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  1. High – Sensitivity C - reactive protein is associated with Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Indians with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Asegaonkar, Shilpa B; Bavikar, Jayashree Suhas; Marathe, Amruta; Tekade, Mangesh; Asegaonkar, Balaji N.; Jayashree, Bardapurkar

    2013-01-01

    Background: India is experiencing twin epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases imposing huge toll on healthcare system. In type 2 diabetes 65-80% deaths occur due to cardiovascular disease whose etiology cannot be explained by chronic hyperglycemia, dyslipedemia and traditional cardiac risk factors. To improve risk stratification serum high-sensitivity C- reactive protein estimation is an adjunct to other risk factors. Study design: O.P.D. based Cross sectional study....

  2. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Olsen, M.H.; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...

  3. Examination of the relation between periodontal health status and cardiovascular risk factors: serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Trevisan, M; Genco, R J; Falkner, K L; Dorn, J P; Sempos, C T

    2000-02-01

    Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994), the authors examined the relation between periodontal health and cardiovascular risk factors: serum total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen. A total of 10,146 participants were included in the analyses of cholesterol and C-reactive protein and 4,461 in the analyses of fibrinogen. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding index, calculus index, and periodontal disease status (defined by pocket depth and attachment loss). While cholesterol and fibrinogen were analyzed as continuous variables, C-reactive protein was dichotomized into two levels. The results show a significant relation between indicators of poor periodontal status and increased C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. The association between periodontal status and total cholesterol level is much weaker. No consistent association between periodontal status and high density lipoprotein cholesterol was detectable. Similar patterns of association were observed for participants aged 17-54 years and those 55 years and older. In conclusion, this study suggests that total cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen are possible intermediate factors that may link periodontal disease to elevated cardiovascular risk.

  4. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p sex < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions

  5. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Sales, Allan Robson Kluser [Unidade de Reabilitação Cardiovascular e Fisiologia do Exercício - Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da, E-mail: anobrega@id.uff.br [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p{sub sex} < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  6. The social patterns of a biological risk factor for disease: race, gender, socioeconomic position, and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Pamela; Karraker, Amelia; Friedman, Elliot

    2012-07-01

    Understand the links between race and C-reactive protein (CRP), with special attention to gender differences and the role of class and behavioral risk factors as mediators. This study utilizes the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data, a nationally representative study of older Americans aged 57-85 to explore two research questions. First, what is the relative strength of socioeconomic versus behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences in CRP levels? Second, what role does gender play in understanding race differences? Does the relative role of socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences vary when examining men and women separately? When examining men and women separately, socioeconomic and behavioral risk factor mediators vary in their importance. Indeed, racial differences in CRP among men aged 57-74 are little changed after adjusting for both socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors with levels 35% higher for black men as compared to white men. For women aged 57-74, however, behavioral risk factors explain 30% of the relationship between race and CRP. The limited explanatory power of socioeconomic position and, particularly, behavioral risk factors, in elucidating the relationship between race and CRP among men, signals the need for research to examine additional mediators, including more direct measures of stress and discrimination.

  7. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Pacheco Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. Objective: To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. Methods One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors, MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. Results: The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p 0.05. The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01. Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (psex < 0.01. Conclusions: Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  8. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and risk of sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry E Wang

    Full Text Available Conventional C-reactive protein assays have been used to detect or guide the treatment of acute sepsis. The objective of this study was to determine the association between elevated baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and the risk of future sepsis events.We studied data from 30,239 community dwelling, black and white individuals, age ≥45 years old enrolled in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS cohort. Baseline hsCRP and participant characteristics were determined at the start of the study. We identified sepsis events through review of hospital records. Elevated hsCRP was defined as values >3.0 mg/L. Using Cox regression, we determined the association between elevated hsCRP and first sepsis event, adjusting for sociodemographic factors (age, sex, race, region, education, income, health behaviors (tobacco and alcohol use, chronic medical conditions (coronary artery disease, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic lung disease and statin use.Over the mean observation time of 5.7 years (IQR 4.5-7.1, 974 individuals experienced a sepsis event, and 11,447 (37.9% had elevated baseline hsCRP (>3.0 mg/L. Elevated baseline hsCRP was independently associated with subsequent sepsis (adjusted HR 1.56; 95% CI 1.36-1.79, adjusted for sociodemographics, health behaviors, chronic medical conditions and statin use.Elevated baseline hsCRP was associated with increased risk of future sepsis events. hsCRP may help to identify individuals at increased risk for sepsis.

  9. Relationship between C-Reactive Protein and Body Mass Index in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. C-reactive protein is an acute-phase protein synthesized in the liver and its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha). Baseline levels of C-reactive protein in apparently healthy men and women predict long-term risk of a first myocardial infarction. In older men and ...

  10. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine Willum; Olsen, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    were recorded at baseline. CRP was determined by a high-sensitivity assay, and IR was determined by the homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) method. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 9.4 years, the incidence of the prespecified CV event, defined as the composite event of CV death, nonfatal...... and HOMA-IR, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of a CV event was 1.33 (1.14-1.55; PHOMA-IR level. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...

  11. The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and metabolic risk factors in black and white South African women: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Cindy; Evans, Juliet; Micklesfield, Lisa K; Olsson, Tommy; Goedecke, Julia H

    2018-01-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is associated with metabolic risk, however it is unclear whether the relationship is confounded by racial/ethnic differences in socioeconomic status (SES), lifestyle factors or central adiposity. The aims of the study was, (1) to investigate whether hsCRP levels differ by race/ethnicity; (2) to examine the race/ethnic-specific associations between hsCRP, HOMA-IR and serum lipids [total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoproteins (HDL-C) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL-C)]; and (3) to determine whether race/ethnic-specific associations are explained by SES, lifestyle factors or waist circumference (WC). The convenience sample comprised 195 black and 153 white apparently health women, aged 18-45 years. SES (education, assets and housing density) and lifestyle factors (alcohol use, physical activity and contraceptive use) were collected by questionnaire. Weight, height and WC were measured, and fasting blood samples collected for hsCRP, glucose, insulin, and lipids. Black women had higher age- and BMI-adjusted hsCRP levels than white women ( p  = 0.047). hsCRP was associated with HOMA-IR ( p  C (p C ( p  C in white women, and inversely associated with HDL-C in black women. Higher hsCRP was also associated with higher TC in white women and lower TC in black women. Furthermore, when adjusting for SES and lifestyle factors, the associations between hsCRP, and TC and TG, remained, however the associations between hsCRP, and HDL-C and LDL-C, were no longer significant. Although circulating hsCRP may identify individuals at increased metabolic risk, the heterogeneity in these associations between racial/ethnic groups highlights the need for prospective studies investigating the role of hsCRP for risk prediction in different populations.

  12. C REACTIVE PROTEIN AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN CASES WITH DIABETES MALLITUS TYPE II

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    Munevera Bećarević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Factors of cardiovascular risk (CVR are often grouped in cases with diabetes mellitus (DM with significant increasment of risk for CV disease . The aim of this research is to determine the frequency of CVR and and total CVR in cases with DM and to investigate connection of CRP of other factors of CVR in total cardiovascular risks. Material and methods: In 92 cases with DM weist values were taken as well as body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, sugar in blood, cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein (CRP and according to SCORE system the 10 year period of CVR were determined. Results: Out of 92 tested cases with age 55,22± 8,3 years, 63,05% were males and 36,95% were women, 81,5% were with values of sugar in blood >7mmol/l, 44,6% were with values of HbA1C>7% and 63,0% >6,5%. The value of cholesterol were >4,5mmol/l in 87%, triglycerides >1,7mmol/l in 78.3% of tested cases. 81,5% of tested cases were overweight and 49% with larger weight values. Average cardiovascular factor according to SCORE system was 3, 92± 3,7% with significant difference among sexes (M-4,86; W-2,32, p3mg/l 52% of tested cases were with high cardiovascular risk. There is significant positive correlation between CRP and cholesterol level (p<0, 01, triglycerides, blood in sugar, HbA1c and upper values of blood pressure (p<0, 05. Significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk (p=0, 63 was not evident. Conclusion: Cases with diabetes mellitus have high level of non regulated cardiovascular risk factors. Even though there is significant correlation between CRP and and pressure values, sugar in blood, HbA1c, cholesterol, triglycerides, significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk in cases with diabetes mellitus is not evident.

  13. Metabolic syndrome, C-reactive protein and cardiovascular risk in psoriasis patients: a cross-sectional study*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Renato Soriani; Silva, Daniela Antoniali; Cardili, Renata Nahas; Souza, Cacilda da Silva

    2018-01-01

    Background Psoriasis has been associated with co-morbidities and elevated cardiovascular risk. Objectives To analyze the relationships among metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk, C-reactive protein, gender, and Psoriasis severity. Methods In this cross-sectional study, plaque Psoriasis patients (n=90), distributed equally in gender, were analyzed according to: Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, cardiovascular risk determined by the Framingham risk score and global risk assessment, C-reactive protein and metabolic syndrome criteria (NCEPT-ATP III). Results Metabolic syndrome frequency was 43.3% overall, without significance between genders (P=0.14); but women had higher risk for obesity (OR 2.56, 95%CI 1.02-6.41; P=0.04) and systemic arterial hypertension (OR 3.29, 95%CI 1.39-7.81; P=0.006). The increase in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index also increased the risk for metabolic syndrome (OR 1.060, 95%CI 1.006-1.117; P=0.03). Absolute 10-year cardiovascular risk was higher in males (P=0.002), but after global risk assessment, 51.1% patients, 52.2% women, were re-classified as high-intermediate cardiovascular risk; without significance between genders (P=0.83). C-reactive protein level was elevated nearly six-fold overall, higher in metabolic syndrome (P=0.05), systemic arterial hypertension (P=0.004), and high-intermediate 10-year cardiovascular risk patients (Preactive protein patients (t=1.98; P=0.05). Study limitations Restricted sample, hospital-based and representative of a single center and no specification of psoriatic arthritis. Conclusions Psoriasis, metabolic syndrome, systemic arterial hypertension and age share the increase in C-reactive protein, which could implicate in additional burden for increasing the cardiovascular risk and be an alert for effective interventions. PMID:29723366

  14. C-reactive protein and cardiovascular risk in bipolar disorder patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshe, Victoria S; Pira, Shamira; Mantere, Outi; Bosche, Bert; Looper, Karl J; Herrmann, Nathan; Müller, Daniel J; Rej, Soham

    2017-10-03

    New research is revealing a strong association between inflammatory markers with bipolar disorder (BD), potentially due to the high prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in BD. We aimed to synthesize the literature examining the association between the clinically most relevant inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP) and cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with BD. MEDLINE, Embase and PsychInfo were systematically searched for all relevant English language articles published prior to April 2017. Articles were included if they examined the association between CRP and cardiovascular risk factors/disease in BD. Fifteen relevant articles were retrieved. Studies were mostly cross-sectional and heterogeneous in the cardiovascular risk factors investigated. Overall, elevated CRP was associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome, elevated body mass index, higher waist circumference, and obesity. CRP was inconsistently associated with elevated fasting glucose, insulin levels, serum triglycerides, total cholesterol levels, and low high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels. Atypical antipsychotic use may mediate some of these effects. No study examined CRP's association with actual cardiovascular disease (e.g. coronary artery disease) in BD. In BD, CRP is associated with increases in several cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting that systemic inflammation could be a shared driving force for both outcomes of BD and cardiovascular risk. Further longitudinal research is needed in this area to verify causality, including an examination of actual cardiovascular disease. Non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments with anti-inflammatory effects should also be investigated, particularly in patients with increased CRP, for their potential to reduce cardiovascular risk in BD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Highly-sensitive C-reactive protein, a biomarker of cardiovascular disease risk, in radically-treated differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients after repeated thyroid hormone withholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciu, A; Piciu, D; Marlowe, R J; Irimie, A

    2013-02-01

    In patients radically treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, we assessed the response of highly-sensitive C-reactive protein, an inflammatory biomarker for cardiovascular risk, after thyroid hormone withholding ("deprivation"), as well as factors potentially influencing this response. We included 52 adults (mean age 45.6±14.0 years, 35 females) who were disease-free after total thyroidectomy, radioiodine ablation and chronic thyroid hormone therapy. They were lifelong non-smokers without apparent inflammatory comorbidity, cardiovascular history beyond pharmacotherapy-controlled hypertension, anti-dyslipidemic medication, or C-reactive protein >10 mg/L in any study measurement. The index deprivation lasted ≥2 weeks, elevating serum thyrotropin >40 mIU/L or ≥100 × the individual's suppressed level. We examined the relationship of age, number of prior deprivations, and gender with the magnitude of post-deprivation C-reactive protein concentration through multivariable statistical analyses using the F test on linear regression models. Post-deprivation, C-reactive protein reached intermediate cardiovascular risk levels (based on general population studies involving chronic elevation), 1-3 mg/L, in 44.2% of patients and high-risk levels, >3 mg/L, in another 17.3%. Mean C-reactive protein was 1.77±1.50 mg/L, differing significantly in females (2.12±1.66 mg/L) vs. males (1.05±0.69 mg/L, P <0.001). In multivariable analysis, patients ≤45 years old (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval 0.164 [0.049-0.548]) were less likely, and females, more likely (3.571 [1.062-12.009]) to have post-deprivation C-reactive protein ≥1 mg/L. Thyroid hormone withdrawal frequently elevated C-reactive protein to levels that when present chronically, were associated with increased cardiovascular risk in general population studies. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Serum C-reactive protein in the prediction of cardiovascular diseases: Overview of the latest clinical studies and public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Amir; Tavakoly Sany, Seyedeh Belin; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Tajfard, Mohammad; Ferns, Gordon

    2018-06-22

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Epidemiological studies using high-sensitivity assays for serum C-reactive protein have shown a consistent association between cardiovascular disease risk and serum C-reactive protein concentrations. C-reactive protein is a biomarker for inflammation, and has been established in clinical practice as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease events. There is evidence that serum C-reactive protein is an excellent biomarker of cardiovascular disease and is also an independent and strong predictor of adverse cardiovascular events. Further characterization of the impact and influence of lifestyle exposures and genetic variation on the C-reactive protein response to cardiovascular disease events may have implications for the therapeutic approaches to reduce cardiovascular disease events. This review summarizes the studies that have examined the association between serum C-reactive protein and the risk of cardiovascular disease. We also discuss the impact of independent factors and C-reactive protein genetic polymorphisms on baseline plasma C-reactive protein levels. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Depressive symptoms and C-reactive protein in a Brazilian urban community

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    W.W. Dressler

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Psychological depression is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. C-reactive protein has been implicated as a mediator of the effect of psychological depression. Several studies have found that individuals, especially men, who report higher levels of psychological depression also have higher levels of C-reactive protein. The current study was undertaken to replicate these results in a Brazilian population, in which there is a much wider range of variation in both background characteristics (such as socioeconomic status and coronary artery disease risk factors. A sample of 271 individuals was interviewed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Fasting blood samples were obtained and evaluated for C-reactive protein (assessed by a turbidimetric immunoassay using a Dade Behring kit analysis in a subsample (N = 258 of individuals. The mean ± SD C-reactive protein for the entire sample was 0.43 ± 0.44, with 0.42 ± 0.48 for men and 0.43 ± 0.42 mg/L for women. Data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic status, tobacco use, and both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Higher reported depressive symptoms were correlated with higher C-reactive protein for men (partial r = 0.298, P = 0.004 and with lower C-reactive protein for women (partial r = -0.154, P = 0.059. The differences in the associations for men and women could be a result of differential effects of sex hormones on stress reactivity and immune response. On the other hand, this difference in the associations may be related to gender differences in the disclosure of emotion and the effect that self-disclosure has on physical health and immune response.

  18. C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Adult Nigerians | Baba | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant produced in the liver in response to tissue injury or systemic inflammation, its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha). Elevated CRP levels have been linked to an increased risk of later development of diabetes ...

  19. C-reactive protein in relation to early atherosclerosis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakob, Maha; Meurman, Jukka H; Jogestrand, Tomas; Nowak, Jacek; Söder, Per-Östen; Söder, Birgitta

    2012-02-01

    Periodontitis may affect atherosclerosis via the chronic inflammation. We investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in relation to early vascular atherosclerotic changes in non-symptomatic subjects with and without long-term periodontitis. Carotid ultrasonography with calculation of common carotid artery intima-media area (cIMA) was performed, and hsCRP and atherosclerosis risk factors were analysed in randomly chosen 93 patients with periodontitis and 41 controls. The relationship between hsCRP, cIMA and atherosclerosis risk factors was evaluated with multiple logistic regression analysis. Women displayed lower hsCRP (p periodontitis, cIMA values were higher than in controls. Periodontitis appeared to be a major predictor for increased cIMA (odds ratio, 3.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-12.26). Neither of these factors was significantly associated with hsCRP which thus appeared not sensitive enough to be a marker for periodontitis or atherosclerosis. Hence, irrespective of low hsCRP levels, periodontitis appeared to increase the risk for atherosclerosis.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are positively associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Eun-Sil; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Park, Ji Eun; Choi, Young Ju; Huh, Kap Bum; Kim, Wha Young

    2010-07-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation may induce chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study investigated the relation between inflammatory biomarkers and chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes, which has not yet been reported in Asian populations. A cross-sectional study was performed in 543 patients recruited from diabetic clinics for an ongoing, prospective study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between inflammatory biomarkers and the presence of chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate Disease equation using plasma creatinine). The risk of chronic kidney disease increased in the highest quartiles of C-reactive protein (CRP) [multivariate odds ratio (OR) = 3.73; 95% CI = 1.19-1.70] and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (multivariate OR = 4.45; 95% CI = 1.63-12.11) compared to the lowest quartiles after adjustments for age, sex, zinc intake, and other putative risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Our results suggest that CRP and tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. A causal mechanism of this association should be evaluated in a followup study of Korean patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Lipid, lipoproteins, C-reactive protein, and hemostatic factors at baseline in the diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) appear to be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) due at least in part to an increased prevalence of risk factors. We evaluated lipid, lipoprotein, C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) levels at study entry in the largest multiethnic cohort of participants with IGT described, namely in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). Measurements were performed at the baseline visit of 3,819 randomized participants of the DPP. Among 3,622 participants who were not taking lipid-lowering medicines, cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in relation to demographic, anthropometric, and metabolic measures. Major determinants of risk factors were assessed in multivariate analysis. Over 40% of participants had elevated triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, and CRP levels and reduced HDL cholesterol levels. Men had higher triglyceride and tPA and lower HDL cholesterol concentrations and smaller LDL particle size than women, whereas women had higher CRP and fibrinogen levels. African Americans had less dyslipidemia but higher fibrinogen levels, and Asian Americans had lower CRP and fibrinogen levels than Caucasians and Hispanics. The surrogate measure of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) had the strongest association with HDL cholesterol, triglyceride, and tPA levels and LDL particle size. BMI had the greatest influence on CRP and fibrinogen levels. Using median splits of indexes of insulin resistance and insulin secretion (insulin-to-glucose ratio), participants with greater insulin resistance had a more adverse CVD risk-factor profile, whereas insulin secretion had little influence on risk factors. The pattern of CVD risk factors in participants with IGT in the DPP exhibits substantial heterogeneity and is significantly influenced by race, sex, and age, as well as by obesity, glucose, and insulin measures. The degree of insulin

  2. C-reactive protein level and obesity as cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Ülkü Uludağ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of C-reactive protein(CRP level elevation and obesity for the increased cardiovasculardisease risk in polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS.Methods: A hundred and nine patients with PCOS and 30age matched healthy volunteers with regular menstrualcycle are involved in the study. PCOS group is furthersubdivided into three subgroups according to the bodymass index (BMI. Subgroups included 54 with BMI30. Blood samplesfor glucose, insulin, uric acid, and CRP were collected inthe morning after overnight fasting (12 hours. Homeostasismodel assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IRwas calculated. Results: Fasting blood glucose, insulin,and HOMA-IR was significantly higher in PCOS group(p=0.02, p=0.01 and p=0.02. CRP level was higher insubgroup with BMI>30. High CRP level in PCOS wasfound to be independent from BMI (p30.When compared with the control group high insulin levelwas the only to be statistically significant in obese PCOSpatients (p=0.005. HOMA-IR was higher in PCOS subgroupwith BMI>30 when compared with controls and thePCOS subgroup with BMI<25 (p<0.001, p= 0.003.Conclusion: Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and high CRPlevels are seemed to be related and potentiating eachother in PCOS. Struggling with obesity is one of the mostimportant issues for preventive medicine.Key words: PCOS, CRP, obesity, cardiovascular risk

  3. C-reactive protein as a risk factor for coronary heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analyses for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, David I; Fu, Rongwei; Freeman, Michele; Rogers, Kevin; Helfand, Mark

    2009-10-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP) may help to refine global risk assessment for coronary heart disease (CHD), particularly among persons who are at intermediate risk on the basis of traditional risk factors alone. To assist the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) in determining whether CRP should be incorporated into guidelines for CHD risk assessment. MEDLINE search of English-language articles (1966 to November 2007), supplemented by reference lists of reviews, pertinent studies, editorials, and Web sites and by expert suggestions. Prospective cohort, case-cohort, and nested case-control studies relevant to the independent predictive ability of CRP when used in intermediate-risk persons. Included studies were reviewed according to predefined criteria, and the quality of each study was rated. The validity of the body of evidence and the net benefit or harm of using CRP for CHD risk assessment were evaluated. The combined magnitude of effect was determined by meta-analysis. The body of evidence is of good quality, consistency, and applicability. For good studies that adjusted for all Framingham risk variables, the summary estimate of relative risk for incident CHD was 1.58 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.83) for CRP levels greater than 3.0 mg/L compared with levels less than 1.0 mg/L. Analyses from 4 large cohorts were consistent in finding evidence that including CRP improves risk stratification among initially intermediate-risk persons. C-reactive protein has desirable test characteristics, and good data exist on the prevalence of elevated CRP levels in intermediate-risk persons. Limited evidence links changes in CRP level to primary prevention of CHD events. Study methods for measuring Framingham risk variables and other covariates varied. Ethnic and racial minority populations were poorly represented in most studies, limiting generalizability. Few studies directly assessed the effect of CRP on risk reclassification in intermediate-risk persons. Strong evidence indicates

  4. Relationship between C-reactive protein and physical fitness, physical activity, obesity and selected cardiovascular risk factors in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza; Rahnama, Ameneh; Salesi, Mohsen; Rahnama, Nader; Mojtahedi, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between C-reactive protein (CRP) with physical fitness, physical activity, obesity, and selected cardiovascular risk factors in school-children. Forty-four boy schoolchildren (mean ± SD: age 10.25 ± 0.75 years, height 144 ± 0.2 cm, body weight 46.1 5± 4.59 kg, body mass index 22.16 ± 2.16 kg/m(2)) voluntarily participated in this study. Physical fitness and physical activity were assessed using the 20-meter fitness test. Adiposity was estimated using body mass index. Blood samples were taken after an overnight fast and measured for CRP, LDL, HDL and cholesterol. Pearson's correlation was calculated to determine the relations between these factors. Mean (SD) CRP concentration was 1.07 (0.82) mg/l. A significant correlation was observed between CRP and VO2max (r=-0.45, P= 0.001), body mass index (r=0.55, P=0.000) and cholesterol (r=-0.35, P=0.04). No significant relation was found between CRP and physical activity, LDL and HDL (P> 0.05). Moreover, significant associations were observed between body mass index and VO2max (r=-0.33, P=0.02) and physical activity (r=-0.43, P=0.04). Body mass index was the most powerful predictor of serum concentrations of CRP in schoolchildren. It may be an important factor to control body weight to prevent an increase in serum CRP in children and to help the primordial prevention of chronic diseases.

  5. Does elevated C-reactive protein increase atrial fibrillation risk? A Mendelian randomization of 47,000 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) with increased risk of atrial fibrillation is a robust and perhaps even causal association.......The purpose of this study was to test whether the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) with increased risk of atrial fibrillation is a robust and perhaps even causal association....

  6. C-reactive protein and anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies as risk factors of cardiovascular death in incident patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Ramón; Frías, Yolanda; de Ventura, Maria Jesús; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Hurtado, María Elena; Alcántara, Guadalupe; Vázquez, Roberto; Ortiz, Ruth; Salcedo, Mario; Rios, Maria Elena; Kaji, Julio; Amato, Dante

    2003-01-01

    Recently it has been pointed out that inflammation and infections caused by germs such as Chlamydia pneumoniae are independent cardiovascular risk factors for the general population, but information about these relationships in dialysis patients is scarce. This work was done to analyze the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) and IgG anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae antibodies (anti-Chlp-IgG) as independent cardiovascular risk factors in incident patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Single-cohort, prospective observational study. Three CAPD centers from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and one from the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado, Mexico. A cohort of 75 adult incident patients on CAPD, without clinical signs of congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, or peripheral arterial insufficiency. No restrictions for age, gender, or cause of renal failure were applied. Mortality. Demographic variables, body composition by electrical bioimpedance, serum glucose, urea, creatinine, lipids, homocysteine, nutritional markers (albumin, prealbumin, and transferrin), CRP, and anti-Chlp-IgG were measured and registered at the time of the first admission. When a patient died, the cause of death was determined by review of the clinical chart. Mean follow-up time was 10.25 patient-months. There were 14 cardiovascular deaths. CRP was positive (> 10 mg/L) in 64% of the patients, and anti-Chlp-IgG in 64%; 29% of the patients were positive for both markers. The relative risk for cardiovascular mortality was 6.23 for patients positive for either CRP or anti-Chlp-IgG, and increased to 9.52 when both markers were positive. Multivariate analysis revealed that CRP and anti-Chlp-IgG were stronger cardiovascular death predictors than age, diabetes, and nutritional status. These data suggest that inflammation and the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infections are important predictors of cardiovascular death in

  7. C-reactive protein gene C1444T polymorphism and risk of recurrent ischemic events in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherostenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenillas, Juan F; Massot, Andreu; Alvarez-Sabín, Jose; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; del Rio-Espinola, Albert; Chacon, Pilar; Quintana, Manuel; Molina, Carlos A; Rovira, Alex; Montaner, Joan

    2009-01-01

    High levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of further ischemic events in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD). It remains unknown to which extent this increased risk might be genetically predetermined. We aimed to investigate the relationship between a common genetic polymorphism of the CRP gene and the risk of recurrent ischemic events in symptomatic ICAD patients. We studied 75 consecutive patients with a first-ever cerebral ischemic event attributable to symptomatic ICAD. Blood samples were drawn 3 months after the qualifying event. Genomic DNA was isolated and the C1444T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the CRP gene was determined. The blood concentration of CRP was also measured. Patients underwent long-term clinical follow-up to detect the occurrence of further major ischemic events. During a median follow-up time of 23 months, 18 patients (24%) suffered a major ischemic event (10 ischemic strokes, 3 transient ischemic attacks and 5 myocardial infarctions). Raised CRP levels at baseline (p = 0.02) and the presence of the T allele within the CRP C1444T SNP were associated with a higher risk of recurrent ischemic events (p = 0.02). Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, vascular risk factors and CRP level identified that the presence of the T allele in the studied polymorphism predicted the occurrence of further ischemic events (hazard ratio 3.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-11.1; p = 0.025). The presence of the T allele within the CRP gene C1444T polymorphism may be associated with a higher risk of further ischemic events in symptomatic ICAD patients. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Urine albumin/creatinine ratio, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide--three new cardiovascular risk markers--do they improve risk prediction and influence treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael H; Sehestedt, Thomas; Lyngbaek, Stig

    2010-01-01

    -proBNP), related to hemodynamic cardiovascular risk factors, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), related to metabolic cardiovascular risk factors and urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), related to hemodynamic as well as metabolic risk factors. In healthy subjects with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular...... death lower than 5% based on HeartScore and therefore not eligible for primary prevention, the actual 10-year risk of cardiovascular death exceeded 5% in a small subgroup of subjects with UACR higher than the 95-percentile of approximately 1.6 mg/mmol. Combined use of high UACR or high hsCRP identified...... a larger subgroup of 16% with high cardiovascular risk in which primary prevention may be advised despite low-moderate cardiovascular risk based on HeartScore. Furthermore, combined use of high UACR or high Nt-proBNP in subjects with known cardiovascular disease or diabetes identified a large subgroup...

  9. Testing the hypothesis that vitamin C deficiency is a risk factor for clozapine-induced agranulocytosis using guinea pigs and ODS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Julia; Wilson, John X; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2008-04-01

    The use of clozapine is limited by a relatively high incidence of drug-induced agranulocytosis. Clozapine is oxidized by bone marrow cells to a reactive nitrenium ion. Although many idiosyncratic drug reactions are immune-mediated, the fact that patients with a history of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis do not immediately develop agranulocytosis on rechallenge suggests that some other factor may be responsible for the idiosyncratic nature of this reaction. The reactive nitrenium ion is very rapidly reduced back to clozapine by vitamin C, and many schizophrenic patients are vitamin C deficient. We set out to test the hypothesis that vitamin C deficiency is a major risk factor for clozapine-induced agranulocytosis using a vitamin C deficient guinea pig model. Although the vitamin C deficient guinea pigs did not develop agranulocytosis, the amount of clozapine covalent binding in these animals was less than we had previously observed in samples from rats and humans. Therefore, we studied ODS rats that also cannot synthesize vitamin C. Vitamin C deficient ODS rats also did not develop agranulocytosis, and furthermore, although covalent binding in the bone marrow was greater than that in the guinea pig, it was not increased in the vitamin C deficient ODS rats relative to ODS rats that had adequate vitamin C in their diet. Therefore, it is very unlikely that vitamin C deficiency is a major risk factor for clozapine-induced agranulocytosis.

  10. Identifiable risk factors in hepatitis b and c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, F.U.; Pervez, A.; Rafiq, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Both hepatitis B and C are common infections affecting masses and are leading causes of Chronic Liver Disease in Pakistan as well as worldwide. In majority of cases both viral diseases spread by factors that are preventable. The present study is conducted to determine the identifiable risk factors in patients admitted with Chronic Hepatitis B and C. Methods: An observational study was carried out for a period of 6 months. All age groups and both sexes were included. The patients were interviewed and the identifiable risk factors were looked for. The standard methods for detection of Hepatitis B and C were used. Results: One-hundred and ten patients were studied from January to July 2009. Sixty-five patients had Hepatitis C, 35 had Hepatitis B, and 10 had both Hepatitis B and C. Ninety-three patients had a history of injections and transfusions etc., and 38 had surgical scars. Tattoos were present in 42 patients and nose and/or ear piercing marks were present in 28 patients. The number of risk factors increased in co-infection. Conclusion: There is a role of unhygienic health delivery practices, lack of awareness and resources for standard screening protocol for spread of Hepatitis B and C. (author)

  11. C-reactive protein concentration and risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and mortality: an individual participant meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Lowe, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Associations of C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration with risk of major diseases can best be assessed by long-term prospective follow-up of large numbers of people. We assessed the associations of CRP concentration with risk of vascular and non-vascular outcomes under different circumstances....

  12. Vitamin C Intakeand Risk Factors for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ayu Destiani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease of the knee joints characterized by progressive softening and disintegration of articular cartilage. In OA, which is influenced by several risk factors, free radicals are increased by local ischemia in the cartilage. As an exogenous antioxidant, vitamin C also plays an important role in collagen and glycosaminoglycan synthesis. This study was carried out to identify vitamin C intake as well as risk factors in knee OA. Methods: The study population was determined by non-probability sampling with convenient approach to knee OA patients at the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in October–November 2013. Data were obtained through questionnaire interview about risk factors, severity index of OA and vitamin C intake profile. Data presentation was conducted by descriptive method. Results: There were 47 patients diagnosed with knee OA in the Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic. The result showed that 7 patients (14.9% had low vitamin C intake for the last 3 months. There were 30 patients with family history of OA (63.8%. Thirty two patients (68.1% were passive smokers, 44 patients (93.6% had history of repeated use of knee joints and majority of respondents had obesity.  Conclusions: Most of the subjects have sufficient vitamin C intake and more than half have risk factors that may contribute to the incidence of knee OA.   DOI: 10.15850/amj.v4n2.1067

  13. C-reactive protein (+1444C>T) polymorphism influences CRP response following a moderate inflammatory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aiuto, Francesco; Casas, Juan P; Shah, Tina; Humphries, Steve E; Hingorani, Aroon D; Tonetti, Maurizio S

    2005-04-01

    Elevations in C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration are associated with an increased risk of future coronary events in prospective studies and it has been suggested that CRP could be used to aid risk prediction. A +1444C>T polymorphism in the CRP gene has been associated with differences in CRP concentration. We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on the CRP response to periodontal therapy, an intermediate inflammatory stimulus. Clinical parameters, CRP, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentrations were evaluated in 55 consecutive patients suffering from periodontitis at baseline, 1, 7 and 30 days after an intensive course of periodontal treatment. In a multivariate analysis individuals homozygous for the +1444T allele showed higher CRP concentrations (day 1, 21.10+/-4.81 mg/L and day 7, 4.89+/-0.74 mg/L) compared with C-allele carriers (day 1, 12.37+/-1.61 mg/L and day 7, 3.08+/-2.00 mg/L). This effect was independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammatory factors known to affect CRP concentrations. CRP genotype may need to be considered when CRP values are used in coronary risk prediction.

  14. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 21 280-290 Aromatic...

  15. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts target organ damage in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Nie, Hai; He, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1082 consecutive patients of Chinese origin were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and target organ damage, including cardiac hypertrophy......Observational studies established high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a risk factor for cardiovascular events in the general population. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship between target organ damage and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in a cohort of Chinese patients......, carotid intima-media thickness, and renal impairment, were investigated. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in 619 patients with metabolic syndrome was 2.42 mg/L (0.75 and 3.66 mg/L) compared with 1.13 mg/L (0.51 and 2.46 mg/L) among 463 control subjects (P

  16. [Hepatitis caused by virus C. Risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garassini, M E; Pulgar, Y; Alvarado, M; Garassini, M A

    1995-01-01

    To establish the risk factors to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we studied 120 patients divided in 2 groups: A first group of 40 patients with HCV infection, 24 (60%) with past medical history of blood transfusion, 14 (35%) of them also had hemodialysis and 3 Kidney transplant. 10 patients (25%) had mayor surgery without transfusion, 3 had frequent visits to the dentist and 3 month baby whose mother was HCV positive. In 4 patients we found no risk factors. A second group of 80 patients who visit our clinic for the first time, 2 were found positive for HCV (1.6%). 13 of them had blood transfusion, one was HCV+ (OR: 5.5, P = 0.73). 41 had history of mayor surgery, one HCV+ (OR: 0.95, P = 1.000). The risk factors related to HCV infection in our population were blood transfusion, hemodialysis and mayor surgery. The use of EV drugs, tatoos, sexual behavior, interfamiliar or vertical transmission were not risk factor in our population.

  17. Evaluation of cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with mycosis fungoides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mycosis fungoides, the most common subtype of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is more common in patients aged 45-55. OBJECTIVE Cardiovascular risk factors have been investigated in several skin diseases. However, the relation between cardiovascular diseases and mycosis fungoides remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess cardiovascular risk factors in patients with mycosis fungoides. METHODS 32 patients with mycosis fungoides and 26 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, homocystein, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein – cholesterol, were measured in the sera of patients. RESULTS Patients had significantly higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, low-density lipoprotein - cholesterol, total cholesterol (p= 0.032) (phomocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein than healthy subjects. The present study has demonstrated an increased rate of cardiovascular risk in patients with mycosis fungoides. Even though the etiology of these associations is elusive, dermatologists should be sensitized to investigate metabolic derangements in patients with mycosis fungoides, in order to lessen mortality and comorbidity with a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:25672297

  18. C-reactive protein and serum creatinine, but not haemoglobin A1c, are independent predictors of coronary heart disease risk in non-diabetic Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Agus; Tai, E Shyong; Tan, Vincent Y; Welsh, Alan H; Liew, Reginald; Naidoo, Nasheen; Wu, Yi; Yuan, Jian-Min; Koh, Woon P; van Dam, Rob M

    2016-08-01

    In western populations, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and to a lesser degree serum creatinine and haemoglobin A1c, predict risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, data on Asian populations that are increasingly affected by CHD are sparse and it is not clear whether these biomarkers can be used to improve CHD risk classification. We conducted a nested case-control study within the Singapore Chinese Health Study cohort, with incident 'hard' CHD (myocardial infarction or CHD death) as an outcome. We used data from 965 men (298 cases, 667 controls) and 528 women (143 cases, 385 controls) to examine the utility of hsCRP, serum creatinine and haemoglobin A1c in improving the prediction of CHD risk over and above traditional risk factors for CHD included in the ATP III model. For each sex, the performance of models with only traditional risk factors used in the ATP III model was compared with models with the biomarkers added using weighted Cox proportional hazards analysis. The impact of adding these biomarkers was assessed using the net reclassification improvement index. For men, loge hsCRP (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.05; 1.49) and loge serum creatinine (hazard ratio 4.82, 95% confidence interval: 2.10; 11.04) showed statistically significantly associations with CHD risk when added to the ATP III model. We did not observe a significant association between loge haemoglobin A1c and CHD risk (hazard ratio 1.83, 95% confidence interval: 0.21; 16.06). Adding hsCRP and serum creatinine to the ATP III model improved risk classification in men with a net gain of 6.3% of cases (p-value = 0.001) being reclassified to a higher risk category, while it did not significantly reduce the accuracy of classification for non-cases. For women, squared hsCRP was borderline significantly (hazard ratio 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.00; 1.03) and squared serum creatinine was significantly (hazard ratio 1.81, 95% confidence interval: 1.49; 2

  19. The Correlation between Different Risk Factors of Hepatitis C and Different Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Mozhgan; Basirkazeruni, Hanieh; Rostami, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C infection is one of the health problems in the world. Several known risk factors are responsible in transmission of this infection. We are going to study the prevalence of these risk factors for different genotypes of hepatitis C and if possible, specify probable relations between each risk factor and transmission of each genotype. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study done on 270 people who had positive anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody and HCV RNA. Demographic specificity and possible risk factors were collected using a questionnaire, and statistical analysis was done by SPSS software (version 20). Chi-square test used to estimate the prevalence and relation between each qualitative risk factor and HCV genotype transmitted. Analysis of variance was used for studying the prevalence and relation between quantitative risk factors and HCV genotypes. Results: The sample size was 270 persons. Of these, 217 (80.4%) were men and 185 (68.5%) were infected with genotype Type III. Most people were in age range of 31–40 years old 92 (34%). Single people were 126 (46.7%) and 169 (62.6%) were high school and university graduated. Tattooing as a risk factor had a meaningful relation with hepatitis C genotype (P < 0.001). Conclusions: According to the findings, most people in central provinces of Iran with hepatitis C are carrying genotype III, with most prevalent risk factors such as intravenous drug use and unsafe sexual activity. Besides, tattooing had a significant association with hepatitis C genotype, so that in these groups of people, genotype I was more frequent isolated virus. PMID:28503500

  20. Increased Baseline C-Reactive Protein Concentrations Are Associated with Increased Risk of Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Benfield, Thomas; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) increases rapidly during an infection. We tested the hypothesis that chronic low-level increases in CRP are associated with an increased risk of infectious disease. METHODS: We studied 9660 individuals from a prospective general...... population cohort, including 3592 in whom infectious disease developed, and another 60 896 individuals from a cross-sectional general population study, of whom 13 332 developed infectious disease; 55% were women, and the mean age was 57 years. Hospital diagnoses of infections in 1977-2010 were based....... RESULTS: Individuals with CRP >3 mg/L had 1.2 and 1.7 times increased risk of infectious disease, in the prospective general population cohort and the cross-sectional general population study, respectively, compared with individuals with CRP

  1. HIGH-SENSITIVITY C-REACTIVE PROTEIN (hsCRP IN YOUNG ADULTS: RELATION TO AEROBIC CAPACITY, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mazurek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atheromatosis develops as a result of a chronic inflammatory process of the arteries. Inflammatory biomarkers, particularly high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, positively correlate with atheromatosis risk factors and can be used to estimate and predict the risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hsCRP concentration and BMI, body composition, classical risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, energy expenditure for physical activity (WEE and  ·VO2max. 166 volunteers (78 women and 88 men were included in the examinations. Their mean age was 20.2±0.9 years. Health condition was described by the following variables: smoking, WEE,  ·VO2max, body mass index (BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, fat mass (FM, fat-free mass (FFM, lipid profile, hsCRP, glucose and insulin concentration, and insulin resistance. Between the subgroups created on the basis of hsCRP concentration, in quartiles 1 to 3 and quartile 4, a comparative analysis was carried out. 79.5�0of women and 69.3�0of men had hsCRP values within the references ranges. Moderately high values were found in 14.1�0of women and 22.7�0of men and high in 6.4�0and 7.9�20respectively. Mean values of BMI, FFM, WHR, WEE,  ·VO2max, glucose and triglyceride concentration, and TC/HDL index were significantly lower, while FM and HDL were significantly higher, in women than in men. In the quartile 4 subgroup compared to the quartile 1-3 subgroup, we found significantly lower HDL concentration and a tendency for higher values of BMI (p=0.06 and TC (p=0.07 as well as higher percentages of smoking among men. In young, physically active, healthy persons, serum concentration of hsCRP is not related to physical activity or  ·VO2max.

  2. C-reactive protein, dietary n-3 fatty acids, and the extent of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Skou, Helle Aarup; Hansen, Vibeke Ellegaard

    2001-01-01

    The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Experimental and clinical studies provide evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from fish. We have studied the effect of marin.......003). The inverse correlation between CRP and DHA may reflect an anti-inflammatory effect of DHA in patients with stable coronary artery disease and suggest a novel mechanism by which fish consumption may decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. (C) 2001 by Excerpta Medica, Inc....

  3. Circadian Misalignment Increases C-Reactive Protein and Blood Pressure in Chronic Shift Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Mistretta, Joseph; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-04-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classical risk factors. Shift workers' behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers, independent of differences in work stress, food quality, and other factors that are likely to differ between night and day shifts. Thus, our objectives were to determine the independent effect of circadian misalignment on 24-h high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP; a marker of systemic inflammation) and blood pressure levels-cardiovascular disease risk factors-in chronic shift workers. Chronic shift workers undertook two 3-day laboratory protocols that simulated night work, comprising 12-hour inverted behavioral and environmental cycles (circadian misalignment) or simulated day work (circadian alignment), using a randomized, crossover design. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h hs-CRP by 11% ( p shift workers. This may help explain the increased inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers.

  4. Manifold implications of obesity in ischemic heart disease among Japanese patients according to covariance structure analysis: Low reactivity of B-type natriuretic peptide as an intervening risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Joshi; Minai, Kosuke; Kawai, Makoto; Ogawa, Kazuo; Inoue, Yasunori; Morimoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Ogawa, Takayuki; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is believed to be one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Western countries. However, the effects of obesity should be continuously examined in the Japanese population because the average bodily habitus differs among countries. In this study, we collectively examined the significance of obesity and obesity-triggered risk factors including the low reactivity of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Japanese patients. The study patients consisted of 1252 subjects (IHD: n = 970; non-IHD: n = 282). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, and the low reactivity of BNP were significant risk factors for IHD, but body mass index (BMI) was not. A theoretical path model was proposed by positioning BMI at the top of the hierarchical model. Exploratory factor analysis revealed that BMI did not play a causative role in IHD (P = NS). BMI was causatively linked to other risk factors (Pobesity per se is not a strong risk factor for IHD in Japanese patients. However, several important risk factors triggered by obesity exhibited a causative role for IHD. The low reactivity of BNP is a substantial risk factor for IHD.

  5. Comparison of Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors between Active and Sedentary Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Najafgholizadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major problems threatening the world’s people are cardiovascular diseases, accounting for 30% of the deaths. The factors exposing people to this danger are called risk factors. Objective: This study aimed to compare the cardiovascular risk factors and C-reactive protein between active and sedentary elderly men. Methods: The study was a descriptive comparison of two groups that were conducted in Rasht city in 2015. The subjects of this study consist of 30 active elderly men and 30 sedentary elderly men who were selected non-randomly and purposefully. Inclusion criteria of research for active subjects were have regular physical activity at least six months and don’t use cigarette and pills that affect profile lipids and inclusion criteria for sedentary subjects were don’t have regular physical activity and also don’t use cigarette and pills that affect profile lipids. The measured cardiovascular risk factors of subjects include fasting blood sugar (FBS, triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, highdensity lipoprotein (HDL, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, glycated haemoglobinA1c (HbA1c, and C-reactive protein (CRP. The statistical methods used for data analysis are Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, t-student, and U Mann-Whitney with significance level less than 0.05. Findings: The t-student exam shows that cardiovascular risk factors, including FBS, TG, TC, HDL, VLDL, HbA1c, and CRP, in active elderly men are lower than sedentary elderly men. This difference is also statistically significant (P≤0/01. Conclusion: The study showed that cardiovascular risk factors in active elderly men are less than sedentary ones. However, 80% of active elderly men had still at least one or several cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein as useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Yi-Yen; Sheu, Bor-Fuh; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Loke, Song-Seng; Chen, Jih-Chang; Li, Wen-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein as Useful Surrogate Markers for Evaluating CKD Risk in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsun Chuang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Results: Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Conclusion: Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

  8. Lack of efficacy of resveratrol on C-reactive protein and selected cardiovascular risk factors--Results from a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Corina; Ursoniu, Sorin; Wong, Nathan D; Muntner, Paul; Graham, Ian M; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Rizzo, Manfredi; Rysz, Jacek; Sperling, Laurence S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Banach, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that oral supplementation with resveratrol exerts cardioprotective effects, but evidence of the effects on C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels and other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors is inconclusive. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of resveratrol supplementation on plasma CRP concentrations and selected predictors of CV risk. The search included PUBMED, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Scopus, and EMBASE (up to August 31, 2014) to identify RCTs investigating the effects of resveratrol supplementation on selected CV risk factors. Quantitative data synthesis was performed using a random-effects model, with weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as summary statistics. Meta-analysis of data from 10 RCTs (11 treatment arms) did not support a significant effect of resveratrol supplementation in altering plasma CRP concentrations (WMD: -0.144 mg/L, 95% CI: -0.968-0.680, p = 0.731). Resveratrol supplementation was not found to alter plasma levels of total cholesterol (WMD: 1.49 mg/dL, 95% CI: -14.96-17.93, p = 0.859), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (WMD: -0.31 mg/dL, 95% CI: -9.57-8.95, p = 0.948), triglycerides (WMD: 2.67 mg/dL, 95% CI: -28.34-33.67, p = 0.866), and glucose (WMD: 1.28 mg/dL, 95% CI: -5.28-7.84, p = 0.703). It also slightly reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations (WMD: -4.18 mg/dL, 95% CI: -6.54 to -1.82, p = 0.001). Likewise, no significant effect was observed on systolic (WMD: 0.82 mmHg, 95% CI: -8.86-10.50, p = 0.868) and diastolic blood pressure (WMD: 1.72 mm Hg, 95% CI: -6.29-9.73, p=0.674). This meta-analysis of available RCTs does not suggest any benefit of resveratrol supplementation on CV risk factors. Larger, well-designed trials are necessary to confirm these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk Factors for Hepatitis B and C among Military Recruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azam, N.; Azam, N.; Javed, K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine significant risk factors for hepatitis B and C in young military recruits testing positive during pre enrollment screening. Study Design: Case control analytical study. Material and Method: Healthy male recruits during June-December 2005 at Pathology Laboratory, CMH Malir Cantt. Results: The analysis of risk factors among cases and controls has been categorized into two groups according to source of risk. History of previous therapeutic injection administration during the past 5 years, blood donation and sharing toothbrushes and razors in family revealed results which were significant with p-value of 0.002, 0.007 and 0.001 respectively. None of the other risk factors assessed in the comparable groups were found to be significant. Other factors considered plausible by other studies for transmission of hepatitis B and C viruses; like tattooing, ever lived in hostel and injection drug abuse showed OR < 1, this suggested insufficient sample size and frame before any suggestion of direction of association. Conclusion: History of injections for therapeutic purposes, blood donation and sharing toothbrushes and razors among family members were the factors which were significant amongst cases. (author)

  10. Fibrates down-regulate IL-1-stimulated C-reactive protein gene expression in hepatocytes by reducing nuclear p50-NFκB-C/EBP-β complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleemann, R.; Gervois, P.P.; Verschuren, L.; Staels, B.; Princen, H.M.G.; Kooistra, T.

