paradiso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C2-symmetric and C1-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  1. NHC Backbone Configuration in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Veronica; Costabile, Chiara; Grisi, Fabia

    2016-01-20

    The catalytic properties of olefin metathesis ruthenium complexes bearing N-heterocyclic carbene ligands with stereogenic centers on the backbone are described. Differences in catalytic behavior depending on the backbone configurations of symmetrical and unsymmetrical NHCs are discussed. In addition, an overview on asymmetric olefin metathesis promoted by chiral catalysts bearing C₂-symmetric and C₁-symmetric NHCs is provided.

  2. Extracting the information backbone in online system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Ming Zhang

    Full Text Available Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such "less can be more" feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency.

  3. The Backbone of the Climate Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Y.; Donges, J. F.; Marwan, N.; Kurths, J.

    2009-12-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system, relying on the nonlinear mutual information of time series analysis and betweenness centrality of complex network theory. We show, that this approach reveals a rich internal structure in complex climate networks constructed from reanalysis and model surface air temperature data. Our novel method uncovers peculiar wave-like structures of high energy flow, that we relate to global surface ocean currents. This points to a major role of the oceanic surface circulation in coupling and stabilizing the global temperature field in the long term mean (140 years for the model run and 60 years for reanalysis data). We find that these results cannot be obtained using classical linear methods of multivariate data analysis. Furthermore, we introduce significance tests to quantify the robustness of measured network properties to uncertainties. References: [1] J.F. Donges, Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths. Complex networks in climate dynamics -- -- Comparing linear and nonlinear network construction methods. European Physical Journal -- Special Topics, 174, 157-179, 2009. [2] J.F. Donges, Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths. Backbone of the climate network. Europhysics Letters, in press, 2009.

  4. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role.

  5. Extracting the Information Backbone in Online System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such “less can be more” feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  6. High Speed Fibre Optic Backbone LAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Masaaki; Hara, Shingo; Kajita, Yuji; Kashu, Fumitoshi; Ikeuchi, Masaru; Hagihara, Satoshi; Tsuzuki, Shinji

    1987-09-01

    Our firm has developed the SUMINET-4100 series, a fibre optic local area network (LAN), to serve the communications system trunk line needs for facilities, such as steel refineries, automobile plants and university campuses, that require large transmission capacity, and for the backbone networks used in intelligent building systems. The SUMINET-4100 series is already in service in various fields of application. Of the networks available in this series, the SUMINET-4150 has a trunk line speed of 128 Mbps and the multiplexer used for time division multiplexing (TDM) was enabled by designing an ECL-TTL gate array (3000 gates) based custom LSI. The synchronous, full-duplex V.24 and V.3.5 interfaces (SUMINET-2100) are provided for use with general purpose lines. And the IBM token ring network, the SUMINET-3200, designed for heterogeneous PCs and the Ethernet can all be connected to sub loops. Further, the IBM 3270 TCA and 5080 CADAM can be connected in the local mode. Interfaces are also provided for the NTT high-speed digital service, the digital PBX systems, and the Video CODEC system. The built-in loop monitor (LM) and network supervisory processor (NSP) provide management of loop utilization and send loop status signals to the host CPU's network configuration and control facility (NCCF). These built-in functions allow both the computer system and LAN to be managed from a single source at the host. This paper outlines features of the SUMINET-4150 and provides an example of its installation.

  7. Autocatalytic cyclization of an excised intervening sequence RNA is a cleavage-ligation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaug, A J; Grabowski, P J; Cech, T R

    The intervening sequence (IVS) of the Tetrahymena ribosomal RNA precursor is excised as a linear RNA molecule which subsequently cyclizes itself in a protein-independent reaction. Cyclization involves cleavage of the linear IVS RNA 15 nucleotides from its 5' end and formation of a phosphodiester bond between the new 5' phosphate and the original 3'-hydroxyl terminus of the IVS. This recombination mechanism is analogous to that by which splicing of the precursor RNA is achieved. The circular molecules appear to have no direct function in RNA splicing, and we propose the cyclization serves to prevent unwanted RNA from driving the splicing reactions backwards.

  8. Extracting Backbones from Weighted Complex Networks with Incomplete Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Qian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The backbone is the natural abstraction of a complex network, which can help people understand a networked system in a more simplified form. Traditional backbone extraction methods tend to include many outliers into the backbone. What is more, they often suffer from the computational inefficiency—the exhaustive search of all nodes or edges is often prohibitively expensive. In this paper, we propose a backbone extraction heuristic with incomplete information (BEHwII to find the backbone in a complex weighted network. First, a strict filtering rule is carefully designed to determine edges to be preserved or discarded. Second, we present a local search model to examine part of edges in an iterative way, which only relies on the local/incomplete knowledge rather than the global view of the network. Experimental results on four real-life networks demonstrate the advantage of BEHwII over the classic disparity filter method by either effectiveness or efficiency validity.

  9. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The concept of using highly ionic conducting backbones with subsequent infiltration of electronically conducting particles has widely been used to develop alternative anode-supported SOFC's. In this work, the idea was to develop infiltrated backbones as an alternative design based on cathode......-supported SOFC. The cathodes are obtained by infiltrating LSM into a sintered either thick (300 μm) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) backbone or a thin YSZ backbone (10-15 μm) integrated onto a thick (300 μm) porous strontium substituted lanthanum manganite (LSM) and YSZ composite. Fabrication challenges...... printed symmetrical cells. Samples with LSM/YSZ composite and YSZ backbones made with graphite+PMMA as pore formers exhibited comparable Rp values to the screen printed LSM/YSZ cathode. This route was chosen as the best to fabricate the cathode supported cells. SEM micrograph of a cathode supported cell...

  10. Measures of RNA metabolism rates: Toward a definition at the level of single bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachutka, Leonhard; Gagneur, Julien

    2016-11-14

    We give an overview of experimental and computational methods to estimate RNA metabolism rates genome-wide. We then advocate a local definition of RNA metabolism rate at the level of individual phosphodiester bonds. Rates of formation and disappearance of individual bonds are unambiguously defined, in contrast to rates of complete transcripts. We show that over previous approaches, the recently developed transient transcriptome sequencing (TT-seq) protocol allows for estimation of metabolism rates of individual bonds with least positional bias.

  11. Mineral catalysis of the formation of the phosphodiester bond in aqueous solution - The possible role of montmorillonite clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Gozen; KAMALUDDIN; Agarwal, Vipin; Hua, Lu Lin

    1989-01-01

    The possible role of montmorillonite clays in the spontaneous formation on the primitive earth of the phosphodiester bond in the presence of water was investigated in experiments measuring the binding of various nucleosides and nucleotides with Na(+)-montmorillonite 22A and the reactions of these compounds with a water-soluble carbodiimide. It was found that, at neutral pH, adenine derivatives bind stronger than the corresponding uracil derivatives, consistent with the protonation of the adenine by the acidic clay surface and a cationic binding of the protonated ring to the anionic clay surface. The reaction of the 5-prime-AMP with carbodiimide resulted in the formation of 2-prime,5-prime-pApA (18.9 percent), 3-prime,5-prime-pApA (11 percent), and AppA (4.8 percent). The yields of these oligomers obtained when poly(U) was used in place of the clay were 15.5 percent, 3.7 percent, and 14.9 percent AppA, respectively.

  12. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    A four-step infiltration method has been developed to infiltrate La0.75Sr0.25MnO3+δ (LSM25) nanoparticles into porous structures (YSZ or LSM-YSZ backbones). The pore size distribution in the backbones is obtained either by using PMMA and/or graphites as pore formers or by leaching treatment of sa...... of samples with Ni remained in the YSZ structure at high temperatures. All impregnated backbones, presented Rs comparable to a standard screen printed cathode, which proves that LSM nanoparticles forms a pathway for electron conduction....

  13. A backbone lever-arm effect enhances polymer mechanochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukovich, Hope M.; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B.; Kean, Zachary S.; Lenhardt, Jeremy M.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2013-02-01

    Mechanical forces along a polymer backbone can be used to bring about remarkable reactivity in embedded mechanically active functional groups, but little attention has been paid to how a given polymer backbone delivers that force to the reactant. Here, single-molecule force spectroscopy was used to directly quantify and compare the forces associated with the ring opening of gem-dibromo and gem-dichlorocyclopropanes affixed along the backbone of cis-polynorbornene and cis-polybutadiene. The critical force for isomerization drops by about one-third in the polynorbornene scaffold relative to polybutadiene. The root of the effect lies in more efficient chemomechanical coupling through the polynorbornene backbone, which acts as a phenomenological lever with greater mechanical advantage than polybutadiene. The experimental results are supported computationally and provide the foundation for a new strategy by which to engineer mechanochemical reactivity.

  14. LOAD AWARE ADAPTIVE BACKBONE SYNTHESIS IN WIRELESS MESH NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yuan; Zheng Baoyu

    2009-01-01

    Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) are envisioned to support the wired backbone with a wireless Backbone Networks (BNet) for providing internet connectivity to large-scale areas.With a wide range of internet-oriented applications with different Quality of Service (QoS) requirement,the large-scale WMNs should have good scalability and large bandwidth.In this paper,a Load Aware Adaptive Backbone Synthesis (LAABS) algorithm is proposed to automatically balance the traffic flow in the WMNs.The BNet will dynamically split into smaller size or merge into bigger one according to statistic load information of Backbone Nodes (BNs).Simulation results show LAABS generates moderate BNet size and converges quickly,thus providing scalable and stable BNet to facilitate traffic flow.

  15. Towards a natural classification and backbone tree for Sordariomycete

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maharachchikumbura, S.S.N.; Hyde, K.D.; Jones, E.B.G.; McKenzie, E.H.C.; Huang, S.-K.; Abdel-Wahab, M.A.; Daranagama, D.A.; Dayarathne, M.; D'souza, M.J.; Goonasekara, I.D.; Hongsanan, S.; Jayawardena, R.S.; Kirk, P.M.; Konta, S.; Liu, J.-K.; Liu, Z.-Y.; Norphanphoun, C.; Pang, K.-L.; Perera, R.H.; Senanayake, I.C.; Shang, Q.; Shenoy, B.D.; Xiao, Y.; Bahkali, A.H.; Kang, J.; Somrothipol, S.; Suetrong, S.; Wen, T.; Xu, J.

    , lichenized or lichenicolous taxa The class includes freshwater, marine and terrestrial taxa and has a worldwide distribution This paper provides an updated outline of the Sordariomycetes and a backbone tree incorporating asexual and sexual genera in the class...

  16. Backbone topology, access, and the commercial Internet, 1997 - 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Morton E O'Kelly; Grubesic, Tony H.

    2002-01-01

    As the Internet grows in popularity, telecommunications infrastructure in the United States continues to increase in capacity and geographic reach to meet market demand. Important components of this infrastructure include the commercial fiber-optic backbones used to transport digital information between locations. The spatial organization of commercial Internet backbones reflects an increasingly competitive privatized market for service provision, in which certain locations are more accessibl...

  17. On Backbone Structure for a Future Multipurpose Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Cuevas, Ruben; Riaz, M. Tahir

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications are evolving towards the unification of services and infrastructures. This unification must be achieved at the highest hierarchical level for a complete synergy of services. Therefore, one of the requirements is a multipurpose backbone network capable of supporting all the curr......Telecommunications are evolving towards the unification of services and infrastructures. This unification must be achieved at the highest hierarchical level for a complete synergy of services. Therefore, one of the requirements is a multipurpose backbone network capable of supporting all...

  18. Single nucleotide RNA choreography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Mohan, Srividya; Hershkovitz, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2006-01-01

    New structural analysis methods, and a tree formalism re-define and expand the RNA motif concept, unifying what previously appeared to be disparate groups of structures. We find RNA tetraloops at high frequencies, in new contexts, with unexpected lengths, and in novel topologies. The results, with broad implications for RNA structure in general, show that even at this most elementary level of organization, RNA tolerates astounding variation in conformation, length, sequence and context. However the variation is not random; it is well-described by four distinct modes, which are 3-2 switches (backbone topology variations), insertions, deletions and strand clips.

  19. Topologia dos backbones de internet no Brasil / Internet backbone topology in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Paiva da Motta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo visa reafirmar o papel do espaço no estudo das Novas Tecnologias de Informação e Comunicação (NTICs. Examinamos a topologia dos backbones de internet no Brasil usando as ferramentas matemáticas da teoria dos grafos. Através do cálculo de índices de centralidade (proximidade e intermediação, bem como de outras técnicas quantitativas, as redes físicas que compõem a internet são relacionadas à rede urbana preexistente, mostrando que em suas características gerais o funcionamento não subverte a geografia econômica do país, a despeito do ideário antigeográfico suscitado por parte da literatura sobre os impactos da tecnologia.

  20. Triazine-Based Sequence-Defined Polymers with Side-Chain Diversity and Backbone-Backbone Interaction Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grate, Jay W; Mo, Kai-For; Daily, Michael D

    2016-03-14

    Sequence control in polymers, well-known in nature, encodes structure and functionality. Here we introduce a new architecture, based on the nucleophilic aromatic substitution chemistry of cyanuric chloride, that creates a new class of sequence-defined polymers dubbed TZPs. Proof of concept is demonstrated with two synthesized hexamers, having neutral and ionizable side chains. Molecular dynamics simulations show backbone-backbone interactions, including H-bonding motifs and pi-pi interactions. This architecture is arguably biomimetic while differing from sequence-defined polymers having peptide bonds. The synthetic methodology supports the structural diversity of side chains known in peptides, as well as backbone-backbone hydrogen-bonding motifs, and will thus enable new macromolecules and materials with useful functions.

  1. Adding diverse noncanonical backbones to rosetta: enabling peptidomimetic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drew

    Full Text Available Peptidomimetics are classes of molecules that mimic structural and functional attributes of polypeptides. Peptidomimetic oligomers can frequently be synthesized using efficient solid phase synthesis procedures similar to peptide synthesis. Conformationally ordered peptidomimetic oligomers are finding broad applications for molecular recognition and for inhibiting protein-protein interactions. One critical limitation is the limited set of design tools for identifying oligomer sequences that can adopt desired conformations. Here, we present expansions to the ROSETTA platform that enable structure prediction and design of five non-peptidic oligomer scaffolds (noncanonical backbones, oligooxopiperazines, oligo-peptoids, [Formula: see text]-peptides, hydrogen bond surrogate helices and oligosaccharides. This work is complementary to prior additions to model noncanonical protein side chains in ROSETTA. The main purpose of our manuscript is to give a detailed description to current and future developers of how each of these noncanonical backbones was implemented. Furthermore, we provide a general outline for implementation of new backbone types not discussed here. To illustrate the utility of this approach, we describe the first tests of the ROSETTA molecular mechanics energy function in the context of oligooxopiperazines, using quantum mechanical calculations as comparison points, scanning through backbone and side chain torsion angles for a model peptidomimetic. Finally, as an example of a novel design application, we describe the automated design of an oligooxopiperazine that inhibits the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction. For the general biological and bioengineering community, several noncanonical backbones have been incorporated into web applications that allow users to freely and rapidly test the presented protocols (http://rosie.rosettacommons.org. This work helps address the peptidomimetic community's need for an automated and expandable

  2. Oligomerization reactions of deoxyribonucleotides on montmorillonite clay - The effect of mononucleotide structure, phosphate activation and montmorillonite composition on phosphodiester bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, James P.; KAMALUDDIN; Ertem, Gozen

    1990-01-01

    The 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP and 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-AMP bind 2 times more strongly to montmorillonite 22A than do 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-CMP and 5(prime)-TMP. The dinucleotide d(pG)2 forms in 9.2 percent yield and the cyclic dinucleotide c(dpG)2 in 5.4 percent yield in the reaction of 2(prime)-d-5(prime)-GMP with EDAC in the presence of montmorillonite 22A. The yield of dimers which contain the phosphodiester bond decreases as the reaction medium is changed from 0.2 M NaCl to a mixture of 0.2 M NaCl and 0.075 M MgCl2. A low yield of d(pA)2 was observed in the condensation reaction of 5(prime)-ImdpA on montmorillonite 22A. The yield of d(pA)2 obtained when EDAC is used as the condensing agent increases with increasing iron content of the Na(+)-montmorillonite used as catalyst. Evidence is presented which shows that the acidity of the Na(+)-montmorillonite is a necessary but not sufficient factor for the montmorillonite catalysis of phosphodiester bond formation.

  3. APPECT: An Approximate Backbone-Based Clustering Algorithm for Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Yu; Xu, Guandong; Jin, Pin

    2011-01-01

    algorithm for Tags (APPECT). The main steps of APPECT are: (1) we execute the K-means algorithm on a tag similarity matrix for M times and collect a set of tag clustering results Z={C1,C2,…,Cm}; (2) we form the approximate backbone of Z by executing a greedy search; (3) we fix the approximate backbone...... resulting from the severe difficulty of ambiguity, redundancy and less semantic nature of tags. Clustering method is a useful tool to address the aforementioned difficulties. Most of the researches on tag clustering are directly using traditional clustering algorithms such as K-means or Hierarchical...

  4. APPECT: An Approximate Backbone-Based Clustering Algorithm for Tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Yu; Xu, Guandong; Jin, Pin

    2011-01-01

    algorithm for Tags (APPECT). The main steps of APPECT are: (1) we execute the K-means algorithm on a tag similarity matrix for M times and collect a set of tag clustering results Z={C1,C2,…,Cm}; (2) we form the approximate backbone of Z by executing a greedy search; (3) we fix the approximate backbone...... resulting from the severe difficulty of ambiguity, redundancy and less semantic nature of tags. Clustering method is a useful tool to address the aforementioned difficulties. Most of the researches on tag clustering are directly using traditional clustering algorithms such as K-means or Hierarchical...

  5. The RNA infrastructure: an introduction to ncRNA networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lesley J

    2011-01-01

    The RNA infrastructure connects RNA-based functions. With transcription-to-translation processing forming the core of the network, we can visualise how RNA-based regulation, cleavage and modification are the backbone of cellular function. The key to interpreting the RNA-infrastructure is in understanding how core RNAs (tRNA, mRNA and rRNA) and other ncRNAs operate in a spatial-temporal manner, moving around the nucleus, cytoplasm and organelles during processing, or in response to environmental cues. This chapter summarises the concept of the RNA-infrastructure, and highlights examples of RNA-based networking within prokaryotes and eukaryotes. It describes how transcription-to-translation processes are tightly connected, and explores some similarities and differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA networking.

  6. Mechanistic insights into RNA transphosphorylation from kinetic isotope effects and linear free energy relationships of model reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyuan; Giese, Timothy J; Huang, Ming; Wong, Kin-Yiu; Harris, Michael E; York, Darrin M

    2014-10-27

    Phosphoryl transfer reactions are ubiquitous in biology and the understanding of the mechanisms whereby these reactions are catalyzed by protein and RNA enzymes is central to reveal design principles for new therapeutics. Two of the most powerful experimental probes of chemical mechanism involve the analysis of linear free energy relations (LFERs) and the measurement of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). These experimental data report directly on differences in bonding between the ground state and the rate-controlling transition state, which is the most critical point along the reaction free energy pathway. However, interpretation of LFER and KIE data in terms of transition-state structure and bonding optimally requires the use of theoretical models. In this work, we apply density-functional calculations to determine KIEs for a series of phosphoryl transfer reactions of direct relevance to the 2'-O-transphosphorylation that leads to cleavage of the phosphodiester backbone of RNA. We first examine a well-studied series of phosphate and phosphorothioate mono-, di- and triesters that are useful as mechanistic probes and for which KIEs have been measured. Close agreement is demonstrated between the calculated and measured KIEs, establishing the reliability of our quantum model calculations. Next, we examine a series of RNA transesterification model reactions with a wide range of leaving groups in order to provide a direct connection between observed Brønsted coefficients and KIEs with the structure and bonding in the transition state. These relations can be used for prediction or to aid in the interpretation of experimental data for similar non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions. Finally, we apply these relations to RNA phosphoryl transfer catalyzed by ribonuclease A, and demonstrate the reaction coordinate-KIE correlation is reasonably preserved. A prediction of the secondary deuterium KIE in this reaction is also provided. These results demonstrate the utility of

  7. The Graphical Representation of the Digital Astronaut Physiology Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briers, Demarcus

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes my internship project with the NASA Digital Astronaut Project to analyze the Digital Astronaut (DA) physiology backbone model. The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) applies integrated physiology models to support space biomedical operations, and to assist NASA researchers in closing knowledge gaps related to human physiologic responses to space flight. The DA physiology backbone is a set of integrated physiological equations and functions that model the interacting systems of the human body. The current release of the model is HumMod (Human Model) version 1.5 and was developed over forty years at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC). The physiology equations and functions are scripted in an XML schema specifically designed for physiology modeling by Dr. Thomas G. Coleman at UMMC. Currently it is difficult to examine the physiology backbone without being knowledgeable of the XML schema. While investigating and documenting the tags and algorithms used in the XML schema, I proposed a standard methodology for a graphical representation. This standard methodology may be used to transcribe graphical representations from the DA physiology backbone. In turn, the graphical representations can allow examination of the physiological functions and equations without the need to be familiar with the computer programming languages or markup languages used by DA modeling software.

  8. Optimal sink placement in backbone assisted wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Snigdh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a scheme for selecting the best site for sink placement in WSN applications employing backbone assisted communications. By placing the sink at a specific position, energy scavenging and delay constraints can effectively be controlled. In contrast to the conventional scheme for base station placement at the geographical centre or random placement at the end of the region of interest, the proposed scheme places the base station at either the graph theoretical centre or centroid of the backbone connecting nodes in the region of interest. This strategy shows a considerable reduction in the total number of hops that each packet needs to travel to reach the sink. The proposed scheme is applied on all the families of graphs prevalent in backbone assisted sensor networks to confirm the performance consistency and improvement in network parameters of the communication backbone measured in terms of delay, the carried load and the total energy consumption, eventually affected by the average number of hops for the message to reach the sink.

  9. Predicting the tolerated sequences for proteins and protein interfaces using RosettaBackrub flexible backbone design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin A Smith

    Full Text Available Predicting the set of sequences that are tolerated by a protein or protein interface, while maintaining a desired function, is useful for characterizing protein interaction specificity and for computationally designing sequence libraries to engineer proteins with new functions. Here we provide a general method, a detailed set of protocols, and several benchmarks and analyses for estimating tolerated sequences using flexible backbone protein design implemented in the Rosetta molecular modeling software suite. The input to the method is at least one experimentally determined three-dimensional protein structure or high-quality model. The starting structure(s are expanded or refined into a conformational ensemble using Monte Carlo simulations consisting of backrub backbone and side chain moves in Rosetta. The method then uses a combination of simulated annealing and genetic algorithm optimization methods to enrich for low-energy sequences for the individual members of the ensemble. To emphasize certain functional requirements (e.g. forming a binding interface, interactions between and within parts of the structure (e.g. domains can be reweighted in the scoring function. Results from each backbone structure are merged together to create a single estimate for the tolerated sequence space. We provide an extensive description of the protocol and its parameters, all source code, example analysis scripts and three tests applying this method to finding sequences predicted to stabilize proteins or protein interfaces. The generality of this method makes many other applications possible, for example stabilizing interactions with small molecules, DNA, or RNA. Through the use of within-domain reweighting and/or multistate design, it may also be possible to use this method to find sequences that stabilize particular protein conformations or binding interactions over others.

  10. Montmorillonite, oligonucleotides, RNA and origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Gozen

    2004-01-01

    isomers (Ertem and Ferris, 2000). Formation of phosphodiester bonds between mononucleotides by montmorillonite catalysis is a fascinating discovery, and a significant step forward in efforts to find out how the first RNA-like oligomers might have formed in the course of chemical evolution. However, as has been pointed out in several publications, these systems should be regarded as models rather than a literal representation of prebiotic chemistry (Orgel, 1998; Joyce and Orgel, 1999; Schwartz, 1999).

  11. RNA Catalysis, Thermodynamics and the Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Scott

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World Hypothesis posits that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs. RNA self-replicases are, in general, assumed to have employed nucleotide 5ʹ-polyphosphates (or their analogues as substrates for RNA polymerization. The mechanism by which these substrates might be synthesized with sufficient abundance to supply a growing and evolving population of RNAs is problematic for evolutionary hypotheses because non-enzymatic synthesis and assembly of nucleotide 5ʹ-triphosphates (or other analogously activated phosphodiester species is inherently difficult. However, nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates are also phosphodiesters, and are the natural and abundant products of RNA degradation. These have previously been dismissed as viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. We propose that the arguments for their dismissal are based on a flawed assumption, and that nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates in fact possess several significant, advantageous properties that indeed make them particularly viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. An RNA World hypothesis based upon the polymerization of nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates possesses additional explanatory power in that it accounts for the observed ribozyme “fossil record”, suggests a viable mechanism for substrate transport across lipid vesicle boundaries of primordial proto-cells, circumvents the problems of substrate scarcity and implausible synthetic pathways, provides for a primitive but effective RNA replicase editing mechanism, and definitively explains why RNA, rather than DNA, must have been the original catalyst. Finally, our analysis compels us to propose that a fundamental and universal property that drives the evolution of living systems, as well as pre-biotic replicating molecules (be they composed of RNA or protein, is that they exploit chemical reactions that already possess competing kinetically-preferred and thermodynamically-preferred pathways in a

  12. Identification of systems containing nonlinear stiffnesses using backbone curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londoño, Julián M.; Cooper, Jonathan E.; Neild, Simon A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a method for the dynamic identification of structures containing discrete nonlinear stiffnesses. The approach requires the structure to be excited at a single resonant frequency, enabling measurements to be made in regimes of large displacements where nonlinearities are more likely to be significant. Measured resonant decay data is used to estimate the system backbone curves. Linear natural frequencies and nonlinear parameters are identified using these backbone curves assuming a form for the nonlinear behaviour. Numerical and experimental examples, inspired by an aerospace industry test case study, are considered to illustrate how the method can be applied. Results from these models demonstrate that the method can successfully deliver nonlinear models able to predict the response of the test structure nonlinear dynamics.

  13. Backbone decomposition for continuous-state branching processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, A E Kyprianou Y-X

    2011-01-01

    In the spirit of Duqesne and Winkel (2007) and Berestycki et al. (2011) we show that supercritical continuous-state branching process with a general branching mechanism and general immigration mechanism is equal in law to a continuous-time Galton Watson process with immigration with Poissonian dressing. The result also characterises the limiting backbone decomposition which is predictable from the work on consistent growth of Galton-Watson trees with immigration in Cao and Winkel (2010).

  14. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    OpenAIRE

    Sharley, John N.

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance-Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure....

  15. Extracting the multiscale backbone of complex weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M. Ángeles; Boguñá, Marián; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A large number of complex systems find a natural abstraction in the form of weighted networks whose nodes represent the elements of the system and the weighted edges identify the presence of an interaction and its relative strength. In recent years, the study of an increasing number of large-scale networks has highlighted the statistical heterogeneity of their interaction pattern, with degree and weight distributions that vary over many orders of magnitude. These features, along with the large number of elements and links, make the extraction of the truly relevant connections forming the network's backbone a very challenging problem. More specifically, coarse-graining approaches and filtering techniques come into conflict with the multiscale nature of large-scale systems. Here, we define a filtering method that offers a practical procedure to extract the relevant connection backbone in complex multiscale networks, preserving the edges that represent statistically significant deviations with respect to a null model for the local assignment of weights to edges. An important aspect of the method is that it does not belittle small-scale interactions and operates at all scales defined by the weight distribution. We apply our method to real-world network instances and compare the obtained results with alternative backbone extraction techniques. PMID:19357301

  16. The Structural Basis of Ribozyme-Catalyzed RNA Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, M.P.; Scott, W.G.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Life originated, according to the RNA World hypothesis, from self-replicating ribozymes that catalyzed ligation of RNA fragments. We have solved the 2.6 angstrom crystal structure of a ligase ribozyme that catalyzes regiospecific formation of a 5' to 3' phosphodiester bond between the 5'-triphosphate and the 3'-hydroxyl termini of two RNA fragments. Invariant residues form tertiary contacts that stabilize a flexible stem of the ribozyme at the ligation site, where an essential magnesium ion coordinates three phosphates. The structure of the active site permits us to suggest how transition-state stabilization and a general base may catalyze the ligation reaction required for prebiotic RNA assembly.

  17. Dolutegravir treatment response by baseline viral load and NRTI backbone in treatment-naïve HIV-infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Small

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In two 48-week studies in naïve subjects, dolutegravir with NRTI of choice has shown non-inferiority to raltegravir and, with ABC/3TC, superiority to Atripla. Factors that influenced choice of NRTIs included viral load, resistance and safety. Methods: We analysed response rates and time to virologic failure by NRTI backbone and baseline viral load in the pivotal DTG-naïve studies. SPRING-2 randomized participants to DTG 50 mg QD or RAL 400 mg BID, each in combination with investigator-selected NRTIs (TDF/FTC or ABC/3TC. SINGLE randomised participants to DTG 50 mg+ABC/3TC QD or TDF/FTC/EFV (Atripla QD. In SPRING-2, changes in serum creatinine were examined by INI and NRTI backbone. Results: The two studies randomized and treated 1655 subjects, of whom 249 (15% were female, 388 (23% non-white, 495 (30% had HIV-1 RNA >100,000 c/ml, and 224 (14% had CD4+ count <200 cells/mm3. Primary analyses demonstrated non-inferiority of DTG to RAL in SPRING-2 (Δ=2.5%; 95% CI:−2.2% to +7.1%, excluding −10%, and superiority of the DTG regimen in SINGLE (7.4%; +2.5% to +12.3%. In SPRING-2, response rates by NRTI backbone were comparable in each viral load stratum. In SINGLE, a 7% difference in response (favoring DTG+ABC/3TC was observed in each viral load stratum. Exploratory analyses examining time-to-virologic failure showed no difference in response rates between the NRTIs irrespective of baseline viral load or study. Resistance to INIs or NRTIs was not demonstrated in any subject on DTG-based therapy through 48 weeks. Withdrawals due to AEs on DTG-based regimen were few (2% in both studies. In SPRING-2, no significant differences were observed in serum creatinine change from baseline to Week 48 by NRTI backbones. Conclusions: In SPRING-2 and SINGLE, DTG was effective with both ABC/3TC and TDF/FTC, and in subjects with high and low viral load. DTG was well tolerated in both studies. Renal safety also was similar by NRTI backbone. DTG is a once

  18. Resistance of Feynman diagrams and the percolation backbone dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, H K; Stenull, O; Oerding, K

    1999-06-01

    We present an alternative view of Feynman diagrams for the field theory of random resistor networks, in which the diagrams are interpreted as being resistor networks themselves. This simplifies the field theory considerably as we demonstrate by calculating the fractal dimension D(B) of the percolation backbone to three loop order. Using renormalization group methods we obtain D(B)=2+epsilon/21-172epsilon(2)/9261+2epsilon(3)[-74 639+22 680zeta(3)]/4 084 101, where epsilon=6-d with d being the spatial dimension and zeta(3)=1.202 057... .

  19. Application of Multicast-based Video Conference on CERNET Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Multicast-based video conference is a representative application in advanced network. In multi-point video conference using multicast can get better efficiency facilitated by inner-group broadcast mechanism. In the application, the multicast-based network resources assignment, management and security should be considered together. This paper presents a framework model of multicast-based video conferencing application with three layers. And a practical multicast-based video conferencing is implemented in CERNET(China Education and Research Network) backbone. The practice is valuable for the development of multicast-based video conferencing application in China.

  20. Design of an IPTV Multicast System for Internet Backbone Networks

    OpenAIRE

    T. H. Szymanski; Gilbert, D

    2010-01-01

    The design of an IPTV multicast system for the Internet backbone network is presented and explored through extensive simulations. In the proposed system, a resource reservation algorithm such as RSVP, IntServ, or DiffServ is used to reserve resources (i.e., bandwidth and buffer space) in each router in an IP multicast tree. Each router uses an Input-Queued, Output-Queued, or Crosspoint-Queued switch architecture with unity speedup. A recently proposed Recursive Fair Stochastic Matrix Decompos...

  1. Unique optimal solution instance and computational complexity of backbone in the graph bi-partitioning problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As an important tool for heuristic design of NP-hard problems, backbone analysis has become a hot spot in theoretical computer science in recent years. Due to the difficulty in the research on computational complexity of the backbone, many researchers analyzed the backbone by statistic ways. Aiming to increase the backbone size which is usually very small by the existing methods, the unique optimal solution instance construction (UOSIC) is proposed for the graph bi-partitioning problem (GBP). Also, we prove by using the UOSIC that it is NP-hard to obtain the backbone, i.e. no algorithm exists to obtain the backbone of a GBP in polynomial time under the assumption that P ( NP. Our work expands the research area of computational complexity of the backbone. And the UOSIC provides a new way for heuristic design of NP-hard problems.

  2. Controlled evolution of an RNA enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    It is generally thought that prior to the origin of protein synthesis, life on earth was based on self-replicating RNA molecules. This idea has become especially popular recently due to the discovery of catalytic RNA (ribozymes). RNA has both genotypic and phenotypic properties, suggesting that it is capable of undergoing Darwinian evolution. RNA evolution is likely to have played a critical role in the early history of life on earth, and thus is important in considering the possibility of life elsewhere in the solar system. We have constructed an RNA-based evolving system in the laboratory, combining amplification and mutation of an RNA genotype with selection of a corresponding RNA phenotype. This system serves as a functional model of a primitive organism. It can also be used as a tool to explore the catalytic potential of RNA. By altering the selection constraints, we are attempting to modify the substrate specificity of an existing ribozyme in order to develop ribozymes with novel catalytic function. In this way, we hope to gain a better understanding of RNA's catalytic versatility and to assess its suitability for the role of primordial catalyst. All of the RNA enzymes that are known to exist in contemporary biology carry out cleavage/ligation reactions involving RNA substrates. The Tetrahymena ribozyme, for example, catalyzes phosphoester transfer between a guanosine containing and an oligopyrimidine containing substrate. We tested the ability of mutant forms of the Tetrahymena ribozyme to carry out a comparable reaction using DNA, rather than RNA substrate. An ensemble of structural variants of the ribozyme was prepared and tested for their ability to specifically cleave d(GGCCCTCT-A3TA3TA) at the phosphodiester bond following the sequence CCCTCT. We recovered a mutant form of the enzyme that cleaves DNA more efficiently than does the wild-type. Beginning with this selected mutant we have now scattered random mutations throughout the ribozyme and have begun

  3. Process-based network decomposition reveals backbone motif structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanyu; Du, Chenghang; Chen, Hao; Simha, Rahul; Rong, Yongwu; Xiao, Yi; Zeng, Chen

    2010-06-08

    A central challenge in systems biology today is to understand the network of interactions among biomolecules and, especially, the organizing principles underlying such networks. Recent analysis of known networks has identified small motifs that occur ubiquitously, suggesting that larger networks might be constructed in the manner of electronic circuits by assembling groups of these smaller modules. Using a unique process-based approach to analyzing such networks, we show for two cell-cycle networks that each of these networks contains a giant backbone motif spanning all the network nodes that provides the main functional response. The backbone is in fact the smallest network capable of providing the desired functionality. Furthermore, the remaining edges in the network form smaller motifs whose role is to confer stability properties rather than provide function. The process-based approach used in the above analysis has additional benefits: It is scalable, analytic (resulting in a single analyzable expression that describes the behavior), and computationally efficient (all possible minimal networks for a biological process can be identified and enumerated).

  4. Constructing Battery-Aware Virtual Backbones in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Ma

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in battery-powered sensor networks is to construct energy efficient virtual backbones for network routing. Recent study in battery technology reveals that batteries tend to discharge more power than needed and reimburse the over-discharged power if they are recovered. In this paper we first provide a mathematical battery model suitable for implementation in sensor networks. We then introduce the concept of battery-aware connected dominating set (BACDS and show that in general the minimum BACDS (MBACDS can achieve longer lifetime than the previous backbone structures. Then we show that finding a MBACDS is NP-hard and give a distributed approximation algorithm to construct the BACDS. The resulting BACDS constructed by our algorithm is at most (8+Δopt size, where Δ is the maximum node degree and opt is the size of an optimal BACDS. Simulation results show that the BACDS can save a significant amount of energy and achieve up to 30% longer network lifetime than previous schemes.

  5. Constructing Battery-Aware Virtual Backbones in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yuanyuan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in battery-powered sensor networks is to construct energy efficient virtual backbones for network routing. Recent study in battery technology reveals that batteries tend to discharge more power than needed and reimburse the over-discharged power if they are recovered. In this paper we first provide a mathematical battery model suitable for implementation in sensor networks. We then introduce the concept of battery-aware connected dominating set (BACDS and show that in general the minimum BACDS (MBACDS can achieve longer lifetime than the previous backbone structures. Then we show that finding a MBACDS is NP-hard and give a distributed approximation algorithm to construct the BACDS. The resulting BACDS constructed by our algorithm is at most opt size, where is the maximum node degree and opt is the size of an optimal BACDS. Simulation results show that the BACDS can save a significant amount of energy and achieve up to longer network lifetime than previous schemes.

  6. Characterizing Aciniform Silk Repetitive Domain Backbone Dynamics and Hydrodynamic Modularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laurence Tremblay

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spider aciniform (wrapping silk is a remarkable fibrillar biomaterial with outstanding mechanical properties. It is a modular protein consisting, in Argiope trifasciata, of a core repetitive domain of 200 amino acid units (W units. In solution, the W units comprise a globular folded core, with five α-helices, and disordered tails that are linked to form a ~63-residue intrinsically disordered linker in concatemers. Herein, we present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy-based 15N spin relaxation analysis, allowing characterization of backbone dynamics as a function of residue on the ps–ns timescale in the context of the single W unit (W1 and the two unit concatemer (W2. Unambiguous mapping of backbone dynamics throughout W2 was made possible by segmental NMR active isotope-enrichment through split intein-mediated trans-splicing. Spectral density mapping for W1 and W2 reveals a striking disparity in dynamics between the folded core and the disordered linker and tail regions. These data are also consistent with rotational diffusion behaviour where each globular domain tumbles almost independently of its neighbour. At a localized level, helix 5 exhibits elevated high frequency dynamics relative to the proximal helix 4, supporting a model of fibrillogenesis where this helix unfolds as part of the transition to a mixed α-helix/β-sheet fibre.

  7. Characterization of hybridization between synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides and RNA in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politz, J C; Taneja, K L; Singer, R H

    1995-01-01

    Cells internalized synthetic oligonucleotides (oligos) in culture. The hybridization of these molecules to target RNA in the living cell was subsequently detected and characterized after fixation of the cells, with or without previous detergent extraction. Hybridized oligo was distinguished from free oligo in the cell using an in situ reverse transcription technique. This assay exploited the ability of the hybridized oligo to prime synthesis of a specific cDNA strand; unhybridized oligo present in the cell could not act as a primer for reverse transcription. Phosphorothioate and fluorochrome-labeled phosphodiester oligo dT were found to enter cells rapidly and hybridize to poly (A) RNA within 30 min. Hybrids containing phosphorothioate oligo dT were detectable in cells after up to 4 h of efflux time. Phosphodiester bonded oligo dT containing covalently-linked fluorochromes appeared more stable in the cell than unmodified phosphodiester oligo dT; hybrids containing these oligos could be detected in cells as long as 18h after efflux began. The in situ transcription assay was also sensitive enough to detect hybridization of anti-actin oligos to actin mRNA in the cell. It is probable, therefore, that this assay can be used to help assess the efficacy of antisense oligos by their hybridization to a target mRNA in cells or tissues; hybridized oligos are more likely to induce a specific antisense effect. Additionally, this assay will help to identify probes that would be useful as stable hybridization tags to follow RNA movement in living cells. Images PMID:8559650

  8. Investigating the role of a backbone to substrate hydrogen bond in OMP decarboxylase using a site-specific amide to ester substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bijoy J; Goto, Yuki; Cembran, Alessandro; Fedorov, Alexander A; Almo, Steven C; Gao, Jiali; Suga, Hiroaki; Gerlt, John A

    2014-10-21

    Hydrogen bonds between backbone amide groups of enzymes and their substrates are often observed, but their importance in substrate binding and/or catalysis is not easy to investigate experimentally. We describe the generation and kinetic characterization of a backbone amide to ester substitution in the orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase from Methanobacter thermoautotrophicum (MtOMPDC) to determine the importance of a backbone amide-substrate hydrogen bond. The MtOMPDC-catalyzed reaction is characterized by a rate enhancement (∼10(17)) that is among the largest for enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The reaction proceeds through a vinyl anion intermediate that may be stabilized by hydrogen bonding interaction between the backbone amide of a conserved active site serine residue (Ser-127) and oxygen (O4) of the pyrimidine moiety and/or electrostatic interactions with the conserved general acidic lysine (Lys-72). In vitro translation in conjunction with amber suppression using an orthogonal amber tRNA charged with L-glycerate ((HO)S) was used to generate the ester backbone substitution (S127(HO)S). With 5-fluoro OMP (FOMP) as substrate, the amide to ester substitution increased the value of Km by ∼1.5-fold and decreased the value of kcat by ∼50-fold. We conclude that (i) the hydrogen bond between the backbone amide of Ser-127 and O4 of the pyrimidine moiety contributes a modest factor (∼10(2)) to the 10(17) rate enhancement and (ii) the stabilization of the anionic intermediate is accomplished by electrostatic interactions, including its proximity of Lys-72. These conclusions are in good agreement with predictions obtained from hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations.

  9. DBR1 siRNA inhibition of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Yathi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 and all retroviruses are related to retroelements of simpler organisms such as the yeast Ty elements. Recent work has suggested that the yeast retroelement Ty1 replicates via an unexpected RNA lariat intermediate in cDNA synthesis. The putative genomic RNA lariat intermediate is formed by a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond, like that found in pre-mRNA intron lariats and it facilitates the minus-strand template switch during cDNA synthesis. We hypothesized that HIV-1 might also form a genomic RNA lariat and therefore that siRNA-mediated inhibition of expression of the human RNA lariat de-branching enzyme (DBR1 expression would specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Results We designed three short interfering RNA (siRNA molecules targeting DBR1, which were capable of reducing DBR1 mRNA expression by 80% and did not significantly affect cell viability. We assessed HIV-1 replication in the presence of DBR1 siRNA and found that DBR1 knockdown led to decreases in viral cDNA and protein production. These effects could be reversed by cotransfection of a DBR1 cDNA indicating that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication was a specific effect of DBR1 underexpression. Conclusion These data suggest that DBR1 function may be needed to debranch a putative HIV-1 genomic RNA lariat prior to completion of reverse transcription.

  10. Backbone building from quadrilaterals: a fast and accurate algorithm for protein backbone reconstruction from alpha carbon coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gront, Dominik; Kmiecik, Sebastian; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2007-07-15

    In this contribution, we present an algorithm for protein backbone reconstruction that comprises very high computational efficiency with high accuracy. Reconstruction of the main chain atomic coordinates from the alpha carbon trace is a common task in protein modeling, including de novo structure prediction, comparative modeling, and processing experimental data. The method employed in this work follows the main idea of some earlier approaches to the problem. The details and careful design of the present approach are new and lead to the algorithm that outperforms all commonly used earlier applications. BBQ (Backbone Building from Quadrilaterals) program has been extensively tested both on native structures as well as on near-native decoy models and compared with the different available existing methods. Obtained results provide a comprehensive benchmark of existing tools and evaluate their applicability to a large scale modeling using a reduced representation of protein conformational space. The BBQ package is available for downloading from our website at http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/services/BBQ/. This webpage also provides a user manual that describes BBQ functions in detail.

  11. Phase Transitions and Backbones of the Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in phase transitions of combinatorial problems. Phase transitions have been successfully used to analyze combinatorial optimization problems, characterize their typical-case features and locate the hardest problem instances. In this paper, we study phase transitions of the asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem (ATSP), an NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem that has many real-world applications. Using random instances of up to 1,500 cities in which intercity distances are uniformly distributed, we empirically show that many properties of the problem, including the optimal tour cost and backbone size, experience sharp transitions as the precision of intercity distances increases across a critical value. Our experimental results on the costs of the ATSP tours and assignment problem agree with the theoretical result that the asymptotic cost of assignment problem is pi ^2 /6 the number of cities goes to infinity. In addition, we show that the average computation...

  12. Transforming plastic surfaces with electrophilic backbones from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Samuel; Bowen, Raffick A R; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-28

    We demonstrate a simple nonaqueous reaction scheme for transforming the surface of plastics from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. The chemical modification is achieved by base-catalyzed trans-esterification with polyols. It is permanent, does not release contaminants, and causes no optical or mechanical distortion of the plastic. We present contact angle measurements to show successful modification of several types of plastics including poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polycarbonate (PC). Its applicability to blood analysis is explored using chemically modified PET blood collection tubes and found to be quite satisfactory. We expect this approach will reduce the cost of manufacturing plastic devices with optimized wettability and can be generalized to other types of plastic materials having an electrophilic linkage as its backbone.

  13. Variation of protein backbone amide resonance by electrostatic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2015-01-01

    Amide resonance is found to be sensitive to electrostatic field with component parallel or antiparallel the amide C-N bond. This effect is linear and without threshold in the biologically plausible electrostatic field range -0.005 to 0.005 au. Variation of amide resonance varies Resonance Assisted Hydrogen Bonding such as occurs in the hydrogen bonded chains of backbone amides of protein secondary structures such as beta sheet and non-polyproline helix such as alpha helix, varying the stability of the secondary structure. The electrostatic properties including permittivity of amino acid residue sidegroups influence the electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide. The significance of this factor relative to other factors in protein folding depends on the magnitude of electrostatic field component parallel or antiparallel the C-N bond of each amide, and preliminary protein-scale calculations of the magnitude of these components suggest this factor warrants investigation in ...

  14. Backbones of evolutionary history test biodiversity theory for microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, James P; Kembel, Steven W; Sharpton, Thomas J

    2015-07-07

    Identifying the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine biological diversity is a central question in ecology. In microbial ecology, phylogenetic diversity is an increasingly common and relevant means of quantifying community diversity, particularly given the challenges in defining unambiguous species units from environmental sequence data. We explore patterns of phylogenetic diversity across multiple bacterial communities drawn from different habitats and compare these data to evolutionary trees generated using theoretical models of biodiversity. We have two central findings. First, although on finer scales the empirical trees are highly idiosyncratic, on coarse scales the backbone of these trees is simple and robust, consistent across habitats, and displays bursts of diversification dotted throughout. Second, we find that these data demonstrate a clear departure from the predictions of standard neutral theories of biodiversity and that an alternative family of generalized models provides a qualitatively better description. Together, these results lay the groundwork for a theoretical framework to connect ecological mechanisms to observed phylogenetic patterns in microbial communities.

  15. Bioactivities of fish protein hydrolysates from defatted salmon backbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasa Slizyte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactivities of bulk fish protein hydrolysates (FPH from defatted salmon backbones obtained with eight different commercial enzymes and their combinations were tested. All FPH showed antioxidative activity in vitro. DPPH scavenging activity increased, while iron chelating ability decreased with increasing time of hydrolysis. All FPH showed ACE inhibiting effect which depended on type of enzyme and increased with time of hydrolysis. The highest effect was found for FPH produced with Trypsin. Bromelain + Papain hydrolysates reduced the uptake of radiolabelled glucose into CaCo-2 cells, a model of human enterocytes, indicating a potential antidiabetic effect of FPH. FPH obtained by Trypsin, Bromelain + Papain and Protamex showed the highest ACE inhibitory, cellular glucose transporter (GLUT/SGLT inhibitory and in vitro antioxidative activities, respectively. Correlation was observed between the measured bioactivities, degree of hydrolysis and molecular weight profiles, supporting prolonged hydrolysis to obtain high bioactivities.

  16. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOL006C, YMR233W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available by cleaving and re-sealing the phosphodiester backbone; relaxes both positively and negatively supercoiled D...in DNA by cleaving and re-sealing the phosphodiester backbone; relaxes both positively and negatively superc

  17. Changing the topology of protein backbone: the effect of backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a SH3 domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank H Schumann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the effects of the backbone cyclization on the structure and dynamics of a protein is essential for using protein topology engineering to alter protein stability and function. Here we have determined, for the first time, the structure and dynamics of the linear and various circular constructs of the N-SH3 domain from protein c-Crk. These constructs differ in the length and amino acid composition of the cyclization region. The backbone cyclization was carried out using intein-mediated intramolecular chemical ligation between the juxtaposed N- and the C-termini. The structure and backbone dynamics studies were performed using solution NMR. Our data suggest that the backbone cyclization has little effect on the overall three-dimensional structure of the SH3 domain: besides the termini, only minor structural changes were found in the proximity of the cyclization region. In contrast to the structure, backbone dynamics are significantly affected by the cyclization. On the subnanosecond time scale, the backbone of all circular constructs on average appears more rigid than that of the linear SH3 domain; this effect is observed over the entire backbone and is not limited to the cyclization site. The backbone mobility of the circular constructs becomes less restricted with increasing length of the circularization loop. In addition, significant conformational exchange motions (on the sub-millisecond time scale were found in the N-Src loop and in the adjacent β-strands in all circular constructs studied in this work. These effects of backbone cyclization on protein dynamics have potential implications for the stability of the protein fold and for ligand binding.

  18. Design of an IPTV Multicast System for Internet Backbone Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. H. Szymanski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of an IPTV multicast system for the Internet backbone network is presented and explored through extensive simulations. In the proposed system, a resource reservation algorithm such as RSVP, IntServ, or DiffServ is used to reserve resources (i.e., bandwidth and buffer space in each router in an IP multicast tree. Each router uses an Input-Queued, Output-Queued, or Crosspoint-Queued switch architecture with unity speedup. A recently proposed Recursive Fair Stochastic Matrix Decomposition algorithm used to compute near-perfect transmission schedules for each IP router. The IPTV traffic is shaped at the sources using Application-Specific Token Bucker Traffic Shapers, to limit the burstiness of incoming network traffic. The IPTV traffic is shaped at the destinations using Application-Specific Playback Queues, to remove residual network jitter and reconstruct the original bursty IPTV video streams at each destination. All IPTV traffic flows are regenerated at the destinations with essentially zero delay jitter and essentially-perfect QoS. The destination nodes deliver the IPTV streams to the ultimate end users using the same IPTV multicast system over a regional Metropolitan Area Network. It is shown that all IPTV traffic is delivered with essentially-perfect end-to-end QoS, with deterministic bounds on the maximum delay and jitter on each video frame. Detailed simulations of an IPTV distribution system, multicasting several hundred high-definition IPTV video streams over several essentially saturated IP backbone networks are presented.