    2003-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a major acute-phase protein in humans. Elevated plasma CRP levels are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. CRP is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and is induced by interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-6 under inflammatory situations, such as the acute phase. Fibrates

  11. C-reactive protein, Rheumatoid factor and circulatory immune complex as markers for monitoring treatment of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Ahmadi, F.; Nashibi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and circulatory immune complex (CIC) determinations in monitoring the outcome of infective endocarditis (IE). Methodology: In this prospective analytic descriptive study CRP, RF and CIC were measured on admission and 4 weeks after initiation of standard antibiotic regimen in 30 hospitalized patients with IE in an educational hospital between 2006 and 2007 in Ahvaz a city south west Iran . Duke criteria were used for diagnosis of IE. CRP and RF were examined using quantitative neflometry (Binding site kit, UK) and CIC was detected by semi quantitative immune diffusion (Baharafshan SIRD kit, Iran). Data were evaluated using statistical analyses in SPSS (version 12, USA) software for windows. Results: The fall in serum C-reactive protein or RF was significant (P= 0.05). Only two of the 30 patients, who had elevated CRP, RF and CIC week four failed to response and one needed cardiac surgery. Conclusions: The C-reactive protein proved to be a good tool for monitoring the treatment of IE. Also RF proved useful in the assessment of patients with IE, but the value of CIC was negligible. (author)

  12. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-04-28

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negative, antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) positive individuals during therapies containing rituximab, anti-TNF or HSCT.For HBsAg-positive patients, prophylactic antiviral therapy is proven to the effective in preventing HBV reactivation. Recent evidence also demonstrated entecavir to be more effective than lamivudine in this aspect. For HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals, the risk of reactivations differs with the type of immunosuppression. For rituximab, a prospective study demonstrated the 2-year cumulative risk of reactivation to be 41.5%, but prospective data is still lacking for other immunosupressive regimes. The optimal management in preventing HBV reactivation would involve appropriate risk stratification for different immunosuppressive regimes in both HBsAg-positive and HBsAg-negative, anti-HBc positive individuals.

  13. Time variability of C-reactive protein: implications for clinical risk stratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bogaty

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is proposed as a screening test for predicting risk and guiding preventive approaches in coronary artery disease (CAD. However, the stability of repeated CRP measurements over time in subjects with and without CAD is not well defined. We sought to determine the stability of serial CRP measurements in stable subjects with distinct CAD manifestations and a group without CAD while carefully controlling for known confounders.We prospectively studied 4 groups of 25 stable subjects each 1 a history of recurrent acute coronary events; 2 a single myocardial infarction ≥7 years ago; 3 longstanding CAD (≥7 years that had never been unstable; 4 no CAD. Fifteen measurements of CRP were obtained to cover 21 time-points: 3 times during one day; 5 consecutive days; 4 consecutive weeks; 4 consecutive months; and every 3 months over the year. CRP risk threshold was set at 2.0 mg/L. We estimated variance across time-points using standard descriptive statistics and Bayesian hierarchical models.Median CRP values of the 4 groups and their pattern of variability did not differ substantially so all subjects were analyzed together. The median individual standard deviation (SD CRP values within-day, within-week, between-weeks and between-months were 0.07, 0.19, 0.36 and 0.63 mg/L, respectively. Forty-six percent of subjects changed CRP risk category at least once and 21% had ≥4 weekly and monthly CRP values in both low and high-risk categories.Considering its large intra-individual variability, it may be problematic to rely on CRP values for CAD risk prediction and therapeutic decision-making in individual subjects.

  14. C-reactive protein gene polymorphisms and myocardial infarction risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanbin; Liu, Tongku; He, Haitao; Sun, Yuqing; Zhuo, Fengling

    2013-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), the classic acute-phase protein, plays an important role in the etiology of myocardial infarction (MI). Emerging evidence has shown that the common polymorphisms in the CRP gene may influence an individual's susceptibility to MI; but individually published studies showed inconclusive results. This meta-analysis aimed to derive a more precise estimation of the associations between CRP gene polymorphisms and MI risk. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and China BioMedicine (CBM) databases was conducted on articles published before June 1st, 2013. Crude odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Nine case-control studies were included with a total of 2992 MI patients and 4711 healthy controls. The meta-analysis results indicated that CRP rs3093059 (T>C) polymorphism was associated with decreased risk of MI, especially among Asian populations. However, similar associations were not observed in CRP rs1800947 (G>C) and rs2794521 (G>A) polymorphisms (all p>0.05) among both Asian and Caucasian populations. Univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses showed that ethnicity may be a major source of heterogeneity. No publication bias was detected in this meta-analysis. In conclusion, the current meta-analysis indicates that CRP rs3093059 (T>C) polymorphism may be associated with decreased risk of MI, especially among Asian populations.

  15. Level of C - reactive protein as an indicator for prognosis of premature uterine contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najat Nakishbandy, Bayar M; Barawi, Sabat A M

    2014-01-01

    high concentrations of maternal C-reactive protein have been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, and premature uterine contraction may be predicted by elevated levels of C-reactive protein. This may ultimately be simple and cost-effective enough to introduce as a low-risk screening program. an observational case control study was performed from May 1st, 2010 to December 1st, 2010 at Maternity Teaching Hospital-Erbil/ Kurdistan Region/ Iraq. The sample size was (200) cases. Hundred of them were presented with premature uterine contractions at 24(+0)-36(+6) weeks. The other hundred were control group at same gestational ages. The level of C-reactive protein was determined in both groups and both groups were followed till delivery. (93) out of (100) women with premature uterine contractions had elevated level of C-Reactive protein and 91% delivered prematurely while in the control group only (9) out of (100) women had elevated level of C-reactive protein and only 8% of them delivered preterm. Differences were statistically highly significant. C-reactive protein can be used as a biomarker in prediction of premature delivery when it is associated with premature uterine contractions. As well it can be used as a screening test to detect cases that are at risk of premature delivery.

  16. Cytokines and clustered cardiovascular risk factors in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo; Müller, Klaus; Eiberg, Stig

    2010-01-01

    pronounced in fat and unfit children based on the association with CRP levels. The association between fitness and fatness variables, insulin resistance, and clustered risk could be caused by other mechanisms related to these exposures. The role of IL-6 remains unclear.......The aim was to evaluate the possible role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), low fitness, and fatness in the early development of clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and insulin resistance. Subjects for this cross......-sectional study were obtained from 18 schools near Copenhagen, Denmark. Two hundred ten 9-year-old children were selected for cytokine analysis from 434 third-grade children with complete CVD risk profiles. The subgroup was selected according to the CVD risk factor profile (upper and lower quartile of a composite...

  17. The association between C-reactive protein levels and the risk for chronic kidney disease hospitalizations in adults of a remote Indigenous Australian community - A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Luke W; Hoy, Wendy E; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2017-09-01

    Indigenous Australians are significantly burdened by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with diabetes and cardiovascular incidence in previous studies. Elevated CRP has been associated with albuminuria and reduced eGFR in cross-sectional studies. This study investigated the long-term predictive association between CRP measured at a baseline exam and the incidence of a CKD-related hospitalization. Health screening examinations were conducted in individuals of a remote indigenous Australian community between 1992 and 1998. The risk of subsequent CKD hospitalisations, documented through Northern Territory hospital records up to 2010, was estimated with Cox proportional hazard models in people aged over 18 years at the baseline screen and who had albumin-creatinine ratios (ACRs) less than 34g/mol. 546 participants were eligible for our study. Individuals in the highest CRP tertile at baseline had increased levels of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. They also had almost 4 times the risk of a CKD-related hospitalisation compared with participants in the lowest CRP tertile (HR=3.91, 95%CI 1.01-15.20, P=0.049) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. Participants with CRP concentrations greater than 3mg/L had almost 3 times the risk of CKD hospitalisations than those ≤3mg/L (HR=2.84, 95%CI 1.00-8.00, P=0.049). Furthermore, risk of CKD hospitalisations increased 34% per doubling of baseline CRP (HR=1.34, 95%CI 1.04-1.74, P=0.024). In individuals in this remote indigenous community without overt albuminuria at baseline the risk for incident CKD related hospitalisations was predicted by elevated C-reactive protein levels almost a decade earlier. Further research is needed to understand the roles that CRP and systemic inflammation play in CKD risk. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  18. Vitamin D and C-Reactive Protein: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte C Liefaard

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent and has been associated with many diseases. It has been suggested that vitamin D has effects on the immune system and inhibits inflammation. The aim of our study was to investigate whether vitamin D has an inhibitory effect on systemic inflammation by assessing the association between serum levels of vitamin D and C-reactive protein. We studied the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and C-reactive protein through linear regression in 9,649 participants of the Rotterdam Study, an observational, prospective population-based cohort study. We used genetic variants related to vitamin D and CRP to compute a genetic risk score and perform bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis. In linear regression adjusted for age, sex, cohort and other confounders, natural log-transformed CRP decreased with 0.06 (95% CI: -0.08, -0.03 unit per standard deviation increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Bi-directional Mendelian randomization analyses showed no association between the vitamin D genetic risk score and lnCRP (Beta per SD = -0.018; p = 0.082 or the CRP genetic risk score and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (Beta per SD = 0.001; p = 0.998. In conclusion, higher levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein. In this study we did not find evidence for this to be the result of a causal relationship.

  19. C-Reactive Protein Levels in the Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Bonny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation in the Brugada syndrome (BrS and its clinical implication have been little studied. Aims. To assess the level of inflammation in BrS patients. Methods. All studied BrS patients underwent blood samples drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP levels at admission, prior to any invasive intervention. Patients with a previous ICD placement were controlled to exclude those with a recent (<14 days shock. We divided subjects into symptomatic (syncope or aborted sudden death and asymptomatic groups. In a multivariable analysis, we adjusted for significant variables (age, CRP ≥ 2 mg/L. Results. Fifty-four subjects were studied (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 49 (91% male. Twenty (37% were symptomatic. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean CRP level was 1,4 ± 0,9 mg/L in asymptomatic and 2,4 ± 1,4 mg/L in symptomatic groups (P = .003. In the multivariate model, CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L remained an independent marker for being symptomatic (P = .018; 95% CI: 1.3 to 19.3. Conclusion. Inflammation seems to be more active in symptomatic BrS. C-reactive protein concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L might be associated with the previous symptoms in BrS. The value of inflammation as a risk factor of arrhythmic events in BrS needs to be studied.

  20. [Relationship between periodontitis and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Heng-biao; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Na; Jin, Dan; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Chun-mei

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between periodontitis and the traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD), as well as the role in the mechanisms responsible for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the relationship of peridontitis and CHD. A periodontal examination was conducted on a total of 356 subjects, and community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN) was obtained from each subject. Periodontal status was categorized into TN periodontal, hsCRP concentration and routinely CHD serological indexes. In the groups of TN periodontal pockets were found in the Group hsCRP > or = 3.0 mg x L(-1) (P periodontal disease.

  1. Circulating C-Reactive Protein and Breast Cancer Risk-Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Doris S M; Bandera, Elisa V; Greenwood, Darren C; Norat, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic literature review to explore the association between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP), a low-grade inflammation biomarker, and breast cancer risk. Relevant prospective studies in women were identified in PubMed and Web of Science until February 2015. Random-effects dose-response meta-analysis was conducted, overall and in postmenopausal women. Twelve out of 15 studies identified were included in the meta-analysis on any breast cancers (3,522 cases; 69,610 women) and nine on postmenopausal breast cancer (2,516 cases; 36,847 women). For each doubling of CRP concentration, a 7% [95% confidence interval (CI), 2%-12%] and 6% (95% CI, 1%-11%) increased risk was observed (I(2) = 47% and 32%; Pheterogeneity = 0.04 and 0.17), respectively. The association was linear over most of the range of CRP concentrations. Positive associations remained in the studies that examined the exclusion of early years of follow-up. Associations were attenuated in studies adjusted for lifestyle factors, which partly explained the significant heterogeneity between studies in the overall analysis. On average, the associations in studies adjusted or not adjusted for body mass index were similar. Low-grade inflammation may have a role in breast cancer development. Additional prospective studies are needed to better understand confounding and effect modification from lifestyle factors. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Serum C-reactive protein and C-reactive gene (-717C>T polymorphism are not associated with periodontitis in Indonesian male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Winoto Suhartono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal pathogens and influenced by multiple risk factors such as genetics, smoking habit, age and systemic diseases. The inflammatory cascade is characterized by the release of C-reactive protein (CRP. Periodontitis has been reported to have plausible links to increased level of CRP, which in turn has been associated to elevated risk of  cardiovascular disease (CVD. Purpose: The purpose of this study was t o investigate the relationship amongst the severity of periodontitis, CRP level in blood and CRP (-717 C>T gene polymorphism in male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. Method: The severity of periodontitis was assessed for 97 consenting male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. The CRP level of the subjects was determined by using immuno-turbidimetric assay performed in PARAHITA Diagnostic Center Laboratory ISO 9001: 2000 Cert No. 15225/2. The rate of CRP (-717C>T gene polymorphism was determined by using PCR-RFLP in Oral Biology Laboratory, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia. Result: The results suggest that the CRP protein level is not significantly associated with the tested CRP gene polymorphism (p>0.05. Also, while the severity of periodontitis increased significantly with subject age, the CRP level in blood serum was not significantly related to the severity of  periodontitis. The genotypes of the tested polymorphism did not show significant association with the severity of periodontitis either in smokers or in the combined population including smokers and non-smokers. The results naturally do not exclude such associations, but suggest that to discern the differences the sample size must be considerably increased. Conclusion: The CRP (-717C>T gene polymorphism and CRP level in blood serum were not found to be associated with the severity of periodontitis in male smokers or in the combined population of smokers and non-smokers.

  3. PET CT Identifies Reactivation Risk in Cynomolgus Macaques with Latent M. tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philana Ling Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection presents across a spectrum in humans, from latent infection to active tuberculosis. Among those with latent tuberculosis, it is now recognized that there is also a spectrum of infection and this likely contributes to the variable risk of reactivation tuberculosis. Here, functional imaging with 18F-fluorodeoxygluose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET CT of cynomolgus macaques with latent M. tuberculosis infection was used to characterize the features of reactivation after tumor necrosis factor (TNF neutralization and determine which imaging characteristics before TNF neutralization distinguish reactivation risk. PET CT was performed on latently infected macaques (n = 26 before and during the course of TNF neutralization and a separate set of latently infected controls (n = 25. Reactivation occurred in 50% of the latently infected animals receiving TNF neutralizing antibody defined as development of at least one new granuloma in adjacent or distant locations including extrapulmonary sites. Increased lung inflammation measured by PET and the presence of extrapulmonary involvement before TNF neutralization predicted reactivation with 92% sensitivity and specificity. To define the biologic features associated with risk of reactivation, we used these PET CT parameters to identify latently infected animals at high risk for reactivation. High risk animals had higher cumulative lung bacterial burden and higher maximum lesional bacterial burdens, and more T cells producing IL-2, IL-10 and IL-17 in lung granulomas as compared to low risk macaques. In total, these data support that risk of reactivation is associated with lung inflammation and higher bacterial burden in macaques with latent Mtb infection.

  4. Impact of high-intensity concurrent training on cardiovascular risk factors in persons with multiple sclerosis - pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keytsman, Charly; Hansen, Dominique; Wens, Inez; O Eijnde, Bert

    2017-10-27

    High-intensity concurrent training positively affects cardiovascular risk factors. Because this was never investigated in multiple sclerosis, the present pilot study explored the impact of this training on cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Before and after 12 weeks of high-intense concurrent training (interval and strength training, 5 sessions per 2 weeks, n = 16) body composition, resting blood pressure and heart rate, 2-h oral glucose tolerance (insulin sensitivity, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood glucose and insulin concentrations), blood lipids (high- and low-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels) and C-reactive protein were analyzed. Twelve weeks of high-intense concurrent training significantly improved resting heart rate (-6%), 2-h blood glucose concentrations (-13%) and insulin sensitivity (-24%). Blood pressure, body composition, blood lipids and C-reactive protein did not seem to be affected. Under the conditions of this pilot study, 12 weeks of concurrent high-intense interval and strength training improved resting heart rate, 2-h glucose and insulin sensitivity in multiple sclerosis but did not affect blood C-reactive protein levels, blood pressure, body composition and blood lipid profiles. Further, larger and controlled research investigating the effects of high-intense concurrent training on cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis is warranted. Implications for rehabilitation High-intensity concurrent training improves cardiovascular fitness. This pilot study explores the impact of this training on cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis. Despite the lack of a control group, high-intense concurrent training does not seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors in multiple sclerosis.

  5. Serum lipids modify periodontal infection - C-reactive protein association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Anniina; Saxlin, Tuomas; Suominen, Anna-Liisa; Ylöstalo, Pekka; Leiviskä, Jaana; Tervonen, Tellervo; Knuuttila, Matti

    2012-09-01

    To investigate whether low-grade inflammation-related factors such as serum low-density (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) modify the association between periodontal infection and C-reactive protein. This study was based on a subpopulation of the Health 2000 Survey, which consisted of dentate, non-diabetic, non-rheumatic subjects who were 30-49 years old (n = 2710). The extent of periodontal infection was measured by means of the number of teeth with periodontal pocket ≥4 mm and teeth with periodontal pocket ≥6 mm and systemic inflammation using high sensitive C-reactive protein. The extent of periodontal infection was associated with elevated levels of C-reactive protein among those subjects whose HDL-C value was below the median value of 1.3 mmol/l or LDL-C above the median value of 3.4 mmol/l. Among those with HDL-C ≥ 1.3 mmol/l or LDL-C ≤ 3.4 mmol/l, the association between periodontal infection and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein was practically non-existent. This study suggests that the relation of periodontal infection to the systemic inflammatory condition is more complicated than previously presumed. The findings of this study suggest that the possible systemic effect of periodontal infection is dependent on serum lipid composition. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Undertaking blood transfusion, tattooing and sharing of needles were associated with hepatitis C infection (P=0.001). HBV was not associated with any of the risk factors (P>0.05). Conclusion: Our findings suggest a high prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C among pregnant women; blood transfusion, tattooing and ...

  7. Inflammatory Markers and Clustered Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Danish Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Anna; El-Naaman, Bianca; McMurray, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the associations between inflammatory markers and clustering of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, and to examine how inflammatory markers and CVD risk are related to fatness and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO(2peak)) in adolescents. Methods: Body mass and height, skinfolds...... and blood pressure of 413 adolescents (mean age 13.4 ± 0.3 years) were measured. Circulating fasting levels of glucose, insulin, lipids, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, soluble TNF receptor-1 (sTNFR1), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) were...

  8. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) as a simple and independent prognostic factor in extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ya-Jun; Li, Zhi-Ming; Xia, Yi; Huang, Jia-Jia; Huang, Hui-Qiang; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Lin, Tong-Yu; Li, Su; Cai, Xiu-Yu; Wu-Xiao, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of the inflammatory response, and it shows significant prognostic value for several types of solid tumors. The prognostic significance of CRP for lymphoma has not been fully examined. We evaluated the prognostic role of baseline serum CRP levels in patients with extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL). We retrospectively analyzed 185 patients with newly diagnosed ENKTL. The prognostic value of the serum CRP level was evaluated for the low-CRP group (CRP≤10 mg/L) versus the high-CRP group (CRP>10 mg/L). The prognostic value of the International Prognostic Index (IPI) and the Korean Prognostic Index (KPI) were evaluated and compared with the newly developed prognostic model. Patients in the high-CRP group tended to display increased adverse clinical characteristics, lower rates of complete remission (P60 years, hypoalbuminemia, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels were independent adverse predictors of OS. Based on these four independent predictors, we constructed a new prognostic model that identified 4 groups with varying OS: group 1, no adverse factors; group 2, 1 factor; group 3, 2 factors; and group 4, 3 or 4 factors (PKPI in distinguishing between the low- and intermediate-low-risk groups, the intermediate-low- and high-intermediate-risk groups, and the high-intermediate- and high-risk groups. Our results suggest that pretreatment serum CRP levels represent an independent predictor of clinical outcome for patients with ENKTL. The prognostic value of the new prognostic model is superior to both IPI and KPI.

  9. Elevated maternal C-reactive protein and increased risk of schizophrenia in a national birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Sarah; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Leiviskä, Jaana; Kellendonk, Christoph; McKeague, Ian W; Brown, Alan S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate an association between early gestational C-reactive protein, an established inflammatory biomarker, prospectively assayed in maternal sera, and schizophrenia in a large, national birth cohort with an extensive serum biobank. A nested case-control design from the Finnish Prenatal Study of Schizophrenia cohort was utilized. A total of 777 schizophrenia cases (schizophrenia, N=630; schizoaffective disorder, N=147) with maternal sera available for C-reactive protein testing were identified and matched to 777 control subjects in the analysis. Maternal C-reactive protein levels were assessed using a latex immunoassay from archived maternal serum specimens. Increasing maternal C-reactive protein levels, classified as a continuous variable, were significantly associated with schizophrenia in offspring (adjusted odds ratio=1.31, 95% confidence interval=1.10-1.56). This finding remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders, including maternal and parental history of psychiatric disorders, twin/singleton birth, urbanicity, province of birth, and maternal socioeconomic status. This finding provides the most robust evidence to date that maternal inflammation may play a significant role in schizophrenia, with possible implications for identifying preventive strategies and pathogenic mechanisms in schizophrenia and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Genetic polymorphism 609C>T in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 enhances the risk of proximal colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freriksen, J.J.; Salomon, J.; Roelofs, H.M.; Morsche, R.H. te; Stappen, J.W. van der; Dura, P.; Witteman, B.J.; Lacko, M.; Peters, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is responsible for the majority of deaths among all types of cancer. Lifestyle factors may not only be the main risk factor for GI cancer but reactive oxygen species (ROS) may also be involved. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) 609C>T (rs1800566) and 465C>T

  11. Concordance of haemoglobin A1c, blood pressure and C-reactive protein between children and their parents in Chinese households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, F; Howard, A G; Herring, A H; Adair, L S; Thompson, A L; Popkin, B M; Aiello, A E; Zhang, B; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2017-10-01

    China has the world's highest diabetes prevalence, which along with hypertension and inflammation continues to grow particularly among children. Little is known about the strength of the association of these cardiometabolic risk factors between parents and their children; thus, the potential of household-based strategies to reduce risk is unknown. The objective of the study is to examine the parent-child association for haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large, geographically diverse Chinese sample. In 940 parent-child pairs (children aged 7-17 years) who participated in the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey, we measured each individual's HbA1c and CRP using fasting blood and BP. We used sex-specific random-effects linear regression to examine the parent-child association for these risk factors, accounting for within-family clustering. Child's HbA1c was positively associated with parental HbA1c. Beta coefficients ranged from 0.06 (95% CI 0.03-0.12) for father-daughter to 0.43 (95% CI 0.28-0.58) for mother-son pairs. We also detected a positive mother-daughter association for BP and positive father-child associations for CRP. The statistically significant parent-child association for HbA1c, BP and CRP in Chinese families suggests that household-based interventions could be useful for confronting the high rates of diabetes, hypertension and inflammation in China. © 2016 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  12. Cardiometabolic risk factors as apolipoprotein B, triglyceride/HDL-cholesterol ratio and C-reactive protein, in adolescents with and without obesity: cross-sectional study in middle class suburban children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Carla; Graffigna, Mabel; Soutelo, Jimena; Honfi, Margarita; Ledesma, Laura; Miksztowicz, Verónica; Pazos, Mónica; Migliano, Marta; Schreier, Laura Ester; Berg, Gabriela Alicia

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of obesity (OB), overweight (OW), and metabolic syndrome (MS) has increased worldwide. That imposes a substantial risk for type 2 diabetes and premature cardiovascular disease. However, to date no unified criteria exist to asses risk or outcomes in children and adolescents. To establish the presence of OB/OW and MS and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in adolescents. Male (n = 514) and female (n = 429) adolescents from high school were studied (11-14 yr). Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure were determined in all subjects. Glucose, lipoprotein profile, apolipoprotein B (apoB), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were measured. Triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (TG/HDL-cholesterol) ratio was calculated. The frequency of OB/OW and MS were 22.2 and 3.7%, respectively. In comparison to healthy adolescents, TG/HDL-cholesterol ratio was increased in OB/OW (2.9 ± 2.5 vs. 1.6 ± 1.0) and MS groups (4.0 ± 2.5 vs. 1.6 ± 0.9), p < 0.001. OB/OW adolescents presented higher values of hs-CRP in comparison to non-obese, median (range): 1.9 (0.1-9.4) vs. 1.4 (0.1-9.9), mg/L, p < 0.001. ApoB (mean ± SD) was 71 ± 21 mg/dL in MS group and 59 ± 17 mg/dL in those without MS (p < 0.001). TG/HDL-cholesterol ratio positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.18, p < 0.001), WC (r = 0.24, p < 0.001), and apoB (r = 0.24, p < 0.001); hs-CRP correlated with WC (r = 0.14, p < 0.001) and BMI (r = 0.17, p < 0.001). Even when the frequency of OB, OW, and MS in adolescents was low, those subjects presented an atherogenic lipoprotein. These findings emphasize the importance to evaluate cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents to assess strategies to prevent future disease. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Prevalence of risk factors for hepatitis C and associated factors: a population-based study in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitko, David Timm; Bastos, Gisele Alsina Nader; Pinto, Maria Eugênia Bresolin

    2013-04-01

    The hepatitis C is a severe public health problem worldwide because its consequences. Studies which aim at determining the prevalence of risk factors are really important to understand the problem. To estimate the prevalence and factors associated with some risk factors for the disease in a community, called Restinga, located in the city of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. This paper is based on a population-based cross-sectional study, with systematic sampling and proportional to the size of census tracts in which 3,391 adults answered a standardized questionnaire. The prevalence of blood transfusion among the people who were interviewed was 14.98%, 60.83% of those had it before 1993. A total of 16.16% of the people had a tattoo, 7.23% wore a piercing, 1.09% said they had already injected illicit drugs and 12.39% reported previous hospitalization. Prevalence ratios showed that tattoos were more common among young people, piercings among women and illicit drugs among men. To summarize, the recognition of risk factors for hepatitis C enables proper screening of possible carriers of the hepatitis C virus, thus enabling a reduction in virus shedding. However, being only possible if health services are prepared to deal with hepatitis C virus, through education and public awareness.

  14. Risk avoidance in sympatric large carnivores: reactive or predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuis, Femke; Cozzi, Gabriele; Valeix, Marion; McNutt, John W; Macdonald, David W

    2013-09-01

    1. Risks of predation or interference competition are major factors shaping the distribution of species. An animal's response to risk can either be reactive, to an immediate risk, or predictive, based on preceding risk or past experiences. The manner in which animals respond to risk is key in understanding avoidance, and hence coexistence, between interacting species. 2. We investigated whether cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), known to be affected by predation and competition by lions (Panthera leo) and spotted hyaenas (Crocuta crocuta), respond reactively or predictively to the risks posed by these larger carnivores. 3. We used simultaneous spatial data from Global Positioning System (GPS) radiocollars deployed on all known social groups of cheetahs, lions and spotted hyaenas within a 2700 km(2) study area on the periphery of the Okavango Delta in northern Botswana. The response to risk of encountering lions and spotted hyaenas was explored on three levels: short-term or immediate risk, calculated as the distance to the nearest (contemporaneous) lion or spotted hyaena, long-term risk, calculated as the likelihood of encountering lions and spotted hyaenas based on their cumulative distributions over a 6-month period and habitat-associated risk, quantified by the habitat used by each of the three species. 4. We showed that space and habitat use by cheetahs was similar to that of lions and, to a lesser extent, spotted hyaenas. However, cheetahs avoided immediate risks by positioning themselves further from lions and spotted hyaenas than predicted by a random distribution. 5. Our results suggest that cheetah spatial distribution is a hierarchical process, first driven by resource acquisition and thereafter fine-tuned by predator avoidance; thus suggesting a reactive, rather than a predictive, response to risk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013 British Ecological Society.

  15. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz Jr.; Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes de; Quadros, Alexandre Schaan de; Portal, Vera Lúcia, E-mail: veraportal.pesquisa@gmail.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde: Cardiologia - Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent implantation, it was an independent predictor

  16. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in critically ill patients after abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sapin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The development of sepsis after abdominal surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to inflammation, it may be difficult to diagnose infection when it occurs, but measurement of C-reactive protein could facilitate this diagnosis. In the present study, we evaluated the predictive value and time course of C-reactive protein in relation to outcome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU after abdominal surgery. METHODS: We included patients admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery over a period of two years. The patients were divided into two groups according to their outcome: favorable (F; left the ICU alive, without modification of the antibiotic regimen and unfavorable (D; death in the ICU, surgical revision with or without modification of the antibiotic regimen or just modification of the regimen. We then compared the highest C-reactive protein level on the first day of admission between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 308 patients were included: 86 patients had an unfavorable outcome (group D and 222 had a favorable outcome (group F. The groups were similar in terms of leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and platelet count. C-reactive protein was significantly higher at admission in group D and was the best predictor of an unfavorable outcome, with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 72% for a threshold of 41 mg/L. No changes in C-reactive protein, as assessed based on the delta C-reactive protein, especially at days 4 and 5, were associated with a poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: A C-reactive protein cut-off of 41 mg/L during the first day of ICU admission after abdominal surgery was a predictor of an adverse outcome. However, no changes in the C-reactive protein concentration, especially by day 4 or 5, could identify patients at risk of death.

  17. Fatty acids linked to cardiovascular mortality are associated with risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven O. E. Ebbesson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although saturated fatty acids (FAs have been linked to cardiovascular mortality, it is not clear whether this outcome is attributable solely to their effects on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C or whether other risk factors are also associated with FAs. The Western Alaskan Native population, with its rapidly changing lifestyles, shift in diet from unsaturated to saturated fatty acids and dramatic increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD, presents an opportunity to elucidate any associations between specific FAs and known CVD risk factors. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that the specific FAs previously identified as related to CVD mortality are also associated with individual CVD risk factors. Methods: In this community-based, cross-sectional study, relative proportions of FAs in plasma and red blood cell membranes were compared with CVD risk factors in a sample of 758 men and women aged ≥35 years. Linear regression analyses were used to analyze relations between specific FAs and CVD risk factors (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, body mass index, fasting glucose and fasting insulin, 2-hour glucose and 2-hour insulin. Results: The specific saturated FAs previously identified as related to CVD mortality, the palmitic and myristic acids, were adversely associated with most CVD risk factors, whereas unsaturated linoleic acid (18:2n-6 and the marine n-3 FAs were not associated or were beneficially associated with CVD risk factors. Conclusions: The results suggest that CVD risk factors are more extensively affected by individual FAs than hitherto recognized, and that risk for CVD, MI and stroke can be reduced by reducing the intake of palmitate, myristic acid and simple carbohydrates and improved by greater intake of linoleic acid and marine n-3 FAs.

  18. Fibrinogen, homocyst(e)ine, and C-reactive protein concentrations relative to sex and socioeconomic status in British young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Non-Eleri; Cooper, Stephen-Mark; Williams, Simon R P; Baker, Julien S; Davies, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses the prevalence of recently identified coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in young people of differing socioeconomic status (SES). From November 2001 through March 2002, 100 boys and 108 girls, of age 12.9 +/- 0.3 years, selected from differing SES were assessed for CHD risk factors. Measurements included fibrinogen (Fg), homocyst(e)ine (Hcy), and C-reactive protein (CRP). Fibrinogen was significantly greater among boys from a higher SES compared with those from a low SES (P < or = 0.05). Differences according to sex (P < or = 0.05) were identified for Fg and CRP. The data indicate the prevalence of recently identified CHD risk factors in this cohort of British schoolchildren. For the purpose of this article, the phrase "young people" embraces both children and adolescents. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  19. Effect of water pipe tobacco smoking on plasma high sensitivity C reactive protein level and endothelial function compared to cigarette smoking

    OpenAIRE

    Osama Ali Diab; Elzahraa Mohamed Abdelrahim; Mohamed Esmail

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoking is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease, however, little is known regarding water pipe (WP) smoking. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and flow mediated dilatation (FMD) are well recognized methods to assess cardiovascular risks. Objectives: To study the effect of WP smoking on hs-CRP level and endothelial function compared to cigarette smoking. Methods: The study included 77 male subjects (30 WP smokers, 30 cigarette smokers, and ...

  20. PREVALENCE OF RISK FACTORS FOR HEPATITIS C AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS: a population-based study in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Timm KVITKO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The hepatitis C is a severe public health problem worldwide because its consequences. Studies which aim at determining the prevalence of risk factors are really important to understand the problem. Objective To estimate the prevalence and factors associated with some risk factors for the disease in a community, called Restinga, located in the city of Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Method This paper is based on a population-based cross-sectional study, with systematic sampling and proportional to the size of census tracts in which 3,391 adults answered a standardized questionnaire. Results The prevalence of blood transfusion among the people who were interviewed was 14.98%, 60.83% of those had it before 1993. A total of 16.16% of the people had a tattoo, 7.23% wore a piercing, 1.09% said they had already injected illicit drugs and 12.39% reported previous hospitalization. Prevalence ratios showed that tattoos were more common among young people, piercings among women and illicit drugs among men. Conclusions To summarize, the recognition of risk factors for hepatitis C enables proper screening of possible carriers of the hepatitis C virus, thus enabling a reduction in virus shedding. However, being only possible if health services are prepared to deal with hepatitis C virus, through education and public awareness.

  1. Seroprevalence of hepatitis C and associated risk factors among an urban population in Haiti

    OpenAIRE

    Hepburn, Matthew J; Lawitz, Eric J

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The seroprevalence of hepatitis C varies substantially between countries and geographic regions. A better understanding of the seroprevalence of this disease, and the risk factors associated with seropositive status, supply data for the development of screening programs and provide insight into the transmission of the disease. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis C and associated risk factors in an urban population in Haiti. Me...

  2. C-Reactive Protein Predicts Progression of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A 5-Year Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have indicated that high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP is a risk factor for the peripheral arterial disease (PAD in diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the possible predictive significance of hs-CRP for the development and progression of PAD in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D.

  3. Impaired blood rheology is associated with endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hideki; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Nara, Makoto; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Murakami, Masami

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between blood rheology and endothelial function in patients with coronary risk factors, brachial arterial flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), an index of endothelial function and blood passage time (BPT), an index of blood rheology, and fasting blood cell count, glucose metabolism, and plasma fibrinogen, lipid, C-reactive protein, and whole blood viscosity levels were measured in 95 patients with coronary risk factors and 37 healthy controls. Brachial arterial FMD after reactive hyperemia was assessed by ultrasonography. BPT was assessed using the microchannel method. In healthy controls, BPT significantly correlated with FMD (r = - 0.325, p index (BMI; r = 0.530, p measurement of blood rheology using the microchannel method may be useful in evaluating brachial arterial endothelial function as a marker of atherosclerosis in these patients.

  4. Comparison of risk factors for hepatitis b and c in patients visiting a gastroenterology clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazi, L.; Abbas, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out and compare the risk factors for hepatitis Band C infections in patients visiting a gastroenterology clinic. Design: A case-control study. Place and Duration of Study: The Liver Stomach Clinic, Karachi, from July 2004 to September 2004. Patients and Methods: Patients of hepatitis Band C visiting the clinic were interviewed and data were noted on a prescribed form. Patients with dyspeptic symptoms who were negative for both hepatitis Band C were taken as controls. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS package. Results: Total numbers of patients interviewed were 148; 63 with hepatitis C, 41 with hepatitis B and 44 in the control group. These patients hailed from various parts of Pakistan with diverse ethnicity. Comparing hepatitis C with the control group, important risk factors identified were lower level of education, the occupational exposure to the blood and syringes, history of blood transfusions, taking therapeutic injections and intravenous drips, and habit of getting shaved by barbers. Patients of hepatitis B were younger as compared to the control group. Their knowledge about spread of infection was poor. These patients had not received hepatitis B vaccine during childhood. Less number of risk factors could be identified in this group, Shaving from the barber's shop was also found to be a risk factor just like in hepatitis C. Conclusion: There is a need to educate general population about the possible risk factors associated with the spread of hepatitis C and B. Proper screening of blood products and universal precautions against the spread of infections are recommended. Treatment by in drips and getting shaved by barbers should be discouraged. Vaccination against hepatitis B is recommended. (author)

  5. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Nuñez-Atahualpa, Lourdes; Figueroa-Sánchez, Mauricio; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Martín-Márquez, Beatriz Teresita; Martínez-García, Erika Aurora; Macias-Reyes, Héctor; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Navarro-Hernandez, Rosa Elena; Nuñez-Atahualpa, María Alejandra; Andrade-Garduño, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC) were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP), and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P < 0.001). Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P < 0.01), and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) (P = 0.02). The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r = 0.513, P = 0.001), CRP (r = 0.799, P < 0.001), TNFα (r = 0.642, P = 0.001), and IL-6 (r = 0.751, P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P < 0.001) and anti-CCP levels (P = 0.03). Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events. PMID:25821796

  6. Serum Levels of Anticyclic Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and C-Reactive Protein Are Associated with Increased Carotid Intima-Media Thickness: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Cohort of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Vázquez-Del Mercado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main cause of death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA is cardiovascular events. We evaluated the relationship of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibody levels with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in RA patients. Methods. Forty-five anti-CCP positive and 37 anti-CCP negative RA patients, and 62 healthy controls (HC were studied. All groups were assessed for atherogenic index of plasma (AIP and cIMT. Anti-CCP, C-reactive protein (CRP, and levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. The anti-CCP positive RA patients showed increased cIMT compared to HC and anti-CCP negative (P<0.001. Anti-CCP positive versus anti-CCP negative RA patients, had increased AIP, TNFα and IL-6 (P<0.01, and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c (P=0.02. The cIMT correlated with levels of anti-CCP (r=0.513, P=0.001, CRP (r=0.799, P<0.001, TNFα (r=0.642, P=0.001, and IL-6 (r=0.751, P<0.001. In multiple regression analysis, cIMT was associated with CRP (P<0.001 and anti-CCP levels (P=0.03. Conclusions. Levels of anti-CCP and CRP are associated with increased cIMT and cardiovascular risk supporting a clinical role of the measurement of cIMT in RA in predicting and preventing cardiovascular events.

  7. Utility of the combination of serum highly-sensitive C-reactive protein level at discharge and a risk index in predicting readmission for acute exacerbation of COPD,

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    Chun Chang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Frequent readmissions for acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD are an independent risk factor for increased mortality and use of health-care resources. Disease severity and C-reactive protein (CRP level are validated predictors of long-term prognosis in such patients. This study investigated the utility of combining serum CRP level with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD exacerbation risk classification for predicting readmission for AECOPD. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study of consecutive patients hospitalized for AECOPD at Peking University Third Hospital, in Beijing, China. We assessed patient age; gender; smoking status and history (pack-years; lung function; AECOPD frequency during the last year; quality of life; GOLD risk category (A-D; D indicating the greatest risk; and serum level of high-sensitivity CRP at discharge (hsCRP-D. RESULTS: The final sample comprised 135 patients. Of those, 71 (52.6% were readmitted at least once during the 12-month follow-up period. The median (interquartile time to readmission was 78 days (42-178 days. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D were independent predictors of readmission (hazard ratio = 3.486; 95% CI: 1.968-6.175; p < 0.001 and hazard ratio = 2.201; 95% CI: 1.342-3.610; p = 0.002, respectively. The ordering of the factor combinations by cumulative readmission risk, from highest to lowest, was as follows: hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D ≥ 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD category D; hsCRP-D < 3 mg/L and GOLD categories A-C. CONCLUSIONS: Serum hsCRP-D and GOLD classification are independent predictors of readmission for AECOPD, and their predictive value increases when they are used in combination.

  8. Does high C-reactive protein concentration increase atherosclerosis? The Whitehall II Study.

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    Mika Kivimäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation, is associated with risk of coronary events and sub-clinical measures of atherosclerosis. Evidence in support of this link being causal would include an association robust to adjustments for confounders (multivariable standard regression analysis and the association of CRP gene polymorphisms with atherosclerosis (Mendelian randomization analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped 3 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs [+1444T>C (rs1130864; +2303G>A (rs1205 and +4899T>G (rs 3093077] in the CRP gene and assessed CRP and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, a structural marker of atherosclerosis, in 4941 men and women aged 50-74 (mean 61 years (the Whitehall II Study. The 4 major haplotypes from the SNPs were consistently associated with CRP level, but not with other risk factors that might confound the association between CRP and CIMT. CRP, assessed both at mean age 49 and at mean age 61, was associated both with CIMT in age and sex adjusted standard regression analyses and with potential confounding factors. However, the association of CRP with CIMT attenuated to the null with adjustment for confounding factors in both prospective and cross-sectional analyses. When examined using genetic variants as the instrument for serum CRP, there was no inferred association between CRP and CIMT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Both multivariable standard regression analysis and Mendelian randomization analysis suggest that the association of CRP with carotid atheroma indexed by CIMT may not be causal.

  9. Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Severely Obese Adolescents: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Simmons, Mark; Jenkins, Todd M; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Brandt, Mary L; Harmon, Carroll M; Courcoulas, Anita; Chen, Michael; Horlick, Mary; Daniels, Stephen R; Urbina, Elaine M

    2015-05-01

    Severe obesity is increasingly common in the adolescent population but, as of yet, very little information exists regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks in this group. To assess the baseline prevalence and predictors of CVD risks among severely obese adolescents undergoing weight-loss surgery. A prospective cohort study was conducted from February 28, 2007, to December 30, 2011, at the following 5 adolescent weight-loss surgery centers in the United States: Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio; Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio; Texas Children's Hospital in Houston; University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Children's Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham. Consecutive patients aged 19 years or younger were offered enrollment in a long-term outcome study; the final analysis cohort consisted of 242 participants. This report examined the preoperative prevalence of CVD risk factors (ie, fasting hyperinsulinemia, elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, impaired fasting glucose levels, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes mellitus) and associations between risk factors and body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Preoperative data were collected within 30 days preceding bariatric surgery. The mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years and median body mass index was 50.5. Cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence was fasting hyperinsulinemia (74%), elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (75%), dyslipidemia (50%), elevated blood pressure (49%), impaired fasting glucose levels (26%), and diabetes mellitus (14%). The risk of impaired fasting glucose levels, elevated blood pressure, and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels increased by 15%, 10%, and 6%, respectively, per 5-unit increase in body mass index (P adolescent boys compared with adolescent girls. White individuals

  10. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B 12 , folic acid and homocysteine. Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn's disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease.

  11. Risk Factors of Treatment Failure in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Mook Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSome diabetic feet heal without complication, but others undergo amputation due to progressive wounds. This study investigates the risk factors for amputation of diabetic feet.MethodsA total of 55 patients who visited our institution from 2008 to 2012 were included in the study. The patients with abnormal fasting blood sugar levels, lower leg vascularity, and poor nutrition were excluded from the study group, and the wound states were unified. The patients were categorized into a treatment success group (n=47 and a treatment failure group (n=8, and their hemoglobin A1C (HgA1C, C-reactive protein (CRP, white blood cell count (WBC, and serum creatinine levels were analyzed.ResultsThe initial CRP, WBC, and serum creatinine levels in the treatment failure group were significantly higher than that of the treatment success group, and the initial HgA1C level was significantly higher in the treatment success group. The CRP and WBC levels of both groups changed significantly as time passed, but their serum creatinine levels did not.ConclusionsThe initial CRP, WBC, and serum creatinine levels were considered to be risk factors for amputation. Among them, the serum creatinine level was found to be the most important predictive risk factor. Because serum creatinine represents the renal function, thorough care is needed for the feet of diabetic patients with renal impairment.

  12. Cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors in lumbar radicular pain or clinically defined sciatica: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Jaro; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Solovieva, Svetlana; Varonen, Helena; Kalso, Eija; Ukkola, Olavi; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2007-01-01

    Lumbar radicular pain is a fairly common health problem, yet its risk factors are far from clear. There are no published systematic reviews on associations between cardiovascular or lifestyle risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess associations between these risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. We conducted a systematic search of the Medline database for all original articles on lumbar radicular pain or sciatica published until August 2006. Twenty-two papers from 19 studies were included in the review. Overweight or obesity was associated with sciatica in most of the case-control and cohort studies. Some studies showed an increased risk of lumbar radicular pain in smokers with a long smoking history or in those with high levels of physical activity. A few case-control studies showed an association between serum C-reactive protein and sciatica. No consistent associations were found for serum lipids levels or high blood pressure. In summary, the associations of overweight, long smoking history, high physical activity and a high serum C-reactive protein level with lumbar radicular pain or sciatica were substantiated by the present review. However, more prospective studies are needed in order to further clarify these associations and the mechanisms of action. PMID:17525856

  13. The effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on macrophage migration inhibitory factor, C-reactive protein and fetuin-a levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kebapcilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori eradication on blood levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, macrophage migration inhibitory factor and fetuin-A in patients with dyspepsia who are concurrently infected with H. pylori. METHODS: H.pylori infection was diagnosed based on the 14C urea breath test (UBT and histology. Lansoprazole 30 mg twice daily, amoxicillin 1 g twice daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily were given to all infected patients for 14 days; 14C UBT was then re-measured. In 30 subjects, migration inhibitory factor, fetuin-A and hs-CRP levels were examined before and after the eradication of H. pylori infection and compared to levels in 30 healthy subjects who tested negative for H. pylori infection. RESULTS: Age and sex distribution were comparable between patients and controls. Migration inhibitory factor and hs-CRP levels were higher, and fetuin-A levels were lower, in H. pylori-infected patients (p0.05. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that H. pylori eradication reduces the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as migration inhibitory factor and hs-CRP and also results in a significant increase in anti-inflammatory markers such as fetuin-A.

  14. THE PREVALENCE OF ELEVATED LEVELS OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH TRADITIONAL RISK FACTORS AND MORBIDITY AMONG RESIDENTS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION (ACCORDING TO THE ESSE-RF STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Evstifeeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP level with socio-demographic, behavioral and traditional risk factors in different regions of the Russian Federation (RF.Material and methods. Data of the multicenter epidemiological study of cardiovascular disease in different regions of the Russian Federation (ESSE-RF were used. Representative sample of the unorganized male and female population aged 25-64 from 6 regions of the Russian Federation was drown. 3407 men and 6354 women (n=9761 were included into the study. Standard questionnaire was applied in all subjects. Gender, age, level of education, place of residence and region of residence, traditional risk factors and diseases were analyzed. HsCRP level (level ≥3.0 mg/l was defined as elevated one was evaluated to detect of indolent inflammation.Results. HsCRP levels in women was significantly higher compared to males (p<0.005. The average prevalence of elevated hsCRP in the regions was 24.2%, for men - 21.4%, and for women - 25.7% (p<0.005. Significant age-related dynamics of hsCRP (p<0.0001 was found. The average level of hsCRP was significantly lower (p<0.0001 in a cohort of persons with higher education against these with lower level of education. Level of hsCRP as well as prevalence of elevated hsCRP level were higher in villagers than this in the urban population (p<0.05. Prevalence of elevated hsCRP in patients with traditional risk factors after adjustment for sex, age, and region of residence showed that the elevated hsCRP was mostly associated with metabolic factors and diseases that were characterized by systemic inflammation.Conclusion. Elevated level of hsCRP (≥3.0 mg/l was significantly associated with female gender, with an older, less educated, and smoking population of Russians. After the multivariate adjustment there remained significant associations (p<0.0001 of elevated hsCRP level with obesity, including abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia

  15. THE PREVALENCE OF ELEVATED LEVELS OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH TRADITIONAL RISK FACTORS AND MORBIDITY AMONG RESIDENTS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION (ACCORDING TO THE ESSE-RF STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Evstifeeva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP level with socio-demographic, behavioral and traditional risk factors in different regions of the Russian Federation (RF.Material and methods. Data of the multicenter epidemiological study of cardiovascular disease in different regions of the Russian Federation (ESSE-RF were used. Representative sample of the unorganized male and female population aged 25-64 from 6 regions of the Russian Federation was drown. 3407 men and 6354 women (n=9761 were included into the study. Standard questionnaire was applied in all subjects. Gender, age, level of education, place of residence and region of residence, traditional risk factors and diseases were analyzed. HsCRP level (level ≥3.0 mg/l was defined as elevated one was evaluated to detect of indolent inflammation.Results. HsCRP levels in women was significantly higher compared to males (p<0.005. The average prevalence of elevated hsCRP in the regions was 24.2%, for men - 21.4%, and for women - 25.7% (p<0.005. Significant age-related dynamics of hsCRP (p<0.0001 was found. The average level of hsCRP was significantly lower (p<0.0001 in a cohort of persons with higher education against these with lower level of education. Level of hsCRP as well as prevalence of elevated hsCRP level were higher in villagers than this in the urban population (p<0.05. Prevalence of elevated hsCRP in patients with traditional risk factors after adjustment for sex, age, and region of residence showed that the elevated hsCRP was mostly associated with metabolic factors and diseases that were characterized by systemic inflammation.Conclusion. Elevated level of hsCRP (≥3.0 mg/l was significantly associated with female gender, with an older, less educated, and smoking population of Russians. After the multivariate adjustment there remained significant associations (p<0.0001 of elevated hsCRP level with obesity, including abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia

  16. C-reactive protein as a prognostic indicator for rebleeding in patients with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Hee; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Soon-Wook; Kang, Seung Hun; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, Bo-In; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2015-05-01

    In patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, rebleeding after an initial treatment is observed in 10-20% and is associated with mortality. To investigate whether the initial serum C-reactive protein level could predict the risk of rebleeding in patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. This was a retrospective study using prospectively collected data for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Initial clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and C-reactive protein levels were compared between those with and without 30-day rebleeding. A total of 453 patients were included (mean age, 62 years; male, 70.9%). The incidence of 30-day rebleeding was 15.9%. The mean serum C-reactive protein level was significantly higher in these patients than in those without rebleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding, indicating a possible role as a useful screening indicator for predicting the risk of rebleeding. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Elevated C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminemia measured before resection of colorectal liver metastases predict postoperative survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Teruya, Masanori; Kishiki, Tomokazu; Endo, Daisuke; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Miki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Morita, Koji

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have investigated whether the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score measured before resection of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM), can predict postoperative survival. Sixty-three consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for CRLM were investigated. GPS was calculated on the basis of admission data as follows: patients with both an elevated C-reactive protein (>10 mg/l) and hypoalbuminemia (l) were allocated a GPS score of 2. Patients in whom only one of these biochemical abnormalities was present were allocated a GPS score of 1, and patients with a normal C-reactive protein and albumin were allocated a score of 0. Significant factors concerning survival were the number of liver metastases (p = 0.0044), carcinoembryonic antigen level (p = 0.0191), GPS (p = 0.0029), grade of liver metastasis (p = 0.0033), and the number of lymph node metastases around the primary cancer (p = 0.0087). Multivariate analysis showed the two independent prognostic variables: liver metastases > or =3 (relative risk 2.83) and GPS1/2 (relative risk 3.07). GPS measured before operation and the number of liver metastases may be used as novel predictors of postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent curative resection for CRLM. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. C-reactive (CRP) protein in transfusion dependent thalassaemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, R.; Mughal, Z.U.N.

    2009-01-01

    In thalassaemic patients iron overload, secondary to blood transfusion, results toxic effects by producing reactive radicals. Iron overload can be studied using serum ferritin level which has a direct correlation with the body's iron status. While oxidative damage can be studied using biomarker of inflammation like hsC-reactive proteins. Blood samples of 55 thalassaemic patients (39 males, 16 females) were collected from Fatmid Foundation (Hyderabad). The samples were analyzed for CBC, serum ferritin level and hsC-reactive proteins. High mean serum ferritin levels was found in all the patients regardless of the frequency of blood transfusion (4774.2135+-3143.3040 mu g/L), indicating the iron overload. High mean hsC-reactive protein was found (2.5151+-1.3712) with a positive correlation with ferritin (r= 0.8371198, p= 0.0000) and platelets (r= 0.43293443, p=0.000962175). C-reactive proteins serve as biomarker of various inflammatory conditions, progression of cardiovascular diseases and as indicator of morbidity and mortality. High C-reactive proteins in these patients indicate ongoing iron overload toxicity related damage in these patients. The estimation of hsC-reactive proteins and other biomarkers of inflammation and oxidation may help in better management of these patients. (author)

  19. Physical activity, C-reactive protein levels and the risk of future coronary artery disease in apparently healthy men and women: the EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Day, Nicholas E.; Luben, Robert; Bingham, Sheila A.; Peters, Ron J. G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity is inversely associated with the risk of future coronary artery disease. Whether this relationship is in part mediated by lower levels of systemic inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations, is unknown. METHODS: We performed a nested case-control

  20. Apolipoprotein C-III Levels and Incident Coronary Artery Disease Risk: The EPIC-Norfolk Prospective Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Capelleveen, Julian C; Bernelot Moens, Sophie J; Yang, Xiaohong; Kastelein, John J P; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Stroes, Erik S G; Witztum, Joseph L; Hovingh, G Kees; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2017-06-01

    Apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) is a key regulator of triglyceride metabolism. Elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and apoC-III levels are causally linked to coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The mechanism(s) through which apoC-III increases CAD risk remains largely unknown. The aim was to confirm the association between apoC-III plasma levels and CAD risk and to explore which lipoprotein subfractions contribute to this relationship between apoC-III and CAD risk. Plasma apoC-III levels were measured in baseline samples from a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study. The study comprised 2711 apparently healthy study participants, of whom 832 subsequently developed CAD. We studied the association of baseline apoC-III levels with incident CAD risk, lipoprotein subfractions measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and inflammatory biomarkers. ApoC-III levels were significantly associated with CAD risk (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.48 for highest compared with lowest quintile), retaining significance after adjustment for traditional CAD risk factors (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.94). ApoC-III levels were positively correlated with triglyceride levels, ( r =0.39), particle numbers of very-low-density lipoprotein ( r =0.25), intermediate-density lipoprotein ( r =0.23), small dense low-density lipoprotein ( r =0.26), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ( r =0.15), whereas an inverse correlation was observed with large low-density lipoprotein particle number ( r =-0.11), P C-reactive protein. ApoC-III levels are significantly associated with incident CAD risk. Elevated levels of remnant lipoproteins, small dense low-density lipoprotein, and low-grade inflammation may explain this association. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Identification of epidemiological risk factors for hepatitis C in Punjab, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghias, M.; Pervaiz, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the major health issues in Punjab, Pakistan. About 3% of the world population have been infected by hepatitis C virus. The objective of this study was to find out significantly associated factors with Hepatitis C in the region. Demographic, socio-economic and clinical factors were taken in consideration to determine the predictive strength of these associated factors by the logistic regression model approach. This was a hospital based case-control study of 400 patients; out of which 119 were controlled patients (HCV negative) while 281 were cases (HCV positive). Patients admitted in gastroenterology wards of Jinnah, Shaikh Zayed, and Mayo hospitals in Lahore city were interviewed to gather risk factors information. Data was collected in six months starting from April 2006 to September 2006. results from multiple linear logistic regression model for overall data showed that age (OR=1.035, p=0.001), history of blood transfusion (OR=9.204, p=0.004), history of hospitalization (OR=2.979, p=0.043), Tattooing (OR=27.484, p=0.013), family history of hepatitis (OR=4.069, p=0.000), surgical operation (OR=4.290, p=0.030) were found to have significant and positively association with Hepatitis C. Hence our estimated logit model can be used to predict the chance of hepatitis C under the presence or absence of certain significant factors. (author)

  2. The contribution of a 9p21.3 variant, a KIF6 variant, and C-reactive protein to predicting risk of myocardial infarction in a prospective study

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    Tracy Russell P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic risk factors might improve prediction of coronary events. Several variants at chromosome 9p21.3 have been widely reported to be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD in prospective and case-control studies. A variant of KIF6 (719Arg has also been reported to be associated with increased risk of CHD in large prospective studies, but not in case-control studies. We asked whether the addition of genetic information (the 9p21.3 or KIF6 variants or a well-established non-genetic risk factor (C-reactive protein [CRP] can improve risk prediction by the Framingham Risk Score (FRS in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS--a prospective observational study of risk factors for cardiovascular disease among > 5,000 participants aged 65 or older. Methods Improvement of risk prediction was assessed by change in the area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC and by net reclassification improvement (NRI. Results Among white participants the FRS was improved by addition of KIF6 719Arg carrier status among men as assessed by the AUC (from 0.581 to 0.596, P = 0.03 but not by NRI (NRI = 0.027, P = 0.32. Adding both CRP and 719Arg carrier status to the FRS improved risk prediction by the AUC (0.608, P = 0.02 and NRI (0.093, P = 0.008 in men, but not women (P ≥ 0.24. Conclusions While none of these risk markers individually or in combination improved risk prediction among women, a combination of KIF6 719Arg carrier status and CRP levels modestly improved risk prediction among white men; although this improvement is not significant after multiple-testing correction. These observations should be investigated in other prospective studies.

  3. Suppression of interleukin-6-induced C-reactive protein expression by FXR agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Songwen; Liu Qiangyuan; Wang Juan; Harnish, Douglas C.

    2009-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a human acute-phase protein, is a risk factor for future cardiovascular events and exerts direct pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, plays an essential role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report that two synthetic FXR agonists, WAY-362450 and GW4064, suppressed interleukin-6-induced CRP expression in human Hep3B hepatoma cells. Knockdown of FXR by short interfering RNA attenuated the inhibitory effect of the FXR agonists and also increased the ability of interleukin-6 to induce CRP production. Furthermore, treatment of wild type C57BL/6 mice with the FXR agonist, WAY-362450, attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced serum amyloid P component and serum amyloid A3 mRNA levels in the liver, whereas no effect was observed in FXR knockout mice. These data provide new evidence for direct anti-inflammatory properties of FXR.

  4. Viral hepatitis and HIV-associated tuberculosis: Risk factors and TB treatment outcomes in Thailand

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    Likanonsakul Sirirat

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The occurrence of tuberculosis (TB, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, and viral hepatitis infections in the same patient poses unique clinical and public health challenges, because medications to treat TB and HIV are hepatotoxic. We conducted an observational study to evaluate risk factors for HBsAg and/or anti-HCV reactivity and to assess differences in adverse events and TB treatment outcomes among HIV-infected TB patients. Methods Patients were evaluated at the beginning, during, and at the end of TB treatment. Blood samples were tested for aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, total bilirubin (BR, complete blood count, and CD4+ T lymphocyte cell count. TB treatment outcomes were assessed at the end of TB treatment according to international guidelines. Results Of 769 enrolled patients, 752 (98% had serologic testing performed for viral hepatitis: 70 (9% were reactive for HBsAg, 237 (31% for anti-HCV, and 472 (63% non-reactive for both markers. At the beginning of TB treatment, 18 (26% patients with HBsAg reactivity had elevated liver function tests compared with 69 (15% patients non-reactive to any viral marker (p = 0.02. At the end of TB treatment, 493 (64% were successfully treated. Factors independently associated with HBsAg reactivity included being a man who had sex with men (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–4.3 and having low TB knowledge (AOR, 1.8; CI, 1.0–3.0. Factors most strongly associated with anti-HCV reactivity were having injection drug use history (AOR, 12.8; CI, 7.0–23.2 and living in Bangkok (AOR, 15.8; CI, 9.4–26.5. The rate of clinical hepatitis and death during TB treatment was similar in patients HBsAg reactive, anti-HCV reactive, both HBsAg and anti-HCV reactive, and non-reactive to any viral marker. Conclusion Among HIV-infected TB patients living in Thailand, markers of viral hepatitis infection, particularly hepatitis C virus

  5. C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The levels often increase slightly with age, female gender and in African Americans. Increased serum CRP is related to traditional cardiovascular risk factors and may reflect the role of these risk factors in causing vascular inflammation. ...

  6. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  7. Association between Depression and C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, and a depression-related elevation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has been proposed as a possible mechanism. The objective of this paper is to examine association between depression and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP. Methods. Subjects consisted of 508 healthy adults (mean age 48.5 years; 49% women, 88% white residing in central Massachusetts. Data were collected at baseline and at quarterly intervals over a one-year period per individual. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to assess the association for the entire sample and by gender. Results. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 5.8 (standard deviation (SD 5.4; median 4.3, and average serum hs-CRP was 1.8 mg/L (SD 1.7; median 1.2. Results from the multivariable linear mixed models show that individuals with higher depression scores have higher levels of hs-CRP. Analyses by gender show persistence of an independent association among women, but not among men. Body mass index (BMI = weight(kg/height(m2 appears to be a partial mediator of this relationship. Conclusion. Depression score was correlated to hs-CRP levels in women. Further studies are required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations and their implications.

  8. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which...... may lead to a biased estimation of risk. Using four cohorts from CHANCES which had repeated measures in participants 50 years and older, multivariate time-dependent Cox proportional hazards was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) to examine the relationship between......, they may participate in distinct/independent pathways. Accounting for independent changes in risk factors over time may be crucial for unveiling their effects on mortality and disease morbidity....

  9. C-Reactive Protein and Coronary Heart Disease: All Said—Is Not It?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Strang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP and coronary heart disease (CHD have been the subject of intensive investigations over the last decades. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between moderately elevated CRP levels and incident CHD whereas genetic studies have shown that polymorphisms associated with elevated CRP levels do not increase the risk of ischemic vascular disease, suggesting that CRP might be a bystander rather than a causal factor in the progress of atherosclerosis. Beside all those epidemiological and genetic studies, the experimental investigations also try to reveal the role of CRP in the progress of atherosclerosis. This review will highlight the complex results of genomic, epidemiological, and experimental studies on CRP and will show why further studies investigating the relationship between CRP and atherosclerosis might be needed.

  10. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  11. Biological variation and reference intervals for circulating osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, H P; Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Monitoring inflammatory diseases and osteoclastogenesis with osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (total sRANKL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has recently attracted increased interest. The purpose...

  12. Blood pressure reactivity to psychological stress and coronary calcification in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Karen A; Zhu, Sha; Tucker, Diane C; Whooley, Mary A

    2006-03-01

    A longstanding hypothesis is that individuals who exhibit large increases in blood pressure during psychological stress are at risk for atherosclerosis. We tested whether blood pressure changes during psychological stress predict subsequent coronary calcification (CaC) in young healthy adults. We evaluated 2816 healthy black and white women, 20 to 35 years of age, from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study, who were not using medication for hypertension or diabetes in 1987-1988. Participants completed video game and star tracing tasks while their blood pressure was recorded. Thirteen years later (2000-2001), they completed computed tomography measures of CaC. Overall 9.3% (261 of 2816) had CaC present at follow-up. Each 10 mm Hg change in systolic blood pressure during the video game was associated with a 24% increased odds of having CaC at follow-up (unadjusted odds ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.46; P=0.008). This association persisted after adjustment for age, race, sex, education, smoking, alcohol, family history of myocardial infarction, smoking, daily alcohol consumption, body mass index, and resting or baseline blood pressure (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.58; P=0.006). Blood pressure changes during the star tracing task were not associated with subsequent CaC. Blood pressure changes during a video game predicted the presence of CaC 13 years later. To our knowledge, this is the first study that reports blood pressure reactivity to a stressor being related to calcification in the coronary arteries. Blood pressure reactivity may provide useful prognostic information about future risk beyond standard risk factors.

  13. Seroprevalence of hepatitis C and associated risk factors among an urban population in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hepburn Matthew J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The seroprevalence of hepatitis C varies substantially between countries and geographic regions. A better understanding of the seroprevalence of this disease, and the risk factors associated with seropositive status, supply data for the development of screening programs and provide insight into the transmission of the disease. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis C and associated risk factors in an urban population in Haiti. Methods A prospective survey for hepatitis C antibodies was conducted among an urban outpatient population in Cap-Haïtien, Haiti, with a sample size of 500 subjects. An anonymous 12 question survey, with inquiries related to demographic characteristics and risk factors for HCV acquisition, was concomitantly administered with testing. These demographic and behavioral risk factors were correlated with HCV antibody status using univariate and multivariate tests. Results The prevalence of positive HCV antibody was 22/500 (4.4%. Subjects that were anti-HCV positive had an average of 7 ± 8.6 lifetime sexual partners, compared to average of 2.5 ± 3.5 lifetime sexual partners among HCV-negative subjects (p = 0.02. In a multiple logistic regression model, intravenous drug use (OR 3.7, 1.52–9.03 95% CI and number of sexual partners (OR 1.1, 1.04–1.20 95% CI were independently associated with a positive HCV antibody result. Conclusions A substantial number of subjects with HCV antibodies were detected in this population in Haiti. Further investigation into the correlation between the number of sexual partners and testing positive for hepatitis C antibodies is indicated.

  14. C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, clinical pulmonary infection score, and pneumonia severity scores in nursing home acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfyridis, Ilias; Georgiadis, Georgios; Vogazianos, Paris; Mitis, Georgios; Georgiou, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    Patients with nursing home acquired pneumonia (NHAP) present a distinct group of lower respiratory track infections with different risk factors, clinical presentation, and mortality rates. To evaluate the diagnostic value of clinical pulmonary infection score (CPIS), C-reactive protein, and procalcitonin and to compare the accuracy of pneumonia severity scores (confusion, urea nitrogen, breathing frequency, blood pressure, ≥ 65 y of age [CURB-65]; pneumonia severity index; NHAP index; systolic blood pressure, multilobar involvement, albumin, breathing frequency, tachycardia, confusion, oxygen, arterial pH [SMART-COP]; and systolic blood pressure, oxygen, age > 65 y, breathing frequency [SOAR]) in predicting in-patient mortality from NHAP. Nursing home residents admitted to the hospital with acute respiratory illness were enrolled in the study. Subjects were classified as having NHAP (Group A) or other pulmonary disorders (Group B). Clinical, imaging, and laboratory data were assessed to compute CPIS and severity scores. C-reactive protein and procalcitonin were measured by immunonephelometry and immunoassay, respectively. Fifty-eight subjects were diagnosed with NHAP (Group A) and 29 with other pulmonary disorders (Group B). The mean C-reactive protein ± SD was 16.38 ± 8.6 mg/dL in Group A and 5.2 ± 5.6 mg/dL in Group B (P 1.1 ng/mL was an independent predictor of in-patient mortality. Of the pneumonia severity scores, CURB-65 showed greater accuracy in predicting in-patient mortality (area under the curve of 0.68, 95% CI 0.53-0.84, P = .06). CPIS, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein are reliable for the diagnosis of NHAP. Procalcitonin and CURB-65 are accurate in predicting in-patient mortality in NHAP.

  15. Risk factors and genotypes of hepatitis C virus infection in libyan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alashek, Wa; Altagdi, M

    2008-12-01

    The prevalence and incidence of HCV infection varies geographically due to exposure to different risk factors. Identification of HCV genotype is important to defining the epidemiology of the disease. The objective of this study was to describe genotype distribution and its relation to risk factors among HCV infected patients attending virology clinic of the Department of Infectious Diseases at the Tripoli Medical Centre. The medical records of 891 Libyan chronic HCV infected patients registered and followed up from January 2003 to January 2007 were reviewed. Data gathered includes patient's age, gender, risk factors and family history of HCV infection. Statistical analysis was performed using t, x2 and contingency coefficient tests. The mean age was 40.22±13.09 years. Two thirds of patients were males. Normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) at diagnosis was found in 62% of the patients. HCV RNA<2 million copies at diagnosis was found among 54% of patients. HCV genotype 1 (G1) was the most frequent (30.9%), followed by G4 (29.2%). Genotype 2 affected 19.3% and G3 13.6%. No classification of HCV genotype was available for 2% of the patients. Many subtypes of HCV were detected with different frequencies (G1a and b, G2a, b, c and a/c, G3a and G4a and c/d). All genotypes of HCV were more common among males (P<0.001). Genotype 3 was the most frequent among male patients (88.6%). Regarding the risk factors, 33% of patients had a history of hospitalization and/or surgical procedures, and 22.7% had a history of blood transfusion. A past history of intravenous drug abuse (IVDA) was reported by 15% of the patients, and 15.9% reported a history of dental procedures. The relationship between the genotype of HCV and risk factors was statistically significant (P<0.001). No history of risky exposure was found among 10.8% of patients. Genotypes 1 and 4 were more predominant among HCV infected patients. Males were affected more than females and they presented themselves to the

  16. Reactivity to Daily Stressors in Adulthood: The Importance of Stressor Type in Characterizing Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hay, Elizabeth L.; Diehl, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    This study examined daily stressors in adults aged 18 to 89 years (M = 49.6 years) over 30 days. We examined the role of individual factors (i.e., age, self-concept differentiation, perceived control) in physical and psychological reactivity to interpersonal, network, home, and health stressors. Findings were consistent with the perspective that adults were less reactive to stress on days they felt in control and that younger adults and adults with high self-concept differentiation (SCD) were...

  17. C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and cardiovascular disease prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Pennells, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events.......There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events....

  18. Quantifying Cardiometabolic Risk Using Modifiable Non–Self-Reported Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Miguel; Li, Yi; Pencina, Michael J.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sensitive general cardiometabolic risk assessment tools of modifiable risk factors would be helpful and practical in a range of primary prevention interventions or for preventive health maintenance. Purpose To develop and validate a cumulative general cardiometabolic risk score that focuses on non–self-reported modifiable risk factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and BMI so as to be sensitive to small changes across a span of major modifiable risk factors, which may not individually cross clinical cut off points for risk categories. Methods We prospectively followed 2,359 cardiovascular disease (CVD)-free subjects from the Framingham offspring cohort over a 14–year follow-up. Baseline (fifth offspring examination cycle) included HbA1c and cholesterol measurements. Gender–specific Cox proportional hazards models were considered to evaluate the effects of non–self-reported modifiable risk factors (blood pressure, total cholesterol, high–density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, BMI, and HbA1c) on general CVD risk. We constructed 10–year general cardiometabolic risk score functions and evaluated its predictive performance in 2012–2013. Results HbA1c was significantly related to general CVD risk. The proposed cardiometabolic general CVD risk model showed good predictive performance as determined by cross-validated discrimination (male C-index=0.703, 95% CI=0.668, 0.734; female C-index=0.762, 95% CI=0.726, 0.801) and calibration (lack-of-fit χ2=9.05 [p=0.338] and 12.54 [p=0.128] for men and women, respectively). Conclusions This study presents a risk factor algorithm that provides a convenient and informative way to quantify cardiometabolic risk based on modifiable risk factors that can motivate an individual’s commitment to prevention and intervention. PMID:24951039

  19. Quantifying cardiometabolic risk using modifiable non-self-reported risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Miguel; Li, Yi; Pencina, Michael J; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Berkman, Lisa F; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2014-08-01

    Sensitive general cardiometabolic risk assessment tools of modifiable risk factors would be helpful and practical in a range of primary prevention interventions or for preventive health maintenance. To develop and validate a cumulative general cardiometabolic risk score that focuses on non-self-reported modifiable risk factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and BMI so as to be sensitive to small changes across a span of major modifiable risk factors, which may not individually cross clinical cut-off points for risk categories. We prospectively followed 2,359 cardiovascular disease (CVD)-free subjects from the Framingham offspring cohort over a 14-year follow-up. Baseline (fifth offspring examination cycle) included HbA1c and cholesterol measurements. Gender-specific Cox proportional hazards models were considered to evaluate the effects of non-self-reported modifiable risk factors (blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, BMI, and HbA1c) on general CVD risk. We constructed 10-year general cardiometabolic risk score functions and evaluated its predictive performance in 2012-2013. HbA1c was significantly related to general CVD risk. The proposed cardiometabolic general CVD risk model showed good predictive performance as determined by cross-validated discrimination (male C-index=0.703, 95% CI=0.668, 0.734; female C-index=0.762, 95% CI=0.726, 0.801) and calibration (lack-of-fit chi-square=9.05 [p=0.338] and 12.54 [p=0.128] for men and women, respectively). This study presents a risk factor algorithm that provides a convenient and informative way to quantify cardiometabolic risk on the basis of modifiable risk factors that can motivate an individual's commitment to prevention and intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Concentraciones de proteína C reactiva en adultos mexicanos: alta prevalencia de un factor de riesgo cardiovascular C-reactive protein concentrations in Mexican men and women: high prevalence of a cardiovascular risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Flores

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Examinar la distribución y variables relacionadas con las concentraciones de proteína C reactiva (CRP en adultos mexicanos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudió a 2 194 adultos que participaron en la ENSA 2000. La concentración de CRP en suero se midió por un método de alta sensibilidad. Se obtuvo información sobre características sociodemográficas, enfermedad crónica y hábitos. Se midieron glucosa en ayuno, presión arterial, peso, talla y circunferencia de cintura. RESULTADOS: Se estudió a 730 hombres y 1 464 mujeres no embarazadas. La edad promedio fue de 38.3±15.2 años. Los límites de CRP se hallaron entre 0.19 y 255 mg/l (mediana: 2.26; rango intercuartil (RI: 0.96, 5.83 mg/l. La concentración de CRP fue mayor en mujeres (mediana: 2.86; RI: 1.11, 6.68 mg/l en comparación con los hombres (mediana: 1.63; RI: 0.8, 3.87 mg/l; p3.0-10 mg/l. En el análisis multivariado de regresión probit, la edad, el IMC, la circunferencia de cintura, la diabetes mellitus, la microalbuminuria y el uso de anticonceptivos hormonales se vincularon de forma positiva con el riesgo de concentraciones de CRP >1 mg/l. El sexo masculino y el consumo moderado de alcohol se relacionaron de modo negativo con el riesgo de concentraciones de CRP >3 mg/l (p3.0-10 mg/l en adultos mexicanos, lo que indica una considerable proporción de individuos con alto riesgo cardiovascular, al margen de otros factores de riesgo.OBJECTIVE: To examine the distribution and correlates of C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations in Mexican adults. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data was analyzed from 2 194 Mexican adults who participated in the 2000 National Health Survey (ENSA-2000. CRP concentrations were measured with a high-sensitivity assay. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, chronic disease and habits was obtained. Fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, weight, height and waist circumference were measured. RESULTS: A total of 730 men and 1 464 non-pregnant women

  1. Borylnitrenes: electrophilic reactive intermediates with high reactivity towards C-H bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinger, Holger F; Filthaus, Matthias

    2010-12-21

    Borylnitrenes (catBN 3a and pinBN 3b; cat = catecholato, pin = pinacolato) are reactive intermediates that show high tendency towards insertion into the C-H bonds of unactivated hydrocarbons. The present article summarizes the matrix isolation investigations that were aimed at identifying, characterizing and investigating the chemical behaviour of 3a by spectroscopic means, and of the experiments in solution and in the gas phase that were performed with 3b. Comparison with the reactivity reported for difluorovinylidene 1a in solid argon indicates that 3a shows by and large similar reactivity, but only after photochemical excitation. The derivative 3b inserts into the C-H bonds of hydrocarbon solvents in high yields and thus allows the formation of primary amines, secondary amines, or amides from "unreactive" hydrocarbons. It can also be used for generation of methylamine or methylamide from methane in the gas phase at room temperature. Remaining challenges in the chemistry of borylnitrenes are briefly summarized.

  2. C-reactive Protein −717A>G and −286C>T>A Gene Polymorphism and Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Liu; Pei-Liang Geng; Fu-Qin Yan; Tong Chen; Wei Wang; Xu-Dong Tang; Jing-Chen Zheng; Wei-Ping Wu; Zhen-Fu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the formation and progression of ischemic stroke. Recently, more and more epidemiological studies have focused on the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) −717A > G and −286C > T > A genetic polymorphisms and ischemic stroke. However, the findings of these researches are not conclusive. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether these two polymorphisms are associated with the risk of ischemic stroke. Eligible studies...

  3. Peroxiredoxin isoforms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Eter, E. [Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cardiovascular Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Al-Masri, A.A. [Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Cardiovascular Research Group, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-03-03

    The production of oxygen free radicals in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to the development of complications, especially the cardiovascular-related ones. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are antioxidant enzymes that combat oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the levels of PRDX isoforms (1, 2, 4, and 6) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (28F/25M) and 25 healthy control subjects (7F/18M) were enrolled. We measured the plasma levels of each PRDX isoform and analyzed their correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. The plasma PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 levels were higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy control subjects. PRDX2 and -6 levels were negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c. In contrast, PRDX1 levels were positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels. PRDX4 levels were negatively correlated with triglycerides. In conclusion, PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 showed differential correlations with a variety of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These results should encourage further research into the crosstalk between PRDX isoforms and cardiovascular risk factors.

  4. Peroxiredoxin isoforms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Eter, E.; Al-Masri, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The production of oxygen free radicals in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to the development of complications, especially the cardiovascular-related ones. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are antioxidant enzymes that combat oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the levels of PRDX isoforms (1, 2, 4, and 6) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (28F/25M) and 25 healthy control subjects (7F/18M) were enrolled. We measured the plasma levels of each PRDX isoform and analyzed their correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. The plasma PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 levels were higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy control subjects. PRDX2 and -6 levels were negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c. In contrast, PRDX1 levels were positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels. PRDX4 levels were negatively correlated with triglycerides. In conclusion, PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 showed differential correlations with a variety of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These results should encourage further research into the crosstalk between PRDX isoforms and cardiovascular risk factors

  5. Plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid and C-reactive protein, and risk of future coronary artery disease, in apparently healthy men and women: the EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Meuwese, Marijn C; Day, Nicholas E; Luben, Robert; Welch, Ailsa; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2006-09-01

    High plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid, a marker of fruit and vegetable intake, are associated with low risk of coronary artery disease. Whether this relationship is explained by a reduction in systemic inflammation is unclear. We investigated the relationship between ascorbic acid plasma concentration and coronary artery disease risk, and in addition whether this relationship depended on classical risk factors and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. We used a prospective nested case-control design. The study consisted of 979 cases and 1794 controls (1767 men and 1006 women). Increasing ascorbic acid quartiles were associated with lower age, BMI, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and CRP concentration, but with higher HDL-cholesterol concentration. No associations existed between ascorbic acid concentration and total cholesterol concentration or LDL-cholesterol concentration. When data from men and women were pooled, the risk estimates decreased with increasing ascorbic acid quartiles such that people in the highest ascorbic acid quartile had an odds ratio for future coronary artery disease of 0.67 (95 % CI 0.52, 0.87) compared with those in the lowest quartile (P for linearity=0.001). This relationship was independent of sex, age, diabetes, smoking, BMI, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure and CRP level. These data suggest that the risk reduction associated with higher ascorbic acid plasma concentrations, a marker of fruit and vegetable intake, is independent of classical risk factors and also independent of CRP concentration.

  6. Vascular risk factors, cerebrovascular reactivity, and the default-mode brain network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Thaddeus J; Bryan, R Nick; Erus, Guray; Davatzikos, Christos; Jacobs, David R; D'Esposito, Mark; Lewis, Cora E; Launer, Lenore J

    2015-07-15

    Cumulating evidence from epidemiologic studies implicates cardiovascular health and cerebrovascular function in several brain diseases in late life. We examined vascular risk factors with respect to a cerebrovascular measure of brain functioning in subjects in mid-life, which could represent a marker of brain changes in later life. Breath-hold functional MRI (fMRI) was performed in 541 women and men (mean age 50.4 years) from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Brain MRI sub-study. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) was quantified as percentage change in blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in activated voxels, which was mapped to a common brain template and log-transformed. Mean CVR was calculated for anatomic regions underlying the default-mode network (DMN) - a network implicated in AD and other brain disorders - in addition to areas considered to be relatively spared in the disease (e.g. occipital lobe), which were utilized as reference regions. Mean CVR was significantly reduced in the posterior cingulate/precuneus (β=-0.063, 95% CI: -0.106, -0.020), anterior cingulate (β=-0.055, 95% CI: -0.101, -0.010), and medial frontal lobe (β=-0.050, 95% CI: -0.092, -0.008) relative to mean CVR in the occipital lobe, after adjustment for age, sex, race, education, and smoking status, in subjects with pre-hypertension/hypertension compared to normotensive subjects. By contrast, mean CVR was lower, but not significantly, in the inferior parietal lobe (β=-0.024, 95% CI: -0.062, 0.014) and the hippocampus (β=-0.006, 95% CI: -0.062, 0.050) relative to mean CVR in the occipital lobe. Similar results were observed in subjects with diabetes and dyslipidemia compared to those without these conditions, though the differences were non-significant. Reduced CVR may represent diminished vascular functionality for the DMN for individuals with prehypertension/hypertension in mid-life, and may serve as a preclinical marker for brain dysfunction in later

  7. Lifestyle and clinical factors associated with elevated C-reactive protein among newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Mor, Anil; Rungby, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine the prevalence of and modifiable factors associated with elevated C-reactive Protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, in men and women with newly diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) in a population-based setting. METHODS: CRP was measured in 1,037 patients (57...... was primarily elevated among patients with no regular physical activity (aRR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1-1.9)), previous cardiovascular disease (aRR1.5 (95% CI 1.2-1.9) and other comorbidity. For both genders, elevated CRP was 1.4-fold increased in those with weight gain >30 kg since age 20 years. Sensitivity analyses...

  8. Investigating the Causal Relationship of C-Reactive Protein with 32 Complex Somatic and Psychiatric Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prins, Bram P; Abbasi, Ali; Wong, Anson

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with immune, cardiometabolic, and psychiatric traits and diseases. Yet it is inconclusive whether these associations are causal. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses using two genetic risk scores (GRSs) as inst...

  9. Risk Factors for Hepatitis C Virus Infection among Blood Donors in Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaller, Nickolas; Nelson, Kenrad E.; Aladashvili, Malvina; Badridze, Nino; Rio, Carlos del; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz

    2004-01-01

    Background: Growing awareness about the importance of blood safety for controlling the transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has helped to decrease the spread of this virus in many settings. This study was conducted in order to evaluate potential risk factors for HCV infection among blood donors in Georgia. Methods: The study population consisted of 553 blood donors in three major Georgian cities; Tbilisi, the capital city and Batumi and Poti, naval port cities. Risk factors were examined using a behavior questionnaire. All blood samples were initially tested using 3rd generation anti-HCV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and confirmed using recombinant immunoblot assays and nucleic acid testing. Results: Forty-three blood donors, 7.8%, were confirmed HCV positive. Significant risk factors included: drug injection ever (OR: 42; 95% CI: 3.2-550.7); history of hepatitis (OR: 25.9; 95% CI: 4.6-145.5); history of a previous surgical procedure (OR: 148.4; 95% CI: 26.9-817.4); blood transfusion (OR: 25.9; 95% CI: 3.2-210.9). Conclusions: This study found a very high prevalence of HCV among blood donors in Georgia. The main risk factor for HCV infection in this population of blood donors was previous contact with contaminated blood or blood products. Reliable screening of donors and their blood is critical for controlling the further spread of HCV in Georgia

  10. The analysis of false prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (activator: silica): Interference of C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Li, Fanfan; Shu, Kuangyi; Chen, Tao; Wang, Xiaoou; Xie, Yaoqi; Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Zhaohua; Jin, Susu; Jiang, Minghua

    2018-05-13

    To investigate the effect of C-reactive protein on the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (different activators) in different detecting systems. The C-reactive protein and coagulation test of 112 patients with the infectious disease were determined by automation protein analyzer IMMAG 800 and automation coagulation analyzer STA-R Evolution, respectively. The pooled plasma APTT with different concentrations of C-reactive protein was measured by different detecting system: STA-R Evolution (activator: silica, kaolin), Sysmex CS-2000i (activator: ellagic acid), and ACL TOP 700 (activator: colloidal silica). In addition, the self-made platelet lysate (phospholipid) was added to correct the APTT prolonged by C-reactive protein (150 mg/L) on STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system. The good correlation between C-reactive protein and APTT was found on the STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system. The APTT on the STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system was prolonged by 24.6 second, along with increasing C-reactive protein concentration. And the APTT of plasma containing 150 mg/L C-reactive protein was shortened by 3.4-6.9 second when the plasma was mixed with self-made platelet lysate. However, the APTT was prolonged unobviously on other detecting systems including STA-R Evolution (activator: kaolin), Sysmex CS-2000i, and ACL TOP 700. C-reactive protein interferes with the detection of APTT, especially in STA-R Evolution (activator: silica) system. The increasing in C-reactive protein results in a false prolongation of the APTT (activator: silica), and it is most likely that C-reactive protein interferes the coagulable factor binding of phospholipid. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Diabetes mellitus: an important risk factor for reactivation of tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Solá

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus was identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis (TB infection, and relapse after therapy. The risk of acquiring TB is described as comparable to that of HIV population. The fact that diabetics are 3× times more prone to develop pulmonary TB than nondiabetics cannot be overlooked. With DM recognized as global epidemic, and TB affecting one-third of the world population, physicians must remain vigilant. We present a 45-year-old woman born in Dominican Republic (DR, with 10-year history of T2DM treated with metformin, arrived to our Urgency Room complaining of dry cough for the past 3months. Interview unveiled unintentional 15lbs weight loss, night sweats, occasional unquantified fever, and general malaise but denied bloody sputum. She traveled to DR 2years before, with no known ill exposure. Physical examination showed a thin body habitus, otherwise well appearing woman with stable vital signs, presenting solely right middle lung field ronchi. LDH, ESR, hsCRP and Hg A1C were elevated. Imaging revealed a right middle lobe cavitation. Sputum for AFB disclosed active pulmonary TB. Our case portrays that the consideration of TB as differential diagnosis in diabetics should be exercised with the same strength, as it is undertaken during the evaluation of HIV patients with lung cavitation. Inability to recognize TB will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace.

  12. Reduced high-molecular-weight adiponectin and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are synergistic risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a large-scale middle-aged to elderly population: the Shimanami Health Promoting Program Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabara, Yasuharu; Osawa, Haruhiko; Kawamoto, Ryuichi; Tachibana-Iimori, Rieko; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Nakura, Jun; Miki, Tetsuro; Makino, Hideich; Kohara, Katsuhiko

    2008-03-01

    In Western countries, one of the most important modifiable targets for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases is metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin is an adipose tissue-specific plasma protein that inversely associates with metabolic syndrome. Among several molecular isoforms, high-molecular-weight (HMW) complex is considered the active form. Increased serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration also associates with metabolic syndrome, and adiponectin could modulate plasma C-reactive protein levels. Here, through cross-sectional investigation, we investigated whether reduced HMW adiponectin and increased hsCRP levels in plasma are synergistically associated with metabolic syndrome. Measurement of HMW complex of adiponectin is one of the novelties of this study. We analyzed 1845 community-dwelling middle-aged to elderly subjects (62+/-13 yr). Plasma HMW adiponectin levels were measured by ELISA. Clinical parameters were obtained from the subjects' personal health records, evaluated at their annual medical check-up. Each component of metabolic syndrome, except for raised blood pressure, showed significantly lower plasma HMW adiponectin concentrations for both men and women (P<0.001). In contrast, plasma hsCRP levels were significantly higher in subjects with metabolic disorders (P<0.001). After adjusting for other confounding factors, HMW adiponectin [log normalized, odds ratio 0.084 (95% confidence interval 0.050-0.142), P<0.001] and hsCRP [3.009 (2.175-4.163), P<0.001] were identified as independent determinants of metabolic syndrome. In addition to the direct associations, we also observed a synergistic effect between these two molecules (F=11.8, P<0.001). Reduced HMW adiponectin and elevated hsCRP are synergistically associated with the accumulation of metabolic disorders. The combination of these markers would be useful for identifying at-risk populations.

  13. Genetically elevated C-reactive protein and ischemic vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risks of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. Methods: We studied 10,276 persons from a general population cohort, including 1786 in whom...... ischemic heart disease developed and 741 in whom ischemic cerebrovascular disease developed. We examined another 31,992 persons from a cross-sectional general population study, of whom 2521 had ischemic heart disease and 1483 had ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we compared 2238 patients...... with ischemic heart disease with 4474 control subjects and 612 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease with 1224 control subjects. We measured levels of high-sensitivity CRP and conducted genotyping for four CRP polymorphisms and two apolipoprotein E polymorphisms. Results: The risk of ischemic heart...

  14. The differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kamiya, Yumiko

    2010-11-02

    Abstract Background This article provides new insights into the impact of social engagement on CVD risk factors in older adults. We hypothesized that objective (social participation, social ties and marital status) and subjective (emotional support) aspects of social engagement are independently associated with objective measures of cardiovascular risk. Methods Data from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA) were analyzed. The effects of social participation, social ties, marital status, and emotional support on hypertension, obesity, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were estimated by logistic regression controlling for age, sex, education, physical function, depression, cardiovascular disease, other chronic diseases, physical activity, and smoking. Results Social participation is a consistent predictor of low risk for four risk factors, even after controlling for a wide range of covariates. Being married is associated with lower risk for hypertension. Social ties and emotional support are not significantly associated with any of the cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that participation in social activities has a stronger association with CV risk factors than marital status, social ties or emotional support. Different forms of social engagement may therefore have different implications for the biological risk factors involved.

  15. C-reactive protein alterations in bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargél, Aroldo A; Godin, Ophelia; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kupfer, David J; Leboyer, Marion

    2015-02-01

    There is growing evidence that bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with inflammation, including abnormal levels of acute-phase C-reactive protein (CRP). Our meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the size of the association between CRP levels and BD, accounting also for subgroup differences (mood phases and treatment). MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science and references of identified articles were searched up to June 2013 using the keywords (bipolar disorder) AND (C-reactive protein OR CRP). English language studies measuring blood levels of CRP in patients with BD and control subjects were selected, 136 abstracts were reviewed, 20 articles retrieved, and 11 studies included. Two independent reviewers extracted data. All studies were included in the primary analyses, and between-group differences for subanalyses were also reported. This meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models. Eleven studies comprising 1,618 subjects were eligible for inclusion. Overall, CRP levels were significantly elevated in patients with BD versus controls (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.55; P < .0001). CRP levels were significantly higher in manic (SMD = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.02; P < .001) and euthymic (SMD = 0.26; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.51; P = .04), but not in depressed (SMD = 0.28; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.73; P = .22) patients with BD compared to controls. CRP levels were unrelated to use of lithium or antipsychotic medication. This meta-analysis supports an association between increased CRP levels and BD. Given that an elevated level of CRP is a marker of low-grade inflammation and a risk factor for cardiovascular and malignant diseases, measurement of CRP level might be relevant to the clinical care of bipolar patients. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Hepatitis C: frequency and risk factors associated with sero-positivity among adults in Larkana city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, F.H.; Abro, H.A.; Abbasi, P.A.; Buriro, A.