  19. Reconstruction of Protein Backbones from the BriX Collection of Canonical Protein Fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Lies Baeten; Joke Reumers; Vicente Tur; François Stricher; Tom Lenaerts; Luis Serrano; Frederic Rousseau; Joost Schymkowitz

    2008-01-01

    As modeling of changes in backbone conformation still lacks a computationally efficient solution, we developed a discretisation of the conformational states accessible to the protein backbone similar to the successful rotamer approach in side chains. The BriX fragment database, consisting of fragments from 4 to 14 residues long, was realized through identification of recurrent backbone fragments from a non-redundant set of high-resolution protein structures. BriX contains an alphabet of more ...

  20. A hierarchical virtual backbone construction protocol for mobile ad hoc networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a hierarchical backbone construction protocol for mobile ad hoc networks. Our protocol is based on the idea of using an efficient extrema finding method to create clusters comprising the nodes that are within certain prespecified wireless hop distance. Afterward, we apply our ‘diameter’ algorithm among clusters to identify the dominating nodes that are, finally, connected via multi-hop virtual links to construct the backbone. We present the analytic as well as simulation study of our algorithm and also a method for the dynamic maintenance of constructed backbone. In the end, we illustrate the use of the virtual backbone with the help of an interesting application.

  1. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-12-30

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or hydrophobic-hydrophobic, form smooth, structured, homogeneous films from water (ionic) or tetrahydrofuran (hydrophobic). Mismatched conjugated polymers, by contrast, form inhomogeneous films with rough topologies. The polymers with ionic backbone chains are conjugated polyions (conjugated polymers with closed-shell charges in the backbone), which are semiconducting materials with tunable bad-gaps, not unlike uncharged conjugated polymers.

  2. Macromolecules Mimicking Backbones of Nucleic and Teichoic Acids.Synthesis,Some Properties and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanislaw; Penczek; Julia; B.Pretula; Krzysztof; Kaluzynski

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Several methods have been elaborated in this laboratory allowing preparation of macromolecules with phosphodiester bonds,and having sequence of atoms similar as in the chains of biomacromolecules - nucleic or teichoic acids (TA),namely:-(C)n-O-PO-,where n=2 (for teichoic acids) or 3.These methods,to be discussed in the lecture,are based on the ring-opening polymerization,transesterification,and recently elaborated direct addition of phosphoric acid to diepoxides.For the first time an attempt h...

  3. Transfer of primer binding site-mutated simian immunodeficiency virus vectors by genetically engineered artificial and hybrid tRNA-like primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A C; Grunwald, T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2001-01-01

    could be obtained by cotransfection of a gene for an engineered tRNA(Pro)-tRNA hybrid with a match to PBS-Pro. The importance of tRNA backbone identity was further analyzed by complementing the PBS-X2 vector with a gene for a matching x2 primer with a tRNA backbone, which led to three- to fourfold...

  4. Structural basis of transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ritwika S; Warner, Brittany A; Molodtsov, Vadim; Pupov, Danil; Esyunina, Daria; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing σ factor initiates transcription at specific promoter sites by de novo RNA priming, the first step of RNA synthesis where RNAP accepts two initiating ribonucleoside triphosphates (iNTPs) and performs the first phosphodiester bond formation. We present the structure of de novo transcription initiation complex that reveals unique contacts of the iNTPs bound at the transcription start site with the template DNA and also with RNAP and demonstrate the importance of these contacts for transcription initiation. To get further insight into the mechanism of RNA priming, we determined the structure of initially transcribing complex of RNAP holoenzyme with 6-mer RNA, obtained by in crystallo transcription approach. The structure highlights RNAP-RNA contacts that stabilize the short RNA transcript in the active site and demonstrates that the RNA 5'-end displaces σ region 3.2 from its position near the active site, which likely plays a key role in σ ejection during the initiation-to-elongation transition. Given the structural conservation of the RNAP active site, the mechanism of de novo RNA priming appears to be conserved in all cellular RNAPs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Thin Films Formed from Conjugated Polymers with Ionic, Water-Soluble Backbones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voortman, Thomas P; Chiechi, Ryan C

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the morphologies of films of conjugated polymers in which the backbone (main chain) and pendant groups are varied between ionic/hydrophilic and aliphatic/hydrophobic. We observe that conjugated polymers in which the pendant groups and backbone are matched, either ionic-ionic or h

  6. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnerståle, Sofia; Nowakowski, Michal; Baraznenok, Vera; Stenberg, Gun; Lindberg, Jimmy; Mayzel, Maxim; Orekhov, Vladislav; Agback, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs). ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15)N/(13)C/(1)H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3) domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS) based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  7. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Unnerståle

    Full Text Available Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1 is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs. ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15N/(13C/(1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3 domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  8. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: The flow of control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattfelder, J. B.; Battiston, S.

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  9. Data acquisition backbone core DABC release v1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, Joern; Essel, Hans G.; Kurz, Nikolaus; Linev, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The new experiments at FAIR require new concepts of data acquisition systems for the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a general purpose software framework developed for the implementation of such data acquisition systems. A DABC application consists of functional components like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, filter, analysis and storage which can be configured at runtime. Application specific code including the support of all kinds of data channels (front-end systems) is implemented by C++ program plug-ins. DABC is also well suited as environment for various detector and readout components test beds. A set of DABC plug-ins has been developed for the FAIR experiment CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter) at GSI. This DABC application is used as DAQ system for test beamtimes. Front-end boards equipped with n-XYTER ASICs and ADCs are connected to read-out controller boards (ROC). From there the data is sent over Ethernet (UDP), or over optics and PCIe interface cards into Linux PCs. DABC does the controlling, event building, archiving and data serving. The first release of DABC was published in 2009 and is available under GPL license.

  10. Backbone of complex networks of corporations: the flow of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glattfelder, J B; Battiston, S

    2009-09-01

    We present a methodology to extract the backbone of complex networks based on the weight and direction of links, as well as on nontopological properties of nodes. We show how the methodology can be applied in general to networks in which mass or energy is flowing along the links. In particular, the procedure enables us to address important questions in economics, namely, how control and wealth are structured and concentrated across national markets. We report on the first cross-country investigation of ownership networks, focusing on the stock markets of 48 countries around the world. On the one hand, our analysis confirms results expected on the basis of the literature on corporate control, namely, that in Anglo-Saxon countries control tends to be dispersed among numerous shareholders. On the other hand, it also reveals that in the same countries, control is found to be highly concentrated at the global level, namely, lying in the hands of very few important shareholders. Interestingly, the exact opposite is observed for European countries. These results have previously not been reported as they are not observable without the kind of network analysis developed here.

  11. RNA-DNA Chimeras in the Context of an RNA World Transition to an RNA/DNA World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavette, Jesse V; Stoop, Matthias; Hud, Nicholas V; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan

    2016-10-10

    The RNA world hypothesis posits that DNA and proteins were later inventions of early life, or the chemistry that gave rise to life. Most scenarios put forth for the emergence of DNA assume a clean separation of RNA and DNA polymer, and a smooth transition between RNA and DNA. However, based on the reality of "clutter" and lack of sophisticated separation/discrimination mechanisms in a protobiological (and/or prebiological) world, heterogeneous RNA-DNA backbone containing chimeric sequences could have been common-and have not been fully considered in models transitioning from an RNA world to an RNA-DNA world. Herein we show that there is a significant decrease in Watson-Crick duplex stability of the heterogeneous backbone chimeric duplexes that would impede base-pair mediated interactions (and functions). These results point to the difficulties for the transition from one homogeneous system (RNA) to another (RNA/DNA) in an RNA world with a heterogeneous mixture of ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides and sequences, while suggesting an alternative scenario of prebiological accumulation and co-evolution of homogeneous systems (RNA and DNA).

  12. Peptide Backbone Sampling Convergence with the Adaptive Biasing Force Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Reilly, Kyle A.; Hills, Ronald D.; Guvench, Olgun

    2013-01-01

    Complete Boltzmann sampling of reaction coordinates in biomolecular systems continues to be a challenge for unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. A growing number of methods have been developed for applying biases to biomolecular systems to enhance sampling while enabling recovery of the unbiased (Boltzmann) distribution of states. The Adaptive Biasing Force (ABF) algorithm is one such method, and works by canceling out the average force along the desired reaction coordinate(s) using an estimate of this force progressively accumulated during the simulation. Upon completion of the simulation, the potential of mean force, and therefore Boltzmann distribution of states, is obtained by integrating this average force. In an effort to characterize the expected performance in applications such as protein loop sampling, ABF was applied to the full ranges of the Ramachandran ϕ/ψ backbone dihedral reaction coordinates for dipeptides of the 20 amino acids using all-atom explicit-water molecular dynamics simulations. Approximately half of the dipeptides exhibited robust and rapid convergence of the potential of mean force as a function of ϕ/ψ in triplicate 50-ns simulations, while the remainder exhibited varying degrees of less complete convergence. The greatest difficulties in achieving converged ABF sampling were seen in the branched-sidechain amino acids threonine and valine, as well as the special case of proline. Proline dipeptide sampling was further complicated by trans-to-cis peptide bond isomerization not observed in unbiased control molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, the ABF method was found to be a robust means of sampling the entire ϕ/ψ reaction coordinate for the 20 amino acids, including high free-energy regions typically inaccessible in standard molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:23215032

  13. MCBT: Multi-Hop Cluster Based Stable Backbone Trees for Data Collection and Dissemination in WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Inyoung; Kim, Moonseong; Mutka, Matt W; Choo, Hyunseung; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    We propose a stable backbone tree construction algorithm using multi-hop clusters for wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The hierarchical cluster structure has advantages in data fusion and aggregation. Energy consumption can be decreased by managing nodes with cluster heads. Backbone nodes, which are responsible for performing and managing multi-hop communication, can reduce the communication overhead such as control traffic and minimize the number of active nodes. Previous backbone construction algorithms, such as Hierarchical Cluster-based Data Dissemination (HCDD) and Multicluster, Mobile, Multimedia radio network (MMM), consume energy quickly. They are designed without regard to appropriate factors such as residual energy and degree (the number of connections or edges to other nodes) of a node for WSNs. Thus, the network is quickly disconnected or has to reconstruct a backbone. We propose a distributed algorithm to create a stable backbone by selecting the nodes with higher energy or degree as the cluster heads. This increases the overall network lifetime. Moreover, the proposed method balances energy consumption by distributing the traffic load among nodes around the cluster head. In the simulation, the proposed scheme outperforms previous clustering schemes in terms of the average and the standard deviation of residual energy or degree of backbone nodes, the average residual energy of backbone nodes after disseminating the sensed data, and the network lifetime.

  14. Ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis accelerated by the steric effect of the backbone substituent in cyclic (alkyl)(amino) carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Song, Shangfei; Wang, Xiao; Jiao, Jiajun; Shi, Min

    2013-10-21

    Three ruthenium complexes bearing backbone-monosubstituted CAACs were prepared and displayed dramatic improvement in catalytic efficiency not only in RCM reaction but also in the ethenolysis of methyl oleate, compared to those bearing backbone-disubstituted CAACs.

  15. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N Experiment to Facilitate the Assignment of Backbone Resonances in Proteins Exhibiting High Backbone Shift Degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh; Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish; Guleria, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three dimensional NMR experiments involving amide 1H and 15N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(5,3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate (and/or to validate) the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide 15N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. HiNi and Hi-1Ni-1) for overlapping amide NH peaks. The experiment -encoding 5D spectral information- leads to a conventional 3D spectrum with significantly reduced spectral crowding and complexity. The impr...

  16. Frequency Assignment for Joint Aerial Layer Network High-Capacity Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-11

    ARL-TR-8093•AUG 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Frequency Assignment for Joint Aerial Layer Network High-Capacity Backbone by Peng Wang and Brian...2017 US Army Research Laboratory Frequency Assignment for Joint Aerial Layer Network High-Capacity Backbone by Peng Wang and Brian Henz Computational...Rev. 8/98)    Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 August 2017 Technical Report Frequency Assignment for Joint Aerial Layer Network High-Capacity Backbone

  17. RNA Ligase Structures Reveal the Basis for RNA Specificity and Conformational Changes that Drive Ligation Forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandakumar,J.; Shuman, S.; Lima, C.

    2006-01-01

    T4 RNA ligase 2 (Rnl2) and kinetoplastid RNA editing ligases exemplify a family of RNA repair enzymes that seal 3'OH/5'PO{sub 4} nicks in duplex RNAs via ligase adenylylation (step 1), AMP transfer to the nick 5'PO{sub 4} (step 2), and attack by the nick 3'OH on the 5'-adenylylated strand to form a phosphodiester (step 3). Crystal structures are reported for Rnl2 at discrete steps along this pathway: the covalent Rnl2-AMP intermediate; Rnl2 bound to an adenylylated nicked duplex, captured immediately following step 2; and Rnl2 at an adenylylated nick in a state poised for step 3. These structures illuminate the stereochemistry of nucleotidyl transfer and reveal how remodeling of active-site contacts and conformational changes propel the ligation reaction forward. Mutational analysis and comparison of nick-bound structures of Rnl2 and human DNA ligase I highlight common and divergent themes of substrate recognition that can explain their specialization for RNA versus DNA repair.

  18. A Distributed Virtual Backbone Formation for Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong-tao; HE Chen; JIANG Ling-ge

    2007-01-01

    The virtual backbone is an approach for solving routing problems in wireless ad hoc and sensor networks. A connected dominating set (CDS) was proposed as a virtual backbone to improve the performance of wireless networks. The quality of a virtual backbone is measured not only by approximation factor, which is the ratio of its size to that of minimum CDS, but also time complexity and message complexity. In this paper, a distributed algorithm is presented to construct a minimum CDS for ad hoc and sensor networks. By destroying triangular loops in the virtual backbone, the proposed algorithm can effectively construct a CDS with smaller size. Moreover, our algorithm, which is fully localized, has a constant approximation ratio, linear message and time complexity, and low implementation complexity. The simulation results and theoretical analysis show that our algorithm has better efficiency and performance than conventional approaches.

  19. An exhaustive survey of regular peptide conformations using a new metric for backbone handedness (h

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan V. Mannige

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Ramachandran plot is important to structural biology as it describes a peptide backbone in the context of its dominant degrees of freedom—the backbone dihedral angles φ and ψ (Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan & Sasisekharan, 1963. Since its introduction, the Ramachandran plot has been a crucial tool to characterize protein backbone features. However, the conformation or twist of a backbone as a function of φ and ψ has not been completely described for both cis and trans backbones. Additionally, little intuitive understanding is available about a peptide’s conformation simply from knowing the φ and ψ values of a peptide (e.g., is the regular peptide defined by φ = ψ =  − 100°  left-handed or right-handed?. This report provides a new metric for backbone handedness (h based on interpreting a peptide backbone as a helix with axial displacement d and angular displacement θ, both of which are derived from a peptide backbone’s internal coordinates, especially dihedral angles φ, ψ and ω. In particular, h equals sin(θd∕|d|, with range [−1, 1] and negative (or positive values indicating left(or right-handedness. The metric h is used to characterize the handedness of every region of the Ramachandran plot for both cis (ω = 0° and trans (ω = 180° backbones, which provides the first exhaustive survey of twist handedness in Ramachandran (φ, ψ space. These maps fill in the ‘dead space’ within the Ramachandran plot, which are regions that are not commonly accessed by structured proteins, but which may be accessible to intrinsically disordered proteins, short peptide fragments, and protein mimics such as peptoids. Finally, building on the work of (Zacharias & Knapp, 2013, this report presents a new plot based on d and θ that serves as a universal and intuitive alternative to the Ramachandran plot. The universality arises from the fact that the co-inhabitants of such a plot include every possible peptide backbone

  20. RNA helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In...

  1. Borate Minerals and RNA Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Di Mauro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The abiotic origin of genetic polymers faces two major problems: a prebiotically plausible polymerization mechanism and the maintenance of their polymerized state outside a cellular environment. The stabilizing action of borate on ribose having been reported, we have explored the possibility that borate minerals stabilize RNA. We observe that borate itself does not stabilize RNA. The analysis of a large panel of minerals tested in various physical-chemical conditions shows that in general no protection on RNA backbone is exerted, with the interesting exception of ludwigite (Mg2Fe3+BO5. Stability is a fundamental property of nucleic polymers and borate is an abundant component of the planet, hence the prebiotic interest of this analysis.

  2. Screening of Modified RNA duplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Kjems, Jørgen

    Because of sequence specific gene targeting activity siRNAs are regarded as promising active compounds in gene medicine. But one serious problem with delivering siRNAs as treatment is the now well-established non-specific activities of some RNA duplexes. Cellular reactions towards double stranded...... RNAs include the 2´-5´ oligoadenylate synthetase system, the protein kinase R, RIG-I and Toll-like receptor activated pathways all resulting in antiviral defence mechanism. We have previously shown that antiviral innate immune reactions against double stranded RNAs could be detected in vivo as partial...... protection against a fish pathogenic virus. This protection corresponded with an interferon response in the fish. Here we use this fish model to screen siRNAs containing various chemical modifications of the RNA backbone for their antiviral activity, the overall aim being identification of an siRNA form...

  3. RNA topology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases.

  4. Metal dependence and branched RNA cocrystal structures of the RNA lariat debranching enzyme Dbr1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Nathaniel E.; Katolik, Adam; Roberts, Kenneth M.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Holloway, Stephen P.; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Montemayor, Eric J.; Stevens, Scott W.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Damha, Masad J.; Hart, P. John (UW); (Texas); (McGill); (UTSMC); (Cornell); (SC)

    2016-12-06

    Intron lariats are circular, branched RNAs (bRNAs) produced during pre-mRNA splicing. Their unusual chemical and topological properties arise from branch-point nucleotides harboring vicinal 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. The 2',5'-bonds must be hydrolyzed by the RNA debranching enzyme Dbr1 before spliced introns can be degraded or processed into small nucleolar RNA and microRNA derived from intronic RNA. Here, we measure the activity of Dbr1 from Entamoeba histolytica by using a synthetic, dark-quenched bRNA substrate that fluoresces upon hydrolysis. Purified enzyme contains nearly stoichiometric equivalents of Fe and Zn per polypeptide and demonstrates turnover rates of ~3 s-1. Similar rates are observed when apo-Dbr1 is reconstituted with Fe(II)+Zn(II) under aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, a rate of ~4.0 s-1 is observed when apoenzyme is reconstituted with Fe(II). In contrast, apo-Dbr1 reconstituted with Mn(II) or Fe(II) under aerobic conditions is inactive. Diffraction data from crystals of purified enzyme using X-rays tuned to the Fe absorption edge show Fe partitions primarily to the β-pocket and Zn to the α-pocket. Structures of the catalytic mutant H91A in complex with 7-mer and 16-mer synthetic bRNAs reveal bona fide RNA branchpoints in the Dbr1 active site. A bridging hydroxide is in optimal position for nucleophilic attack of the scissile phosphate. The results clarify uncertainties regarding structure/function relationships in Dbr1 enzymes, and the fluorogenic probe permits high-throughput screening for inhibitors that may hold promise as treatments for retroviral infections and neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Synthesis of RNA oligomers on heterogeneous templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of an RNA world in the chemical origin of life is appealing, as nucleic acids are capable of both information storage and acting as templates that catalyse the synthesis of complementary molecules. Template-directed synthesis has been demonstrated for homogeneous oligonucleotides that, like natural nucleic acids, have 3',5' linkages between the nucleotide monomers. But it seems likely that prebiotic routes to RNA-like molecules would have produced heterogeneous molecules with various kinds of phosphodiester linkages and both linear and cyclic nucleotide chains. Here we show that such heterogeneity need be no obstacle to the templating of complementary molecules. Specifically, we show that heterogeneous oligocytidylates, formed by the montmorillonite clay-catalysed condensation of actuated monomers, can serve as templates for the synthesis of oligoguanylates. Furthermore, we show that oligocytidylates that are exclusively 2',5'-linked can also direct synthesis of oligoguanylates. Such heterogeneous templating reactions could have increased the diversity of the pool of protonucleic acids from which life ultimately emerged.

  6. Who Watches the Watchmen: Roles of RNA Modifications in the RNA Interference Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha B Shelton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA levels are widely thought to be predictive of RNA function. However, the existence of more than a hundred chemically distinct modifications of RNA alone is a major indication that these moieties may impart distinct functions to subgroups of RNA molecules that share a primary sequence but display distinct RNA "epigenetic" marks. RNAs can be modified on many sites, including 5' and 3' ends, the sugar phosphate backbone, or internal bases, which collectively provide many opportunities for posttranscriptional regulation through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we will focus on how modifications on messenger and microRNAs may affect the process of RNA interference in mammalian cells. We believe that taking RNA modifications into account will not only advance our understanding of this crucial pathway in disease and cancer but will also open the path to exploiting the enzymes that "write" and "erase" them as targets for therapeutic drug development.

  7. Who Watches the Watchmen: Roles of RNA Modifications in the RNA Interference Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Samantha B; Reinsborough, Calder; Xhemalce, Blerta

    2016-07-01

    RNA levels are widely thought to be predictive of RNA function. However, the existence of more than a hundred chemically distinct modifications of RNA alone is a major indication that these moieties may impart distinct functions to subgroups of RNA molecules that share a primary sequence but display distinct RNA "epigenetic" marks. RNAs can be modified on many sites, including 5' and 3' ends, the sugar phosphate backbone, or internal bases, which collectively provide many opportunities for posttranscriptional regulation through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we will focus on how modifications on messenger and microRNAs may affect the process of RNA interference in mammalian cells. We believe that taking RNA modifications into account will not only advance our understanding of this crucial pathway in disease and cancer but will also open the path to exploiting the enzymes that "write" and "erase" them as targets for therapeutic drug development.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of dolutegravir plus backbone compared with raltegravir plus backbone, darunavir+ritonavir plus backbone and efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine in treatment naïve and experienced HIV-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restelli U

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Umberto Restelli,1,2 Giuliano Rizzardini,3,4 Andrea Antinori,5 Adriano Lazzarin,6 Marzia Bonfanti,1 Paolo Bonfanti,7 Davide Croce1,2 1Centre for Research on Health Economics, Social and Health Care Management, LIUC – Università Cattaneo, Castellanza, Varese, Italy; 2School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 3First and Second Divisions of Infectious Diseases, “Luigi Sacco” Hospital, Milan, Italy; 4School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; 5National Institute for Infectious Diseases “L Spallanzani”, Rome, 6Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 7Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, A Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy Background: In January 2014, the European Medicines Agency issued a marketing authorization for dolutegravir (DTG, a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor for HIV treatment. The study aimed at determining the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the use of DTG+backbone compared with raltegravir (RAL+backbone, darunavir (DRV+ritonavir(r+backbone and efavirenz/tenofovir/emtricitabine (EFV/TDF/FTC in HIV-positive treatment-naïve patients and compared with RAL+backbone in treatment-experienced patients, from the Italian National Health Service’s point of view.Materials and methods: A published Monte Carlo Individual Simulation Model (ARAMIS-DTG model was used to perform the analysis. Patients pass through mutually exclusive health states (defined in terms of diagnosis of HIV with or without opportunistic infections [OIs] and cardiovascular disease [CVD] and successive lines of therapy. The model considers costs (2014 and quality of life per monthly cycle in a lifetime horizon. Costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs are dependent on OI, CVD, AIDS events, adverse events and antiretroviral therapies.Results: In

  9. Gender features of functional condition of backbone of teenagers with scoliotic posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiy Afanasiev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study mobility of backbone, endurance of muscles of a trunk and to define gender features of functional condition of backbone at children of the middle school age with scoliotic posture depending on the direction of the top of arch of curvature of spine. Material & Methods: 40 girls and 40 boys, including 18 girls and 18 boys with the right-side deformation of backbone in the thoracic department, the left-side – 22 girls and 22 boys are examined. Results: features of changes of indicators, depending on sex of children and frontage of the top of arch of curvature of spine column, are revealed when studying the level of flexibility of backbone and endurance of muscles of a trunk at children of the middle school age with scoliotic posture. Conclusions: it is established that the level of decrease in flexibility of backbone is higher at boys, than at girls, whereas indicators of contractile ability and tone of muscles of "muscular corset" are higher at boys.

  10. No-Enclave Percolation Corresponds to Holes in the Cluster Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Ziff, Robert M.; Deng, Youjin

    2016-10-01

    The no-enclave percolation (NEP) model introduced recently by Sheinman et al. can be mapped to a problem of holes within a standard percolation backbone, and numerical measurements of such holes give the same size-distribution exponent τ =1.82 (1 ) as found for the NEP model. An argument is given that τ =1 +dB/2 ≈1.822 for backbone holes, where dB is the backbone dimension. On the other hand, a model of simple holes within a percolation cluster yields τ =1 +df/2 =187 /96 ≈1.948 , where df is the fractal dimension of the cluster, and this value is consistent with the experimental results of gel collapse of Sheinman et al., which give τ =1.91 (6 ). This suggests that the gel clusters are of the universality class of percolation cluster holes. Both models give a discontinuous maximum hole size at pc, signifying explosive percolation behavior.

  11. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  12. Side-Chain-Induced Rigid Backbone Organization of Polymer Semiconductors through Semifluoroalkyl Side Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Boseok; Kim, Ran; Lee, Seon Baek; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yun-Hi; Cho, Kilwon

    2016-03-23

    While high-mobility p-type conjugated polymers have been widely reported, high-mobility n-type conjugated polymers are still rare. In the present work, we designed semifluorinated alkyl side chains and introduced them into naphthalene diimide-based polymers (PNDIF-T2 and PNDIF-TVT). We found that the strong self-organization of these side chains induced a high degree of order in the attached polymer backbones by forming a superstructure composed of "backbone crystals" and "side-chain crystals". This phenomenon was shown to greatly enhance the ordering along the backbone direction, and the resulting polymers thus exhibited unipolar n-channel transport in field-effect transistors with remarkably high electron mobility values of up to 6.50 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and with a high on-off current ratio of 10(5).

  13. INFLUENCE OF BACKBONE RIGIDITY ON THE LIQUID CRYSTALLINITY OF MESOGEN-CONTAINING POLYACETYLENES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Two acetylene polymers containing cyanobiphenyl-based mesogens,poly{10-[((4'-cyano-4-biphenylyl)oxy)carbonyl]-1-decyne} (PA8CN), which has a relatively flexible polyalkyne backbone, and poly {[4-(((12-((4'-cyano-4-biphenylyl)oxy)dodecyl)oxy)carbonyl) phenyl]-acetylene} (PB12CN), which has a fairly rigid poly(phenylacetylene)backbone, were synthesized using respectively WCl6 and [Rh(nbd)Cl]2 as the catalysts.PA8CN exhibits enantiotropic interdigitated smectic A phase (SAd) over a temperature range as wide as ca. 100℃, whereas PB12CN is non-mesomorphic, demonstrating that the backbone rigidity plays an important role in determining the liquid crystallinity of the polyacetylenes.

  14. Impact of Backbone Fluorination on π-Conjugated Polymers in Organic Photovoltaic Devices: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Leclerc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed bulk heterojunction solar cells have experienced a remarkable acceleration in performances in the last two decades, reaching power conversion efficiencies above 10%. This impressive progress is the outcome of a simultaneous development of more advanced device architectures and of optimized semiconducting polymers. Several chemical approaches have been developed to fine-tune the optoelectronics and structural polymer parameters required to reach high efficiencies. Fluorination of the conjugated polymer backbone has appeared recently to be an especially promising approach for the development of efficient semiconducting polymers. As a matter of fact, most currently best-performing semiconducting polymers are using fluorine atoms in their conjugated backbone. In this review, we attempt to give an up-to-date overview of the latest results achieved on fluorinated polymers for solar cells and to highlight general polymer properties’ evolution trends related to the fluorination of their conjugated backbone.

  15. Click chemistry for rapid labeling and ligation of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Das, Subha R

    2011-01-03

    The copper(I)-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction (click chemistry) is shown to be compatible with RNA (with free 2'-hydroxyl groups) in spite of the intrinsic lability of RNA. RNA degradation is minimized through stabilization of the Cu(I) in aqueous buffer with acetonitrile as cosolvent and no other ligand; this suggests the general possibility of "ligandless" click chemistry. With the viability of click chemistry validated on synthetic RNA bearing "click"-reactive alkynes, the scope of the reaction is extended to in-vitro-transcribed or, indeed, any RNA, as a click-reactive azide is incorporated enzymatically. Once clickable groups are installed on RNA, they can be rapidly click labeled or conjugated together in click ligations, which may be either templated or nontemplated. In click ligations the resultant unnatural triazole-linked RNA backbone is not detrimental to RNA function, thus suggesting a broad applicability of click chemistry in RNA biological studies.

  16. Polyolefin Backbone Substitution in Binders for Low Temperature Powder Injection Moulding Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenika Hausnerova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the substitution of polyolefin backbone binder components with low melting temperature carnauba wax for powder injection moulding applications. The effect of various binder compositions of Al2O3 feedstock on thermal degradation parameters is investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Within the experimental framework 29 original feedstock compositions were prepared and the superiority of carnauba wax over the polyethylene binder backbone was demonstrated in compositions containing polyethylene glycol as the initial opening agent and governing the proper mechanism of the degradation process. Moreover, the replacement of synthetic polymer by the natural wax contributes to an increase of environmental sustainability of modern industrial technologies.

  17. Using Excel To Study The Relation Between Protein Dihedral Angle Omega And Backbone Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Christopher; Evans, Samari; Tao, Xiuping

    How to involve the uninitiated undergraduate students in computational biophysics research? We made use of Microsoft Excel to carry out calculations of bond lengths, bond angles and dihedral angles of proteins. Specifically, we studied protein backbone dihedral angle omega by examining how its distribution varies with the length of the backbone length. It turns out Excel is a respectable tool for this task. An ordinary current-day desktop or laptop can handle the calculations for midsized proteins in just seconds. Care has to be taken to enter the formulas for the spreadsheet column after column to minimize the computing load. Supported in part by NSF Grant #1238795.

  18. Peptide-functionalized semiconductor surfaces: strong surface electronic effects from minor alterations to backbone composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matmor, Maayan; Lengyel, George A; Horne, W Seth; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2017-02-22

    The use of non-canonical amino acids is a powerful way to control protein structure. Here, we show that subtle changes to backbone composition affect the ability of a dipeptide to modify solid surface electronic properties. The extreme sensitivity of the interactions to the peptide structure suggests potential applications in improving the performance of electronic devices.

  19. Treatment Results of Injuries of Thoracic and Lumbar Backbone Departments at Osteoporosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Y. Sumin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Information relates to radiologic (computer tomography manifestations providing the visualization of thoracic and lumbar backbone department injuries at osteoporotic patients. Contemporary methods of transcutaneous and trans-pedicle vertebroplasty with bone cement allows to obtain a stable positive healing effect against such pathologies.

  20. Synthesis of a Backbone Hexasaccharide Fragment of the Pectic Polysaccharide Rhamnogalacturonan I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakharova, Alexandra N.; Madsen, Robert; Clausen, Mads H.

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis of the fully unprotected hexasaccharide backbone of the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I is described. The strategy relies on iterative coupling of a common pentenyl disaccharide glycosyl donor followed by a late-stage oxidation of the C-6 positions of the galactose residues. ...

  1. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  2. Interconnection and Competition Among Asymmetric Networks in the Internet Backbone Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahn, E.; Prüfer, J.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the interrelation between interconnection and competition in the internet backbone market.Networks asymmetric in size choose among different interconnection regimes and compete for end-users.We show that a direct interconnection regime, Peering, softens competition compared to indirect in

  3. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  4. Analysis of components of conserved "backbone sequences" among genomes of Shigella spp. strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong; PENG Junping; YANG Jian; SUN Lilian; CHEN Shuxia; Jin Qi

    2004-01-01

    Difference in the genomic compositions of prokaryotes is the basis of the diversity in their biological characters. However, besides their flora- or strain-specific genes, those floras with closer relationship in the evolution also have conserved "backbone sequences", which reveal the marks of their origin and evolution, and these "backbone sequences" are just the basis of their elementary living abilities and common biological properties. Shigella is very closely related to E. coli in the origin and evolution, and may turn out to belong to the same genus. In this study, a microarray containing E. coli K-12 whole genome and Sf301 specific ORFs is used to investigate the genomic components of four Shigella strains. The results indicate that 16%-22% K-12 ORFs sequences are not detected in the genome of Shigella strains while the genome of Shigella contains at least 2800 conserved ORFs, which compose the common "backbone sequences". Advanced analysis indicated that the "backbone sequences" are the essential components in maintaining the normal physiological activities of intestinal bacteria. Furthermore, only 20% Sf301-specific ORFs exist in other strains simultaneously, which demonstrate the great genome heterogeneity and the genetic diversity among the strains.

  5. Integrative technology of massage manipulations in physical rehabilitation of students with backbone pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotelevskiy V.I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to analyze effectiveness of massage manipulations’ integrative technology in physical rehabilitation of higher educational establishments’ students with backbone pathology. Material: in the research 195 students of 19-20 years’ age participated. All students had periodical initial neurological symptoms of functional pathology and first stage osteochondrosis in different parts of backbone. We conducted a course of 10 sessions of therapeutic massage. Results: the sense of massage integrative technology is that every specialist shall have certain optimal set of skills and knowledge in technique of manipulation sessions of massage. Integrative technology of massage manipulations consists of psycho-corrective and manipulation parts. It considers psycho-somatic, mechanical and reflex rehabilitation aspects of patho-genesis of backbone functional disorders and vertebral osteochondrosis. Conclusions: depending on pathological process or backbone functional state of every person (peculiarities of his (her psycho-somatic status or, even, his (her bents. Individual approach in choice of strategy, tactic and methodological provisioning of massage session shall be used.

  6. Influence of structures of polymer backbones on cooperative photoreorientation behavior of p-cyanoazobenzene side chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Mina; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Ichimura, Kunihiro;

    2001-01-01

    Photoinduced orientational behavior of a polymethacrylate (CN6) and a polyester (p6a12) with p-cyanoazobenzene side chains was studied to reveal the structural effect of the liquid crystalline polymer backbones. Irradiation with linearly polarized W light resulted in the reorientation of the azob...

  7. Backbone dynamics of the EIAV-Tat protein from {sup 15}N relaxation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejchart, A.; Herrmann, F.; Roesch, P.; Sticht, H.; Willbold, D. [Bayreuth Univ., Bayreuth (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The work investigates the mobility of EIAV-Tat protein backbone by measuring the relaxation parameters of the {sup 15}N nitrogens. High degree of the flexibility, non-typical of rigid, well structured proteins was shown. 3 refs, 2 figs.

  8. Sequential insertion of three different organometallics into a versatile building block containing a PNA backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Malay; Gasser, Gilles; Bobukhov, Dmytro; Merz, Klaus; Shtemenko, Alexander V; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2010-06-28

    In the view of developing a synthetic route for the controlled insertion of distinct organometallic moieties into peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers, a proof-of-principle study of the chemoselective insertion of three different organometallics into a building block containing both a PNA backbone and an alkyne side-chain is presented in this study.

  9. Animals without Backbones: The Invertebrate Story. Grade Level 5-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Brian; Fuqua, Paul

    This guide, when used in tandem with the videotape "Animals Without Backbones," helps students learn about invertebrates. These materials promote hands-on discovery and learning. The guide is composed of six curriculum-based teaching units: (1) "Getting Started"; (2) "Porifera"; (3) "Cnidarians"; (4) "Worms"; (5) "Mollusks"; (6) "Arthropods"; and…

  10. Solvent-induced differentiation of protein backbone hydrogen bonds in calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranić, Nenad; Atanasova, Elena; Streiff, John H; Macura, Slobodan; Prendergast, Franklyn G

    2007-07-01

    In apo and holoCaM, almost half of the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) at the protein backbone expected from the corresponding NMR or X-ray structures were not detected by h3JNC' couplings. The paucity of the h3JNC' couplings was considered in terms of dynamic features of these structures. We examined a set of seven proteins and found that protein-backbone H-bonds form two groups according to the h3JNC' couplings measured in solution. H-bonds that have h3JNC' couplings above the threshold of 0.2 Hz show distance/angle correlation among the H-bond geometrical parameters, and appear to be supported by the backbone dynamics in solution. The other H-bonds have no such correlation; they populate the water-exposed and flexible regions of proteins, including many of the CaM helices. The observed differentiation in a dynamical behavior of backbone H-bonds in apo and holoCaM appears to be related to protein functions.

  11. Organization of Nucleotides in Different Environments and the Formation of Pre-Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Himbert; Mindy Chapman; Deamer, David W.; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2016-01-01

    RNA is a linear polymer of nucleotides linked by a ribose-phosphate backbone. Polymerization of nucleotides occurs in a condensation reaction in which phosphodiester bonds are formed. However, in the absence of enzymes and metabolism there has been no obvious way for RNA-like molecules to be produced and then encapsulated in cellular compartments. We investigated 5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and 5′-uridine monophosphate (UMP) molecules confined in multi-lamellar phospholipid bilayers, nan...

  12. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Pan [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu [School of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Chaowei [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  13. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  14. A 1.9 Å Crystal Structure of the HDV Ribozyme Precleavage Suggests both Lewis Acid and General Acid Mechanisms Contribute to Phosphodiester Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chadalavada, Durga M.; Chase, Elaine; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Golden, Barbara L. (Purdue); (Penn)

    2010-11-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme and HDV-like ribozymes are self-cleaving RNAs found throughout all kingdoms of life. These RNAs fold into a double-nested pseudoknot structure and cleave RNA, yielding 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic phosphate and 5{prime}-hydroxyl termini. The active site nucleotide C75 has a pK{sub a} shifted >2 pH units toward neutrality and has been implicated as a general acid/base in the cleavage reaction. An active site Mg{sup 2+} ion that helps activate the 2{prime}-hydroxyl for nucleophilic attack has been characterized biochemically; however, this ion has not been visualized in any previous structures. To create a snapshot of the ribozyme in a state poised for catalysis, we have crystallized and determined the structure of the HDV ribozyme bound to an inhibitor RNA containing a deoxynucleotide at the cleavage site. This structure includes the wild-type C75 nucleotide and Mg{sup 2+} ions, both of which are required for maximal ribozyme activity. This structure suggests that the position of C75 does not change during the cleavage reaction. A partially hydrated Mg{sup 2+} ion is also found within the active site where it interacts with a newly resolved G {center_dot} U reverse wobble. Although the inhibitor exhibits crystallographic disorder, we modeled the ribozyme-substrate complex using the conformation of the inhibitor strand observed in the hammerhead ribozyme. This model suggests that the pro-RP oxygen of the scissile phosphate and the 2{prime}-hydroxyl nucleophile are inner-sphere ligands to the active site Mg{sup 2+} ion. Thus, the HDV ribozyme may use a combination of metal ion Lewis acid and nucleobase general acid strategies to effect RNA cleavage.

  15. Alkane-modified short polyethyleneimine for siRNA delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Avi; Dahlman, James E; Sahay, Gaurav; Love, Kevin T; Jiang, Shan; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Levins, Christopher G; Wang, Yingxia; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a highly specific gene-silencing mechanism triggered by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Effective intracellular delivery requires the development of potent siRNA carriers. Here, we describe the synthesis and screening of a series of siRNA delivery materials. Short polyethyleneimine (PEI, Mw 600) was selected as a cationic backbone to which lipid tails were conjugated at various levels of saturation. In solution these polymer-lipid hybrids self-assemble to form nanoparticles capable of complexing siRNA. The complexes silence genes specifically and with low cytotoxicity. The efficiency of gene knockdown increased as the number of lipid tails conjugated to the PEI backbone increased. This is explained by reducing the binding affinity between the siRNA strands to the complex, thereby enabling siRNA release after cellular internalization. These results highlight the importance of complexation strength when designing siRNA delivery materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Aromatic Copolyamides with Anthrazoline Units in the Backbone: Synthesis, Characterization, Pervaporation Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina A. Polotskaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Copolyamides with anthrazoline units in the backbone (coPA were synthesized and dense nonporous films were prepared by solvent evaporation. Glass transition temperature, density, and fractional free volume were determined for the dense nonporous films composed of polyamide and two of its copolymers containing 20 and 30 mol % anthrazoline units in the backbone. Transport properties of the polymer films were estimated by sorption and pervaporation tests toward methanol, toluene, and their mixtures. An increase in anthrazoline fragments content leads to an increasing degree of methanol sorption but to a decreasing degree of toluene sorption. Pervaporation of a methanol–toluene mixture was studied over a wide range of feed concentration (10–90 wt % methanol. Maximal separation factor was observed for coPA-20 containing 20 mol % fragments with anthrazoline units; maximal total flux was observed for coPA-30 with the highest fractional free volume.

  17. Backbone cyclization of a recombinant cystine-knot peptide by engineered Sortase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Karen; Maurer, Till; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Coons, Mary; Franke, Yvonne; Hannoush, Rami N

    2014-11-28

    Cyclotides belong to the family of cyclic cystine-knot peptides and have shown promise as scaffolds for protein engineering and pharmacological modulation of cellular protein activity. Cyclotides are characterized by a cystine-knotted topology and a head-to-tail cyclic polypeptide backbone. While they are primarily produced in plants, cyclotides have also been obtained by chemical synthesis. However, there is still a need for methods to generate cyclotides in high yields to near homogeneity. Here, we report a biomimetic approach which utilizes an engineered version of the enzyme Sortase A to catalyze amide backbone cyclization of the recombinant cyclotide MCoTI-II, thereby allowing the efficient production of active homogenous species in high yields. Our results provide proof of concept for using engineered Sortase A to produce cyclic MCoTI-II and should be generally applicable to generating other cyclic cystine-knot peptides.

  18. Protein and peptide alkoxyl radicals can give rise to C-terminal decarboxylation and backbone cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1996-01-01

    when the free amino acid does not, and that hydroperoxides can be formed on both the backbone (at alpha-carbon positions) and the side chain. Decomposition of alpha-carbon hydroperoxides by Fe(II)-EDTA gives initially an alkoxyl radical via a pseudo-Fenton reaction; these radicals fragment rapidly...... with k estimated as > or = 10(7) s(-1). With N-acetyl amino acids and dipeptides beta-scission of an alkoxyl radical at the C-terminal alpha-carbon results in C-terminal decarboxylation, with release of CO2.-; the corresponding amides undergo deamidation with release of .C(O)NH2. Cyclic dipeptides...... undergo analogous reactions with cleavage of the alpha-carbon to carbonyl-carbon bond and formation of .C(O)NHR radicals. With substrates with large aliphatic side chains, radicals from side-chain hydroperoxides are also observed. C-terminal decarboxylation and backbone fragmentation are also observed...

  19. Smart-Grid Backbone Network Real-Time Delay Reduction via Integer Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagadrai, Sasikanth; Yilmaz, Muhittin; Valluri, Pratyush

    2016-08-01

    This research investigates an optimal delay-based virtual topology design using integer linear programming (ILP), which is applied to the current backbone networks such as smart-grid real-time communication systems. A network traffic matrix is applied and the corresponding virtual topology problem is solved using the ILP formulations that include a network delay-dependent objective function and lightpath routing, wavelength assignment, wavelength continuity, flow routing, and traffic loss constraints. The proposed optimization approach provides an efficient deterministic integration of intelligent sensing and decision making, and network learning features for superior smart grid operations by adaptively responding the time-varying network traffic data as well as operational constraints to maintain optimal virtual topologies. A representative optical backbone network has been utilized to demonstrate the proposed optimization framework whose simulation results indicate that superior smart-grid network performance can be achieved using commercial networks and integer programming.

  20. Analytical Model based on Green Criteria for Optical Backbone Network Interconnection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez Lopez, Jose Manuel; Riaz, M. Tahir; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2011-01-01

    to the evaluation of the environmental impact of networks from physical interconnection point of view. Networks deployment, usage, and disposal are analyzed as contributing elements to ICT’s (Information and Communications Technology) CO2 emissions. This paper presents an analytical model for evaluating...... and quantifying the CO2 emissions of optical backbone networks during their lifetime. The main goal of this work is to present the model and illustrate how to evaluate the physical interconnection of backbones from an environmental perspective. This model can be applied as a new type of decision support criteria...... for backbone’s interconnection, since minimization of CO2 emissions is becoming an important factor. In addition, two case studies are presented to illustrate the use and application of this model, and the need for de facto and international standards to reduce CO2 emissions through good network planning....

  1. On the purported "backbone fluorescence" in protein three-dimensional fluorescence spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolotti, Annalisa; Wong, Yin How; Korsholm, Stine S.

    2016-01-01

    as any traditional protein emission spectrum. The many papers in reputable journals erroneously reporting this peak assignment, contradicting 5 decades of prior knowledge, have led to the creation of a new dogma, where many authors and reviewers now take the purported backbone fluorescence......In this study, several proteins (albumin, lysozyme, insulin) and model compounds (Trp, Tyr, homopolypeptides) were used to demonstrate the origin of the fluorescence observed upon their excitation at 220-230 nm. In the last 10 years we have observed a worrying increase in the number of articles...... claiming that this fluorescence originates from the protein backbone, contrary to the established knowledge that UV protein emission is due to aromatic amino acids only. Overall, our data clearly demonstrate that the observed emission upon excitation at 220-230 nm is due to the excitation of Tyr and/or Trp...

  2. Energy Efficient Low-Cost Virtual Backbone Construction for Optimal Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohaideen Pitchai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many prominent applications in wireless sensor networks which require collected information have to be routed to end nodes in an efficient manner. In general, weighted connected dominating Sets (WCDS based routing is a promising approach for enhancing the routing efficiency in sensor networks. Backbone has been used extensively in routing. Here an efficient WCDS algorithm for constructing a virtual backbone with low total cost, hop spanning ratio, and minimum number of dominators is proposed. We report a systematic approach, which has three phases. Initial phase considers the issues of revoking a partial CDS tree from a complete CDS tree. Secondary and final phases make the design of the complete algorithm by considering the determination of dominators using an iteration process. Our findings reveal better performance than the existing algorithms in terms of total cost, hop spanning ratio, and number of dominators.

  3. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, George A.; Nelson, David A.; Molton, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Structure of Chiral Amino Acids and Their Corresponding Amino Alcohols with Camphoric Backbone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Hui-Fen; HUANG Wei; LI Hui-Hui; YAO Cheng

    2006-01-01

    Chiral amino acids and their corresponding amino alcohols bearing camphoric backbone were prepared from D-(+)-camphoric imide and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, ESI-MS, and NMR measurements. Among them, one intermediate (lS,3R)-3-amino-2,2,3-trimethyl cyclopentane-1-carboxylic acid hydrochloride 3 was structurally elucidated by X-ray diffraction techniques. Versatile intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions observed in its packing structure result in a two-dimensional framework.

  5. Inferential protein structure determination and refinement using fast, electronic structure based backbone amide chemical shift predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    This report covers the development of a new, fast method for calculating the backbone amide proton chemical shifts in proteins. Through quantum chemical calculations, structure-based forudsiglese the chemical shift for amidprotonen in protein has been parameterized. The parameters are then implemented in a computer program called Padawan. The program has since been implemented in protein folding program Phaistos, wherein the method andvendes to de novo folding of the protein structures and to refine the existing protein structures.

  6. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    2017-01-01

    for biosensorer,  der kan spore enten microRNA’er eller små molekyler, eksemplificeret ved S-adenosylmethionin (SAM). Slutteligt indikerer foreløbige resultater, at apta-FRET SAM sensoren kan udtrykkes i Escherichia coli-celler, hvilket viser, at RNA-origami arkitekturen muliggør cotransskriptionel foldning af......RNA-nanoteknologi feltet har demonstreret alsidigheden af RNA som byggemateriale, og rationelt designede RNA-nanostrukturer er blevet brugt i udviklingen af strukturelle platforme og dynamiske anordninger med anvendelser både in vitro og in vivo. Naturlige RNA-strukturer foldes cotransskriptionelt...... fra en enkelt RNA-streng, og udfører en lang række komplekse cellulære funktioner. Mange af funktionerne er blevet udnyttet til at skabe funktionelle RNA-baserede nanoapparater, men den nuværende litteratur giver kun få eksempler på cotranskriptionel produktion af RNA-nanostrukturer. I 2014...

  7. Prediction of backbone dihedral angles and protein secondary structure using support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirst Jonathan D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of the secondary structure of a protein is a critical step in the prediction of its tertiary structure and, potentially, its function. Moreover, the backbone dihedral angles, highly correlated with secondary structures, provide crucial information about the local three-dimensional structure. Results We predict independently both the secondary structure and the backbone dihedral angles and combine the results in a loop to enhance each prediction reciprocally. Support vector machines, a state-of-the-art supervised classification technique, achieve secondary structure predictive accuracy of 80% on a non-redundant set of 513 proteins, significantly higher than other methods on the same dataset. The dihedral angle space is divided into a number of regions using two unsupervised clustering techniques in order to predict the region in which a new residue belongs. The performance of our method is comparable to, and in some cases more accurate than, other multi-class dihedral prediction methods. Conclusions We have created an accurate predictor of backbone dihedral angles and secondary structure. Our method, called DISSPred, is available online at http://comp.chem.nottingham.ac.uk/disspred/.

  8. An Analytic Method for the Kinematics and Dynamics of a Multiple-Backbone Continuum Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuum robots have been the subject of extensive research due to their potential use in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we propose a new continuum robot with three backbones, and provide a unified analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a multiple‐backbone continuum robot. The robot achieves actuation by independently pulling three backbones to carry out a bending motion of two‐degrees‐of‐freedom (DoF. A three‐dimensional CAD model of the robot is built and the kinematical equation is established on the basis of the Euler‐Bernoulli beam. The dynamical model of the continuum robot is constructed by using the Lagrange method. The simulation and the experiment’s validation results show the continuum robot can exactly bend into pre‐set angles in the two‐dimensional space (the maximum error is less than 5% of the robot length and can make a circular motion in three‐dimensional space. The results demonstrate that the proposed analytic method for the kinematics and dynamics of a continuum robot is feasible.