    2009-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major public health problem. Infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to chronicity and there are about 170 million people infected with HCV. Up to 70% of chronically infected individuals develop active liver disease. The Objective of the study was to find out the frequency of Anti-HCV seropositivity and risk factors of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) transmission in people of Larkana city. The study was conducted at Larkana from April 2006 to April 2007. Camps were established in the main general practitioners' clinics. A questionnaire about knowledge of HCV and risk factors of its transmission was administered to subjects. Descriptive statistics were done by SPSS-10. Total 450 cases were enrolled into this study. They were divided into 3 age groups. Eighty-nine (19.8%) cases were in age group 40 years. There were 353 (78.4%) male and 97 (21.6%) female subjects, out of these 450 cases 30 (6.6%) were positive for Anti-HCV. A number of risk factors of HCV transmission were present in these cases. History of therapeutic injections was present in 72 cases and 35 cases used public barber services. History of therapeutic injections and use of barber services for shave were the most frequent risk factors in our study. (author)

  17. Moderate, but not vigorous, intensity exercise training reduces C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Michael V; Hathaway, Elizabeth D; Higgins, Simon; Forehand, Ronald L; Schmidt, Michael D; Evans, Ellen M

    2018-06-01

    Sprint interval cycle training is a contemporary popular mode of training but its relative efficacy, under conditions of matched energy expenditure, to reduce risk factors for cardiometabolic disease is incompletely characterised, especially in young women. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative efficacy of six weeks of moderate-intensity cycling (MOD-C) and vigorous sprint-interval cycling (VIG-SIC) on lipid profile, insulin (INS) and insulin resistance using the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in inactive, overweight/obese (OW/OB) young women. Participants (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 , waist circumference ≥88 cm) were randomly assigned to MOD-C (20-30 min at 60-70% of heart rate reserve(HRR)) or VIG-SIC (5-7 repeated bouts 30-second maximal effort sprints, followed by four minutes of active recovery) supervised training three days/week for six weeks, with each group matched on energy expenditure. Adiposity (%Fat) was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry. Forty-four participants (20.4 ± 1.6 years, 65.9% Caucasian, 29.8 ± 4.1 kg/m 2 ) were included in the analysis. The improvement in CRP observed in the MOD-C group was larger than the VIG-C group (p = .034). Overall, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels improved following training (p  .05). These results indicate MOD-C training may be more effective in reducing CRP than VIG-SIC.

  18. Evaluation of the C-reactive protein serum levels in periodontitis patients with or without atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakare, Kaustubh S; Deo, Vikas; Bhongade, Manohar L

    2010-01-01

    Several studies suggested an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD). C- reactive protein is elevated in periodontitis patients and has been found to be a predictor of increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Since, CRP is known to play a role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the serum levels of CRP in periodontitis patients with or without atherosclerosis. A total of 45 patients, 15 chronic periodontitis patients with atherosclerosis (Group A), 15 chronic periodontitis patients with no history of any systemic disease (Group B), and 15 clinically healthy individuals with no history of periodontal or systemic disease (Group C) within age range of 30 to 55 years were selected for the study. PI, PBI, PPD, CAL and radiographic marginal alveolar bone level were assessed in all the three groups. CRP levels were assessed with 'Turbi-latex' kit using turbidimetric analysis. The mean CAL recorded was 4.9mm in group A, 4.6mm in group B and 1.9 mm in group C. The mean radiographic marginal bone level was 45 to 50% in group A, 45 to 50% in group B and 90 to 95% in group C. Mean serum C-reactive protein level was significantly higher in group A (8.9 mg/l), as compared to group B (4.9 mg/l) as well as group C (0.9 mg/l). Within the limits of this study it was concluded that periodontitis may add to the inflammatory burden of the individual and may result in increased risk of atherosclerosis based on serum C-reactive protein concentrations.

  19. Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo B. Batacan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of light intensity physical activity (LIPA on cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors remain to be established. This review summarizes the effects of LIPA on CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in adults. A systematic search of four electronic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL examining LIPA and CVD risk factors (body composition, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile and CVD-related markers (maximal oxygen uptake, heart rate, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 published between 1970 and 2015 was performed on 15 March 2015. A total of 33 intervention studies examining the effect of LIPA on CVD risk factors and markers were included in this review. Results indicated that LIPA did not improve CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in healthy individuals. LIPA was found to improve systolic and diastolic blood pressure in physically inactive populations with a medical condition. Reviewed studies show little support for the role of LIPA to reduce CVD risk factors. Many of the included studies were of low to fair study quality and used low doses of LIPA. Further studies are needed to establish the value of LIPA in reducing CVD risk.

  20. [Periodontal treatment for cardiovascular risk factors: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Linkai; Li, Chunjie; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yukui; Zhao, Hongwei

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of periodontal treatment for the management of cardiovascular risk factors. Eligible studies in Cochrane Controlled Trials Register/CENTRAL, PubMed, EMBASE, and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) were searched until October 13, 2011. References of the included studies were hand searched. Two reviewers assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data of the included studies in duplicate. Meta-analysis was conducted with Revman 5.1. Six randomized controlled trials involving 682 participants were included. One case had low risk of bias, another one had moderate risk of bias, and the remaining four had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis showed that periodontal treatment has no significant effect on C-reactive protein, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides (P > 0.05). However, the treatment had a significant effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [MD = 0.05, 95% CI (0.00, 0.09), P = 0.04]. Periodontal treatment has good effects on controlling high-density lipoprotein cholesterol although more randomized controlled trials must be conducted to verify its effectiveness.

  1. Homocysteine and other cardiovascular risk factors in patients with lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, N; Samir, N; Megahed, H; Farid, E

    2014-11-01

    Chronic inflammation was found to play an important role in the development of cardiovascular risk factors. Homocysteine (Hcy) and fibrinogen have been identified as a major independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lichen planus is assumed to be closely related to dyslipidaemia. Several cytokines involved in lichen planus pathogenesis, could explain its association with dyslipidaemia. Also chronic inflammation with lichen planus has been suggested as a component of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to detect a panel of cardiovascular risk factors in patients of lichen planus. This study was done on 40 patients of lichen planus and 40 healthy controls. All patients and controls were subjected to clinical examination. Serum levels of homocysteine, fibrinogen and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique (ELISA). Metabolic syndrome parameters including anthropometric measures, lipid profiles, blood sugar and blood pressure were studied. Patients with lichen planus showed significant association with metabolic syndrome parameters than controls (P lichen planus patients than controls (P lichen planus were found to have higher makers of both metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in relation to controls most probably due to long standing inflammation. © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Vestbo, Jørgen; Zacho, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design.......It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design....

  3. C-reactive protein + 1059 G>C polymorphism in type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramandeep; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Sharma, Rubina; Bhanwer, A J S

    2013-12-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant involved in chronic and acute inflammation. CRP is associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, atherosclerosis, unstable angina, insulin resistance and diabetes. The present study evaluates the association of + 1059 G>C silent polymorphism in exon 2 of CRP gene in 581 cases [CAD (206), T2D (266), T2D with CAD (109)] and 235 controls in the population of Punjab (North-West India). The frequency of + 1059 G allele is highest in CAD (98.3%) followed by T2D (98.1%), T2D + CAD cases (97.7%) and controls (94.7%). G-allele is associated with increased risk of T2D [P = 0.003, OR = 2.93 (1.39-6.17)] and CAD [P = 0.004, OR = 3.25 (1.39-7.60)] in comparison to controls. Recessive model shows that GG genotype increases the risk of CAD by 4 fold (P = 0.003, OR = 4.19, 1.62-10.80), T2D by 3 fold (P = 0.008, OR = 3.23, 1.36-7.60) and T2D + CAD by 3.5 fold (P = 0.029, OR = 3.64, 1.14-11.66). Factor analyses show that BMI, WC, and WHR are core predictors for CAD and T2D, whereas CHO, TG and VLDL for T2D + CAD. The present study concludes that GG genotype of CRP + 1059 G>C polymorphism and clustering of obesity and dyslipidemia underlie the risk towards CAD, T2D and T2D + CAD in the North-West Indian population of Punjab.

  4. DNA-polymorphisms and plasma levels of vascular disease risk factors in Greenland Inuit--is there a relation with the low risk of cardiovascular disease in the Inuit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maat, M de; Bladbjerg, E-M; Johansen, L G

    1999-01-01

    Greenland Inuit are a population with a low risk of cardiovascular disease. Recently, we stated that frequencies of potentially high risk alleles of the apolipoproteins, fibrinogen, factor V, glycoprotein IIIa and factor VII (FVII) genes have different allele frequencies in the Inuit when compared...... and CVD risk in Caucasian populations, but for other measures this was not the case (allele frequencies of the PAI-1 polymorphism, and plasma levels of fibrinogen, FVII and t-PA). In conclusion there are clear differences in genetic background and plasma levels of risk factors in Greenland Inuit compared......, aged 30-34 gamma. In addition, we compared the plasma levels of these factors and those of C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-Dimer in Inuit and in Danes, comparable for age and gender. Frequencies (f) were assessed of the alleles that are known as the potential high risk alleles in Caucasians...

  5. Predictive value of c-reactive protein for thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, N.; Bashir, F.

    2014-01-01

    The serum levels of C-reactive protein on admission may predict the efficacy of reperfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Objectives: This study was conducted to know the predictive value of CRP for success of thrombolysis and to know the prognostic value of C-reactive protein in patients having acute myocardial infarction. Study Design: It was single center, open labeled cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of acute myocardial infarction diagnosed on clinical and ECG criteria, who received thrombolytic therapy with strepto- kinase, were included in the study. The diagnosis of acute rnyocardial infarction was made on clinical para meters and ECG criteria. The ECG changes were noted before starting thrombolysis. The baseline sample for C-reactive protein (CRP,) was taken before starting thrombolysis. The time duration between onset of symptoms and start of thrombolysis was also noted. The thrombolysis was done with streptokinase infusion, 1.5 million units diluted in 100ml normal saline, intravenously over one hour. The ECG was repeated after six hours of completion of thrombolysis and, changes were noted and compared with ECG changes before thrombolysis. Now second sample for C-reactive protein (CRP2) was taken after six hours of completion of thrombolysis. CRP was measured by a high sensitivity assay which can accurately measure basal levels of CRP throughout the currently accepted cardiovascular risk assessment range (0.20 - 10.0 mg/L). According to ECG findings after thrombolysis, all patients were divided into two groups. Group A was considered as successful group to thrombolysis, in whom ECG changes were settled. Group B was considered as unsuccessful group to thrombolysis, in whom ECG changes remained same as before thrombolysis. Both values of C-reactive protein, CRP, and CRP2 were compared in both groups group A and group B. Results: Plasma CRP values before and after thrombolysis had strong predictive value for

  6. [Latest Treatment of Viral Hepatitis--Overcoming Hepatitis C and Reactivation of Hepatitis B].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), discovered as causative viruses of post-transfusion hepatitis, become persistent infections, leading to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For HCV, recent IFN-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies have increased sustained virological response (SVR) rates and reduced adverse events. IFN-based therapies, still the standard of care in Asian countries, are influenced by IL28B genetic variants and the liver fibrosis stage, but the DAA combinations obscure the influence of these factors. These new therapies can eradicate HCV and prevent HCC development. On the other hand, it is difficult to eradicate HBV completely. Although HBV infection can be prevented by vaccination, reactivation of HBV following anti-cancer chemotherapy and immunosuppressive therapy is a well-known complication. HBV reactivation has been reported to be associated with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab-containing chemotherapy and TNF-α inhibitor-containing immunosuppressive therapy in HBV-resolved patients. Our prospective observational study revealed that monthly monitoring of HBV DNA was useful for preventing HBV reactivation-related hepatitis among B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients with resolved HBV infection following rituximab-steroid-chemo, suggesting that preemptive therapy guided by serial HBV DNA monitoring should be recommended. Recently, highly sensitive HBsAg detection by Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ may be useful for several clinical applications. The sensitivity of this assay (5 mIU/mL) was approximately 10-fold higher than Abbott ARCHITECT, but still lower than HBV-DNA assays. The convenient HBsAg-HQ may be useful for detecting occult HBV infection and HBV reactivation in relatively low-risk groups except for those receiving rituximab-steroid-chemo. [

  7. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Kolsum

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Umme Kolsum, Kay Roy, Cerys Starkey, Zoë Borrill, Nick Truman, Jørgen Vestbo, Dave SinghNorth West Lung Research Centre, University of Manchester, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust, Wythenshawe, Manchester, UKBackground: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of Interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP over one year and examined the relationships between these systemic markers in COPD.Methods: Fifty-eight stable COPD patients completed a baseline and one-year visit. Serum IL-6, plasma CRP, and plasma TNF-α were measured. Repeatability was expressed by intraclass correlation coefficient (Ri and the Bland–Altman method. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the systemic markers at both visits.Results: There was moderate repeatability with a very high degree of statistical significance (p ≤ 0.001 between the two visits for all the systemic biomarkers (IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α. CRP was significantly associated with IL-6 at both visits (r = 0.55, p = 0.0001, r = 0.51, p = 0.0002, respectively. There were no other significant associations between the systemic markers at either of the visits.Conclusions: Systemic inflammatory biomarkers IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α were moderately repeatable over a twelve month period in COPD patients. We have also shown that a robust and repeatable association between IL-6 and CRP exists.Keywords: interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, C-reactive protein, repeatability, COPD   

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism associates with recurrent coronary event risk in patients with high HDL and C-reactive protein levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Corsetti

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate whether fibrinolysis plays a role in establishing recurrent coronary event risk in a previously identified group of postinfarction patients. This group of patients was defined as having concurrently high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and C-reactive protein (CRP and was previously demonstrated to be at high-risk for recurrent coronary events. Potential risk associations of a genetic polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2 were probed as well as potential modulatory effects on such risk of a polymorphism of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP-1, a scavenger receptor known to be involved in fibrinolysis in the context of cellular internalization of plasminogen activator/plansminogen activator inhibitor complexes. To this end, Cox multivariable modeling was performed as a function of genetic polymorphisms of PAI-2 (SERPINB, rs6095 and LRP-1 (LRP1, rs1800156 as well as a set of clinical parameters, blood biomarkers, and genetic polymorphisms previously demonstrated to be significantly and independently associated with risk in the study population including cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, rs708272, p22phox (CYBA, rs4673, and thrombospondin-4 (THBS4, rs1866389. Risk association was demonstrated for the reference allele of the PAI-2 polymorphism (hazard ratio 0.41 per allele, 95% CI 0.20-0.84, p=0.014 along with continued significant risk associations for the p22phox and thrombospondin-4 polymorphisms. Additionally, further analysis revealed interaction of the LRP-1 and PAI-2 polymorphisms in generating differential risk that was illustrated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. We conclude from the study that fibrinolysis likely plays a role in establishing recurrent coronary risk in postinfarction patients with concurrently high levels of HDL-C and CRP as manifested by differential effects on risk by polymorphisms of several genes linked

  9. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Serratia marcescens bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Bean; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Ann, Hea Won; Choi, Heun; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 30 years, Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) has emerged as an important pathogen, and a common cause of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 98 patients who had one or more blood cultures positive for S. marcescens between January 2006 and December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Multiple risk factors were compared with association with 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality was 22.4% (22/98 episodes). In a univariate analysis, the onset of bacteremia during the intensive care unit stay (p=0.020), serum albumin level (p=0.011), serum C-reactive protein level (p=0.041), presence of indwelling urinary catheter (p=0.023), and Sequential Oran Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the onset of bacteremia (pmarcescens bacteremia.

  10. Periodontal disease is associated with higher levels of C-reactive protein in non-diabetic, non-smoking acute myocardial infarction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodovazenitis, George; Pitsavos, Christos; Papadimitriou, Lambros; Deliargyris, Efthymios N; Vrotsos, Ioannis; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Madianos, Phoebus N

    2011-12-01

    A link between periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular events has been proposed, but confounding by shared risk factors such as smoking and diabetes remains a concern. We examined the prevalence of PD and its contribution to C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients and in subjects without AMI and with angiographically nonobstructive coronary disease in the absence of these confounding risk factors. Periodontal status and admission CRP levels were evaluated in 87 non-diabetic and non-smoking subjects undergoing cardiac catheterization. The study group comprised of 47 patients with documented AMI, and 40 subjects without AMI and with angiographically nonobstructive coronary disease (ANCD group). Both the prevalence of PD and CRP levels were significantly higher in AMI patients compared with ANCD subjects (38.3% vs. 17.5%, p=0.03 and 44.3 vs. 8.5 mg/L, pperiodontitis may emerge as a novel target for reducing future risk in AMI survivors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors and metabolic syndrome in obese Kuwaiti adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boodai SA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shurooq A Boodai,1 Lynne M Cherry,2 Naveed A Sattar,2 John J Reilly3 1University of Glasgow School of Medicine, Yorkhill Hospitals, Glasgow, Scotland; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, British Heart Foundation Glasgow Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland; 3University of Strathclyde Physical Activity for Health Group, School of Psychological Sciences and Health, Glasgow, Scotland Background: Childhood and adolescent obesity is associated with insulin resistance, abnormal glucose metabolism, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, liver disease, and compromised vascular function. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factor abnormalities and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a sample of obese Kuwaiti adolescents, as prevalence data might be helpful in improving engagement with obesity treatment in future. Methods: Eighty obese Kuwaiti adolescents (40 males with a mean (standard deviation age of 12.3 years (1.1 years participated in the present study. All participants had a detailed clinical examination and anthropometry, blood pressure taken, and assessment of fasting levels of C-reactive protein, intracellular adhesion molecule, interleukin-6, fasting blood glucose, insulin, liver function tests (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma glutamyltransferase, lipid profile (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment, and adiponectin. MetS was assessed using two recognized criteria modified for use in younger individuals. Results: The cardiometabolic risk factors with highest prevalence of abnormal values included aspartate aminotransferase (88.7% of the sample and insulin resistance by homeostasis model assessment (67.5%, intracellular adhesion molecule (66.5%, fasting insulin (43.5%, C-reactive protein (42.5%, low

  12. Heated hatha yoga to target cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating in women at risk for obesity-related illnesses: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Lindsey B; Medina, Johnna L; Baird, Scarlett O; Rosenfield, David; Powers, Mark B; Smits, Jasper A J

    2016-06-01

    Cortisol reactivity to stress is associated with affective eating, an important behavioral risk factor for obesity and related metabolic diseases. Yoga practice is related to decreases in stress and cortisol levels, thus emerging as a potential targeted complementary intervention for affective eating. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a heated, hatha yoga intervention for reducing cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating. Females (N = 52; ages 25-46 years; 75% White) at risk for obesity and related illnesses were randomly assigned to 8 weeks of Bikram Yoga practice or to waitlist control. Cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stress induction were measured at Weeks 0 (pretreatment) and 9 (posttreatment). Self-reported binge eating frequency and coping motives for eating were assessed at Weeks 0, 3, 6, and 9. Among participants with elevated cortisol reactivity at pretreatment ("high reactors"), those randomized to the yoga condition evidenced greater pre- to posttreatment reductions in cortisol reactivity (p = .042, d = .85), but there were not significant condition differences for the "low reactors" (p = .178, d = .53). Yoga participants reported greater decreases in binge eating frequency (p = .040, d = .62) and eating to cope with negative affect (p = .038, d = .54). This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of heated hatha yoga for treating physiological stress reactivity and affective eating among women at risk for obesity-related illnesses. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Major Depression, C-Reactive Protein, and Incident Ischemic Heart Disease in Healthy Men and Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surtees, Paul G.; Wainwright, Nicholas W. J.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Luben, Robert N.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how C-reactive protein (CRP) and major depressive disorder (MDD) relate to each other and to incident ischemic heart disease (IHD). Studies have shown that both depression and raised CRP concentration predict IHD and that elevated CRP is linked with increased risk of

  14. Evaluation of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in the peripheral blood of patients with chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Dhruva Kumar; Lakshmi, Deepa; Krishnan, Rama; Emmadi, Pamela

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate systemic levels of inflammatory markers of cardiovascular diseases like C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in patients with chronic periodontitis, in comparison to periodontally healthy individuals. A total of 42 individuals, both males and females above the age of 30 years, were included in the study. Healthy controls (Group I, n = 14), chronic localized periodontitis (Group II, n = 14), and chronic generalized periodontitis (Group III, n = 14), all without any medical disorder, were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were taken and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were estimated in the serum samples by using the Particle-Enhanced Turbidimetric Immunoassay (PETIA) technique. Serum samples of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assayed by using the Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (IMMULITE) technique. When mean CRP levels were compared between the groups, group III showed statistical significance when compared to group I (P = 0.04). Group III had a higher median IL-6 level (6.35 pg/mL) than Group II (Periodontitis results in higher systemic levels of CRP and IL-6. These elevated inflammatory factors may increase inflammatory activity in atherosclerotic lesions and potentially increasing the risk for cardiovascular events.

  15. Elevated C-reactive protein in the diagnosis, prognosis, and cause of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize present evidence of an association between circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and cancer risk, and to evaluate whether elevated circulating CRP levels cause cancer. Additionally, the review provides background information on the acute......-phase response, chronic inflammation, the molecular biology, function and measurement of CRP, circulating levels of CRP in health and disease, the principle of Mendelian randomization, the association between circulating levels of CRP and cancer prognosis, and cancer biomarkers. In the Copenhagen General...... increased risk of death from breast cancer compared to patients with CRP levels...

  16. C-reactive protein and later preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Schlüssel, Michael M; Vaz, Juliana S

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia....

  17. Influence of glucoregulation quality on c-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α level in patients with diabetes type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Milena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Results of studies which have proved an increased inflammatory activity in diabetes type 1, have been published over recent years. One of possible mechanisms that are used to explain chronic inflammation in diabetes is the state of hyperglycemia leading to the enhanced synthesis of glycosylation end products (AGEs which activate macrophages, increase the oxidative stress and affect the synthesis of interleukins (IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and C-reactive protein (CRP. The aim of the study was to determine the inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6, TNF-α in patients with diabetes type 1 and to establish their correlation with glucoregulation parameters and other cardiovascular risk factors as well as to compare them with the healthy controls. Methods. The study included 76 patients with diabetes type 1 and 30 healthy controls. We determined values of inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6, TNF-α and glucoregulation parameters (fasting glucose HbA1c. Results. The values of CRP (p = 0.014, IL-6 (p = 0.020 and TNF-α (p = 0.037 were statistically significantly higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy controls. There was a positive correlation between CRP with postprandial glycemia (p = 0.004; the multivariate regression analysis revealed a statistically significant correlation between CRP and age (p = 0.001, smoking (p = 0.055, fasting glucose (p = 0.021 and triglycerides (p = 0.048 as well as between IL-6 and LDLcholesterol (p = 0,009. No statistically significant correlations were found between glycosilated hemoglobin (HbA1c and the inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α. Conclusion. The patients with type 1 diabetes were found to have a low level of inflammatory activity manifested by the increased values of CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α.

  18. Influence of glucoregulation quality on C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha level in patients with diabetes type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Milena; Ilić, Tatjana; Stokić, Edita; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Naglić, Dragana Tomić; Bajkin, Ivana; Icin, Tijana

    2011-09-01

    Results of studies which have proved an increased inflammatory activity in diabetes type 1, have been published over recent years. One of possible mechanisms that are used to explain chronic inflammation in diabetes is the state of hyperglycemia leading to the enhanced synthesis of glycosylation end products (AGEs) which activate macrophages, increase the oxidative stress and affect the synthesis of interleukins (IL-1, IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of the study was to determine the inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha) in patients with diabetes type 1 and to establish their correlation with glucoregulation parameters and other cardiovascular risk factors as well as to compare them with the healthy controls. The study included 76 patients with diabetes type 1 and 30 healthy controls. We determined values of inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and glucoregulation parameters (fasting glucose HbA(1c)). The values of CRP (p = 0.014), IL-6 (p = 0.020) and TNF-alpha (p = 0.037) were statistically significantly higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy controls. There was a positive correlation between CRP with postprandial glycemia (p = 0.004); the multivariate regression analysis revealed a statistically significant correlation between CRP and age (p = 0.001), smoking (p = 0.055), fasting glucose (p = 0.021) and triglycerides (p = 0.048) as well as between IL-6 and LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.009). No statistically significant correlations were found between glycosilated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and the inflammatory markers (CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha). The patients with type 1 diabetes were found to have a low level of inflammatory activity manifested by the increased values of CRP, IL-6 and TNF-alpha.

  19. Reactivation of hepatitis B in patients of chronic hepatitis C with hepatitis B virus infection treated with direct acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Chung-Feng; Hsieh, Meng-Hsuan; Ko, Yu-Min; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Ta-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hung; Liang, Po-Cheng; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Huang, Ching-I; Huang, Jee-Fu; Kuo, Po-Lin; Dai, Chia-Yen; Yu, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2017-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) may reactivate when treating chronic hepatitis C (CHC) with direct acting antivirals (DAA). We aim to investigate the risk of HBV reactivation during DAA therapy. Chronic hepatitis C patients receiving pan-oral DAA therapy from December 2013 to August 2016 were evaluated. Fifty-seven patients that had a past HBV infection (negative hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] and positive hepatitis B core antibody) and seven patients that had a current HBV infection (positive HBsAg) were enrolled. Serum HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) markers were regularly measured. The endpoints were the HCV sustained virological response (SVR) and the HBV virological/clinical reactivation. The overall SVR 12 rate was 96.9%, and two patients, one with positive HBsAg, had a relapse of HCV. No episodes of HBV virological reactivation were observed among the patients with a past HBV infection. For the seven patients with a current HBV infection, HBV virological reactivation was found in four (57.1%) of the seven patients. Clinical reactivation of HBV was observed in one patient with pretreatment detectable HBV DNA and recovered after entecavir administration. For the other three patients with HBV virological reactivation, the reappearance of low level HBV DNA without clinical reactivation was observed. HBsAg levels demonstrated only small fluctuations in all the patients. There was a minimal impact of hepatitis B core antibody seropositivity on HCV efficacy and safety. For CHC patients with current HBV infection, the risk of HBV reactivation was present, and monitoring the HBV DNA level during therapy is warranted. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of risk factors and markers for cardiovascular disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study was designed to investigate the lipid profile, C- reactive protein and urinary level of micro-albumin as part of routine risk assessment in diabetic patients. Subjects and Methods: Plasma levels of total cholesterol, low density liproprotein cholesterol (LDL – C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol

  1. Hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škop, V.; Trnovská, J.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Kůdela, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Šilhavý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2016), s. 891-899 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : fenofibrate * rosuvastatin * C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * inflammation * hepatotoxic Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  2. Population-based study of high plasma C-reactive protein concentrations among the Inuit of Nunavik.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Marie-Eve; Dewailly, Eric; Chateau-Degat, Marie-Ludivine; Couture, Patrick; Lamarche, Benoît

    2012-01-01

    The shift away from traditional lifestyle in the Inuit population over the past few decades has been associated with an increased prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure (BP) and diabetes. However, the impact of this transition on the pro-inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has not been documented. To examine the prevalence of elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations in Inuit from Nunavik in the province of Quebec (Canada) and identify anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle risk factors associated with elevated hs-CRP. A population-representative sample of 801 Inuit residents from 14 villages of Nunavik, aged between 18 and 74 years, was included in the analyses. Subjects participated in a clinical session and completed questionnaires on lifestyle. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for elevated hs-CRP. Elevated plasma hs-CRP concentrations (≥ 2 mg/L) were present in 32.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 29.5-35.8) of the Inuit adult population and were more prevalent among women than among men (36.7% vs. 29.0%, p=0.007). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that every 1 mmHg increase in systolic BP was associated with a 3% increase in the odds of having hs-CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L in the Inuit population (95% CI 1.01-1.04). The combination of older age (≥ 50 vs. Inuit with values that are similar to those seen in Canadian Caucasian populations. Sex, age, waist circumference and systolic BP are major factors that increase the risk of this inflammatory phenotype among Inuit from Nunavik, despite their different lifestyle background compared with Caucasians.

  3. Obese Hypertensive Men Have Plasma Concentrations of C-Reactive Protein Similar to That of Obese Normotensive Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, Camilla L; Andersen, Ulrik B; Linneberg, Allan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-grade chronic inflammation is a characteristic feature of obesity, the most important lifestyle risk factor for hypertension. Elevated plasma concentrations of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with an increased risk of hypertension, but elevated...... plasma CRP concentrations are also closely associated with obesity. It is uncertain whether CRP is directly involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension or is only a marker of other pathogenic processes closely related to obesity. METHODS: We studied 103 obese men (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30.0 kg/m(2......)); 63 of these men had 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) ≥ 130/80 mm Hg and comprised the obese hypertensive (OHT) group. The 40 remaining obese men had 24-hour ABP obese normotensive (ONT) group. Our control group comprised 27 lean normotensive (LNT) men. All...

  4. Anemia as a risk factor for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This prospective-(cohort study was conducted to evaluate whether anemia is a risk factor for childhood asthma. Materials and Methods: Two hundred children in the age group of 2-18 years who attended the Outpatient Department with upper respiratory / lower respiratory tract infections were included in this study. One hundred children with anemia were taken as the study group and another 100, age - and sex-matched children without anemia were taken as the control.They were subjected to complete blood count (CBC C-reactive protein (CRP estimation, Mantoux test and chest X-ray. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs were performed on those above six years showing evidence of asthma. Peripheral smear, serum ferritin and serum iron-binding capacity were estimated for all anemic children. Results: Asthma was present in 74 (74% children in the study group and in 33 (33% children in the control group. Iron-deficiency anemia was present in 85 (85% anemia of chronic infection in 20 (20% and the other five (5% had hemolytic anemia. Anemia was found to be a risk factor for childhood asthma. Conclusion: Anemic children were 5.75 times more susceptible to asthmatic attacks when compared with nonanemic children.

  5. Association between inflammatory markers and cardiovascular risk factors in women from Kolkata, W.B, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Debdutta; Das, Nilanjan; Saha, Indranil; Sanapala, Krishna Rao; Chaudhuri, Debnath; Ghosh, Saurabh; Dey, Sanjit

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the use of inflammatory biomarkers in the prediction of cardiovascular risk. However, information is scant regarding the association between these inflammatory markers with other cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians, particularly in women. To explore the association between inflammatory markers such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and white blood cell (WBC) count and cardiovascular risk factors such as overall and central adiposity, blood pressure, lipid and lipoprotein variables and fasting glucose. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis on 100 women aged 35-80 years. Participants were selected following cluster sampling methodology from 12 different randomly selected urban wards of Kolkata Municipal Corporation. Hs-CRP has a significant association with body mass index (BMI) ( p HDL-C) and both inflammatory markers, hs-CRP (p = 0.031) and WBC count, (p = 0.014). Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) was also negatively associated with hs-CRP. WBC count has significant correlation with fasting glucose and total cholesterol (TC) /HDL-C ratio. Using logistic regression, adjusting for age, BMI (odds ratio/OR, 1.186; confidence interval/CI, 1.046-1.345; p = 0.008) and WC (OR, 1.045; CI, 1.005-1.087; p = 0.027) were the covariates significantly associated with hs-CRP. In the present study, risk factors like BMI, WC, and HDL-C and apo A1 show significant association with hs-CRP. WBC count was significantly correlated with HDL-C, fasting glucose, TC/HDL-C ratio in women.

  6. Epidemiological manifestations of hepatitis C virus genotypes and its association with potential risk factors among Libyan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elasifer, Hana A; Agnnyia, Yossif M; Al-Alagi, Basher A; Daw, Mohamed A

    2010-11-13

    The information on hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes among Libyan population and its association with various risk factors is not known. The objectives of this study were to determine the epidemiological manifestations of HCV genotypes among Libyan patients and their association with certain potential risk factors. A total of 1240 of HCV infected patients registered at Tripoli Medical Centre were studied in five years period from January 2005 to October 2009. The information were reviewed and the data were collected. A sample from each patient (785 male; 455 female) was analysed for genotyping and sub-typing using specific genotyping assay. The information was correlated with the risk factors studied and the statistical data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. Off the total patients studied, four different genotypes were reported, including genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4. Genotype4 was the commonest (35.7%), followed by genotype1 (32.6%). According to subtypes 28% were unclassified genotype 4, 14.6% were genotype 1b and some patients infected with more than one subtype (2.3% genotype 4c/d, 1% genotype 2a/c). Genotypes 1 was the commonest among males, while genotype 4 among females. According to the risk factors studied, Genotype1 and genotype 4 were found with most of the risk factors. Though they were particularly evident surgical intervention, dental procedures and blood transfusion while genotype 1 was only followed by genotype 3 mainly which mainly associated with certain risk groups such as intravenous drug abusers. Here in we report on a detailed description of HCV genotype among Libyans. The most common genotype was type 4 followed by genotype 1, other genotypes were also reported at a low rate. The distribution of such genotypes were also variable according to gender and age. The commonly prevalent genotypes found to be attributable to the medical -related transmission of HCV, such as blood, surgery and dental procedures when compared with other risk

  7. Gas-phase reactivity of lanthanide cations with fluorocarbons: C-F versus C-H and C-C bond activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornehl, H.H.; Hornung, G.; Schwarz, H.

    1996-01-01

    The gas-phase reactivity of the fluorinated hydrocarbons CF 4 , CHF 3 , CH 3 F, C 2 F 6 , 1,1-C 2 H 4 F 2 , and C 6 F 6 with the lanthanide cations Ce + , Pr + , Sm + , Ho + , Tm + , and Yb + and the reactivity of C 6 H 5 F with all lanthanide cations Ln + (Ln = La-Lu, with the exception of Pm + ) have been examined by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The perfluorinated compounds tetrafluoromethane and hexafluoroethane as well as trifluoromethane do not react with any lanthanide cation. Selective activation of the strong C-F bonds in fluoromethane, 1,1-difluoroethane, hexafluorobenzene, and fluorobenzene appears as a general reaction scheme along the 4f row. Experimental evidence is given for a 'harpoon'-like mechanism for the F atom abstraction process which operates via an initial electron transfer from the lanthanide cation to the fluorinated substrate in the encounter complex Ln + RF. The most reactive lanthanides La + , Ce + , Gd + , and Tb + and also the formal closed-shell species Lu + exhibit additional C-H and C-C bond activation pathways in the reaction with fluorobenzene, namely dehydrohalogenation as well as loss of a neutral acetylene molecule. In the case of Tm + and Yb + the formation of neutral LnF 3 is observed in a multistep process via C-C coupling and charge transfer. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C - a potent risk factor in children diagnosed with stadium 4 neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Miskowiak

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of VEGF-C, CD34 and VEGFR-2 in cancer tissue of children diagnosed with stadium 4 neuroblastoma (NB and correlate their presence with the survival rate of children diagnosed with that stage of the disease. Eighteen children assigned to stadium 4 composed the study group. Fourteen patients (allocated to stadium 3 formed a control group. VEGF-C, CD34 and VEGFR-2 expressions were evaluated by immunohistochemical assay. Consecutive slides incubated with anti-CD34 and anti-VEGFR-2 antibodies revealed that the two markers were colocalized within endothelial layer of the blood vessels. On the other hand, VEGF-C was expressed exclusively in tumour cells. As demonstrated by Fisher's exact test, the risk of NB treatment failure (progression or relapse as well as tumour related death, when all the patients were considered, was found to be significant in VEGF-C positive patients. VEGF-C expression in NB constitutes a potent risk factor and may direct future anti-angiogenic treatment strategy. The proximity of VEGF-C and CD34/VEGFR-2 of NB could be the equivalent of a potentially interesting VEGF-C fashion involving a tumour cell invasion into the blood vessels in an early phase of metastases promoting.

  9. ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in households with children of preschool age: prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bunt, G; Liakopoulos, A; Mevius, D J; Geurts, Y; Fluit, A C; Bonten, M J M; Mughini-Gras, L; van Pelt, W

    2017-02-01

    ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging public health concern. As households with preschool children may substantially contribute to the community burden of antimicrobial resistance, we determined the prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria in preschool children and their parents. From April 2013 to January 2015, each month 2000 preschool children were randomly selected from Dutch population registries. The parents were invited to complete an epidemiological questionnaire and to obtain and send a faecal sample from the selected child and from one parent. Samples were tested for ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for ESBL/AmpC carriage in children and parents, and findings were internally validated by bootstrapping. In total, 1016 families were included and ESBL/AmpC prevalence was 4.0% (95% CI 3.2%-5.0%); 3.5% (95% CI 2.5%-4.8%) in children and 4.5% (95% CI 3.4%-6.0%) in parents. Attending a daycare centre (DCC) was the only significant risk factor for children (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0-4.3). For parents, the only significant risk factor was having one or more children attending DCCs (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.8). For parents of ESBL/AmpC-positive children the OR for ESBL/AmpC carriage was 19.7 (95% CI 9.2-42.4). Co-carriage of specific ESBL/AmpC genotypes in child and parent occurred more often than expected by chance (14.6% versus 1.1%, P < 0.001). In this study, intestinal carriage with ESBL/AmpCs was detected in ∼4% of households with preschool children. DCC attendance was a risk factor in both children and parents and co-carriage of specific genotypes frequently occurred in child-parent pairs. These findings suggest household transmission or/and family-specific exposure to common sources of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For

  10. The global geographical overlap of aflatoxin and hepatitis C: Controlling risk factors for liver cancer worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliyaguru, Dushani L.; Wu, Felicia

    2012-01-01

    About 85% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, liver cancer) cases occur in low-income countries, where the risk factors of dietary aflatoxin exposure and chronic hepatitis B and C (HBV and HCV) viral infection are common. While studies have shown synergism between aflatoxin and HBV in causing HCC, much less is known about whether aflatoxin and HCV synergize similarly. From an exposure perspective, we examine whether there is a geographical overlap in populations worldwide exposed to high dietary aflatoxin levels and with high HCV prevalence. While HCV is one of the most important risk factors for HCC in high-income nations (where aflatoxin exposure is low), we find that HCV prevalence is much higher in Africa and Asia, where aflatoxin exposure is also high. However, within a given world region, there are some inconsistencies regarding exposure and cancer risk. Therefore, there is a need to control risk factors such as aflatoxin and hepatitis viruses in a cost-effective manner to prevent global HCC, while continuing to evaluate biological mechanisms by which these risk factors interact to increase HCC risk. PMID:23281740

  11. Capacitive immunosensor for C-reactive protein quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2015-08-02

    We report an agglutination-based immunosensor for the quantification of C-reactive protein (CRP). The developed immunoassay sensor requires approximately 15 minutes of assay time per sample and provides a sensitivity of 0.5 mg/L. We have measured the capacitance of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) and quantified the concentration of added analyte. The proposed method is a label free detection method and hence provides rapid measurement preferable in diagnostics. We have so far been able to quantify the concentration to as low as 0.5 mg/L and as high as 10 mg/L. By quantifying CRP in serum, we can assess whether patients are prone to cardiac diseases and monitor the risk associated with such diseases. The sensor is a simple low cost structure and it can be a promising device for rapid and sensitive detection of disease markers at the point-of-care stage.

  12. Determination of risk factors for hepatitis B and C in male patients suffering from chronic hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Waquaruddin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B and C is common in Pakistan and various risk factors are attributable to its spread. One thousand and fifty consecutive male cases suffering from chronic liver disease (327 HBV and 723 HCV were selected from the OPD of public sector hospital and a private clinic dealing exclusively with the liver patients. To compare the results 723 age and gender matched controls were selected from the blood transfusion services of the public sector hospital. A standard questionnaire was filled for all patients and controls which included the information on possible risk factors. Findings Family history of liver disease was significantly higher (43% and 34% in HBV and HCV positive cases as compared to 5% in controls [odds ratio 15.6; 95% Confidence Interval CI: 10.1 -- 24.1, 10.9; 95% Confidence Interval CI: 7.3 -- 16.4] and same trend was seen for death due to liver disease in the family. Majority 74% hepatitis B positive cases had their shaves done at communal barbers but this practice was equally prevalent amongst controls (68%, thus negating it as a possible risk factor, but there is a significant risk with p Conclusion Injections, surgery and dental treatment appear as major risk factors for the transmission of hepatitis B and C in the community. Massive health care awareness drives need to be done for both health care providers and the public to reduce this menace.

  13. Associations of adversity in childhood and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in mid-adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emma L; Fraser, Abigail; Caleyachetty, Rishi; Hardy, Rebecca; Lawlor, Debbie A; Howe, Laura D

    2018-02-01

    Studies assessing associations of childhood psychosocial adversity (e.g. sexual abuse, physical neglect, parental death), as opposed to socioeconomic adversity, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in adulthood are scarce. The aim of this study is to assess associations of various types of psychosocial adversity and cumulative adversity in childhood, with multiple CVD risk factors in mid-life. At study enrolment, women from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (N=3612) retrospectively reported: lack of maternal care, maternal overprotection, parental mental illness, household dysfunction, sexual abuse, physical and emotional abuse, and neglect in childhood. Approximately 23 years later, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, low and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and arterial distensibility were assessed (mean age 51 years). We examined associations of each specific type of psychosocial adversity and cumulative adversity with CVD risk factors. No specific type of psychosocial adversity was consistently associated with the CVD risk factors. There was evidence that a one standard deviation greater cumulative psychosocial adversity was associated with 0.51cm greater waist circumference (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02cm, 1.00cm, p=0.04) and a lower arterial distensibility, even after adjustment for age, ethnicity and childhood and adult socioeconomic position. We found no consistent evidence that any specific type of psychosocial adversity, or cumulative psychosocial adversity in childhood, is associated with CVD risk factors in adult women. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Personal and couple level risk factors: Maternal and paternal parent-child aggression risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Meagan C; Rodriguez, Christina M; Baker, Levi R

    2017-07-01

    Previous literature examining parent-child aggression (PCA) risk has relied heavily upon mothers, limiting our understanding of paternal risk factors. Moreover, the extent to which factors in the couple relationship work in tandem with personal vulnerabilities to impact PCA risk is unclear. The current study examined whether personal stress and distress predicted PCA risk (child abuse potential, over-reactive discipline style, harsh discipline practices) for fathers as well as mothers and whether couple functioning mediated versus moderated the relation between personal stress and PCA risk in a sample of 81 couples. Additionally, the potential for risk factors in one partner to cross over and affect their partner's PCA risk was considered. Findings indicated higher personal stress predicted elevated maternal and paternal PCA risk. Better couple functioning did not moderate this relationship but partially mediated stress and PCA risk for both mothers and fathers. In addition, maternal stress evidenced a cross-over effect, wherein mothers' personal stress linked to fathers' couple functioning. Findings support the role of stress and couple functioning in maternal and paternal PCA risk, including potential cross-over effects that warrant further inquiry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Ramadan fasting on cardiovascular risk factors: a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nematy Mohsen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has shown that Ramadan fasting has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors, however there are controversies. In the present study, the effect of Ramadan fasting on cardiovascular risk factors has been investigated. Method This is a prospective observational study that was carried out in a group of patients with at least one cardiovascular risk factor (including history of documented previous history of either coronary artery disease (CAD, metabolic syndrome or cerebro-vascular disease in past 10 y. Eighty two volunteers including 38 male and 44 female, aged 29–70 y, mean 54.0 ± 10 y, with a previous history of either coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome or cerebro-vascular disease were recruited. Subjects attended the metabolic unit after at least 10 h fasting, before and after Ramadan who were been fasting for at least 10 days. A fasting blood sample was obtained, blood pressure was measured and body mass index (BMI was calculated. Lipids profile, fasting blood sugar (FBS and insulin, homocysteine (hcy, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and complete blood count (CBC were analyzed on all blood samples. Results A significant improvement in 10 years coronary heart disease risk (based on Framingham risk score was found (13.0 ± 8 before Ramadan and 10.8 ±7 after Ramadan, P 0.001, t test.There was a significant higher HDL-c, WBC, RBC and platelet count (PLT, and lower plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-c, VLDL-c, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and waist circumference after Ramadan (P 0.05, t test. The changes in FBS, insulin,Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR, hcy, hs-CRP and diastolic blood pressure before and after Ramadan were not significant (P >0.05, t test. Conclusions This study shows a significant improvement in 10 years coronary heart disease risk score and other cardiovascular risk factors such as lipids profile

  16. Late metal carbene complexes generated by multiple C-H activations: examining the continuum of M=C bond reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Matthew T; Grubbs, Robert H

    2009-10-20

    Unactivated C(sp(3))-H bonds are ubiquitous in organic chemicals and hydrocarbon feedstocks. However, these resources remain largely untapped, and the development of efficient homogeneous methods for hydrocarbon functionalization by C-H activation is an attractive and unresolved challenge for synthetic chemists. Transition-metal catalysis offers an attractive possible means for achieving selective, catalytic C-H functionalization given the thermodynamically favorable nature of many desirable partial oxidation schemes and the propensity of transition-metal complexes to cleave C-H bonds. Selective C-H activation, typically by a single cleavage event to produce M-C(sp(3)) products, is possible through myriad reported transition-metal species. In contrast, several recent reports have shown that late transition metals may react with certain substrates to perform multiple C-H activations, generating M=C(sp(2)) complexes for further elaboration. In light of the rich reactivity of metal-bound carbenes, such a route could open a new manifold of reactivity for catalytic C-H functionalization, and we have targeted this strategy in our studies. In this Account, we highlight several early examples of late transition-metal complexes that have been shown to generate metal-bound carbenes by multiple C-H activations and briefly examine factors leading to the selective generation of metal carbenes through this route. Using these reports as a backdrop, we focus on the double C-H activation of ethers and amines at iridium complexes supported by Ozerov's amidophosphine PNP ligand (PNP = [N(2-P(i)Pr(2)-4-Me-C(6)H(3))(2)](-)), allowing isolation of unusual square-planar iridium(I) carbenes. These species exhibit reactivity that is distinct from the archetypal Fischer and Schrock designations. We present experimental and theoretical studies showing that, like the classical square-planar iridium(I) organometallics, these complexes are best described as nucleophilic at iridium. We discuss

  17. To Evaluate and Compare Periodontal Disease and Smoking as a Parallel Risk Factor for Systemic Health by Gauging the Serum C-Reactive Protein Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Ruchi Dinesh; Sharma, Payal; Chandran, Sarath; Vasavada, Dharmesh; Nadig, Priyadarshini; Bakutra, Gaurav

    2017-03-01

    Physiologic and metabolic changes that occur immediately after a damage or disease are known as Acute Phase Reaction (APR). Acute Phase Proteins (APP) are blood proteins secreted by hepatocytes during APR C-Reactive Protein (CRP) being the important one. Present study was designed to estimate and compare the levels of the serum CRP in current smokers, former smokers and non-smokers, with and without periodontitis. An experimental study was planned on 165 subjects who were divided into four groups. Group 1- nonsmokers with periodontitis. Group 2- smokers without periodontitis. Group 3- smokers with periodontitis. Group 4- former smokers without periodontitis. Healthy controls were not included in the study as the normal range of CRP in health is already established. Periodontal examination was done and serum CRP was measured. After getting the acceptance to be a part of the study, written informed consent was taken from each participant. Data analysis was done by ANOVA and post-hoc tests. Highest level of CRP was found in smokers with periodontitis followed by non-smokers with periodontitis and smokers without periodontitis. Former smokers had minimum CRP compared to the other groups (p-value=0.03). Periodontitis alone and in combination with smoking increases the systemic inflammatory burden and associated cardiovascular risk. This fact should be communicated thoroughly to the general population, general dentist, physicians and cardiovascular specialist to enhance early screening and multidisciplinary treatment.

  18. Depressive symptoms and inflammation are independent risk factors of fatigue in breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C; Miller, A H; Felger, J; Mister, D; Liu, T; Torres, M A

    2017-07-01

    Psychosocial and inflammatory factors have been associated with fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Nevertheless, the relative contribution and/or interaction of these factors with cancer-related fatigue have not been well documented. This cross-sectional study enrolled 111 stage 0-III breast cancer patients treated with breast surgery followed by whole breast radiotherapy. Fatigue was measured by the total score of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20. Potential risk factors included inflammatory markers (plasma cytokines and their receptors and C-reactive protein; CRP), depressive symptoms (as assessed by the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Reported), sleep (as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and perceived stress (as assessed by the Perceived Stress Scale) as well as age, race, marital status, smoking history, menopause status, endocrine treatment, chemotherapy and cancer stage. Linear regression modeling was employed to examine risk factors of fatigue. Only risk factors with a significance level fatigue. At 1 year post-radiotherapy, depressive symptoms (pfatigue. Mediation analysis showed that depressive symptoms also mediated the associations of fatigue with sleep and stress. Depressive symptoms and inflammation were independent risk factors for cancer-related fatigue at 1 year post-radiotherapy, and thus represent independent treatment targets for this debilitating symptom.

  19. Plasmid-mediated AmpC: prevalence in community-acquired isolates in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and risk factors for carriage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Ascelijn Reuland

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of pAmpC beta-lactamases in community-acquired Gram negative bacteria in the Netherlands, and to identify possible risk factors for carriage of these strains.Fecal samples were obtained from community-dwelling volunteers. Participants also returned a questionnaire for analysis of risk factors. Screening for pAmpC was performed with selective enrichment broth and a selective screening agar. Confirmation of AmpC-production was performed with two double disc combination tests: cefotaxime and ceftazidime with either boronic acid or cloxacillin as inhibitor. Multiplex PCR was used as gold standard for detection of pAmpC. 16S rRNA PCR and AFLP were performed as required, plasmids were identified by PCR-based replicon typing. Questionnaire results were analyzed with SPSS, version 20.0.Fecal samples were obtained from 550 volunteers; mean age 51 years (range: 18-91, 61% were females. pAmpC was present in seven E. coli isolates (7/550, 1.3%, 0.6-2.7 95% CI: six CMY-2-like pAmpC and one DHA. ESBL-encoding genes were found in 52/550 (9.5%, 7.3-12.2 95% CI isolates; these were predominantly blaCTX-M genes. Two isolates had both ESBL and pAmpC. Admission to a hospital in the previous year was the only risk factor we identified.Our data indicate that the prevalence of pAmpC in the community seems still low. However, since pAmpC-producing isolates were not identified as ESBL producers by routine algorithms, there is consistent risk that further increase of their prevalence might go undetected.

  20. Emotional reactivity: Beware its involvement in traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'bailara, Katia; Atzeni, Thierry; Contrand, Benjamin; Derguy, Cyrielle; Bouvard, Manuel-Pierre; Lagarde, Emmanuel; Galéra, Cédric

    2018-04-01

    Reducing risk attributable to traffic accidents is a public health challenge. Research into risk factors in the area is now moving towards identification of the psychological factors involved, particularly emotional states. The aim of this study was to evaluate the link between emotional reactivity and responsibility in road traffic accidents. We hypothesized that the more one's emotional reactivity is disturbed, the greater the likelihood of being responsible for a traffic accident. This case-control study was based on a sample of 955 drivers injured in a motor vehicle crash. Responsibility levels were determined with a standardized method adapted from the quantitative Robertson and Drummer crash responsibility instrument. Emotional reactivity was assessed with the MATHYS. Hierarchical cluster analysis discriminated four distinctive driver's emotional reactivity profiles: basic emotional reactivity (54%), mild emotional hyper-reactivity (29%), emotional hyper-reactivity (11%) and emotional hypo-reactivity (6%). Drivers who demonstrated emotional hypo-reactivity had a 2.3-fold greater risk of being responsible for a traffic accident than those with basic emotional reactivity. Drivers' responsibility in traffic accidents depends on their emotional status. The latter can change the ability of drivers, modifying their behavior and thus increasing their propensity to exhibit risk behavior and to cause traffic accidents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of risk factors for hepatitis B and C in Peshawar, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiq M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Shafiq,1 Muhammad Nadeem,2 Zeeshan Sattar,3 Sohaib Mohammad Khan,2 Sheikh Muhammad Faheem,4 Irfan Ahsan,5 Rabia Naheed,6 Tahir Mehmood Khattak,2 Shahzad Akbar,7 Muhammad Talha Khan,3 Muhammad Ilyas Khan,1 Muhammad Zubair Khan8 1Department of Internal Medicine, Khyber Teaching Hospital, University Town, Peshawar, 2Department of General Surgery, Nishtar Medical College and Hospital, Dera Ghazi Khan, Punjab, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Khyber Medical College, University Campus, Peshawar, 4Department of Neurology, King Edward Medical University, Anarkali, Lahore, Pakistan; 5Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 6Department of Internal Medicine, Fatima Memorial Hospital, Lahore, 7Department of Internal Medicine, Lady Reading Hospital, Andar Shehr, Peshawar, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Hayatabad Medical Complex, Hayat Abad, Pakistan Background: Hepatitis B and C need immediate worldwide attention as the infection rates are too high. More than 240 million people have chronic (long-term liver infections. Every year, about 600,000 people die globally due to the acute or chronic consequences of hepatitis B and more than 350,000 people die from hepatitis C-related liver diseases. Methods: Our study was designed as a case-control, descriptive study. It was conducted through formal interviews by using structured questionnaires. A total of 100 cases were included, with four controls for each case. Results: This study confirms household contact, history of dental work, history of surgery, sexual contact, and history of transfusion (blood and its components as the main risk factors which are responsible for the increased prevalence of hepatitis. Conclusion: The important risk factors, responsible for the high prevalence of hepatitis B and C in our society are household contact, history of dental work, history of surgery, sexual contact, and history of transfusion (blood and its components. The odds ratio of

  2. Serum C-reactive protein concentration and genotype in relation to ischemic stroke subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenvall, Claes; Jood, Katarina; Blomstrand, Christian; Nilsson, Staffan; Jern, Christina; Ladenvall, Per

    2006-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has evolved as an inflammatory risk marker of cardiovascular disease. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the CRP locus have been found to be associated with CRP levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate CRP levels and genetic variants in etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke. The Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke (SAHLSIS) comprises 600 consecutive ischemic stroke cases (18 to 69 years) and 600 matched controls from western Sweden. Stroke subtypes were defined by the TOAST classification. Serum CRP levels were determined by a high-sensitivity immunometric assay. CRP levels were significantly higher for all ischemic stroke subtypes compared with controls, both in the acute phase and at the 3-month follow-up. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, CRP at follow-up was related to higher odds ratios (ORs) of overall ischemic stroke (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43) and large-vessel disease (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.00). The CRP -286C>T>A, 1059G>C, and 1444C>T single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed significant associations with CRP levels. However, neither CRP genotypes nor haplotypes showed an association to overall ischemic stroke. This is the first large study on CRP in different TOAST subtypes in a young ischemic stroke population. CRP levels differed between etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke both in the acute phase and at the 3-month follow-up. CRP at follow-up was associated with overall ischemic stroke and the large-vessel disease subtype. Genetic variants at the CRP locus were associated with CRP levels, but no association was detected for overall ischemic stroke.

  3. Prognostic implications of plasma fibrinogen and serum C- reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reactive protein levels in non-small cell lung cancer resection and ... Abstract. Purpose: To investigate the prognostic implications of plasma fibrinogen and serum C-reactive protein ... The possibility of complete resection and associated findings are reported. Results: ... operable using pre-operative chemotherapy and/or ...

  4. Impact of traditional and novel risk factors on the relationship between socioeconomic status and incident cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Michelle A; Glynn, Robert J; Buring, Julie; Ridker, Paul M

    2006-12-12

    Persons of lower socioeconomic status have greater cardiovascular risk than those of higher socioeconomic status. However, the mechanism through which socioeconomic status affects cardiovascular disease (CVD) is uncertain. Virtually no data are available that examine the prospective association between novel inflammatory and hemostatic CVD risk indicators, socioeconomic status, and incident CVD events. We assessed the relationship between 2 indicators of socioeconomic status (education and income), traditional and novel CVD risk factors (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, fibrinogen, and homocysteine), and incident CVD events among 22,688 apparently healthy female health professionals participating in the Women's Health Study. These women were followed up for 10 years for the development of myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, coronary revascularization, and cardiovascular death. More educated women were less likely to be smokers; had a lower prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity; and were more likely to participate in vigorous physical activity than less educated women. At baseline, median total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, C-reactive protein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, fibrinogen, and homocysteine levels for women in 5 categories of education (master's degree, and a doctoral degree) and 6 categories of income [ or = 100,000 dollars) decreased progressively with increasing education or income levels (all Prisk of incident CVD events decreased with increasing education (1.0, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4, and 0.5; P for trend risk factors on the relationship between education/income and CVD events, the relative hazard of incident CVD associated with a 1-category-higher level of education changed from 0.79 in age- and race-adjusted analysis to 0.89 in fully adjusted analysis. The 11% lower risk per 1 category of education remained significant (P for trend=0.006), suggesting that controlling

  5. C-reactive protein as a systemic marker of inflammation in periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcic, A; Kesic, L J; Milasin, J

    2011-03-01

    Periodontitis has been identified as a potential risk factor for systemic pathologies such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aims of this investigation were to assess the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory factor, as well as to discover whether there is a relation to the severity of periodontitis and to the periodontopathogens. Periodontal examinations and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level measurements were performed in 50 patients with periodontitis. Periodontal health indicators included the gingival bleeding on probing index and periodontal disease status. The patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depth periodontitis had high attachment loss and pocket depth >5 mm. The control group comprised 25 volunteers with healthy gingiva, gingival sulcus periodontal parameters and CRP levels were significantly higher in the patients with periodontitis. Patients who had severe periodontitis, with high levels of mean clinical attachment loss, and subjects with moderate periodontitis had higher mean CRP levels. The percentage of subjects with elevated levels of CRP >5 mg/l was greater in the higher clinical attachment loss group compared to the group with lower attachment loss. The presence of P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans were also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Periodontitis and the presence of P. gingivalis are associated with an enhanced inflammatory response expressed by higher CRP levels. The association of periodontitis with CRP levels appears to be a contributing factor for CVD and might be a possible intermediate pathway in this association.

  6. Persistent Latent Tuberculosis Reactivation Risk in United States Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, John; Parker, Matthew; Lowenthal, Phillip; Flood, Jennifer; Fu, Yunxin; Asis, Redentor; Reves, Randall

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Current guidelines limit latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) evaluation to persons in the United States less than or equal to 5 years based on the assumption that high TB rates among recent entrants are attributable to high LTBI reactivation risk, which declines over time. We hypothesized that high postarrival TB rates may instead be caused by imported active TB. Objectives: Estimate reactivation and imported TB in an immigrant cohort. Methods: We linked preimmigration records from a cohort of California-bound Filipino immigrants during 2001–2010 with subsequent TB reports. TB was likely LTBI reactivation if the immigrant had no evidence of active TB at preimmigration examination, likely imported if preimmigration radiograph was abnormal and TB was reported less than or equal to 6 months after arrival, and likely reactivation of inactive TB if radiograph was abnormal but TB was reported more than 6 months after arrival. Measurements and Main Results: Among 123,114 immigrants, 793 TB cases were reported. Within 1 year of preimmigration examination, 85% of TB was imported; 6 and 9% were reactivation of LTBI and inactive TB, respectively. Conversely, during Years 2–9 after U.S. entry, 76 and 24% were reactivation of LTBI and inactive TB, respectively. The rate of LTBI reactivation (32 per 100,000) did not decline during Years 1–9. Conclusions: High postarrival TB rates were caused by detection of imported TB through active postarrival surveillance. Among immigrants without active TB at baseline, reported TB did not decline over 9 years, indicating sustained high risk of LTBI reactivation. Revised guidelines should support LTBI screening and treatment more than 5 years after U.S. arrival. PMID:24308495

  7. Epidemiological manifestations of hepatitis C virus genotypes and its association with potential risk factors among Libyan patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daw Mohamed A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The information on hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes among Libyan population and its association with various risk factors is not known. The objectives of this study were to determine the epidemiological manifestations of HCV genotypes among Libyan patients and their association with certain potential risk factors. Methods A total of 1240 of HCV infected patients registered at Tripoli Medical Centre were studied in five years period from January 2005 to October 2009. The information were reviewed and the data were collected. A sample from each patient (785 male; 455 female was analysed for genotyping and sub-typing using specific genotyping assay. The information was correlated with the risk factors studied and the statistical data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5. Results Off the total patients studied, four different genotypes were reported, including genotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4. Genotype4 was the commonest (35.7%, followed by genotype1 (32.6%. According to subtypes 28% were unclassified genotype 4, 14.6% were genotype 1b and some patients infected with more than one subtype (2.3% genotype 4c/d, 1% genotype 2a/c. Genotypes 1 was the commonest among males, while genotype 4 among females. According to the risk factors studied, Genotype1 and genotype 4 were found with most of the risk factors. Though they were particularly evident surgical intervention, dental procedures and blood transfusion while genotype 1 was only followed by genotype 3 mainly which mainly associated with certain risk groups such as intravenous drug abusers. Conclusion Here in we report on a detailed description of HCV genotype among Libyans. The most common genotype was type 4 followed by genotype 1, other genotypes were also reported at a low rate. The distribution of such genotypes were also variable according to gender and age. The commonly prevalent genotypes found to be attributable to the medical -related transmission of HCV, such as blood

  8. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Roy, Kay; Starkey, Cerys

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein......(i)) and the Bland-Altman method. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the systemic markers at both visits. RESULTS: There was moderate repeatability with a very high degree of statistical significance (p...... (CRP) over one year and examined the relationships between these systemic markers in COPD. METHODS: Fifty-eight stable COPD patients completed a baseline and one-year visit. Serum IL-6, plasma CRP, and plasma TNF-alpha were measured. Repeatability was expressed by intraclass correlation coefficient (R...

  9. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Roy, Kay; Starkey, Cerys

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein......(i)) and the Bland-Altman method. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the systemic markers at both visits. RESULTS: There was moderate repeatability with a very high degree of statistical significance (p...... (CRP) over one year and examined the relationships between these systemic markers in COPD. METHODS: Fifty-eight stable COPD patients completed a baseline and one-year visit. Serum IL-6, plasma CRP, and plasma TNF-alpha were measured. Repeatability was expressed by intraclass correlation coefficient (R...

  10. High levels of vitamin D in relation to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dao-min; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ai-guo; Chu, Zhao-xue; Wu, Qing; Li, Hui; Ge, Jin-fang; Dong, Yi; Zhu, Peng

    2015-08-30

    There is growing evidence on the novel role of vitamin D in reducing inflammation. This study aimed to examine the hypothesis that vitamin D is inversely associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with schizophrenia, and high levels of vitamin D may be linked to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated CRP. Ninety-three patients with schizophrenia and 93 family-matched controls were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Plasma concentrations of CRP and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were measured using commercial kits. Information about demographic characteristics and clinic data were obtained by interviews or medical records. Mean levels of CRP and 25(OH)D were 43.3% higher and 26.7% lower for patients compared to controls, respectively. 25(OH)D were inversely associated with CRP in the patients, but not in the controls. The proportions of patients significantly increased with increasing quartiles of CRP, while significantly decreased with increasing quartiles of 25(OH)D. Among individuals with high CRP, participants with high 25(OH)D have significantly lower proportion (adjusted OR =0.217, 95% CI 0.063, 0.751) of schizophrenia compared to those with low 25(OH)D. The evidence suggested that high levels of vitamin D may be linked to reduced risk of schizophrenia with elevated CRP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. C-reactive protein and pentraxin-3 binding of factor H-like protein 1 differs from complement factor H: Implications for retinal inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, M. (Maurice); Zhang, J.H. (Justine H.); Tilakaratna, V. (Viranga); Black, G. (Graeme); Perveen, R. (Rahat); McHarg, S. (Selina); Inforzato, A. (Antonio); Day, A.J. (Anthony J.); Clark, S.J. (Simon J.)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractRetinal inflammation plays a key role in the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition that leads to loss of central vision. The deposition of the acute phase pentraxin C-reactive protein (CRP) in the macula activates the complement system, thereby contributing

  12. [Chronic low-grade inflammation, lipid risk factors and mortality in functionally dependent elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasović, Olga; Trifunović, Danijela; Despotovié, Nebojsa; Milosević, Dragoslav P

    2010-07-01

    It has been proved that a highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) can be used as an established marker of chronic inflammation for cardiovascular risk assessment. Since mean values of both low-density cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) decrease during aging, the knowledge that increased hsCRP concentration predicts mortality (Mt) would influence therapy and treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to examine importance of chronic low grade inflammation and its association with lipid risk factors for all-cause Mt in functionally dependent elderly. The participants of this longitudinal prospective study were 257 functionally dependent elderly aged 65-99 years. Baseline measurements: anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting plasma total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), HDL-C, LDL-C, non-HDL-C, hemoglobin Alc (HbA1c) were recorded and different lipid ratios were calculated. Inflammation was assessed by the levels of white blood cells, fibrinogen and hsCRP. The participants with hsCRP grater than 10 mg/L were excluded from the study. The residual participants (77.4% women) were divided into three groups according to their hsCRP levels: a low (agressive lipid lowering treatment.

  13. Major dietary patterns and cardiovascular risk factors from childhood to adulthood. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkilä, Vera; Räsänen, Leena; Raitakari, Olli T; Marniemi, Jukka; Pietinen, Pirjo; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Viikari, Jorma

    2007-07-01

    Studies on the impact of single nutrients on the risk of CVD have often given inconclusive results. Recent research on dietary patterns has offered promising information on the effects of diet as a whole on the risk of CVD. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is an ongoing, prospective cohort study with a 21-year follow-up to date. The subjects were children and adolescents at baseline (3-18 years, n 1768) and adults at the latest follow-up study (24-39 years, n 1037). We investigated the associations between two major dietary patterns and several risk factors for CVD. In longitudinal analyses with repeated measurements, using multivariate mixed linear regression models, the traditional dietary pattern (characterised by high consumption of rye, potatoes, butter, sausages, milk and coffee) was independently associated with total and LDL cholesterol concentrations, apolipoprotein B and C-reactive protein concentrations among both genders, and also with systolic blood pressure and insulin levels among women and concentrations of homocysteine among men (P health-conscious food choices (such as high consumption of vegetables, legumes and nuts, tea, rye, cheese and other dairy products, and alcoholic beverages) was inversely, but less strongly associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Our results support earlier findings that dietary patterns have a role in the development of CVD.

  14. Interindividual variation in the response by fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 to yellow fever vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuur, M.; Beek, M.T. van der; Tak, H.S.; Visser, L.G.; Maat, M.P.M. de

    2004-01-01

    The acute phase reaction is important in many disease processes. Habitual levels of the acute phase proteins fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the dynamic variation of plasma levels of acute phase

  15. Hepatitis C virus infection in South Australian prisoners: seroprevalence, seroconversion, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emma Ruth; Bi, Peng; Ryan, Philip

    2009-03-01

    To determine entry antibody seroprevalence and seroconversion to hepatitis C virus (HCV) and associated risk factors in newly incarcerated prisoners. Males and females entering South Australian prisons completed risk factor surveys and were offered HCV-antibody testing. Participants completed additional surveys and, if HCV-negative at last test, underwent further antibody tests at 3-monthly intervals for up to 15 months. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate techniques. HCV seroprevalence among 662 prison entrants was estimated at 42%. Previous injecting history was highly prevalent at entry (64%) and both community and prison injecting independently predicted entry HCV status. Tattooing was not an important risk factor. While community exposure could not be ruled out, three seroconversions were noted in 148 initially HCV-seronegative individuals occurring in a median 121 days--4.6 per 100 person-years. Prison injecting was infrequently reported, but HCV-seropositive participants were significantly more likely to commence IDU in prison than seronegative participants (p=0.035). Entry HCV seroprevalence in South Australian prisoners is extremely high and may have contributed to a 'ceiling effect', minimizing the observable seroconversion rate. Greater frequency of injecting among those already infected with HCV represents a significant threat to other prisoners and prison staff.

  16. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A. H.; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J.; Macfadyen, Jean G.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T.; Glynn, Robert J.; Ridker, P. M.; Fonseca, F. A. H.; Genest, J.; Gotto, A. M.; Koenig, W.; Libby, P.; Lorenzatti, A. J.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Shepherd, J.; Willerson, J. T.; Danielson, E.; Glynn, R. J.; MacFadyen, J. G.; Mora, S.; Collins, R.; Bailey, K.; Gersh, B.; Lamas, G.; Smith, S.; Vaughan, D.; Mahaffey, K.; Brown, P.; Montgomery, D.; Wilson, M.; Wood, F.; Altamirano, J.; Boskis, P.; Colombo, H.; Cuneo, C.; Diaz, M.; Esper, R.; Trip, M.; Hoekstra, J.; Koch, S.; Lucas, M.; van de Beek, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of risk-factor guided and birth-cohort screening for chronic hepatitis C infection in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Liu

    Full Text Available No consensus exists on screening to detect the estimated 2 million Americans unaware of their chronic hepatitis C infections. Advisory groups differ, recommending birth-cohort screening for baby boomers, screening only high-risk individuals, or no screening. We assessed one-time risk assessment and screening to identify previously undiagnosed 40-74 year-olds given newly available hepatitis C treatments.A Markov model evaluated alternative risk-factor guided and birth-cohort screening and treatment strategies. Risk factors included drug use history, blood transfusion before 1992, and multiple sexual partners. Analyses of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey provided sex-, race-, age-, and risk-factor-specific hepatitis C prevalence and mortality rates. Nine strategies combined screening (no screening, risk-factor guided screening, or birth-cohort screening and treatment (standard therapy-peginterferon alfa and ribavirin, Interleukin-28B-guided (IL28B triple-therapy-standard therapy plus a protease inhibitor, or universal triple therapy. Response-guided treatment depended on HCV genotype. Outcomes include discounted lifetime costs (2010 dollars and quality adjusted life-years (QALYs. Compared to no screening, risk-factor guided and birth-cohort screening for 50 year-olds gained 0.7 to 3.5 quality adjusted life-days and cost $168 to $568 per person. Birth-cohort screening provided more benefit per dollar than risk-factor guided screening and cost $65,749 per QALY if followed by universal triple therapy compared to screening followed by IL28B-guided triple therapy. If only 10% of screen-detected, eligible patients initiate treatment at each opportunity, birth-cohort screening with universal triple therapy costs $241,100 per QALY. Assuming treatment with triple therapy, screening all individuals aged 40-64 years costs less than $100,000 per QALY.The cost-effectiveness of one-time birth-cohort hepatitis C screening for 40-64 year olds

  18. Pathogenetic role of Factor VII deficiency and thrombosis in cross-reactive material positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, A; Sambado, L; Bonamigo, E; Ferrari, S; Lombardi, A M

    2013-12-01

    Congenital Factor VII (FVII) deficiency can be divided into two groups: cases of "true" deficiency, or cross-reactive material (CRM) negative and variants that are cross-reactive material positive.The first form is commonly recognized as Type I condition whereas the second one is known as Type II. FVII deficiency has been occasionally associated with thrombotic events, mainly venous. The reasons underlying this peculiar manifestation are unknown even though in the majority of associated patients thrombotic risk factors are present. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if a thrombotic event was more frequent in Type I or in Type II defect.The majority of patients with FVII deficiency and thrombosis belong to Type II defects. In the following paper we discuss the possible role of the dysfunctional FVII cross-reaction material as a contributory cause for the occurrence of thrombosis.

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with hypertension depending on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sіrenko O.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors and hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on body weight. The study involved 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and stably selected therapy for more than 6 months at the age from 45 to 65 years (mean age 53,19 ± 5,40 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk was assessed, taking into account risk factors by SCORE scale and amended for patients with RA. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, body mass index, body area index were determined. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 41 (41% patients with rheuma¬toid arthritis and was associated with traditional risk factors (age, obesity, rheumatoid factor, hyperuricemia and the duration of glucocorticoid therapy. Obesity and excess body mass occurred in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, herewith the highest level of inflammation indicators and risk of cardiovascular events was in overweight patients. Obesity was associated with duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the activity of the inflammatory process, the duration of glucocorticoids taking. It is found that the traditional SCORE scale does not fully reflect the risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis. Identification of hypertension and obesity increases the information content of the risk assessment of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Dissimilar association of conventional immune-reactive versus specific insulin with cardiovascular risk factors: a consequence of proinsulinaemia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, P.A.; Mooy, J.M.; Kostense, P.J.; Popp-Snijders, C.; Bouter, L.M.; Heine, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    In this study involving 365 non-diabetic elderly Caucasians, we examined the relationship of immuno-specific insulin (ISI), total immuno-reactive insulin (IRI), proinsulin (PI) and proinsulin-insulin ratio (PI:ISI) to serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), systolic

  1. Dissimilar association of conventional immuno-reactive versus specific insulin with cardiovascular risk factors : a consequence of proinsulinaemia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, P A; Mooy, J M; Kostense, P J; Popp-Snijders, C; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J

    In this study involving 365 non-diabetic elderly Caucasians, we examined the relationship of immuno-specific insulin (ISI), total immuno-reactive insulin (IRI), proinsulin (PI) and proinsulin-insulin ratio (PI:ISI) to serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglyceride (TG), systolic

  2. Six-year change in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Christina M; Lutsey, Pamela L; Ballantyne, Christie M; Folsom, Aaron R; Pankow, James S; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Single measurements of elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. Large increases or sustained elevations in hs-CRP may be associated with even greater risk of these outcomes. The objective of this study was to characterize the association of 6-year change in hs-CRP with incident diabetes, incident cardiovascular events (heart disease, stroke, and heart failure), and mortality. We included 10,160 ARIC participants with hs-CRP measured at visits 2 (1990-1992) and 4 (1996-1998). Change in hs-CRP was categorized as sustained low/moderate (<3 mg/L at both visits), decreased (≥3 mg/L at visit 2 and <3 mg/L at visit 4), increased (<3 mg/L at visit 2 and ≥3 mg/L at visit 4), and sustained elevated (≥3 mg/L at both visits). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of 6-year change in hs-CRP with incident diabetes, cardiovascular events, and death during ~15 years after visit 4. Compared with persons with sustained low/moderate hs-CRP, those with increased or sustained elevated hs-CRP had an increased risk of incident diabetes (hazard ratios [95% CIs] 1.56 [1.38-1.76] and 1.39 [1.25-1.56], respectively), whereas those with deceased hs-CRP did not. Persons with sustained elevated hs-CRP had an increased risk of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and mortality (hazard ratios [95% CIs] 1.51 [1.23-1.85], 1.70 [1.32-2.20], 1.60 [1.35-1.89], and 1.52 [1.37-1.69], respectively) compared with those with sustained low/moderate hs-CRP. Associations for sustained elevated hs-CRP were greater than for those with increased hs-CRP over 6 years. Large increases or sustained elevations in hs-CRP over a 6-year period were associated with a subsequent increased risk of diabetes, and persons with sustained elevations in hs-CRP were at the highest risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Two measurements of hs-CRP are better than one for

  3. CYP2C19 activity and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with an acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna; Medina-Gil, José María; Garay-Sánchez, Paloma; Tugores, Antonio

    2017-09-20

    CYP2C19 is a major isoform of cytochrome P450 that metabolizes a number of drugs and is involved in the glucocorticoids synthesis. CYP2C19 polymorphisms have been associated with the genetic risk for type 2 diabetes. Five hundred and three patients with an acute coronary event were studied to assess the association between the CYP2C19 activity (CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3 and CYP2C19*17 variants) and the type of acute coronary syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors (arterial systemic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and smoking), analytical parameters and the extent and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Genotype distribution in our series was similar to that expected in the Caucasian population. Among the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, very poor metabolizer patients (*2/*2, *3/*3 or *2/*3) had a greater tendency to present diabetes mellitus needing insuline (P=.067). Conversely, when we compared very poor, poor and normal metabolizers vs. rapid and ultrarapid metabolizers we found significant differences in those diabetic patients under insulin treatment (64 patients [18%] vs. 17 patients [11%]; P=.032). On the contrary, analytical parameters, systemic arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking or the personal/family history of coronary artery disease did not reach statistical significance regardless of CYP2C19 activity. Similarly, the number and the type of coronary disease (thrombotic, fibrotic or both) did not differ between patients with different CYP2C19 enzyme activity. Patients with an acute coronary event and a very poor, poor and normal CYP2C19 metabolizer genotype have a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus needing insuline than patients with the rapid and ultrarapid metabolizers CPY2C19 genotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential Mediators between Fibromyalgia and C-Reactive protein: Results from a Large U.S. Community Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Termeh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Lilly, Christa; Innes, Kim Karen

    2017-07-07

    Fibromyalgia, a potentially debilitating chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology, may be characterized by inflammation. In this study, we investigated the relation of FMS to serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large population of adults (18+) and investigated the influence of other factors on this relationship, including BMI, comorbidities, as well as mood and sleep disturbance. Participants were 52,535 Ohio Valley residents (Fibromyalgia n = 1125). All participants completed a comprehensive health survey (2005-2006) part of the C8 Health Project; serum levels of CRP were obtained, as was history of Fibromyalgia physician diagnosis. Logistic and linear regressions were used for this cross-sectional analysis. Mean CRP was higher among participants reporting Fibromyalgia than those without (5.54 ± 9.8 vs.3.75 ± 7.2 mg/L, p BMI) and comorbidities to the model markedly weakened this relationship (AORs, respectively, for highest vs lowest CRP quartile = 1.2 (CI 1.0,1.4) and 1.1 (CI 0.9,1.3). In contrast, inclusion of mood and sleep impairment only modestly reduced the adjusted risk estimate (AORs for highest vs. lowest quartile = 1.3 (CI 1.1,1.5) for each)). Findings from this large cross-sectional study indicate a significant positive cross-sectional association of Fibromyalgia to serum C-reactive protein may be explained, in part, by BMI and comorbidity. Prospective research is needed to confirm this, and clarify the potential mediating influence of obesity and comorbid conditions on this relationship.

  5. Comparison of risk factors among blood donors, volunteers and replacement individuals, infected or not by hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJDB Felippe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily parenterally by contaminated blood and is often associated with: intravenous drug abuse, invasive procedures, blood transfusions, acupuncture, tattooing, and alcohol and tobacco use. This study aimed to quantify and evaluate the risk factors among blood donors, volunteer blood donors and replacement individuals, infected or not by the C virus. The main transmission routes of C virus were identified in 55 men and 25 women (GI monitored by the Ambulatory Unit of the Department of Tropical Diseases, Botucatu Medical School, and in 24 men and 26 women (GII, all active blood donors at the Bauru State Hospital Transfusional Agency. Both groups were similar in: tobacco and alcohol consumption, sexual behavior, tattooing and illicit drug use. The duration of alcohol and tobacco consumption and blood transfusions in GI were longer, whereas the option for steady partners, condom use, disposable materials and piercings were predominant in GII. In conclusion, the risk factors for hepatitis C demonstrate the necessity of health policies that act on the primary and secondary prevention levels (respectively, reduction of infection incidence and hepatopathy risk.

  6. The impact of CCR5-Δ32 deletion on C-reactive protein levels and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khoa Manh; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The C-C chemokine receptor 5-Δ32 deletion (CCR5-Δ32) has been associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), but the effect on cardiovascular diseases is uncertain. This study addresses the impact of CCR5-Δ32 on the risk of low-grade inflammation...... and hospitalization with cardiovascular diseases in a large cohort of blood donors. METHODS: Genotyping of 15,206 healthy participants from The Danish Blood Donor Study for CCR5-Δ32 was performed and combined with CRP measurements and questionnaire data. Cardiovascular disease diagnoses were identified by ICD-10......: In this cohort, carriers of the CCR5-Δ32 deletion had normal CRP levels but a borderline significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases....

  7. Neck circumference and clustered cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Piñero, José; Delgado-Alfonso, Alvaro; Gracia-Marco, Luis; Gómez-Martínez, Sonia; Esteban-Cornejo, Irene; Veiga, Oscar L; Marcos, Ascensión; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor

    2017-09-11

    Early detection of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as obesity, is crucial to prevent adverse long-term effects on individuals' health. Therefore, the aims were: (1) to explore the robustness of neck circumference (NC) as a predictor of CVD and examine its association with numerous anthropometric and body composition indices and (2) to release sex and age-specific NC cut-off values to classify youths as overweight/obese. Cross-sectional study. 23 primary schools and 17 secondary schools from Spain. 2198 students (1060 girls), grades 1-4 and 7-10. Pubertal development, anthropometric and body composition indices, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively), cardiorespiratory fitness, blood sampling triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), glucose and inflammatory markers. Homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) and cluster of CVD risk factors were calculated. NC was negatively associated with maximum oxygen consumption (R2=0.231, P<0.001 for boys; R2=0.018, P<0.001 for girls) and adiponectin (R2=0.049, P<0.001 for boys; R2=0.036, P<0.001 for girls); and positively associated with SBP, DBP, TC/HDL-c, TG, HOMA, complement factors C-3 and C-4, leptin and clustered CVD risk factor in both sexes (R2 from 0.035 to 0.353, P<0.01 for boys; R2 from 0.024 to 0.215, P<0.001 for girls). Moreover, NC was positively associated with serum C reactive protein and LDL-c only in boys (R2 from 0.013 to 0.055, P<0.05). NC is a simple, low-cost and practical screening tool of excess of upper body obesity and CVD risk factors in children and adolescents. Paediatricians can easily use it as a screening tool for overweight/obesity in children and adolescents. For this purpose, sex and age-specific thresholds to classify children and adolescents as normal weight or overweight/obese are provided. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  8. Estimating past hepatitis C infection risk from reported risk factor histories: implications for imputing age of infection and modeling fibrosis progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busch Michael P

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is prevalent and often causes hepatic fibrosis, which can progress to cirrhosis and cause liver cancer or liver failure. Study of fibrosis progression often relies on imputing the time of infection, often as the reported age of first injection drug use. We sought to examine the accuracy of such imputation and implications for modeling factors that influence progression rates. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data on hepatitis C antibody status and reported risk factor histories from two large studies, the Women's Interagency HIV Study and the Urban Health Study, using modern survival analysis methods for current status data to model past infection risk year by year. We compared fitted distributions of past infection risk to reported age of first injection drug use. Results Although injection drug use appeared to be a very strong risk factor, models for both studies showed that many subjects had considerable probability of having been infected substantially before or after their reported age of first injection drug use. Persons reporting younger age of first injection drug use were more likely to have been infected after, and persons reporting older age of first injection drug use were more likely to have been infected before. Conclusion In cross-sectional studies of fibrosis progression where date of HCV infection is estimated from risk factor histories, modern methods such as multiple imputation should be used to account for the substantial uncertainty about when infection occurred. The models presented here can provide the inputs needed by such methods. Using reported age of first injection drug use as the time of infection in studies of fibrosis progression is likely to produce a spuriously strong association of younger age of infection with slower rate of progression.

  9. Effect of treatment with Omega-3 fatty acids on C-reactive protein and tumor necrosis factor-alfa in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Tayyebi-Khosroshahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP, a strong independent risk marker of cardiovascular disease (CVD, and tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-α, a known pro-inflammatory cytokine, are elevated and have damaging effects in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. Omega-3 fatty acids play an important modulatory role in inflammatory responses. The aim of this study is to review the alterations in serum levels of TNF-α, CRP and other parameters caused by omega-3 supplementation in dialysis patients. The clinical trial was performed in 37 patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis in hemodialysis centers of three university hospitals in Tabriz. Blood samples were obtained from the study patients for hemoglobin, albumin, ferritin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol, TNF-α and high specific-CRP (hs-CRP measurement. The patients received 3 g omega-3 per day for 2 months. The side-effects noticed were nausea, diarrhea and dyspepsia and undesired drug smell. The difference noted in hemoglobin, albumin, ferritin, CRP, triglyceride, total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol before and after supplementation with omega-3 fatty acid was not statistically significant (P > 0.05. However, the use of omega-3 decreased the serum levels of TNF-α significantly. We conclude that the use of 3 g of omega-3 per day caused significant decrease in serum levels of TNF-α in the dialysis population, and its use is recommended in such patients.

  10. Risk Factors and Genotypes of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Libyan Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alashek WA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and incidence of HCV infection varies geographically due to exposureto different risk factors. Identification of HCV genotype is important to defining the epidemiology of thedisease. The objective of this study was to describe genotype distribution and its relation to riskfactors among HCV infected patients attending virology clinic of the Department of InfectiousDiseases at the Tripoli Medical Centre. Methods: The medical records of 891 Libyan chronic HCVinfected patients registered and followed up from January 2003 to January 2007 were reviewed. Datagathered includes patient's age, gender, risk factors and family history of HCV infection. Statisticalanalysis was performed using t, x2 and contingency coefficient tests. Results: The mean age was40.22±13.09 years. Two thirds of patients were males. Normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT atdiagnosis was found in 62% of the patients. HCV RNA < 2 million copies at diagnosis was foundamong 54% of patients. HCV genotype 1 (G1 was the most frequent (30.9%, followed by G4(29.2%. Genotype 2 affected 19.3% and G3 13.6%. No classification of HCV genotype was availablefor 2% of the patients. Many subtypes of HCV were detected with different frequencies (G1a and b,G2a, b, c and a/c, G3a and G4a and c/d. All genotypes of HCV were more common among males(P<0.001. Genotype 3 was the most frequent among male patients (88.6%. Regarding the riskfactors, 33% of patients had a history of hospitalization and/or surgical procedures, and 22.7% had ahistory of blood transfusion. A past history of intravenous drug abuse (IVDA was reported by 15% ofthe patients, and 15.9% reported a history of dental procedures. The relationship between thegenotype of HCV and risk factors was statistically significant (P<0.001. No history of risky exposurewas found among 10.8% of patients. Conclusion: Genotypes 1 and 4 were more predominantamong HCV infected patients. Males were affected more than females and

  11. Rosuvastatin for primary prevention among individuals with elevated high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and 5% to 10% and 10% to 20% 10-year risk. Implications of the Justification for Use of Statins in Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridker, Paul M; Macfadyen, Jean G; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2010-01-01

    Recent primary prevention guidelines issued in Canada endorse the use of statin therapy among individuals at "intermediate risk" who have elevated levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). However, trial data directly addressing whether this recommendation defines a patient populatio...

  12. Prevalence, sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors for hepatitis C infection among pregnant women in Calabar municipality, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboto, Clement Ibi; Andy, Iniobong Ebenge; Eni, Ogban Ibor; Jewell, Andrew Paul

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology and risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in developing countries where intravenous drug use (IDU) is uncommon its poorly understood. This study therefore aims to determine the prevalence of HCV and its associated risk factors among pregnant women in Calabar municipality. A total of 506 out of 716 antenatal care (ANC) patients seen at the General Hospital, Mary Slessor Avenue, Calabar between August and November 2005 and the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH) between October and November 2005 were evaluated for their HCV status using the One Step HCV Test kit (Binomial diagnostics, UK), with reference to the subjects' demographic and behavioural risk factors. HCV prevalence was determined to be 0.4% (2/506) and was only seen in women aged 38 years and over. Histories of blood transfusion, surgery, involvement in polygamous marriage, sharing of a toothbrush and female circumcision were all non-significant risk factors for the infecion. This study reveals a low HCV prevalence among pregnant women in Calabar municipality with no identifiable risk factor. The study calls for a re-evaluation of the transmission modes of HCV especially in developing countries where intravenous drug use is rare.

  13. C-reactive protein and angiographic characteristics of stable and unstable coronary artery disease : Data from the prospective PREVEND cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, C.A.; Post, W.J.; Hillege, H.L.; Tio, R.A.; Tijssen, J.G.; van Dijk, R.B.; Dijk, Willem; Bakker, S.J.; de Jong, P.E.; van Gilst, W.H.; Zijlstra, F.

    Aims: High sensitive-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is associated with coronary risk, which may be explained by an association with (unstable) coronary artery disease (CAD). Until now, histopathological and angiographic studies have failed to consistently demonstrate a strong relationship. However,

  14. Fasting plasma glucose and variation in cardiometabolic risk factors in people with high-risk HbA1c-defined prediabetes: A cross-sectional multiethnic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivanichakorn, Weerachai; Godsland, Ian F; Thomson, Hazel; Misra, Shivani; Phisalprapa, Pochamana; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Pramyothin, Pornpoj; Washirasaksiri, Chaiwat; Snehalatha, Chamukuttan; Ramachandran, Ambady; Alberti, K George M M; Johnston, Desmond G; Oliver, Nick S

    2017-12-01

    Variation in cardiometabolic risk in prediabetes and any impacts of ethnicity on such variation have been little studied. In an ethnically diverse dataset, selected according to a high-risk HbA1c-based definition of prediabetes, we have investigated relationships between glycaemia and cardiometabolic risk factors and the influence of ethnicity on these relationships. We undertook a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from a diabetes prevention study in the UK and a chronic care clinic in Thailand, selected for people without diabetes (fasting plasma glucose fasting plasma glucose (FPG), blood pressure (BP), lipids and insulin resistance-related risk factors (IRFs). Independently of individual characteristics including ethnicity, only systolic BP was weakly associated with FPG (beta coefficient 1.76 (95%CI 0.10-3.42), p 0.03) and only LDL-c with IFG (FPG 5.6 to fasting glucose (FPG ≥ 6.1 to <7.0 mmol/L) were considered. Relative to White, South Asian ethnicity was independently associated with lower systolic and diastolic BP, Black with lower triglycerides, cholesterol/HDL-c ratio and having 2 or more IRFs, and Thai with lower cholesterol/HDL-c ratio and all three non-white ethnicities with lower total and LDL cholesterol. In high-risk HbA1c-defined prediabetes additional measurement of FPG will add little to evaluation of cardiometabolic risk. Additionally, UK Whites tend to have the most adverse cardiometabolic profile of any ethnic group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic low-grade inflammation, lipid risk factors and mortality in functionally dependent elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasović Olga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. It has been proved that a highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP can be used as an established marker of chronic inflammation for cardiovascular risk assessment. Since mean values of both low-density cholesterol (LDL-C and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C decrease during aging, the knowledge that increased hsCRP concentration predicts mortality (Mt would influence therapy and treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to examine importance of chronic low grade inflammation and its association with lipid risk factors for all-cause Mt in functionally dependent elderly. Methods. The participants of this longitudinal prospective study were 257 functionally dependent elderly aged 65-99 years. Baseline measurements: anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting plasma total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, HDL-C, LDL-C, non- HDL-C, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c were recorded and different lipid ratios were calculated. Inflammation was assessed by the levels of white blood cells, fibrinogen and hsCRP. The participants with hsCRP grater than 10 mg/L were excluded from the study. The residual participants (77.4% women were divided into three groups according to their hsCRP levels: a low (< 1 mg/L, n = 70, average (1 to 3 mg/L, n = 69, and high (3-10 mg/L, n = 69 hsCRP group. Associations of all-cause Mt with different risk factors were examined using logistic regression analysis. Results. The hsCRP level showed a significant positive correlation with waist (r = 0.199, p = 0.004 and hip (r = 0.187, p = 0.007 circumferences, body mass index (r = 0.143, p = 0.040 and serum triglyceride level (r = 0.139, p = 0.045 and significant negative correlation with HDL-C (r = -0.164, p = 0.018. Ratios TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C were significantly smaller in the low hsCRP group compared to the average hsCRP group (p = 0.019, p = 0.045, respectively and without significant differences compared with the high hsCRP group. Two years after the

  16. The diagnostic value of c-reactive protein estimation in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of serum and CSF C-reactive protein (C-rp) in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. Design: An observational, respective hospital-based study. Place and duration of study: It was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Department of Pediatrics, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute Lahore, Over a Period of one year between march, 1999 and March, 2000. Subject and Methods: A randomized group of thirty patients, who presented with clinical features, suggestive of meningitis, were included in the study. C-reactive protein determinations were performed by latex agglutination method on the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of these patients. Results: In the present study, c-reactive protein was found to be a more sensitive test for differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial meningitis on initial examination than the usual conventional methods used to diagnose bacterial meningitis. CSF C-reactive protein had a greater sensitivity (92% as compared to serum C-reactive protein (71%). Conclusion: C-reactive protein determination in CSF was found to be a useful indicator of bacterial meningitis that can be used to distinguish it from viral meningitis. (author)

  17. [A prospective follow-up study on the association between serum level of C-reactive protein and risk of digestive system cancers in Chinese women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G; Cao, L Y; Chen, S H; Xie, S H; Feng, X S; Lyu, Z Y; Guo, L W; Li, F; Su, K; Chang, S; Ren, J S; Dai, M; Li, N; Wu, S L; He, J

    2016-11-23

    Objective: It has been reported by some prospective studies that C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with cancer risk. However, the correlation between CRP and digestive system cancers has not been evaluated in Chinese females. We conducted a large population-based cohort study to investigate whether elevated level of CRP in serum is associated with an increased risk of digestive system cancers in Chinese women. Methods: From the Chinese Kailuan Female Cohort, 19, 437 women were enrolled in this study in July 2006, and all of the subjects were followed up through 2014. At the baseline investigation, the serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) were tested for all subjects, and demographic information and risk factor data were collected. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratios ( HR ) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI ) for the baseline levels of hsCRP after adjusting for age, marital status, smoking, drinking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes and physical activity, and risk of digestive system tumors (including colorectal cancer, stomach cancer, pancreas cancer, liver and gallbladder cancer, and other cancers). Results: By Dec 31, 2014, a total of 100 incident cancer cases were observed, including 47 colorectal cancers, 17 stomach cancers, and altogether 29 pancreas, liver and gallbladder cancers. All the subjects investigated were divided into three groups according to the level of hsCRP (3 mg/L). The 8-year cumulative incidence of digestive system cancers were 405/100 000, 520/100 000 and 787/100 000 in these 3 groups, respectively (Log rank test χ 2 = 8.37, P =0.015). Compared to those with lower hsCRP levels (3 mg/L) had a significantly increased risk of pancreas, liver and gallbladder cancers ( HR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.06-6.91; P trend = 0.036). Conclusions: Elevated levels of hsCRP at baseline may be associated with increased risk of certain digestive system cancers.