  9. Protein backbone dynamics revealed by quasi spectral density function analysis of amide N-15 nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishima, R; Nagayama, K

    1995-03-14

    Spectral density functions J(0), J(omega N), and J(omega H + omega N) of individual amide N-15 nuclei in proteins were approximated by a quasi spectral density function (QSDF). Using this function, the backbone dynamics were analyzed for seven protein systems on which data have been published. We defined J(0; omega N) as the difference between the J(0) and the J(omega N) values, which describes motions slower than 50 (or 60) MHz, and J(omega N; omega H+N) as the difference between the J(omega N) and the J(omega H + omega N) values, which describes motions slower than 450 (or 540) MHz. The QSDF analysis can easily extract the J(0; omega N) of protein backbones, which have often some relation to biologically relevant reactions. Flexible N-terminal regions in eglin c and glucose permease IIA and a loop region in eglin c showed smaller values of both the J(0; omega N) and the J(omega N; omega H+N) as compared with the other regions, indicating increases in motions faster than nanosecond. The values of the J(0; omega N) for the backbone of the FK506 binding protein showed a large variation in the apoprotein but fell in a very narrow range after the binding of FK506. Characteristic increase or decrease in the values of J(0) and J(omega N) was observed in two or three residues located between secondary structures.

  10. Systematic determination of the mosaic structure of bacterial genomes: species backbone versus strain-specific loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrault-Jacquemard A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public databases now contain multitude of complete bacterial genomes, including several genomes of the same species. The available data offers new opportunities to address questions about bacterial genome evolution, a task that requires reliable fine comparison data of closely related genomes. Recent analyses have shown, using pairwise whole genome alignments, that it is possible to segment bacterial genomes into a common conserved backbone and strain-specific sequences called loops. Results Here, we generalize this approach and propose a strategy that allows systematic and non-biased genome segmentation based on multiple genome alignments. Segmentation analyses, as applied to 13 different bacterial species, confirmed the feasibility of our approach to discern the 'mosaic' organization of bacterial genomes. Segmentation results are available through a Web interface permitting functional analysis, extraction and visualization of the backbone/loops structure of documented genomes. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we performed a precise analysis of the mosaic organization of three E. coli strains and functional characterization of the loops. Conclusion The segmentation results including the backbone/loops structure of 13 bacterial species genomes are new and available for use by the scientific community at the URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  11. East vergent structure of Backbone Range: Insights from A-Lan-Yi area and sandbox modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. A.; Lu, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Taiwan, including Pingtung peninsula and Taitung, is the incipient oblique collision zone of Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. The Luzon volcanic arc converged toward Taiwan Island and formed Hengchun Ridge south offshore Taiwan. Thus, Taiwan mountain belt developed from north to south as the Backbone Range, so that we can infer the incipient feature structure from the topography and outcrop study of southern Taiwan. Our field survey of this study concentrated at the southeast coastline of Taiwan, also known as A-Lan-Yi Trail. According to previous study, the deformational structures such as faults and folds are consistent with regional kinematic processes, and the preserved transpression structure is the most important evidence of incipient collision. In this study, we use the sedimentary sequences of study area to trace the regional tectonics from north to south. Discovered structures in this area show the similar kinematic history as the eastern flank of Backbone Range, so that we suggest they are at the same series of a tectonic event. To complete the regional structure mapping in this accessible area, besides the field geological data, we also applied the LiDAR-derived DTM which is a 3D visualization technology to improve our topography information. In addition, we use the sandbox modeling to demonstrate the development of structures in the eastern flank of Backbone Range. After combining the results of field observation and regional structure mapping, this study provides a strong evidence of backthrusting and backfolding deformation during the incipient oblique collision stage.

  12. NMR backbone dynamics of VEK-30 bound to the human plasminogen kringle 2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Prorok, Mary; Castellino, Francis J

    2010-07-07

    To gain insights into the mechanisms for the tight and highly specific interaction of the kringle 2 domain of human plasminogen (K2(Pg)) with a 30-residue internal peptide (VEK-30) from a group A streptococcal M-like protein, the dynamic properties of free and bound K2(Pg) and VEK-30 were investigated using backbone amide (15)N-NMR relaxation measurements. Dynamic parameters, namely the generalized order parameter, S(2), the local correlation time, tau(e), and the conformational exchange contribution, R(ex), were obtained for this complex by Lipari-Szabo model-free analysis. The results show that VEK-30 displays distinctly different dynamic behavior as a consequence of binding to K2(Pg), manifest by decreased backbone flexibility, particularly at the binding region of the peptide. In contrast, the backbone dynamics parameters of K2(Pg) displayed similar patterns in the free and bound forms, but, nonetheless, showed interesting differences. Based on our previous structure-function studies of this interaction, we also made comparisons of the VEK-30/K2(Pg) dynamics results from different kringle modules complexed with small lysine analogs. The differences in dynamics observed for kringles with different ligands provide what we believe to be new insights into the interactions responsible for protein-ligand recognition and a better understanding of the differences in binding affinity and binding specificity of kringle domains with various ligands.

  13. RNA granules

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Paul; Kedersha, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic RNA granules in germ cells (polar and germinal granules), somatic cells (stress granules and processing bodies), and neurons (neuronal granules) have emerged as important players in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. RNA granules contain various ribosomal subunits, translation factors, decay enzymes, helicases, scaffold proteins, and RNA-binding proteins, and they control the localization, stability, and translation of their RNA cargo. We review the relationshi...

  14. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: RNA-directed virus replication Volume 1. Topics covered include: Replication of the poliovirus genome; Influenza viral RNA transcription and replication; and Relication of the reoviridal: Information derived from gene cloning and expression.

  15. Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Mauro, Ernesto

    Generation of RNA in abiotic conditions. Ernesto Di Mauro Dipartimento di Genetica Bi-ologia Molecolare, Universit` "Sapienza" Roma, Italy. a At least four conditions must be satisfied for the spontaneous generation of (pre)-genetic poly-mers: 1) availability of precursors that are activated enough to spontaneously polymerize. Preliminary studies showed that (a) nucleic bases and acyclonucleosides can be synthesized from formamide H2NCOH by simply heating with prebiotically available mineral catalysts [last reviewed in (1)], and that b) nucleic bases can be phosphorylated in every possible posi-tion [2'; 3'; 5'; cyclic 2',3'; cyclic 3',5' (2)]. The higher stability of the cyclic forms allows their accumulation. 2) A polymerization mechanism. A reaction showing the formation of RNA polymers starting from prebiotically plausible precursors (3',5' cyclic GMP and 3', 5'cyclic AMP) was recently reported (3). Polymerization in these conditions is thermodynamically up-hill and an equilibrium is attained that limits the maximum length of the polymer produced to about 40 nucleotides for polyG and 100 nucleotides for polyA. 3) Ligation of the synthesized oligomers. If this type of reaction could occur according to a terminal-joining mechanism and could generate canonical 3',5' phosphodiester bonds, exponential growth would be obtained of the generated oligomers. This type of reaction has been reported (4) , limited to homogeneous polyA sequences and leading to the production of polyA dimers and tetramers. What is still missing are: 4) mechanisms that provide the proof of principle for the generation of sequence complexity. We will show evidence for two mechanisms providing this proof of principle for simple complementary sequences. Namely: abiotic sequence complementary-driven terminal ligation and sequence-complementary terminal growth. In conclusion: all the steps leading to the generation of RNA in abiotic conditions are satisfied. (1) R Saladino, C Crestini, F

  16. RNA epigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Nian; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian messenger and long non-coding RNA contain tens of thousands of post-transcriptional chemical modifications. Among these, the N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) modification is the most abundant and can be removed by specific mammalian enzymes. M6A modification is recognized by families of RNA binding proteins that affect many aspects of mRNA function. mRNA/lncRNA modification represents another layer of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, analogous to DNA methylation and histone modifi...

  17. PLGA microspheres encapsulating siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Giuseppe; Salzano, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) represents a new and powerful approach to suppress the expression of pathologically genes. However, biopharmaceutical drawbacks, such as short half-life, poor cellular uptake, and unspecific distribution into the body, hamper the development of siRNA-based therapeutics. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide), (PLGA) microspheres can be a useful tool to overcome these issues. siRNA can be encapsulated into the PLGA microspheres, which protects the loaded nucleic acid against the enzymatic degradation. Moreover, PLGA microspheres can be injected directly into the action site, where the siRNA can be released in controlled manner, thus avoiding the need of frequent invasive administrations. The complete biodegradability of PLGA to monomers easily metabolized by the body, and its approval by FDA and EMA for parenteral administration, assure the safety of this copolymer and do not require the removal of the device after the complete drug release. In chapter, a basic protocol for the preparation of PLGA microspheres encapsulating siRNA is described. This protocol is based on a double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique, a well known and easy to reproduce method. This specific protocol has been developed to encapsulate a siRNA anti-TNFα in PLGA microspheres, and it has been designed and optimized to achieve high siRNA encapsulation efficiency and slow siRNA release in vitro. However, it can be extended also to other siRNA as well as other RNA or DNA-based oligonucleotides (miRNA, antisense, decoy, etc.). Depending on the applications, chemical modifications of the backbone and site-specific modification within the siRNA sequences could be required.

  18. The main early and late promoters of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 form unstable open complexes with sigma A-RNA polymerase that are stabilized by DNA supercoiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, F; Nuez, B; Mencía, M; Salas, M

    1993-02-25

    Most Escherichia coli promoters studied so far form stable open complexes with sigma 70-RNA polymerase which have relatively long half-lives and, therefore, are resistant to a competitor challenge. A few exceptions are nevertheless known. The analysis of a number of promoters in Bacillus subtilis has suggested that the instability of open complexes formed by the vegetative sigma A-RNA polymerase may be a more general phenomenon than in Escherichia coli. We show that the main early and late promoters from the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 form unstable open complexes that are stabilized either by the formation of the first phosphodiester bond between the initiating nucleoside triphosphates or by DNA supercoiling. The functional characteristics of these two strong promoters suggest that they are not optimized for a tight and stable RNA polymerase binding. Their high activity is probably the consequence of the efficiency of further steps leading to the formation of an elongation complex.

  19. Synthesis of novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkages between the hydrocarbon chains and pseudoglyceryl backbone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Bhattacharya; Saubhik Haldar

    2002-06-01

    Five novel cationic lipids with fully or partially non-scissile linkage regions between the pseudoglyceryl backbone and the hydrocarbon chains have been synthesized. The membrane-forming properties of these new lipids are briefly presented.

  20. Synthesis and Molecular Recognition of Novel Cyclic Pseudopeptides Containing L-Glutamic Acid or L-Aspartic Acid Backbones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao王涛; HUANG Xiao-Yi黄小毅; XIA Chuan-Qin夏传琴; YU Xiao-Qi余孝其; XIE Ru-Gang谢如刚

    2004-01-01

    Novel cyclic pseudopeptides containing L-glutamic acid or L-aspartic acid backbone structures were efficiently synthesized and characterized. Their chiral recognition properties for L- and D-amino acid methyl ester hydrochloride were discussed also.

  1. Oxidation Responsive Polymers with a Triggered Degradation via Arylboronate Self-Immolative Motifs on a Polyphosphazene Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation responsive polymers with triggered degradation pathways have been prepared via attachment of self-immolative moieties onto a hydrolytically unstable polyphosphazene backbone. After controlled main-chain growth, postpolymerization functionalization allows the preparation of hydrolytically stable poly(organo)phosphazenes decorated with a phenylboronic ester caging group. In oxidative environments, triggered cleavage of the caging group is followed by self-immolation, exposing the unstable glycine-substituted polyphosphazene which subsequently undergoes to backbone degradation to low-molecular weight molecules. As well as giving mechanistic insights, detailed GPC and 1H and 31P NMR analysis reveal the polymers to be stable in aqueous solutions, but show a selective, fast degradation upon exposure to hydrogen peroxide containing solutions. Since the post-polymerization functionalization route allows simple access to polymer backbones with a broad range of molecular weights, the approach of using the inorganic backbone as a platform significantly expands the toolbox of polymers capable of stimuli-responsive degradation.

  2. Combinatorial analysis of interacting RNA molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Thomas J X

    2010-01-01

    Recently several minimum free energy (MFE) folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Their folding targets are interaction structures, that can be represented as diagrams with two backbones drawn horizontally on top of each other such that (1) intramolecular and intermolecular bonds are noncrossing and (2) there is no "zig-zag" configuration. This paper studies joint structures with arc-length at least four in which both, interior and exterior stack-lengths are at least two (no isolated arcs). The key idea in this paper is to consider a new type of shape, based on which joint structures can be derived via symbolic enumeration. Our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures with surprisingly small exponential growth rates. They are of interest in the context of designing prediction algorithms for RNA-RNA interactions.

  3. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    in diabetes resulting from the diabetic state, a dysfunction that includes increased production of hydrogen peroxide. We suggest that the intracellular RNA oxidation is compartmentalized from the traditional biomarkers in the extracellular compartment, and therefore provides independent prognostic value...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  4. Exposing Hidden Alternative Backbone Conformations in X-ray Crystallography Using qFit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Daniel A; Fraser, James S; van den Bedem, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP) to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the "flap" regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Overall, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.

  5. Exposing Hidden Alternative Backbone Conformations in X-ray Crystallography Using qFit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Keedy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins must move between different conformations of their native ensemble to perform their functions. Crystal structures obtained from high-resolution X-ray diffraction data reflect this heterogeneity as a spatial and temporal conformational average. Although movement between natively populated alternative conformations can be critical for characterizing molecular mechanisms, it is challenging to identify these conformations within electron density maps. Alternative side chain conformations are generally well separated into distinct rotameric conformations, but alternative backbone conformations can overlap at several atomic positions. Our model building program qFit uses mixed integer quadratic programming (MIQP to evaluate an extremely large number of combinations of sidechain conformers and backbone fragments to locally explain the electron density. Here, we describe two major modeling enhancements to qFit: peptide flips and alternative glycine conformations. We find that peptide flips fall into four stereotypical clusters and are enriched in glycine residues at the n+1 position. The potential for insights uncovered by new peptide flips and glycine conformations is exemplified by HIV protease, where different inhibitors are associated with peptide flips in the "flap" regions adjacent to the inhibitor binding site. Our results paint a picture of peptide flips as conformational switches, often enabled by glycine flexibility, that result in dramatic local rearrangements. Our results furthermore demonstrate the power of large-scale computational analysis to provide new insights into conformational heterogeneity. Overall, improved modeling of backbone heterogeneity with high-resolution X-ray data will connect dynamics to the structure-function relationship and help drive new design strategies for inhibitors of biomedically important systems.

  6. Limits on variations in protein backbone dynamics from precise measurements of scalar couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögeli, Beat; Ying, Jinfa; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2007-08-01

    3JHN,Halpha, 3JHN,Cbeta, and 3JHN,C' couplings, all related to the backbone torsion angle phi, were measured for the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G, or GB3. Measurements were carried out using both previously published methods and novel sequences based on the multiple-quantum principle, which limit attenuation of experimental couplings caused by finite lifetimes of the spin states of passive spins. High reproducibility between the multiple-quantum and conventional approaches confirms the accuracy of the measurements. With few exceptions, close agreement between 3JHN,Halpha, 3JHN,Cbeta, and 3JHN,C' and values predicted by their respective Karplus equations is observed. For the three types of couplings, up to 20% better agreement is obtained when fitting the experimental couplings to a dynamic ensemble NMR structure, which has a phi angle root-mean-square spread of 9 +/- 4 degrees and was previously calculated on the basis of a very extensive set of residual dipolar couplings, than for any single static NMR structure. Fits of 3J couplings to a 1.1-A X-ray structure, with hydrogens added in idealized positions, are 40-90% worse. Approximately half of the improvement when fitting to the NMR structures relates to the amide proton deviating from its idealized, in-peptide-plane position, indicating that the positioning of hydrogens relative to the backbone atoms is one of the factors limiting the accuracy at which the backbone torsion angle phi can be extracted from 3J couplings. Introducing an additional, residue-specific variable for the amplitude of phi angle fluctuations does not yield a statistically significant improvement when fitting to a set of dynamic Karplus curves, pointing to a homogeneous behavior of these amplitudes.

  7. ngs_backbone: a pipeline for read cleaning, mapping and SNP calling using Next Generation Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cañizares Joaquin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possibilities offered by next generation sequencing (NGS platforms are revolutionizing biotechnological laboratories. Moreover, the combination of NGS sequencing and affordable high-throughput genotyping technologies is facilitating the rapid discovery and use of SNPs in non-model species. However, this abundance of sequences and polymorphisms creates new software needs. To fulfill these needs, we have developed a powerful, yet easy-to-use application. Results The ngs_backbone software is a parallel pipeline capable of analyzing Sanger, 454, Illumina and SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection sequence reads. Its main supported analyses are: read cleaning, transcriptome assembly and annotation, read mapping and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP calling and selection. In order to build a truly useful tool, the software development was paired with a laboratory experiment. All public tomato Sanger EST reads plus 14.2 million Illumina reads were employed to test the tool and predict polymorphism in tomato. The cleaned reads were mapped to the SGN tomato transcriptome obtaining a coverage of 4.2 for Sanger and 8.5 for Illumina. 23,360 single nucleotide variations (SNVs were predicted. A total of 76 SNVs were experimentally validated, and 85% were found to be real. Conclusions ngs_backbone is a new software package capable of analyzing sequences produced by NGS technologies and predicting SNVs with great accuracy. In our tomato example, we created a highly polymorphic collection of SNVs that will be a useful resource for tomato researchers and breeders. The software developed along with its documentation is freely available under the AGPL license and can be downloaded from http://bioinf.comav.upv.es/ngs_backbone/ or http://github.com/JoseBlanca/franklin.

  8. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2017-01-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature ( T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature ( T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  9. SEVA Linkers: A Versatile and Automatable DNA Backbone Exchange Standard for Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Rennig, Maja

    2016-01-01

    DNA vectors serve to maintain and select recombinant DNA in cell factories, and as design complexity increases, there is a greater need for well-characterized parts and methods for their assembly. Standards in synthetic biology are top priority, but standardizing molecular cloning contrasts...... flexibility, and different researchers prefer and master different molecular technologies. Here, we describe a new, highly versatile and automatable standard “SEVA linkers” for vector exchange. SEVA linkers enable backbone swapping with 20 combinations of classical enzymatic restriction/ligation, Gibson...... to the synthetic biology community....

  10. Synthesis and properties of carbohydrate-phosphate backbone-modified oligonucleotide analogues and nucleic acid mimetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramova, Tatyana V; Silnikov, Vladimir N [Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-31

    Advances in the synthesis of oligo(deoxy)ribonucleotide analogues and nucleic acid mimetics made in the last decade are summarized. Attention is focused on new methods for the synthesis of derivatives with a modified ribose-phosphate backbone (phosphorothioate, boranophosphate, and nucleoside phosphonate derivatives) and derivatives devoid of the phosphate group. Among nucleic acid mimetics, conformationally restricted modified peptide nucleic acids, including those bearing a negative or positive charge, and morpholino oligomers are considered. Advantages and drawbacks of the main types of analogues as regards the complexity of the synthesis and the possibility of their application as antisense agents or reagents for hybridization analysis are compared.

  11. Synthesis and properties of carbohydrate-phosphate backbone-modified oligonucleotide analogues and nucleic acid mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramova, Tatyana V.; Silnikov, Vladimir N.

    2011-05-01

    Advances in the synthesis of oligo(deoxy)ribonucleotide analogues and nucleic acid mimetics made in the last decade are summarized. Attention is focused on new methods for the synthesis of derivatives with a modified ribose-phosphate backbone (phosphorothioate, boranophosphate, and nucleoside phosphonate derivatives) and derivatives devoid of the phosphate group. Among nucleic acid mimetics, conformationally restricted modified peptide nucleic acids, including those bearing a negative or positive charge, and morpholino oligomers are considered. Advantages and drawbacks of the main types of analogues as regards the complexity of the synthesis and the possibility of their application as antisense agents or reagents for hybridization analysis are compared.

  12. Relative specificities of water and ammonia losses from backbone fragments in collision-activated dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savitski, Mikhail M; Kjeldsen, Frank; Nielsen, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a database containing over 20,000 high-resolution collision-activation mass spectra of tryptic peptide dications was employed to study the relative specificity of neutral losses from backbone fragments. The high resolution of the FTMS instrument allowed for the first time the first...... isotope of the water loss and the monoisotope of the ammonia loss to be distinguished. Contrary to a popular belief, water losses from y' ions are not specific enough to rely upon for detecting the presence of amino acids with oxygen in the side chains. At the same time, ammonia loss from b ions...

  13. Backbone tuning in indenylidene–ruthenium complexes bearing an unsaturated N-heterocyclic carbene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César A. Urbina-Blanco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The steric and electronic influence of backbone substitution in IMes-based (IMes = 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenylimidazol-2-ylidene N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC was probed by synthesizing the [RhCl(CO2(NHC] series of complexes to quantify experimentally the Tolman electronic parameter (electronic and the percent buried volume (%Vbur, steric parameters. The corresponding ruthenium–indenylidene complexes were also synthesized and tested in benchmark metathesis transformations to establish possible correlations between reactivity and NHC electronic and steric parameters.

  14. Sulfation and Cation Effects on the Conformational Properties of the Glycan Backbone of Chondroitin Sulfate Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one of several glycosaminoglycans that are major components of proteoglycans. A linear polymer consisting of repeats of the disaccharide -4GlcAβ1-3GalNAcβ1-, CS undergoes differential sulfation resulting in five unique sulfation patterns. Because of the dimer repeat, the CS glycosidic “backbone” has two distinct sets of conformational degrees of freedom defined by pairs of dihedral angles: (ϕ1, ψ1) about the β1-3 glycosidic linkage and (ϕ2, ψ2) about the β1-4 glycosidic linkage. Differential sulfation and the possibility of cation binding, combined with the conformational flexibility and biological diversity of CS, complicate experimental efforts to understand CS three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution. Therefore, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations with Adaptive Biasing Force sampling of the CS backbone were applied to obtain high resolution, high precision free energies of CS disaccharides as a function of all possible backbone geometries. All ten disaccharides (β1-3 vs. β1-4 linkage x five different sulfation patterns) were studied; additionally, ion effects were investigated by considering each disaccharide in the presence of either neutralizing sodium or calcium cations. GlcAβ1-3GalNAc disaccharides have a single, broad, thermodynamically important free-energy minimum whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcA disaccharides have two such minima. Calcium cations but not sodium cations bind to the disaccharides, and binding is primarily to the GlcA –COO− moiety as opposed to sulfate groups. This binding alters the glycan backbone thermodynamics in instances where a calcium cation bound to –COO− can act to bridge and stabilize an interaction with an adjacent sulfate group, whereas, in the absence of this cation, the proximity of a sulfate group to –COO− results in two like charges being both desolvated and placed adjacent to each other and is found to be destabilizing. In addition to providing

  15. Synthesis of Aminophosphine Ligands with Binaphthyl Backbones for Silver(I)-catalyzed Enantioselective Allylation of Benzaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Yi(王以); JI,Bao-Ming(吉保明); DING,Kui-Ling(丁奎岭)

    2002-01-01

    A series of aminophosphine ligands was synthesized from 2amino-2′-hydroxy-1,1′-binaphthyl (NOBIN). Their asymmetric induction efficiency was examined for silver(I)catalyzed enantioselective allylation reaction of benzaldehyde with allyltributyltin.Under the optimized reaction conditions,quantitative yield as well as moderate ee value (54.5% ee)of product was achieved by the catalysis with silver(I)/3 complex. The effects of the binaphthyl backbone and the substituted situated at chelating N, Patoms on enantioselectivity of the reaction were also discussed.

  16. RosettaRemodel: a generalized framework for flexible backbone protein design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ssu Huang

    Full Text Available We describe RosettaRemodel, a generalized framework for flexible protein design that provides a versatile and convenient interface to the Rosetta modeling suite. RosettaRemodel employs a unified interface, called a blueprint, which allows detailed control over many aspects of flexible backbone protein design calculations. RosettaRemodel allows the construction and elaboration of customized protocols for a wide range of design problems ranging from loop insertion and deletion, disulfide engineering, domain assembly, loop remodeling, motif grafting, symmetrical units, to de novo structure modeling.

  17. Multifaceted enrichment analysis of RNA-RNA crosstalk reveals cooperating micro-societies in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Fusilli, Caterina; Capocefalo, Daniele; Panza, Anna; Biagini, Tommaso; Castellana, Stefano; Gentile, Annamaria; De Cata, Angelo; Palumbo, Orazio; Stallone, Raffaella; Rubino, Rosa; Carella, Massimo; Piepoli, Ada

    2016-05-19

    Alterations in the balance of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles contribute to the onset and development of colorectal cancer. The regulatory functions of individual miRNA-gene pairs are widely acknowledged, but group effects are largely unexplored. We performed an integrative analysis of mRNA-miRNA and miRNA-miRNA interactions using high-throughput mRNA and miRNA expression profiles obtained from matched specimens of human colorectal cancer tissue and adjacent non-tumorous mucosa. This investigation resulted in a hypernetwork-based model, whose functional backbone was fulfilled by tight micro-societies of miRNAs. These proved to modulate several genes that are known to control a set of significantly enriched cancer-enhancer and cancer-protection biological processes, and that an array of upstream regulatory analyses demonstrated to be dependent on miR-145, a cell cycle and MAPK signaling cascade master regulator. In conclusion, we reveal miRNA-gene clusters and gene families with close functional relationships and highlight the role of miR-145 as potent upstream regulator of a complex RNA-RNA crosstalk, which mechanistically modulates several signaling pathways and regulatory circuits that when deranged are relevant to the changes occurring in colorectal carcinogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Design, Construction, and Validation of Artificial MicroRNA Vectors Using Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Expression System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Basdeo; Chi, Ming; Han, Dianwei; Tang, Haifeng; Tang, Guiliang; Xiang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology utilizes microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis pathway to produce artificially selected small RNAs using miRNA gene backbone. It provides a feasible strategy for inducing loss of gene function, and has been applied in functional genomics study, improvement of crop quality and plant virus disease resistance. A big challenge in amiRNA applications is the unpredictability of silencing efficacy of the designed amiRNAs and not all constructed amiRNA candidates would be expressed effectively in plant cells. We and others found that high efficiency and specificity in RNA silencing can be achieved by designing amiRNAs with perfect or almost perfect sequence complementarity to their targets. In addition, we recently demonstrated that Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression system can be used to validate amiRNA constructs, which provides a simple, rapid and effective method to select highly expressible amiRNA candidates for stable genetic transformation. Here, we describe the methods for design of amiRNA candidates with perfect or almost perfect base-pairing to the target gene or gene groups, incorporation of amiRNA candidates in miR168a gene backbone by one step inverse PCR amplification, construction of plant amiRNA expression vectors, and assay of transient expression of amiRNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana through agro-infiltration, small RNA extraction, and amiRNA Northern blot.

  19. Redox-controlled backbone dynamics of human cytochrome c revealed by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Koichi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kamiya, Masakatsu [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kawano, Keiichi [Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} The dynamic parameters for the backbone dynamics in Cyt c were determined. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme. {yields} The backbone mobility of Cyt c is more restricted upon the oxidation of the heme. {yields} The redox-dependent dynamics are shown in the backbone of Cyt c. {yields} The backbone dynamics of Cyt c would regulate the electron transfer from Cyt c. -- Abstract: Redox-controlled backbone dynamics in cytochrome c (Cyt c) were revealed by 2D {sup 15}N NMR relaxation experiments. {sup 15}N T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values and {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N NOEs of uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled reduced and oxidized Cyt c were measured, and the generalized order parameters (S{sup 2}), the effective correlation time for internal motion ({tau}{sub e}), the {sup 15}N exchange broadening contributions (R{sub ex}) for each residue, and the overall correlation time ({tau}{sub m}) were estimated by model-free dynamics formalism. These dynamic parameters clearly showed that the backbone dynamics of Cyt c are highly restricted due to the covalently bound heme that functions as the stable hydrophobic core. Upon oxidation of the heme iron in Cyt c, the average S{sup 2} value was increased from 0.88 {+-} 0.01 to 0.92 {+-} 0.01, demonstrating that the mobility of the backbone is further restricted in the oxidized form. Such increases in the S{sup 2} values were more prominent in the loop regions, including amino acid residues near the thioether bonds to the heme moiety and positively charged region around Lys87. Both of the regions are supposed to form the interaction site for cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) and the electron pathway from Cyt c to CcO. The redox-dependent mobility of the backbone in the interaction site for the electron transfer to CcO suggests an electron transfer mechanism regulated by the backbone dynamics in the Cyt c-CcO system.

  20. Enumeration of RNA complexes via random matrix theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Chekhov, Leonid O.; Penner, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    molecules and hydrogen bonds in a given complex. The free energies of this matrix model are computed using the so-called topological recursion, which is a powerful new formalism arising from random matrix theory. These numbers of RNA complexes also have profound meaning in mathematics: they provide...... the number of chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones and chords as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces of fixed topological type....

  1. RNA. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Marie Z; Kruger, Robert P; Rivas, Fabiola; Smith, Orla; Szewczak, Lara

    2009-02-20

    Two scientists walk into a bar. After a pint and an exchange of pleasantries, one says to the other, "Where do you come from? Scientifically, I mean." The queried scientist responds, "Out of the RNA world." "Don't we all," the asker responds chuckling. Fifteen years ago, the joke would have been made with a nod to the notion that life arose from an RNA-based precursor, the so-called "RNA world." Yet had this conversation happened last week, the scientists would also be grinning in appreciation of the extent to which contemporary cellular biology is steeped in all things RNA. Ours is truly an RNA world.In this year's special review issue, the Cell editorial team has brought together articles focused on RNA in the modern world, providing perspectives on classical and emerging areas of inquiry. We extend our thanks to the many distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make the issue informative, thought-provoking, and timely. We hope that this collection of articles, written as we stand on the verge of a new wave of RNA biology, edifies and inspires by revealing the inner workings of these versatile molecules and by highlighting the next key questions that need to be addressed as we strive to understand the full functional scope of RNA in cells.

  2. Acceleration of protein backbone NMR assignment by combinatorial labeling: Application to a small molecule binding study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Christopher; Löhr, Frank; Schwarz, Daniel; Dötsch, Volker

    2017-05-01

    Selective labeling with stable isotopes has long been recognized as a valuable tool in protein NMR to alleviate signal overlap and sensitivity limitations. In this study, combinatorial (15) N-, (13) C(α) -, and (13) C'-selective labeling has been used during the backbone assignment of human cyclophilin D to explore binding of an inhibitor molecule. Using a cell-free expression system, a scheme that involves (15) N, 1-(13) C, 2-(13) C, fully (15) N/(13) C, and unlabeled amino acids was optimized to gain a maximum of assignment information from three samples. This scheme was combined with time-shared triple-resonance NMR experiments, which allows a fast and efficient backbone assignment by giving the unambiguous assignment of unique amino acid pairs in the protein, the identity of ambiguous pairs and information about all 19 non-proline amino acid types. It is therefore well suited for binding studies where de novo assignments of amide (1) H and (15) N resonances need to be obtained, even in cases where sensitivity is the limiting factor. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A fusion networking model for smart grid power distribution backbone communication network based on PTN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In current communication network for distribution in Chinese power grid systems, the fiber communication backbone network for distribution and TD-LTE power private wireless backhaul network of power grid are both bearing by the SDH optical transmission network, which also carries the communication network of transformer substation and main electric. As the data traffic of the distribution communication and TD-LTE power private wireless network grow rapidly in recent years, it will have a big impact with the SDH network’s bearing capacity which is mainly used for main electric communication in high security level. This paper presents a fusion networking model which use a multiple-layer PTN network as the unified bearing of the TD-LTE power private wireless backhaul network and fiber communication backbone network for distribution. Network dataflow analysis shows that this model can greatly reduce the capacity pressure of the traditional SDH network as well as ensure the reliability of the transmission of the communication network for distribution and TD-LTE power private wireless network.

  4. Optimization of Protein Backbone Dihedral Angles by Means of Hamiltonian Reweighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margreitter, Christian; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-09-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations depend critically on the accuracy of the underlying force fields in properly representing biomolecules. Hence, it is crucial to validate the force-field parameter sets in this respect. In the context of the GROMOS force field, this is usually achieved by comparing simulation data to experimental observables for small molecules. In this study, we develop new amino acid backbone dihedral angle potential energy parameters based on the widely used 54A7 parameter set by matching to experimental J values and secondary structure propensity scales. In order to find the most appropriate backbone parameters, close to 100 000 different combinations of parameters have been screened. However, since the sheer number of combinations considered prohibits actual molecular dynamics simulations for each of them, we instead predicted the values for every combination using Hamiltonian reweighting. While the original 54A7 parameter set fails to reproduce the experimental data, we are able to provide parameters that match significantly better. However, to ensure applicability in the context of larger peptides and full proteins, further studies have to be undertaken.

  5. On the role of thermal backbone fluctuations in myoglobin ligand gate dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Peng, Xubiao

    2012-01-01

    We construct an energy function that describes the crystallographic structure of spermwhale myoglobin backbone. As a model in our construction, we use the Protein Data Bank entry 1ABS that has been measured at liquid helium temperature. Consequently the thermal B-factor fluctuations are very small, which is an advantage in our construction. The energy function that we utilize resembles that of the discrete non-linear Schrodinger equation. Likewise, ours supports solitons as local minimum energy configurations. We describe the 1ABS backbone in terms of solitons with a precision that deviates from 1ABS by an average root-mean-square distance, which is less than the experimentally observed Debye-Waller B-factor fluctuation distance. We then subject the multisoliton solution to extensive numerical heating and cooling experiments, over a very wide range of temperatures. We concentrate in particular to temperatures above 300K and below the theta-point unfolding temperature, which is around 348K. We confirm that the...

  6. Automatic assignment of protein backbone resonances by direct spectrum inspection in targeted acquisition of NMR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Leo E; Masse, James E; Jaravine, Victor; Orekhov, Vladislav; Pervushin, Konstantin

    2008-10-01

    The necessity to acquire large multidimensional datasets, a basis for assignment of NMR resonances, results in long data acquisition times during which substantial degradation of a protein sample might occur. Here we propose a method applicable for such a protein for automatic assignment of backbone resonances by direct inspection of multidimensional NMR spectra. In order to establish an optimal balance between completeness of resonance assignment and losses of cross-peaks due to dynamic processes/degradation of protein, assignment of backbone resonances is set as a stirring criterion for dynamically controlled targeted nonlinear NMR data acquisition. The result is demonstrated with the 12 kDa (13)C,(15) N-labeled apo-form of heme chaperone protein CcmE, where hydrolytic cleavage of 29 C-terminal amino acids is detected. For this protein, 90 and 98% of manually assignable resonances are automatically assigned within 10 and 40 h of nonlinear sampling of five 3D NMR spectra, respectively, instead of 600 h needed to complete the full time domain grid. In addition, resonances stemming from degradation products are identified. This study indicates that automatic resonance assignment might serve as a guiding criterion for optimal run-time allocation of NMR resources in applications to proteins prone to degradation.

  7. Automatic assignment of protein backbone resonances by direct spectrum inspection in targeted acquisition of NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Leo E. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Biological Sciences (Singapore); Masse, James E. [National Institutes of Health (United States); Jaravine, Victor [J. W. Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Orekhov, Vladislav [Gothenburg University, Swedish NMR Centre (Sweden); Pervushin, Konstantin [Nanyang Technological University, School of Biological Sciences (Singapore)], E-mail: kpervushin@ntu.edu.sg

    2008-10-15

    The necessity to acquire large multidimensional datasets, a basis for assignment of NMR resonances, results in long data acquisition times during which substantial degradation of a protein sample might occur. Here we propose a method applicable for such a protein for automatic assignment of backbone resonances by direct inspection of multidimensional NMR spectra. In order to establish an optimal balance between completeness of resonance assignment and losses of cross-peaks due to dynamic processes/degradation of protein, assignment of backbone resonances is set as a stirring criterion for dynamically controlled targeted nonlinear NMR data acquisition. The result is demonstrated with the 12 kDa {sup 13}C,{sup 15} N-labeled apo-form of heme chaperone protein CcmE, where hydrolytic cleavage of 29 C-terminal amino acids is detected. For this protein, 90 and 98% of manually assignable resonances are automatically assigned within 10 and 40 h of nonlinear sampling of five 3D NMR spectra, respectively, instead of 600 h needed to complete the full time domain grid. In addition, resonances stemming from degradation products are identified. This study indicates that automatic resonance assignment might serve as a guiding criterion for optimal run-time allocation of NMR resources in applications to proteins prone to degradation.

  8. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Roberta; Malito, Enrico; Lazzarin, Maddalena; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Castagnetti, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J; Margarit, Immaculada; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b) at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468) encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  9. Structure and assembly of group B streptococcus pilus 2b backbone protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Cozzi

    Full Text Available Group B Streptococcus (GBS is a major cause of invasive disease in infants. Like other Gram-positive bacteria, GBS uses a sortase C-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism to generate cell surface pili from backbone and ancillary pilin precursor substrates. The three pilus types identified in GBS contain structural subunits that are highly immunogenic and are promising candidates for the development of a broadly-protective vaccine. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the backbone protein of pilus 2b (BP-2b at 1.06Å resolution. The structure reveals a classical IgG-like fold typical of the pilin subunits of other Gram-positive bacteria. The crystallized portion of the protein (residues 185-468 encompasses domains D2 and D3 that together confer high stability to the protein due to the presence of an internal isopeptide bond within each domain. The D2+D3 region, lacking the N-terminal D1 domain, was as potent as the entire protein in conferring protection against GBS challenge in a well-established mouse model. By site-directed mutagenesis and complementation studies in GBS knock-out strains we identified the residues and motives essential for assembly of the BP-2b monomers into high-molecular weight complexes, thus providing new insights into pilus 2b polymerization.

  10. Protonation–deprotonation of the glycine backbone as followed by Raman scattering and multiconformational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Belén; Pflüger, Fernando [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France); Kruglik, Sergei G. [Laboratoire Jean Perrin, FRE 3231, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), Case courrier 138, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ghomi, Mahmoud, E-mail: mahmoud.ghomi@univ-paris13.fr [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: • New pH-dependent Raman spectra in the middle wavenumber region (1800-300 cm{sup −1}). • New quantum mechanical calculations for exploring the Gly conformational landscape. • Construction of muticonformation based theoretical Raman spectra. - Abstract: Because of the absence of the side chain in its chemical structure and its well defined Raman spectra, glycine was selected here to follow its backbone protonation–deprotonation. The scan of the recorded spectra in the 1800–300 cm{sup −1} region led us to assign those obtained at pH 1, 6 and 12 to the cationic, zwitterionic and anionic species, respectively. These data complete well those previously published by Bykov et al. (2008) [16] devoted to the high wavenumber Raman spectra (>2500 cm{sup −1}). To reinforce our discussion, DFT calculations were carried out on the clusters of glycine + 5H{sub 2}O, mimicking reasonably the first hydration shell of the amino acid. Geometry optimization of 141 initial clusters, reflecting plausible combinations of the backbone torsion angles, allowed exploration of the conformational features, as well as construction of the theoretical Raman spectra by considering the most stable clusters containing each glycine species.

  11. Cellulose nanofiber backboned Prussian blue nanoparticles as powerful adsorbents for the selective elimination of radioactive cesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipin, Adavan Kiliyankil; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Sakata, Ichiro; Isogai, Akira; Endo, Morinobu; Li, Mingda; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-11-01

    On 11 March 2011, the day of the unforgettable disaster of the 9 magnitude Tohoku earthquake and quickly followed by the devastating Tsunami, a damageable amount of radionuclides had dispersed from the Fukushima Daiichi’s damaged nuclear reactors. Decontamination of the dispersed radionuclides from seawater and soil, due to the huge amounts of coexisting ions with competitive functionalities, has been the topmost difficulty. Ferric hexacyanoferrate, also known as Prussian blue (PB), has been the most powerful material for selectively trapping the radioactive cesium ions; its high tendency to form stable colloids in water, however, has made PB to be impossible for the open-field radioactive cesium decontamination applications. A nano/nano combinatorial approach, as is described in this study, has provided an ultimate solution to this intrinsic colloid formation difficulty of PB. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) were used to immobilize PB via the creation of CNF-backboned PB. The CNF-backboned PB (CNF/PB) was found to be highly tolerant to water and moreover, it gave a 139 mg/g capability and a million (106) order of magnitude distribution coefficient (Kd) for absorbing of the radioactive cesium ion. Field studies on soil and seawater decontaminations in Fukushima gave satisfactory results, demonstrating high capabilities of CNF/PB for practical applications.

  12. Di-Isocyanate Crosslinked Aerogels with 1, 6-Bis (Trimethoxysilyl) Hexane Incorporated in Silica Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivod, Stephanie L.; Meador, Mary Ann B.; Nguyen, Baochau N.; Quade, Derek; Randall, Jason; Perry, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Silica aerogels are desirable materials for many applications that take advantage of their light weight and low thermal conductivity. Addition of a conformal polymer coating which bonds with the amine decorated surface of the silica network improves the strength of the aerogels by as much as 200 times. Even with vast improvement in strength they still tend to undergo brittle failure due to the rigid silica backbone. We hope to increase the flexibility and elastic recovery of the silica based aerogel by altering the silica back-bone by incorporation of more flexible hexane links. To this end, we investigated the use of 1,6-bis(trimethoxysilyl)hexane (BTMSH), a polysilsesquioxane precursor3, as an additional co-reactant to prepare silica gels which were subsequently cross-linked with di-isocyanate. Previously, this approach of adding flexibility by BTMSH incorporation was demonstrated with styrene cross-linked aerogels. In our study, we varied silane concentration, mol % of silicon from BTMSH and di-isocyanate concentration by weight percent to attempt to optimize both the flexibility and the strength of the aerogels.

  13. Importance of backbone angles versus amino acid configurations in peptide vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Carmen; Ruud, Kenneth; Reiher, Markus

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we investigate whether the differential scattering of right- and left-circularly polarized light in peptide Raman optical activity spectra are uniquely dominated by the backbone conformation, or whether the configurations of the individual amino acid also play a significant role. This is achieved by calculating Raman optical activity spectra using density functional theory for four structurally related peptides with a common backbone conformation, but with different sequences of amino acid configurations. Furthermore, the ROA signals of the amide normal modes are decomposed into contributions from groups of individual atoms. It is found that the amino acid configuration has a considerable influence on the ROA peaks in the amide I, II, and III regions, although the local decomposition reveals that the side-chain atoms only contribute to those peaks directly in the case of the amide II vibrations. Furthermore, small changes in the amide normal modes may lead to large and irregular modifications in the ROA intensity differences, making it difficult to establish transferable ROA intensity differences even for structurally similar vibrations.

  14. Impact of Backbone Tether Length and Structure on the Electrochemical Performance of Viologen Redox Active Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Mark; Chénard, Etienne; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Assary, Rajeev S.; Hui, Jingshu; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-10-25

    The design of chemically stable and electrochemically reversible redox active polymers (RAPs) is of great interest for energy storage technologies. Particularly, RAPs are new players for flow batteries relying on a size-exclusion based mechanism of electrolyte separation, but few studies have provided detailed molecular understanding of redox polymers in solution. Here, we use a systematic molecular design approach to investigate the impact of linker and redox-pendant electronic interactions on the performance of viologen RAPs. We used scanning electrochemical microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, bulk electrolysis, temperature-dependent absorbance, and spectroelectrochemistry to study the redox properties, charge transfer kinetics, and self-exchange of electrons through redox active dimers and their equivalent polymers. Stark contrast was observed between the electrochemical properties of viologen dimers and their corresponding polymers. Electron self-exchange kinetics in redox active dimers that only differ by their tether length and rigidity influences their charge transfer properties. Predictions from the Marcus Hush theory were consistent with observations in redox active dimers, but they failed to fully capture the behavior of macromolecular systems. For example, polymer bound viologen pendants, if too close in proximity, do not retain chemical reversibility. In contrast to polymer films, small modifications to the backbone structure decisively impact the bulk electrolysis of polymer solutions. This first comprehensive study highlights the careful balance between electronic interactions and backbone rigidity required to design RAPs with superior electrochemical performance.

  15. Control of polymer-packing orientation in thin films through synthetic tailoring of backbone coplanarity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Mark S.

    2013-10-22

    Controlling solid-state order of π-conjugated polymers through macromolecular design is essential for achieving high electronic device performance; yet, it remains a challenge, especially with respect to polymer-packing orientation. Our work investigates the influence of backbone coplanarity on a polymer\\'s preference to pack face-on or edge-on relative to the substrate. Isoindigo-based polymers were synthesized with increasing planarity by systematically substituting thiophenes for phenyl rings in the acceptor comonomer. This increasing backbone coplanarity, supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of representative trimers, leads to the narrowing of polymer band gaps as characterized by ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Among the polymers studied, regiosymmetric II and TII polymers exhibited the highest hole mobilities in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), while in organic photovoltaics (OPVs), TBII polymers that display intermediate levels of planarity provided the highest power conversion efficiencies. Upon thin-film analysis by atomic force microscropy (AFM) and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), we discovered that polymer-packing orientation could be controlled by tuning polymer planarity and solubility. Highly soluble, planar polymers favor face-on orientation in thin films while the less soluble, nonplanar polymers favor an edge-on orientation. This study advances our fundamental understanding of how polymer structure influences nanostructural order and reveals a new synthetic strategy for the design of semiconducting materials with rationally engineered solid-state properties. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. The Nanomechanical Properties of Lactococcus lactis Pili Are Conditioned by the Polymerized Backbone Pilin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickaël Castelain

    Full Text Available Pili produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis are putative linear structures consisting of repetitive subunits of the major pilin PilB that forms the backbone, pilin PilA situated at the distal end of the pilus, and an anchoring pilin PilC that tethers the pilus to the peptidoglycan. We determined the nanomechanical properties of pili using optical-tweezers force spectroscopy. Single pili were exposed to optical forces that yielded force-versus-extension spectra fitted using the Worm-Like Chain model. Native pili subjected to a force of 0-200 pN exhibit an inextensible, but highly flexible ultrastructure, reflected by their short persistence length. We tested a panel of derived strains to understand the functional role of the different pilins. First, we found that both the major pilin PilB and sortase C organize the backbone into a full-length organelle and dictate the nanomechanical properties of the pili. Second, we found that both PilA tip pilin and PilC anchoring pilin were not essential for the nanomechanical properties of pili. However, PilC maintains the pilus on the bacterial surface and may play a crucial role in the adhesion- and biofilm-forming properties of L. lactis.

  17. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and also in the size of the outer region.

  18. Influence of Backbone Fluorination in Regioregular Poly(3-alkyl-4-fluoro)thiophenes

    KAUST Repository

    Fei, Zhuping

    2015-06-03

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. We report two strategies toward the synthesis of 3-alkyl-4-fluorothiophenes containing straight (hexyl and octyl) and branched (2-ethylhexyl) alkyl groups. We demonstrate that treatment of the dibrominated monomer with 1 equiv of alkyl Grignard reagent leads to the formation of a single regioisomer as a result of the pronounced directing effect of the fluorine group. Polymerization of the resulting species affords highly regioregular poly(3-alkyl-4-fluoro)thiophenes. Comparison of their properties to those of the analogous non-fluorinated polymers shows that backbone fluorination leads to an increase in the polymer ionization potential without a significant change in optical band gap. Fluorination also results in an enhanced tendency to aggregate in solution, which is ascribed to a more co-planar backbone on the basis of Raman and DFT calculations. Average charge carrier mobilities in field-effect transistors are found to increase by up to a factor of 5 for the fluorinated polymers.

  19. Improving VANETs Connectivity with a Totally Ad Hoc Living Mobile Backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joilson Alves Junior

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vehicular ad hoc network (VANET for intelligent transportation systems is an emerging concept to improve transportation security, reliability, and management. The network behavior can be totally different in topological aspects because of the mobility of vehicular nodes. The topology can be fully connected when the flow of vehicles is high and may have low connectivity or be invalid when the flow of vehicles is low or unbalanced. In big cities, the metropolitan buses that travel on exclusive lanes may be used to set up a metropolitan vehicular data network (backbone, raising the connectivity among the vehicles. Therefore, this paper proposes the implementation of a living mobile backbone, totally ad hoc (MOB-NET, which will provide infrastructure and raise the network connectivity. In order to show the viability of MOB-NET, statistical analyses were made with real data of express buses that travel through exclusive lanes, besides evaluations through simulations and analytic models. The statistic, analytic, and simulation results prove that the buses that travel through exclusive lanes can be used to build a communication network totally ad hoc and provide connectivity in more than 99% of the time, besides raising the delivery rate up to 95%.

  20. RNA Structure Refinement using the ERRASER-Phenix pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Echols, Nathaniel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    Summary The final step of RNA crystallography involves the fitting of coordinates into electron density maps. The large number of backbone atoms in RNA presents a difficult and tedious challenge, particularly when experimental density is poor. The ERRASER-Phenix pipeline can improve an initial set of RNA coordinates automatically based on a physically realistic model of atomic-level RNA interactions. The pipeline couples diffraction-based refinement in Phenix with the Rosetta-based real-space refinement protocol ERRASER (Enumerative Real-Space Refinement ASsisted by Electron density under Rosetta). The combination of ERRASER and Phenix can improve the geometrical quality of RNA crystallographic models while maintaining or improving the fit to the diffraction data (as measured by Rfree). Here we present a complete tutorial for running ERRASER-Phenix through the Phenix GUI, from the command-line, and via an application in the Rosetta On-line Server that Includes Everyone (ROSIE). PMID:26227049

  1. HIV-1 phenotypic reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance test interpretation is not dependent on the subtype of the virus backbone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Bronze

    Full Text Available To date, the majority of HIV-1 phenotypic resistance testing has been performed with subtype B virus backbones (e.g. HXB2. However, the relevance of using this backbone to determine resistance in non-subtype B HIV-1 viruses still needs to be assessed. From 114 HIV-1 subtype C clinical samples (36 ARV-naïve, 78 ARV-exposed, pol amplicons were produced and analyzed for phenotypic resistance using both a subtype B- and C-backbone in which the pol fragment was deleted. Phenotypic resistance was assessed in resulting recombinant virus stocks (RVS for a series of antiretroviral drugs (ARV's and expressed as fold change (FC, yielding 1660 FC comparisons. These Antivirogram® derived FC values were categorized as having resistant or sensitive susceptibility based on biological cut-off values (BCOs. The concordance between resistance calls obtained for the same clinical sample but derived from two different backbones (i.e. B and C accounted for 86.1% (1429/1660 of the FC comparisons. However, when taking the assay variability into account, 95.8% (1590/1660 of the phenotypic data could be considered as being concordant with respect to their resistance call. No difference in the capacity to detect resistance associated with M184V, K103N and V106M mutations was noted between the two backbones. The following was concluded: (i A high level of concordance was shown between the two backbone phenotypic resistance profiles; (ii Assay variability is largely responsible for discordant results (i.e. for FC values close to BCO; (iii Confidence intervals should be given around the BCO's, when assessing resistance in HIV-1 subtype C; (iv No systematic resistance under- or overcalling of subtype C amplicons in the B-backbone was observed; (v Virus backbone subtype sequence variability outside the pol region does not contribute to phenotypic FC values. In conclusion the HXB2 virus backbone remains an acceptable vector for phenotyping HIV-1 subtype C pol amplicons.