  18. Effect of obesity on cardiovascular disease risk factors in African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Okafor, Queen; Cowan, Patricia A; Wicks, Mona N; Rice, Muriel; Husch, Donna S; Khoo, Michelle S C

    2012-04-01

    Obesity is a growing health care concern with implications for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Obesity and CVD morbidity and mortality are highly prevalent among African American women. This pilot study examined the association between obesity and the traditional and emerging CVD risk factors in a sample of African American women. Participants comprised 48 women (27 obese, 21 normal weight) aged 18-45. with no known history of CVD. The women completed demographic and 7-day physical activity recall questionnaires. Height and weight were used to determine body mass index (BMI). Hypertension risk was assessed using the average of two resting blood pressure (BP) measurements. Lipid profile, blood glucose, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and E-selectin (eSel) levels were assessed using fasting blood samples. Laboratory findings were interpreted using the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and Adult Treatment Panel (ATP) III reference guidelines as well as manufacturers' reference ranges for the novel CVD risk factors. The most common traditional risk factors were physical inactivity (72.9%), positive family history of CVD (58.3%), and obesity (56.3%). Obese individuals had elevated systolic BP (p = .0002), diastolic BP (p = .0007) and HDL-cholesterol (p = .01), triglyceride (p = .02), hs-CRP (p = .002), and fibrinogen (p = .01), when compared with normal-weight women. The findings suggest an association between obesity and higher prevalence of both traditional and emerging CVD risk factors in young African American women.

  19. C-reactive protein and homocysteine predict long-term mortality in young ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Halvor; Nyland, Harald; Idicula, Titto; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine on follow-up and subsequent mortality in young ischemic stroke patients in a population-based study. Young ischemic stroke patients were followed-up on average 6 years after the index stroke. CRP and homocysteine levels were measured and risk factors were recorded, including myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, and cancer. Stroke outcome was measured using the modified Rankin Scale score. Subsequent survival was obtained by examining the official population registry. Cox regression analyses were performed. In total, 198 patients were included in this study (82 [41%] women and 116 [59%] men). The mean age on follow-up was 47.8 years. In total, 36 (18.2%) patients died during the subsequent mean follow-up of 12.4 years. Cox regression analysis revealed that mortality was associated with CRP (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05; P=.001) and homocysteine levels (HR 1.04; P=.02) in patients without dissection. Kaplan-Meier curves grouped by dichotomized CRP (CRP≤1 v >1 mg/L) showed increasing separation between the survival curves, and likewise for dichotomized homocysteine (≤9 v >9 μg/L). There is an independent association between CRP and homocysteine levels obtained several years after ischemic stroke in young adults and subsequent mortality, even when adjusting for traditional risk factors. This association seems to continue for at least 12 years after the measurements. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between Plaque Composition as assessed by Virtual Histology and C-reactive Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Dimytri Alexandre de Alvim; Sousa, Amanda Guerra Moraes R.; Costa Junior, José de Ribamar; Costa, Ricardo Alves da; Staico, Rodolfo; Tanajura, Luis Fernando Leite; Centemero, Marinella Patrizia; Feres, Fausto; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Sousa, J. Eduardo Moraes R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that coronary plaque composition plays a pivotal role in plaque instability, and imaging modalities and serum biomarkers have been investigated to identify vulnerable plaque. Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) characterizes plaque components as calcified, fibrotic, fibrofatty, or necrotic core. C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent risk factor and a powerful predictor of future coronary events. However, a relationship between inflammatory response indicated by CRP and plaque characteristics in ACS patients remains not well established. To determine, by using VH-IVUS, the relation between coronary plaque components and plasma high-sensitivity CRP levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). 52 patients with ACS were enrolled in this prospective study. Electrocardiographically-gated VH-IVUS were performed in the culprit lesion before PCI. Blood sample was drawn from all patients before the procedure and after 24 hours, and hs-CRP levels were determined. Mean age was 55.3±4.9 years, 76.9% were men and 30.9% had diabetes. Mean MLA was 3.9±1.3 mm 2 , and plaque burden was 69±11.3%, as assessed by IVUS. VH-IVUS analysis at the minimum luminal site identified plaque components: fibrotic (59.6±15.8%), fibrofatty (7.6±8.2%), dense calcium (12.1±9.2%) and necrotic core (20.7±12.7%). Plasma hs-CRP (mean 16.02±18.07 mg/L) did not correlate with necrotic core (r=-0.089, p = 0.53) and other plaque components. In this prospective study with patients with ACS, the predominant components of the culprit plaque were fibrotic and necrotic core. Serum hs C-reactive protein levels did not correlate with plaque composition

  1. Correlation between Plaque Composition as assessed by Virtual Histology and C-reactive Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Dimytri Alexandre de Alvim, E-mail: dimytri@cardiol.br; Sousa, Amanda Guerra Moraes R.; Costa Junior, José de Ribamar; Costa, Ricardo Alves da; Staico, Rodolfo; Tanajura, Luis Fernando Leite; Centemero, Marinella Patrizia; Feres, Fausto; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Sousa, J. Eduardo Moraes R. [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that coronary plaque composition plays a pivotal role in plaque instability, and imaging modalities and serum biomarkers have been investigated to identify vulnerable plaque. Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) characterizes plaque components as calcified, fibrotic, fibrofatty, or necrotic core. C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent risk factor and a powerful predictor of future coronary events. However, a relationship between inflammatory response indicated by CRP and plaque characteristics in ACS patients remains not well established. To determine, by using VH-IVUS, the relation between coronary plaque components and plasma high-sensitivity CRP levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). 52 patients with ACS were enrolled in this prospective study. Electrocardiographically-gated VH-IVUS were performed in the culprit lesion before PCI. Blood sample was drawn from all patients before the procedure and after 24 hours, and hs-CRP levels were determined. Mean age was 55.3±4.9 years, 76.9% were men and 30.9% had diabetes. Mean MLA was 3.9±1.3 mm{sup 2}, and plaque burden was 69±11.3%, as assessed by IVUS. VH-IVUS analysis at the minimum luminal site identified plaque components: fibrotic (59.6±15.8%), fibrofatty (7.6±8.2%), dense calcium (12.1±9.2%) and necrotic core (20.7±12.7%). Plasma hs-CRP (mean 16.02±18.07 mg/L) did not correlate with necrotic core (r=-0.089, p = 0.53) and other plaque components. In this prospective study with patients with ACS, the predominant components of the culprit plaque were fibrotic and necrotic core. Serum hs C-reactive protein levels did not correlate with plaque composition.

  2. Risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection in the Colombian Caribbean coast: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Ismael de Jesús; Lince, Beatriz; Caez, Clara; De Vuono, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    An estimated 6.8-8.9 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus in Latin America, of which less than 1% receives antiviral treatment. Studies so far in Colombia have attempted to determine the prevalence of the disease in some risk groups, thus preventing the identification of other factors potentially involved in the spread of the infection. To identify traditional and non-traditional risk factors for chronic hepatitis C in the Colombian Caribbean coast. This was a case-control study (1:3) matched by health care provider and age (± 10 years) conducted at the primary care level of gastroenterology and hepatology outpatient services. All patients with a positive ELISA underwent a confirmatory viral load test. A multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the independent predictors of infection. Blood transfusion (OR=159.2; 95% CI: 35.4-715; pstudies before recommending their use in the design of new screening strategies.

  3. Comparative evaluation of levels of C-reactive protein and PMN in periodontitis patients related to cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, G; Nagaraj, M; Jayashree, A

    2013-05-01

    Numerous cross-sectional studies have suggested that chronic periodontitis is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence that periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases are linked by inflammatory factors including C-reactive protein. The purpose of the study was to investigate the levels of CRP and PNM cells as a marker of inflammatory host response in the serum of chronic periodontitis patients and in patients with CVD. Study population included 75 patients; both male and female above 35 years were included for the study. The patients were divided into three groups of 25 each - Group I: Chronic periodontitis patients with CVD, Group II: Chronic periodontitis patients without CVD and Group III: Control subjects (without chronic periodontitis and CVD). Patients with chronic periodontitis had ≥8 teeth involved with probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm involved. The control group had PD ≤ 3 mm and no CVD. Venous blood was collected from the patients and C-reactive protein levels were analyzed by immunoturbidimetry. PMN was recorded by differential count method. On comparison, OHI-S Index, GI, mean PD, CRP and PMN values showed significant difference from Group I to III. CRP level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group II and Group III. PMN level was highly significant in Group I when compared with Group III PMN level which was not significant. This study indicated that periodontitis may add the inflammation burden of the individual and may result in increased levels of CVD based on serum CRP levels. Thus, controlled prospective trials with large sample size should be carried out to know the true nature of the relationship if indeed one exists.

  4. Risk factors for mortality among malnourished HIV-infected adults eligible for antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodd, Susannah L; Kelly, Paul; Koethe, John R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of HIV-infected adults starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa are malnourished. We aimed to increase understanding of the factors affecting their high mortality, particularly in the high-risk period before ART initiation. METHODS: We...... weeks of ART (66; 95 % CI 57, 76) and was not affected by trial study arm. In adjusted analyses, lower CD4 count, BMI and mid-arm circumference and raised C-reactive protein were associated with an increased risk of mortality throughout the study. Male sex and lower hand-grip strength carried...... deaths represent advanced HIV disease rather than treatment-related events. Therefore, more efforts are needed to promote earlier diagnosis and immediate initiation of ART, as recently recommended by WHO for all persons with HIV worldwide. The positive effect of tuberculosis treatment suggests...

  5. Potential risk of HBV reactivation in patients with resolved HBV infection undergoing direct-acting antiviral treatment for HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Furusyo, Norihiro; Murata, Masayuki; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Takeo; Ura, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    Despite a known risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatment for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-HBV coinfection, it remains unclear whether patients with past HBV infection are at risk for reactivation. This study evaluated the risk of HBV reactivation during treatment with sofosbuvir (SOF)-based regimens, focusing on patients with resolved HBV infection. This study analyzes the data of 183 consecutive patients treated with SOF-based regimens. From these patients, 63 with resolved HBV infection (negative for hepatitis B surface antigen [HBsAg] and undetectable HBV DNA but positive for hepatitis B core antibody) were eligible for this study. HBV reactivation was defined as a quantifiable HBV DNA level >20 IU/mL. Among the patients antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) positive (10-500 mIU/mL) (n = 30), the titre of anti-HBs was significantly decreased with time, as shown by the results of repeated-measures analysis of variance (P = .0029). Overall, four patients (6.3%) with resolved HBV infection came to have detectable HBV DNA during treatment, including one who had HBV reactivation at week 4 (HBV DNA 80 IU/mL). However, none developed hepatic failure. Among four patients who had detectable HBV DNA during treatment, all were negative or had very low-titre (HBV infection and negative or very low-titre anti-HBs at baseline are at risk for having detectable HBV DNA transiently during treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Risk Factors and Genotypes of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Libyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence and incidence of HCV infection varies geographically due to exposure to different risk factors. Identification of HCV genotype is important to defining the epidemiology of the disease. The objective of this study was to describe genotype distribution and its relation to risk factors among HCV ...

  7. Hepatitis C virus risk factors in blood donors from Sohag governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Abdelaziz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Egypt has the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV worldwide. Most of data came from lower Egypt regions (Cairo and northern to it. So, we decided to study risk factors and prevalence of HCV transmission in our governorate. In this cross sectional study, we recruited 631 blood donors from April, 2011 to March 2012 who were tested for anti-HCV, HBs Ag, anti- HBc and anti-HIV. Fifty seven donors were excluded as they are HBs Ag and anti-HBc positive. We found 138 (24% HCV seropositive participants. Logistic regression final model demonstrated that endoscopy, hospital admission, socioeconomic status, IV drug use and age made a significant contribution to prediction (P=0.0001. The level of education also made significant contribution to prediction (P=0.014. In conclusion, it is wise to determine high HCV prevalence areas and risk factors for its seropositivity then build up a governorate suitable infection control program concentrating upon prevention more than treatment of HCV patients. Also, the introduction of pre-test and post-test counseling in blood banks will help in better donor selection and early detection of patients.

  8. Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus among women with hepatitis C virus before liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarallo, P A; Smolowitz, J; Carriero, D; Tarallo, J; Siegel, A; Jia, H; Emond, J C

    2013-08-01

    We sought to assess the prevalence and risk factors for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among female liver transplant (LT) candidates. Traditional health screening before LT listing has included Pap smear and is typically carried out by the patient's local provider. The prevalence of high-risk HPV in this population has not been studied. With Institutional Review Board approval, 62 LT candidates received a liquid-based Pap smear with high-risk HPV testing as part of their pre-transplant evaluation by a single provider. Clinical variables included age, ethnicity, insurance status, prior Pap smear, and HPV results, HPV risk factors including age of first intercourse, number of lifetime partners, last sexual activity, smoking, birth control pill use, history of sexually transmitted infections, human immunodeficiency virus status, immunosuppressive medication, medical diagnoses, prescribed medications, and history of hepatitis A, B, C, or D. The 62 women had a median age of 56 years, and 39% had high-risk behavior known to be associated with HPV. Ten of 62 patients (16.1%) had high-risk HPV at baseline screening, 5 of whom had atypical cytology. All of the patients who were positive for high-risk HPV had an etiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as the underlying cause of liver disease, with the majority (90%) having no history of high-risk behavior for HPV. In contrast, all patients with high-risk behavior who were HCV negative were HPV negative. Fisher's exact test demonstrated a statistically significant relationship between HPV and HCV; odds ratio = 24.4, 95% confidence interval, 1.4, 438.7, P-value = 0.0013. None of the other potential risk factors were associated with HPV in this cohort. In this study, we provide evidence of a strong association between HCV and HPV in LT candidates, which has not been previously reported. HPV positivity was observed in non-sexually active women, suggesting a reactivation of dormant HPV. An association between

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helal Imed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The aim of our investigation was the evaluation of an extensive cardiovascular profile in hemodialysis (HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. We studied 74 patients with ESRD (38 males, 36 females, maintained either on chronic HD (n= 50 or chronic PD (n= 24 and age and sex matched 20 healthy subjects as controls. The lipid profile, homo-cysteine (Hcy and C reactive protein (CRP were measured. When compared to a healthy popu-lation, HD patients displayed a marked atherogenic profile, as attested by increased levels of total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C, apolipoprotein A (Apo A, CRP, Hcy and lower concentrations of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C, Apo B, albumin (ALB. A significant difference was noted concerning the rates of Apo B, HDL-C, TC, ALB and Hcy. Same biological disorders that those found at HD patients were noted in these PD patients. One also noted lower concentration in Apo A. there were a significant diffe-rence with the reference group concerning the rates of albumin, Apo A, HDL-Cl and Hcy. When compared to PD patients, HD patients had significantly decreased concentration of LDL-C. The peculiar metabolic changes observed in the present study confirm the marked tendency of patients with impaired renal function for developing cardiovascular diseases, irrespectively of the type of dialysis. We suggest including uremia-related risk factors in the panel for evaluation of cardio-vascular risk in dialysis patients.

  10. Solid-phase classical complement activation by C-reactive protein (CRP) is inhibited by fluid-phase CRP-C1q interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoewall, Christopher; Wetteroe, Jonas; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Askendal, Agneta; Almroth, Gunnel; Skogh, Thomas; Tengvall, Pentti

    2007-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) interacts with phosphorylcholine (PC), Fcγ receptors, complement factor C1q and cell nuclear constituents, yet its biological roles are insufficiently understood. The aim was to characterize CRP-induced complement activation by ellipsometry. PC conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (PC-KLH) was immobilized to cross-linked fibrinogen. A low-CRP serum with different amounts of added CRP was exposed to the PC-surfaces. The total serum protein deposition was quantified and deposition of IgG, C1q, C3c, C4, factor H, and CRP detected with polyclonal antibodies. The binding of serum CRP to PC-KLH dose-dependently triggered activation of the classical pathway. Unexpectedly, the activation was efficiently down-regulated at CRP levels >150 mg/L. Using radial immunodiffusion, CRP-C1q interaction was observed in serum samples with high CRP concentrations. We propose that the underlying mechanism depends on fluid-phase interaction between C1q and CRP. This might constitute another level of complement regulation, which has implications for systemic lupus erythematosus where CRP is often low despite flare-ups

  11. Collaborative pooled analysis of data on C-reactive protein gene variants and coronary disease: judging causality by Mendelian randomisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danesh, J.; Hingorani, A.; Wensley, F.

    2008-01-01

    Many prospective studies have reported associations between circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but causality remains uncertain. Studies of CHD are being conducted that involve measurement of common polymorphisms of the CRP gene known to be associ...

  12. Lifestyle and clinical factors associated with elevated C-reactive protein among newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: a cross-sectional study from the nationwide DD2 cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Mor, Anil; Rungby, Jørgen; Berencsi, Klara; Nielsen, Jens Steen; Stidsen, Jacob V; Friborg, Søren; Brandslund, Ivan; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2014-08-28

    We aimed to examine the prevalence of and modifiable factors associated with elevated C-reactive Protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, in men and women with newly diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) in a population-based setting. CRP was measured in 1,037 patients (57% male) with newly diagnosed Type 2 DM included in the prospective nationwide Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) project. We assessed the prevalence of elevated CRP and calculated relative risks (RR) examining the association of CRP with lifestyle and clinical factors by Poisson regression, stratified by gender. We used linear regression to examine the association of CRP with other biomarkers. The median CRP value was 2.1 mg/L (interquartile range, 1.0 - 4.8 mg/L). In total, 405 out of the 1,037 Type 2 DM patients (40%) had elevated CRP levels (>3.0 mg/L). More women (46%) than men (34%) had elevated CRP. Among women, a lower risk of elevated CRP was observed in patients receiving statins (adjusted RR (aRR) 0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6-0.9)), whereas a higher risk was seen in patients with central obesity (aRR 2.3 (95% CI 1.0-5.3)). For men, CRP was primarily elevated among patients with no regular physical activity (aRR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1-1.9)), previous cardiovascular disease (aRR1.5 (95% CI 1.2-1.9) and other comorbidity. For both genders, elevated CRP was 1.4-fold increased in those with weight gain >30 kg since age 20 years. Sensitivity analyses showed consistent results with the full analysis. The linear regression analysis conveyed an association between high CRP and increased fasting blood glucose. Among newly diagnosed Type 2 DM patients, 40% had elevated CRP levels. Important modifiable risk factors for elevated CRP may vary by gender, and include low physical activity for men and central obesity and absence of statin use for women.

  13. [ALAT and viral RNA as risk factors in 68 blood donors with anti-hepatitis C antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullen, E; De Saussure, P; Soulier-Lauper, M

    1993-01-23

    Determine the risk factors in blood donors with anti hepatitis C antibodies (anti-HCV ab) possible liver involvement and evaluation of their infectious potential by a search for viral RNA in blood. Between July 1990 and October 1991, 19,632 blood donors were screened for hepatitis C. Antibodies to HCV were detected in 74 donors (2nd generation ELISA, Abbott). We evaluated the risk factors, determined ALAT levels and looked for circulating RNA virus by amplification of the non-coding region of the viral genome (RTPCR) in 68 of these 74 donors screened. A control was chosen arbitrarily from 103 donors with high ALAT levels, but with no antibodies to HCV nor detectable circulating viral DNA. The prevalence of anti-HCV ab in blood donors in 0.37%. No risk factor was found in 29 donors (43%). Parenteral exposure (former i.v. drug addiction and history of transfusions) was found to be the mode of transmission of hepatitis C in 23 donors (34%). History of NANB jaundice (non-post transfusion) was reported in 1 donor (1%). The remaining 15 donors (22%) were found to have minor risk factors - either isolated or in combination (exposure, tatoos, multiple sexual partners). Former i.v. drug addiction (p = 0.0000006) as well as a history of transfusions (p = 0.0071) are significantly more frequent in the group of donors with antibodies to HCV. None of the 35 sexual partners of the tested donors proved to be positive. 21 donors (30%) had high ALAT (+2 SD). Viral RNA was detected in blood of 26 donors (38%). The proportion of cases with positive viral RNA was 61% if only those donors with high ALAT levels were taken into consideration (13 positive of 21). Risk factors were found in 39 donors (57%) with antibodies to HCV. History of parenteral exposure was found to be significantly more frequent than in the control group (p = 0.0000054). Sexual transmission within couples was not demonstrated in the population tested. A positive PCR test is a probable indicator of a continuous

  14. c.29C>T polymorphism in the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFB1) gene correlates with increased risk of urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Kirti Amresh; Pooja, Singh; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Sankhwar, Pushp Lata; Goel, Apul; Rajender, Singh

    2015-10-01

    TGF-β1 is a pleiotropic cytokine, which plays a dual role in tumor development. In the early stages, it inhibits the growth of tumor while in the late stages of carcinoma, it promotes tumor growth. The purpose of this study was to analyze the distribution of the TGFB1 gene polymorphisms between cases and controls so as to assess their correlation with bladder cancer risk. This study included 237 cases of urinary bladder cancer and 290 age matched controls from the same ethnic background. Three polymorphisms in the TGFB1 gene, c.29C>T (rs-1800470), c.74G>C (rs-1800471) and +140A>G (rs-13447341), were analyzed by direct DNA sequencing. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences in the demographical data, except that the frequencies of smokers and non-vegetarians were higher in the cases. Eighty percent of the bladder cancer patients had superficial transitional cell carcinoma, and 53.16% and 26.31% of the patients were in grade I and grade II, respectively. We found that c.29C>T substitution increased the risk of bladder cancer significantly and recessive model of analysis was the best fitted model (p=0.004; OR=1.72 95% CI 1.18-2.50). A significantly higher risk in the recessive form was also suggested by co-dominant analysis showing that the homozygous form (TT) was a significant risk factor in comparison to CC and CT genotypes. The other two polymorphisms, c.74G>C (p=0.18, OR=0.67 95% CI 0.37-1.21) and +140A>G (p=0.416, OR=0.77 95% CI 0.41-1.45) did not affect the risk of urinary bladder cancer. In conclusion, we found that the TGFB1 c.29C>T substitution increases the risk of bladder cancer significantly while c.74G>C and +140A>G polymorphisms do not affect the risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, A M; Williams, G M

    2005-09-01

    Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food requires knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in the target organ which results from the competition between DNA adduct formation and repair. Estimates of DNA adduct levels can be made by direct measurement or indirectly as a consequence of their presence, for example, by tumor formation in animal models or exposed populations epidemiologically. Food-borne DNA-reactive carcinogens are present from a variety of sources. They are generally not intrinsically DNA-reactive but require bioactivation to DNA-reactive metabolites a process which may be modulated by the compound itself or the presence of other xenobiotics. A single DNA reactant may form several distinct DNA adducts each undergoing different rates of repair. Some DNA reactants may be photochemically activated or produce reactive oxygen species and thus indirect oxidative DNA damage. The levels of DNA adducts arising from exposures influenced by variations in the doses, the frequency with which an individual is exposed, and rates of DNA repair for specific adducts. Each adduct has a characteristic efficiency with which it induces mutations. Based on experience with the well-studied DNA-reactive food carcinogen aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)), a limit of 20 ppb or approximately 30 microg/day has been set and is considered a tolerable daily intake (TDI). Since AFB(1) is considered a potent carcinogen, doses of carcinogens is made.

  16. Interactions between C-Reactive Protein Genotypes with Markers of Nutritional Status in Relation to Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelie Nienaber-Rousseau

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein concentrations (CRP, is a risk factor for chronic diseases. Both genetic and environmental factors affect susceptibility to inflammation. As dietary interventions can influence inflammatory status, we hypothesized that dietary effects could be influenced by interactions with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the CRP gene. We determined 12 CRP SNPs, as well as various nutrition status markers in 2010 black South Africans and analyzed their effect on CRP. Interactions were observed for several genotypes with obesity in determining CRP. Lipid intake modulated the pro-inflammatory effects of some SNPs, i.e., an increase in both saturated fatty acid and monounsaturated fatty acid intake in those homozygous for the polymorphic allele at rs2808630 was associated with a larger increase in CRP. Those harboring the minor alleles at rs3093058 and rs3093062 presented with significantly higher CRP in the presence of increased triglyceride or cholesterol intake. When harboring the minor allele of these SNPs, a high omega-6 to -3 ratio was, however, found to be anti-inflammatory. Carbohydrate intake also modulated CRP SNPs, as HbA1C and fasting glucose levels interacted with some SNPs to influence the CRP. This investigation highlights the impact that nutritional status can have on reducing the inherent genetic susceptibility to a heightened systemic inflammatory state.

  17. Hepatitis B virus reactivation during immunosuppressive therapy: Appropriate risk stratification

    OpenAIRE

    Seto, Wai-Kay

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation during immunosuppresive therapy has increased remarkably during recent years. HBV reactivation in hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive individuals has been well-described in certain immunosuppressive regimens, including therapies containing corticosteroids, anthracyclines, rituximab, antibody to tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HBV reactivation could also occur in HBsAg-negati...

  18. Vaccine-induced cross-genotype reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Gottwein, Judith M; Houghton, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We detected cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies (NtAb) against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chimpanzees vaccinated with HCV-1 (genotype 1a) recombinant E1/E2 envelope glycoproteins. Five vaccinated chimpanzees, protected following HCV-1 challenge, were initially studied using the heterologous H77......a, with limited reactivity against 2a and 3a. Our study provides encouragement for the development of a recombinant envelope-based vaccine against hepatitis C....

  19. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P

  20. Affective reactivity to daily stressors is associated with elevated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Nancy L; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E; Ong, Anthony D; Almeida, David M

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation increases the risk of chronic diseases, but the links between emotional responses to daily events and inflammation are unknown. We examined individual differences in affective reactivity to daily stressors (i.e., changes in positive and negative affect in response to stressors) as predictors of inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A cross-sectional sample of 872 adults from the National Study of Daily Experiences (substudy of Midlife in the United States II) reported daily stressors and affect during telephone interviews for 8 days. Blood samples were obtained at a separate clinic visit and assayed for inflammatory markers. Multilevel models estimated trait affective reactivity slopes for each participant, which were inputted into regression models to predict inflammation. People who experienced greater decreases in positive affect on days when stressors occurred (i.e., positive affect reactivity) had elevated log IL-6, independent of demographic, physical, psychological, and behavioral factors (B = 1.12, SE = 0.45, p = .01). Heightened negative affect reactivity was associated with higher log CRP among women (p = .03) but not men (p = .57); health behaviors accounted for this association in women. Adults who fail to maintain positive affect when faced with minor stressors in everyday life appear to have elevated levels of IL-6, a marker of inflammation. Women who experience increased negative affect when faced with minor stressors may be at particular risk of elevated inflammation. These findings add to growing evidence regarding the health implications of affective reactivity to daily stressors. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Risk factors associated with the presentation of brucellosis in the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Aceves Pérez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to describe the risk factors associated with the presentation of brucellosis on the spine, and determine the strength of association between these factors. METHODS: The medical records of patients with brucellosis on the spine were analyzed and a spreadsheet was created to compile the following data: age, sex, place of origin and residence, risk factors (exposure at work, consumption of unpasteurized products and comorbidities, clinical presentation (lumbar pain, anorexia, headache, myalgia, fatigue, paresthesia, dysesthesia, muscle weakness, weight loss, fever, affected spine level, presence of abscesses, disease duration (acute, subacute, chronic, laboratory studies (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, serology, blood culture, Rose Bengal test, histopathological reports, imaging studies (x-rays, MRI, bone gammagraphy, established treatment (medical and/or surgical, therapeutic failure and sequelae. RESULTS: A total of 17 patients, 10 women (58.8% and seven men (41.2%, were reviewed from January 2007 to January 2011. The group had a mean age of 57.8 years with a standard deviation of +13.91 and age range between 16-74 years. CONCLUSIONS: There is no significant difference between the groups compared with respect to age and sex, however, improvement of the neurological deficit was observed in eight patients who underwent surgical procedure.

  2. Cluster analysis of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in women of reproductive age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Chang, Yuan-chin Ivan; Chang, Yu-chia; Wang, Chia-Woei; Chen, Chi-Huang; Hsu, Ming-I

    2014-05-01

    To study the association between endocrine disturbances and metabolic complications in women seeking gynecologic care. Retrospective study, cluster analysis. Outpatient clinic, university medical center. 573 women, including 384 at low risk and 189 at high risk of cardiometabolic disease. None. Cardiovascular and metabolic parameters and clinical and biochemical characteristics. Risk factors for metabolic disease are associated with a low age of menarche, high levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and liver enzymes, and low levels of sex hormone-binding globulin. Overweight/obese status, polycystic ovary syndrome, oligo/amenorrhea, and hyperandrogenism were found to increase the risk of cardiometabolic disease. However, hyperprolactinemia and premature ovarian failure were not associated with the risk of cardiometabolic disease. In terms of androgens, the serum total testosterone level and free androgen index but not androstenedione or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were associated with cardiometabolic risk. Although polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with metabolic risk, obesity was the major determinant of cardiometabolic disturbances in reproductive-aged women. Hyperprolactinemia and premature ovarian failure were not associated with the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. NCT01826357. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, A.M.; Williams, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food requires knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in the target organ which results from the competition between DNA adduct formation and repair. Estimates of DNA adduct levels can be made by direct measurement or indirectly as a consequence of their presence, for example, by tumor formation in animal models or exposed populations epidemiologically. Food-borne DNA-reactive carcinogens are present from a variety of sources. They are generally not intrinsically DNA-reactive but require bioactivation to DNA-reactive metabolites a process which may be modulated by the compound itself or the presence of other xenobiotics. A single DNA reactant may form several distinct DNA adducts each undergoing different rates of repair. Some DNA reactants may be photochemically activated or produce reactive oxygen species and thus indirect oxidative DNA damage. The levels of DNA adducts arising from exposures influenced by variations in the doses, the frequency with which an individual is exposed, and rates of DNA repair for specific adducts. Each adduct has a characteristic efficiency with which it induces mutations. Based on experience with the well-studied DNA-reactive food carcinogen aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ), a limit of 20 ppb or ∼30 μg/day has been set and is considered a tolerable daily intake (TDI). Since AFB 1 is considered a potent carcinogen, doses of 32 P-postlabeling or the use of surrogates such as hemoglobin adducts, together with approaches to evaluate the results. A discussion of approaches to estimating possible threshold effects for DNA-reactive carcinogens is made

  4. [Relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and obesity/metabolic syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Wang, Wenpeng; Teng, Yue; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Ping; Yan, Yinkun; Mi, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To explore the relationship between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and obesity/metabolic syndrome (MetS) related factors in children. 403 children aged 10-14 and born in Beijing were involved in this study. Height, weight, waist circumference, fat mass percentage (Fat%), blood pressure (BP), hsCRP, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C) were observed among these children. hsCRP was transformed with base 10 logarithm (lgCRP). MetS was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation 2007 definition. Associations between MetS related components and hsCRP were tested using partial correlation analysis, analysis of covariance and linear regression models. 1) lgCRP was positively correlated with BMI, waist circumference, Fat%,BP, FPG, LDL-C and TC while negatively correlated with HDL-C. With BMI under control, the relationships disappeared, but LDL-C (r = 0.102). 2) The distributions of lgCRP showed obvious differences in all the metabolic indices, in most groups, respectively. With BMI under control, close relationships between lgCRP and high blood pressure/high TG disappeared and the relationship with MetS weakened. 3) Through linear regression models, factors as waist circumference, BMI, Fat% were the strongest factors related to hsCRP, followed by systolic BP, HDL-C, diastolic BP, TG and LDL-C. With BMI under control, the relationships disappeared, but LDL-C(β = 0.045). hsCRP was correlated with child obesity, lipid metabolism and MetS. Waist circumference was the strongest factors related with hsCRP. Obesity was the strongest and the independent influencing factor of hsCRP.

  5. Elevated uric acid and obesity-related cardiovascular disease risk factors among hypertensive youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, Lauren D; Miller, Edgar R; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J; Loeffler, Lauren F; Holmes, Kathryn W; Appel, Lawrence J; Brady, Tammy M

    2015-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is associated with high blood pressure in adolescents and with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adults. We sought to determine if UA is independently associated with CVD risk factors and left ventricular mass (LVM) over time in hypertensive youth. This was a 1-year prospective observational study of hypertensive children aged 3-19 years. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of serum UA with CVD risk factors and LVM were explored. Of the 49 children who completed both the baseline and 12-month assessments, at baseline the mean age was 13.8 years and mean UA was 5.5 mg/dL; 24% had elevated UA, 51% were overweight/obese and 39% had LVH. Measures of adiposity, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, LVM and LVH were all significantly associated with elevated UA at baseline, but not with change over time. Each 1 mg/dL increase in baseline UA was associated with a 2.5 g/m(2.7) increase in the LVM index at follow-up (95% confidence interval 0.64, 4.39; p = 0.01); after adjustment for age, sex, race, body mass index z-score, change in UA, time, blood pressure and medication use, this association was no longer significant. Hypertensive children with elevated UA have a higher prevalence of obesity-related CVD risk factors. Among hypertensive children, UA may be a marker of adiposity and not an independent CVD risk factor.

  6. Risk factors for peptic ulcer in patients with acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIAO Juan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical characteristics of acute pancreatitis (AP associated with peptic ulcer (PU and to analyze the risk factors for PU in AP patients. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical data of 156 AP patients who were admitted to our hospital from January 2008 to January 2012. All patients underwent gastroscopy within 48 h after admission to detect PU and Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection. The severity of AP was assessed by Ranson score, APACHE Ⅱ score, and CT severity index. The clinical characteristics of AP patients with or without PU were statistically analyzed using independent samples t-test and chi-square test. The univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for PU in AP patients. ResultsAmong the 156 AP patients, 88 (56.4% had PU, but only 28 (31.8% of the 88 cases were infected with Hp. Of the 28 patients, 22 had gastric ulcer, and 6 had both gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer. Of the 60 PU patients not infected with Hp, 25 had gastric ulcer, 26 had duodenal ulcer, and 9 had both gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer. The univariate logistic regression analysis showed that male gender, alcohol-induced pancreatitis, smoking, alcohol consumption, high triglyceride level, high C-reactive protein level, and APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 were significantly associated with PU in AP patients. However, the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 was the independent risk factor for PU in AP patients (OR=8.54, 95% CI: 4.52-16.15, P<0.01. ConclusionAP patients are susceptible to PU, but the infection rate of Hp is low. APACHE Ⅱ score ≥8 is the independent risk factor for PU in AP patients.

  7. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  8. Prospective associations of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and CRP genetic risk scores with risk of total knee and hip replacement for osteoarthritis in a diverse cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadyab, A H; Terkeltaub, R; Kooperberg, C; Reiner, A; Eaton, C B; Jackson, R D; Krok-Schoen, J L; Salem, R M; LaCroix, A Z

    2018-05-22

    To examine associations of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and polygenic CRP genetic risk scores (GRS) with risk of end-stage hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA), defined as incident total hip (THR) or knee replacement (TKR) for OA. This study included a cohort of postmenopausal white, African American, and Hispanic women from the Women's Health Initiative. Women were followed from baseline to date of THR or TKR, death, or December 31, 2014. Medicare claims data identified THR and TKR. Hs-CRP and genotyping data were collected at baseline. Three CRP GRS were constructed: 1) a 4-SNP GRS comprised of genetic variants representing variation in the CRP gene among European populations; 2) a multilocus 18-SNP GRS of genetic variants significantly associated with CRP levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies; and 3) a 5-SNP GRS of genetic variants significantly associated with CRP levels among African American women. In analyses conducted separately among each race and ethnic group, there were no significant associations of ln hs-CRP with risk of THR or TKR, after adjusting for age, body mass index, lifestyle characteristics, chronic diseases, hormone therapy use, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use. CRP GRS were not associated with risk of THR or TKR in any ethnic group. Serum levels of ln hs-CRP and genetically-predicted CRP levels were not associated with risk of THR or TKR for OA among a diverse cohort of women. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. C-reactive protein as a marker of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Kanaparthy, Aruna; Mahendra, Muktishree

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal subgingival pathogens affect local and systemic immune and inflammatory response and cause the release of cytokines; this results in periodontal destruction and initiation of an acute phase systemic inflammatory response characterized by the release of C-reactive proteins (CRP). This study set out to evaluate the serum concentration of CRP that can be used as a marker of periodontal disease as well as a risk indicator for cardiovascular disease. Based on their periodontal status, 45 patients were divided into three groups. The following clinical parameters were recorded: plaque index, gingival index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels. Scoring was done on six tooth surfaces for all teeth. For the CRP assessment, blood samples were collected from subjects at the time of clinical examination. The results indicated an increase in serum CRP levels in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis as compared to controls.

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of Hepatitis C virus infection in Brazil, 2005 through 2009: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Leila MMB

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C chronic liver disease is a major cause of liver transplant in developed countries. This article reports the first nationwide population-based survey conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of HCV antibodies and associated risk factors in the urban population of Brazil. Methods The cross sectional study was conducted in all Brazilian macro-regions from 2005 to 2009, as a stratified multistage cluster sample of 19,503 inhabitants aged between 10 and 69 years, representing individuals living in all 26 State capitals and the Federal District. Hepatitis C antibodies were detected by a third-generation enzyme immunoassay. Seropositive individuals were retested by Polymerase Chain Reaction and genotyped. Adjusted prevalence was estimated by macro-regions. Potential risk factors associated with HCV infection were assessed by calculating the crude and adjusted odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI and p values. Population attributable risk was estimated for multiple factors using a case–control approach. Results The overall weighted prevalence of hepatitis C antibodies was 1.38% (95% CI: 1.12%–1.64%. Prevalence of infection increased in older groups but was similar for both sexes. The multivariate model showed the following to be predictors of HCV infection: age, injected drug use (OR = 6.65, sniffed drug use (OR = 2.59, hospitalization (OR = 1.90, groups socially deprived by the lack of sewage disposal (OR = 2.53, and injection with glass syringe (OR = 1.52, with a borderline p value. The genotypes 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, 2b and 3a were identified. The estimated population attributable risk for the ensemble of risk factors was 40%. Approximately 1.3 million individuals would be expected to be anti-HCV-positive in the country. Conclusions The large estimated absolute numbers of infected individuals reveals the burden of the disease in the near future, giving rise to costs for the health care

  11. Frequency of subclinical thyroid dysfunction and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among women at a workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Olmos, Rodrigo; Nogueira, Antônio-Carlos; Penalva, Daniele Queirós Fucciolo; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Benseñor, Isabela Martins

    2010-01-01

    Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is very common in clinical practice and there is some evidence that it may be associated with cardiovascular disease. The aim here was to evaluate the frequencies of subclinical thyroid disease and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among women at a workplace, and to evaluate the association between subclinical thyroid disease and cardiovascular risk factors among them. Cross-sectional study on 314 women aged 40 years or over who were working at Universidade de São Paulo (USP). All the women answered a questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the Rose angina questionnaire. Anthropometric variables were measured and blood samples were analyzed for blood glucose, total cholesterol and fractions, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (free-T4) and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO). The frequencies of subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were, respectively, 7.3% and 5.1%. Women with subclinical thyroid disease presented higher levels of anti-TPO than did women with normal thyroid function (P = 0.01). There were no differences in sociodemographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors according to thyroid function status, except for greater sedentarism among the women with subclinical hypothyroidism. Restricting the comparison to women with subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH > 10 mIU/l) did not change the results. In this sample of women, there was no association between poor profile of cardiovascular risk factors and presence of subclinical thyroid disease that would justify screening at the workplace.

  12. Frequency and risk factors of hepatitis c virus in pregnant women attending military hospital rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, R.; Razzaq, K.; Imran, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of anti-Hepatitis C virus antibodies in pregnant ladies attending Military Hospital Rawalpindi and to analyze risk factors for disease acquisition in them. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of gynaecology and obstetrics Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from Feb 2013 to Jul 2013. Material and Methods: All pregnant ladies attending Military Hospital Rawalpindi were tested for anti HCV antibodies by third generation ELISA method and evaluation of potential risk factors for acquisition of HCV infection was done. Results: Six point ninety five percent of study population was found to be positive for anti HCV antibodies. Conclusion: Six point nine five percentage of study pregnant ladies were found to have anti HCV antibodies. These HCV positive pregnant women were more likely to have history of blood transfusion, therapeutic injection use and surgery. (author)

  13. Androidal fat dominates in predicting cardiometabolic risk in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    We hypothesized that soy isoflavones would attenuate the anticipated increase in androidal fat mass in postmenopausal women during the 36-month treatment, and thereby favorably modify the circulating cardiometabolic risk factors: triacylglycerol, LDLC, HDL-C, glucose, insulin, uric acid, C-reactive ...

  14. Adjunctive N-acetylcysteine in depression: exploration of interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Kyoko; Gray, Laura; Bortolasci, Chiara; Panizzutti, Bruna; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Kidnapillai, Srisaiyini; Spolding, Briana; Walder, Ken; Berk, Michael; Malhi, Gin; Dodd, Seetal; Dean, Olivia M

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to explore effects of adjunctive N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment on inflammatory and neurogenesis markers in unipolar depression. We embarked on a 12-week clinical trial of NAC (2000 mg/day compared with placebo) as an adjunctive treatment for unipolar depression. A follow-up visit was conducted 4 weeks following the completion of treatment. We collected serum samples at baseline and the end of the treatment phase (week 12) to determine changes in interleukin-6 (IL6), C-reactive protein (CRP) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) following NAC treatment. NAC treatment significantly improved depressive symptoms on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) over 16 weeks of the trial. Serum levels of IL6 were associated with reductions of MADRS scores independent of treatment response. However, we found no significant changes in IL6, CRP and BDNF levels following NAC treatment. Overall, this suggests that our results failed to support the hypothesis that IL6, CRP and BDNF are directly involved in the therapeutic mechanism of NAC in depression. IL6 may be a useful marker for future exploration of treatment response.

  15. Effects of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein and HDL in serum of subjects with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Anne Carolina Eleutério; Carneiro, Valéria Martins de Araújo; Guimarães, Maria do Carmo Machado

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in the sera and its association with body mass index and high density lipoprotein in subjects with severe periodontitis. Sera from 28 subjects (mean age: 34.36±6.24; 32% men) with severe periodontitis and 27 healthy controls (mean age: 33.18±6.42; 33% men) were collected prior to periodontal therapy. Blood samples were obtained from 23 subjects who completed therapy (9-12 months). Oral and systemic parameters such as the number of blood cells, glucose examination, lipid profile, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels accessed by high-sensitivity immunonephelometry assay, were included. Before therapy, in the periodontitis group, the ratio of subjects with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein C-reactive protein C-reactive protein C-reactive protein >0.3 mg/dL (28.91±6.03) (Pperiodontitis, periodontal therapy was associated with decreased levels of circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and increase of high density lipoprotein in serum. The clinical trial was registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.br/, No. RBR-24T799.

  16. C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen, and Cardiovascular Disease Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Pennells, Lisa; Wood, Angela M.; White, Ian R.; Gao, Pei; Walker, Matthew; Thompson, Alexander; Sarwar, Nadeem; Caslake, Muriel; Butterworth, Adam S.; Amouyel, Philippe; Assmann, Gerd; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Barr, Elizabeth L. M.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bjorkelund, Cecilia; Brenner, Hermann; Brunner, Eric; Clarke, Robert; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cremer, Peter; Cushman, Mary; Dagenais, Gilles R.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Dankner, Rachel; Davey-Smith, George; Deeg, Dorly; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Engstrom, Gunnar; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fowkes, F. Gerry R.; Gallacher, John; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giampaoli, Simona; Gillum, Richard F.; Hofman, Albert; Howard, Barbara V.; Ingelsson, Erik; Iso, Hiroyasu; Jorgensen, Torben; Kiechl, Stefan; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kromhout, Daan; Kuller, Lewis H.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Meade, Tom W.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events. Methods We analyzed data from 52 prospective studies that included 246,669 participants without a history of

  17. The clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency: : a relation to clinical thrombotic risk-factors and to levels of protein C and protein S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henkens, C. M. A.; van der Meer, J.; Hillege, J. L.; Bom, V. J. J.; Halie, M. R.; van der Schaaf, W.

    We investigated 103 first-degree relatives of 13 unrelated protein C or protein S deficient patients to assess the role of additional thrombotic risk factors and of protein C and protein S levels in the clinical expression of hereditary protein C and protein S deficiency. Fifty-seven relatives were

  18. Acrolein, A Reactive Product of Lipid Peroxidation, Induces Oxidative Modification of Cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Hoon [Cheongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein (ACR) is a well-known carbonyl toxin produced by lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In Alzheimer's brain, ACR was found to be elevated in hippocampus and temporal cortex where oxidative stress is high. In this study, we evaluated oxidative modification of cytochrome c occurring after incubation with ACR. When cytochrome c was incubated with ACR, protein aggregation increased in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of carbonyl compounds and the release of iron were obtained in ACR-treated cytochrome c. Reactive oxygen species scavengers and iron specific chelator inhibited the ACR-mediated cytochrome c modification and carbonyl compound formation. Our data demonstrate that oxidative damage of cytochrome c by ACR might induce disruption of cyotochrome c structure and iron mishandling as a contributing factor to the pathology of AD.