  2. Comb-type prepolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide backbone and poly(L-lysine) graft chains for multivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, S; Maruyama, A; Akaike, T

    1999-01-01

    The comb-type copolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide (PAAm) backbone and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) graft chains have been prepared as the "prepolymer" for designing multivalent ligands. To regulate the length and density of the clusters of primary amino groups, the Nalpha-carboxyanhydride of Nepsilon-carbobenzoxy (CBZ)-L-lysine was first polymerized using p-vinylbenzylamine as an initiator. The resulting poly(CBZ-L-lysine) macromonomer was then radically copolymerized with AAm, followed by the deprotection of amino groups. For the model study, the reactive clusters of primary amino groups were completely converted into anion clusters by the reaction with succinic anhydride. The model multivalent ligands having the biotin label on the PAAm backbone were prepared by the terpolymerization of the macromonomer, AAm, and the biotin derivative having a vinyl group. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the biotin with no spacer on the PAAm backbone was recognized by the avidin-peroxidase conjugate specifically. Therefore, the highly sensitive detection of the interaction between cells and various model multivalent ligands was possible. The selective labeling onto the PAAm backbone revealed that the converted anion clusters of graft chains interacted exclusively with the cell and that the backbone was inert to the interaction with the cell. These results indicate that the various PAAm-graft-PLL comb-type copolymers with the defined length and density of the PLL-grafts are the potential prepolymers to investigate and to optimize the affinity of the multivalent ligands for receptors.

  3. Polarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model (POSSIM) force field: Developing parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Sergei Y.; Kaminski, George A.

    2011-01-01

    A previously introduced POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model) force field has been extended to include parameters for alanine peptides and protein backbones. New features were introduced into the fitting protocol, as compared to the previous generation of the polarizable force field for proteins. A reduced amount of quantum mechanical data was employed in fitting the electrostatic parameters. Transferability of the electrostatics between our recently developed NMA model and the protein backbone was confirmed. Binding energy and geometry for complexes of alanine dipeptide with a water molecule were estimated and found in a good agreement with high-level quantum mechanical results (for example, the intermolecular distances agreeing within ca. 0.06Å). Following the previously devised procedure, we calculated average errors in alanine di- and tetra-peptide conformational energies and backbone angles and found the agreement to be adequate (for example, the alanine tetrapeptide extended-globular conformational energy gap was calculated to be 3.09 kcal/mol quantim mechanically and 3.14 kcal/mol with the POSSIM force field). However, we have now also included simulation of a simple alpha-helix in both gas-phase and water as the ultimate test of the backbone conformational behavior. The resulting alanine and protein backbone force field is currently being employed in further development of the POSSIM fast polarizable force field for proteins. PMID:21743799

  4. Effect of backbone chemistry on hybridization thermodynamics of oligonucleic acids: a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-02-28

    In this paper we study how varying oligonucleic acid backbone chemistry affects the hybridization/melting thermodynamics of oligonucleic acids. We first describe the coarse-grained (CG) model with tunable parameters that we developed to enable the study of both naturally occurring oligonucleic acids, such as DNA, and their chemically-modified analogues, such as peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and locked nucleic acids (LNAs). The DNA melting curves obtained using such a CG model and molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit solvent and with explicit ions match with the melting curves obtained using the empirical nearest-neighbor models. We use these CG simulations to then elucidate the effect of backbone flexibility, charge, and nucleobase spacing along the backbone on the melting curves, potential energy and conformational entropy change upon hybridization and base-pair hydrogen bond residence time. We find that increasing backbone flexibility decreases duplex thermal stability and melting temperature mainly due to increased conformational entropy loss upon hybridization. Removing charges from the backbone enhances duplex thermal stability due to the elimination of electrostatic repulsion and as a result a larger energetic gain upon hybridization. Lastly, increasing nucleobase spacing decreases duplex thermal stability due to decreasing stacking interactions that are important for duplex stability.

  5. Tuning backbones and side-chains of cationic conjugated polymers for optical signal amplification of fluorescent DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-Qin; Liu, Xing-Fen; Fan, Qu-Li; Wang, Lihua; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lian-Hui; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Wei

    2009-06-15

    Three cationic conjugated polymers (CCPs) exhibiting different backbone geometries and charge densities were used to investigate how their conjugated backbone and side chain properties, together with the transitions of DNA amphiphilic properties, interplay in the CCP/DNA-C* (DNA-C*: fluorophore-labeled DNA) complexes to influence the optical signal amplification of fluorescent DNA detection based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). By examining the FRET efficiencies to dsDNA-C* (dsDNA: double-stranded DNA) and ssDNA-C* (ssDNA: single-stranded DNA) for each CCP, twisted conjugated backbones and higher charge densities were proved to facilitate electrostatic attraction in CCP/dsDNA-C* complexes, and induced improved sensitivity to DNA hybridization. Especially, by using the CCP with twisted conjugated backbone and the highest charge density, a more than 7-fold higher efficiency of FRET to dsDNA-C* was found than to ssDNA-C*, indicating a high signal amplification for discriminating between dsDNA and ssDNA. By contrast, linear conjugated backbones and lower charge density were demonstrated to favor hydrophobic interactions in CCP/ssDNA-C* complexes. These findings provided guidelines for the design of novel sensitive CCP, which can be useful to recognize many other important DNA activities involving transitions of DNA amphiphilic properties like DNA hybridization, such as specific DNA binding with ions, some secondary or tertiary structural changes of DNA, and so forth.

  6. EMSCOPE - Electromagnetic Component of EarthScope Backbone and Transportable Array Experiments 2006-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, G.; Evans, R.; Ingate, S.; Livelybrooks, D.; Mickus, K.; Park, S.; Schultz, A.; Unsworth, M.; Wannamaker, P.

    2007-12-01

    USArray (http://www.iris.edu/USArray) in conjunction with EMSOC (Electromagnetic Studies of the Continents) (http://emsoc.ucr.edu/emsoc) is installing magnetotelluric (MT) stations as part of Earthscope. The MT component of Earthscope consists of permanent (Backbone) and transportable long period stations to record naturally occurring, time varying electric and magnetic fields to produce a regional lithospheric/asthensospheric electrical conductivity map of the United States. The recent arrival of 28 long period MT instruments allows for the final installation of the Backbone stations throughout the US and yearly transportable array studies. The Backbone MT survey consists of 7 stations spaced throughout the continental US with preliminary installation at Soap Creek, Oregon; Parkfield, California; Braden, Missouri and Socorro, New Mexico.Siting and permitting are underway or completed at stations in eastern Montana, northern Wisconsin and Virginia. These stations will be recording for at least five years to determine electrical conductivities at depths that extend into the mantle transition zone. The first transportable array experiment was performed in the summer and fall of 2006 in central and eastern Oregon (Oregon Pilot Project) using equipment loaned from EMSOC. Thirty-one long period MT stations were recorded with 14 to 21 day occupations. Preliminary 3D inverse models indicate several lithospheric electrical conductivity anomalies including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath-Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region. The second transportable array experiment was performed in the summer and fall of 2007 and completes coverage of the Oregon, Washington, and western Idaho, targeting the Cascadia subduction zone, Precambrian boundaries, and sub-basalt lithologies. The 2008

  7. CORBA and MPI-based 'backbone' for coupling advanced simulation tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seydaliev, M.; Caswell, D., E-mail: marat.seydaliev@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    There is a growing international interest in using coupled, multidisciplinary computer simulations for a variety of purposes, including nuclear reactor safety analysis. Reactor behaviour can be modeled using a suite of computer programs simulating phenomena or predicting parameters that can be categorized into disciplines such as Thermalhydraulics, Neutronics, Fuel, Fuel Channels, Fission Product Release and Transport, Containment and Atmospheric Dispersion, and Severe Accident Analysis. Traditionally, simulations used for safety analysis individually addressed only the behaviour within a single discipline, based upon static input data from other simulation programs. The limitation of using a suite of stand-alone simulations is that phenomenological interdependencies or temporal feedback between the parameters calculated within individual simulations cannot be adequately captured. To remove this shortcoming, multiple computer simulations for different disciplines must exchange data during runtime to address these interdependencies. This article describes the concept of a new framework, which we refer to as the 'Backbone', to provide the necessary runtime exchange of data. The Backbone, currently under development at AECL for a preliminary feasibility study, is a hybrid design using features taken from the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), a standard defined by the Object Management Group, and the Message Passing Interface (MPI), a standard developed by a group of researchers from academia and industry. Both have well-tested and efficient implementations, including some that are freely available under the GNU public licenses. The CORBA component enables individual programs written in different languages and running on different platforms within a network to exchange data with each other, thus behaving like a single application. MPI provides the process-to-process intercommunication between these programs. This paper outlines the different

  8. Internalization of oligodeoxynucleotide antisense to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor mRNA in endothelial cells: a three-dimensional reconstruction by confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyroba, E; Pawlowska, Z; Kobylanska, A; Pluskota, E; Maszewska, M; Stec, W J; Cierniewski, C S

    1996-01-01

    A three-dimensional reconstruction analysis of localization of phosphodiester and phosphorothioate oligonucleotide antisense to type-1 plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) mRNA within endothelial cells is described. When EA.hy 926 cells were incubated with fluorescently labelled phosphodiester (PO-16) or phosphorothioate (PS-16) oligonucleotides at low, not cytotoxical concentrations, the relative brightness composition of the images of the particular samples was much higher for PS-16 than PO-16 and dependent upon the extracellular concentration and the incubation time. The 3-D reconstructions based on the series of optical sections of the samples, spaced every 1.5 microns, showed the punctuate accumulation of the oligonucleotides and a striking difference in a spatial distribution between PO-16 and PS-16 within the cytoplasm. Even after 24 h incubation of endothelial cells with 2.5 microM of PO-16 and PS-16 oligonucleotides, there was a predominant oligonucleotide localization within the cytoplasm and only traces of oligonucleotides could be seen in the cell nucleus and/or perinuclear organelles.

  9. Enumeration of RNA complexes via random matrix theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Chekhov, Leonid O.; Penner, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, we review a derivation of the numbers of RNA complexes of an arbitrary topology. These numbers are encoded in the free energy of the Hermitian matrix model with potential V(x)=x(2)/2 - stx/(1 - tx), where s and t are respective generating parameters for the number of RNA m...... the number of chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones and chords as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces of fixed topological type....

  10. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xianyang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; Stagno, Jason R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Bhandari, Yuba R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Wang, Yun-Xing [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  11. Probing the role of backbone hydrogen bonds in protein-peptide interactions by amide-to-ester mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Hultqvist, Greta; Balle, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    -protein interactions, those of the PDZ domain family involve formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds: C-termini or internal linear motifs of proteins bind as β-strands to form an extended antiparallel β-sheet with the PDZ domain. Whereas extensive work has focused on the importance of the amino acid side chains...... of the protein ligand, the role of the backbone hydrogen bonds in the binding reaction is not known. Using amide-to-ester substitutions to perturb the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern, we have systematically probed putative backbone hydrogen bonds between four different PDZ domains and peptides corresponding...... to natural protein ligands. Amide-to-ester mutations of the three C-terminal amides of the peptide ligand severely affected the affinity with the PDZ domain, demonstrating that hydrogen bonds contribute significantly to ligand binding (apparent changes in binding energy, ΔΔG = 1.3 to >3.8 kcal mol(-1...

  12. Hamiltonian replica-exchange simulations with adaptive biasing of peptide backbone and side chain dihedral angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermeir, Katja; Zacharias, Martin

    2014-01-15

    A Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) simulation method has been developed that employs a two-dimensional backbone and one-dimensional side chain biasing potential specifically to promote conformational transitions in peptides. To exploit the replica framework optimally, the level of the biasing potential in each replica was appropriately adapted during the simulations. This resulted in both high exchange rates between neighboring replicas and improved occupancy/flow of all conformers in each replica. The performance of the approach was tested on several peptide and protein systems and compared with regular MD simulations and previous REMD studies. Improved sampling of relevant conformational states was observed for unrestrained protein and peptide folding simulations as well as for refinement of a loop structure with restricted mobility of loop flanking protein regions.

  13. Extensive Air Showers: from the muonic smoking guns to the hadronic backbone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazon L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive Air Showers are complex macroscopic objects initiated by single ultra-high energy particles. They are the result of millions of high energy reactions in the atmosphere and can be described as the superposition of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The hadronic cascade is the air shower backbone, and it is mainly made of pions. Decays of neutral pions initiate electromagnetic cascades, while the decays of charged pions produce muons which leave the hadronic core and travel many kilometers almost unaffected. Muons are smoking guns of the hadronic cascade: the energy, transverse momentum, spatial distribution and depth of production are key to reconstruct the history of the air shower. In this work, we overview the phenomenology of muons on the air shower and its relation to the hadronic cascade. We briefly review the experimental efforts to analyze muons within air showers and discuss possible paths to use this information.

  14. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus

    2015-07-01

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common (13)C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  15. Sequential backbone assignment based on dipolar amide-to-amide correlation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, ShengQi; Grohe, Kristof; Rovó, Petra; Vasa, Suresh Kumar; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Linser, Rasmus, E-mail: rali@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department for NMR-Based Structural Biology (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Proton detection in solid-state NMR has seen a tremendous increase in popularity in the last years. New experimental techniques allow to exploit protons as an additional source of information on structure, dynamics, and protein interactions with their surroundings. In addition, sensitivity is mostly improved and ambiguity in assignment experiments reduced. We show here that, in the solid state, sequential amide-to-amide correlations turn out to be an excellent, complementary way to exploit amide shifts for unambiguous backbone assignment. For a general assessment, we compare amide-to-amide experiments with the more common {sup 13}C-shift-based methods. Exploiting efficient CP magnetization transfers rather than less efficient INEPT periods, our results suggest that the approach is very feasible for solid-state NMR.

  16. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  17. Icosahedral medium-range orders and backbone formation in an amorphous alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mirim; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Jae-Chul

    2010-12-01

    Analyses of metallic amorphous solids constructed using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have demonstrated that individual short-range orders (SROs) are linked with neighboring SROs and form various medium-range orders (MROs). These MROs have been observed to have different structural stability depending on their linking patterns. On the basis of the assessment of the structural stability of various MROs, we propose new types of structural organization, namely, icosahedral medium-range orders (I-MROs) and their extended-range order that forms the backbone of amorphous solids. We also discuss why the atomic-scale structure of an amorphous alloy can be more appropriately described in terms of I-MROs, rather than by the degree of short-range ordering as characterized by the fractions of SROs.

  18. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Freire, V. N.

    2011-10-01

    We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  19. A renormalization approach to describe charge transport in quasiperiodic dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmento, R.G. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Fulco, U.L. [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Albuquerque, E.L., E-mail: eudenilson@gmail.com [Departamento de Biofisica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Caetano, E.W.S. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Ceara, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Freire, V.N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2011-10-31

    Highlights: → One-step renormalization approach to describe the DBL-DNA molecule. → Electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model. → A quasiperiodic sequence to mimic the DNA nucleotides arrangement. → Electronic transmission spectra. → I-V characteristics. -- Abstract: We study the charge transport properties of a dangling backbone ladder (DBL)-DNA molecule focusing on a quasiperiodic arrangement of its constituent nucleotides forming a Rudin-Shapiro (RS) and Fibonacci (FB) Poly (CG) sequences, as well as a natural DNA sequence (Ch22) for the sake of comparison. Making use of a one-step renormalization process, the DBL-DNA molecule is modeled in terms of a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian to investigate its transmissivity and current-voltage (I-V) profiles. Beyond the semiconductor I-V characteristics, a striking similarity between the electronic transport properties of the RS quasiperiodic structure and the natural DNA sequence was found.

  20. Design of a sialylglycopolymer with a chitosan backbone having efficient inhibitory activity against influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Myco; Itoh, Masae; Makimura, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Kohji; Umekawa, Midori; Masui, Ayano; Matahira, Yoshiharu; Shibata, Mari; Ashida, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2008-08-14

    We verified here the inhibitory activity of a sialylglycopolymer prepared from natural products, chitosan and hen egg yolk, against influenza virus infection and estimated the requirements of the molecule for efficient inhibition. The inhibitory activity clearly depended on two factors, the length (the degree of polymerization: DP) of the chitosan backbone and the amount (the degree of substitution: DS) of conjugated sialyloligosaccharide side chain. The inhibitory efficiency increased in accordance with the DP value, with the highest inhibitory activity obtained when the DP was 1430. The inhibition of virus infection reached more than 90% as the DS value increased up to 15.6% when the neighboring sialyloligosaccharide side chains came as close as 4 nm, which was nearly the distance between two receptor-binding pockets in a hemagglutinin trimer. These results demonstrate that the sialylglycopolymer could be an excellent candidate of the safe and efficient anti-influenza drug.

  1. The Effects of NHC-Backbone Substitution on Efficiency in Ruthenium-based Olefin Metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Kevin M.; Bourg, Jean-Baptiste; Chung, Cheol K.; Virgil, Scott C.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts bearing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands with varying degrees of backbone and N-aryl substitution have been prepared. These complexes show greater resistance to decomposition through C–H activation of the N-aryl group, resulting in increased catalyst lifetimes. This work has utilized robotic technology to examine the activity and stability of each catalyst in metathesis, providing insights into the relationship between ligand architecture and enhanced efficiency. The development of this robotic methodology has also shown that, under optimized conditions, catalyst loadings as low as 25 ppm can lead to 100% conversion in the ring-closing metathesis of diethyl diallylmalonate. PMID:19351207

  2. Polystyrene Backbone Polymers Consisting of Alkyl-Substituted Triazine Side Groups for Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ch. D. Salert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the synthesis of new electron-transporting styrene monomers and their corresponding polystyrenes all with a 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine basic structure in the side group. The monomers differ in the alkyl substitution and in the meta-/paralinkage of the triazine to the polymer backbone. The thermal and spectroscopic properties of the new electron-transporting polymers are discussed in regard to their chemical structures. Phosphorescent OLEDs were prepared using the obtained electron-transporting polymers as the emissive layer material in blend systems together with a green iridium-based emitter 13 and a small molecule as an additional cohost with wideband gap characteristics (CoH-001. The performance of the OLEDs was characterized and discussed in regard to the chemical structure of the new electron-transporting polymers.

  3. A recombinant, chimeric tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate based on a dengue virus serotype 2 backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E; Wallace, Derek; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is caused by infection with one of four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV-1-4), necessitating tetravalent dengue vaccines that can induce protection against all four DENV. Takeda's live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) comprises an attenuated DENV-2 strain plus chimeric viruses containing the prM and E genes of DENV-1, -3 and -4 cloned into the attenuated DENV-2 'backbone'. In Phase 1 and 2 studies, TDV was well tolerated by children and adults aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prior dengue exposure; mild injection-site symptoms were the most common adverse events. TDV induced neutralizing antibody responses and seroconversion to all four DENV as well as cross-reactive T cell-mediated responses that may be necessary for broad protection against dengue fever.

  4. Side chain and backbone contributions of Phe508 to CFTR folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibodeau, Patrick H.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Thomas, Philip J. (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-12-07

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an integral membrane protein, cause cystic fibrosis (CF). The most common CF-causing mutant, deletion of Phe508, fails to properly fold. To elucidate the role Phe508 plays in the folding of CFTR, missense mutations at this position were generated. Only one missense mutation had a pronounced effect on the stability and folding of the isolated domain in vitro. In contrast, many substitutions, including those of charged and bulky residues, disrupted folding of full-length CFTR in cells. Structures of two mutant nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) reveal only local alterations of the surface near position 508. These results suggest that the peptide backbone plays a role in the proper folding of the domain, whereas the side chain plays a role in defining a surface of NBD1 that potentially interacts with other domains during the maturation of intact CFTR.

  5. Essential roles of four-carbon backbone chemicals in the control of metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sabrina; Chriett; Luciano; Pirola

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of obesity worldwide and its related cardiometabolic complications is an urgent public health problem. While weight gain results from a negative balance between the energy expenditure and calorie intake, recent research has demonstrated that several small organic molecules containing a four-carbon backbone can modulate this balance by favoring energy expenditure, and alleviating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Such small molecules include the bacterially produced short chain fatty acid butyric acid, its chemically produced derivative 4-phenylbutyric acid, the main ketone body D-β-hydroxybutyrate- synthesized by the liver- and the recently discovered myokine β-aminoisobutyric acid. Conversely, another butyraterelated molecule, α-hydroxybutyrate, has been found to be an early predictor of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action of these molecules, and discuss their use as therapeutics to improve metabolic homeostasis or their detection as early biomarkers of incipient insulin resistance.

  6. Modification of rifamycin polyketide backbone leads to improved drug activity against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Aeshna; Almabruk, Khaled H; Saxena, Anjali; Yang, Jongtae; Mukherjee, Udita; Kaur, Hardeep; Kohli, Puneet; Kumari, Rashmi; Singh, Priya; Zakharov, Lev N; Singh, Yogendra; Mahmud, Taifo; Lal, Rup

    2014-07-25

    Rifamycin B, a product of Amycolatopsis mediterranei S699, is the precursor of clinically used antibiotics that are effective against tuberculosis, leprosy, and AIDS-related mycobacterial infections. However, prolonged usage of these antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of rifamycin-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As part of our effort to generate better analogs of rifamycin, we substituted the acyltransferase domain of module 6 of rifamycin polyketide synthase with that of module 2 of rapamycin polyketide synthase. The resulting mutants (rifAT6::rapAT2) of A. mediterranei S699 produced new rifamycin analogs, 24-desmethylrifamycin B and 24-desmethylrifamycin SV, which contained modification in the polyketide backbone. 24-Desmethylrifamycin B was then converted to 24-desmethylrifamycin S, whose structure was confirmed by MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography. Subsequently, 24-desmethylrifamycin S was converted to 24-desmethylrifampicin, which showed excellent antibacterial activity against several rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains.

  7. Quality of service estimation based on maximum bottleneck algorithm for domain aggregation in backbone networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yang; ZHAN Yi-chun; YU Shao-hua

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the routing among autonomous systems (ASs) with quality of service (QoS) requirements. To avoid the intractability of the problem, abstract QoS capability must be informed among ASs, because the routhing which constrained QoS has been proved to be nondeterministic polynomial-time (NP) hard even inside an AS. This paper employs the modified Dijkstra algorithm to compute the maximum bottleneck bandwidth inside an AS. This approach lays a basis for the AS-level switching capability on which interdomain advertisement can be performed. Furthermore, the paper models the aggregated traffic in backbone network with fractional Brownian motion (FBM), and by integrating along the time axis in short intervals, a good estimation of the distribution of queue length in the next short intervals can be obtained. The proposed advertisement mechanism can be easily implemented with the current interdomain routing protocols. Numerical study indicates that the presented scheme is effective and feasible.

  8. Solid-phase synthesis of lidocaine and procainamide analogues using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Simon K; Peacock, Mandy J; Kates, Steven A; Barany, George

    2003-01-01

    New solid-phase strategies have been developed for the synthesis of lidocaine (1) and procainamide (2) analogues, using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring. Both sets were prepared starting from a common resin-bound intermediate, followed by four general steps: (i) attachment of a primary aliphatic or aromatic amine to the solid support via reductive amination (as monitored by a novel test involving reaction of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with residual aldehyde groups); (ii) acylation of the resultant secondary amine; (iii) displacement of halide with an amine; and (iv) trifluoroacetic acid-mediated release from the support. A manual parallel strategy was followed to provide 60 novel compounds, of which two dozen have not been previously described. In most cases, initial crude purities were >80%, and overall isolated yields were in the 40-88% range.

  9. Enhanced biosynthetically directed fractional carbon-13 enrichment of proteins for backbone NMR assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, Broc R; Sonstrom, Reilly E; Gupta, Riju A; Rovnyak, David

    2015-11-01

    Routes to carbon-13 enrichment of bacterially expressed proteins include achieving uniform or positionally selective (e.g. ILV-Me, or (13)C', etc.) enrichment. We consider the potential for biosynthetically directed fractional enrichment (e.g. carbon-13 incorporation in the protein less than 100%) for performing routine n-(D)dimensional NMR spectroscopy of proteins. First, we demonstrate an approach to fractional isotope addition where the initial growth media containing natural abundance glucose is replenished at induction with a small amount (e.g. 10%(w/w)u-(13)C-glucose) of enriched nutrient. The approach considered here is to add 10% (e.g. 200mg for a 2g/L culture) u-(13)C-glucose at the induction time (OD600=0.8), resulting in a protein with enhanced (13)C incorporation that gives almost the same NMR signal levels as an exact 20% (13)C sample. Second, whereas fractional enrichment is used for obtaining stereospecific methyl assignments, we find that (13)C incorporation levels no greater than 20%(w/w) yield (13)C and (13)C-(13)C spin pair incorporation sufficient to conduct typical 3D-bioNMR backbone experiments on moderate instrumentation (600 MHz, RT probe). Typical 3D-bioNMR experiments of a fractionally enriched protein yield expected backbone connectivities, and did not show amino acid biases in this work, with one exception. When adding 10% u-(13)C glucose to expression media at induction, there is poor preservation of (13)Cα-(13)Cβ spin pairs in the amino acids ILV, leading to the absence of Cβ signals in HNCACB spectra for ILV, a potentially useful editing effect. Enhanced fractional carbon-13 enrichment provides lower-cost routes to high throughput protein NMR studies, and makes modern protein NMR more cost-accessible.

  10. Aqueous self-assembly of hydrophobic macromolecules with adjustable rigidity of the backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhou; Liu, Dapeng; Lin, Jiaping; Wang, Xiaosong

    2017-08-02

    P(FpC3P) (Fp: CpFe(CO)2; C3P: propyl diphenyl phosphine) has a helical backbone, resulting from piano stool metal coordination geometry, which is rigid with intramolecular aromatic interaction of the phenyl groups. The macromolecule is hydrophobic, but the polarized CO groups can interact with water for aqueous self-assembly. The stiffness of P(FpC3P), which is adjustable by temperature, is an important factor influencing the morphologies of kinetically trapped assemblies. P(FpC3P)7 self-assembles in DMSO/water (10/90 by volume) into lamellae at 25 °C, vesicles at 40 °C and irregular aggregates at higher temperatures (60 and 70 °C). The colloidal stability decreases in the order of lamellae, vesicles and irregular aggregates. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation reveals the same temperature-dependent self-assembled morphologies with an interior of hydrophobic aromatic groups covered with the metal coordination units. The rigid backbone at 25 °C accounts for the formation of the layered morphology, while the reduced rigidity of the same P(FpC3P)7 at 40 °C curves up the lamellae into vesicles. At a higher temperature (60 or 70 °C), P(FpC3P)7 behaves as a random coil without obvious amphiphilic segregation, resulting in irregular aggregates. The stiffness is, therefore, a crucial factor for the aqueous assembly of macromolecules without obvious amphiphilic segregation, which is reminiscent of the solution behavior observed for many hydrophobic biological macromolecules such as proteins.

  11. Preparation of stable spherical micelles with rigid backbones based on polyaryletherketone copolymers containing lateral pyridyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuling; Liu, Lingzhi; Guo, Yunliang; Jiang, Zhenhua; Wang, Guibin, E-mail: wgb@jlu.edu.cn

    2013-07-15

    A new bisphenol monomer, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenylimine) pyridine (PYPH), was synthesized via a deoxidization reaction of an amine. A series of novel polyaryletherketone copolymers containing lateral pyridyl groups (PY-PAEKs) based on PYPH, 2,2-di(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane and 4,4′-difluorobenzophenone were prepared by nucleophilic aromatic substitution polycondensation reactions. Furthermore, spherical micelles with rigid PY-PAEKs as the inner cores and flexible polyacrylic acid (PAA) as the outer shells were obtained in a selective solvent (H{sub 2}O) successfully. The formation of the spherical micelles was confirmed by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy as well as by surface tension measurements. The formation and size of the spherical micelles depended on the weight ratio of PAA/PY-PAEK, the concentration and pH value of the mixed solution containing the PY-PAEK and PAA, and the number of pyridyl groups in the PY-PAEK. The structure of the spherical micelles could be stabilized by a cross-linking reaction between the pyridyl groups of the PY-PAEKs and 1,4-dibromobutane. The diameter of the spherical micelles decreased because of the removal of the PAA shell from the PY-PAEK core after the cross-linking reaction. The resulting stable spherical micelles with rigid backbones did not dissolve in a number of polar solvents and remained unaffected by changes in the pH values. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Polyaryletherketone copolymers containing lateral pyridyl groups were synthesized. • Spherical micelles were prepared using these copolymers and polyacrylic acid. • The copolymers and polyacrylic acid formed the core and the shell of the micelles, respectively. • The obtained micelles were stabilized by a cross-linking reaction. • The cross-linked micelles had rigid backbones, independent of solvents and pH values.

  12. Backbone-hydrazone-containing biodegradable copolymeric micelles for anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Luan, Shujuan; Qin, Benkai; Wang, Yingying; Wang, Kai; Qi, Peilan; Song, Shiyong

    2016-11-01

    Well-defined biodegradable, pH-sensitive amphiphilic block polymers, poly(ethylene glycol)-Hyd-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-Hyd-PLA) which have acid-cleavable linkages in their backbones, were synthesized via ring-opening polymerization initiated from hydrazone-containing macroinitiators. Introducing a hydrazone bond onto the backbone of an amphiphilic copolymer will find a broad-spectrum encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy showed that the diblock copolymers self-assembled into stable micelles with average diameters of 100 nm. The mean diameters and size distribution of the hydrazone-containing micelles changed obviously in mildly acidic pH (multiple peaks from 1 to 202 nm appeared under a pH 4.0 condition) than in neutral, while there were no changes in the case of non-sensitive ones. Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX) were loaded with drug loading content ranging from 2.4 to 3.5 %, respectively. Interestingly, the anticancer drugs released from mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles could also be promoted by the increased acidity. An in vitro cytotoxicity study showed that the DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles have significantly enhanced cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells compared with the non-sensitive poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(lactic acid) (mPEG-PLA) micelles. Confocal microscopy observation indicated that more DOX were delivered into the nuclei of cells following 6 or 12 h incubation with DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles. In vivo studies on H22-bearing Swiss mice demonstrated the superior anticancer activity of DOX-loaded mPEG-Hyd-PLA micelles over free DOX and DOX-loaded mPEG-PLA micelles. These hydrazone-containing pH-responsive degradable micelles provide a useful strategy for antitumor drug delivery.

  13. Subpicosecond protein backbone changes detected during the green-absorbing proteorhodopsin primary photoreaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J; Kralj, Joel M; Chieffo, Logan R; Wang, Xihua; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Ziegler, Lawrence D; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2007-10-11

    Recent studies demonstrate that photoactive proteins can react within several picoseconds to photon absorption by their chromophores. Faster subpicosecond protein responses have been suggested to occur in rhodopsin-like proteins where retinal photoisomerization may impulsively drive structural changes in nearby protein groups. Here, we test this possibility by investigating the earliest protein structural changes occurring in proteorhodopsin (PR) using ultrafast transient infrared (TIR) spectroscopy with approximately 200 fs time resolution combined with nonperturbing isotope labeling. PR is a recently discovered microbial rhodopsin similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR) found in marine proteobacteria and functions as a proton pump. Vibrational bands in the retinal fingerprint (1175-1215 cm(-1)) and ethylenic stretching (1500-1570 cm(-1)) regions characteristic of all-trans to 13-cis chromophore isomerization and formation of a red-shifted photointermediate appear with a 500-700 fs time constant after photoexcitation. Bands characteristic of partial return to the ground state evolve with a 2.0-3.5 ps time constant. In addition, a negative band appears at 1548 cm(-1) with a time constant of 500-700 fs, which on the basis of total-15N and retinal C15D (retinal with a deuterium on carbon 15) isotope labeling is assigned to an amide II peptide backbone mode that shifts to near 1538 cm(-1) concomitantly with chromophore isomerization. Our results demonstrate that one or more peptide backbone groups in PR respond with a time constant of 500-700 fs, almost coincident with the light-driven retinylidene chromophore isomerization. The protein changes we observe on a subpicosecond time scale may be involved in storage of the absorbed photon energy subsequently utilized for proton transport.

  14. Contribution of Peptide Backbone to Anti-Citrullinated Peptide Antibody Reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Hartwig Trier

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 1-2% of the world population. One of the characteristic features of RA is the presence of autoantibodies. Especially the highly specific anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPAs, which have been found in up to 70% of RA patients' sera, have received much attention. Several citrullinated proteins are associated with RA, suggesting that ACPAs may react with different sequence patterns, separating them from traditional antibodies, whose reactivity usually is specific towards a single target. As ACPAs have been suggested to be involved in the development of RA, knowledge about these antibodies may be crucial. In this study, we examined the influence of peptide backbone for ACPA reactivity in immunoassays. The antibodies were found to be reactive with a central Cit-Gly motif being essential for ACPA reactivity and to be cross-reactive between the selected citrullinated peptides. The remaining amino acids within the citrullinated peptides were found to be of less importance for antibody reactivity. Moreover, these findings indicated that the Cit-Gly motif in combination with peptide backbone is essential for antibody reactivity. Based on these findings it was speculated that any amino acid sequence, which brings the peptide into a properly folded structure for antibody recognition is sufficient for antibody reactivity. These findings are in accordance with the current hypothesis that structural homology rather than sequence homology are favored between citrullinated epitopes. These findings are important in relation to clarifying the etiology of RA and to determine the nature of ACPAs, e.g., why some Cit-Gly-containing sequences are not targeted by ACPAs.

  15. Effects of Tryptophan Content and Backbone Spacing on the Uptake Efficiency of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-07-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to traverse cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo. Uptake occurs through both endocytotic and nonendocytotic pathways, but the molecular requirements for efficient internalization are not fully understood. Here we investigate how the presence of tryptophans and their position within an oligoarginine influence uptake mechanism and efficiency. Flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence imaging are used to estimate uptake efficiency, intracellular distribution and toxicity in Chinese hamster ovarian cells. Further, membrane leakage and lipid membrane affinity are investigated. The peptides contain eight arginine residues and one to four tryptophans, the tryptophans positioned either at the N-terminus, in the middle, or evenly distributed along the amino acid sequence. Our data show that the intracellular distribution varies among peptides with different tryptophan content and backbone spacing. Uptake efficiency is higher for the peptides with four tryptophans in the middle, or evenly distributed along the peptide sequence, than for the peptide with four tryptophans at the N-terminus. All peptides display low cytotoxicity except for the one with four tryptophans at the N-terminus, which was moderately toxic. This finding is consistent with their inability to induce efficient leakage of dye from lipid vesicles. All peptides have comparable affinities for lipid vesicles, showing that lipid binding is not a decisive parameter for uptake. Our results indicate that tryptophan content and backbone spacing can affect both the CPP uptake efficiency and the CPP uptake mechanism. The low cytotoxicity of these peptides and the possibilities of tuning their uptake mechanism are interesting from a therapeutic point of view. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Backbone cyclization of analgesic conotoxin GeXIVA facilitates direct folding of the ribbon isomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaosa; Huang, Yen-Hua; Kaas, Quentin; Harvey, Peta J; Wang, Conan K; Tae, Han-Shen; Adams, David J; Craik, David J

    2017-08-28

    Conotoxin GeXIVA inhibits the α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and is analgesic in animal models of pain. α-conotoxins have four cysteines, which can have three possible disulfide connectivities: globular (CysI-CysIII and CysII-CysIV); ribbon (CysI-CysIV and CysII-CysIII) or bead (CysI-CysII and CysIII-CysIV). Native α-conotoxins preferably adopt the globular connectivity, and previous studies of α-conotoxins have focused on the globular isomers as the ribbon and bead isomers typically have lower potency at nAChRs than the globular form. A recent report showed that the bead and ribbon isomers of GeXIVA are more potent than the globular isomer, with low nanomolar half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s). Despite this high potency, the therapeutic potential of GeXIVA is limited because, like most peptides, it is susceptible to proteolytic degradation and is challenging to synthesize in high yield. Here we used backbone cyclization as a strategy to improve the folding yield as well as increase the serum stability of ribbon GeXIVA while preserving activity at the α9α10 nAChR. Specifically, cyclization of ribbon GeXIVA with a two-residue linker maintained the biological activity at the human α9α10 nAChR and improved stability in human serum. Short linkers led to selective formation of the ribbon disulfide isomer without requiring orthogonal protection. Overall, this study highlights the value of backbone cyclization in directing folding, improving yields and stabilizing conotoxins with therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. The extension of a DNA double helix by an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, P.; Sharma, P. K.; Madsen, Charlotte S.

    2013-01-01

    Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand.......Additional base pair: The DNA duplex can be extended with an additional Watson-Crick base pair on the same backbone by the use of double-headed nucleotides. These also work as compressed dinucleotides and form two base pairs with cognate nucleobases on the opposite strand....

  18. Structural dynamics of protein backbone {phi} angles: extended molecular dynamics simulations versus experimental {sup 3}J scalar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markwick, Phineus R. L. [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France); Showalter, Scott A. [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NHMFL (United States); Bouvignies, Guillaume [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France); Brueschweiler, Rafael [Florida State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, NHMFL (United States)], E-mail: bruschweiler@magnet.fsu.edu; Blackledge, Martin [CNRS/CEA/UJF, Protein Dynamics and Flexibility, Institut de Biologie Structurale Jean-Pierre Ebel UMR 5075 (France)], E-mail: martin.blackledge@ibs.fr

    2009-09-15

    {sup 3}J scalar couplings report on the conformational averaging of backbone {phi} angles in peptides and proteins, and therefore represent a potentially powerful tool for studying the details of both structure and dynamics in solution. We have compared an extensive experimental dataset with J-couplings predicted from unrestrained molecular dynamics simulation using enhanced sampling available from accelerated molecular dynamics or using long timescale trajectories (200 ns). The dynamic fluctuations predicted to be present along the backbone, in agreement with residual dipolar coupling analysis, are compatible with the experimental {sup 3}J scalar couplings providing a slightly better reproduction of these experimental parameters than a high-resolution static structure.

  19. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.;

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model-free appr......The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model...

  20. Metal ion binding and function in natural and artificial small RNA enzymes from a structural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    Ribozymes are often perceived as part of an antiquated catalytic arsenal hearkening back to a pre-biotic RNA World that was eventually supplanted by proteins. However, recent genome-wide searches have revealed a plethora of new catalytic RNA motifs that appear to be variations on well-known themes. This suggests that ribozymes have continued to evolve in order to fulfill specific, RNA-essential biological niches. Although such ribozymes are small and catalyze one-step phosphodiester-bond scission reactions, ongoing structure and function analyses at the lab bench have demonstrated that RNA has the capacity for a diverse number of reactions such as carbon-carbon bond formation, and tRNA aminoacylation. Here we describe the fundamental structure and metal binding properties of four naturally occurring RNA enzymes: the hammerhead, hairpin, hepatitis delta virus, and glmS metabolite sensing ribozyme. In addition, we discuss the fold and ion coordination of three artificial ribozymes developed to probe the boundaries of RNA catalysis; these include the leadzyme, the flexizyme, and the Diels-Alder ribozyme. Our approach is to relate structure to function with the knowledge of ideal metal-ion coordination geometry that we have derived herein from surveys of high-resolution small molecule structures. An emergent theme is that natural and artificial ribozymes that catalyze single-step reactions often possess a pre-formed active site. Multivalent ions facilitate RNA active site formation, but can also provide Lewis acid functionality that is necessary for catalysis. When metal ion binding isn't possible, ribozymes make due by ionizing their bases, or by recruiting cofactors that augment their chemical functionality.

  1. MicroRNA Detection Using a Double Molecular Beacon Approach: Distinguishing Between miRNA and Pre-miRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Amanda Marie; Baker, Meredith B; Bao, Gang; Searles, Charles D

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression and are recognized for their roles both as modulators of disease progression and as biomarkers of disease activity, including neurological diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Commonly, miRNA abundance is assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), however, qRT-PCR for miRNA can be labor intensive, time consuming, and may lack specificity for detection of mature versus precursor forms of miRNA. Here, we describe a novel double molecular beacon approach to miRNA assessment that can distinguish and quantify mature versus precursor forms of miRNA in a single assay, an essential feature for use of miRNAs as biomarkers for disease. Using this approach, we found that molecular beacons with DNA or combined locked nucleic acid (LNA)-DNA backbones can detect mature and precursor miRNAs (pre-miRNAs) of low (beacon assay was accurate in assessing miRNA abundance in a sample containing a mixed population of mature and precursor miRNAs. In contrast, qRT-PCR and the single molecular beacon assay overestimated miRNA abundance. Additionally, the double molecular beacon assay was less labor intensive than traditional qRT-PCR and had 10-25% increased specificity. Our data suggest that the double molecular beacon-based approach is more precise and specific than previous methods, and has the promise of being the standard for assessing miRNA levels in biological samples.

  2. Interaction of sulforaphane with DNA and RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Abassi Joozdani

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN-DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2, while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN-phosphate (PO2 interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN-DNA=3.01 (± 0.035×10(4 M(-1 and K(SFN-RNA= 6.63 (±0.042×10(3 M(-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1, DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure.

  3. Multiscale methods for computational RNA enzymology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteva, Maria T.; Dissanayake, Thakshila; Chen, Haoyuan; Radak, Brian K.; Kuechler, Erich R.; Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA catalysis is of fundamental importance to biology and yet remains ill-understood due to its complex nature. The multi-dimensional “problem space” of RNA catalysis includes both local and global conformational rearrangements, changes in the ion atmosphere around nucleic acids and metal ion binding, dependence on potentially correlated protonation states of key residues and bond breaking/forming in the chemical steps of the reaction. The goal of this article is to summarize and apply multiscale modeling methods in an effort to target the different parts of the RNA catalysis problem space while also addressing the limitations and pitfalls of these methods. Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, reference interaction site model (RISM) calculations, constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) simulations, Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (HREMD) and quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations will be discussed in the context of the study of RNA backbone cleavage transesterification. This reaction is catalyzed by both RNA and protein enzymes, and here we examine the different mechanistic strategies taken by the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) and RNase A. PMID:25726472

  4. Interaction of Sulforaphane with DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi Joozdani, Farzaneh; Yari, Faramarz; Abassi Joozdani, Parvaneh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN–DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV–Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2), while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN–phosphate (PO2) interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN–DNA)=3.01 (± 0.035)×104 M-1 and K(SFN–RNA)= 6.63 (±0.042)×103 M-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1), DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure. PMID:26030290

  5. Structural basis for dsRNA recognition and interferon antagonism by Ebola VP35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Daisy W.; Prins, Kathleen C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (Sinai); (Iowa State); (LBNL); (UTSMC)

    2010-03-12

    Ebola viral protein 35 (VP35), encoded by the highly pathogenic Ebola virus, facilitates host immune evasion by antagonizing antiviral signaling pathways, including those initiated by RIG-I-like receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain (IID) bound to short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which together with in vivo results reveals how VP35-dsRNA interactions contribute to immune evasion. Conserved basic residues in VP35 IID recognize the dsRNA backbone, whereas the dsRNA blunt ends are 'end-capped' by a pocket of hydrophobic residues that mimic RIG-I-like receptor recognition of blunt-end dsRNA. Residues critical for RNA binding are also important for interferon inhibition in vivo but not for viral polymerase cofactor function of VP35. These results suggest that simultaneous recognition of dsRNA backbone and blunt ends provides a mechanism by which Ebola VP35 antagonizes host dsRNA sensors and immune responses.

  6. Ion concentration dependent tRNA folding energy landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongzhong; Cho, Samuel

    2013-03-01

    The RNA folding is highly dependent on the ionic conditions of its environment in the cell because the surrounding ions electrostatically screen the charged phosphates that line the RNA backbone. Recent studies (Cho, Pincus, and Thirumalai, PNAS, 2007; Biyun, Cho, and Thirumalai, JACS, 2011) demonstrated that the coarse-grained model we use accurately captures the RNA folding mechanisms by incorporating a Debye-Huckel potential to screen the electrostatics. We compare the ion-concentration dependent tRNA folding mechanism to the classical thermodynamic melting profiles of Crothers and co-workers, and we observe excellent agreement. We also supported our findings by performing empirical force field MD simulations with CHARMM and AMBER, and we observe remarkably comparable qualitative similarities between the average base-base distances from simulations and the empirically measured base-stacking potentials from the well-known Turner's Rules.

  7. High-Throughput Sequencing Based Methods of RNA Structure Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental and comp......In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental...... and computational protocol for detecting the reverse transcription termination sites (RTTS-Seq). This protocol was subsequently applied to hydroxyl radical footprinting of three dimensional RNA structures to give a probing signal that correlates well with the RNA backbone solvent accessibility. Moreover, we applied...

  8. Three-dimensional tertiary structure of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Sussman, J. L.; Suddath, F. L.; Quigley, G. J.; Mcpherson, A.; Wang, A. H. J.; Seeman, N. C.; Rich, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an analysis and interpretation of a 3-A electron density map of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA. Some earlier detailed assignments of nucleotide residues to electron density peaks are found to be in error, even though the overall tracing of the backbone conformation of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA was generally correct. A new, more comprehensive interpretation is made which makes it possible to define the tertiary interactions in the molecule. The new interpretation makes it possible to visualize a number of tertiary interactions which not only explain the structural role of most of the bases which are constant in transfer RNAs, but also makes it possible to understand in a direct and simple fashion the chemical modification data on transfer RNA. In addition, this pattern of tertiary interactions provides a basis for understanding the general three-dimensional folding of all transfer RNA molecules.

  9. In the Near Future Backbone Aluminum Enterprises will Close Down About 2.4 million Tonnes of Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    On August 21,China Nonferrous Metals Industry Association Aluminum Industry Branch assembled some backbone aluminum enterprises and Henan Nonferrous Metal Industry Association to hold a discussion meeting in Beijing over the current operation trend of aluminum industry,dilemma and opportunity ahead and measures to diffuse surplus capacity,the meeting also discussed the

  10. Interaction of Al-induced peptide backbone ring structure with the sidechains of His, Phe, Trp and Tyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴清雷; 宋波

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is widely used as an antimicrobial coagulant, food additive, and cookware. However, many reports indicate that aluminium may be a critical factor in many amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Unfortunately, the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood, which limits efforts to prevent and treat these diseases. In this paper, using an ab initio method, we studied the interaction of Al-backbone ring structure with theπ-electron-rich sidechains of His, Phe, Trp, and Tyr. We found that in the absence of water, the Al-backbone ring can stably bind with those sidechains. In the presence of water, the Al-backbone ring can bind to the His sidechain and cannot bind to the other sidechains. As revealed by further investigations, this could be attributed to the fact that there was a coordinate bond of the Al-backbone ring with the His sidechain, while there were theπ-πstacking and cation-π-like interactions with the other sidechains. These findings potentially provide a molecular understanding of Al-related toxicity, and may be helpful in designing drugs for those aforementioned aluminum-linked diseases and encourage treatment of Al-polluted water.

  11. Tailor-made synthesis of various backbone-substituted imidazolinium salts by triflic anhydride mediated intramolecular cyclisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Su, Xiaolong; Fu, Jun; Qin, Xinke; Zhao, Meixin; Shi, Min

    2012-09-21

    We have found a Tf(2)O-mediated intramolecular cyclization reaction and have revealed an intriguing stereoselectivity and a regioselectivity during the preparation of intermediate alcohols, which allow for the tailor-made synthesis of various backbone-substituted imidazolinium salts, and structurally specific syn-4,5-disubstituted imidazolinium salts.

  12. Backbone amide linker strategy for the synthesis of 1,4-triazole-containing cyclic tetra- and pentapeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springer, J.; de Cuba, K.R.; Calvet-Vitale, S.; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Hermkens, P.H.H.; Hiemstra, H.; van Maarseveen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    A backbone amide linker strategy was chosen for the solid-phase synthesis of triazole-containing Cyclic tetra- and pentapeptides. An alkyne-substituted linker derived from 4-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzaldehyde was elongated by using standard "Fmoc-based" solid phase chemistry and terminated by coupling of

  13. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Jyh-Jong; Su, Shih-Chieh; Yu, Chin-Sheng

    2015-07-03

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP.

  14. A Multi-Objective Approach for Protein Structure Prediction Based on an Energy Model and Backbone Angle Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Jong Tsay

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure prediction (PSP is concerned with the prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure and is a challenging calculation problem. After decades of research effort, numerous solutions have been proposed for optimisation methods based on energy models. However, further investigation and improvement is still needed to increase the accuracy and similarity of structures. This study presents a novel backbone angle preference factor, which is one of the factors inducing protein folding. The proposed multiobjective optimisation approach simultaneously considers energy models and backbone angle preferences to solve the ab initio PSP. To prove the effectiveness of the multiobjective optimisation approach based on the energy models and backbone angle preferences, 75 amino acid sequences with lengths ranging from 22 to 88 amino acids were selected from the CB513 data set to be the benchmarks. The data sets were highly dissimilar, therefore indicating that they are meaningful. The experimental results showed that the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD of the multiobjective optimization approach based on energy model and backbone angle preferences was superior to those of typical energy models, indicating that the proposed approach can facilitate the ab initio PSP.

  15. VPLS: alternativa de interconexión a través del backbone IP/MPLS de ETECSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmel Barreto Prieto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La Empresa de Telecomunicaciones de Cuba (ETECSA maneja en condiciones de exclusividad la infraestructura de telecomunicaciones del país, por lo que el resto de los proveedores necesitan utilizar dicha infraestructura como soporte para la interconexión de los nodos que componen sus redes. Teniendo en cuenta el desarrollo de las tecnologías de las telecomunicaciones, ETECSA ha apostado por la implementación de un backbone IP/MPLS (Internet Protocol over  MultiProtocol Label Switching: Protocolo de Internet sobre Conmutación Multiprotocolo basada en Etiquetas en su red, el cual se espera absorba todos los servicios actualmente soportados por el backbone ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode/Frame Relay. Sin embargo, en estos momentos, la red IP/MPLS solamente oferta servicios VPN (Virtual Private Network: Red Privada Virtual a nivel de red (nivel tres del modelo OSI, cuestión que, para los otros proveedores, resulta inadmisible. El presente artículo describe una propuesta de implementación de una entidad VPLS (Virtual Private LAN Service: Servicio de LAN Privada Virtual como alternativa para la migración de los servicios de VPN de nivel dos que actualmente se soportan sobre el backbone ATM/Frame Relay, hacia el backbone IP/MPLS, variante que garantiza la independencia por parte de los proveedores que son clientes de ETECSA en la operación y enrutamiento de su red.

  16. Alkali metal salts of formazanate ligands : diverse coordination modes as a result of the nitrogen-rich [NNCNN] ligand backbone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Travieso-Puente, Raquel; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Otten, Edwin

    2014-01-01

    Alkali metal salts of redox-active formazanate ligands were prepared, and their structures in the solid-state and in solution are determined. The nitrogen-rich [NNCNN] backbone of formazanates results in a varied coordination chemistry, with both the internal and terminal nitrogen atoms available fo

  17. Structure-function analysis of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum RNA ligase – engineering a thermostable ATP independent enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelkovsky Alexander M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA ligases are essential reagents for many methods in molecular biology including NextGen RNA sequencing. To prevent ligation of RNA to itself, ATP independent mutant ligases, defective in self-adenylation, are often used in combination with activated pre-adenylated linkers. It is important that these ligases not have de-adenylation activity, which can result in activation of RNA and formation of background ligation products. An additional useful feature is for the ligase to be active at elevated temperatures. This has the advantage or reducing preferences caused by structures of single-stranded substrates and linkers. Results To create an RNA ligase with these desirable properties we performed mutational analysis of the archaeal thermophilic RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. We identified amino acids essential for ATP binding and reactivity but dispensable for phosphodiester bond formation with 5’ pre-adenylated donor substrate. The motif V lysine mutant (K246A showed reduced activity in the first two steps of ligation reaction. The mutant has full ligation activity with pre-adenylated substrates but retained the undesirable activity of deadenylation, which is the reverse of step 2 adenylation. A second mutant, an alanine substitution for the catalytic lysine in motif I (K97A abolished activity in the first two steps of the ligation reaction, but preserved wild type ligation activity in step 3. The activity of the K97A mutant is similar with either pre-adenylated RNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA as donor substrates but we observed two-fold preference for RNA as an acceptor substrate compared to ssDNA with an identical sequence. In contrast, truncated T4 RNA ligase 2, the commercial enzyme used in these applications, is significantly more active using pre-adenylated RNA as a donor compared to pre-adenylated ssDNA. However, the T4 RNA ligases are ineffective in ligating ssDNA acceptors. Conclusions

  18. A Nucleolar PUF RNA-binding Protein with Specificity for a Unique RNA Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Muench, Douglas G

    2015-12-11

    PUF proteins are a conserved group of sequence specific RNA-binding proteins that bind to RNA in a modular fashion. The RNA-binding domain of PUF proteins typically consists of eight clustered Puf repeats. Plant genomes code for large families of PUF proteins that show significant variability in their predicted Puf repeat number, organization, and amino acid sequence. Here we sought to determine whether the observed variability in the RNA-binding domains of four plant PUFs results in a preference for nonclassical PUF RNA target sequences. We report the identification of a novel RNA binding sequence for a nucleolar Arabidopsis PUF protein that contains an atypical RNA-binding domain. The Arabidopsis PUM23 (APUM23) binding sequence was 10 nucleotides in length, contained a centrally located UUGA core element, and had a preferred cytosine at nucleotide position 8. These RNA sequence characteristics differ from those of other PUF proteins, because all natural PUFs studied to date bind to RNAs that contain a conserved UGU sequence at their 5' end and lack specificity for cytosine. Gel mobility shift assays validated the identity of the APUM23 binding sequence and supported the location of 3 of the 10 predicted Puf repeats in APUM23, including the cytosine-binding repeat. The preferred 10-nucleotide sequence bound by APUM23 is present within the 18S rRNA sequence, supporting the known role of APUM23 in 18S rRNA maturation. This work also reveals that APUM23, an ortholog of yeast Nop9, could provide an advanced structural backbone for Puf repeat engineering and target-specific regulation of cellular RNAs.

  19. Isolation of novel ribozymes that ligate AMP-activated RNA substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, A. J.; Szostak, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The protein enzymes RNA ligase and DNA ligase catalyze the ligation of nucleic acids via an adenosine-5'-5'-pyrophosphate 'capped' RNA or DNA intermediate. The activation of nucleic acid substrates by adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) may be a vestige of 'RNA world' catalysis. AMP-activated ligation seems ideally suited for catalysis by ribozymes (RNA enzymes), because an RNA motif capable of tightly and specifically binding AMP has previously been isolated. RESULTS: We used in vitro selection and directed evolution to explore the ability of ribozymes to catalyze the template-directed ligation of AMP-activated RNAs. We subjected a pool of 10(15) RNA molecules, each consisting of long random sequences flanking a mutagenized adenosine triphosphate (ATP) aptamer, to ten rounds of in vitro selection, including three rounds involving mutagenic polymerase chain reaction. Selection was for the ligation of an oligonucleotide to the 5'-capped active pool RNA species. Many different ligase ribozymes were isolated; these ribozymes had rates of reaction up to 0.4 ligations per hour, corresponding to rate accelerations of approximately 5 x10(5) over the templated, but otherwise uncatalyzed, background reaction rate. Three characterized ribozymes catalyzed the formation of 3'-5'-phosphodiester bonds and were highly specific for activation by AMP at the ligation site. CONCLUSIONS: The existence of a new class of ligase ribozymes is consistent with the hypothesis that the unusual mechanism of the biological ligases resulted from a conservation of mechanism during an evolutionary replacement of a primordial ribozyme ligase by a more modern protein enzyme. The newly isolated ligase ribozymes may also provide a starting point for the isolation of ribozymes that catalyze the polymerization of AMP-activated oligonucleotides or mononucleotides, which might have been the prebiotic analogs of nucleoside triphosphates.

  20. Influence of backbone rigidness on single chain conformation of thiophene-based conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjian; Liu, Jianhua; Simón-Bower, Lauren; Zhai, Lei; Gesquiere, Andre J

    2013-04-25

    Structural order of conjugated polymers at different length scales directs the optoelectronic properties of the corresponding materials; thus it is of critical importance to understand and control conjugated polymer morphology for successful application of these materials in organic optoelectronics. Herein, with the aim of probing the dependence of single chain folding properties on the chemical structure and rigidness of the polymer backbones, single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to four thiophene-based conjugated polymers. These include regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PBTTT-14), poly(2,5-bis(3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thiophene-2-yl)thiophen-2-ylthiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole) (PTzQT-12), and poly(3,3-didodecylquaterthiophene)] (PQT-12). Our previous work has shown that RR-P3HT and PBTTT-14 polymer chains fold in their nanostructures, whereas PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 do not fold in their nanostructures. At the single molecule level, it was found that RR-P3HT single chains almost exclusively fold into loosely and strongly aggregated conformations, analogous to the folding properties in nanostructures. PQT-12 displays significant chain folding as well, but only into loosely aggregated conformations, showing an absence of strongly aggregated polymer chains. PBTTT-14 exhibits a significant fraction of rigid polymer chain. The findings made for single molecules of PQT-12 and PBTTT-14 are thus in contrast with the observations made in their corresponding nanostructures. PTzQT-12 appears to be the most rigid and planar conjugated polymer of these four polymers. However, although the presumably nonfolding polymers PQT-12 and PTzQT-12 exhibit less folding than RR-P3HT, there is still a significant occurrence of chain folding for these polymers at the single molecule level. These results suggest that the folding properties of conjugated polymers can be influenced by the architecture of the

  1. Determination of optimal sites of antisense oligonucleotide cleavage within TNFα mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B. H.; Giles, R. V.; Spiller, D. G.; Grzybowski, J.; Tidd, D. M.; Sibson, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides provide a powerful tool in order to determine the consequences of the reduced expression of a selected target gene and may include target validation and therapeutic applications. Methods of predicting optimum antisense sites are not always effective. We have compared the efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides, which were selected in vitro using random combinatorial oligonucleotide libraries of differing length and complexity, upon putative target sites within TNFα mRNA. The relationship of specific target site accessibility and oligonucleotide efficacy with respect to these parameters proved to be complex. Modification of the length of the recognition sequence of the oligonucleotide library illustrated that independent target sites demonstrated a preference for antisense oligonucleotides of a defined and independent optimal length. The efficacy of antisense oligonucleotide sequences selected in vitro paralleled that observed in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated U937 cells. The application of methylphosphonate:phosphodiester chimaeric oligonucleotides to U937 cells reduced mRNA levels to up to 19.8% that of the untreated cell population. This approach provides a predictive means to profile any mRNA of known sequence with respect to the identification and optimisation of sites accessible to antisense oligonucleotide activity. PMID:11522838

  2. Evolution in vitro of an RNA enzyme with altered metal dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, N.; Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme catalyses a sequence-specific phosphodiester cleavage reaction on an external RNA oligonucleotide substrate in the presence of a divalent metal cation cofactor. This reaction proceeds readily with either Mg2+ or Mn2+, but no detectable reaction has been reported when other divalent cations are used as the sole cofactor. Cations such as Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ can stabilize the correct folded conformation of the ribozyme, thereby partially alleviating the Mg2+ or Mn2+ requirement. But catalysis by the ribozyme involves coordination of either Mg2+ or Mn2+ at the active site, resulting in an overall requirement for one of these two cations. Here we use an in vitro evolution process to obtain variants of the Tetrahymena ribozyme that are capable of cleaving an RNA substrate in reaction mixtures containing Ca2+ as the divalent cation. These findings extend the range of different chemical environments available to RNA enzymes and illustrate the power of in vitro evolution in generating macromolecular catalysts with desired properties.

  3. Persistence of seed-based activity following segmentation of a microRNA guide strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorn, Guillaume; Zhao, Lihong; Sachs, Alan B; Flanagan, W Michael; Lim, Lee P

    2010-12-01

    microRNAs are ∼ 22 nucleotide regulatory RNAs that are processed into duplexes from hairpin structures and incorporated into Argonaute proteins. Here, we show that a nick in the middle of the guide strand of an miRNA sequence allows for seed-based targeting characteristic of miRNA activity. Insertion of an inverted abasic, a dye, or a small gap between the two segments still permits target knockdown. While activity from the seed region of the segmented miRNA is apparent, activity from the 3' half of the guide strand is impaired, suggesting that an intact guide backbone is required for contribution from the 3' half. miRNA activity was also observed following nicking of a miRNA precursor. These results illustrate a structural flexibility in miRNA duplexes and may have applications in the design of miRNA mimetics.

  4. ENZYME-IIB(CELLOBIOSE) OF THE PHOSPHOENOL-PYRUVATE-DEPENDENT PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE SYSTEM OF ESCHERICHIA-COLI - BACKBONE ASSIGNMENT AND SECONDARY STRUCTURE DETERMINED BY 3-DIMENSIONAL NMR-SPECTROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AB, E; SCHUURMANWOLTERS, GK; SAIER, MH; REIZER, J; JACUINOD, M; ROEPSTORFF, P; DIJKSTRA, K; SCHEEK, RM; ROBILLARD, GT

    1994-01-01

    The assignment of backbone resonances and the secondary structure determination of the Cys 10 Ser mutant of enzyme IIBCellobiose of the Escherichia coli cellobiose-specific phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are presented. The backbone resonances were assigned using 4 triple re

  5. Enzyme IIBcellobiose of the phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli : Backbone assignment and secondary structure determined by three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AB, Eiso; Schuurman-Wolters, Gea K.; Saier, Milton H.; Reizer, Jonathan; Jacuinod, Michel; Roepstorff, Peter; Dijkstra, Klaas; Scheek, Ruud M.; Robillard, George T.

    1994-01-01

    The assignment of backbone resonances and the secondary structure determination of the Cys 10 Ser mutant of enzyme IIBcellobiose of the Escherichia coli cellobiose-specific phosphoenol-pyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system are presented. The backbone resonances were assigned using 4 triple re

  6. Backbone resonance assignment and order tensor estimation using residual dipolar couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shealy, Paul; Liu, Yizhou; Simin, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    An NMR investigation of proteins with known X-ray structures is of interest in a number of endeavors. Performing these studies through nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) requires the costly step of resonance assignment. The prevalent assignment strategy does not make use of existing structural information and requires uniform isotope labeling. Here we present a rapid and cost-effective method of assigning NMR data to an existing structure—either an X-ray or computationally modeled structure. The presented method, Exhaustively Permuted Assignment of RDCs (EPAR), utilizes unassigned residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data that can easily be obtained by NMR spectroscopy. The algorithm uses only the backbone N–H RDCs from multiple alignment media along with the amino acid type of the RDCs. It is inspired by previous work from Zweckstetter and provides several extensions. We present results on 13 synthetic and experimental datasets from 8 different structures, including two homodimers. Using just two alignment media, EPAR achieves an average assignment accuracy greater than 80%. With three media, the average accuracy is higher than 94%. The algorithm also outputs a prediction of the assignment accuracy, which has a correlation of 0.77 to the true accuracy. This prediction score can be used to establish the needed confidence in assignment accuracy. PMID:21667298

  7. Comparison of the backbone dynamics of a natural and a consensus designed 3-TPR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarymowycz, Virginia A; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Regan, Lynne; Stone, Martin J

    2008-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) is a 34-amino acid helix-turn-helix motif that occurs in tandem arrays in numerous proteins. Here we compare the backbone dynamics of a natural 3-repeat TPR domain, from the protein UBP, with the behavior of a designed protein CTPR3, which consists of three identical consensus TPR units. Although the three tandem TPR repeats in both CTPR3 and UBP behave as a single unit, with no evidence of independent repeat motions, the data indicate that certain positions in UBP are significantly more flexible than are the corresponding positions in CTPR3. Most of the dynamical changes occur at or adjacent to positions that are involved in intra-repeat packing interactions. These observations lead us to suggest that the three-TPR domain of UBP does not incorporate optimized packing, compared to that seen in the idealized CTPR. The natural TPR domain is not only less stable overall than CTPR3, but also presents increased local flexibility at the positions where the sequences differs from the conserved consensus.

  8. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; Lehoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6.

  9. Noise assisted excitation energy transfer in a linear model of a selectivity filter backbone strand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassereh, Hassan; Salari, Vahid; Shahbazi, Farhad

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of noise and disorder on the efficiency of excitation energy transfer (EET) in a N=5 sites linear chain with ‘static’ dipole-dipole couplings. In fact, here, the disordered chain is a toy model for one strand of the selectivity filter backbone in ion channels. It has recently been discussed that the presence of quantum coherence in the selectivity filter is possible and can play a role in mediating ion-conduction and ion-selectivity in the selectivity filter. The question is ‘how a quantum coherence can be effective in such structures while the environment of the channel is dephasing (i.e. noisy)?’ Basically, we expect that the presence of the noise should have a destructive effect in the quantum transport. In fact, we show that such expectation is valid for ordered chains. However, our results indicate that introducing the dephasing in the disordered chains leads to the weakening of the localization effects, arising from the multiple back-scatterings due to the randomness, and then increases the efficiency of quantum energy transfer. Thus, the presence of noise is crucial for the enhancement of EET efficiency in disordered chains. We also show that the contribution of both classical and quantum mechanical effects are required to improve the speed of energy transfer along the chain. Our analysis may help for better understanding of fast and efficient functioning of the selectivity filters in ion channels.

  10. Noise assisted excitation energy transfer in a linear model of a selectivity filter backbone strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassereh, Hassan; Salari, Vahid; Shahbazi, Farhad

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of noise and disorder on the efficiency of excitation energy transfer (EET) in a N = 5 sites linear chain with 'static' dipole-dipole couplings. In fact, here, the disordered chain is a toy model for one strand of the selectivity filter backbone in ion channels. It has recently been discussed that the presence of quantum coherence in the selectivity filter is possible and can play a role in mediating ion-conduction and ion-selectivity in the selectivity filter. The question is 'how a quantum coherence can be effective in such structures while the environment of the channel is dephasing (i.e. noisy)?' Basically, we expect that the presence of the noise should have a destructive effect in the quantum transport. In fact, we show that such expectation is valid for ordered chains. However, our results indicate that introducing the dephasing in the disordered chains leads to the weakening of the localization effects, arising from the multiple back-scatterings due to the randomness, and then increases the efficiency of quantum energy transfer. Thus, the presence of noise is crucial for the enhancement of EET efficiency in disordered chains. We also show that the contribution of both classical and quantum mechanical effects are required to improve the speed of energy transfer along the chain. Our analysis may help for better understanding of fast and efficient functioning of the selectivity filters in ion channels.

  11. Amino acid preference against beta sheet through allowing backbone hydration enabled by the presence of cation

    CERN Document Server

    Sharley, John N

    2016-01-01

    It is known that steric blocking by peptide sidechains of hydrogen bonding, HB, between water and peptide groups, PGs, in beta sheets accords with an amino acid intrinsic beta sheet preference. The present observations with Quantum Molecular Dynamics, QMD, simulation with quantum mechanical treatment of every water molecule solvating a beta sheet that would be transient in nature suggest that this steric blocking is not applicable in a hydrophobic region unless a cation is present, so that the amino acid beta sheet preference due to this steric blocking is only effective in the presence of a cation. We observed backbone hydration in a polyalanine and to a lesser extent polyvaline alpha helix without a cation being present, but a cation could increase the strength of these HBs. Parallel beta sheets have a greater tendency than antiparallel beta sheets of equivalent small size to retain regular structure in solvated QMD, and a 4 strand 4 inter-PG HB chain parallel beta sheet was used. Stability was reinforced b...

  12. Dependence of crystallite formation and preferential backbone orientations on the side chain pattern in PBDTTPD polymers

    KAUST Repository

    El Labban, Abdulrahman

    2014-11-26

    (Figure Presented) Alkyl substituents appended to the π-conjugated main chain account for the solution-processability and film-forming properties of most π-conjugated polymers for organic electronic device applications, including field-effect transistors (FETs) and bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Beyond film-forming properties, recent work has emphasized the determining role that side-chain substituents play on polymer self-assembly and thin-film nanostructural order, and, in turn, on device performance. However, the factors that determine polymer crystallite orientation in thin-films, implying preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate, are a matter of some debate, and these structural changes remain difficult to anticipate. In this report, we show how systematic changes in the side-chain pattern of poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene-alt-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers can (i) influence the propensity of the polymer to order in the π-stacking direction, and (ii) direct the preferential orientation of the polymer crystallites in thin films (e.g., "face-on" vs "edge-on"). Oriented crystallites, specifically crystallites that are well-ordered in the π-stacking direction, are believed to be a key contributor to improved thin-film device performance in both FETs and BHJ solar cells.

  13. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  14. Backbone, side chain and heme resonance assignments of cytochrome OmcF from Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Joana M; Silva E Sousa, Marta; Salgueiro, Carlos A; Bruix, Marta

    2015-10-01

    Gene knockout studies on Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs) cells showed that the outer membrane cytochrome OmcF is involved in respiratory pathways leading to the extracellular reduction of Fe(III) citrate and U(VI) oxide. In addition, microarray analysis of OmcF-deficient mutant versus the wild-type strain revealed that many of the genes with decreased transcript level were those whose expression is upregulated in cells grown with a graphite electrode as electron acceptor. This suggests that OmcF also regulates the electron transfer to electrode surfaces and the concomitant electrical current production by Gs in microbial fuel cells. Extracellular electron transfer processes (EET) constitute nowadays the foundations to develop biotechnological applications in biofuel production, bioremediation and bioenergy. Therefore, the structural characterization of OmcF is a fundamental step to understand the mechanisms underlying EET. Here, we report the complete assignment of the heme proton signals together with (1)H, (13)C and (15)N backbone and side chain assignments of the OmcF, excluding the hydrophobic residues of the N-terminal predicted lipid anchor.

  15. Reversible Self-Assembly of Backbone-Thermoresponsive Long Chain Hyperbranched Poly(N-Isopropyl Acrylamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we mainly described the reversible self-assembly of a backbone-thermoresponsive, long-chain, hyperbranched poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide (LCHBPNIPAM in aqueous solution. Here, we revealed a reversible self-assembly behavior of LCHBPNIPAM aqueous solution derived from temperature. By controlling the temperature of LCHBPNIPAM aqueous solution, we tune the morphology of the LCHBPNIPAM self-assemblies. When the solution temperature increased from the room temperature to the lower critical solution temperature of PNIPAM segments, LCHBPNIPAM self-assembled from multi-compartment vesicles into solid micelles. The morphology of LCHBPNIPAM self-assemblies changed from solid micelles to multi-compartment vesicles again when the temperature decreased back to the room temperature. The size presented, at first, an increase, and then a decrease, tendency in the heating-cooling process. The above thermally-triggered self-assembly behavior of LCHBPNIPAM aqueous solution was investigated by dynamic/static light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance in D2O, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These results indicated that LCHBPNIPAM aqueous solution presents a reversible self-assembly process. The controlled release behaviors of doxorubicin from the vesicles and micelles formed by LCHBPNIPAM further proved the feasibility of these self-assemblies as the stimulus-responsive drug delivery system.

  16. Navigating the massive world of reddit: using backbone networks to map user interests in social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randal S. Olson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the massive online worlds of social media, users frequently rely on organizing themselves around specific topics of interest to find and engage with like-minded people. However, navigating these massive worlds and finding topics of specific interest often proves difficult because the worlds are mostly organized haphazardly, leaving users to find relevant interests by word of mouth or using a basic search feature. Here, we report on a method using the backbone of a network to create a map of the primary topics of interest in any social network. To demonstrate the method, we build an interest map for the social news web site reddit and show how such a map could be used to navigate a social media world. Moreover, we analyze the network properties of the reddit social network and find that it has a scale-free, small-world, and modular community structure, much like other online social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. We suggest that the integration of interest maps into popular social media platforms will assist users in organizing themselves into more specific interest groups, which will help alleviate the overcrowding effect often observed in large online communities.

  17. Degenerate primer MOB typing of multiresistant clinical isolates of E. coli uncovers new plasmid backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Ruiz del Castillo, Belén; Alvarado, Andrés; de la Cruz, Fernando; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate Primer MOB Typing is a PCR-based protocol for the classification of γ-proteobacterial transmissible plasmids in five phylogenetic relaxase MOB families. It was applied to a multiresistant E. coli collection, previously characterized by PCR-based replicon-typing, in order to compare both methods. Plasmids from 32 clinical isolates of multiresistant E. coli (19 extended spectrum beta-lactamase producers and 13 non producers) and their transconjugants were analyzed. A total of 95 relaxases were detected, at least one per isolate, underscoring the high potential of these strains for antibiotic-resistance transmission. MOBP12 and MOBF12 plasmids were the most abundant. Most MOB subfamilies detected were present in both subsets of the collection, indicating a shared mobilome among multiresistant E. coli. The plasmid profile obtained by both methods was compared, which provided useful data upon which decisions related to the implementation of detection methods in the clinic could be based. The phylogenetic depth at which replicon and MOB-typing classify plasmids is different. While replicon-typing aims at plasmid replication regions with non-degenerate primers, MOB-typing classifies plasmids into relaxase subfamilies using degenerate primers. As a result, MOB-typing provides a deeper phylogenetic depth than replicon-typing and new plasmid groups are uncovered. Significantly, MOB typing identified 17 plasmids and an integrative and conjugative element, which were not detected by replicon-typing. Four of these backbones were different from previously reported elements.

  18. Enhancing backbone sampling in Monte Carlo simulations using internal coordinates normal mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Victor A; Lecina, Daniel; Grebner, Christoph; Guallar, Victor

    2016-10-15

    Normal mode methods are becoming a popular alternative to sample the conformational landscape of proteins. In this study, we describe the implementation of an internal coordinate normal mode analysis method and its application in exploring protein flexibility by using the Monte Carlo method PELE. This new method alternates two different stages, a perturbation of the backbone through the application of torsional normal modes, and a resampling of the side chains. We have evaluated the new approach using two test systems, ubiquitin and c-Src kinase, and the differences to the original ANM method are assessed by comparing both results to reference molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that the sampled phase space in the internal coordinate approach is closer to the molecular dynamics phase space than the one coming from a Cartesian coordinate anisotropic network model. In addition, the new method shows a great speedup (∼5-7×), making it a good candidate for future normal mode implementations in Monte Carlo methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Is there a Climate Network - A Backbone of the Climate System? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurths, J.

    2010-12-01

    We consider an inverse problem: Is there a backbone-like structure underlying the climate system? For this we propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system. This technique is then applied to reanalysis and model surface air temperature data. Parameters of this network, as betweenness centrality, uncover relations to global circulation patterns in oceans and atmosphere. We especially study the role of hubs and of long range connections, called teleconnections, in the flows of energy and matter in the climate system. The global scale view on climate networks offers promising new perspectives for detecting dynamical structures based on nonlinear physical processes in the climate system. References Arenas, A., A. Diaz-Guilera, J. Kurths, Y. Moreno, and C. Zhou, Phys. Reports 2008, 469, 93. Donges, J., Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Europ. Phys. J. ST 2009, 174, 157-179. Donges, J., Y. Zou, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Europhys. Lett. 2009, 87, 48007. Nawrath, J. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2010, 104, 038701. Donner, R., Y. Zou, J. Donges, N. Marwan, and J. Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 2010, 81, 015101(R ).

  20. Quantitative residue-specific protein backbone torsion angle dynamics from concerted measurement of 3J couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ho; Li, Fang; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2015-02-04

    Three-bond (3)J(C'C') and (3)J(HNHα) couplings in peptides and proteins are functions of the intervening backbone torsion angle ϕ. In well-ordered regions, (3)J(HNHα) is tightly correlated with (3)J(C'C'), but the presence of large ϕ angle fluctuations differentially affects the two types of couplings. Assuming the ϕ angles follow a Gaussian distribution, the width of this distribution can be extracted from (3)J(C'C') and (3)J(HNHα), as demonstrated for the folded proteins ubiquitin and GB3. In intrinsically disordered proteins, slow transverse relaxation permits measurement of (3)J(C'C') and (3)J(HNH) couplings at very high precision, and impact of factors other than the intervening torsion angle on (3)J will be minimal, making these couplings exceptionally valuable structural reporters. Analysis of α-synuclein yields rather homogeneous widths of 69 ± 6° for the ϕ angle distributions and (3)J(C'C') values that agree well with those of a recent maximum entropy analysis of chemical shifts, J couplings, and (1)H-(1)H NOEs. Data are consistent with a modest (≤30%) population of the polyproline II region.

  1. Dependence of crystallite formation and preferential backbone orientations on the side chain pattern in PBDTTPD polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Labban, Abdulrahman; Warnan, Julien; Cabanetos, Clément; Ratel, Olivier; Tassone, Christopher; Toney, Michael F; Beaujuge, Pierre M

    2014-11-26

    Alkyl substituents appended to the π-conjugated main chain account for the solution-processability and film-forming properties of most π-conjugated polymers for organic electronic device applications, including field-effect transistors (FETs) and bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Beyond film-forming properties, recent work has emphasized the determining role that side-chain substituents play on polymer self-assembly and thin-film nanostructural order, and, in turn, on device performance. However, the factors that determine polymer crystallite orientation in thin-films, implying preferential backbone orientation relative to the device substrate, are a matter of some debate, and these structural changes remain difficult to anticipate. In this report, we show how systematic changes in the side-chain pattern of poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-alt-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers can (i) influence the propensity of the polymer to order in the π-stacking direction, and (ii) direct the preferential orientation of the polymer crystallites in thin films (e.g., "face-on" vs "edge-on"). Oriented crystallites, specifically crystallites that are well-ordered in the π-stacking direction, are believed to be a key contributor to improved thin-film device performance in both FETs and BHJ solar cells.

  2. An Enhanced Backbone-Assisted Reliable Framework for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An extremely reliable source to sink communication is required for most of the contemporary WSN applications especially pertaining to military, healthcare and disaster-recovery. However, due to their intrinsic energy, bandwidth and computational constraints, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs encounter several challenges in reliable source to sink communication. In this paper, we present a novel reliable topology that uses reliable hotlines between sensor gateways to boost the reliability of end-to-end transmissions. This reliable and efficient routing alternative reduces the number of average hops from source to the sink. We prove, with the help of analytical evaluation, that communication using hotlines is considerably more reliable than traditional WSN routing. We use reliability theory to analyze the cost and benefit of adding gateway nodes to a backbone-assisted WSN. However, in hotline assisted routing some scenarios where source and the sink are just a couple of hops away might bring more latency, therefore, we present a Signature Based Routing (SBR scheme. SBR enables the gateways to make intelligent routing decisions, based upon the derived signature, hence providing lesser end-to-end delay between source to the sink communication. Finally, we evaluate our proposed hotline based topology with the help of a simulation tool and show that the proposed topology provides manifold increase in end-to-end reliability.

  3. Phylogenomics resolves a spider backbone phylogeny and rejects a prevailing paradigm for orb web evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Jason E; Garrison, Nicole L; Hamilton, Chris A; Godwin, Rebecca L; Hedin, Marshal; Agnarsson, Ingi

    2014-08-04

    Spiders represent an ancient predatory lineage known for their extraordinary biomaterials, including venoms and silks. These adaptations make spiders key arthropod predators in most terrestrial ecosystems. Despite ecological, biomedical, and biomaterial importance, relationships among major spider lineages remain unresolved or poorly supported. Current working hypotheses for a spider "backbone" phylogeny are largely based on morphological evidence, as most molecular markers currently employed are generally inadequate for resolving deeper-level relationships. We present here a phylogenomic analysis of spiders including taxa representing all major spider lineages. Our robust phylogenetic hypothesis recovers some fundamental and uncontroversial spider clades, but rejects the prevailing paradigm of a monophyletic Orbiculariae, the most diverse lineage, containing orb-weaving spiders. Based on our results, the orb web either evolved much earlier than previously hypothesized and is ancestral for a majority of spiders or else it has multiple independent origins, as hypothesized by precladistic authors. Cribellate deinopoid orb weavers that use mechanically adhesive silk are more closely related to a diverse clade of mostly webless spiders than to the araneoid orb-weaving spiders that use adhesive droplet silks. The fundamental shift in our understanding of spider phylogeny proposed here has broad implications for interpreting the evolution of spiders, their remarkable biomaterials, and a key extended phenotype--the spider web.

  4. An Enhanced Backbone-Assisted Reliable Framework for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufail, Ali; Khayam, Syed Ali; Raza, Muhammad Taqi; Ali, Amna; Kim, Ki-Hyung

    2010-01-01

    An extremely reliable source to sink communication is required for most of the contemporary WSN applications especially pertaining to military, healthcare and disaster-recovery. However, due to their intrinsic energy, bandwidth and computational constraints, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) encounter several challenges in reliable source to sink communication. In this paper, we present a novel reliable topology that uses reliable hotlines between sensor gateways to boost the reliability of end-to-end transmissions. This reliable and efficient routing alternative reduces the number of average hops from source to the sink. We prove, with the help of analytical evaluation, that communication using hotlines is considerably more reliable than traditional WSN routing. We use reliability theory to analyze the cost and benefit of adding gateway nodes to a backbone-assisted WSN. However, in hotline assisted routing some scenarios where source and the sink are just a couple of hops away might bring more latency, therefore, we present a Signature Based Routing (SBR) scheme. SBR enables the gateways to make intelligent routing decisions, based upon the derived signature, hence providing lesser end-to-end delay between source to the sink communication. Finally, we evaluate our proposed hotline based topology with the help of a simulation tool and show that the proposed topology provides manifold increase in end-to-end reliability. PMID:22294890

  5. Structure and backbone dynamics of a microcrystalline metalloprotein by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michael J; Pell, Andrew J; Bertini, Ivano; Felli, Isabella C; Gonnelli, Leonardo; Pierattelli, Roberta; Herrmann, Torsten; Emsley, Lyndon; Pintacuda, Guido

    2012-07-10

    We introduce a new approach to improve structural and dynamical determination of large metalloproteins using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with (1)H detection under ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS). The approach is based on the rapid and sensitive acquisition of an extensive set of (15)N and (13)C nuclear relaxation rates. The system on which we demonstrate these methods is the enzyme Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), which coordinates a Cu ion available either in Cu(+) (diamagnetic) or Cu(2+) (paramagnetic) form. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements are obtained from the difference in rates measured in the two forms and are employed as structural constraints for the determination of the protein structure. When added to (1)H-(1)H distance restraints, they are shown to yield a twofold improvement of the precision of the structure. Site-specific order parameters and timescales of motion are obtained by a gaussian axial fluctuation (GAF) analysis of the relaxation rates of the diamagnetic molecule, and interpreted in relation to backbone structure and metal binding. Timescales for motion are found to be in the range of the overall correlation time in solution, where internal motions characterized here would not be observable.

  6. Backbone exponents of the two-dimensional q-state Potts model: a Monte Carlo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youjin; Blöte, Henk W J; Nienhuis, Bernard

    2004-02-01

    We determine the backbone exponent X(b) of several critical and tricritical q-state Potts models in two dimensions. The critical systems include the bond percolation, the Ising, the q=2-sqrt[3], 3, and 4 state Potts, and the Baxter-Wu model, and the tricritical ones include the q=1 Potts model and the Blume-Capel model. For this purpose, we formulate several efficient Monte Carlo methods and sample the probability P2 of a pair of points connected via at least two independent paths. Finite-size-scaling analysis of P2 yields X(b) as 0.3566(2), 0.2696(3), 0.2105(3), and 0.127(4) for the critical q=2-sqrt[3], 1,2, 3, and 4 state Potts model, respectively. At tricriticality, we obtain X(b)=0.0520(3) and 0.0753(6) for the q=1 and 2 Potts model, respectively. For the critical q-->0 Potts model it is derived that X(b)=3/4. From a scaling argument, we find that, at tricriticality, X(b) reduces to the magnetic exponent, as confirmed by the numerical results.

  7. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E.; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA “bait” sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA “trigger” sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch “ON” translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present. PMID:28350000

  8. Probing tRNA interaction with biogenic polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouameur, Amin Ahmed; Bourassa, Philippe; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2010-10-01

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels. This effect may be explained by the ability of polyamines to bind and influence the secondary structure of tRNA, mRNA, and rRNA. We report the interaction between tRNA and the three biogenic polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and cobalt(III)hexamine at physiological conditions, using FTIR spectroscopy, capillary electrophoresis, and molecular modeling. The results indicated that tRNA was stabilized at low biogenic polyamine concentration, as a consequence of polyamine interaction with the backbone phosphate group. The main tRNA reactive sites for biogenic polyamine at low concentration were guanine-N7/O6, uracil-O2/O4, adenine-N3, and 2'OH of the ribose. At high polyamine concentration, the interaction involves guanine-N7/O6, adenine-N7, uracil-O2 reactive sites, and the backbone phosphate group. The participation of the polycation primary amino group, in the interaction and the presence of the hydrophobic contact, are also shown. The binding affinity of biogenic polyamine to tRNA molecule was in the order of spermine > spermidine > putrescine with K(Spm) = 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1), K(Spd) = 6.1 × 10(5) M(-1), and K(Put) = 1.0 × 10(5) M(-1), which correlates with their positively charged amino group content. Hill analysis showed positive cooperativity for the biogenic polyamines and negative cooperativity for cobalt-hexamine. Cobalt(III)hexamine contains high- and low-affinity sites in tRNA with K(1) = 3.2 × 10(5) M(-1) and K(2) = 1.7 × 10(5) M(-1), that have been attributed to the interactions with guanine-N7 sites and the backbone PO(2) group, respectively. This mechanism of tRNA binding could explain the condensation phenomenon observed at high Co(III) content, as previously shown in the Co(III)-DNA complexes.

  9. Kinetic Analysis of tRNA Methylfransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Ming; Masuda, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain many chemical modifications that are introduced after transcription. A major form of these modifications is methyl transfer to bases and backbone groups, using S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet) as the methyl donor. Each methylation confers a specific advantage to tRNA in structure or in function. A remarkable methylation is to the G37 base on the 3' side of the anticodon to generate m1G37-tRNA, which suppresses frameshift errors during protein synthesis and is therefore essential for cell growth in all three domains of life. This methylation is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukaryotes and archaea. Although TrmD and Trm5 catalyze the same methylation reaction, kinetic analysis reveal that these two enzymes are unrelated to each other and are distinct in their reaction mechanism. This chapter summarizes the kinetic assays that are used to reveal the distinction between TrmD and Trm5. Three types of assays are described, the steady-state, the pre-steady-state, and the single turnover assays, which collectively provide the basis for mechanistic investigation of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer reactions. PMID:26253967

  10. Primordial soup or vinaigrette: did the RNA world evolve at acidic pH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt Harold S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RNA world concept has wide, though certainly not unanimous, support within the origin-of-life scientific community. One view is that life may have emerged as early as the Hadean Eon 4.3-3.8 billion years ago with an atmosphere of high CO2 producing an acidic ocean of the order of pH 3.5-6. Compatible with this scenario is the intriguing proposal that life arose within alkaline (pH 9-11 deep-sea hydrothermal vents like those of the 'Lost City', with the interface with the acidic ocean creating a proton gradient sufficient to drive the first metabolism. However, RNA is most stable at pH 4-5 and is unstable at alkaline pH, raising the possibility that RNA may have first arisen in the acidic ocean itself (possibly near an acidic hydrothermal vent, acidic volcanic lake or comet pond. As the Hadean Eon progressed, the ocean pH is inferred to have gradually risen to near neutral as atmospheric CO2 levels decreased. Presentation of the hypothesis We propose that RNA is well suited for a world evolving at acidic pH. This is supported by the enhanced stability at acidic pH of not only the RNA phosphodiester bond but also of the aminoacyl-(tRNA and peptide bonds. Examples of in vitro-selected ribozymes with activities at acid pH have recently been documented. The subsequent transition to a DNA genome could have been partly driven by the gradual rise in ocean pH, since DNA has greater stability than RNA at alkaline pH, but not at acidic pH. Testing the hypothesis We have proposed mechanisms for two key RNA world activities that are compatible with an acidic milieu: (i non-enzymatic RNA replication of a hemi-protonated cytosine-rich oligonucleotide, and (ii specific aminoacylation of tRNA/hairpins through triple helix interactions between the helical aminoacyl stem and a single-stranded aminoacylating ribozyme. Implications of the hypothesis Our hypothesis casts doubt on the hypothesis that RNA evolved in the vicinity of alkaline

  11. Interaction between the Spliceosomal Pre-mRNA Branch Site and U2 snRNP Protein p14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, William; Schroeder, Kersten T; Bryant, Amy N; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2016-02-02

    We have probed the molecular basis of recognition between human spliceosomal U2 snRNP protein p14 and RNA targets representing the intron branch site region. Interaction of an RNA duplex representing the branch site helix perturbed at least 10 nuclear magnetic resonance cross-peaks of (15)N-labeled p14. However, similar chemical shift changes were observed upon interaction with a duplex without the bulged branch site residue, suggesting that binding of p14 to RNA is nonspecific and does not recognize the branch site. We propose that the p14-RNA interaction screens charges on the backbone of the branch site during spliceosome assembly.

  12. Characterization of Mg2+ Distributions around RNA in Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Binding of metal ions is an important factor governing the folding and dynamics of RNA. Shielding of charges in the polyanionic backbone allows RNA to adopt a diverse range of folded structures that give rise to their many functions within the cell. Some RNA sequences fold only in the presence of Mg2+, which may be bound via direct interactions or occupy the more diffuse “ion atmosphere” around the RNA. To understand the driving forces for RNA folding, it is important to be able to fully characterize the distribution of metal ions around the RNA. In this work, a combined Grand Canonical Monte Carlo-Molecular Dynamics (GCMC-MD) method is applied to characterize Mg2+ distributions around folded RNA structures. The GCMC-MD approach identifies known inner- and outer-shell Mg2+ coordination, while also predicting new regions occupied by Mg2+ that are not observed in crystal structures but that may be relevant in solution, including the case of the Mg2+ riboswitch, for which alternate Mg2+ binding sites may have implications for its function. This work represents a significant step forward in establishing a structural and thermodynamic description of RNA–Mg2+ interactions and their role in RNA structure and function. PMID:27819065

  13. Soluble and Membrane-Bound β-Glucosidases Are Involved in Trimming the Xyloglucan Backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro, Javier; Valdivia, Elene R; Fraga, Patricia; Iglesias, Natalia; Revilla, Gloria; Zarra, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    In many flowering plants, xyloglucan is a major component of primary cell walls, where it plays an important role in growth regulation. Xyloglucan can be degraded by a suite of exoglycosidases that remove specific sugars. In this work, we show that the xyloglucan backbone, formed by (1→4)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl residues, can be attacked by two different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) β-glucosidases from glycoside hydrolase family 3. While BGLC1 (At5g20950; for β-glucosidase active against xyloglucan 1) is responsible for all or most of the soluble activity, BGLC3 (At5g04885) is usually a membrane-anchored protein. Mutations in these two genes, whether on their own or combined with mutations in other exoglycosidase genes, resulted in the accumulation of partially digested xyloglucan subunits, such as GXXG, GXLG, or GXFG. While a mutation in BGLC1 had significant effects on its own, lack of BGLC3 had only minor effects. On the other hand, double bglc1 bglc3 mutants revealed a synergistic interaction that supports a role for membrane-bound BGLC3 in xyloglucan metabolism. In addition, bglc1 bglc3 was complemented by overexpression of either BGLC1 or BGLC3 In overexpression lines, BGLC3 activity was concentrated in a microsome-enriched fraction but also was present in soluble form. Finally, both genes were generally expressed in the same cell types, although, in some cases, BGLC3 was expressed at earlier stages than BGLC1 We propose that functional specialization could explain the separate localization of both enzymes, as a membrane-bound β-glucosidase could specifically digest soluble xyloglucan without affecting the wall-bound polymer.

  14. A new mixed-backbone oligonucleotide against glucosylceramide synthase sensitizes multidrug-resistant tumors to apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri A Patwardhan

    Full Text Available Enhanced ceramide glycosylation catalyzed by glucosylceramide synthase (GCS limits therapeutic efficiencies of antineoplastic agents including doxorubicin in drug-resistant cancer cells. Aimed to determine the role of GCS in tumor response to chemotherapy, a new mixed-backbone oligonucleotide (MBO-asGCS with higher stability and efficiency has been generated to silence human GCS gene. MBO-asGCS was taken up efficiently in both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cells, but it selectively suppressed GCS overexpression, and sensitized drug-resistant cells. MBO-asGCS increased doxorubicin sensitivity by 83-fold in human NCI/ADR-RES, and 43-fold in murine EMT6/AR1 breast cancer cells, respectively. In tumor-bearing mice, MBO-asGCS treatment dramatically inhibited the growth of multidrug-resistant NCI/ADR-RE tumors, decreasing tumor volume to 37%, as compared with scrambled control. Furthermore, MBO-asGCS sensitized multidrug-resistant tumors to chemotherapy, increasing doxorubicin efficiency greater than 2-fold. The sensitization effects of MBO-asGCS relied on the decreases of gene expression and enzyme activity of GCS, and on the increases of C(18-ceramide and of caspase-executed apoptosis. MBO-asGCS was accumulation in tumor xenografts was greater in other tissues, excepting liver and kidneys; but MBO-asGCS did not exert significant toxic effects on liver and kidneys. This study, for the first time in vivo, has demonstrated that GCS is a promising therapeutic target for cancer drug resistance, and MBO-asGCS has the potential to be developed as an antineoplastic agent.

  15. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte; Łężyk, Mateusz; Difilippo, Elisabetta; Logtenberg, Madelon J; Schols, Henk A; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest homologues are 59 % for HEX1 and 51 % for HEX2 on the protein level. Both β-N-acetylhexosaminidases are classified into glycosyl hydrolase family 20 (GH 20) are able to hydrolyze para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylglucosamine (pNP-GlcNAc) as well as para-nitrophenyl-β-N-acetylgalactosamine (pNP-GalNAc) and exhibit pH optima of 8 and 6 for HEX1 and HEX2, respectively. The enzymes are able to hydrolyze N-acetylchitooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization of two, three, and four. The major findings were, that HEX1 and HEX2 catalyze trans-glycosylation reactions with lactose as acceptor, giving rise to the human milk oligosaccharide precursor lacto-N-triose II (LNT2) with yields of 2 and 8 % based on the donor substrate. In total, trans-glycosylation reactions were tested with the disaccharide acceptors β-lactose, sucrose, and maltose, as well as with the monosaccharides galactose and glucose resulting in the successful attachment of GlcNAc to the acceptor in all cases.

  16. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Cheng; Huang, Jiaxin; Boutis, Gregory S

    2011-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source ...

  17. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  18. Progress in palladium-based catalytic systems for the sustainable synthesis of annulated heterocycles: a focus on indole backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Mélanie; Amardeil, Régine; Djakovitch, Laurent; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2012-05-21

    A survey highlighting the most recent palladium catalytic systems produced and their performances for progress in direct synthesis of indole backbones by heterocarbocyclization of reactive substrates is provided. The discussion is developed in relation with the principles of sustainable chemistry concerning atom and mass economy. In this respect, the general convergent character of the syntheses is of particular interest (one-pot, domino, cascade or tandem reactions), and the substrates accessibility and reactivity, together with the final waste production, are also important. This critical review clearly indicates that the development of ligand chemistry, mainly phosphines and carbenes, in the last few decades gave a significant impetus to powerful functionalization of indoles at virtually all positions of this ubiquitous backbone (118 references).

  19. Role of monomer sequence and backbone structure in polypeptoid and polypeptide polymers for anti-fouling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Anastasia; Rizis, Georgios; Wenning, Brandon; Finlay, John; Ober, Christopher; Segalman, Rachel

    Polymeric coatings rely on a fine balance of surface properties to achieve biofouling resistance. Bioinsipired polymers and oligomers provide a modular strategy for the inclusion of multiple functionalities with controlled architecture, sequence and surface properties. In this work, polypeptoid and polypeptide functionalized coatings based on PEO and PDMS block copolymers were compared with respect to surface presentation and fouling by Ulva linza. While polypeptoids and polypeptides are simple isomers of each other, the lack of backbone chirality and hydrogen bonding in polypeptoids leads to surprisingly different surface behavior. Specifically, the polypeptoids surface segregate much more strongly than analogous polypeptide functionalized polymers, which in turn affects the performance of the coating. Indeed, polypeptoid functionalized surfaces were significantly better both in terms of anti-fouling and fouling release than the corresponding polypeptide-bearing polymers. The role of specific monomer sequence and backbone chemistry will be further discussed in this poster.

  20. Identification of high-affinity P2Y₁₂ antagonists based on a phenylpyrazole glutamic acid piperazine backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Gernot; Hessler, Gerhard; Evers, Andreas; Weiss, Tilo; Florian, Peter; Just, Melitta; Czech, Jörg; Czechtizky, Werngard; Görlitzer, Jochen; Ruf, Sven; Kohlmann, Markus; Nazaré, Marc

    2012-10-25

    A series of novel, highly potent P2Y₁₂ antagonists as inhibitors of platelet aggregation based on a phenylpyrazole glutamic acid piperazine backbone is described. Exploration of the structural requirements of the substituents by probing the structure-activity relationship along this backbone led to the discovery of the N-acetyl-(S)-proline cyclobutyl amide moiety as a highly privileged motif. Combining the most favorable substituents led to remarkably potent P2Y₁₂ antagonists displaying not only low nanomolar binding affinity to the P2Y₁₂ receptor but also a low nanomolar inhibition of platelet aggregation in the human platelet rich plasma assay with IC₅₀ values below 50 nM. Using a homology and a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship model, a binding hypothesis elucidating the impact of several structural features was developed.

  1. Nucleic Acid Backbone Structure Variations: Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    )RNA and in the future also antigene applications targeting the double-stranded DNA of the genes themselves leading to gene silencing or guiding specific gene repair. Finally, the special chemical and structural properties of PNA suggest that these or similar molecules might have played a role in the prebiotic origin...

  2. Generation of marker- and/or backbone-free transgenic wheat plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Genping

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to animals and vertical transfer of herbicide resistance genes to the weedy relatives are perceived as major biosafety concerns in genetically modified (GM crops. In this study, five novel vectors which used gusA and bar as a reporter gene and a selection marker gene, respectively, were constructed based on the pCLEAN dual binary vector system. Among these vectors, 1G7B and 5G7B carried two T-DNAs located on two respective plasmids with 5G7B possessing an additional virGwt gene. 5LBTG154 and 5TGTB154 carried two T-DNAs in the target plasmid with either one or double right borders, and 5BTG154 carried the selectable marker gene on the backbone outside of the T-DNA left border in the target plasmid. In addition, 5BTG154, 5LBTG154 and 5TGTB154 used pAL154 as a helper plasmid which contains Komari fragment to facilitate transformation. These five dual binary vector combinations were transformed into Agrobacterium strain AGL1 and used to transform durum wheat cv Stewart 63. Evaluation of the co-transformation efficiencies, the frequencies of marker-free transgenic plants and integration of backbone sequences in the obtained transgenic lines indicated that two vectors (5G7B and 5TGTB154 were more efficient in generating marker-free transgenic wheat plants with no or minimal integration of backbone sequences in the wheat genome. The vector series developed in this study for generation of marker- and/or backbone-free transgenic wheat plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation will be useful to facilitate the creation of ‘clean’ GM wheat containing only the foreign genes of agronomic importance.