  19. Acrolein, A Reactive Product of Lipid Peroxidation, Induces Oxidative Modification of Cytochrome c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Acrolein (ACR) is a well-known carbonyl toxin produced by lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which is involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In Alzheimer's brain, ACR was found to be elevated in hippocampus and temporal cortex where oxidative stress is high. In this study, we evaluated oxidative modification of cytochrome c occurring after incubation with ACR. When cytochrome c was incubated with ACR, protein aggregation increased in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of carbonyl compounds and the release of iron were obtained in ACR-treated cytochrome c. Reactive oxygen species scavengers and iron specific chelator inhibited the ACR-mediated cytochrome c modification and carbonyl compound formation. Our data demonstrate that oxidative damage of cytochrome c by ACR might induce disruption of cyotochrome c structure and iron mishandling as a contributing factor to the pathology of AD

  20. Cranberry juice consumption lowers markers of cardiometabolic risk, including blood pressure and circulating C-reactive protein, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Janet A; Baer, David J; Khoo, Christina; Gebauer, Sarah K; Charron, Craig S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiometabolic risk is the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, or stroke, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of low-calorie cranberry juice (LCCJ) to lower cardiometabolic risk. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm study was conducted with controlled diets. Thirty women and 26 men (mean baseline characteristics: 50 y; weight, 79 kg; body mass index, 28 kg/m(2)) completed an 8-wk intervention with LCCJ or a flavor/color/energy-matched placebo beverage. Twice daily volunteers consumed 240 mL of LCCJ or the placebo beverage, containing 173 or 62 mg of phenolic compounds and 6.5 or 7.5 g of total sugar per 240-mL serving, respectively. Fasting serum triglycerides (TGs) were lower after consuming LCCJ and demonstrated a treatment × baseline interaction such that the participants with higher baseline TG concentrations were more likely to experience a larger treatment effect (1.15 ± 0.04 mmol/L vs. 1.25 ± 0.04 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.027). Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was lower for individuals consuming LCCJ than for individuals consuming the placebo beverage [ln transformed values of 0.522 ± 0.115 ln(mg/L) vs. 0.997 ± 0.120 ln(mg/L), P = 0.0054, respectively, and equivalent to 1.69 mg/L vs. 2.71 mg/L back-transformed]. LCCJ lowered diastolic blood pressure (BP) compared with the placebo beverage (69.2 ± 0.8 mm Hg for LCCJ vs. 71.6 ± 0.8 mm Hg for placebo; P = 0.048). Fasting plasma glucose was lower (P = 0.03) in the LCCJ group (5.32 ± 0.03 mmol/L) than in the placebo group (5.42 ± 0.03 mmol/L), and LCCJ had a beneficial effect on homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance for participants with high baseline values (P = 0.035). LCCJ can improve several risk factors of CVD in adults, including circulating TGs, CRP, and glucose, insulin resistance, and diastolic BP. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01295684. © 2015

  1. C-reactive protein in antiphospholipid syndrome: relationship with cardiovascular pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess relationship of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP level in pts with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS with clinico-laboratory features and cardiovascular pathology. Material and methods. 206 pts were included. 58 from them had primary APS (PAPS, 72 –systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with APS and 76 – SLE. 29 from 76 pts of the latter group were positive on anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA – SLE with antiphospholipid antibodies (APhL and 47 – low positive or negative on ACA – SLE without APhL. 72 persons without autoimmune diseases were included into control group. CRP (with high sensitivity immuno-nephelometric assay, APhL (with solid phase immuno-enzyme assay, plasma lipids were evaluated, sonography with measurement of intima-media complex (IMC thickness of common carotid arteries, carotid artery bulbs and internal carotid arteries, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography (EchoCG, Holter ECG monitoring were performed. Results. HsCRP serum level in pts was significantly higher than in control: 2,55 [0,71; 7,04] mg/l (varied from 0,15 to 39,85 vs 0,68 [0,26; 1,97] mg/l (varied from 0,1 to 9,61, p<0,001. Most high hsCRP concentration was found in SLE with APS (p=0,02. HsCRP level in pts with PAPS with history of combined or isolated arterial thrombosis was significantly higher than in pts with SLE and APS having the same localization of thrombosis. HsCRP concentration less than 3 mg/l correlated with duration of postthrombotic period in pts with PAPS. HsCRP level also correlated with triglyceride concentration, body mass index, summated coronary risk and magistral arteries IMC thickness. Conclusion. HsCRP elevation in pts with APS was associated with development of combined and arterial thrombosis as well as with traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis.

  2. A Letter to the Editor: Using C-reactive protein to suggest an alternative explanation of the findings of Simanek et al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Laust Hvas

    2011-01-01

    , Zacho J, Friberg J, Jensen GB, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Benn M (2010) Does elevated C-reactive protein increase atrial fibrillation risk? A Mendelian randomization of 47,000 individuals from the general population. J Am Coll Cardiol 56: 789-795. S0735-1097(10)02305-3 [pii];10.1016/j.jacc.2010.02.066 [doi]. 9....... Timpson NJ, Lawlor DA, Harbord RM, Gaunt TR, Day IN, Palmer LJ, Hattersley AT, Ebrahim S, Lowe GD, Rumley A, Davey SG (2005) C-reactive protein and its role in metabolic syndrome: mendelian randomisation study. Lancet 366: 1954-1959. S0140-6736(05)67786-0 [pii];10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67786-0 [doi]. 10...

  3. Life course socioeconomic position and C-reactive protein: mediating role of health-risk behaviors and metabolic alterations. The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidyane V Camelo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic inflammation has been postulated to be one mediating mechanism explaining the association between low socioeconomic position (SEP and cardiovascular disease (CVD. We sought to examine the association between life course SEP and C-reactive protein (CRP levels in adulthood, and to evaluate the extent to which health-risk behaviors and metabolic alterations mediate this association. Additionally, we explored the possible modifying influence of gender. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Our analytical sample comprised 13,371 participants from ELSA-Brasil baseline, a multicenter prospective cohort study of civil servants. SEP during childhood, young adulthood, and adulthood were considered. The potential mediators between life course SEP and CRP included clusters of health-risk behaviors (smoking, low leisure time physical activity, excessive alcohol consumption, and metabolic alterations (obesity, hypertension, low HDL, hypertriglyceridemia, and diabetes. Linear regression models were performed and structural equation modeling was used to evaluate mediation. Although lower childhood SEP was associated with higher levels of CRP in adult life, this association was not independent of adulthood SEP. However, CRP increased linearly with increasing number of unfavorable social circumstances during the life course (p trend <0.001. The metabolic alterations were the most important mediator between cumulative SEP and CRP. This mediation path accounted for 49.5% of the total effect of cumulative SEP on CRP among women, but only 20.2% among men. In consequence, the portion of the total effect of cumulative SEP on CRP that was mediated by risk behaviors and metabolic alterations was higher among women (55.4% than among men (36.8%. CONCLUSIONS: Cumulative SEP across life span was associated with elevated systemic inflammation in adulthood. Although health-risk behaviors and metabolic alterations were important mediators of this association, a sizable

  4. C- Reactive Protein in Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and the follow-up therapeutic response to tuberculosis (TB) among patients aged 19-68 years attending out-patient clinics of two hospitals in Abeokuta, Southwestern ...

  5. Serum, plasma, and dried blood spot high sensitivity C-reactive protein enzyme immunoassay for population research

    OpenAIRE

    Brindle, Eleanor; Fujita, Masako; Shofer, Jane; O’Connor, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is used as a biomarker of morbidity and mortality risk in studies of population health, and is essential to interpretation of several micronutrient biomarkers. There is thus need for a robust high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) measurement method for large-scale, non-clinical studies. We developed an efficient, inexpensive assay suitable for quantifying CRP across the physiological range using any blood specimen type. The ELISA uses readily available monoclonal antibodies to...

  6. Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Association with C-Reactive Protein and Incident Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertruida J. van Woudenbergh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate whether the Glycemic Index (GI or Glycemic Load (GL of a diet is associated with C-reactive Protein (CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective study. Materials and Methods. Our analysis included 4,366 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline. During follow-up 456 diabetes cases were confirmed. Dietary GI and GL were derived from a food-frequency questionnaire and its association with CRP was examined cross-sectionally using linear regression models. The association of GI and GL with diabetes incidence was examined using Cox proportional hazard models. Results. GL, but not GI, was associated with lnCRP at baseline (bGL=0.11 per 50 units; P=.01. When comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of GI with respect to diabetes incidence, a Relative Risk (RR of 0.95 [95%CI 0.75, 1.21] was found after adjustment for lifestyle and nutritional factors. For GL the RR for diabetes incidence was 1.00 [95%CI 0.74, 1.36]. Additional adjustment for CRP did not change RRs. Conclusion. Since GI was not associated with CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes, it is unlikely that a high GI diet induces the previously shown positive association between CRP and risk of type 2 diabetes by increasing CRP concentrations.

  7. A robust quantitative solid phase immunoassay for the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) based on cytidine 5 '-diphosphocholine coupled dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Pedersen, H. G.; Jensen, A. L.

    2009-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important acute phase protein, being used as a sensitive indicator of inflammation and infection and is also associated with the risk of cardiovascular problems. The present paper describes a robust and sensitive ELISA for CRP, based on the affinity of CRP for phosp......C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important acute phase protein, being used as a sensitive indicator of inflammation and infection and is also associated with the risk of cardiovascular problems. The present paper describes a robust and sensitive ELISA for CRP, based on the affinity of CRP...... was applied to determination of pig and human CRP using commercially available antibodies against human CRP. The assay was shown to be more sensitive than previously published immunoassays employing albumin-coupled cytidine diphosphocholine. The coating was stable for at least 30 days at room temperature...

  8. C-reactive Protein -717A>G and -286C>T>A Gene Polymorphism and Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Geng, Pei-Liang; Yan, Fu-Qin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Wei; Tang, Xu-Dong; Zheng, Jing-Chen; Wu, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhen-Fu

    2015-06-20

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the formation and progression of ischemic stroke. Recently, more and more epidemiological studies have focused on the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) -717A > G and -286C > T > A genetic polymorphisms and ischemic stroke. However, the findings of these researches are not conclusive. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether these two polymorphisms are associated with the risk of ischemic stroke. Eligible studies were identified from the database of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI, Weipu, and Wanfang. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association. Four articles were included in our study, including 1926 cases and 2678 controls for -717A > G polymorphism, 652 cases and 1103 controls for -286C > T > A polymorphism. The results of meta-analysis showed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -717A > G was not significantly associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (GG vs. AA, OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.83-1.50, P = 0.207; GG + GA vs. AA, OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93-1.17, P = 0.533; GG vs. GA + AA, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.82-1.47, P = 0.220). Meta-analysis of SNP - 286C > T > A also demonstrated no statistical evidence of a significant association with the risk of ischemic stroke (AA vs. CC, OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.59-1.25, P = 0.348; AA vs. CC, OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.80-1.06, P = 0.609; AA vs. CC, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.62-1.30, P = 0.374). This meta-analysis demonstrated little evidence to support a role of CRP gene -717A > G, -286C > T > A polymorphisms in ischemic stroke predisposition. However, to draw comprehensive and more reliable conclusions, further larger studies are needed to validate the association between CRP gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke in various ethnic groups.

  9. Socioeconomic and racial/ethnic differentials of C-reactive protein levels: a systematic review of population-based studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victora Cesar G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Socioeconomic and racial/ethnic factors strongly influence cardiovascular disease outcomes and risk factors. C-reactive protein (CRP, a non-specific marker of inflammation, is associated with cardiovascular risk, and knowledge about its distribution in the population may help direct preventive efforts. A systematic review was undertaken to critically assess CRP levels according to socioeconomic and racial/ethnic factors. Methods Medline was searched through December 2006 for population-based studies examining CRP levels among adults with respect to indicators of socioeconomic position (SEP and/or race/ethnicity. Bibliographies from located studies were scanned and 26 experts in the field were contacted for unpublished work. Results Thirty-two relevant articles were located. Cross-sectional (n = 20 and cohort studies (n = 11 were included, as was the control group of one trial. CRP levels were examined with respect to SEP and race/ethnicity in 25 and 15 analyses, respectively. Of 20 studies that were unadjusted or adjusted for demographic variables, 19 found inverse associations between CRP levels and SEP. Of 15 similar studies, 14 found differences between racial/ethnic groups such that whites had the lowest while blacks, Hispanics and South Asians had the highest CRP levels. Most studies also included adjustment for potential mediating variables in the causal chain between SEP or race/ethnicity and CRP. Most of these studies showed attenuated but still significant associations. Conclusion Increasing poverty and non-white race was associated with elevated CRP levels among adults. Most analyses in the literature are underestimating the true effects of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic factors due to adjustment for mediating factors.

  10. Homocyst(e)ine and risk of cardiovascular disease in the multiple risk factor intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W; Shaten, B J; Hempel, J D; Cutler, J A; Kuller, L H

    2000-01-01

    A nested case-control study was undertaken involving men participating in the Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT). Serum samples from 712 men, stored for upto 20 years, were analysed for homocyst(e)ine. Cases involved non-fatal myocardial infractions, identified through the active phase of the study, which ended on February 28, 1982, and deaths due to coronary heart disease, monitored through 1990. The non-fatal myocardial infarction occurred within 7 years of sample collection, whereas the majority of coronary heart disease deaths occurred more than 11 years after sample collection. Mean homocyst(e)ine concentrations were in the expected range and did not differ significantly between case patients and control subjects: myocardial infarction cases, 12.6 micromol/L; myocardial infarction controls, 13.1 micromol/L; coronary heart disease death cases, 12.8 micromol/L; and coronary heart disease controls, 12.7 micromol/L. Odds ratios versus quartile 1 for coronary heart disease deaths and myocardial infarctions combined were as follows: quartile 2, 1.03; quartile 3, 0.84; and quartile 4, 0.92. Thus, in this prospective study, no association of homocyst(e)ine concentration with heart disease was detected. Homocyst(e)ine levels were weakly associated with the acute-phase (C-reactive) protein. These results are discussed with respect to the suggestion that homocyst(e)ine is an independent risk factor for heart disease.

  11. Association of individual and community factors with C-reactive protein and 25-hydroxyvitamin D: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwen Chai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many individual and community/neighborhood factors may contribute to inflammation and vitamin D deficiency leading to the development of chronic diseases. This study examined the associations of serum C-reactive protein (CRP and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] levels with individual and community/neighborhood (tract-level or county-level factors using a nationally representative sample from 2001–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES. Data from the 2001–2006 waves of the continuous NHANES was merged with the 2000 census and other neighborhood data sources constructed using geographic information system. Associations between multilevel factors and biomarker levels were assessed using multilevel random-intercept regression models. 6643 participants aged 19–65 (3402 men and 3241 women were included in the analysis. Family income-to-needs ratio was inversely associated with CRP (P=0.002 and positively associated with 25(OHD levels (P=0.0003. County crime rates were positively associated with CRP (P=0.007 and inversely associated with 25(OHD levels (P=0.0002. The associations with income-to-needs ratio were significant in men [CRP, P=0.005; 25(OHD, P=0.005] but not in women. For county crime rates, the association was only significant in women for CRP (P=0.004 and was significant in both men (P=0.01 and women (P=0.001 for 25(OHD. Additionally, overall CRP was positively associated with age (P<0.0001, female sex (P<0.0001, Hispanic race/ethnicity (P=0.0001, current smokers (P<0.0001, body mass index (BMI, P<0.0001, and participants who were US-born (P=0.02. Non-Hispanic black (P<0.0001 and Hispanic race/ethnicity (P<0.0001, current smoker (P=0.047, and higher BMI (P<0.0001 were associated with lower serum 25(OHD levels. No significant associations were observed between other community/neighborhood variables and serum CRP and 25(OHD levels. The current results suggest that family income-to-needs ratio and county crime rate may

  12. Risk Factors for Serogroup C Meningococcal Disease during Outbreak among Men who Have Sex with Men, New York City, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridpath, Alison; Greene, Sharon K; Robinson, Byron F; Weiss, Don

    2015-08-01

    Risk factors for illness during a serogroup C meningococcal disease outbreak among men who have sex with men in New York City, New York, USA, in 2012-2013 included methamphetamine and cocaine use and sexually transmitted infections. Outbreak investigations should consider routinely capturing information regarding drug use and sex-related risk factors.

  13. Cross-sectional relations of race and poverty status to cardiovascular risk factors in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Lifespan (HANDLS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldstein, Shari R; Moody, Danielle L Beatty; McNeely, Jessica M; Allen, Allyssa J; Sprung, Mollie R; Shah, Mauli T; Al'Najjar, Elias; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2016-03-14

    Examine interactive relations of race and poverty status with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a socioeconomically diverse sample of urban-dwelling African American (AA) and White adults. Participants were 2,270 AAs and Whites (57% AA; 57% female; ages 30-64 years) who completed the first wave of the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span (HANDLS) study. CVD risk factors assessed included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol (TC), high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), and systolic, diastolic, and pulse pressure (SBP, DBP, PP). Interactive and independent relations of race, poverty status, and sex were examined for each outcome via ordinary least squares regression adjusted for age, education, literacy, substance use, depressive symptoms, perceived health care barriers, medical co-morbidities, and medications. Significant interactions of race and poverty status (p's poverty had lower BMI and WC and higher HDL-C than non-poverty AAs, whereas Whites living in poverty had higher BMI and WC and lower HDL-C than non-poverty Whites. Main effects of race revealed that AAs had higher levels of HbA1c, SBP, and PP, and Whites had higher levels of TC, LDL-C and TG (p's Poverty status moderated race differences for BMI, WC, and HDL-C, conveying increased risk among Whites living in poverty, but reduced risk in their AA counterparts. Race differences for six additional risk factors withstood extensive statistical adjustments including SES indicators.

  14. Perinatal risk factors for neonatal encephalopathy: an unmatched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tann, Cally J; Nakakeeto, Margaret; Willey, Barbara A; Sewegaba, Margaret; Webb, Emily L; Oke, Ibby; Mutuuza, Emmanuel Derek; Peebles, Donald; Musoke, Margaret; Harris, Kathryn A; Sebire, Neil J; Klein, Nigel; Kurinczuk, Jennifer J; Elliott, Alison M; Robertson, Nicola J

    2018-05-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is the third leading cause of child mortality. Preclinical studies suggest infection and inflammation can sensitise or precondition the newborn brain to injury. This study examined perinatal risks factor for NE in Uganda. Unmatched case-control study. Mulago National Referral Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. 210 term infants with NE and 409 unaffected term infants as controls were recruited over 13 months. Data were collected on preconception, antepartum and intrapartum exposures. Blood culture, species-specific bacterial real-time PCR, C reactive protein and placental histology for chorioamnionitis and funisitis identified maternal and early newborn infection and inflammation. Multivariable logistic regression examined associations with NE. Neonatal bacteraemia (adjusted OR (aOR) 8.67 (95% CI 1.51 to 49.74), n=315) and histological funisitis (aOR 11.80 (95% CI 2.19 to 63.45), n=162) but not chorioamnionitis (aOR 3.20 (95% CI 0.66 to 15.52), n=162) were independent risk factors for NE. Among encephalopathic infants, neonatal case fatality was not significantly higher when exposed to early neonatal bacteraemia (OR 1.65 (95% CI 0.62 to 4.39), n=208). Intrapartum antibiotic use did not improve neonatal survival (p=0.826). After regression analysis, other identified perinatal risk factors (n=619) included hypertension in pregnancy (aOR 3.77), male infant (aOR 2.51), non-cephalic presentation (aOR 5.74), lack of fetal monitoring (aOR 2.75), augmentation (aOR 2.23), obstructed labour (aOR 3.8) and an acute intrapartum event (aOR 8.74). Perinatal infection and inflammation are independent risk factors for NE in this low-resource setting, supporting a role in the aetiological pathway of term brain injury. Intrapartum antibiotic administration did not mitigate against adverse outcomes. The importance of intrapartum risk factors in this sub-Saharan African setting is highlighted. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  15. Metformin modifies the exercise training effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in impaired glucose tolerant adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Steven K.; Nightingale, Joy; Choi, Sung-Eun; Chipkin, Stuart R.; Braun, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerant (IGT) adults are at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Exercise or metformin reduce CVD risk, but the efficacy of combining treatments is unclear. To determine the effects of exercise training plus metformin, compared to each treatment alone, on CVD risk factors in IGT adults. Subjects were assigned to: placebo (P), metformin (M), exercise plus placebo (EP), or exercise plus metformin (EM) (8/group). In a double-blind design, P or 2000mg/d of M were administered for 12 weeks and half performed aerobic and resistance training 3 days/week for approximately 60 minutes/day at 70% pre-training heart rate peak. Outcomes included: adiposity, blood pressure (BP), lipids and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). Z-scores were calculated to determine metabolic syndrome severity. M and EM, but not EP, decreased body weight compared to P (p metabolic syndrome Z-score compared to baseline (EP; trend p = 0.07 and EM or M; p exercise and/or metformin improve some CVD risk factors, only training or metformin alone lowered hs-CRP and BP. Thus, metformin may attenuate the effects of training on some CVD risk factors and metabolic syndrome severity in IGT adults. PMID:23505172

  16. A Reactive and Cycle-True IP Emulator for MPSoC Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Angiolini, Federico; Sparsø, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The design of MultiProcessor Systems-on-Chip (MPSoC) emphasizes intellectual-property (IP)-based communication-centric approaches. Therefore, for the optimization of the MPSoC interconnect, the designer must develop traffic models that realistically capture the application behavior as executing...... on the IP core. In this paper, we introduce a Reactive IP Emulator (RIPE) that enables an effective emulation of the IP-core behavior in multiple environments, including bit and cycle-true simulation. The RIPE is built as a multithreaded abstract instruction-set processor, and it can generate reactive...

  17. Personal Risk and Resilience Factors in the Context of Daily Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Manfred; Hay, Elizabeth L.; Chui, Helena

    2012-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the role that personal risk and resilience factors play as adults of all ages cope with the stressors encountered in everyday life. Theorists have suggested that researchers should focus on the effects of daily stress and coping rather than focusing exclusively on major life events and chronic stress and have proposed that understanding how adults cope with daily stress is a key aspect of understanding long-term well-being and adaptation in adulthood. After presenting a conceptual model outlining the major components of the daily stress process, the chapter reviews the existing empirical literature on personal risk and resilience factors in the context of daily stress. This research clearly suggests that there is no universal generalization that can be made regarding whether chronological age, in and of itself, confers greater vulnerability or resilience onto adults. Instead, we argue that researchers should ask when and under what conditions is age associated with greater vulnerability to daily stress and when and under what conditions is age associated with greater resilience to daily stress. Age differences in reactivity to daily stress are clearly embedded within a complex system of factors—structural, individual, and situational—that influence stress reactivity and stress recovery in several ways. This complexity should not be taken to mean that stress reactivity and recovery cannot be charted or understood. Researchers, however, will need to approach this complexity with a great deal of theoretical, methodological, and statistical rigor to move our understanding of the importance of age in shaping risk and resilience to daily stress forward. The final section of the chapter outlines several directions for future research in the area of aging and resilience. In particular, we argue that a focus on personal risk and resilience factors in the context of daily stress, in combination with the application of sophisticated statistical

  18. Demographic, risk factors and motivations among blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, S C; de Almeida-Neto, C; Nishiya, A S; Oliveira, C D L; Ferreira, J E; Alencar, C S; Levi, J E; Salles, N A; Mendrone, A; Sabino, E C

    2014-06-01

    To identify the demographic characteristics, risk factors and motivations for donating among blood donors with reactive serologic tests for syphilis. Post-donation interviews with syphilis seropositive blood donors improve recruitment and screening strategies. This case-control study compares 75 Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) > 8, EIA+ (enzyme immunoassay) and FTA-ABS+ (fluorescent treponemal antibody); 80 VDRL-, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+; and 34 VDRL- and EIA- donors between 2004 and 2009. Donors were assessed by their demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour, history of alcohol and illicit drugs use, and motivations to donate. Donors with VDRL > 8 were more likely to be divorced [AOR = 12·53; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·30-120·81], to have had more than six sexual partners (AOR=7·1; 95% CI 1·12-44·62) and to report male-male-sex in the past 12 months (AOR=8·18; 95% CI 1·78-37·60). Donors with VDRL-, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+ were less likely to be female (AOR=0·26; 95% CI 0·07-0·96), more likely to be older (AOR=10·2; 95% CI 2·45-42·58 ≥ 39 and illicit drugs use; 30·7% (VDRL > 8) and 12·5% (VDRL-, EIA+ and FTA-ABS+) of donors reported that they had been at risk for HIV infection (P = 0·004). One-third of donors came to the blood bank to help a friend or a relative who needed blood. Although donors exposed to syphilis reported and recognised some high risk behaviour, most were motivated by direct appeal to donate blood. Monitoring the risk profile of blood donors can benefit public health and improve blood safety. © 2014 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2014 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  19. Resting serum concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resting serum concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in sportsmen and untrained male adults. F.A. Niyi-Odumosu, O. A. Bello, S.A. Biliaminu, B.V. Owoyele, T.O. Abu, O.L. Dominic ...

  20. Acute effects of vinegar intake on some biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rohani Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exaggerated postprandial spikes in blood glucose and lipids induce proportional increases in oxidative stress, which acutely trigger impairment endothelial, inflammation and increased risk of future cardiovascular events. In this research, we have investigated acute effects of vinegar intake on some of the biochemical atherosclerosis risk factors in high cholesterol fed rabbits to see if we can find a probable protective value for it. Methods The rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: normal diet, high cholesterol diet (%1cholesterol, %1 cholesterol with 5 ml vinegar (low dose, %1 cholesterol with 10 ml vinegar (high dose. After fasting for 12-15 hours, blood samples were taken to determine baseline values. Three hours after feeding, blood samples were collected again to investigate acute effects of vinegar intake on the measured factors. Results Using high-dose vinegar with cholesterolemic diet caused significant reduce in LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C, oxidized-LDL (ox-LDL, malondialdehyde (MDA, total cholesterol (TC and apolipoprotein B (ApoB in comparison with hypercholesterolemic diet. Consumption low-dose vinegar with cholesterolemic diet induced a significant decrease in fibrinogen and glucose compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. Level of serum nitrite, nitrate, triacylglycerol (TAG, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, apolipoprotein A (ApoA, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT, serum glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT and C-reactive protein (CRP were not significantly difference in low and high doses vinegar with cholesterolemic diet compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. A significant difference was observed for LDL-C, ApoB100 and TC between low and high doses vinegar. Conclusion This study suggest that vinegar, might have some acute effects on biochemical risk factors of atherosclerosis and a probable protective value can be considered for its postprandial use.

  1. Plasma levels of C-Reactive Protein and Fibrinogen in Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we determined the changes in plasma C- reactive protein (C-RP) and Fibrinogen levels in Drug sensitive Tuberculosis (DSTB) patients at diagnosis, Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) patients at diagnosis and during chemotherapy. Twenty-four (24) patients MDRTB patients and 24 newly diagnosed ...

  2. Amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein but not cystatin C predict cardiovascular events in male patients with peripheral artery disease independently of ambulatory pulse pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Per H; Arpegård, Johannes; Ostergren, Jan; Svensson, Per

    2014-03-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) are at high risk for cardiovascular (CV) events. We have previously shown that ambulatory pulse pressure (APP) predicts CV events in PAD patients. The biomarkers amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and cystatin C are related to a worse outcome in patients with CV disease, but their predictive values have not been studied in relation to APP. Blood samples and 24-hour measurements of ambulatory blood pressure were examined in 98 men referred for PAD evaluation during 1998-2001. Patients were followed for a median of 71 months. The outcome variable was CV events defined as either CV mortality or any hospitalization for myocardial infarction, stroke, or coronary revascularization. The predictive values of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and log(cystatin C) alone and together with APP were assessed by multivariable Cox regression. Area under the curve (AUC) and net reclassification improvement (NRI) were calculated compared with a model containing other significant risk factors. During follow-up, 36 patients had at least 1 CV event. APP, log(NT-proBNP), and log(hs-CRP) all predicted CV events in univariable analysis, whereas log(cystatin C) did not. In multivariable analysis log(NT-proBNP) (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.62; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-2.51) and log(hs-CRP) (HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.19-2.24) predicted events independently of 24-hour PP. The combination of log(NT-proBNP), log(hs-CRP), and average day PP improved risk discrimination (AUC = 0.833 vs. 0.736; P < 0.05) and NRI (37%; P < 0.01) when added to other significant risk factors. NT-proBNP and hs-CRP predict CV events independently of APP and the combination of hs-CRP, NT-proBNP, and day PP improves risk discrimination in PAD patients.

  3. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD, as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP. We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS; INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001. Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94 and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027 and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028 remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%. Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03 and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009 and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001 were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  4. Liver inflammation is a Risk Factor for Prediabetes in At-Risk Latinos with and without Hepatitis C Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Blaire E; Bacchetti, Peter; Ayala, Claudia E.; Gelman, Nicholas; Melgar, Jennifer; Khalili, Mandana

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Early recognition of prediabetes can lead to timely clinical interventions to prevent type 2 diabetes. Both Latino ethnicity and chronic hepatitis C (HCV) have been identified as diabetic risk factors. We aimed to investigate predictors of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), a common prediabetic state, among Latinos with and without HCV. Methods One hundred Latino adults with no history of diabetes or cirrhosis underwent clinical, laboratory, and metabolic evaluation, including oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) and insulin suppression testing to quantify directly measured insulin resistance (IR). Isolated IFG was defined as fasting glucose ≥100mg/dL and prediabetes among Latinos with and without HCV. Among HCV-infected individuals, early antiviral therapy could mitigate the effect of inflammation and represent an important intervention to prevent diabetes in this at-risk population. PMID:25156890

  5. The role of classic risk factors and prothrombotic factor gene mutations in ischemic stroke risk development in young and middle-aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanc, Visnja; Sonicki, Zdenko; Vukasovic, Ines; Solter, Vesna V; Zavoreo, Iris; Kes, Vanja B

    2014-03-01

    In young individuals, a genetically predisposing hypercoagulability and classic modifying risk factors can act synergistically on the ischemic stroke risk development. The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of classic vascular risk factors and polymorphisms of the G20210A coagulation factor II (prothrombin), Arg506Glu coagulation factor V Leiden, C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and the impact of these gene mutations and classic vascular risk factors on the overall stroke risk in individuals aged 55 years or younger. The study included 155 stroke patients aged 55 years or younger and 150 control subjects. Stroke prevalence and odds ratio (OR) were assessed for the following parameters: G20210A prothrombin, Arg506Glu factor V Leiden, C677T MTHFR, and 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphisms; total number of study polymorphisms in a particular subject (genetic sum); and classic vascular risk factors of hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The prevalence of hypertension (P stroke patients. The following parameters were found to act as independent risk factors for ischemic stroke: decreased HDL cholesterol level (P ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged individuals. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Frequency of subclinical thyroid dysfunction and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among women at a workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Diaz-Olmos

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is very common in clinical practice and there is some evidence that it may be associated with cardiovascular disease. The aim here was to evaluate the frequencies of subclinical thyroid disease and risk factors for cardiovascular disease among women at a workplace, and to evaluate the association between subclinical thyroid disease and cardiovascular risk factors among them. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study on 314 women aged 40 years or over who were working at Universidade de São Paulo (USP. METHODS: All the women answered a questionnaire on sociodemographic characteristics and risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the Rose angina questionnaire. Anthropometric variables were measured and blood samples were analyzed for blood glucose, total cholesterol and fractions, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, free thyroxine (free-T4 and anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO. RESULTS: The frequencies of subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were, respectively, 7.3% and 5.1%. Women with subclinical thyroid disease presented higher levels of anti-TPO than did women with normal thyroid function (P = 0.01. There were no differences in sociodemographic factors and cardiovascular risk factors according to thyroid function status, except for greater sedentarism among the women with subclinical hypothyroidism. Restricting the comparison to women with subclinical hypothyroidism (TSH > 10 mIU/l did not change the results. CONCLUSION: In this sample of women, there was no association between poor profile of cardiovascular risk factors and presence of subclinical thyroid disease that would justify screening at the workplace.

  7. Cardiometabolic risk clustering in spinal cord injury: results of exploratory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, Alexander; Tinsley, Emily A; Nash, Mark S; Mendez, Armando J; Burns, Patricia; Elrod, Matt; Hamm, Larry F; Groah, Suzanne L

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests an elevated prevalence of cardiometabolic risks among persons with spinal cord injury (SCI); however, the unique clustering of risk factors in this population has not been fully explored. The purpose of this study was to describe unique clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors differentiated by level of injury. One hundred twenty-one subjects (mean 37 ± 12 years; range, 18-73) with chronic C5 to T12 motor complete SCI were studied. Assessments included medical histories, anthropometrics and blood pressure, and fasting serum lipids, glucose, insulin, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). The most common cardiometabolic risk factors were overweight/obesity, high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C). Risk clustering was found in 76.9% of the population. Exploratory principal component factor analysis using varimax rotation revealed a 3-factor model in persons with paraplegia (65.4% variance) and a 4-factor solution in persons with tetraplegia (73.3% variance). The differences between groups were emphasized by the varied composition of the extracted factors: Lipid Profile A (total cholesterol [TC] and LDL-C), Body Mass-Hypertension Profile (body mass index [BMI], systolic blood pressure [SBP], and fasting insulin [FI]); Glycemic Profile (fasting glucose and HbA1c), and Lipid Profile B (TG and HDL-C). BMI and SBP formed a separate factor only in persons with tetraplegia. Although the majority of the population with SCI has risk clustering, the composition of the risk clusters may be dependent on level of injury, based on a factor analysis group comparison. This is clinically plausible and relevant as tetraplegics tend to be hypo- to normotensive and more sedentary, resulting in lower HDL-C and a greater propensity toward impaired carbohydrate metabolism.

  8. Increased systemic elastase and C-reactive protein in aggressive periodontitis (CLOI-D-00160R2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfeil, Martin; Scharf, Susanne; Siegelin, Yasemin; Schacher, Beate; Oremek, Gerhard M; Sauer-Eppel, Hildegund; Schubert, Ralf; Eickholz, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The inflammatory mediators, serum elastase and C-reactive protein (CRP), are associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease. Thus, the aim of this study is to compare systemic inflammatory mediators in periodontally healthy controls (C), patients with untreated aggressive (AgP) and chronic (ChP) periodontitis. C [periodontal pocket probing depth (PPD)  30% of sites; age >35 years), and AgP (clinically healthy; PDD ≥ 3.6 mm at >30% of sites, bone loss ≥50% at ≥2 teeth; age ≤35 years) were examined clinically, and the body mass index was assessed. Blood was sampled for assessment of serum levels of elastase, CRP, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), interleukin (IL) 6, 8, and leukocyte counts. Thirty C, 31 ChP, and 29 AgP were analyzed. Elastase, CRP, LBP, and IL-6 levels were elevated in AgP compared to C (p C. AgP patients exhibit a stronger systemic inflammatory burden than C patients.

  9. Association of malnutrition-inflammation score, dialysis-malnutrition score and serum albumin with novel risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As'habi, Atefeh; Tabibi, Hadi; Hedayati, Mehdi; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra; Nozary-Heshmati, Behnaz

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the associations between malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS), dialysis-malnutrition score (DMS) and serum albumin with novel risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In this cross-sectional study, 291 HD patients were randomly selected from among 2302 adult HD patients in Tehran HD centers. The MIS and DMS were determined during one of the dialysis sessions in these patients. In addition, 4 mL blood was obtained before dialysis and analyzed for serum albumin and novel risk factors for CVD, including C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (sVCAM-1), sE-selectin, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 and lipoprotein (a) [Lp (a)]. MIS and DMS were significantly positively correlated with serum CRP (p protein-energy wasting indicators in HD patients are associated with serum CRP and sICAM-1, as two CVD risk factors.

  10. Association of C-reactive protein positivity among groups of patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ahmed Pirdawood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and a leading cause of disability. Increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein have been associated with prevalent knee osteoarthritis. This study aimed to assess the association between C- reactive protein positivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil Methods: Data from100 participants in this case-control study were enrolled from May 1st to December 1st, 2015 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital in Erbil city. Data were divided into two groups. The cases included 50 patients (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.9 ±3.8 years and diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis of one or both knee joints. Controls included 50 persons (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.1 ±3.9 years without knee osteoarthritis and matched for age, sex, and body mass index. C-reactive protein qualitatively measured. Patients were radiologically assessed by Kellgren and Lawrence grading scale (grade 0-4. Results: C-reactive protein was positive in 41 out of 50 (82% of knee osteoarthritis patients compared to 3 out of 50 (6% of healthy controls (P = 0.001. C- reactive protein positivity among knee osteoarthritis patients were significantly associated with body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, duration of diseases, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (P 0.05. Conclusion: C-reactive protein positivity was significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, early osteoarthritis, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade II, were significantly associated with positive C-reactive protein in knee osteoarthritis.

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome: cardiovascular risk factors according to specific phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Mubeena; Sidelmann, Johannes J; Faber, Jens; Wissing, Marie-Louise M; Naver, Klara V; Mikkelsen, Anne-Lis; Nilas, Lisbeth; Skouby, Sven O

    2015-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the impact of insulin resistance and body mass index (BMI) on inflammatory and hemostatic variables associated with long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in women with PCOS. 149 premenopausal women with PCOS were recruited consecutively from April 2010 to February 2012 at three Danish University Hospitals. The study was conducted at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Herlev University Hospital, Denmark. PCOS was diagnosed in accordance with the Rotterdam criteria and the women were classified into four phenotypes according to BMI and insulin resistance measured by the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Main outcome measures were the biomarkers C-reactive protein (CRP), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and von Willebrand factor antigen. Normal weight insulin-resistant PCOS women were characterized by abdominal obesity and elevated levels of plasma PAI-1. Overweight/obese insulin-resistant PCOS women had increased levels of both PAI-1 and CRP. Of the three Rotterdam criteria, only hyperandrogenemia was significantly associated with the hemostatic risk marker of long-term cardiovascular disease risk. Surrogate risk markers for cardiovascular disease are elevated in women with PCOS, especially insulin-resistant and overweight/obese women. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Flavonoid-rich cocoa consumption affects multiple cardiovascular risk factors in a meta-analysis of short-term studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrime, Mark G; Bauer, Scott R; McDonald, Anna C; Chowdhury, Nubaha H; Coltart, Cordelia E M; Ding, Eric L

    2011-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the consumption of foods rich in polyphenolic compounds, particularly cocoa, may have cardioprotective effects. No review, however, has yet examined the effect of flavonoid-rich cocoa (FRC) on all major cardiovascular risk factors or has examined potential dose-response relationships for these effects. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials was performed to evaluate the effect of FRC on cardiovascular risk factors and to assess a dose-response relationship. Inclusion and exclusion criteria as well as dependent and independent variables were determined a priori. Data were collected for: blood pressure, pulse, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, TG, BMI, C-reactive protein, flow-mediated vascular dilation (FMD), fasting glucose, fasting insulin, serum isoprostane, and insulin sensitivity/resistance indices. Twenty-four papers, with 1106 participants, met the criteria for final analysis. In response to FRC consumption, systolic blood pressure decreased by 1.63 mm Hg (P = 0.033), LDL cholesterol decreased by 0.077 mmol/L (P = 0.038), and HDL cholesterol increased by 0.046 mmol/L (P = 0.037), whereas total cholesterol, TG, and C-reactive protein remained the same. Moreover, insulin resistance decreased (HOMA-IR: -0.94 points; P FMD increased (1.53%; P FMD (P = 0.004), with maximum effect observed at a flavonoid dose of 500 mg/d; a similar relationship may exist with HDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.06). FRC consumption significantly improves blood pressure, insulin resistance, lipid profiles, and FMD. These short-term benefits warrant larger long-term investigations into the cardioprotective role of FRC.

  13. Bacteraemia due to AmpC β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in hospitalized cancer patients: risk factors, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Wenfang; Li, Zheng; Bai, Changsen; Li, Ding; Zheng, Shan; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Sihe

    2017-07-01

    AmpC β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (AmpC-EC) is one of the main antimicrobial resistant pathogens in patients with cancer. A cohort study was performed to evaluate the risk factors, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes of AmpC-EC bacteraemia in hospitalized cancer patients from September 2012 through December 2015. Two hundred forty-eight cases of E. coli bacteraemia were documented in cancer patients, 51 (20.6%) were caused by AmpC-EC and 197 (79.4%) were caused with non-AmpC-EC. Prior exposure to cephalosporins (OR 2.786; 95% CI: 1.094-7.091; P=0.032), carbapenems (OR 2.296; 95% CI: 1.054-5.004; P=0.036), and invasive procedures (OR 4.237; 95% CI: 1.731-10.37; P=0.002) were identified as independent risk factors for AmpC-EC. The time to positivity (TTP) of patients with AmpC-EC bacteraemia tended to be significantly shorter than that of non-AmpC-EC (8.33±2.18h versus 9.48±3.82h; P=0.006), and had a higher 30-day mortality rate in AmpC-EC compared with non-AmpC-EC (25.5% versus 12.2%; P=0.018). Metastasis (OR=2.778, 95% CI: 1.078-7.162; P=0.034), the presence of septic shock (OR=4.983, 95% CI: 1.761-14.10; P=0.002), and organ failure (OR=24.51 95% CI: 9.884-60.81; P<0.001) were independently associated with the overall mortality. The mortality rate showed a gradual increase when appropriate antibiotic therapy (AAT) was delayed more than 48h as determined by the trend test (P<0.001). In conclusion, this study showed that prevalence of AmpC-EC was high in hospitalized cancer patients of our area. Thus, it is necessary to apply appropriate therapeutic approaches and improve outcomes based on the analysis of risk factors for the acquisition of AmpC-EC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impacto da proteína-C reativa no risco cardiovascular de adolescentes Impacto de la Proteína-C reactiva en el riesgo cardiovascular de adolescentes Impact of C-reactive protein on cardiovascular risk in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis Tande da Silva

    2010-05-01

    entre los tres grupos (pBACKGROUND: Several studies suggest that C-reactive protein (CRP is associated with coronary artery disease in adults. However, this association has not been thoroughly explored in cases of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between CRP and cardiovascular risk factors in obese adolescents. METHODS: Eighty-four adolescents (12.6 ± 1.3 years of both genders were divided into the following groups: Normal weight (n = 28, Overweight (n = 28, and Obese (n = 28, according to body mass index (BMI. CRP levels (ultrasensitive ELISA, the lipid profile, and anti-oxLDL antibody levels (ELISA were determined after a 12-hour fast. RESULTS: The groups were similar in age (p = 0.13 and gender (p = 0.83. Total cholesterol, HDL-C, TC/HDL-C, and LDL-C/HDL-C showed significant differences between Normal weight and Obese groups. There was no significant variation in anti-oxLDL levels. CRP values were different among the three groups (p < 0.01. CRP levels showed a significant association with BMI (β = 2.533, AC (β = 2.645, WC (β = 2.945, TC (β = 0.006, LDL-C (β = 0.006, and anti-oxLDL antibodies (β = 0.383, and a negative association with HDL-C (β = -0.017. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that CRP is significantly associated with markers of cardiovascular risk in adolescents.

  15. Factores de riesgo asociados con la caries dental en niños de círculos infantiles Risk factor associated to dental caries in children from nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rodríguez Llanes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Los factores de riesgo asociados con la caries dental constituyen una probabilidad medible y tienen valor predictivo en la prevención de esta enfermedad que la sitúa como la principal causa de pérdida dentaria. Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo de corte transversal para determinar el comportamiento clínico epidemiológico de los factores de riesgo de la caries dental en niños de círculos infantiles del municipio Artemisa entre abril y diciembredel 2007, con la finalidad de identificar la prevalencia y factores de riesgo asociados con la caries dental y analizar el grado de riesgo en la muestra objeto de estudio. El universo de trabajo estuvo formado por 642 infantes pertenecientes a 6 círculos infantiles y la muestra se realizó por factibilidad, en la cual se seleccionaron 2 círculos infantiles para un total de 240 infantes, los cuales se agruparon atendiendo a la edad, sexo, prevalencia de caries dental y factores de riesgo mayormente asociados, así como el grado de riesgo. Se realizó un formulario que incluía el interrogatorio a padres y/o tutores y el examen bucal a los niños en las mismas instituciones, aplicando en cada caso el índice ceo-d. Entre los principales resultados se destaca, que el 80 % de los niños se encontraban libres de caries, que los factores de riesgo que más incidieron fueron la dieta cariogénica y la higiene bucal deficiente y que más del 80 % de la muestra posee un bajo riesgo a caries. Se concluye que la prevalencia de caries dental en estas instituciones es baja, a pesar de la influencia de factores de riesgo que condicionan la aparición de la enfermedad.Risk factors associated to dental caries are a measurable likelihood and also a predictive value in prevention of this condition, which is the major cause of teeth loss. We made a cross-sectional, descriptive and observational study to determine the clinicoepidemiologic behavior of risk factors of dental caries in children from

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Renal Involvement in Childhood Henoch-Schönlein Purpura: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Han; Tang, Yan-Ling; Lv, Xiao-Hang; Zhang, Gao-Fu; Wang, Mo; Yang, Hai-Ping; Li, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is an important cause of chronic kidney disease in children. This meta-analysis identified risk factors associated with renal involvement in childhood HSP. Methods PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were searched. The quality of all eligible studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale criteria. An analysis of possible risk factors was conducted to report the odds ratio (OR) and weighted mean difference (WMD). Results Thirteen studies (2398 children) revealed 20 possible and 13 significant risk factors associated with renal involvement in HSP, with the following meta-analysis estimates of OR and WMD, with 95% confidence intervals: older age (0.90, 0.61–1.19); age > 10 y (3.13, 1.39–7.07); male gender (1.36, 1.07–1.74); abdominal pain (1.94,1.24–3.04); gastrointestinal bleeding (1.86, 1.30–2.65); severe bowel angina (3.38, 1.17–9.80); persistent purpura (4.02, 1.22–13.25); relapse (4.70, 2.42–9.14); WBC > 15 × 109/L (2.42, 1.39–4.22); platelets > 500 × 109/L (2.98, 1.22–7.25); elevated antistreptolysin O (ASO) (2.17, 1.29–3.64); and decreased complement component 3 (C3) (3.13, 1.62–6.05). Factors not significantly associated with renal involvement were: blood pressure; orchitis; elevated C-reactive protein; elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); and elevated serum IgA/IgE or IgG. Arthritis/arthralgia may be a risk factor according to the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology (1.41, 1.01–1.96). Conclusion The following are associated with renal involvement in pediatric HSP: male gender; > 10 y old; severe gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding, and severe bowel angina); arthritis/arthralgia; persistent purpura or relapse; WBC > 15 × 109/L; platelets > 500 × 109/L; elevated ASO; and low C3. Relevant clinical interventions for these risk factors may exert positive effects on the prevention of kidney disease during the early

  17. Effect of a High Protein Weight Loss Diet on Weight, High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, and Cardiovascular Risk among Overweight and Obese Women: A Parallel Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Azadbakht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies regarding the effects of high protein (HP diets on cardiovascular (CVD risk factors have reported contradictory results. We aimed to determine the effects of an HP diet on CVD risk factors and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP among overweight and obese women. In this randomized controlled trial, we recruited 60 overweight and obese women, aged 20–65, into an HP or energy-restricted control diet for three months (protein, carbohydrate, and fat: 25%, 45%, and 30% versus 15%, 55%, and 30%, resp.. Total protein was divided between animal and plant sources in a 1 : 1 ratio, and animal sources were distributed equally between meats and dairy products. Fasting blood samples, hs-CRP, lipid profile, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and anthropometric measurements were assessed using standard guidelines. Percent change was significantly different between the two diet groups for weight (standard protein (SP: −3.90 ± 0.26 versus HP: −6.10 ± 0.34%; , resp. and waist circumference (SP: −3.03 ± 0.21 versus HP: −5.06 ± 0.28%; , resp.. Percent change of fasting blood glucose (FBG substantially decreased in the control group compared to the HP group (−9.13 ± 0.67 versus −4.93 ± 1.4%; P = 0.01, resp.. Total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure (SBP, and diastolic blood pressure (DBP decreased both in the HP and in the control diet groups (P = 0.06, P = 0.07, and P = 0.09, resp.; however, the results were marginally significant. Serum levels of hs-CRP were reduced both in the control (−0.08 ± 0.11%, P = 0.06 and in the high protein groups (−0.04 ± 0.09%, P = 0.06. The energy-restricted HP diet resulted in more beneficial effects on weight loss and reduction of waist circumference. CVD risk factors may improve with HP diets among overweight and obese women. When using isoenergetic weight loss diets, total cholesterol, hs-CRP, and SBP were marginally significantly reduced, independent of dietary protein content

  18. External Quality Control for Dried Blood Spot Based C-reactive Protein Assay: Experience from the Indonesia Family Life Survey and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peifeng; Herningtyas, Elizabeth H.; Kale, Varsha; Crimmins, Eileen M.; Risbud, Arun R.; McCreath, Heather; Lee, Jinkook; Strauss, John; O’Brien, Jennifer C.; Bloom, David E.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation, in dried blood spots has been increasingly incorporated in community-based social surveys internationally. Although the dried blood spot based CRP assay protocol has been validated in the United States, it remains unclear whether laboratories in other less developed countries can generate C-reactive protein results of similar quality. We therefore conducted external quality monitoring for dried blood spot based C-reactive protein measurement for the Indonesia Family Life Survey and the Longitudinal Aging Study in India. Our results show that dried blood spot based C-reactive protein results in these two countries have excellent and consistent correlations with serum-based values and dried blood spot based results from the reference laboratory in the United States. Even though the results from duplicate samples may have fluctuations in absolute values over time, the relative order of C-reactive protein levels remains similar and the estimates are reasonably precise for population-based studies that investigate the association between socioeconomic factors and health. PMID:25879265

  19. Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells do not invade nearby tissues or spread. Risk Factors Key Points Factors That are Known to ... chemicals . Factors That are Known to Increase the Risk of Cancer Cigarette Smoking and Tobacco Use Tobacco ...