  3. Generation of Marker- and/or Backbone-Free Transgenic Wheat Plants via Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gen-Ping; Yu, Xiu-Dao; Sun, Yong-Wei; Jones, Huw D.; Xia, Lan-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to animals and vertical transfer of herbicide resistance genes to the weedy relatives are perceived as major biosafety concerns in genetically modified (GM) crops. In this study, five novel vectors which used gusA and bar as a reporter gene and a selection marker gene, respectively, were constructed based on the pCLEAN dual binary vector system. Among these vectors, 1G7B and 5G7B carried two T-DNAs located on two respective plasmids with 5G7B possessing an additional virGwt gene. 5LBTG154 and 5TGTB154 carried two T-DNAs in the target plasmid with either one or double right borders, and 5BTG154 carried the selectable marker gene on the backbone outside of the T-DNA left border in the target plasmid. In addition, 5BTG154, 5LBTG154, and 5TGTB154 used pAL154 as a helper plasmid which contains Komari fragment to facilitate transformation. These five dual binary vector combinations were transformed into Agrobacterium strain AGL1 and used to transform durum wheat cv Stewart 63. Evaluation of the co-transformation efficiencies, the frequencies of marker-free transgenic plants, and integration of backbone sequences in the obtained transgenic lines indicated that two vectors (5G7B and 5TGTB154) were more efficient in generating marker-free transgenic wheat plants with no or minimal integration of backbone sequences in the wheat genome. The vector series developed in this study for generation of marker- and/or backbone-free transgenic wheat plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation will be useful to facilitate the creation of “clean” GM wheat containing only the foreign genes of agronomic importance. PMID:27708648

  4. Carbon and amide detect backbone assignment methods of a novel repeat protein from the staphylocoagulase in S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voehler, Markus; Ashoka, Maddur Appajaiah; Meiler, Jens; Bock, Paul E

    2017-08-17

    The C-terminal repeat domain of staphylocoagulase that is secreted by the S. aureus is believed to play an important role interacting with fibrinogen and promotes blood clotting. To study this interaction by NMR, full assignment of each amide residue in the HSQC spectrum was required. Despite of the short sequence of the repeat construct, the HSQC spectrum contained a substantial amount of overlapped and exchange broadened resonances, indicating little secondary or tertiary structure. This caused severe problems while using the conventional, amide based NMR method for the backbone assignment. With the growing interest in small apparently disordered proteins, these issues are being faced more frequently. An alternative strategy to improve the backbone assignment capability involved carbon direct detection methods. Circumventing the amide proton detection offers a larger signal dispersion and more uniform signal intensity. For peptides with higher concentrations and in combination with the cold carbon channels of new cryoprobes, higher fields, and sufficiently long relaxation times, the disadvantage of the lower sensitivity of the (13)C nucleus can be overcome. Another advantage of this method is the assignment of the proline backbone residues. Complete assignment with the carbon-detected strategy was achieved with a set of only two 3D, one 2D, and a HNCO measurement, which was necessary to translate the information to the HSQC spectrum.

  5. The Role of Backbone Hydrogen Bonds in the Transition State for Protein Folding of a PDZ Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren W. Pedersen

    Full Text Available Backbone hydrogen bonds are important for the structure and stability of proteins. However, since conventional site-directed mutagenesis cannot be applied to perturb the backbone, the contribution of these hydrogen bonds in protein folding and stability has been assessed only for a very limited set of small proteins. We have here investigated effects of five amide-to-ester mutations in the backbone of a PDZ domain, a 90-residue globular protein domain, to probe the influence of hydrogen bonds in a β-sheet for folding and stability. The amide-to-ester mutation removes NH-mediated hydrogen bonds and destabilizes hydrogen bonds formed by the carbonyl oxygen. The overall stability of the PDZ domain generally decreased for all amide-to-ester mutants due to an increase in the unfolding rate constant. For this particular region of the PDZ domain, it is therefore clear that native hydrogen bonds are formed after crossing of the rate-limiting barrier for folding. Moreover, three of the five amide-to-ester mutants displayed an increase in the folding rate constant suggesting that the hydrogen bonds are involved in non-native interactions in the transition state for folding.

  6. Routing protocol for wireless quantum multi-hop mesh backbone network based on partially entangled GHZ state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Pei-Ying; Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen; Zhan, Hai-Tao; Hua, Jing-Yu

    2017-08-01

    Quantum multi-hop teleportation is important in the field of quantum communication. In this study, we propose a quantum multi-hop communication model and a quantum routing protocol with multihop teleportation for wireless mesh backbone networks. Based on an analysis of quantum multi-hop protocols, a partially entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state is selected as the quantum channel for the proposed protocol. Both quantum and classical wireless channels exist between two neighboring nodes along the route. With the proposed routing protocol, quantum information can be transmitted hop by hop from the source node to the destination node. Based on multi-hop teleportation based on the partially entangled GHZ state, a quantum route established with the minimum number of hops. The difference between our routing protocol and the classical one is that in the former, the processes used to find a quantum route and establish quantum channel entanglement occur simultaneously. The Bell state measurement results of each hop are piggybacked to quantum route finding information. This method reduces the total number of packets and the magnitude of air interface delay. The deduction of the establishment of a quantum channel between source and destination is also presented here. The final success probability of quantum multi-hop teleportation in wireless mesh backbone networks was simulated and analyzed. Our research shows that quantum multi-hop teleportation in wireless mesh backbone networks through a partially entangled GHZ state is feasible.

  7. The determinants of bond angle variability in protein/peptide backbones: A comprehensive statistical/quantum mechanics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improta, Roberto; Vitagliano, Luigi; Esposito, Luciana

    2015-11-01

    The elucidation of the mutual influence between peptide bond geometry and local conformation has important implications for protein structure refinement, validation, and prediction. To gain insights into the structural determinants and the energetic contributions associated with protein/peptide backbone plasticity, we here report an extensive analysis of the variability of the peptide bond angles by combining statistical analyses of protein structures and quantum mechanics calculations on small model peptide systems. Our analyses demonstrate that all the backbone bond angles strongly depend on the peptide conformation and unveil the existence of regular trends as function of ψ and/or φ. The excellent agreement of the quantum mechanics calculations with the statistical surveys of protein structures validates the computational scheme here employed and demonstrates that the valence geometry of protein/peptide backbone is primarily dictated by local interactions. Notably, for the first time we show that the position of the H(α) hydrogen atom, which is an important parameter in NMR structural studies, is also dependent on the local conformation. Most of the trends observed may be satisfactorily explained by invoking steric repulsive interactions; in some specific cases the valence bond variability is also influenced by hydrogen-bond like interactions. Moreover, we can provide a reliable estimate of the energies involved in the interplay between geometry and conformations.

  8. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking.

  9. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Ollikainen

    Full Text Available Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein-ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art "fixed backbone" design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new "coupled moves" design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein-ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution.

  10. Enumeration of RNA complexes via random matrix theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Chekhov, Leonid O; Penner, Robert C; Reidys, Christian M; Sułkowski, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    In the present article, we review a derivation of the numbers of RNA complexes of an arbitrary topology. These numbers are encoded in the free energy of the Hermitian matrix model with potential V(x)=x2/2-stx/(1-tx), where s and t are respective generating parameters for the number of RNA molecules and hydrogen bonds in a given complex. The free energies of this matrix model are computed using the so-called topological recursion, which is a powerful new formalism arising from random matrix theory. These numbers of RNA complexes also have profound meaning in mathematics: they provide the number of chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones and chords as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces of fixed topological type.

  11. Multistep modeling of protein structure: application towards refinement of tyr-tRNA synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, S.; Shibata, M.; Roychoudhury, M.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    The scope of multistep modeling (MSM) is expanding by adding a least-squares minimization step in the procedure to fit backbone reconstruction consistent with a set of C-alpha coordinates. The analytical solution of Phi and Psi angles, that fits a C-alpha x-ray coordinate is used for tyr-tRNA synthetase. Phi and Psi angles for the region where the above mentioned method fails, are obtained by minimizing the difference in C-alpha distances between the computed model and the crystal structure in a least-squares sense. We present a stepwise application of this part of MSM to the determination of the complete backbone geometry of the 321 N terminal residues of tyrosine tRNA synthetase to a root mean square deviation of 0.47 angstroms from the crystallographic C-alpha coordinates.

  12. Empirical corrections to the Amber RNA force field with Target Metadynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Ley, Alejandro; Bussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The computational study of conformational transitions in nucleic acids still faces many challenges. For example, in the case of single stranded RNA tetranucleotides, agreement between simulations and experiments is not satisfactory due to inaccuracies in the force fields commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations. We here use experimental data collected from high-resolution X-ray structures to attempt an improvement of the latest version of the AMBER force field. A modified metadynamics algorithm is used to calculate correcting potentials designed to enforce experimental distributions of backbone torsion angles. Replica-exchange simulations of tetranucleotides including these correcting potentials show significantly better agreement with independent solution experiments for the oligonucleotides containing pyrimidine bases. Although the proposed corrections do not seem to be portable to generic RNA systems, the simulations revealed the importance of the alpha and beta backbone angles on the modulation of ...

  13. Unconventional N-H…N Hydrogen Bonds Involving Proline Backbone Nitrogen in Protein Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, R N V Krishna; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2016-05-10

    Contrary to DNA double-helical structures, hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) involving nitrogen as the acceptor are not common in protein structures. We systematically searched N-H…N H-bonds in two different sets of protein structures. Data set I consists of neutron diffraction and ultrahigh-resolution x-ray structures (0.9 Å resolution or better) and the hydrogen atom positions in these structures were determined experimentally. Data set II contains structures determined using x-ray diffraction (resolution ≤ 1.8 Å) and the positions of hydrogen atoms were generated using a computational method. We identified 114 and 14,347 potential N-H…N H-bonds from these two data sets, respectively, and 56-66% of these were of the Ni+1-Hi+1…Ni type, with Ni being the proline backbone nitrogen. To further understand the nature of such unusual contacts, we performed quantum chemical calculations on the model compound N-acetyl-L-proline-N-methylamide (Ace-Pro-NMe) with coordinates taken from the experimentally determined structures. A potential energy profile generated by varying the ψ dihedral angle in Ace-Pro-NMe indicates that the conformation with the N-H…N H-bond is the most stable. An analysis of H-bond-forming proline residues reveals that more than 30% of the proline carbonyl groups are also involved in n → π(∗) interactions with the carbonyl carbon of the preceding residue. Natural bond orbital analyses demonstrate that the strength of N-H…N H-bonds is less than half of that observed for a conventional H-bond. This study clearly establishes the H-bonding capability of proline nitrogen and its prevalence in protein structures. We found many proteins with multiple instances of H-bond-forming prolines. With more than 15% of all proline residues participating in N-H…N H-bonds, we suggest a new, to our knowledge, structural role for proline in providing stability to loops and capping regions of secondary structures in proteins.

  14. Occultation observations of atmosphere and climate change from space: a backbone for the GCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, G.

    2003-04-01

    , involving the heavily calibration-dependent Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) data, could have been presumably saved had suitable occultation data been available. This talk will highlight, along the lines outlined above, the general principles, properties, capabilities, and exploitation possibilities of occultation methods with a focus on how they provide key contributions to a better understanding of the Earth's climate system and to better prediction of its future evolution. A properly designed occultation observing system has the capacity to become the leading backbone of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) for monitoring climate change and variability in fundamental atmospheric variables such as temperature, humidity, ozone, and geopotential height from global scales to meso-scales (order 100 km) and from the planetary boundary layer to the mesopause.

  15. A novel molecular beacon-based method for isothermal detection of sequence-specific DNA via T7 RNA polymerase-aided target regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bin-Cheng; Wu, Shan; Ma, Jin-Liang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-06-15

    Developing molecular beacon (MB)-based method for DNA detection has been of great interest to many researchers because of its intrinsic advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and specificity. In this work, we have developed a novel MB-based method for isothermal detection of sequence-specific DNA via T7 RNA polymerase-aided target regeneration strategy. The proposed method involves three primary processes of target-mediated ligation by T4 DNA ligase, transcription reaction by T7 RNA polymerase, and MB switch for signal output. Upon the hybridization with DNA target, a rationally designed MB and a pair of primers encoded with T7 promoter sequence were ligated via the formation of a phosphodiester bond by T4 DNA ligase. The resultant joint fragment acted as template to initiate T7 RNA polymerase-mediated transcription reaction. Correspondingly, a great amount of RNA strands complementary to MB and partial primers were transcribed to initiate new cyclic reactions of MB switch, ligation, and transcription. With such signal amplification strategy of the regeneration of target-like RNA fragments, our proposed assay achieved a detection limit as low as ∼10 pM, which was ∼3 orders of magnitude lower than the traditional MB-based method with a recognition mechanism in 1:1 stoichiometric ratio between MB and target molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodegradable Multiamine Polymeric Vector for siRNA Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuanyuan; Gong, Faming; Cao, Yang; Chen, Weicai; Cheng, Du; Shuai, Xintao

    2015-04-01

    The gene silencing activity of small interfering RNA (siRNA) has led to their use as tools for target validation and as potential therapeutics for a variety of diseases. A major challenge is the development of vectors with high delivery efficiency and low toxicity. Although poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been regarded as the most promising polymeric vector for nucleic acid delivery, the nonbiodegradable structure greatly hinders its clinical application. In the present study, a diblock copolymer, PEG-PAsp(DIP-DETA), of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(L-aspartic acid) (PAsp) randomly grafted with pH-sensitive 2-(diisopropylamino)ethylamine (DIP) and diethylenetriamine (DETA) groups was synthesized via ring-opening polymerization and aminolysis reaction. Similar to polyethylenimine (PEI), the copolymer possesses a multiamine structure that not only allows effective siRNA complexation at neutral pH but also facilitates lysosomal release of siRNA via a proton buffering effect. Moreover, the poly(L-aspartic acid) backbone renders the vector biodegradability, which is not achievable with PEI. This novel polymeric vector can mediate effective intracellular siRNA delivery in various cancer cells. Consequently, the delivery of BCL-2 siRNA resulted in target gene silencing, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting the growth of cancer cells. These results show the potential of this non-PEI based polymeric vector with proton buffering capacity and biodegradability for siRNA delivery in cancer therapy.

  17. Triggering of RNA interference with RNA-RNA, RNA-DNA, and DNA-RNA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, Kirill A; Viard, Mathias; Kagiampakis, Ioannis; Case, Christopher L; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A; Hofmann, Jen; Vrzak, Ashlee; Kireeva, Maria; Kasprzak, Wojciech K; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2015-01-27

    Control over cellular delivery of different functionalities and their synchronized activation is a challenging task. We report several RNA and RNA/DNA-based nanoparticles designed to conditionally activate the RNA interference in various human cells. These nanoparticles allow precise control over their formulation, stability in blood serum, and activation of multiple functionalities. Importantly, interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine activation assays indicate the significantly lower responses for DNA nanoparticles compared to the RNA counterparts, suggesting greater potential of these molecules for therapeutic use.

  18. The Construction of Metal-Organic Framework with Active Backbones by the Utilization of Reticular Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunwoo

    With the principles of reticular chemistry, metal-organic frameworks with ultra-high porosity, chiral-recognition unit as a chiral stationary phase, metalloporhyrins for enhanced hydrogen adsorption and an intrinsic conductivity to form porous conductors, have been prepared. This dissertation presents how the principles of reticular chemistry were utilized to achieve in the preparations of metal-organic frameworks with a large surface area and active backbones. Through the simple isoreticular (having the same framework topology) expansion from MOF-177 composed with 1,3,5-tris(4'-carboxyphenyl-)benzene (BTB3-) as the strut; MOF-200 was prepared with 4,4',4"-(benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diy1))tribenzoic acid an extension from BTB3- by a phenylene unit to yield one of the most porous MOFs with a Langmuir surface area of 10,400 m2. and the lowest density of 0.22 cm3.g-1. A successful thermal polymerization reaction at 325 °C inside of the pores of highly porous MOF, MOF-177, was performed and verified the integrity of the MOF structure even after the thermal reaction. 1,4-Diphenylbutadiyne that is known to polymerize upon heating to form a conjugated backbone was impregnated via solution-diffusion into MOF-177 and then subsequently polymerized by heat to form polymer impregnated MOF-177. Characterization was carried out using powder X-ray diffraction and volumetric sorption analyzer. MOF-1020 with a linear quaterphenyl dicarboxylate-based strut was designed to contain a chiral bisbinaphthyl crown-ether moiety for alkyl ammonium resolution was precisely placed into a Zn4O(CO2)6-based cubic MOF structure. Unfortunately, the chiral resolution was not achieved due to the sensitivity and the pore environment of MOF-1020. However, an interesting phenomenon was observed, where the loss of crystallinity occurs upon solvent removal while the crystallites remain shiny and crystalline, but it readily is restored upon re-solvation of the crystallites. This rare

  19. Efficient downregulation of multiple mRNA targets with a single shRNA-expressing lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, Stepan P; Kravchenko, Julia E; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Frolova, Elena I; Chumakov, Peter M

    2010-05-01

    Gene silencing based on RNA interference is widely used in fundamental research and in practical applications. However, a commonly incomplete functional suppression represents a serious drawback of this technology. We describe a series of lentiviral vectors each containing a single or multiple shRNA-expression cassette(s) driven by a RNA-polymerase III specific promoter and localized within the 3'-LTR of the lentiviral DNA backbone. The vectors also contain an antibiotic-resistance gene that allows positive selection of recipient cells. The combined expression of three different shRNAs specific to a single mRNA was shown to improve dramatically the level of mRNA inhibition, while the use of three different RNA-polymerase III specific promoters avoids the loss of shRNA-expression cassettes through the homologous recombination. The vector system was used for successful simultaneous suppression of three related SESN1, SESN2 and SESN3 genes, which suggests its particular value for testing phenotypes of functionally redundant genes.

  20. Sliding over the blocks in enzyme-free RNA copying--one-pot primer extension in ice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp M G Löffler

    Full Text Available Template-directed polymerization of RNA in the absence of enzymes is the basis for an information transfer in the 'RNA-world' hypothesis and in novel nucleic acid based technology. Previous investigations established that only cytidine rich strands are efficient templates in bulk aqueous solutions while a few specific sequences completely block the extension of hybridized primers. We show that a eutectic water/ice system can support Pb(2+/Mg(2+-ion catalyzed extension of a primer across such sequences, i.e. AA, AU and AG, in a one-pot synthesis. Using mixtures of imidazole activated nucleotide 5'-monophosphates, the two first "blocking" residues could be passed during template-directed polymerization, i.e., formation of triply extended products containing a high fraction of faithful copies was demonstrated. Across the AG sequence, a mismatch sequence was formed in similar amounts to the correct product due to U·G wobble pairing. Thus, the template-directed extension occurs both across pyrimidine and purine rich sequences and insertions of pyrimidines did not inhibit the subsequent insertions. Products were mainly formed with 2'-5'-phosphodiester linkages, however, the abundance of 3'-5'-linkages was higher than previously reported for pyrimidine insertions. When enzyme-free, template-directed RNA polymerization is performed in a eutectic water ice environment, various intrinsic reaction limitations observed in bulk solution can then be overcome.

  1. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network.

  2. Structure-activity study for (bis)ureidopropyl- and (bis)thioureidopropyldiamine LSD1 inhibitors with 3-5-3 and 3-6-3 carbon backbone architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotarski, Shannon L; Pachaiyappan, Boobalan; Holshouser, Steven L; Kutz, Craig J; Li, Youxuan; Huang, Yi; Sharma, Shiv K; Casero, Robert A; Woster, Patrick M

    2015-04-01

    Methylation at specific histone lysine residues is a critical post-translational modification that alters chromatin architecture, and dysregulated lysine methylation/demethylation is associated with the silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The enzyme lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) complexed to specific transcription factors catalyzes the oxidative demethylation of mono- and dimethyllysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me and H3K4me2, respectively). We have previously reported potent (bis)urea and (bis)thiourea LSD1 inhibitors that increase cellular levels of H3K4me and H3K4me2, promote the re-expression of silenced tumor suppressor genes and suppress tumor growth in vitro. Here we report the design additional (bis)urea and (bis)thiourea LSD1 inhibitors that feature 3-5-3 or 3-6-3 carbon backbone architectures. Three of these compounds displayed single-digit IC50 values in a recombinant LSD1 assay. In addition, compound 6d exhibited an IC50 of 4.2μM against the Calu-6 human lung adenocarcinoma line, and 4.8μM against the MCF7 breast tumor cell line, in an MTS cell viability assay. Following treatment with 6b-6d, Calu-6 cells exhibited a significant increase in the mRNA expression for the silenced tumor suppressor genes SFRP2, HCAD and p16, and modest increases in GATA4 message. The compounds described in this paper represent the most potent epigenetic modulators in this series, and have potential for use as antitumor agents.

  3. The dominant role of side-chain backbone interactions in structural realization of amino acid code. ChiRotor: a side-chain prediction algorithm based on side-chain backbone interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, Velin Z; Yan, Lisa; Flook, Paul K

    2007-03-01

    The basic differences between the 20 natural amino acid residues are due to differences in their side-chain structures. This characteristic design of protein building blocks implies that side-chain-side-chain interactions play an important, even dominant role in 3D-structural realization of amino acid codes. Here we present the results of a comparative analysis of the contributions of side-chain-side-chain (s-s) and side-chain-backbone (s-b) interactions to the stabilization of folded protein structures within the framework of the CHARMm molecular data model. Contrary to intuition, our results suggest that side-chain-backbone interactions play the major role in side-chain packing, in stabilizing the folded structures, and in differentiating the folded structures from the unfolded or misfolded structures, while the interactions between side chains have a secondary effect. An additional analysis of electrostatic energies suggests that combinatorial dominance of the interactions between opposite charges makes the electrostatic interactions act as an unspecific folding force that stabilizes not only native structure, but also compact random conformations. This observation is in agreement with experimental findings that, in the denatured state, the charge-charge interactions stabilize more compact conformations. Taking advantage of the dominant role of side-chain-backbone interactions in side-chain packing to reduce the combinatorial problem, we developed a new algorithm, ChiRotor, for rapid prediction of side-chain conformations. We present the results of a validation study of the method based on a set of high resolution X-ray structures.

  4. Refinement of the Sugar-Phosphate Backbone Torsion Beta for AMBER Force Fields Improves the Description of Z- and B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgarbová, Marie; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Cheatham, Thomas E; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-12-01

    Z-DNA duplexes are a particularly complicated test case for current force fields. We performed a set of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with various AMBER force field parametrizations including our recent refinements of the ε/ζ and glycosidic torsions. None of these force fields described the ZI/ZII and other backbone substates correctly, and all of them underpredicted the population of the important ZI substate. We show that this underprediction can be attributed to an inaccurate potential for the sugar-phosphate backbone torsion angle β. We suggest a refinement of this potential, β(OL1), which was derived using our recently introduced methodology that includes conformation-dependent solvation effects. The new potential significantly increases the stability of the dominant ZI backbone substate and improves the overall description of the Z-DNA backbone. It also has a positive (albeit small) impact on another important DNA form, the antiparallel guanine quadruplex (G-DNA), and improves the description of the canonical B-DNA backbone by increasing the population of BII backbone substates, providing a better agreement with experiment. We recommend using β(OL1) in combination with our previously introduced corrections, εζ(OL1) and χ(OL4), (the combination being named OL15) as a possible alternative to the current β torsion potential for more accurate modeling of nucleic acids.

  5. Protein side-chain resonance assignment and NOE assignment using RDC-defined backbones without TOCSY data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    2011-08-01

    One bottleneck in NMR structure determination lies in the laborious and time-consuming process of side-chain resonance and NOE assignments. Compared to the well-studied backbone resonance assignment problem, automated side-chain resonance and NOE assignments are relatively less explored. Most NOE assignment algorithms require nearly complete side-chain resonance assignments from a series of through-bond experiments such as HCCH-TOCSY or HCCCONH. Unfortunately, these TOCSY experiments perform poorly on large proteins. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel algorithm, called NASCA: (NOE Assignment and Side-Chain Assignment), to automate both side-chain resonance and NOE assignments and to perform high-resolution protein structure determination in the absence of any explicit through-bond experiment to facilitate side-chain resonance assignment, such as HCCH-TOCSY. After casting the assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF), NASCA: extends and applies combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute optimal assignments that best interpret the NMR data. The MRF captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NOESY spectra, exploits the backbone structural information determined by RDCs, and considers all possible side-chain rotamers. The complexity of the combinatorial search is reduced by using a dead-end elimination (DEE) algorithm, which prunes side-chain resonance assignments that are provably not part of the optimal solution. Then an A* search algorithm is employed to find a set of optimal side-chain resonance assignments that best fit the NMR data. These side-chain resonance assignments are then used to resolve the NOE assignment ambiguity and compute high-resolution protein structures. Tests on five proteins show that NASCA: assigns resonances for more than 90% of side-chain protons, and achieves about 80% correct assignments. The final structures computed using the NOE distance restraints assigned by NASCA: have backbone

  6. Aptamer-Functionalized and Backbone Redox-Responsive Hyperbranched Polymer for Targeted Drug Delivery in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Hongping; Su, Yue; He, Lin; Wang, Ruibin; Tong, Gangsheng; He, Dannong; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2016-06-13

    A novel type of backbone redox-responsive hyperbranched poly(2-((2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl)disulfanyl)ethyl 4-cyano-4-(((propylthio)carbonothioyl)-thio)-pentanoate-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (HPAEG) has been designed and prepared successfully via the combination of reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and self-condensing vinyl polymerization (SCVP). Owing to the existence of surface vinyl groups, HPAEG could be efficiently functionalized by DNA aptamer AS1411 via Michael addition reaction to obtain an active tumor targeting drug delivery carrier (HPAEG-AS1411). The amphiphilic HPAEG-AS1411 could form nanoparticles by macromolecular self-assembly strategy. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay illustrated that HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles had low cytotoxicity to normal cell line. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results demonstrated that HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles could be internalized into tumor cells via aptamer-mediated endocytosis. Compared with pure HPAEG nanoparticles, HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles displayed enhanced tumor cell uptake. When the HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) were internalized into tumor cells, the disulfide bonds in the backbone of HPAEG-AS1411 were cleaved by glutathione (GSH) in the cytoplasm, so that DOX was released rapidly. Therefore, DOX-loaded HPAEG-AS1411 nanoparticles exhibited a high tumor cellular proliferation inhibition rate and low cytotoxicity to normal cells. This aptamer-functionalized and backbone redox-responsive hyperbranched polymer provides a promising platform for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy.

  7. Research on future structure of power transmission backbone%未来输电网架结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨冬; 刘玉田

    2011-01-01

    Improving self-healing ability, optimizing fluctuation energy reserve, increasing transmission facilities efficiency are three key issues of future transmission backbone planning. Firstly, US "Grid 2030" power transmission backbone is discussed in this paper. By introducing EU " Super Grid 2050" power transmission backbone, the necessity and feasibility of renewable energy power grid in Northwest China, North China and Northeast China are demonstrated. Also, the 2020, 2030, 2050 target networks based on the proposed structure are designed. Finally, the advantages of ultra-high voltage grid (UHV grid)used in EHV/UHV DC transmission power system are explored.%提高大电网自愈能力、优化波动性能源备用、发挥输电设备利用率是未来输电网架结构规划的3个关键问题.首先讨论美国“Grid 2030”直流异步互联电网结构;介绍欧洲“Super Grid 2050”广域可再生能源电网结构;论证中国“三北”可再生能源电网远景设想的必要性和可行性,并给出2020,2030,2050年这3个时间节点的可再生能源电网目标网架;最后探索特高压电网结构应用于超/特高压直流电网的优势.

  8. RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yang; Hongjie Xia; Qi Qian; Xi Zhou

    2015-01-01

    RNAs are functionally diverse macromolecules whose proper functions rely strictly upon their correct tertiary structures. However, because of their high structural flexibility, correct folding of RNAs is challenging and slow. Therefore, cells and viruses encode a variety of RNA remodeling proteins, including helicases and RNA chaperones. In RNA viruses, these proteins are believed to play pivotal roles in all the processes involving viral RNAs during the life cycle. RNA helicases have been studied extensively for decades, whereas RNA chaperones, particularly virus-encoded RNA chaperones, are often overlooked. This review describes the activities of RNA chaperones encoded by RNA viruses, particularly the ones identified and characterized in recent years, and the functions of these proteins in different steps of viral life cycles, and presents an overview of this unique group of proteins.

  9. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  10. Design and synthesis of peptide YY analogues with c-terminal backbone amide-to-ester modifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Louise; Andersen, J.J.; Paulsson, J.F.;

    2013-01-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) is a gut hormone that activates the G protein-coupled neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors, and because of its appetite reducing actions, it is evaluated as an antiobesity drug candidate. The C-terminal tail of PYY is crucial for activation of the NPY receptors. Here, we describe...... the design and preparation of a series of PYY(3-36) depsipeptide analogues, in which backbone amide-to-ester modifications were systematically introduced in the C-terminal. Functional NPY receptor assays and circular dichroism revealed that the ψ(CONH) bonds at positions 30-31 and 33-34 are particularly...

  11. An Unusual Conformational Isomer of Verrucosidin Backbone from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus, Penicillium sp. Y-50-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqian Pan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A new verrucosidin derivative, methyl isoverrucosidinol (1, was isolated from the marine fungus Penicillium sp. Y-50-10, dwelling in sulfur rich sediment in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The structure was established by spectroscopic means including HRMS and 2D-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration was defined mainly by comparison of quantum chemical TDDFT calculated and experimental ECD spectra. Among hitherto known compounds with a verrucosidine backbone isolated from natural resource, compound 1 represents the first example of a new conformational isomer of its skeleton, exhibiting antibiotic activity against Bacillus subtilis with MIC value 32 μg/mL.

  12. Conformation-specific spectroscopy of capped glutamine-containing peptides: role of a single glutamine residue on peptide backbone preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Patrick S; Dean, Jacob C; McBurney, Carl; Kang, Hyuk; Gellman, Samuel H; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-04-28

    The conformational preferences of a series of short, aromatic-capped, glutamine-containing peptides have been studied under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. This work seeks a bottom-up understanding of the role played by glutamine residues in directing peptide structures that lead to neurodegenerative diseases. Resonant ion-dip infrared (RIDIR) spectroscopy is used to record single-conformation infrared spectra in the NH stretch, amide I and amide II regions. Comparison of the experimental spectra with the predictions of calculations carried out at the DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) level of theory lead to firm assignments for the H-bonding architectures of a total of eight conformers of four molecules, including three in Z-Gln-OH, one in Z-Gln-NHMe, three in Ac-Gln-NHBn, and one in Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn. The Gln side chain engages actively in forming H-bonds with nearest-neighbor amide groups, forming C8 H-bonds to the C-terminal side, C9 H-bonds to the N-terminal side, and an amide-stacked geometry, all with an extended (C5) peptide backbone about the Gln residue. The Gln side chain also stabilizes an inverse γ-turn in the peptide backbone by forming a pair of H-bonds that bridge the γ-turn and stabilize it. Finally, the entire conformer population of Ac-Ala-Gln-NHBn is funneled into a single structure that incorporates the peptide backbone in a type I β-turn, stabilized by the Gln side chain forming a C7 H-bond to the central amide group in the β-turn not otherwise involved in a hydrogen bond. This β-turn backbone structure is nearly identical to that observed in a series of X-(AQ)-Y β-turns in the protein data bank, demonstrating that the gas-phase structure is robust to perturbations imposed by the crystalline protein environment.

  13. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone resonance assignments of the archetypal serpin α1-antitrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Kirkpatrick, John; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John; Gooptu, Bibek

    2012-10-01

    Alpha(1)-antitrypsin is a 45-kDa (394-residue) serine protease inhibitor synthesized by hepatocytes, which is released into the circulatory system and protects the lung from the actions of neutrophil elastase via a conformational transition within a dynamic inhibitory mechanism. Relatively common point mutations subvert this transition, causing polymerisation of α(1)-antitrypsin and deficiency of the circulating protein, predisposing carriers to severe lung and liver disease. We have assigned the backbone resonances of α(1)-antitrypsin using multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These assignments provide the starting point for a detailed solution state characterization of the structural properties of this highly dynamic protein via NMR methods.

  14. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the discovery and characterization of two novel β-N-acetylhexosaminidases HEX1 and HEX2, capable of catalyzing the synthesis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) backbone structures with fair yields using chitin oligomers as β-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) donor. The enzyme......-encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest...

  15. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulation shows effect of slow loop dynamics on backbone amide order parameters of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maragakis, Paul; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Eastwood, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    methods. However, apparent systematic discrepancies between order parameters extracted from simulations and experiments are common, particularly for elements of noncanonical secondary structure. In this paper, results from a 1.2 micros explicit solvent MD simulation of the protein ubiquitin are compared...... with previously determined backbone order parameters derived from NMR relaxation experiments [Tjandra, N.; Feller, S. E.; Pastor, R. W.; Bax, A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 12562-12566]. The simulation reveals fluctuations in three loop regions that occur on time scales comparable to or longer than...

  16. IMMUNOMODULATION OF SYNTHESIZED POLYMERS CONTAINING PHOSPHORUS IN THE BACKBONE —EFFECT ON THE PROLIFERATION OF LYMPHOCYTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuoRenxi; WangJun; 等

    1997-01-01

    The immunomodulation of several Charged synthetic polymers containing phosphorus in the backbone was studied in vitro through examining their inhibition or promotion effect on the proliferatioin of both T and B lymphocytes,It is found that polymers based on long chain alkyl ester of tyrosine exhibit immunomodulative activity.Negatively charged polymers show stimulative activity on LPS-induced B lymphocytes proliferation.Positively charged polymers exhibit inhibitory activity on both Con A-induced T lymphocytes and LPS-induced B lymplhyocytes proliferation.

  17. Structure of a bacterial ribonuclease P holoenzyme in complex with tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Nicholas J; Osterman, Amy; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Swinger, Kerren K; Pan, Tao; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-12-09

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P is the universal ribozyme responsible for 5'-end tRNA processing. We report the crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima RNase P holoenzyme in complex with tRNA(Phe). The 154 kDa complex consists of a large catalytic RNA (P RNA), a small protein cofactor and a mature tRNA. The structure shows that RNA-RNA recognition occurs through shape complementarity, specific intermolecular contacts and base-pairing interactions. Soaks with a pre-tRNA 5' leader sequence with and without metal help to identify the 5' substrate path and potential catalytic metal ions. The protein binds on top of a universally conserved structural module in P RNA and interacts with the leader, but not with the mature tRNA. The active site is composed of phosphate backbone moieties, a universally conserved uridine nucleobase, and at least two catalytically important metal ions. The active site structure and conserved RNase P-tRNA contacts suggest a universal mechanism of catalysis by RNase P.

  18. Coupling Protein Side-Chain and Backbone Flexibility Improves the Re-design of Protein-Ligand Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollikainen, Noah; de Jong, René M.; Kortemme, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between small molecules and proteins play critical roles in regulating and facilitating diverse biological functions, yet our ability to accurately re-engineer the specificity of these interactions using computational approaches has been limited. One main difficulty, in addition to inaccuracies in energy functions, is the exquisite sensitivity of protein–ligand interactions to subtle conformational changes, coupled with the computational problem of sampling the large conformational search space of degrees of freedom of ligands, amino acid side chains, and the protein backbone. Here, we describe two benchmarks for evaluating the accuracy of computational approaches for re-engineering protein-ligand interactions: (i) prediction of enzyme specificity altering mutations and (ii) prediction of sequence tolerance in ligand binding sites. After finding that current state-of-the-art “fixed backbone” design methods perform poorly on these tests, we develop a new “coupled moves” design method in the program Rosetta that couples changes to protein sequence with alterations in both protein side-chain and protein backbone conformations, and allows for changes in ligand rigid-body and torsion degrees of freedom. We show significantly increased accuracy in both predicting ligand specificity altering mutations and binding site sequences. These methodological improvements should be useful for many applications of protein – ligand design. The approach also provides insights into the role of subtle conformational adjustments that enable functional changes not only in engineering applications but also in natural protein evolution. PMID:26397464

  19. Probing the limits of ligand steric bulk: backbone C-H activation in a saturated N-heterocyclic carbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nicholas; Tirfoin, Remi; Aldridge, Simon

    2014-03-24

    The consequences of extremely high steric loading have been probed for late transition metal complexes featuring the expanded ring N-heterocyclic carbene 6-Dipp. The reluctance of this ligand to form 2:1 complexes with d-block metals (rationalised on the basis of its percentage buried volume, % Vbur , of 50.8%) leads to C-H and C-N bond activation processes driven by attack at the backbone β-CH2 unit. In the presence of Ir(I) (or indeed H(+) ) the net result is the formation of an allyl formamidine fragment, while Au(I) brings about an additional ring (re-)closure step via nucleophilic attack at the coordinated alkene. The net transformation of 6-Dipp in the presence of [(6-Dipp)Au](+) represents to our knowledge the first example of backbone C-H activation of a saturated N-heterocyclic carbene, proceeding in this case via a mechanism which involves free carbene in addition to the Au(I) centre. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Multi-source micro-friction identification for a class of cable-driven robots with passive backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjahjowidodo, Tegoeh; Zhu, Ke; Dailey, Wayne; Burdet, Etienne; Campolo, Domenico

    2016-12-01

    This paper analyses the dynamics of cable-driven robots with a passive backbone and develops techniques for their dynamic identification, which are tested on the H-Man, a planar cabled differential transmission robot for haptic interaction. The mechanism is optimized for human-robot interaction by accounting for the cost-benefit-ratio of the system, specifically by eliminating the necessity of an external force sensor to reduce the overall cost. As a consequence, this requires an effective dynamic model for accurate force feedback applications which include friction behavior in the system. We first consider the significance of friction in both the actuator and backbone spaces. Subsequently, we study the required complexity of the stiction model for the application. Different models representing different levels of complexity are investigated, ranging from the conventional approach of Coulomb to an advanced model which includes hysteresis. The results demonstrate each model's ability to capture the dynamic behavior of the system. In general, it is concluded that there is a trade-off between model accuracy and the model cost.

  1. Improved site-specific recombinase-based method to produce selectable marker- and vector-backbone-free transgenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Tong, Qi; Li, Zhongxia; Tian, Jinhai; Wang, Yizhi; Su, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Yong

    2014-02-01

    PhiC31 integrase-mediated gene delivery has been extensively used in gene therapy and animal transgenesis. However, random integration events are observed in phiC31-mediated integration in different types of mammalian cells; as a result, the efficiencies of pseudo attP site integration and evaluation of site-specific integration are compromised. To improve this system, we used an attB-TK fusion gene as a negative selection marker, thereby eliminating random integration during phiC31-mediated transfection. We also excised the selection system and plasmid bacterial backbone by using two other site-specific recombinases, Cre and Dre. Thus, we generated clean transgenic bovine fetal fibroblast cells free of selectable marker and plasmid bacterial backbone. These clean cells were used as donor nuclei for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), indicating a similar developmental competence of SCNT embryos to that of non-transgenic cells. Therefore, the present gene delivery system facilitated the development of gene therapy and agricultural biotechnology.

  2. Thermodynamic contribution of backbone conformational entropy in the binding between SH3 domain and proline-rich motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Danyun; Shen, Qingliang; Cho, Jae-Hyun

    2017-02-26

    Biological functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and proteins containing intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are often mediated by short linear motifs, like proline-rich motifs (PRMs). Upon binding to their target proteins, IDPs undergo a disorder-to-order transition which is accompanied by a large conformational entropy penalty. Hence, the molecular mechanisms underlying control of conformational entropy are critical for understanding the binding affinity and selectivity of IDPs-mediated protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Here, we investigated the backbone conformational entropy change accompanied by binding of the N-terminal SH3 domain (nSH3) of CrkII and PRM derived from guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1 (C3G). In particular, we focused on the estimation of conformational entropy change of disordered PRM upon binding to the nSH3 domain. Quantitative characterization of conformational dynamics of disordered peptides like PRMs is limited. Hence, we combined various methods, including NMR model-free analysis, δ2D, DynaMine, and structure-based calculation of entropy loss. This study demonstrates that the contribution of backbone conformational entropy change is significant in the PPIs mediated by IDPs/IDRs.

  3. The Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Graft Copolymers Composed of γ-PGA Backbone and Oligoesters Pendant Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecień, Iwona; Radecka, Iza; Kowalczuk, Marek; Jelonek, Katarzyna; Orchel, Arkadiusz; Adamus, Grażyna

    2017-07-01

    The novel copolymers composed of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) and oligoesters have been developed. The structures of the obtained copolymers including variety of end groups were determined at the molecular level with the aid of electrospray ionization multistage mass spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The fragmentation experiment performed for the selected sodium adducts of the copolymers confirmed that the developed methods lead to the formation of graft copolymers composed of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) backbone and oligoesters pendant chains. Moreover, it was established that fragmentation of selected sodium adducts of graft copolymers proceeded via random breakage of amide bonds along the backbone and ester bonds of the oligoesters pendant chains. Considering potential applications of the synthesized copolymers in the area of biomaterials, the hydrolytic degradation under laboratory conditions and in vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed. The ESI-MSn technique applied in this study has been proven to be a useful tool in structural studies of novel graft copolymers as well as their degradation products.

  4. Circular permutation prediction reveals a viable backbone disconnection for split proteins: an approach in identifying a new functional split intein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Tzai Lee

    Full Text Available Split-protein systems have emerged as a powerful tool for detecting biomolecular interactions and reporting biological reactions. However, reliable methods for identifying viable split sites are still unavailable. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility that valid circular permutation (CP sites in proteins have the potential to act as split sites and that CP prediction can be used to search for internal permissive sites for creating new split proteins. Using a protein ligase, intein, as a model, CP predictor facilitated the creation of circular permutants in which backbone opening imposes the least detrimental effects on intein folding. We screened a series of predicted intein CPs and identified stable and native-fold CPs. When the valid CP sites were introduced as split sites, there was a reduction in folding enthalpy caused by the new backbone opening; however, the coincident loss in entropy was sufficient to be compensated, yielding a favorable free energy for self-association. Since split intein is exploited in protein semi-synthesis, we tested the related protein trans-splicing (PTS activities of the corresponding split inteins. Notably, a novel functional split intein composed of the N-terminal 36 residues combined with the remaining C-terminal fragment was identified. Its PTS activity was shown to be better than current reported two-piece intein with a short N-terminal segment. Thus, the incorporation of in silico CP prediction facilitated the design of split intein as well as circular permutants.

  5. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for investigation of backbone dynamics of oxidized and reduced cytochrome P450cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; Molnar, Kathleen S; Coales, Stephen J; OuYang, Bo; Simorellis, Alana K; Pochapsky, Thomas C

    2008-02-01

    Backbone dynamics of the camphor monoxygenase cytochrome P450(cam) (CYP101) as a function of oxidation/ligation state of the heme iron were investigated via hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D exchange) as monitored by mass spectrometry. Main chain amide NH hydrogens can exchange readily with solvent and the rate of this exchange depends upon, among other things, dynamic fluctuations in local structural elements. A fluxional region of the polypeptide will exchange more quickly with solvent than one that is more constrained. In most regions of the enzyme, exchange rates were similar between oxidized high-spin camphor-bound and reduced camphor- and CO-bound CYP101 (CYP-S and CYP-S-CO, respectively). However, in regions of the protein that have previously been implicated in substrate access by structural and molecular dynamics investigations, the reduced enzyme shows significantly slower exchange rates than the oxidized CYP-S. This observation corresponds to increased flexibility of the oxidized enzyme relative to the reduced form. Structural features previously found to be perturbed in CYP-S-CO upon binding of the biologically relevant effector and reductant putidaredoxin (Pdx) as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance are also more protected from exchange in the reduced state. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental investigation of backbone dynamics within the P450 family using this methodology.

  6. Focus on PNA Flexibility and RNA Binding using Molecular Dynamics and Metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verona, Massimiliano Donato; Verdolino, Vincenzo; Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Corradini, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs) can efficiently target DNA or RNA acting as chemical tools for gene regulation. Their backbone modification and functionalization is often used to increase the affinity for a particular sequence improving selectivity. The understanding of the trading forces that lead the single strand PNA to bind the DNA or RNA sequence is preparatory for any further rational design, but a clear and unique description of this process is still not complete. In this paper we report further insights into this subject, by a computational investigation aiming at the characterization of the conformations of a single strand PNA and how these can be correlated to its capability in binding DNA/RNA. Employing Metadynamics we were able to better define conformational pre-organizations of the single strand PNA and γ-modified PNA otherwise unrevealed through classical molecular dynamics. Our simulations driven on backbone modified PNAs lead to the conclusion that this γ-functionalization affects the single strand preorganization and targeting properties to the DNA/RNA, in agreement with circular dichroism (CD) spectra obtained for this class of compounds. MD simulations on PNA:RNA dissociation and association mechanisms allowed to reveal the critical role of central bases and preorganization in the binding process.

  7. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Polymer Backbone Dynamics in Poly(Ethylene Oxide) Based Lithium and Sodium Polyether-ester-sulfonate Ionomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, David J.; Dou, Shichen; Colby, Ralph H.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer backbone dynamics of single ion conducting poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based ionomer samples with low glass transition temperatures (Tg) have been investigated using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Experiments detecting 13C with 1H decoupling under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions identified the different components of the polymer backbone (PEO spacer and isophthalate groups) and their relative mobilities for a suite of lithium- and sodium-containing ionomer samples with varying cation contents. Variable temperature (203-373 K) 1H-13C cross-polarization MAS (CP-MAS) experiments also provided qualitative assessment of the differences in the motions of the polymer backbone components as a function of cation content and identity. Each of the main backbone components exhibit distinct motions, following the trends expected for motional characteristics based on earlier Quasi Elastic Neutron Scattering and 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements. Previous 1H and 7Li spin-lattice relaxation measurements focused on both the polymer backbone and cation motion on the nanosecond timescale. The studies presented here assess the slower timescale motion of the polymer backbone allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of the polymer dynamics. The temperature dependences of 13C linewidths were used to both qualitatively and quantitatively examine the effects of cation content and identity on PEO spacer mobility. Variable contact time 1H-13C CP-MAS experiments were used to further assess the motions of the polymer backbone on the microsecond timescale. The motion of the PEO spacer, reported via the rate of magnetization transfer from 1H to 13C nuclei, becomes similar for T ≳ 1.1 Tg in all ionic samples, indicating that at similar elevated reduced temperatures the motions of the polymer backbones on the microsecond timescale become insensitive to ion interactions. These results present an improved picture, beyond those of previous findings, for

  8. Treatment of Gram-negative pneumonia in the critical care setting: is the beta-lactam antibiotic backbone broken beyond repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Matteo; Welte, Tobias; Wunderink, Richard G

    2016-01-29

    Beta-lactam antibiotics form the backbone of treatment for Gram-negative pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care unit. However, this beta-lactam antibiotic backbone is increasingly under pressure from emerging resistance across all geographical regions, and health-care professionals in many countries are rapidly running out of effective treatment options. Even in regions that currently have only low levels of resistance, the effects of globalization are likely to increase local pressures on the beta-lactam antibiotic backbone in the near future. Therefore, clinicians are increasingly faced with a difficult balancing act: the need to prescribe adequate and appropriate antibiotic therapy while reducing the emergence of resistance and the overuse of antibiotics. In this review, we explore the burden of Gram-negative pneumonia in the critical care setting and the pressure that antibiotic resistance places on current empiric therapy regimens (and the beta-lactam antibiotic backbone) in this patient population. New treatment approaches, such as systemic and inhaled antibiotic alternatives, are on the horizon and are likely to help tackle the rising levels of beta-lactam antibiotic resistance. In the meantime, it is imperative that the beta-lactam antibiotic backbone of currently available antibiotics be supported through stringent antibiotic stewardship programs.

  9. High performance and highly durable infiltrated cathodes using Pr-modified Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Søgaard, Martin; Bonanos, Nikolaos;

    2014-01-01

    the CGO backbone with Pr through infiltration into the structure followed by firing. The Pr – modified CGO backbone is then infiltrated with LSC. The electrochemical performance of the infiltrated cathodes with and without Pr modification in the backbone was studied by impedance spectroscopy on symmetric...... °C (without Pr: Rp from 0.094 to 0.45 Ω cm2, Rs from 0.74 to 0.79 Ω cm2; with Pr: Rp from 0.051 to 0.32 Ω cm2, Rs from 0.74 to 0.71 Ω cm2). The improved performance and heat treatment tolerance is thought to originate from the imparted electronic conductivity into the CGO backbone by introducing Pr.......Infiltration of electrocatalysts into ionic conducting backbones (e.g. Sr – doped LaCoO3 (LSC) into Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO)) is becoming a widely popular means of preparing composite cathodes for SOFCs. The high surface area nanoparticle grains of the electrocatalyst obtained using the method...

  10. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein Side-Chain Resonance Assignment and NOE Assignment Using RDC-Defined Backbones without TOCSY Data3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    2011-01-01

    One bottleneck in NMR structure determination lies in the laborious and time-consuming process of side-chain resonance and NOE assignments. Compared to the well-studied backbone resonance assignment problem, automated side-chain resonance and NOE assignments are relatively less explored. Most NOE assignment algorithms require nearly complete side-chain resonance assignments from a series of through-bond experiments such as HCCH-TOCSY or HCCCONH. Unfortunately, these TOCSY experiments perform poorly on large proteins. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel algorithm, called NASCA (NOE Assignment and Side-Chain Assignment), to automate both side-chain resonance and NOE assignments and to perform high-resolution protein structure determination in the absence of any explicit through-bond experiment to facilitate side-chain resonance assignment, such as HCCH-TOCSY. After casting the assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF), NASCA extends and applies combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute optimal assignments that best interpret the NMR data. The MRF captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NOESY spectra, exploits the backbone structural information determined by RDCs, and considers all possible side-chain rotamers. The complexity of the combinatorial search is reduced by using a dead-end elimination (DEE) algorithm, which prunes side-chain resonance assignments that are provably not part of the optimal solution. Then an A* search algorithm is employed to find a set of optimal side-chain resonance assignments that best fit the NMR data. These side-chain resonance assignments are then used to resolve the NOE assignment ambiguity and compute high-resolution protein structures. Tests on five proteins show that NASCA assigns resonances for more than 90% of side-chain protons, and achieves about 80% correct assignments. The final structures computed using the NOE distance restraints assigned by NASCA have backbone RMSD 0

  12. Laccase-assisted grafting of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) onto the bacterial cellulose as backbone polymer: development and characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hafiz M N; Kyazze, Godfrey; Tron, Thierry; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2014-11-26

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) exhibits high purity, mechanical strength and an ultra-fine fibrous 3-D network structure with bio-compatible and bio-degradable characteristics, while P(3 HB) are a bio-degradable matrix material derived from natural resources. Herein, we report a mild and eco-friendly fabrication of indigenously isolated P(3 HB) based novel composites consisting of BC (a straight-chain polysaccharide) as a backbone polymer and laccase was used as a grafting tool. The resulting composites were characterised by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analyser (DMA) and water contact angle analyser (WCA). The FTIR spectra of the pure P(3 HB) and P(3 HB) containing graft composites [P(3 HB)-g-BC] showed their strong characteristic bands at 3358 cm(-1), 1721 cm(-1) and 1651 cm(-1), respectively. A homogenous dispersion of P(3 HB) in the backbone polymer of BC was achieved as evident by the SEM micrographs. XRD pattern for P(3 HB) showed distinct peaks at 2θ values that represent the crystalline nature of P(3 HB). While, in comparison with those of neat P(3 HB), the degree of crystallinity for P(3 HB)-g-BC decreased and this reduction is mainly because of the new cross-linking of P(3 HB) within the backbone polymer that changes the morphology and destroys the crystallites. Laccase-assisted graft composite prepared from P(3 HB) and BC was fairly flexible and strong, judged by the tensile strength (64.5 MPa), elongations at break (15.7%), and Young's modulus (0.98 GPa) because inherently high strength of BC allowed the mechanical properties of P(3 HB) to improve in the P(3 HB)-g-BC composite. The hydrophilic property of the P(3 HB)-g-BC was much better than that of the individual counterparts which is also a desired characteristic to enhance the biocompatibility of the materials for proper cell adhesion and proliferation.

  13. Fab Chaperone-Assisted RNA Crystallography (Fab CARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Eileen; Archer, Jennifer; Ye, Jing-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Recent discovery of structured RNAs such as ribozymes and riboswitches shows that there is still much to learn about the structure and function of RNAs. Knowledge learned can be employed in both biochemical research and clinical applications. X-ray crystallography gives unparalleled atomic-level structural detail from which functional inferences can be deduced. However, the difficulty in obtaining high-quality crystals and their phasing information make it a very challenging task. RNA crystallography is particularly arduous due to several factors such as RNA's paucity of surface chemical diversity, lability, repetitive anionic backbone, and flexibility, all of which are counterproductive to crystal packing. Here we describe Fab chaperone assisted RNA crystallography (CARC), a systematic technique to increase RNA crystallography success by facilitating crystal packing as well as expediting phase determination through molecular replacement of conserved Fab domains. Major steps described in this chapter include selection of a synthetic Fab library displayed on M13 phage against a structured RNA crystallization target, ELISA for initial choice of binding Fabs, Fab expression followed by protein A affinity then cation exchange chromatography purification, final choice of Fab by binding specificity and affinity as determined by a dot blot assay, and lastly gel filtration purification of a large quantity of chosen Fabs for crystallization.

  14. Interplay of LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA in the structure and thermodynamics of RNA hybrid systems: a molecular dynamics study using the revised AMBER force field and comparison with experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ilyas; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard; Schatz, George C

    2014-12-11

    When used in nucleic acid duplexes, locked nucleic acid (LNA) and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues enhance the duplex stabilities, and this makes it possible to create much better RNA aptamers to target specific molecules in cells. Thus, LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues are finding increasingly widespread use in RNA-based therapeutics. Herein, we utilize molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and UV melting experiments to investigate the structural and thermodynamic properties of 13 nucleic acid duplexes, including full DNA, RNA, LNA, and 2'-O-methyl RNA duplexes as well as hybrid systems such as LNA:RNA, 2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA, LNA/2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA, and RNA/2'-O-methyl RNA:RNA duplexes. The MD simulations are based on a version of the Amber force field revised specifically for RNA and LNA residues. Our results indicate that LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA residues have two different hybridization mechanisms when included in hybrid duplexes with RNA wherein the former underwinds while the latter overwinds the duplexes. These computational predictions are supported by X-ray structures of LNA and 2'-O-methyl RNA duplexes that were recently presented by different groups, and there is also good agreement with the measured thermal stabilities of the duplexes. We find out that the "underwinding" phenomenon seen in LNA and LNA:RNA hybrid duplexes happens due to expansion of the major groove widths (Mgw) of the duplexes that is associated with decrease in the slide and twist values in base-pair steps. In contrast, 2'-O-methyl RNA residues in RNA duplexes slightly overwind the duplexes while the backbone is forced to stay in C3'-endo. Moreover, base-pair stacking in the LNA and LNA:RNA hybrid systems is gradually reduced with the inclusion of LNA residues in the duplexes while no such effect is seen in the 2'-O-methyl RNA systems. Our results show how competition between base stacking and structural rigidity in these RNA hybrid systems influences structures and stabilities. Even though both

  15. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...... means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including...

  16. Structural and Biochemical Basis for Misfolded RNA Recognition by the Ro Autoantigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs,G.; Stein, A.; Fu, C.; Reinisch, K.; Wolin, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Ro autoantigen is ring-shaped, binds misfolded noncoding RNAs and is proposed to function in quality control. Here we determine how Ro interacts with misfolded RNAs. Binding of Ro to misfolded precursor (pre)-5S ribosomal RNA requires a single-stranded 3 end and helical elements. As mutating most sequences of the helices and tail results in modest decreases in binding, Ro may be able to associate with a range of RNAs. Ro binds several other RNAs that contain single-stranded tails. A crystal structure of Ro bound to a misfolded pre-5S rRNA fragment reveals that the tail inserts into the cavity, while a helix binds on the surface. Most contacts of Ro with the helix are to the backbone. Mutagenesis reveals that Ro has an extensive RNA-binding surface. We propose that Ro uses this surface to scavenge RNAs that fail to bind their specific RNA-binding proteins.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Core of an RNA-Polymerase Ribozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shechner, David M.; Grant, Robert A.; Bagby, Sarah C.; Koldobskaya, Yelena; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Bartel, David P.; (MIT); (HHMI); (UC)

    2010-09-02

    Primordial organisms of the putative RNA world would have required polymerase ribozymes able to replicate RNA. Known ribozymes with polymerase activity best approximating that needed for RNA replication contain at their catalytic core the class I RNA ligase, an artificial ribozyme with a catalytic rate among the fastest of known ribozymes. Here we present the 3.0 angstrom crystal structure of this ligase. The architecture resembles a tripod, its three legs converging near the ligation junction. Interacting with this tripod scaffold through a series of 10 minor-groove interactions (including two A-minor triads) is the unpaired segment that contributes to and organizes the active site. A cytosine nucleobase and two backbone phosphates abut the ligation junction; their location suggests a model for catalysis resembling that of proteinaceous polymerases.

  18. Thermoresponsive Poly(2-oxazoline) Molecular Brushes by Living Ionic Polymerization: Kinetic Investigations of Pendant Chain Grafting and Cloud Point Modulation by Backbone and Side Chain Length Variation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-04-17

    Molecular brushes of poly(2-oxazoline)s were prepared by living anionic polymerization of 2-iso-propenyl-2-oxazoline to form the backbone and subsequent living cationic ring-opening polymerization of 2-n- or 2-iso-propyl-2-oxazoline for pendant chain grafting. In situ kinetic studies indicate that the initiation efficiency and polymerization rates are independent from the number of initiator functions per initiator molecule. This was attributed to the high efficiency of oxazolinium salt and the stretched conformation of the backbone, which is caused by the electrostatic repulsion of the oxazolinium moieties along the macroinitiator. The resulting molecular brushes showed thermoresponsive properties, that is, having a defined cloud point (CP). The dependence of the CP as a function of backbone and side chain length as well as concentration was studied. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Modernización del IP Backbone del Core de Voz para Telefónica Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Echeverria Medina, Jorge Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    En el mercado de las telecomunicaciones, la alta disponibilidad de las redes celulares hace muchos años atrás dejó de ser una meta y hoy en día es un requisito básico para cualquier operador. Siguiendo el continuo evolucionar de las empresas celulares consideradas grandes a nivel mundial, la compañía Telefónica Ecuador a mediados del año 2014 entró en un proceso de modernización de toda su red, modernización que incluyó el Backbone IP para su red de Voz a nivel nacional. Telefónica Ecuador cu...

  20. Backbone structure of Yersinia pestis Ail determined in micelles by NMR-restrained simulated annealing with implicit membrane solvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org; Ding, Yi [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology (United States); Tian, Ye; Yao, Yong [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The outer membrane protein Ail (attachment invasion locus) is a virulence factor of Yersinia pestis that mediates cell invasion, cell attachment and complement resistance. Here we describe its three-dimensional backbone structure determined in decyl-phosphocholine (DePC) micelles by NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure was calculated using the membrane function of the implicit solvation potential, eefxPot, which we have developed to facilitate NMR structure calculations in a physically realistic environment. We show that the eefxPot force field guides the protein towards its native fold. The resulting structures provide information about the membrane-embedded global position of Ail, and have higher accuracy, higher precision and improved conformational properties, compared to the structures calculated with the standard repulsive potential.

  1. TACN-based cationic lipids with amino acid backbone and double tails: materials for non-viral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Xun, Miao-Miao; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-04-01

    Cationic lipids have become an efficient type of non-viral vectors for gene delivery. In this Letter, four cationic lipids containing 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (TACN) headgroup, glutamic/aspartic acid backbone and dioleyl tails were designed and synthesized. The TACN headgroup gives these lipids excellent pH buffering capacities, which were higher than branched 25 kDa PEI. Cationic liposomes prepared from these lipids and DOPE showed good DNA affinity, and full DNA condensation was found at N/P ratio of 3 via agarose gel electrophoresis. The lipoplexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) assay, which gave proper particle sizes and zeta-potentials for transfection. In vitro gene transfection results in two cell lines reveal that TAN (with aspartic acid and amide bond in the structure) shows the best transfection efficiency, which is close to commercially available transfection agent Lipofectamine 2000.

  2. Backbone cyclised peptides from plants show molluscicidal activity against the rice pest Pomacea canaliculata (golden apple snail).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plan, Manuel Rey R; Saska, Ivana; Cagauan, Arsenia G; Craik, David J

    2008-07-09

    Golden apple snails ( Pomacea canaliculata) are serious pests of rice in South East Asia. Cyclotides are backbone cyclized peptides produced by plants from Rubiaceae and Violaceae. In this study, we investigated the molluscicidal activity of cyclotides against golden apple snails. Crude cyclotide extracts from both Oldenlandia affinis and Viola odorata plants showed molluscicidal activity comparable to the synthetic molluscicide metaldehyde. Individual cyclotides from each extract demonstrated a range of molluscicidal activities. The cyclotides cycloviolacin O1, kalata B1, and kalata B2 were more toxic to golden apple snails than metaldehyde, while kalata B7 and kalata B8 did not cause significant mortality. The toxicity of the cyclotide kalata B2 on a nontarget species, the Nile tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus), was three times lower than the common piscicide rotenone. Our findings suggest that the existing diversity of cyclotides in plants could be used to develop natural molluscicides.

  3. Poly(meta-phenylene) Derivative with Rigid Twisted Biphenyl Units in Backbone: Synthesis, Structural Characterization,Photophysical Properties and Electroluminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yan; YANG Bing; ZHANG Hai-quan; LU Ping; SHEN Fang-zhong; LIU Lin-lin; XU Hai; YANG Guang-di; MA Yu-guang

    2007-01-01

    A soluble poly(meta-phenylene) derivative with rigid twisted biphenyl unit was synthesized by the Yamamoto coupling reaction. The polymer is soluble in common organic solvents, and the number-average molecular weight is about 6500. The UV-Vis and quantum chemical calculation indicate that the different conformation segments named "conformers" exist in the polymer backbones; it was also further confirmed by the single crystal X-ray diffraction study of the dimeric model compound. The π-π* transition of biphenyl segments of twisted and planar conformations made the polymer exhibit a strong absorption around 256 nm and a weak absorption at about 300 nm. Furthermore,the polymer exhibits a strong UV photoluminescence at 372 nm when the excitation wavelengths are longer than 300 nm. The ultraviolet-emitting electroluminescence(EL) device with the single layer structure shows EL λmax of the derivative at 370 nm.

  4. Proton-detected MAS NMR experiments based on dipolar transfers for backbone assignment of highly deuterated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Habenstein, Birgit; Loquet, Antoine; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2014-05-01

    Proton-detected solid-state NMR was applied to a highly deuterated insoluble, non-crystalline biological assembly, the Salmonella typhimurium type iii secretion system (T3SS) needle. Spectra of very high resolution and sensitivity were obtained at a low protonation level of 10-20% at exchangeable amide positions. We developed efficient experimental protocols for resonance assignment tailored for this system and the employed experimental conditions. Using exclusively dipolar-based interspin magnetization transfers, we recorded two sets of 3D spectra allowing for an almost complete backbone resonance assignment of the needle subunit PrgI. The additional information provided by the well-resolved proton dimension revealed the presence of two sets of resonances in the N-terminal helix of PrgI, while in previous studies employing 13C detection only a single set of resonances was observed.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the SpaA backbone-pilin subunit from probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepak; von Ossowski, Ingemar; Palva, Airi; Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2013-10-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, a widely used Gram-positive probiotic strain, is clinically well known for its perceived health-promoting effects. It has recently been shown to display proteinaceous pilus fibres (called SpaCBA) on its cell surface. Structurally, SpaCBA pili possess a characteristic three-pilin polymerized architecture, with repeating SpaA major pilins that form the backbone and two types of minor subunits (SpaB and SpaC). In this study, recombinant SpaA protein was purified, characterized and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 2.0 Å and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a=227.9, b=63.2, c=104.3 Å, β=95.1°.

  6. Comparison of solid-state dipolar couplings and solution relaxation data provides insight into protein backbone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevelkov, Veniamin; Xue, Yi; Linser, Rasmus; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R; Reif, Bernd

    2010-04-14

    Analyses of solution (15)N relaxation data and solid-state (1)H(N)-(15)N dipolar couplings from a small globular protein, alpha-spectrin SH3 domain, produce a surprisingly similar pattern of order parameters. This result suggests that there is little or no ns-mus dynamics throughout most of the sequence and, in particular, in the structured portion of the backbone. At the same time, evidence of ns-mus motions is found in the flexible loops and termini. These findings, corroborated by the MD simulations of alpha-spectrin SH3 in a hydrated crystalline environment and in solution, are consistent with the picture of protein dynamics that has recently emerged from the solution studies employing residual dipolar couplings.

  7. Formation of Hierarchical Structure Composed of (Co/Ni)Mn-LDH Nanosheets on MWCNT Backbones for Efficient Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Gan; Hu, Yingfei; Qian, Qinfeng; Yao, Yingfang; Zhang, Shiying; Li, Zhaosheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2016-06-15

    Active, stable, and cost-effective electrocatalysts are attractive alternatives to the noble metal oxides that have been used in water splitting. The direct nucleation and growth of electrochemically active LDH materials on chemically modified MWCNTs exhibit considerable electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen evolution from water oxidation. CoMn-based and NiMn-based hybrids were synthesized using a facile chemical bath deposition method and the as-synthesized materials exhibited three-dimensional hierarchical configurations with tunable Co/Mn and Ni/Mn ratio. Benefiting from enhanced electrical conductivity with MWCNT backbones and LDH lamellar structure, the Co5Mn-LDH/MWCNT and Ni5Mn-LDH/MWCNT could generated a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at overpotentials of ∼300 and ∼350 mV, respectively, in 1 M KOH. In addition, the materials also exhibited outstanding long-term electrocatalytic stability.

  8. Resolution of RNA using high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mclaughlin, L.W.; Bischoff, Rainer

    1987-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatographic techniques can be very effective for the resolution and isolation of nucleic acids. The characteristic ionic (phosphodiesters) and hydrophobic (nucleobases) properties of RNAs can be exploited for their separation. In this respect anion-exchange and reversed-p

  9. Unraveling the complexity of protein backbone dynamics with combined (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR relaxation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamley, Jonathan M; Lougher, Matthew J; Sass, Hans Juergen; Rogowski, Marco; Grzesiek, Stephan; Lewandowski, Józef R

    2015-09-14

    Typically, protein dynamics involve a complex hierarchy of motions occurring on different time scales between conformations separated by a range of different energy barriers. NMR relaxation can in principle provide a site-specific picture of both the time scales and amplitudes of these motions, but independent relaxation rates sensitive to fluctuations in different time scale ranges are required to obtain a faithful representation of the underlying dynamic complexity. This is especially pertinent for relaxation measurements in the solid state, which report on dynamics in a broader window of time scales by more than 3 orders of magnitudes compared to solution NMR relaxation. To aid in unraveling the intricacies of biomolecular dynamics we introduce (13)C spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame (R1ρ) as a probe of backbone nanosecond-microsecond motions in proteins in the solid state. We present measurements of (13)C'R1ρ rates in fully protonated crystalline protein GB1 at 600 and 850 MHz (1)H Larmor frequencies and compare them to (13)C'R1, (15)N R1 and R1ρ measured under the same conditions. The addition of carbon relaxation data to the model free analysis of nitrogen relaxation data leads to greatly improved characterization of time scales of protein backbone motions, minimizing the occurrence of fitting artifacts that may be present when (15)N data is used alone. We also discuss how internal motions characterized by different time scales contribute to (15)N and (13)C relaxation rates in the solid state and solution state, leading to fundamental differences between them, as well as phenomena such as underestimation of picosecond-range motions in the solid state and nanosecond-range motions in solution.

  10. The backbone of the post-synaptic density originated in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Michaël

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics of the early diverging metazoan lineages and of their unicellular sister-groups opens new window to reconstructing the genetic changes which preceded or accompanied the evolution of multicellular body plans. A recent analysis found that the genome of the nerve-less sponges encodes the homologues of most vertebrate post-synaptic proteins. In vertebrate excitatory synapses, these proteins assemble to form the post-synaptic density, a complex molecular platform linking membrane receptors, components of their signalling pathways, and the cytoskeleton. Newly available genomes from Monosiga brevicollis (a member of Choanoflagellata, the closest unicellular relatives of animals and Trichoplax adhaerens (a member of Placozoa: besides sponges, the only nerve-less metazoans offer an opportunity to refine our understanding of post-synaptic protein evolution. Results Searches for orthologous proteins and reconstruction of gene gains/losses based on the taxon phylogeny indicate that post-synaptic proteins originated in two main steps. The backbone scaffold proteins (Shank, Homer, DLG and some of their partners were acquired in a unicellular ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoans. A substantial additional set appeared in an exclusive ancestor of the Metazoa. The placozoan genome contains most post-synaptic genes but lacks some of them. Notably, the master-scaffold protein Shank might have been lost secondarily in the placozoan lineage. Conclusions The time of origination of most post-synaptic proteins was not concomitant with the acquisition of synapses or neural-like cells. The backbone of the scaffold emerged in a unicellular context and was probably not involved in cell-cell communication. Based on the reconstructed protein composition and potential interactions, its ancestral function could have been to link calcium signalling and cytoskeleton regulation. The complex later became integrated into the evolving

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus accelerates zebrafish backbone calcification and gonadal differentiation through effects on the GnRH and IGF systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo A Avella

    Full Text Available Endogenous microbiota play essential roles in the host's immune system, physiology, reproduction and nutrient metabolism. We hypothesized that a continuous administration of an exogenous probiotic might also influence the host's development. Thus, we treated zebrafish from birth to sexual maturation (2-months treatment with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, a probiotic species intended for human use. We monitored for the presence of L. rhamnosus during the entire treatment. Zebrafish at 6 days post fertilization (dpf exhibited elevated gene expression levels for Insulin-like growth factors -I and -II, Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors -α and -β, VDR-α and RAR-γ when compared to untreated-10 days old zebrafish. Using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3 GFP transgenic zebrafish (GnRH3-GFP, higher GnRH3 expression was found at 6, 8 and 10 dpf upon L. rhamnosus treatment. The same larvae exhibited earlier backbone calcification and gonad maturation. Noteworthy in the gonad development was the presence of first testes differentiation at 3 weeks post fertilization in the treated zebrafish population -which normally occurs at 8 weeks- and a dramatic sex ratio modulation (93% females, 7% males in control vs. 55% females, 45% males in the treated group. We infer that administration of L. rhamnosus stimulated the IGF system, leading to a faster backbone calcification. Moreover we hypothesize a role for administration of L. rhamnosus on GnRH3 modulation during early larval development, which in turn affects gonadal development and sex differentiation. These findings suggest a significant role of the microbiota composition on the host organism development profile and open new perspectives in the study of probiotics usage and application.

  12. Selecting Question-Specific Genes to Reduce Incongruence in Phylogenomics: A Case Study of Jawed Vertebrate Backbone Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Yun; Liang, Dan; Zhang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Incongruence between different phylogenomic analyses is the main challenge faced by phylogeneticists in the genomic era. To reduce incongruence, phylogenomic studies normally adopt some data filtering approaches, such as reducing missing data or using slowly evolving genes, to improve the signal quality of data. Here, we assembled a phylogenomic data set of 58 jawed vertebrate taxa and 4682 genes to investigate the backbone phylogeny of jawed vertebrates under both concatenation and coalescent-based frameworks. To evaluate the efficiency of extracting phylogenetic signals among different data filtering methods, we chose six highly intractable internodes within the backbone phylogeny of jawed vertebrates as our test questions. We found that our phylogenomic data set exhibits substantial conflicting signal among genes for these questions. Our analyses showed that non-specific data sets that are generated without bias toward specific questions are not sufficient to produce consistent results when there are several difficult nodes within a phylogeny. Moreover, phylogenetic accuracy based on non-specific data is considerably influenced by the size of data and the choice of tree inference methods. To address such incongruences, we selected genes that resolve a given internode but not the entire phylogeny. Notably, not only can this strategy yield correct relationships for the question, but it also reduces inconsistency associated with data sizes and inference methods. Our study highlights the importance of gene selection in phylogenomic analyses, suggesting that simply using a large amount of data cannot guarantee correct results. Constructing question-specific data sets may be more powerful for resolving problematic nodes.

  13. General order parameter based correlation analysis of protein backbone motions between experimental NMR relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qing; Shi, Chaowei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Yu, Lu [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Zhang, Longhua [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Xiong, Ying, E-mail: yxiong73@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Tian, Changlin, E-mail: cltian@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at The Microscale and School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2015-02-13

    Internal backbone dynamic motions are essential for different protein functions and occur on a wide range of time scales, from femtoseconds to seconds. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin relaxation measurements are valuable tools to gain access to fast (nanosecond) internal motions. However, there exist few reports on correlation analysis between MD and NMR relaxation data. Here, backbone relaxation measurements of {sup 15}N-labeled SH3 (Src homology 3) domain proteins in aqueous buffer were used to generate general order parameters (S{sup 2}) using a model-free approach. Simultaneously, 80 ns MD simulations of SH3 domain proteins in a defined hydrated box at neutral pH were conducted and the general order parameters (S{sup 2}) were derived from the MD trajectory. Correlation analysis using the Gromos force field indicated that S{sup 2} values from NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations were significantly different. MD simulations were performed on models with different charge states for three histidine residues, and with different water models, which were SPC (simple point charge) water model and SPC/E (extended simple point charge) water model. S{sup 2} parameters from MD simulations with charges for all three histidines and with the SPC/E water model correlated well with S{sup 2} calculated from the experimental NMR relaxation measurements, in a site-specific manner. - Highlights: • Correlation analysis between NMR relaxation measurements and MD simulations. • General order parameter (S{sup 2}) as common reference between the two methods. • Different protein dynamics with different Histidine charge states in neutral pH. • Different protein dynamics with different water models.

  14. Controlled Conjugated Backbone Twisting for an Increased Open-Circuit Voltage while Having a High Short-Circuit Current in Poly(hexylthiophene) Derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Ko, Sangwon

    2012-03-21

    Conjugated polymers with nearly planar backbones have been the most commonly investigated materials for organic-based electronic devices. More twisted polymer backbones have been shown to achieve larger open-circuit voltages in solar cells, though with decreased short-circuit current densities. We systematically impose twists within a family of poly(hexylthiophene)s and examine their influence on the performance of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. A simple chemical modification concerning the number and placement of alkyl side chains along the conjugated backbone is used to control the degree of backbone twisting. Density functional theory calculations were carried out on a series of oligothiophene structures to provide insights on how the sterically induced twisting influences the geometric, electronic, and optical properties. Grazing incidence X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate how the thin-film packing structure was affected. The open-circuit voltage and charge-transfer state energy of the polymer:fullerene BHJ solar cells increased substantially with the degree of twist induced within the conjugated backbone-due to an increase in the polymer ionization potential-while the short-circuit current decreased as a result of a larger optical gap and lower hole mobility. A controlled, moderate degree of twist along the poly(3,4-dihexyl-2,2′:5′,2′′- terthiophene) (PDHTT) conjugated backbone led to a 19% enhancement in the open-circuit voltage (0.735 V) vs poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based devices, while similar short-circuit current densities, fill factors, and hole-carrier mobilities were maintained. These factors resulted in a power conversion efficiency of 4.2% for a PDHTT:[6,6]-phenyl-C 71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC 71BM) blend solar cell without thermal annealing. This simple approach reveals a molecular design avenue to increase open-circuit voltage while retaining the short-circuit current. © 2012 American

  15. Backbone dynamics of a biologically active human FGF-1 monomer, complexed to a hexasaccharide heparin-analogue, by {sup 15}N NMR relaxation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Fayos, Rosa [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain); Angulo, Jesus; Ojeda, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Unidad de RM y Unidad de RMN de Biomoleculas Asociada al CSIC, Laboratorio de Estructura e Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose Carracido (Spain); Nieto, Pedro M.; Martin-Lomas, Manuel [Instituto de Investigaciones Quimicas, CSIC, Grupo de Carbohidratos (Spain); Lozano, Rosa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Departamento de Estructura y Funcion de Proteinas (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2006-08-15

    The binding site and backbone dynamics of a bioactive complex formed by the acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1) and a specifically designed heparin hexasaccharide has been investigated by HSQC and relaxation NMR methods. The comparison of the relaxation data for the free and bound states has allowed showing that the complex is monomeric, and still induces mutagenesis, and that the protein backbone presents reduced motion in different timescale in its bound state, except in certain points that are involved in the interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)

  16. The Vienna RNA Websuite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Andreas R.; Lorenz, Ronny; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Neuböck, Richard; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2008-01-01

    The Vienna RNA Websuite is a comprehensive collection of tools for folding, design and analysis of RNA sequences. It provides a web interface to the most commonly used programs of the Vienna RNA package. Among them, we find folding of single and aligned sequences, prediction of RNA–RNA interactions, and design of sequences with a given structure. Additionally, we provide analysis of folding landscapes using the barriers program and structural RNA alignments using LocARNA. The web server together with software packages for download is freely accessible at http://rna.tbi.univie.ac.at/. PMID:18424795

  17. RNA/aTNA Chimeras: RNAi Effects and Nucleases Resistance of Single and Double Stranded RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Alagia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The RNA interference pathway (RNAi is a specific and powerful biological process, triggered by small non-coding RNA molecules and involved in gene expression regulation. In this work, we explored the possibility of increasing the biological stability of these RNA molecules by replacing their natural ribose ring with an acyclic L-threoninol backbone. In particular, this modification has been incorporated at certain positions of the oligonucleotide strands and its effects on the biological properties of the siRNA have been evaluated. In vitro cellular RNAi assays have demonstrated that the L-threoninol backbone is well tolerated by the RNAi machinery in both double and single-stranded fashion, with activities significantly higher than those evinced by the unmodified RNAs and comparable to the well-known phosphorothioate modification. Additionally, this modification conferred extremely strong resistance to serum and 3′/5′-exonucleases. In view of these results, we applied this modification to the knockdown of a therapeutically relevant human gene such as apolipoprotein B (ApoB. Further studies on the activation of the innate immune system showed that L-threoninol-modified RNAs are slightly less stimulatory than unmodified RNAs.

  18. Efficient inhibition of HIV-1 replication by an artificial polycistronic miRNA construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi has been used as a promising approach to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication for both in vitro and in vivo animal models. However, HIV-1 escape mutants after RNAi treatment have been reported. Expressing multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against conserved viral sequences can serve as a genetic barrier for viral escape, and optimization of the efficiency of this process was the aim of this study. Results An artificial polycistronic transcript driven by a CMV promoter was designed to inhibit HIV-1 replication. The artificial polycistronic transcript contained two pre-miR-30a backbones and one pre-miR-155 backbone, which are linked by a sequence derived from antisense RNA sequence targeting the HIV-1 env gene. Our results demonstrated that this artificial polycistronic transcript simultaneously expresses three anti-HIV siRNAs and efficiently inhibits HIV-1 replication. In addition, the biosafety of MT-4 cells expressing this polycistronic miRNA transcript was evaluated, and no apparent impacts on cell proliferation rate, interferon response, and interruption of native miRNA processing were observed. Conclusions The strategy described here to generate an artificial polycistronic transcript to inhibit viral replication provided an opportunity to select and optimize many factors to yield highly efficient constructs expressing multiple siRNAs against viral infection.

  19. Building a stable RNA U-turn with a protonated cytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein-Schmidtke, Sina R; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Groher, Florian; Weigand, Julia E; Gottstein, Daniel; Suess, Beatrix; Wöhnert, Jens

    2014-08-01

    The U-turn is a classical three-dimensional RNA folding motif first identified in the anticodon and T-loops of tRNAs. It also occurs frequently as a building block in other functional RNA structures in many different sequence and structural contexts. U-turns induce sharp changes in the direction of the RNA backbone and often conform to the 3-nt consensus sequence 5'-UNR-3' (N = any nucleotide, R = purine). The canonical U-turn motif is stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the N3 imino group of the U residue and the 3' phosphate group of the R residue as well as a hydrogen bond between the 2'-hydroxyl group of the uridine and the N7 nitrogen of the R residue. Here, we demonstrate that a protonated cytidine can functionally and structurally replace the uridine at the first position of the canonical U-turn motif in the apical loop of the neomycin riboswitch. Using NMR spectroscopy, we directly show that the N3 imino group of the protonated cytidine forms a hydrogen bond with the backbone phosphate 3' from the third nucleotide of the U-turn analogously to the imino group of the uridine in the canonical motif. In addition, we compare the stability of the hydrogen bonds in the mutant U-turn motif to the wild type and describe the NMR signature of the C+-phosphate interaction. Our results have implications for the prediction of RNA structural motifs and suggest simple approaches for the experimental identification of hydrogen bonds between protonated C-imino groups and the phosphate backbone.

  20. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found...... to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  1. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when po...

  2. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Nanotechnology's central goal involves the direct control of matter at the molecular nanometer scale to build nanofactories, nanomachines, and other devices for potential applications including electronics, alternative fuels, and medicine. In this regard, the nascent use of nucleic acids as a material to coordinate the precise arrangements of specific molecules marked an important milestone in the relatively recent history of nanotechnology. While DNA served as the pioneer building material in nucleic acid nanotechnology, RNA continues to emerge as viable alternative material with its own distinct advantages for nanoconstruction. Several complementary assembly strategies have been used to build a diverse set of RNA nanostructures having unique structural attributes and the ability to self-assemble in a highly programmable and controlled manner. Of the different strategies, the architectonics approach uniquely endeavors to understand integrated structural RNA architectures through the arrangement of their characteristic structural building blocks. Viewed through this lens, it becomes apparent that nature routinely uses thermodynamically stable, recurrent modular motifs from natural RNA molecules to generate unique and more complex programmable structures. With the design principles found in natural structures, a number of synthetic RNAs have been constructed. The synthetic nanostructures constructed to date have provided, in addition to affording essential insights into RNA design, important platforms to characterize and validate the structural self-folding and assembly properties of RNA modules or building blocks. Furthermore, RNA nanoparticles have shown great promise for applications in nanomedicine and RNA-based therapeutics. Nevertheless, the synthetic RNA architectures achieved thus far consist largely of static, rigid particles that are still far from matching the structural and functional complexity of natural responsive structural elements such

  3. Typing of core and backbone domains of mucin-type oligosaccharides from human ovarian-cyst glycoproteins by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Mutsaers, J.H.G.M.; Halbeek, H. van; Wu, A.M.; Kabat, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Human blood-group A active glycoproteins from ovarian-cyst fluid were subjected to Smith degradation and subsequent beta-elimination. The resulting oligosaccharide-alditols represent the core and backbone domains of the O-linked carbohydrate chains. Nine of these, ranging in size from disaccharides

  4. The ortho backbone amide linker (o-BAL) is an easily prepared and highly acid-labile handle for solid-phase synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Brask, Jesper; Christensen, J.B.;

    2002-01-01

    The tris(alkoxy)benzyl backbone amide linker (BAL) has found widespread application in solid-phase synthesis. The key intermediate for preparation of para BAL (p-BAL) is 2,6-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde; several reports on its synthesis have appeared. However, the ortho analogue of the handle (o...

  5. Sphingolipid-dependent fusion of Semliki Forest virus with cholesterol-containing liposomes requires both the 3-hydroxyl group and the double bond of the sphingolipid backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corver, J; Moesby, Lise; Erukulla, R K;

    1995-01-01

    , we demonstrate that sphingolipid-dependent fusion of SFV with cholesterol-containing liposomes exhibits remarkable molecular specificity, the 3-hydroxyl group and the 4,5-trans carbon-carbon double bond of the sphingosine backbone being critical for the sphingolipid to mediate the process...

  6. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-02-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  7. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Thomas J X

    2010-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called ``zig-zag'' configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including their generating function, singularity analysis as well as explicit recurrence relations. In particular, our results imply simple asymptotic formulas for the number of joint structures.

  8. Effect of PEG and mPEG-anthracene on tRNA aggregation and particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, E; Mandeville, J S; Arnold, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-01-09

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and its derivatives are synthetic polymers with major applications in gene and drug delivery systems. Synthetic polymers are also used to transport miRNA and siRNA in vitro. We studied the interaction of tRNA with several PEGs of different compositions, such as PEG 3350, PEG 6000, and mPEG-anthracene under physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to analyze the PEG binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of polymer complexation on tRNA stability, aggregation, and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that PEG-tRNA interaction occurs via RNA bases and the backbone phosphate group with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts. The overall binding constants of K(PEG 3350-tRNA)= 1.9 (±0.5) × 10(4) M(-1), K(PEG 6000-tRNA) = 8.9 (±1) × 10(4) M(-1), and K(mPEG-anthracene)= 1.2 (±0.40) × 10(3) M(-1) show stronger polymer-RNA complexation by PEG 6000 and by PEG 3350 than the mPEG-anthracene. AFM imaging showed that PEG complexes contain on average one tRNA with PEG 3350, five tRNA with PEG 6000, and ten tRNA molecules with mPEG-anthracene. tRNA aggregation and particle formation occurred at high polymer concentrations, whereas it remains in A-family structure.

  9. Peptide backbone orientation and dynamics in spider dragline silk and two-photon excitation in nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eles, P.T

    2005-07-01

    In the first part of the dissertation, spider dragline silk is studied by solid state NMR techniques. The dependence of NMR frequency on molecular orientation is exploited using the DECODER experiment to determine the orientation of the protein backbone within the silk fibre. Practical experimental considerations require that the silk fibres be wound about a cylindrical axis perpendicular to the external magnetic field, complicating the reconstruction of the underlying orientation distribution and necessitating the development of numerical techniques for this purpose. A two-component model of silk incorporating static b-sheets and polyglycine II helices adequately fits the NMR data and suggests that the b-sheets are well aligned along the silk axis (20 FWHM) while the helices are poorly aligned (68 FWHM). The effects of fibre strain, draw rate and hydration on orientation are measured. Measurements of the time-scale for peptide backbone motion indicate that when wet, a strain-dependent fraction of the poorly aligned component becomes mobile. This suggests a mechanism for the supercontraction of silk involving latent entropic springs that undergo a local strain-dependent phase transition, driving supercontraction. In the second part of this dissertation a novel method is developed for exciting NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) by rf irradiation at multiple frequencies that sum to (or differ by) the resonance frequency. This is fundamentally different than traditional NMR experiments where irradiation is applied on-resonance. With excitation outside the detection bandwidth, two-photon excitation allows for detection of free induction signals during excitation, completely eliminating receiver dead-time. A theoretical approach to describing two-photon excitation is developed based on average Hamiltonian theory. An intuition for two-photon excitation is gained by analogy to the coherent absorption of multiple photons requiring conservation of total energy and

  10. Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Antibodies: Enhancement of Neutralizing Potency in Polyclonal Mixtures and IgA Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenqian; Mullarkey, Caitlin E.; Duty, J. Andrew; Moran, Thomas M.; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current influenza virus vaccines rely upon the accurate prediction of circulating virus strains months in advance of the actual influenza season in order to allow time for vaccine manufacture. Unfortunately, mismatches occur frequently, and even when perfect matches are achieved, suboptimal vaccine efficacy leaves several high-risk populations vulnerable to infection. However, the recent discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk domain has renewed hope that the development of “universal” influenza virus vaccines may be within reach. Here, we examine the functions of influenza A virus hemagglutinin stalk-binding antibodies in an endogenous setting, i.e., as polyclonal preparations isolated from human sera. Relative to monoclonal antibodies that bind to the HA head domain, the neutralization potency of monoclonal stalk-binding antibodies was vastly inferior in vitro but was enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the polyclonal context. Furthermore, we demonstrated a surprising enhancement in IgA-mediated HA stalk neutralization relative to that achieved by antibodies of IgG isotypes. Mechanistically, this could be explained in two ways. Identical variable regions consistently neutralized virus more potently when in an IgA backbone compared to an IgG backbone. In addition, HA-specific memory B cells isolated from human peripheral blood were more likely to be stalk specific when secreting antibodies of IgA isotypes compared to those secreting IgG. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that HA stalk-binding antibodies perform optimally when in a polyclonal context and that the targeted elicitation of HA stalk-specific IgA should be an important consideration during “universal” influenza virus vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses remain one of the most worrisome global public health threats due to their capacity to cause pandemics. While seasonal vaccines fail to protect against the

  11. Evaluation of backbone-cyclized HER2-binding 2-helix affibody molecule for in vivo molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarvar, Hadis; Jokilaakso, Nima; Andersson, Karl; Malmberg, Jennie; Rosik, Daniel; Orlova, Anna; Karlström, Amelie Eriksson; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Järver, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Affibody molecules, small scaffold proteins, have demonstrated an appreciable potential as imaging probes. Affibody molecules are composed of three alpha-helices. Helices 1 and 2 are involved in molecular recognition, while helix 3 provides stability. The size of Affibody molecules can be reduced by omitting the third alpha-helix and cross-linking the two remaining, providing a smaller molecule with better extravasation and quicker clearance of unbound tracer. The goal of this study was to develop a novel 2-helix Affibody molecule based on backbone cyclization by native chemical ligation (NCL). The HER2-targeting NCL-cyclized Affibody molecule ZHER2:342min has been designed, synthesized and site-specifically conjugated with a DOTA chelator. DOTA-ZHER2:342min was labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga. The binding affinity of DOTA-ZHER2:342min was evaluated in vitro. The targeting properties of (111)In- and (68)Ga-DOTA-ZHER2:342min were evaluated in mice bearing SKOV-3 xenografts and compared with the properties of (111)In- and (68)Ga-labeled PEP09239, a DOTA-conjugated 2-helix Affibody analogue cyclized by a homocysteine disulfide bridge. The dissociation constant (KD) for DOTA-ZHER2:342min binding to HER2 was 18nM according to SPR measurements. DOTA-ZHER2:342min was labeled with (111)In and (68)Ga. Both conjugates demonstrated bi-phasic binding kinetics to HER2-expressing cells, with KD1 in low nanomolar range. Both variants demonstrated specific uptake in HER2-expressing xenografts. Tumor-to-blood ratios at 2h p.i. were 6.1±1.3 for (111)In- DOTA-ZHER2:342min and 4.6±0.7 for (68)Ga-DOTA-ZHER2:342min. However, the uptake of DOTA-ZHER2:342min in lung, liver and spleen was appreciably higher than the uptake of PEP09239-based counterparts. Native chemical ligation enables production of a backbone-cyclized HER2-binding 2-helix Affibody molecule (ZHER2:342min) with low nanomolar target affinity and specific tumor uptake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  13. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  14. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    of the transcriptome, 5’ end capture of RNA is combined with next-generation sequencing for high-throughput quantitative assessment of transcription start sites by two different methods. The methods presented here allow for functional investigation of coding as well as noncoding RNA and contribute to future......While increasing evidence appoints diverse types of RNA as key players in the regulatory networks underlying cellular differentiation and metabolism, the potential functions of thousands of conserved RNA structures encoded in mammalian genomes remain to be determined. Since the functions of most...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA...

  15. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  16. Drug delivery of siRNA therapeutics: potentials and limits of nanosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischl, Daniela; Zimmer, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of human diseases that cannot be cured by rational therapies. The major limitation for the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA), both in vitro and in vivo, is the inability of naked siRNA to passively diffuse through cellular membranes due to the strong anionic charge of the phosphate backbone and consequent electrostatic repulsion from the anionic cell membrane surface. Therefore, the primary success of siRNA applications depends on suitable vectors to deliver therapeutic genes. Cellular entrance is further limited by the size of the applied siRNA molecule. Multiple delivery pathways, both viral and nonviral, have been developed to bypass these problems and have been successfully used to gain access to the intracellular environment in vitro and in vivo, and to induce RNA interference (RNAi). This review focuses on different pathways for siRNA delivery and summarizes recent progress made in the use of vector-based siRNA technology.

  17. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  18. Positional distribution of fatty acids on the glycerol backbone during the biosynthesis of glycerolipids in Ectocarpus fasciculatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The biosynthesis of glycolipids in E. fasciculatus was studied by 14C label and chase. The fatty acids in sulphoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG) were almost 16-car- bon and 18-carbon ones. In addition to the two fatty acids, monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyl diacylglycerol (DGDG) contained 8.5 mol% and 31.0 mol% of eicosapentaenoic acid (20∶5), respectively, and this fatty acid was usually distributed in the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone. When plants were incubated with [2-14C] acetate, differences existed in the positional distribution of the labeled fatty acids in sn-1 and sn-2 among the three glycerolipids. In SQDG, 14C-labeled fatty acids were distributed uniformly in the sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In DGDG, 14C-labeled fatty acids were mainly distributed in the sn-2 position. In MGDG, the radioactivity of fatty acids in sn-1 position was far greater than that in sn-2 position after a 30 min pulse label, and the difference in radioactivity between the two positions decreased rapidly. The above results indicated that differences in the positional distribution of 14C-labeled fatty acids between sn-1 and sn-2 positions might be related to 20∶5 and the biosynthesis of DGDG. Our results also suggested that E. fasciculatus had the same DGDG biosynthetic pathway as that in higher plants and galactosyl transferase was selective for MGDG.

  19. An improved algorithm for finding community structure in networks with an application to IPv6 backbone network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yingxin; XU Ke

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of community structure in a large number of complex networks has attracted lots of interest in recent years.One category of algorithms for detecting community structure,the divisive algorithms,has been proposed and improved impressively.In this paper,we propose an improved divisive algorithm,the basic idea of which is to take more than one parameters into consideration to describe the networks from different points of view.Although its basic idea appears to be a little simple,it is shown experimentally that it outperforms some other algorithms when it is applied to the networks with a relatively obscure community structure.We also demonstrate its effectiveness by applying it to IPv6 backbone network.The communities detected by our algorithm indicate that although underdeveloped compared with IPv4 network,IPv6 network has already exhibited a preliminary community structure.Moreover,our algorithm can be further extended and adapted in the future.In fact,it suggests a simple yet possibly efficient way to improve algorithms.

  20. MERA: a webserver for evaluating backbone torsion angle distributions in dynamic and disordered proteins from NMR data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Medicine (Russian Federation); Shen, Yang; Lee, Jung Ho [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Hummer, Gerhard [Max Planck Institute of Biophysics (Germany); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2015-09-15

    MERA (Maximum Entropy Ramachandran map Analysis from NMR data) is a new webserver that generates residue-by-residue Ramachandran map distributions for disordered proteins or disordered regions in proteins on the basis of experimental NMR parameters. As input data, the program currently utilizes up to 12 different parameters. These include three different types of short-range NOEs, three types of backbone chemical shifts ({sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup α}, and {sup 13}C′), six types of J couplings ({sup 3}J{sub HNHα}, {sup 3}J{sub C′C′}, {sup 3}J{sub C′Hα}, {sup 1}J{sub HαCα}, {sup 2}J{sub CαN} and {sup 1}J{sub CαN}), as well as the {sup 15}N-relaxation derived J(0) spectral density. The Ramachandran map distributions are reported in terms of populations of their 15° × 15° voxels, and an adjustable maximum entropy weight factor is available to ensure that the obtained distributions will not deviate more from a newly derived coil library distribution than required to account for the experimental data. MERA output includes the agreement between each input parameter and its distribution-derived value. As an application, we demonstrate performance of the program for several residues in the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, as well as for several static and dynamic residues in the folded protein GB3.

  1. Pressure dependence of backbone chemical shifts in the model peptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlach, Markus Beck; Koehler, Joerg; Crusca, Edson; Kremer, Werner; Munte, Claudia E; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-01

    For a better understanding of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detected pressure responses of folded as well as unstructured proteins the availability of data from well-defined model systems are indispensable. In this work we report the pressure dependence of chemical shifts of the backbone atoms (1)H(α), (13)C(α) and (13)C' in the protected tetrapeptides Ac-Gly-Gly-Xxx-Ala-NH2 (Xxx one of the 20 canonical amino acids). Contrary to expectation the chemical shifts of these nuclei have a nonlinear dependence on pressure in the range from 0.1 to 200 MPa. The polynomial pressure coefficients B 1 and B 2 are dependent on the type of amino acid studied. The coefficients of a given nucleus show significant linear correlations suggesting that the NMR observable pressure effects in the different amino acids have at least partly the same physical cause. In line with this observation the magnitude of the second order coefficients of nuclei being direct neighbors in the chemical structure are also weakly correlated.

  2. Characterizing the effect of GalNAc and phosphorothioate backbone on binding of antisense oligonucleotides to the asialoglycoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Prakash, Thazha P; Donner, Aaron J; Kinberger, Garth A; Gaus, Hans J; Low, Audrey; Østergaard, Michael E; Bell, Melanie; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P

    2017-03-17

    Targeted delivery of antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) to hepatocytes via the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR) has improved the potency of ASO drugs ∼30-fold in the clinic (1). In order to fully characterize the effect of GalNAc valency, oligonucleotide length, flexibility and chemical composition on ASGR binding, we tested and validated a fluorescence polarization competition binding assay. The ASGR binding, and in vitro and in vivo activities of 1, 2 and 3 GalNAc conjugated single stranded and duplexed ASOs were studied. Two and three GalNAc conjugated single stranded ASOs bind the ASGR with the strongest affinity and display optimal in vitro and in vivo activities. 1 GalNAc conjugated ASOs showed 10-fold reduced ASGR binding affinity relative to three GalNAc ASOs but only 2-fold reduced activity in mice. An unexpected observation was that the ASGR also appears to play a role in the uptake of unconjugated phosphorothioate modified ASOs in the liver as evidenced by the loss of activity of GalNAc conjugated and unconjugated ASOs in ASGR knockout mice. Our results provide insights into how backbone charge and chemical composition assist in the binding and internalization of highly polar anionic single stranded oligonucleotides into cells and tissues. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Identification of oriT and a recombination hot spot in the IncA/C plasmid backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Anna; Szabó, Mónika; Olasz, Ferenc; Kiss, János

    2017-09-06

    Dissemination of multiresistance has been accelerating among pathogenic bacteria in recent decades. The broad host-range conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C family are effective vehicles of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. Although more than 150 family members have been sequenced to date, their conjugation system and other functions encoded by the conserved plasmid backbone have been poorly characterized. The key cis-acting locus, the origin of transfer (oriT), has not yet been unambiguously identified. We present evidence that IncA/C plasmids have a single oriT locus immediately upstream of the mobI gene encoding an indispensable transfer factor. The fully active oriT spans ca. 150-bp AT-rich region overlapping the promoters of mobI and contains multiple inverted and direct repeats. Within this region, the core domain of oriT with reduced but detectable transfer activity was confined to a 70-bp segment containing two inverted repeats and one copy of a 14-bp direct repeat. In addition to oriT, a second locus consisting of a 14-bp imperfect inverted repeat was also identified, which mimicked the function of oriT but which was found to be a recombination site. Recombination between two identical copies of these sites is RecA-independent, requires a plasmid-encoded recombinase and resembles the functioning of dimer-resolution systems.

  4. Three-Dimensional Protein Fold Determination from Backbone Amide Pseudocontact Shifts Generated by Lanthanide Tags at Multiple Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Yagi, Hiromasa

    2013-06-01

    Site-specific attachment of paramagnetic lanthanide ions to a protein generates pseudocontact shifts (PCS) in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of the protein that are easily measured as changes in chemical shifts. By labeling the protein with lanthanide tags at four different sites, PCSs are observed for most amide protons and accurate information is obtained about their coordinates in three-dimensional space. The approach is demonstrated with the chaperone ERp29, for which large differences have been reported between X-ray and NMR structures of the C-terminal domain, ERp29-C. The results unambiguously show that the structure of rat ERp29-C in solution is similar to the crystal structure of human ERp29-C. PCSs of backbone amides were the only structural restraints required. Because these can be measured for more dilute protein solutions than other NMR restraints, the approach greatly widens the range of proteins amenable to structural studies in solution. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impairment assessment of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing over dispersion-managed links in backbone and backhaul networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilarasan, Ilavarasan; Saminathan, Brindha; Murugappan, Meenakshi

    2016-04-01

    The past decade has seen the phenomenal usage of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) in the wired as well as wireless communication domains, and it is also proposed in the literature as a future proof technique for the implementation of flexible resource allocation in cognitive optical networks. Fiber impairment assessment and adaptive compensation becomes critical in such implementations. A comprehensive analytical model for impairments in OFDM-based fiber links is developed. The proposed model includes the combined impact of laser phase fluctuations, fiber dispersion, self phase modulation, cross phase modulation, four-wave mixing, the nonlinear phase noise due to the interaction of amplified spontaneous emission with fiber nonlinearities, and the photodetector noises. The bit error rate expression for the proposed model is derived based on error vector magnitude estimation. The performance analysis of the proposed model is presented and compared for dispersion compensated and uncompensated backbone/backhaul links. The results suggest that OFDM would perform better for uncompensated links than the compensated links due to the negligible FWM effects and there is a need for flexible compensation. The proposed model can be employed in cognitive optical networks for accurate assessment of fiber-related impairments.

  6. Aggregation and Gelation of Aromatic Polyamides with Parallel and Anti-parallel Alignment of Molecular Dipole Along the Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dan; Shang, Jing; Ye, Xiaodong; Shen, Jian

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of macromolecular structures and interactions is important but difficult, due to the facts that a macromolecules are of versatile conformations and aggregate states, which vary with environmental conditions and histories. In this work two polyamides with parallel or anti-parallel dipoles along the linear backbone, named as ABAB (parallel) and AABB (anti-parallel) have been studied. By using a combination of methods, the phase behaviors of the polymers during the aggregate and gelation, i.e., the forming or dissociation processes of nuclei and fibril, cluster of fibrils, and cluster-cluster aggregation have been revealed. Such abundant phase behaviors are dominated by the inter-chain interactions, including dispersion, polarity and hydrogen bonding, and correlatd with the solubility parameters of solvents, the temperature, and the polymer concentration. The results of X-ray diffraction and fast-mode dielectric relaxation indicate that AABB possesses more rigid conformation than ABAB, and because of that AABB aggregates are of long fibers while ABAB is of hairy fibril clusters, the gelation concentration in toluene is 1 w/v% for AABB, lower than the 3 w/v% for ABAB.

  7. N-H stretching modes around 3300 wavenumber from peptide backbones observed by chiral sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li; Wang, Zhuguang; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2014-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular origin of the chiral sum frequency generation (SFG) signals of proteins and peptides at interfaces in the N-H stretching vibrational region. The N-H stretching can be a probe for investigating structural and functional properties of proteins, but remains technically difficult to analyze due to the overlapping with the O-H stretching of water molecules. Chiral SFG spectroscopy offers unique tools to study the N-H stretching from proteins at interfaces without interference from the water background. However, the molecular origin of the N-H stretching signals of proteins is still unclear. This work provides a justification of the origin of chiral N-H signals by analyzing the vibrational frequencies, examining chiral SFG theory, studying proton (hydrogen/deuterium) exchange kinetics, and performing optical control experiments. The results demonstrate that the chiral N-H stretching signals at ~3300 cm(-1) originate from the amide group of the protein backbones. This chiral N-H stretching signal offers an in situ, real-time, and background-free probe for interrogating the protein structures and dynamics at interfaces at the molecular level. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A Network Flow Approach to Predict Protein Targets and Flavonoid Backbones to Treat Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Vargas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is the major cause of respiratory disease in lower respiratory tract in infants and young children. Attempts to develop effective vaccines or pharmacological treatments to inhibit RSV infection without undesired effects on human health have been unsuccessful. However, RSV infection has been reported to be affected by flavonoids. The mechanisms underlying viral inhibition induced by these compounds are largely unknown, making the development of new drugs difficult. Methods. To understand the mechanisms induced by flavonoids to inhibit RSV infection, a systems pharmacology-based study was performed using microarray data from primary culture of human bronchial cells infected by RSV, together with compound-proteomic interaction data available for Homo sapiens. Results. After an initial evaluation of 26 flavonoids, 5 compounds (resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin, apigenin, and tricetin were identified through topological analysis of a major chemical-protein (CP and protein-protein interacting (PPI network. In a nonclustered form, these flavonoids regulate directly the activity of two protein bottlenecks involved in inflammation and apoptosis. Conclusions. Our findings may potentially help uncovering mechanisms of action of early RSV infection and provide chemical backbones and their protein targets in the difficult quest to develop new effective drugs.

  9. Design of an all-fiber erbium-doped laser system for simulating power load in backbone networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobořil, Radek; Bednárek, Lukáš; Vanderka, Aleš; Hájek, Lukáš; Zbořil, Ondřej; Vašinek, Vladimír

    2016-12-01

    This article is focused on the design of an all-fiber laser that was supposed to be used for simulating power load similar to the power load in backbone networks. The first part of the article is a brief introduction to the topic of lasers and erbium doped fiber amplifiers. The following parts present design of a fiber laser with ring cavity, and measuring the ideal length of a doped fiber and the split ratio of the output coupler. After proposing the first stage -a laser- we focused on the construction of the two following stages -EDFA preamplifier and EDFA amplifier. There were used fibers with various levels of erbium ion density, namely ISO-GAIN I6, and Liekki ER110-4/125. The resulting output power of the whole system was 320 mW. This value is sufficient when we take into account that we used only single-mode fibers with energy pumped directly to the fiber core. The output wavelength of the whole laser system was 1559 nm.

  10. Conformational energetics of cationic backbone rearrangements in triterpenoid biosynthesis provide an insight into enzymatic control of product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürti, László; Chein, Rong-Jie; Corey, E J

    2008-07-16

    2,3-( S)-Oxidosqualene (C 30H 50O) serves as a versatile starting point for the remarkable biosynthesis of many isomeric naturally occurring triterpenoids of formula C 30H 50O. These biosyntheses all involve polycyclization via cationic intermediates. The fully cyclized primary products then are converted to various structures by cationic rearrangements involving the polycyclic backbone. The energetics of these rearrangements has been examined by B3LYP 6-31 G* DFT calculations and by ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations at the 6-31G* or 3-21G(*) level. The results have led to the conclusion that the biosynthesis of friedelin, the most drastically rearranged of the pentacyclic triterpenes, involves a complex nonstop process, with no stable intermediates between 2,3-( S)-oxidosqualene and friedelin. It is proposed that this single-reaction biosynthesis consists of pentacyclization to the lupanyl cation followed directly by a sequence of 10 suprafacial 1,2-shifts of carbon and hydrogen, driven by the large exergonicity of the pentacyclization and electrostatic acceleration of the rearrangement steps.

  11. a Proposal for a General Method for Determining Semi-Experimental Equilibrium Structures of Carbon Atom Backbones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Norman C.

    2010-06-01

    Semi-experimental equilibrium structures are determined from ground state rotational constants derived from the analysis of rotational transitions in high-resolution spectra and from the quantum chemical calculation of spectroscopic alphas. In the full application of this method, spectra of numerous isotopic species must be investigated. Most of these isotopic species require specialized synthesis. We now propose focusing on the carbon atoms, for which microwave spectroscopy routinely yields spectra for polar molecules with 13C substitution in natural abundance. Needed spectroscopic alphas can be computed with Gaussian software. Application of the Kraitchman substitution relationships gives Cartesian coordinates for the carbon atoms and thence bond parameters for the carbon backbone. This method will be evaluated with ethylene, 1,1-difluoroethylene, 1,1-difluorocyclopropane, propene, and butadiene. The method will then be applied to cis-hexatriene and the two conformers of glycidol. R. D. Suenram, B. H. Pate, A. Lessari, J. L. Neill, S. Shipman, R. A. Holmes, M. C. Leyden, and N. C. Craig, J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 1864-1868 (2009). A. R. Conrad, N. H. Teumelsan, P. E. Wang, and M. J. Tubergen, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 336-342 (2010).

  12. Alkali metal salts of formazanate ligands: diverse coordination modes as a result of the nitrogen-rich [NNCNN] ligand backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travieso-Puente, Raquel; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Otten, Edwin

    2014-12-28

    Alkali metal salts of redox-active formazanate ligands were prepared, and their structures in the solid-state and in solution are determined. The nitrogen-rich [NNCNN] backbone of formazanates results in a varied coordination chemistry, with both the internal and terminal nitrogen atoms available for bonding with the alkali metal. The potassium salt K[PhNNC(p-tol)NNPh]·2THF (1-K) is dimeric in the solid state and even in THF solution, as a result of the K atom bridging via interaction with a terminal N atom and the aromatic ring of a second unit. Conversely, for the compounds Na[MesNNC(CN)NNMes]·2THF (2-Na) and Na[PhNNC((t)Bu)NNPh] (3-Na) polymeric and hexameric structures are found in the solid state respectively. The preference for binding the alkali metal through internal N atoms (1-K and 2-Na) to give a 4-membered chelate, or via internal/external N atoms (5-membered chelate in 3-Na), contrasts with the 6-membered chelate mode observed in our recently reported formazanate zinc complexes.

  13. Structure of the exceptionally large nonrepetitive carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-82164.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Petersen, Bent O; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Duus, Jens Ø; Helander, Ilkka M

    2003-07-01

    The structures of the oligosaccharides obtained after acetic acid hydrolysis and alkaline deacylation of the rough-type lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-82164 were analysed using NMR spectroscopy, MS and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing by a decasaccharide fragment, and some minor variants lacking the terminal glucose residue. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS that could be deduced from experimental results consists of 25 monosaccharides (including the previously found Ara4NP residue in lipid A) arranged in a well-defined nonrepetitive structure: We presume that the shorter variant with R1 = H represents the core-lipid A part of the LPS, and the additional fragment is present instead of the O-specific polysaccharide. Structures of this type have not been previously described. Analysis of the deacylation products obtained from the LPS of the smooth strain, VTT E-79100T, showed that it contains a very similar core but with one different glycosidic linkage.

  14. Vibrational Relaxation of the Backbone and Base Modes in LacDNA Complexes by UV Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Cristina M; Bratu, Ioan; Hernanz, Antonio

    2017-07-20

    Vibrational band shape analysis through time correlation function concept is widely used to obtain experimental information on the molecular dynamics of medium-size molecules in different environments. Interesting details are revealed by extending this technique to biomolecules such as functional groups of the nucleic acids in media approaching the physiological conditions. In this work a study into the UV resonance Raman (UVRR) vibrational half bandwidths of functional groups in LacDNA, upon lowering the pH (pH 6.4, pH 3.45) and in the presence of Mn(2+) and Ca(2+) ions, respectively, was of interest. The corresponding global relaxation times have been derived. Also, the 793 cm(-1) UVRR band, corresponding to ν (backbone O-P-O, dT) oscillator of LacDNA in aqueous solutions, was selected for band shape-analysis. Vibrational relaxation appears as the dominant relaxation process for this mode, with vibrational dephasing being the most efficient for this oscillator. Current theories developed for vibrational dephasing have been applied to this profile, and relevant relaxation parameters have been obtained and discussed. To our knowledge this is the first study on DNA oligomers vibrational band shape analysis through time correlation function concept.

  15. Pseudo-4D triple resonance experiments to resolve HN overlap in the backbone assignment of unfolded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagai, Ireena; Ragsdale, Stephen W; Zuiderweg, Erik R P

    2011-02-01

    The solution NMR resonance assignment of the protein backbone is most commonly carried out using triple resonance experiments that involve (15)N and (1)HN resonances. The assignment becomes problematic when there is resonance overlap of (15)N-(1)HN cross peaks. For such residues, one cannot unambiguously link the "left" side of the NH root to the "right" side, and the residues associated with such overlapping HN resonances remain often unassigned. Here we present a solution to this problem: a hybrid (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HN(CO)CA(CON)CA sequence. In this experiment, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the Ca(i-1) resonance, which helps in resolving the ambiguity involved in connecting the Ca(i) and Ca(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots. The experiment has limited sensitivity, and is only suited for small or unfolded proteins. In a companion experiment, (4d,3d) reduced-dimensionality HNCO(N)CA, the Ca(i) resonance is modulated with the frequency of the CO(i-1) resonance, hence resolving the ambiguity existent in pairing up the Ca(i) and CO(i-1) resonances for overlapping NH roots.

  16. Thousands of primer-free, high-quality, full-length SSU rRNA sequences from all domains of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karst, Soeren M; Dueholm, Morten S; McIlroy, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are the consensus marker for determination of microbial diversity on the planet, invaluable in studies of evolution and, for the past decade, high-throughput sequencing of variable regions of ribosomal RNA genes has become the backbone of most microbial ecology studies...... (SSU) rRNA genes and synthetic long read sequencing by molecular tagging, to generate primer-free, full-length SSU rRNA gene sequences from all domains of life, with a median raw error rate of 0.17%. We generated thousands of full-length SSU rRNA sequences from five well-studied ecosystems (soil, human...... gut, fresh water, anaerobic digestion, and activated sludge) and obtained sequences covering all domains of life and the majority of all described phyla. Interestingly, 30% of all bacterial operational taxonomic units were novel, compared to the SILVA database (less than 97% similarity...

  17. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Gene Silencing using Small Interferin RNA: DNA Hybrid Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, L

    2006-02-08

    The recent discovery that short hybrid RNA:DNA molecules (siHybrids) induce long-term silencing of gene expression in mammalian cells conflicts with the currently hypothesized mechanisms explaining the action of small, interfering RNA (siRNA). As a first step to elucidating the mechanism for this effect, we set out to quantify the delivery of siHybrids and determine their cellular localization in mammalian cells. We then tracked the segregation of the siHybrids into daughter cells after cell division. Markers for siHybrid delivery were shown to enter cells with and without the use of a transfection agent. Furthermore, delivery without transfection agent only occurred after a delay of 2-4 hours, suggesting a degradation process occurring in the cell culture media. Therefore, we studied the effects of nucleases and backbone modifications on the stability of siHybrids under cell culture conditions.

  18. Structure analysis of free and bound states of an RNA aptamer against ribosomal protein S8 from Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davlieva, Milya; Donarski, James; Wang, Jiachen; Shamoo, Yousif; Nikonowicz, Edward P

    2014-01-01

    Several protein-targeted RNA aptamers have been identified for a variety of applications and although the affinities of numerous protein-aptamer complexes have been determined, the structural details of these complexes have not been widely explored. We examined the structural accommodation of an RNA aptamer that binds bacterial r-protein S8. The core of the primary binding site for S8 on helix 21 of 16S rRNA contains a pair of conserved base triples that mold the sugar-phosphate backbone to S8. The aptamer, which does not contain the conserved sequence motif, is specific for the rRNA binding site of S8. The protein-free RNA aptamer adopts a helical structure with multiple non-canonical base pairs. Surprisingly, binding of S8 leads to a dramatic change in the RNA conformation that restores the signature S8 recognition fold through a novel combination of nucleobase interactions. Nucleotides within the non-canonical core rearrange to create a G-(G-C) triple and a U-(A-U)-U quartet. Although native-like S8-RNA interactions are present in the aptamer-S8 complex, the topology of the aptamer RNA differs from that of the helix 21-S8 complex. This is the first example of an RNA aptamer that adopts substantially different secondary structures in the free and protein-bound states and highlights the remarkable plasticity of RNA secondary structure.

  19. iRNA-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jesper Grud Skat; Schmidt, Søren Fisker; Larsen, Bjørk Ditlev;

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a sensitive and accurate technique to compare steady-state levels of RNA between different cellular states. However, as it does not provide an account of transcriptional activity per se, other technologies are needed to more precisely determine acute transcriptional responses. Here, we...... have developed an easy, sensitive and accurate novel computational method, IRNA-SEQ: , for genome-wide assessment of transcriptional activity based on analysis of intron coverage from total RNA-seq data. Comparison of the results derived from iRNA-seq analyses with parallel results derived using...... current methods for genome-wide determination of transcriptional activity, i.e. global run-on (GRO)-seq and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) ChIP-seq, demonstrate that iRNA-seq provides similar results in terms of number of regulated genes and their fold change. However, unlike the current methods that are all...

  20. RNA-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2003-02-01

    A bewildering number of post-transcriptional modifications are introduced into cellular RNAs by enzymes that are often conserved among archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. The modifications range from those with well-understood functions, such as tRNA aminoacylation, to widespread but more mysterious ones, such as pseudouridylation. Recent structure determinations have included two types of RNA nucleobase modifying enzyme: pseudouridine synthases and tRNA guanine transglycosylases.

  1. Benchmark quantum-chemical calculations on a complete set of rotameric families of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and their comparison with modern density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mládek, Arnošt; Krepl, Miroslav; Svozil, Daniel; Cech, Petr; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel; Zgarbová, Marie; Jurečka, Petr; Sponer, Jiří

    2013-05-21

    The DNA sugar-phosphate backbone has a substantial influence on the DNA structural dynamics. Structural biology and bioinformatics studies revealed that the DNA backbone in experimental structures samples a wide range of distinct conformational substates, known as rotameric DNA backbone conformational families. Their correct description is essential for methods used to model nucleic acids and is known to be the Achilles heel of force field computations. In this study we report the benchmark database of MP2 calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals with aug-cc-pVTZ and aug-cc-pVQZ basis sets, MP2(T,Q), augmented by ΔCCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ corrections. The calculations are performed in the gas phase as well as using a COSMO solvent model. This study includes a complete set of 18 established and biochemically most important families of DNA backbone conformations and several other salient conformations that we identified in experimental structures. We utilize an electronically sufficiently complete DNA sugar-phosphate-sugar (SPS) backbone model system truncated to prevent undesired intramolecular interactions. The calculations are then compared with other QM methods. The BLYP and TPSS functionals supplemented with Grimme's D3(BJ) dispersion term provide the best tradeoff between computational demands and accuracy and can be recommended for preliminary conformational searches as well as calculations on large model systems. Among the tested methods, the best agreement with the benchmark database has been obtained for the double-hybrid DSD-BLYP functional in combination with a quadruple-ζ basis set, which is, however, computationally very demanding. The new hybrid density functionals PW6B95-D3 and MPW1B95-D3 yield outstanding results and even slightly outperform the computationally more demanding PWPB95 double-hybrid functional. B3LYP-D3 is somewhat less accurate compared to the other hybrids. Extrapolated MP2(D,T) calculations are not as

  2. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  3. Backbone amide linker strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shelton, Anne Pernille Tofteng; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    amino acid residue by reductive amination. This can be used as a general approach for the introduction of other C-terminal modifications as well as functionalities, such as fluorophors. The second step is an acylation of a secondary amine, followed by standard Fmoc-based solid-phase synthesis...

  4. Backbone.js essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer with baseline JavaScript proficiency and are familiar with the jQuery library, then this book is ideal for you. Whether you've tried building complex web applications before and been frustrated by the challenge of doing so without the proper tools, or whether you've only built simple websites and are now looking to create full-featured web applications, this book has everything you need to get ahead of the curve.

  5. Nitrogen Backbone Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbo; Eremets, Mikhail I; Troyan, Ivan; Liu, Hanyu; Ma, Yanming; Vereecken, Luc

    2015-08-19

    We found that nitrogen and hydrogen directly react at room temperature and pressures of ~35 GPa forming chains of single-bonded nitrogen atom with the rest of the bonds terminated with hydrogen atoms - as identified by IR absorption, Raman, X-ray diffraction experiments and theoretical calculations. At releasing pressures below ~10 GPa, the product transforms into hydrazine. Our findings might open a way for the practical synthesis of these extremely high energetic materials as the formation of nitrogen-hydrogen compounds is favorable already at pressures above 2 GPa according to the calculations.

  6. Backbone.js cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Mirgorod, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, example driven Beginner's Guide format, there are plenty of step-by-step instructions to get you started fast!Pentaho 4.0 By Example: Beginner's Guide is the ideal companion for a wide-variety of developers. Whether you are new to the world of Business Intelligence reporting, or an experienced BI analyst, this book will guide you through the creation of your first reports in Pentaho. We assume some knowledge of the SQL language and database systems.

  7. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs....

  8. Mapping Optimal Charge Density and Length of ROMP-Based PTDMs for siRNA Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Leah M; deRonde, Brittany M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-10-10

    A fundamental understanding of how polymer structure impacts internalization and delivery of biologically relevant cargoes, particularly small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA), is of critical importance to the successful design of improved delivery reagents. Herein we report the use of ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) methods to synthesize two series of guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs): one based on an imide scaffold that contains one guanidinium moiety per repeat unit, and another based on a diester scaffold that contains two guanidinium moieties per repeat unit. By varying both the degree of polymerization and, in effect, the relative number of cationic charges in each PTDM, the performances of the two ROMP backbones for siRNA internalization were evaluated and compared. Internalization of fluorescently labeled siRNA into Jurkat T cells demonstrated that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-siRNA internalization had a charge content dependence, with PTDMs containing approximately 40 to 60 cationic charges facilitating the most internalization. Despite this charge content dependence, the imide scaffold yielded much lower viabilities in Jurkat T cells than the corresponding diester PTDMs with similar numbers of cationic charges, suggesting that the diester scaffold is preferred for siRNA internalization and delivery applications. These developments will not only improve our understanding of the structural factors necessary for optimal siRNA internalization, but will also guide the future development of optimized PTDMs for siRNA internalization and delivery.

  9. Improved Performance of Anti-miRNA Oligonucleotides Using a Novel Non-Nucleotide Modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A Lennox

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-microRNA oligonucleotides (AMOs are steric blocking antisense reagents that inhibit microRNA (miRNA function by hybridizing and repressing the activity of a mature miRNA. First generation AMOs employed 2′-O-Methyl RNA nucleotides (2′OMe with phosphorothioate (PS internucleotide linkages positioned at both ends to block exonuclease attack. Second generation AMOs improved potency through the use of chemical modifications that increase binding affinity to the target, such as locked nucleic acid (LNA residues. However, this strategy can reduce specificity as high binding affinity compounds can bind to and suppress function of related sequences even if one or more mismatches are present. Further, unnatural modified nucleic acid residues can have toxic side effects. In the present study, a variety of non-nucleotide modifiers were screened for utility in steric blocking antisense applications. A novel compound, N,N-diethyl-4-(4-nitronaphthalen-1-ylazo-phenylamine (“ZEN”, was discovered that increased binding affinity and blocked exonuclease degradation when placed at or near each end of a single-stranded oligonucleotide. This new modification was combined with the 2′OMe RNA backbone to make ZEN-AMOs. The new ZEN-AMOs have high potency and can effectively inhibit miRNA function in vitro at low nanomolar concentrations, show high specificity, and have low toxicity in cell culture.

  10. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  11. Soluble and Membrane-Bound β-Glucosidases Are Involved in Trimming the Xyloglucan Backbone1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    In many flowering plants, xyloglucan is a major component of primary cell walls, where it plays an important role in growth regulation. Xyloglucan can be degraded by a suite of exoglycosidases that remove specific sugars. In this work, we show that the xyloglucan backbone, formed by (1→4)-linked β-d-glucopyranosyl residues, can be attacked by two different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) β-glucosidases from glycoside hydrolase family 3. While BGLC1 (At5g20950; for β-glucosidase active against xyloglucan 1) is responsible for all or most of the soluble activity, BGLC3 (At5g04885) is usually a membrane-anchored protein. Mutations in these two genes, whether on their own or combined with mutations in other exoglycosidase genes, resulted in the accumulation of partially digested xyloglucan subunits, such as GXXG, GXLG, or GXFG. While a mutation in BGLC1 had significant effects on its own, lack of BGLC3 had only minor effects. On the other hand, double bglc1 bglc3 mutants revealed a synergistic interaction that supports a role for membrane-bound BGLC3 in xyloglucan metabolism. In addition, bglc1 bglc3 was complemented by overexpression of either BGLC1 or BGLC3. In overexpression lines, BGLC3 activity was concentrated in a microsome-enriched fraction but also was present in soluble form. Finally, both genes were generally expressed in the same cell types, although, in some cases, BGLC3 was expressed at earlier stages than BGLC1. We propose that functional specialization could explain the separate localization of both enzymes, as a membrane-bound β-glucosidase could specifically digest soluble xyloglucan without affecting the wall-bound polymer. PMID:27956490

  12. Comparison of backbone dynamics of the type III antifreeze protein and antifreeze-like domain of human sialic acid synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Geun [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chin-Ju [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Eun; Seo, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Ae-Ree; Choi, Seo-Ree; Lee, Shim Sung; Lee, Joon-Hwa, E-mail: joonhwa@gnu.ac.kr [Gyeongsang National University, Department of Chemistry and Research Institute of Natural Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in a variety of cold-adapted (psychrophilic) organisms to promote survival at subzero temperatures by binding to ice crystals and decreasing the freezing temperature of body fluids. The type III AFPs are small globular proteins that consist of one α-helix, three 3{sub 10}-helices, and two β-strands. Sialic acids play important roles in a variety of biological functions, such as development, recognition, and cell adhesion and are synthesized by conserved enzymatic pathways that include sialic acid synthase (SAS). SAS consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal antifreeze-like (AFL) domain, which is similar to the type III AFPs. Despite having very similar structures, AFL and the type III AFPs exhibit very different temperature-dependent stability and activity. In this study, we have performed backbone dynamics analyses of a type III AFP (HPLC12 isoform) and the AFL domain of human SAS (hAFL) at various temperatures. We also characterized the structural/dynamic properties of the ice-binding surfaces by analyzing the temperature gradient of the amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil. The dynamic properties of the two proteins were very different from each other. While HPLC12 was mostly rigid with a few residues exhibiting slow motions, hAFL showed fast internal motions at low temperature. Our results provide insight into the molecular basis of thermostability and structural flexibility in homologous psychrophilic HPLC12 and mesophilic hAFL proteins.

  13. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Tiffany M; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  14. Solution NMR analysis of the interaction between the actinoporin sticholysin I and DHPC micelles--correlation with backbone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Castilla, Aracelys; Pazos, Fabiola; Schreier, Shirley; Pires, José Ricardo

    2014-06-01

    Sticholysin I (StI), an actinoporin expressed as a water-soluble protein by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, binds to natural and model membranes, forming oligomeric pores. It is proposed that the first event of a multistep pore formation mechanism consists of the monomeric protein attachment to the lipid bilayer. To date there is no high-resolution structure of the actinoporin pore or other membrane-bound form available. Here we evaluated StI:micelle complexes of variable lipid composition to look for a suitable model for NMR studies. Micelles of pure or mixed lysophospholipids and of dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) were examined. The StI:DHPC micelle was found to be the best system, yielding a stable sample and good quality spectra. A comprehensive chemical shift perturbation analysis was performed to map the StI membrane recognition site in the presence of DHPC micelles. The region mapped (residues F(51), R(52), S(53) in loop 3; F(107), D(108), Y(109), W(111), Y(112), W(115) in loop 7; Q(129), Y(132), D(134), M(135), Y(136), Y(137), G(138) in helix-α2) is in agreement with previously reported data, but additional residues were found to interact, especially residues V(81), A(82), T(83), G(84) in loop 5, and A(85), A(87) in strand-β5. Backbone dynamics measurements of StI free in solution and bound to micelles highlighted the relevance of protein flexibility for membrane binding and suggested that a conformer selection process may take place during protein-membrane interaction. We conclude that the StI:DHPC micelles system is a suitable model for further characterization of an actinoporin membrane-bound form by solution NMR.

  15. Structural basis for the enhanced stability of protein model compounds and peptide backbone unit in ammonium ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasantha, T; Attri, Pankaj; Venkatesu, Pannuru; Devi, R S Rama

    2012-10-04

    Protein folding/unfolding is a fascinating study in the presence of cosolvents, which protect/disrupt the native structure of protein, respectively. The structure and stability of proteins and their functional groups may be modulated by the addition of cosolvents. Ionic liquids (ILs) are finding a vast array of applications as novel cosolvents for a wide variety of biochemical processes that include protein folding. Here, the systematic and quantitative apparent transfer free energies (ΔG'(tr)) of protein model compounds from water to ILs through solubility measurements as a function of IL concentration at 25 °C have been exploited to quantify and interpret biomolecular interactions between model compounds of glycine peptides (GPs) with ammonium based ILs. The investigated aqueous systems consist of zwitterionic glycine peptides: glycine (Gly), diglycine (Gly(2)), triglycine (Gly(3)), tetraglycine (Gly(4)), and cyclic glycylglycine (c(GG)) in the presence of six ILs such as diethylammonium acetate (DEAA), diethylammonium hydrogen sulfate (DEAS), triethylammonium acetate (TEAA), triethylammonium hydrogen sulfate (TEAS), triethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (TEAP), and trimethylammonium acetate (TMAA). We have observed positive values of ΔG'(tr) for GPs from water to ILs, indicating that interactions between ILs and GPs are unfavorable, which leads to stabilization of the structure of model protein compounds. Moreover, our experimental data ΔG'(tr) is used to obtain transfer free energies (Δg'(tr)) of the peptide backbone unit (or glycyl unit) (-CH(2)C═ONH-), which is the most numerous group in globular proteins, from water to IL solutions. To obtain the mechanism events of the ILs' role in enhancing the stability of the model compounds, we have further obtained m-values for GPs from solubility limits. These results explicitly elucidate that all alkyl ammonium ILs act as stabilizers for model compounds through the exclusion of ILs from model compounds of

  16. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M Mott

    Full Text Available In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001 deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis.Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001.Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  17. Backbone resonance assignments for G protein α(i3) subunit in the GDP-bound state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-10-01

    Guanine-nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signaling pathways, by coupling the activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell surface to intracellular responses. In the resting state, G protein forms a heterotrimer, consisting of the G protein α subunit with GDP (Gα·GDP) and the G protein βγ subunit (Gβγ). Ligand binding to GPCRs promotes the GDP-GTP exchange on Gα, leading to the dissociation of the GTP-bound form of Gα (Gα·GTP) and Gβγ. Then, Gα·GTP and Gβγ bind to their downstream effector enzymes or ion channels and regulate their activities, leading to a variety of cellular responses. Finally, Gα hydrolyzes the bound GTP to GDP and returns to the resting state by re-associating with Gβγ. The G proteins are classified with four major families based on the amino acid sequences of Gα: i/o, s, q/11, and 12/13. Here, we established the backbone resonance assignments of human Gαi3, a member of the i/o family with a molecular weight of 41 K, in complex with GDP. The chemical shifts were compared with those of Gα(i3) in complex with a GTP-analogue, GTPγS, which we recently reported, indicating that the residues with significant chemical shift differences are mostly consistent with the regions with the structural differences between the GDP- and GTPγS-bound states, as indicated in the crystal structures. The assignments of Gα(i3)·GDP would be useful for the analyses of the dynamics of Gα(i3) and its interactions with various target molecules.

  18. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  19. Interpretation of DNA vibration modes: IV--A single-helical approach to assign the phosphate-backbone contribution to the vibrational spectra in A and B conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, R; Ghomi, M; Taillandier, E

    1989-02-01

    A calculated approach based on the Higgs method for assigning the vibration modes of an infinite helicoidal polymeric chain has been performed on the basis of a reliable valence force field. The calculated results allowed the phosphate-backbone marker modes of the A and B forms, to be interpreted. In the dynamic models used, the bases have been omitted and no interchain interaction was considered. The calculation can also interprete quite satisfactorily the characteristic Raman peaks and infrared bands in the 1250-700 cm-1 spectral region arising from the sugar or sugar-phosphate association and reproduce their evolution upon the B----A DNA conformational transition. They clearly show that the phosphate-backbone modes in the above mentioned spectral region constitute the optical branches of the phonon dispersion curves with no detectable variation in the first Brillouin-zone.

  20. Sulfur-infiltrated graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon nanosheets with a conductive polymer coating for long-life lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanfeng; Liu, Shaohong; Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Zongbin; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-04-01

    Sandwich-type, two-dimensional hybrid nanosheets were fabricated by the infiltration of nanosized sulfur into graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon with a PPy nanocoating. They exhibit a high reversible capacity for as long as 400 cycles with an ultra slow decay rate of 0.05% per cycle at the high rate of 1-3 C due to the efficient immobilization of polysulfides.Sandwich-type, two-dimensional hybrid nanosheets were fabricated by the infiltration of nanosized sulfur into graphene-backboned mesoporous carbon with a PPy nanocoating. They exhibit a high reversible capacity for as long as 400 cycles with an ultra slow decay rate of 0.05% per cycle at the high rate of 1-3 C due to the efficient immobilization of polysulfides. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, BET, SEM, XPS and more electrochemical data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01015b

  1. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  2. Structures of coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and poliovirus polymerase elongation complexes solved by engineering RNA mediated crystal contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peng; Kortus, Matthew G; Nix, Jay C; Davis, Ralph E; Peersen, Olve B

    2013-01-01

    RNA-dependent RNA polymerases play a vital role in the growth of RNA viruses where they are responsible for genome replication, but do so with rather low fidelity that allows for the rapid adaptation to different host cell environments. These polymerases are also a target for antiviral drug development. However, both drug discovery efforts and our understanding of fidelity determinants have been hampered by a lack of detailed structural information about functional polymerase-RNA complexes and the structural changes that take place during the elongation cycle. Many of the molecular details associated with nucleotide selection and catalysis were revealed in our recent structure of the poliovirus polymerase-RNA complex solved by first purifying and then crystallizing stalled elongation complexes. In the work presented here we extend that basic methodology to determine nine new structures of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus elongation complexes at 2.2-2.9 Å resolution. The structures highlight conserved features of picornaviral polymerases and the interactions they make with the template and product RNA strands, including a tight grip on eight basepairs of the nascent duplex, a fully pre-positioned templating nucleotide, and a conserved binding pocket for the +2 position template strand base. At the active site we see a pre-bound magnesium ion and there is conservation of a non-standard backbone conformation of the template strand in an interaction that may aid in triggering RNA translocation via contact with the conserved polymerase motif B. Moreover, by engineering plasticity into RNA-RNA contacts, we obtain crystal forms that are capable of multiple rounds of in-crystal catalysis and RNA translocation. Together, the data demonstrate that engineering flexible RNA contacts to promote crystal lattice formation is a versatile platform that can be used to solve the structures of viral RdRP elongation complexes and their catalytic cycle intermediates.

  3. Structures of coxsackievirus, rhinovirus, and poliovirus polymerase elongation complexes solved by engineering RNA mediated crystal contacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gong

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases play a vital role in the growth of RNA viruses where they are responsible for genome replication, but do so with rather low fidelity that allows for the rapid adaptation to different host cell environments. These polymerases are also a target for antiviral drug development. However, both drug discovery efforts and our understanding of fidelity determinants have been hampered by a lack of detailed structural information about functional polymerase-RNA complexes and the structural changes that take place during the elongation cycle. Many of the molecular details associated with nucleotide selection and catalysis were revealed in our recent structure of the poliovirus polymerase-RNA complex solved by first purifying and then crystallizing stalled elongation complexes. In the work presented here we extend that basic methodology to determine nine new structures of poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus elongation complexes at 2.2-2.9 Å resolution. The structures highlight conserved features of picornaviral polymerases and the interactions they make with the template and product RNA strands, including a tight grip on eight basepairs of the nascent duplex, a fully pre-positioned templating nucleotide, and a conserved binding pocket for the +2 position template strand base. At the active site we see a pre-bound magnesium ion and there is conservation of a non-standard backbone conformation of the template strand in an interaction that may aid in triggering RNA translocation via contact with the conserved polymerase motif B. Moreover, by engineering plasticity into RNA-RNA contacts, we obtain crystal forms that are capable of multiple rounds of in-crystal catalysis and RNA translocation. Together, the data demonstrate that engineering flexible RNA contacts to promote crystal lattice formation is a versatile platform that can be used to solve the structures of viral RdRP elongation complexes and their catalytic cycle

  4. Study on softening Tilapia backbone by high pressure steam cooking%高压蒸煮软化罗非鱼鱼骨的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴克刚; 张文祥; 柴向华; 何文龙

    2013-01-01

    To study softening Tilapia backbone by high pressure steam cooking,with pH,cooking pressure,steaming time and material/water ratio for study factors,the hardness of Tilapia backbone was evaluated with its maximum bearable pressure on universal testing machine.Results of single-factor experiments and orthogonal experiments showed that the softening effect of backbone was the best with the treatment condition of pH6.5,pressure of 0.13MPa,steaming time of 75min and material/water ratio of 1∶1.Under this condition,the hardness of Tilapia backbone was 33.0N.%以罗非鱼鱼骨为实验对象,以pH、蒸煮压力、蒸煮时间以及料液比为研究因素,采用万能试验机测量鱼骨最大承受压力来评价其硬度,研究高压蒸煮软化工艺.通过单因素实验及正交实验表明:当pH为6.5、蒸煮压力为0.13MPa、时间为75min、料液比为1∶1时,对鱼骨的软化效果最好,此工艺下所得鱼骨硬度为33.0N.

  5. Selective Acid Hydrolysis Condition for the Composition and Linkage with a Fructofuranosyl Backbone of a Polysaccharide from Angelica sinensis (Oliv) Diels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui Yun XU; Yang CHEN; Ru Xian CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A new polysaccharide was extracted and purified from the roots of Angelica sinensis (Oliv) Diels (ASD). Its composition and linkage was elucidated by selective hydrolysis and GC/MS analysis of its derivatives. The polysaccharide was made of→1) Fruf(2→and→6) GlCp (1→as its backbone with highly branched structure. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the fructose residue in polysaccharides from the roots of the ASD.

  6. Mnn10 Maintains Pathogenicity in Candida albicans by Extending α-1,6-Mannose Backbone to Evade Host Dectin-1 Mediated Antifungal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Qun Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a dynamic structure that is important for the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. Mannan, which is located in the outermost layer of the cell wall, has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of C. albicans, however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remains unclear. Here we identified a novel α-1,6-mannosyltransferase encoded by MNN10 in C. albicans. We found that Mnn10 is required for cell wall α-1,6-mannose backbone biosynthesis and polysaccharides organization. Deletion of MNN10 resulted in significant attenuation of the pathogenesis of C. albicans in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Inhibition of α-1,6-mannose backbone extension did not, however, impact the invasive ability of C. albicans in vitro. Notably, mnn10 mutant restored the invasive capacity in athymic nude mice, which further supports the notion of an enhanced host antifungal defense related to this backbone change. Mnn10 mutant induced enhanced Th1 and Th17 cell mediated antifungal immunity, and resulted in enhanced recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes for pathogen clearance in vivo. We also demonstrated that MNN10 could unmask the surface β-(1,3-glucan, a crucial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP of C. albicans recognized by host Dectin-1. Our results demonstrate that mnn10 mutant could stimulate an enhanced Dectin-1 dependent immune response of macrophages in vitro, including the activation of nuclear factor-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and secretion of specific cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and IL-12p40. In summary, our study indicated that α-1,6-mannose backbone is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans via shielding β-glucan from recognition by host Dectin-1 mediated immune recognition. Moreover, our work suggests that inhibition of α-1,6-mannose extension by Mnn10 may represent a novel modality to reduce the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  7. Unraveling the interplay of backbone rigidity and electron rich side-chains on electron transfer in peptides: the realization of tunable molecular wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, John R; Yu, Jingxian; Moore, Katherine E; Shapter, Joe G; Abell, Andrew D

    2014-09-03

    Electrochemical studies are reported on a series of peptides constrained into either a 310-helix (1-6) or β-strand (7-9) conformation, with variable numbers of electron rich alkene containing side chains. Peptides (1 and 2) and (7 and 8) are further constrained into these geometries with a suitable side chain tether introduced by ring closing metathesis (RCM). Peptides 1, 4 and 5, each containing a single alkene side chain reveal a direct link between backbone rigidity and electron transfer, in isolation from any effects due to the electronic properties of the electron rich side-chains. Further studies on the linear peptides 3-6 confirm the ability of the alkene to facilitate electron transfer through the peptide. A comparison of the electrochemical data for the unsaturated tethered peptides (1 and 7) and saturated tethered peptides (2 and 8) reveals an interplay between backbone rigidity and effects arising from the electron rich alkene side-chains on electron transfer. Theoretical calculations on β-strand models analogous to 7, 8 and 9 provide further insights into the relative roles of backbone rigidity and electron rich side-chains on intramolecular electron transfer. Furthermore, electron population analysis confirms the role of the alkene as a "stepping stone" for electron transfer. These findings provide a new approach for fine-tuning the electronic properties of peptides by controlling backbone rigidity, and through the inclusion of electron rich side-chains. This allows for manipulation of energy barriers and hence conductance in peptides, a crucial step in the design and fabrication of molecular-based electronic devices.

  8. Investigation of novel solid oxide fuel cell cathodes based on impregnation of SrTixFe1-xO3-δ into ceria-based backbones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch-Larsen, Mathias; Søgaard, Martin; Hjelm, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes were prepared by impregnating the nitrates corresponding to SrTixFe1-xO3-δ (STF), x= 0; 0.1; 0.2; 0.3; 0.4 and 0.5, into a porous backbone of Ce 0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (CGO). STF was chosen as very high oxygen surface exchange rate, high ionic conductivity...

  9. 1H, 15N and 13C backbone assignments of GDP-bound human H-Ras mutant G12V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nader; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Coyle, Joe; Nietlispach, Daniel; Williams, Glyn

    2016-04-01

    Harvey Ras (H-Ras) is a membrane-associated GTPase with critical functions in cell proliferation and differentiation. The G12V mutant of H-Ras is one of the most commonly encountered oncoproteins in human cancer. This mutation disrupts the GTPase activity of H-Ras, leading to constitutive activation and aberrant downstream signalling. Here we report the backbone resonance assignments of human H-Ras mutant G12V lacking the C-terminal membrane attachment domain.

  10. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation......, regulation of the blood brain barrier and glial scar tissue formation. Despite the involvement in various CNS functions only a limited number of studies have addressed mRNA localization in astrocytes. This PhD project was initially focused on developing and implementing methods that could be used to asses mRNA...... localization in astrocyte protrusions, and following look into the subcellular localization pattern of specific mRNA species of both primary astrocytes isolated from cortical hemispheres of newborn mice, and the mouse astrocyte cell line, C8S. The Boyden chamber cell fractionation assay was optimized, in a way...

  11. Improving the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins by guided-learning through a two-layer neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraggi, Eshel; Xue, Bin; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2009-03-01

    This article attempts to increase the prediction accuracy of residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins through improved learning. Most methods developed for improving the backpropagation algorithm of artificial neural networks are limited to small neural networks. Here, we introduce a guided-learning method suitable for networks of any size. The method employs a part of the weights for guiding and the other part for training and optimization. We demonstrate this technique by predicting residue solvent accessibility and real-value backbone torsion angles of proteins. In this application, the guiding factor is designed to satisfy the intuitive condition that for most residues, the contribution of a residue to the structural properties of another residue is smaller for greater separation in the protein-sequence distance between the two residues. We show that the guided-learning method makes a 2-4% reduction in 10-fold cross-validated mean absolute errors (MAE) for predicting residue solvent accessibility and backbone torsion angles, regardless of the size of database, the number of hidden layers and the size of input windows. This together with introduction of two-layer neural network with a bipolar activation function leads to a new method that has a MAE of 0.11 for residue solvent accessibility, 36 degrees for psi, and 22 degrees for phi. The method is available as a Real-SPINE 3.0 server in http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu.

  12. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-09-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential H(N) − H(α) and H(N) − H(N) NOEs, values for (3) JHNHα, (1) JHαCα, (2) JCαN, and (1) JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of (15)N, (13)C(α), and (13)C' nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20-30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20-40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10-20%) is found. Analysis of (1)H − (1)H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein.

  13. Rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments using cryogenic probes, a distributed Linux-based computing architecture, and an integrated set of spectral analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleón, Daniel; Colson, Kimberly; Moseley, Hunter N B; Anklin, Clemens; Oswald, Robert; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-01-01

    Rapid data collection, spectral referencing, processing by time domain deconvolution, peak picking and editing, and assignment of NMR spectra are necessary components of any efficient integrated system for protein NMR structure analysis. We have developed a set of software tools designated AutoProc, AutoPeak, and AutoAssign, which function together with the data processing and peak-picking programs NMRPipe and Sparky, to provide an integrated software system for rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments. In this paper we demonstrate that these tools, together with high-sensitivity triple resonance NMR cryoprobes for data collection and a Linux-based computer cluster architecture, can be combined to provide nearly complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structures (based on chemical shift data) for a 59-residue protein in less than 30 hours of data collection and processing time. In this optimum case of a small protein providing excellent spectra, extensive backbone resonance assignments could also be obtained using less than 6 hours of data collection and processing time. These results demonstrate the feasibility of high throughput triple resonance NMR for determining resonance assignments and secondary structures of small proteins, and the potential for applying NMR in large scale structural proteomics projects.

  14. A maximum entropy approach to the study of residue-specific backbone angle distributions in α-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Maltsev, Alexander S; Ying, Jinfa; Shen, Yang; Hummer, Gerhard; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein is an intrinsically disordered protein of 140 residues that switches to an α-helical conformation upon binding phospholipid membranes. We characterize its residue-specific backbone structure in free solution with a novel maximum entropy procedure that integrates an extensive set of NMR data. These data include intraresidue and sequential HN–Hα and HN–HN NOEs, values for 3JHNHα, 1JHαCα, 2JCαN, and 1JCαN, as well as chemical shifts of 15N, 13Cα, and 13C′ nuclei, which are sensitive to backbone torsion angles. Distributions of these torsion angles were identified that yield best agreement to the experimental data, while using an entropy term to minimize the deviation from statistical distributions seen in a large protein coil library. Results indicate that although at the individual residue level considerable deviations from the coil library distribution are seen, on average the fitted distributions agree fairly well with this library, yielding a moderate population (20–30%) of the PPII region and a somewhat higher population of the potentially aggregation-prone β region (20–40%) than seen in the database. A generally lower population of the αR region (10–20%) is found. Analysis of 1H–1H NOE data required consideration of the considerable backbone diffusion anisotropy of a disordered protein. PMID:24976112

  15. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  16. Using MUSIC and CC(CONH for Backbone Assignment of Two Medium-Sized Proteins Not Fully Accessible to Standard 3D NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Brenner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The backbone assignment of medium-sized proteins is rarely as straightforward as that of small proteins, and thus often requires creative solutions. Here, we describe the application of a combination of standard 3D heteronuclear methods with CC(CONH and a variety of MUltiplicity Selective In-phase Coherence transfer (MUSIC experiments. Both CC(CONH and MUSIC are, in theory, very powerful methods for the backbone assignment of proteins. Due to low sensitivity, their use has usually been linked to small proteins only. However, we found that combining CC(CONH and MUSIC experiments simplified the assignment of two challenging medium-sized proteins of 13 and 19.5 kDa, respectively. These methods are to some extent complementary to each other: CC(CONH acquired with a long isotropic mixing time can identify amino acids with large aliphatic side chains. Whereas the most sensitive MUSIC experiments identify amino acid types that cannot be detected by CC(CONH, comprising the residues with acid and amide groups, and aromatic rings in their side chains. Together these methods provide a means of identifying the majority of peaks in the 2D 15N HSQC spectrum which simplifies the backbone assignment work even for proteins, e.g., small kinases, whose standard spectra resulted in little spectral resolution and low signal intensities.

  17. Simulations of electrophoretic RNA transport through transmembrane carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-04-01

    The study of interactions between carbon nanotubes and cellular components, such as membranes and biomolecules, is fundamental for the rational design of nanodevices interfacing with biological systems. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrophoretic transport of RNA through carbon nanotubes embedded in membranes. Decorated and naked carbon nanotubes are inserted into a dodecane membrane and a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer, and the system is subjected to electrostatic potential differences. The transport properties of this artificial pore are determined by the structural modifications of the membrane in the vicinity of the nanotube openings and they are quantified by the nonuniform electrostatic potential maps at the entrance and inside the nanotube. The pore is used to transport electrophoretically a short RNA segment and we find that the speed of translocation exhibits an exponential dependence on the applied potential differences. The RNA is transported while undergoing a repeated stacking and unstacking process, affected by steric interactions with the membrane headgroups and by hydrophobic interaction with the walls of the nanotube. The RNA is structurally reorganized inside the nanotube, with its backbone solvated by water molecules near the axis of the tube and its bases aligned with the nanotube walls. Upon exiting the pore, the RNA interacts with the membrane headgroups and remains attached to the dodecane membrane while it is expelled into the solvent in the case of the lipid bilayer. The results of the simulations detail processes of molecular transport into cellular compartments through manufactured nanopores and they are discussed in the context of applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine.

  18. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length.

  19. Assessing integrity of insect RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing total RNA integrity is important for the success of downstream RNA applications. The 2100 Bioanalyzer system with the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) provides a quantitative measure of RNA degradation. Although RINs may not be ascertained for RNA from all organisms, namely those with unusual or...

  20. n Silico Analysis of Envelope Dengue Virus-2 and Envelope Dengue Virus-3 Protein as the Backbone of Dengue Virus Tetravalent Vaccine by Using Homology Modeling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizky I. Taufik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Dengue fever, which was caused by Dengue virus infection, had became a major public health problem in the tropic and subtropical countries. Dengue virus (DENV had four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4, based on their immunogenic in the human body. Preventive measure will be necessary to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, by developing modern vaccine. Approach: This research was focused on in silico study of dengue virus vaccines, by using envelope (E protein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 as their backbones. T cell epitope prediction was determined by using MULTIPRED server and B cell epitope prediction was determined by using Conformational Epitope Prediction server (CEP. Homology modeling study of E DENV-3 protein as the vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (HMM Vaccine 1-6. Moreover, homology modeling study of E DENV-2 protein as vaccine backbone had produced six dengue vaccine peptides (ANN vaccine 1-6. Results: The BLAST analysis of HMM and ANN vaccines had produced 93% and 91% identity, respectively. The Ramachandran Plot of both vaccines had shown less than 15% non glycine residue in the disallowed region, therefore it showed the solid stability of the proteins. The VAST analysis of E DENV-3 backbone vaccines had determined, that HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-3. HMM4 and HMM6 had the highest VAST score of 64.5. Moreover, the VAST analysis of E DENV-2 backbone vaccines had determined, that ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 had the highest structure similarity with native E DENV-2. ANN1, ANN3, ANN4, ANN5 and ANN6 have the highest VAST score of 64.7. Conclusion/Recommendation: It could be inferred from this research that HMM4; HMM6; ANN1; ANN3; ANN4; ANN5; and ANN6 were the best in silico vaccine design, based on their similarity with native E DENV Proteins. This research could be applied for the wet