  20. Changes in CVD risk factors in the activity counseling trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Baruth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Meghan Baruth1, Sara Wilcox1, James F Sallis3, Abby C King4,5, Bess H Marcus6, Steven N Blair1,21Department of Exercise Science, 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Public Health Research Center, Columbia, SC, USA; 3Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; 4Department of Health Research and Policy, 5Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 6Behavioral and Social Sciences Section, Brown University Program in Public Health, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Primary care facilities may be a natural setting for delivering interventions that focus on behaviors that improve cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the 24-month effects of the Activity Counseling Trial (ACT on CVD risk factors, to examine whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status, and to examine whether changes in fitness were associated with changes in CVD risk factors. ACT was a 24-month multicenter randomized controlled trial to increase physical activity. Participants were 874 inactive men and women aged 35–74 years. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three arms that varied by level of counseling, intensity, and resource requirements. Because there were no significant differences in change over time between arms on any of the CVD risk factors examined, all arms were combined, and the effects of time, independent of arm, were examined separately for men and women. Time × Baseline risk factor status interactions examined whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status. Significant improvements in total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and triglycerides were seen in

  1. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  2. Concentrations of the acute phase reactants high-sensitive C-reactive protein and YKL-40 and of interleukin-6 before and after treatment in patients with acromegaly and growth hormone deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Mikkel; Vestergaard, Henrik; Kristensen, Lars Østergaard

    2007-01-01

    Acromegaly is accompanied by increased cardiovascular mortality and a cluster of proatherogenic risk factors. In the general population, ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is associated with elevated levels of inflammatory markers. The acute phase reactant (APR) C-reactive protein (CRP) has been...... reported to be reduced in acromegaly and increase after treatment, suggesting that excess of GH/IGF-I could have anti-inflammatory effects. This is in accordance with results obtained in patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD), where increased levels of CRP have been reported....

  3. Prognostic implications of plasma fibrinogen and serum C- reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Plasma fibrinogen, serum C-reactive protein, biomarker, non-small cell lung cancer. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... demonstrated in colorectal [11], cervical, oesophageal [12], and pancreatic cancers .... demographic and clinical characteristic features of the patients involved are shown in Table ...

  4. predictors of c-reactive protein response in children infected

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... Results: The predictors of the C-reactive protein response in malaria (CRP ≥ 10mg/l) were fever (t = 6.867; ..... The lack of a significant difference between the ... infections - A major cause of death among children in Africa.

  5. Comparative study of C-Reactive Protein and other biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum levels of C-reactive proteins (CRP), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin and globulins were investigated using high sensitivity Immunoturbidometric and colorimetric techniques in individuals with hepatitis (n=50), Malaria (n=50) and 40 control subjects in age ...

  6. Relationship between C-reactive protein and stroke: a large prospective community based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Liu

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP was associated with risk of stroke. There were few studies in Asian population, or on stroke subtypes other than ischemic stroke. We thus investigated the relationship between CRP and the risks of all stroke and its subtypes in a Chinese adult population.In the current study, we included 90,517 Chinese adults free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline (June 2006 to October 2007 in analyses. Strokes were classified as ischemic stroke (IS, intracranial heamorrhage (ICH and subarachnoid heamorrhage (SAH. High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP were categorized into three groups: 3 mg/L. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the association between hs-CRP concentrations and all stroke, as well as its subtypes.During a median follow-up time of 49 months, we documented 1,472 incident stroke cases. Of which 1,049 (71.3% were IS, 383 (26.0% were ICH, and 40 (2.7% were SAH. After multivariate adjustment, hs-CRP concentrations ≥1 mg/L were associated with increased risks of all stroke (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidential interval (CI 1.03-1.33; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.46 and IS (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.36; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.60, but not with ICH and SAH. Subgroup analyses showed that higher hs-CRP concentration was more prone to be a risk factor for all stroke and IS in non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive participants.We found that higher hs-CRP concentrations were associated with a higher risk of IS, particularly for non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive subjects. In contrast, we did not observe significant associations between hs-CRP and ICH/SAH.

  7. Increased Body Mass Index, Elevated C-reactive Protein, and Short Telomere Length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Weischer, Maren

    2014-01-01

    -reactive protein. SETTING AND DESIGN: We studied 45,069 individuals from the Copenhagen General Population Study with measurements of leukocyte telomere length, BMI, and C-reactive protein in a Mendelian randomization study. Using the three obesity-associated polymorphisms FTO rs9939609, MC4R rs17782313, and TMEM...

  8. Predictive value of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mustafa; Ates, Ihsan; Akpinar, Muhammed Yener; Yuksel, Mahmut; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Kacar, Sabite; Coskun, Orhan; Kayacetin, Ertugrul

    2017-08-15

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increases and albumin decreases in patients with inflammation and infection. However, their role in patients with acute pancreatitis is not clear. The present study was to investigate the predictive significance of the CRP/albumin ratio for the prognosis and mortality in acute pancreatitis patients. This study was performed retrospectively with 192 acute pancreatitis patients between January 2002 and June 2015. Ranson scores, Atlanta classification and CRP/albumin ratios of the patients were calculated. The CRP/albumin ratio was higher in deceased patients compared to survivors. The CRP/albumin ratio was positively correlated with Ranson score and Atlanta classification in particular and with important prognostic markers such as hospitalization time, CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. In addition to the CRP/albumin ratio, necrotizing pancreatitis type, moderately severe and severe Atlanta classification, and total Ranson score were independent risk factors of mortality. It was found that an increase of 1 unit in the CRP/albumin ratio resulted in an increase of 1.52 times in mortality risk. A prediction value about CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 was found to be a significant marker in predicting mortality with 92.1% sensitivity and 58.0% specificity. It was seen that Ranson and Atlanta classification were higher in patients with CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 compared with those with CRP/albumin ratio ≤16.28. Patients with CRP/albumin ratio >16.28 had a 19.3 times higher chance of death. The CRP/albumin ratio is a novel but promising, easy-to-measure, repeatable, non-invasive inflammation-based prognostic score in acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship of C-reactive protein, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus: potential role of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David T

    2005-12-01

    Atherosclerosis and the metabolic derangements of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are all associated with underlying inflammatory processes. C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of vascular events. It adds to cardiovascular disease risk at all levels of low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and Framingham risk scores, and elevated levels are also associated with increasing severity of the metabolic syndrome. The development of a simple, stable, noninvasive test to measure high-sensitivity CRP has provided a clinical tool that may have an important role in the identification and assessment of individuals likely to develop cardiovascular or metabolic disease. The role of CRP in predicting cardiovascular risk is less clear in African Americans, however, than in white populations. Statins and thiazolidinediones are being investigated for their potential role in the prevention and treatment of the inflammatory processes involved in the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In the future, assessment of CRP levels may contribute importantly to clinical decision-making in reducing cardiovascular risk.

  10. Effects of atorvastatin on human c reactive protein metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statins are known to reduce plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. Our goals were to define the mechanisms by which CRP was reduced by maximal dose atorvastatin. Eight subjects with combined hyperlipidemia (5 men and 3 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled...

  11. A brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism Val66Met identifies fibromyalgia syndrome subgroup with higher body mass index and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yangming; Russell, I Jon; Liu, Ya-Guang

    2012-08-01

    A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results from a substitution at position 66 from valine (Val) to methionine (Met) and may predispose to human neuropsychiatric disorders. We proposed to determine whether these BDNF gene SNPs were associated with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and/or any of its typical phenotypes. Patients with FMS (N = 95) and healthy normal controls (HNC, N = 58) were studied. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The BDNF SNPs were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).The BDNF SNP distribution was 65 (68%) Val/Val, 28 (30%) Val/Met, and 2 (2%) Met/Met for FMS and 40 (69%), 17(29%), and 1 (2%) for HNC, respectively. The serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP)and body mass index (BMI) in FMS were higher than in HNC. The FMS with BDNF Val66Val had significantly higher mean BMI (P = 0.0001) and hsCRP (P = 0.02) than did FMS carrying the Val66Met genotype. This pattern was not found in HNC. Phenotypic measures of subjective pain, pain threshold, depression, or insomnia did not relate to either of the BDNF SNPs in FMS. The relative distribution BDNF SNPs did not differ between FMS and HNC. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is not selective for FMS. The BDNF Val66Val SNP identifies a subgroup of FMS with elevated hsCRP and higher BMI. This is the first study to associate a BDNF polymorphism with a FMS subgroup phenotype.

  12. [Perception of health risks: psychological and social factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzenhäuser, S; Epp, A

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews central findings and current developments of psychological and sociological research on the perception of health risks. Risk perception is influenced by numerous psychological, social, political, and cultural factors. These factors can be categorized into (a) risk characteristics, (b) characteristics of the risk perceiving person and his/her situation, and (c) characteristics of risk communication. Thus, besides individual cognitive and affective processing of risk information, social processes of risk amplification (e.g., media effects) are also involved in the construction of individual risk perceptions. We discuss the recommendations for health risk communication that follow from these findings with regard to different communication goals.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE HIGH-SENSITIVITY C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN YOUNG OBESE WOMEN WITH PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Palo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common reproductive disorder in young women affecting 5-10% of population. PCOS women are at increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. PCOS is now recognised as not only a reproductive disorder, but also a metabolic one with long-term effects on women’s health. With this background, the present study was undertaken to assess the levels of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP in young obese women with PCOS as compared with healthy obese women without PCOS. MATERIALS AND METHODS This cross-sectional observational study was carried out in MKCG Medical College, Berhampur, in the Department of Cardiology and Gynaecology between January 2016 to December 2016. A total of 56 young obese PCOS patients aged less than 30 years and 25 healthy patients matched for age and BMI were studied. RESULTS Baseline cardiovascular risk factors, hormone variables and lipid profiles and hs-CRP levels are measured in both PCOS patients and control subjects. It has been observed that the median hs-CRP levels are significantly higher in young obese PCOS patients than the control subjects. Obese patients with PCOS had higher levels of hs-CRP compared to healthy obese controls. The mean values of hs-CRP was 5.46 mg/L in PCOS group and 2.8 mg/L in the control group, which is statistically significant. CONCLUSION PCOS patients clearly present a higher risk of CVD due to its peculiar hormonal pattern characterised by insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and inflammatory state. The metabolic disorders in PCOS could possibly be improved by diet and drugs in early periods of their life, so as to decrease the risk of CVD in future. Estimation hs-CRP maybe considered as a reliable predictive marker for future Cardiovascular Disease (CVD in PCOS patients.

  14. Risk factors for diseases of the cardiovascular system among Catholics living in areas of southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Majda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the most frequent cause of mortality of Polish residents. In Poland, there are few publications regarding research on the influence of people’s religiosity on their health. Aim of the research : To determine some factors of cardiovascular risk and the risk of cardiovascular events among Catholics. Material and methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 134 randomly selected Catholics and based on the results of: questionnaire survey, anthropometric measurements, physical examination, the SCORE scale, laboratory tests (CRP, homocysteine. glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides and assessing the risk of cardiovascular events based on the SCORE scale. Statistical analysis was based on the χ 2 test. Founded significance level was 0.05. Results: More than half of the respondents were diagnosed delevated homocysteine level and gluteal-femoral obesity. A little more than half of those surveyed had elevated total cholesterol levels and increased blood pressure, a little more than one-quarter of the respondents had raised triglyceride levels, and one-tenth had heightened glucose and C-reactive protein levels. The higher the age of the respondents, the more often the results of their biochemical exceed standards. Over half of those examined were diagnosed with overweight or obesity. Among examined gynoid obesity prevailed over android obesity. The risk assessment of CVD Catholics revealed that among the modifiable factors, biochemical levels of homocysteine proved to be the most important new risk factor, but among the classic factors it was blood pressure value. More than half of the respondents had moderate risk of cardiovascular events in the study group. Conclusions : Nurses should promote pro-health attitudes, and should encourage the elimination of risk factors and biochemical testing and measurement among Catholics, who are a religious group at higher risk of cardiovascular

  15. On-treatment platelet reactivity: State of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Rossella; Grifoni, Elisa; Giusti, Betti

    2016-02-01

    High on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HcPR) during dual-antiplatelet therapy is a marker of vascular risk, in particular stent thrombosis, in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Genetic determinants (CYP2C19*2 polymorphism), advanced age, female gender, diabetes and reduced ventricular function are related to a higher risk to develop HcPR. In addition, inflammation and increased platelet turnover, as revealed by the elevated percentage of reticulated platelets in patients' blood, that characterize the acute phase of acute coronary syndromes, are associated with HcPR. To overcome the limitation of clopidogrel, new antiplatelet agents (prasugrel and ticagrelor) were developed and the demonstration of their superiority over clopidogrel was obtained in the two randomized trials, TRITON TIMI 38 and PLATO. Emerging evidence is accumulating on the role of high-on aspirin platelet reactivity (HaPR), especially in the clinical context of diabetes. Finally, the presence of new, potent antiplatelet drugs has shifted the focus from thrombotic to bleeding risk. Recent data document that low on-treatment platelet reactivity (LPR) is associated with a significantly higher bleeding risk. Due to the current possibility to choose between multiple antiplatelet strategies, the future perspective is to include in the management of ACS, in addition to clinical data and classical risk factors, the definition of platelet function during treatment in order to set a tailored therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of CKD in Chinese patients with periodontal disease.

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    Kejin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. METHODS: In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2, the presence of albuminuria, or hematuria. All patients with periodontal disease underwent a periodontal examination, including periodontal probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level by Florida Probe. They completed a questionnaire and had blood and urine samples taken. The adjusted prevalence of indicators of kidney damage was calculated and risk factors associated with CKD were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 1392 patients with periodontal disease were invited to participate this study and 1268 completed the survey and examination. After adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence of reduced eGFR, albuminuria, and hematuria was 2.7% (95% CI 1.7-3.7, 6.7% (95% CI 5.5-8.1 and 10.9% (95% CI 9.2-12.5, respectively. The adjusted prevalence of CKD was 18.2% (95% CI 16.2-20.3. Age, male, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, and interleukin-6 levels (≥7.54 ng/L were independent risk factors for reduced eGFR. Female, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, high level of cholesterol, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP (≥ 1.03 mg/L and TNF-α levels (≥ 1.12 ng/L were independently associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Female, lower education (risk factors for hematuria. CONCLUSIONS: 18.2% of Chinese patients with periodontal disease have proteinuria, hematuria, or reduced eGFR, indicating the presence of kidney damage

  17. C-Reactive Protein and Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Concentrations in Relation to the Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosed by Glucose or HbA1c Criteria in Chinese Adults in Qingdao, China

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    J. Ren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate the association of C-reactive protein (CRP and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT concentrations with newly diagnosed diabetes defined by either glucose or HbA1c criteria in Chinese adults. Methods. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2006. Data from 1167 men and 1607 women aged 35–74 years were analyzed. Diabetes was defined according to either glucose or HbA1c criteria alone. Results. Compared with nondiabetes, multivariate-adjusted OR (95%CI was 1.13 (0.90,1.42 in men and 1.21 (1.00,1.45 in women for CRP and 1.42 (1.18,1.72 and 1.57 (1.31,1.87 for GGT, respectively. Neither CRP nor GGT was associated with the presence of diabetes defined by the HbA1c criterion. Conclusions. The effect of elevated CRP on diabetes defined by the glucose criterion was mediated through obesity, but elevated GGT was an independent risk factor for diabetes in this Chinese population. None of the two was, however, associated with the elevated HbA1c concentrations.

  18. Socioeconomic position, health behaviors, and C-reactive protein: A moderated-mediation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Rafferty, Jane A.; Jackson, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective We sought to understand the link between low SEP and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by examining the association between SEP, health-related coping behaviors, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker and independent risk factor for CVD in a US sample of adults. Design We used a multiple mediation model to evaluate how these behaviors work in concert to influence CRP levels and whether these relationships were moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. Main outcome measures CRP levels were divided into two categories: elevated CRP (3.1–10.0 mg/L) and normal CRP (≤ 3.0 mg/L). Results Both poverty and low educational attainment were associated with elevated CRP, and these associations were primarily explained through higher levels of smoking and lower levels of exercise. In the education model, poor diet also emerged as a significant mediator. These behaviors accounted for 87.9% of the total effect of education on CRP and 55.8% the total effect of poverty on CRP. We also found significant moderation of these mediated effects by gender and race/ethnicity. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the influence of socioeconomically-patterned environmental constraints on individual-level health behaviors. Specifically, reducing socioeconomic inequalities may have positive effects on CVD disparities through reducing cigarette smoking and increasing vigorous exercise. PMID:20496985

  19. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease--a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-12-09

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with "intermediate risk" as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARENTAL AND CHILD CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS

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    Azita Fesharak Nia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available   Abstract INTRODUCTION: Adult cardiovascular disease has its root in childhood. Cardiovascular disease aggregates in families, so identification of high-risk families and early screening and control of cardiovascular risk factors in offspring will help prevent cardiovascular disease. This study was performed to determine the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors in parents having a positive history of premature myocardial infarction and their offspring. methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2004 on 91 parents and their offspring (91 children. The parents were randomly selected from among patients hospitalized in the critical care unit of Vali-e-Asr hospital with premature myocardial infarction. Important indicators such as systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, body mass index (BMI, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C were measured in both groups. results: There was no significant relation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure between parents and their offspring. Thirty-three percent of the parents were hypertensive. No cases of hypertension were found in children. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly higher in the children of hypertensive parents. Significant relations were seen between BMI and obesity in parents and their children. There was no significant relation between serum lipids, high TC, high LDL-C and low HDL-C levels in parents and their children. The commonest lipid disorder in parents and their offspring was low HDL-C. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show a significant relation between hypertension, obesity and blood lipid disorders between parents with positive history of premature myocardial infraction and their children. Hence, screening programs in these children for detection of cardiovascular risk factors are recommended.     Keywords

  1. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M.; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs.......To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs....

  2. [Homocystein serum levels and lipid parameters in children with atherosclerosis risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierakowska-Fijałek, Anna; Kaczmarek, Piotr; Pokoca, Lech; Smorag, Ireneusz; Wosik-Erenbek, Marzenna; Baj, Zbigniew

    2007-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of adult patients, however, it begins in childhood and progresses from fatty streaks to raised lesions in arteries in adolescence and young adults. Clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis in adulthood depends on the risk factors such as: lipid disorders, obesity, hypertension, smoking habits and family history of CHD. High serum homocysteine concentration is increasingly recognised as a new risk factor for atherosclerosis and other vascular diseases. Atherogenic effect of homocystein is related to cytotoxin action on the endothelial cells and their function. The aim of this study was to estimate relations between the homocysteine serum concentration and the lipid levels in children with atherosclerosis risk factors. The study was carried out on 48 children with atherosclerosis risk factors. The control group consisted of 25 healthy childrens. Total cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG), HDL-C, LDL-C were determined by enzymatic method. Concentration of homocysteine was estimated by immunoenzymatic method (ELISA). Obesity, lipid disorders, and hypertension were the most frequent risk factors in the investigated children. Statistically significant higher concentration of TC, LDL-C, TG and lower HDL-C were observed in children with atherosclerosis risk factors. No significant differences in homocystein concentration were observed in the investigated groups, but homocystein concentration was significantly higher in group of children with atherosclerosis risk factors. We observed that increased number of the risk factors is followed by high homocystein concentration in the serum.

  3. Adiponectin and C - reactive protein Relationship in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Cardiovascular Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M.A.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common reproductive abnormalities, shares some components of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Therefore, PCOS patients may represent the largest group of women at high risk for the development of early-onset cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes. The adipokine, adiponectin inhibits vascular inflammation and acts as an endogenous modulator of obesity - linked diseases. High - sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is recently debated as a risk factor and mediator for atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between adiponectin and hs- CRP in The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and to identify their relation to Cardiovascular Disease. Adiponectin and hs- CRP measurements were undertaken in 90 PCOS patients and 70 body mass index-matched controls with regular menstrual cycles. Whereas 36.8% of the PCOS patients had CRP levels above 5 mg/liter, only 9.6% of the controls exhibited high CRP levels (P < 0.001). The mean ± SD was 5.46 ± 7.0 in the PCOS group vs. 2.04 ± 1.9 mg/liter in the control (P < 0.001). The body mass index, white blood cell count, TSH, glucose, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels were not significantly different between the two groups. CRP levels are elevated in patients with PCOS and may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk in these patients. The plasma adiponectin levels being significantly lower in these patients. These results suggest that elevation of CRP and reduction of adiponectin could emerge as mediators of atherogenesis and insulin resistance. (author)

  4. Analysis on the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion

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    Zhi JIANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the risk factors of bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Methods The clinical data of children with bacterial meningitis in our hospital were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors for subdural effusion.  Results A total of 128 cases were divided into control group (N = 64 and subdural effusion group (N = 64. There was no significant difference on serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and white blood cell (WBC between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. Compared with control group, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF WBC (Z = 3.126, P = 0.003, CSF protein (Z = 4.928, P = 0.000 and serum procalcitonin (PCT; Z = 2.823, P = 0.007 in subdural effusion group were significantly higher, while CSF glucose (t = 2.166, P = 0.033 was significantly lower. After treatment, CSF WBC (Z = 2.467, P = 0.012 in subdural effusion group was still significantly higher than that of control group, and CSF glucose (t = 4.938, P = 0.000 was still significantly lower. Logistic regression analysis showed that WBC in CSF (P = 0.027, CSF protein (P = 0.002 and serum PCT (P = 0.014 were independent risk factors for bacterial meningitis complicated with subdural effusion.  Conclusions CSF examination of children with bacterial meningitis reveals significant increase of CSF WBC, CSF protein and serum PCT, suggesting concurrent subdural effusion is easily occurred. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.012

  5. Serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Target for Therapy or Trouble?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Virginia B; Jordan, Joanne M

    2007-02-07

    High sensitivity serum C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) has come into clinical use as a marker of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In addition to a role as a marker of disease, CRP has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of CVD. Specific small-molecule inhibitors of CRP have recently been developed with the intent of mitigating cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction. However, the use of CRP, both as a risk marker and a disease target are controversial for several reasons. Serum hs-CRP concentrations can be elevated on the basis of genetics, female gender, and non-Caucasian ethnicity. It is not clear, in these contexts, that elevations of hs-CRP have any pathological significance. As a non-specific indicator of inflammation, CRP is also not a specific indicator of a single disease state such as cardiovascular disease but elevated concentrations can be seen in association with other comorbidities including obesity and pulmonary disease. In sharp contrast to the proposed inhibition of CRP for cardiovascular disease treatment, the infusion of CRP has been shown to have profound therapeutic benefits for autoimmune disease and septic shock. The balance between the risks and benefits of these competing views of the role of CRP in disease and disease therapy is reminiscent of the ongoing controversy regarding the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for musculoskeletal disease and their cardiovascular side effects. Soon, NSAIDs may not be the only agents about which Rheumatologists and Cardiologists may spar.

  6. Are current UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) obesity risk guidelines useful? Cross-sectional associations with cardiovascular disease risk factors in a large, representative English population.

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    Tabassum, Faiza; Batty, G David

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has recently released obesity guidelines for health risk. For the first time in the UK, we estimate the utility of these guidelines by relating them to the established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Health Survey for England (HSE) 2006, a population-based cross-sectional study in England was used with a sample size of 7225 men and women aged ≥35 years (age range: 35-97 years). The following CVD risk factor outcomes were used: hypertension, diabetes, total and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycated haemoglobin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and Framingham risk score. Four NICE categories of obesity were created based on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC): no risk (up to normal BMI and low/high WC); increased risk (normal BMI & very high WC, or obese & low WC); high risk (overweight & very high WC, or obese & high WC); and very high risk (obese I & very high WC or obese II/III with any levels of WC. Men and women in the very high risk category had the highest odds ratios (OR) of having unfavourable CVD risk factors compared to those in the no risk category. For example, the OR of having hypertension for those in the very high risk category of the NICE obesity groupings was 2.57 (95% confidence interval 2.06 to 3.21) in men, and 2.15 (1.75 to 2.64) in women. Moreover, a dose-response association between the adiposity groups and most of the CVD risk factors was observed except total cholesterol in men and low HDL in women. Similar results were apparent when the Framingham risk score was the outcome of interest. In conclusion, the current NICE definitions of obesity show utility for a range of CVD risk factors and CVD risk in both men and women.

  7. Prenatal Stress as a Risk-and an Opportunity-Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sarah; Freeman, Sara M; Bales, Karen L; Belsky, Jay

    2018-04-01

    Two separate lines of research indicate (a) that prenatal stress is associated with heightened behavioral and physiological reactivity and (b) that these postnatal phenotypes are associated with increased susceptibility to both positive and negative developmental experiences. Therefore, prenatal stress may increase sensitivity to the rearing environment. We tested this hypothesis by manipulating prenatal stress and rearing-environment quality, using a cross-fostering paradigm, in prairie voles. Results showed that prenatally stressed voles, as adults, displayed the highest behavioral and physiological reactivity when cross-fostered to low-contact (i.e., low-quality) rearing but the lowest behavioral and physiological reactivity when cross-fostered to high-contact (i.e., high-quality) rearing; non-prenatally stressed voles showed no effect of rearing condition. Additionally, while neither prenatal stress nor rearing condition affected oxytocin receptor binding, prenatally stressed voles cross-fostered to high-contact rearing showed the highest vasopressin-1a receptor binding in the amygdala. Results indicate that prenatal stress induces greater environmental sensitivity, making it both a risk and an opportunity factor.

  8. Prevalence of Chronic non Communicable Diseases and Risk Factors in Older Adults in Holguín

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    Pedro Enrique Miguel Soca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Foundation: chronic non communicable diseases and their associated risk factors constitute a health problem in the elderly. Objective: to determine the prevalence of non communicable chronic diseases and to identify their associated risk factors in the elderly in Holguín province. Method: across-sectional study was carried out with a multistage sampling of 2 085 adults from 4 municipalities in the province of Holguín. The variables analyzed were: age, weight, height, body mass index, abdominal perimeter, hip circumference, waist / hip index, waist / height index, blood pressure and laboratory complement. Quantitative variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation of the mean with their respective 95 % confidence intervals. Results: prevalence rates of chronic diseases and associated factors were overweight: 33.7 %, obesity: 45.2 %, abdominal obesity: 68 %, waist / tall index: 91.2 %, prehypertension: 5.4 % , hypertension: 29.6 %, hypertriglyceridemia: 60.9 %, hypercholesterolemia 54.1 %, HDL-cholesterol under 43,9 %, high LDL-cholesterol 20.7 %, high plasma atherogenic index 53.4 %, metabolic syndrome 56.5 %, ischemic heart disease 24.8 %, hypothyroidism 8.5 %, smoking 17.3 % , positive C-reactive protein 6, 8 % and positive microalbuminuria 3.4 %. Conclusions: older adults presented greater deterioration of anthropometric and lipid profile measurements than non - elderly adults, with high prevalence rates of most of the non - communicable chronic diseases studied and their associated risk factors.

  9. Prognostic value of sustained elevated C-reactive protein levels in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Takeshi; Kaji, Shuichiro; Kim, Kitae; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Tani, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Makoto; Furukawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate management of aortic intramural hematoma is still controversial, because a variety of aortic events can arise during follow-up in some patients. However, simplified identification of these patients remains challenging. The present study aimed to determine the prognostic significance of serial C-reactive protein measurements for the prediction of adverse events in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma. A total of 180 patients with aortic intramural hematoma were retrospectively reviewed. The C-reactive protein data were obtained at admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, and the maximum value was obtained during the acute phase. Adverse aorta-related events were defined by a composite of aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, and surgical or endovascular aortic repair. The C-reactive protein value was 3.0 ± 4.6, 8.7 ± 5.9, 9.0 ± 5.5, and 5.7 ± 4.5 mg/dL on admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, respectively. The maximal value of C-reactive protein was 12.4 ± 6.3 mg/dL at a mean of 4 days from the onset. Patients with elevated C-reactive protein levels (≥7.2 mg/dL) at 2 weeks had significantly greater rates of aorta-related events (P analysis, an elevated C-reactive protein level at 2 weeks (hazard ratio, 3.16; P value compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection (chi-square, 16.94 for ulcer-like projection only vs 34.32 with the addition of C-reactive protein at 2 weeks, P < .001). C-reactive protein was a simple and useful marker providing incremental prognostic information compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection in patients with aortic intramural hematoma. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Human C-Reactive Protein on Pathogenesis of Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kajiya, T.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2011), s. 731-737 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/0290; GA ČR GAP303/10/0505; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805 Grant - others:EC(XE) HEALTH-F4-2010-241504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : C-reactive protein * metabolic syndrome * transgenic rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 6.207, year: 2011

  11. PPARγ gene polymorphism, C-reactive protein level, BMI and periodontitis in post-menopausal Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangming; Sugita, Noriko; Yoshihara, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Masanori; Miyazaki, Hideo; Nakamura, Kazutoshi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the association between the PPARγPro12Ala polymorphism and obesity. Obese individuals had higher C-reactive protein (CRP) levels compared with those of normal weight, and PPARγ activation could significantly reduce serum high-sensitive CRP level. We have previously suggested that the Pro12Ala polymorphism represents a susceptibility factor for periodontitis, which is a known risk factor for increased CRP level. The aim was to investigate associations between PPARγ gene polymorphism, serum CRP level, BMI and/or periodontitis among post-menopausal Japanese women. The final sample in this study comprised 359 post-menopausal Japanese women. Periodontal parameters, including PD, CAL and BOP, were measured per tooth. PPARγPro12Ala genotype was determined by PCR-RFLP. Hs-CRP value was measured by a latex nephelometry assay. No significant differences in age, BMI or periodontal parameters were found between the genotypes. The percentages of sites with PD ≥ 4 mm were significantly higher among the hsCRP ≥ 1 mg/l group than the hsCRP periodontitis, serum CRP level or BMI in post-menopausal Japanese women. However, serum hsCRP level correlated with periodontitis in Ala allele carriers, and with BMI in non-carriers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Immune-Mediated Inflammation Promotes Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Recent-Onset Psoriatic Arthritis Patients without Conventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo A. Kolliker Frers

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the inflammatory burden in recent-onset psoriatic arthritis (PsA patients without conventional cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs are not available. This preliminary study focuses on cardiovascular risk in cutaneous psoriasis (CPs and recent-onset PsA patients. Blood biochemistry (glucose, cholesterol, uric acid, lipid profile and apolipoprotein B was analyzed using standard kits. Proatherogenic inflammation markers, C-reactive protein (CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6, and endothelial activators monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ultrasound images allowed measuring carotid intima–media thickness (cIMT. Our study first shows an increase in cIMT, and in serum levels of sICAM-1 and CRP in recent-onset PsA patients not presenting conventional CVRFs over the non-medicated time-period, from disease diagnosis to the beginning of pharmacological treatment, compared with healthy subjects. The outcome highlights the importance of monitoring serum level of sICAM1, CRP, and cIMT, and the value of primary prevention in psoriatic patients even with no history of cardiovascular events.

  13. Associations Between Diabetic Retinopathy and Plasma Levels of High-sensitive C-reactive Protein or Von Willebrand Factor in Long-term Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jonas Vejvad Nørskov; Hoffmann, Stine Skovbo; Green, Anders

    2013-01-01

    .27 IU/ml (0.79-2.07 IU/ml), respectively. No or minimal DR (ETDRS-levels 10-20) was found in 16.4%, mild DR (ETDRS-level 35) in 19.4%, moderate DR (ETDRS-levels 43-47) in 11.0%, and 53.2% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) corresponding to ETDRS-level 60 or more. In an age- and sex......Purpose: To evaluate high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and von Willebrand factor as possible plasma markers of diabetic retinopathy in a population-based cohort of type 1 diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 201 type 1 diabetic patients from...... a population-based cohort from Fyn County, Denmark. Plasma levels of hs-CRP and von Willebrand factor antigen were measured and related to the level of diabetic retinopathy (DR) as evaluated by dilated nine-field 45 degree monoscopic fundus photos captured by Topcon TRC-NWS6 and graded according to the Early...

  14. C-reactive Protein −717A>G and −286C>T>A Gene Polymorphism and Ischemic Stroke

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    Yan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the formation and progression of ischemic stroke. Recently, more and more epidemiological studies have focused on the association between C-reactive protein (CRP −717A > G and −286C > T > A genetic polymorphisms and ischemic stroke. However, the findings of these researches are not conclusive. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether these two polymorphisms are associated with the risk of ischemic stroke. Eligible studies were identified from the database of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI, Weipu, and Wanfang. We calculated odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs to assess the strength of the association. Results: Four articles were included in our study, including 1926 cases and 2678 controls for −717A > G polymorphism, 652 cases and 1103 controls for −286C > T > A polymorphism. The results of meta-analysis showed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP −717A > G was not significantly associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (GG vs. AA, OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.83-1.50, P = 0.207; GG + GA vs. AA, OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93-1.17, P = 0.533; GG vs. GA + AA, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.82-1.47, P = 0.220. Meta-analysis of SNP − 286C > T > A also demonstrated no statistical evidence of a significant association with the risk of ischemic stroke (AA vs. CC, OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.59-1.25, P = 0.348; AA vs. CC, OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.80-1.06, P = 0.609; AA vs. CC, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.62-1.30, P = 0.374. Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated little evidence to support a role of CRP gene −717A > G, −286C > T > A polymorphisms in ischemic stroke predisposition. However, to draw comprehensive and more reliable conclusions, further larger studies are needed to validate the association between CRP gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke in various ethnic groups.

  15. High sensitivity C-reactive protein and its relationship with impaired glucose regulation in lean patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Won; Han, Ji Eun; Kim, You Shin; Won, Hyung Jae; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik

    2012-04-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine-metabolic disorder, also associated with the metabolic syndrome. Serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of low-grade chronic inflammation is a potent predictor of cardiovascular events, closely linked to metabolic syndrome features and higher in patients with PCOS. However, hs-CRP in lean patients with PCOS has not been fully evaluated and few data are available. We aimed to investigate the relation between glucose intolerance and hs-CRP levels in lean patients with PCOS, and to evaluate the possible relationship between hs-CRP and PCOS by evaluating PCOS-related metabolic abnormalities in Korean women. We consecutively recruited 115 lean (BMI PCOS and 103 lean healthy controls. The PCOS group was divided two groups: impaired glucose regulation (IGR) and normal glucose tolerance group (NGT). In lean patients with PCOS, hs-CRP level was higher in the IGR group than in the NGT group (0.60 ± 1.37 versus 0.18 ± 0.46, p(Bonf) = 0.023) and other metabolic risk factors were also higher in the IGR group than in the NGT group. And there were close relationships between hs-CRP level and metabolic risk factor, such as 2 h postprandial insulin level in the lean patients with PCOS.

  16. Potential Mediators between Fibromyalgia and C-Reactive protein: Results from a Large U.S. Community Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Feinberg, Termeh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Lilly, Christa; Innes, Kim Karen

    2017-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia, a potentially debilitating chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology, may be characterized by inflammation. In this study, we investigated the relation of FMS to serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large population of adults (18+) and investigated the influence of other factors on this relationship, including BMI, comorbidities, as well as mood and sleep disturbance. Methods Participants were 52,535 Ohio Valley residents (Fibromyalgia n?=?1125). All participants compl...

  17. Roles of Vascular and Metabolic Components in Cognitive Dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: Short- and Long-term Modification by Non-genetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD. Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of 1 compromised vascular reactivity, 2 vascular lesions, 3 hypo/hyperglycemia, and 4 exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. Beta-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: 1 functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, 2 MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, 3 clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, 4 amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  18. Roles of vascular and metabolic components in cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: short- and long-term modification by non-genetic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoyuki; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-11-05

    It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD). Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of (1) compromised vascular reactivity, (2) vascular lesions, (3) hypo/hyperglycemia, and (4) exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. β-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: (1) functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, (2) MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, (3) clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  19. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  20. Affective reactivity to daily stressors is associated with elevated inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Nancy L.; Graham-Engeland, Jennifer E.; Ong, Anthony D.; Almeida, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammation increases the risk of chronic diseases, but the links between emotional responses to daily events and inflammation are unknown. We examined individual differences in affective reactivity to daily stressors (i.e., changes in positive and negative affect in response to stressors) as predictors of inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Methods A cross-sectional sample of 872 adults from the National Study of Daily Experiences (sub-study of Midlife in the United States II) reported daily stressors and affect during telephone interviews for 8 days. Blood samples were obtained at a separate clinic visit and assayed for inflammatory markers. Multilevel models estimated trait affective reactivity slopes for each participant, which were inputted into regression models to predict inflammation. Results People who experienced greater decreases in positive affect on days when stressors occurred (i.e, positive affect reactivity) had elevated log IL-6, independent of demographic, physical, psychological, and behavioral factors (B = 1.12, SE = 0.45, p = 0.01). Heightened negative affect reactivity was associated with higher log CRP among women (p = 0.03) but not men (p = 0.57); health behaviors accounted for this association in women. Conclusions Adults who fail to maintain positive affect when faced with minor stressors in everyday life appear to have elevated levels of IL-6, a marker of inflammation. Women who experience increased negative affect when faced with minor stressors may be at particular risk of elevated inflammation. These findings add to growing evidence regarding the health implications of affective reactivity to daily stressors. PMID:26030309

  1. Frequency and interrelations of risk factors for chronic low back pain in a primary care setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Martine Lefevre-Colau

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many risk factors have been identified for chronic low back pain (cLBP, but only one study evaluated their interrelations. We aimed to investigate the frequency of cLBP risk factors and their interrelations in patients consulting their general practitioners (GPs for cLBP. METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive, national survey was performed. 3000 GPs randomly selected were asked to include at least one patient consulting for cLBP. Demographic, clinical characteristics and the presence of cLBP risk factors were recorded. The frequency of each cLBP risk factor was calculated and multiple correspondence analysis (MCA was performed to study their interrelations. RESULTS: A total of 2068 GPs (68.9% included at least 1 patient, for 4522 questionnaires analyzed. In the whole sample of patients, the 2 risk factors most commonly observed were history of recurrent LBP (72.1% and initial limitation of activities of daily living (66.4%. For working patients, common professional risk factors were beliefs, that LBP was due to maintaining a specific posture at work (79.0% and frequent heavy lifting at work (65.5%. On MCA, we identified 3 risk-factor dimensions (axes for working and nonworking patients. The main dimension for working patients involved professional risk factors and among these factors, patients' job satisfaction and job recognition largely contribute to this dimension. DISCUSSION: Our results shed in light for the first time the interrelation and the respective contribution of several previously identified cLBP risk factors. They suggest that risk factors representing a "work-related" dimension are the most important cLBP risk factors in the working population.

  2. Autonomic reactivity and romantic relational aggression among female emerging adults: moderating roles of social and cognitive risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the association between autonomic arousal in response to a relational stressor and the perpetration of relational aggression against romantic partners. In addition, the moderating role of social risk (relational victimization by a romantic partner) and cognitive risk (hostile attribution biases) was explored. Skin conductance, heart rate, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia during an experience of exclusion were assessed in a sample of female emerging adults (N=131). Participants provided self-reports of romantic relational aggression, romantic relational victimization, and hostile attribution biases. Results indicated that both heightened and blunted reactivity served as risk factors for the perpetration of romantic relational aggression depending on women's social and contextual risks. Implications for understanding the development of intimate aggression are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Milk C-reactive protein in canine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiu, Iosif; Dąbrowski, Roman; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Ceron, Jose J; Wdowiak, Anna; Pop, Raul Alexandru; Brudaşcă, Florinel Gheorghe; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-04-01

    Presence of mastitis in lactating bitches can become life threatening for both the bitch and pups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in both milk and serum for canine mastitis diagnosis. Our study showed that milk CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.9μg/mL and from 0.3 to 40.0μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (Pcanine mastitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-ling; WANG Fang; JI Li-nong

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in treatment have greatly reduced the risk of blindness from this disease, but because diabetes is so common, diabetic retinopathy remains an important problem. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Totally 746 type 2 diabetic patients were selected for biochemical and clinical characteristics test and examined by the retina-camera for diabetic retinopathy and the average age was 55.9 years old.Results A total of 526 patients was classified as non-DR, 159 patients as non-proliferative-DR and 61 patients as proliferative-DR. Duration of diabetes [(66.09±72.51) months vs (143.71 ±93.27) months vs (174.30±81.91)months, P=0.00], systolic blood pressure [(131.95±47.20) mmHg vs (138.71 ±21.36) mmHg vs (147.58±24.10)mmHg, P=0.01], urine albumin [(32.79± 122.29) mg/L vs (190.96±455.65) mg/L vs (362.00±552.51) mg/L,P=0.00], glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) [(8.68 ± 2.26)% vs (9.42±1.84)% vs (9.42±1.96)%, P=0.04],C-reactive protein (CRP) [(3.19±7.37) mg/L vs (6.36± 23.59) mg/L vs (3.02±4.34) mg/L, P=0.03],high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) [(1.23±0.37) mmol/L vs (1.33±0.35) mmol/L vs (1.24±0.33)mmol/L, P=0.01], uric acid (UA) [(288.51 ±90.85) mmol/L vs (300.29±101.98) mmol/L vs (337.57±115.09)mmol/L, P=0.00], creatinine (CREA) [(84.22±16.31) μmol/L vs (89.35±27.45) μmol/L vs (103.28±48.64)μmol/L, P=0.00], blood urine nitrogen (BUN) [(5.62± 1.62) mmol/L vs (6.55±2.74) mmol/L vs (8.11±3.60)mmol/L, P=0.00] were statistically different among the three groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that diabetic duration and urine albumin were two independent risk factors of DR (the OR values were 1.010 and 1.003 respectively).Conclusions Diabetic duration and urine albumin are two independent risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  5. Improved predictive value of GRACE risk score combined with platelet reactivity for 1-year cardiovascular risk in patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent coronary stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Haijun

    2016-11-01

    Both high platelet reactivity (HPR) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score have moderate predictive value for major adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), whereas the prognostic significance of GRACE risk score combined with platelet function testing remains unclear. A total of 596 patients with non-ST elevation ACS who underwent PCI were enrolled. The P2Y 12 reaction unit (PRU) value was measured by VerifyNow P2Y 12 assay and GRACE score was calculated by GRACE risk 2.0 calculator. Patients were stratified by a pre-specified cutoff value of PRU 230 and GRACE score 140 to assess 1-year risk of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), and stent thrombosis. Seventy-two (12.1%) patients developed CVD events during 1-year follow-up. Patients with CVD events had a higher PRU value (244.6 ± 50.9 vs. 203.7 ± 52.0, p risk independently. Compared to patients with normal platelet reactivity (NPR) and GRACE score risk (HR: 5.048; 95% CI: 2.268-11.237; p risk score yielded superior risk predictive capacity beyond GRACE score alone, which is shown by improved c-statistic value (0.871, p = 0.002) as well as net reclassification improvement (NRI 0.263, p risk of adverse CVD events. The combination of platelet function testing and GRACE score predicted 1-year CVD risk better.

  6. [Independent risk factors for severe cardiovascular events in male patients with gout: Results of a 7-year prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, M S; Denisov, I S; Markelova, E I; Glukhova, S I; Nasonov, E L

    To determine risk factors for severe cardiovascular (CV) events (CVEs) in male patients with crystal-verified gout. 251 male patients with crystal-verified gout were prospectively followed up in 2003 to 2013. The mean follow-up period was 6.9±2.0 years. New severe CVE cases and deaths were recorded. Logistic regression was used to analyze the impact of traditional and other risk factors and allopurinol use on the risk for severe CVEs. 32 patients died during the follow-up period. Severe CVEs were recorded in 58 (23.1%) patients; CVE deaths were notified in 22 (8.8%) patients. The risk of all severe CVEs was high for hypertension, increased serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level (>5 mg/l), ≥ stage III chronic kidney disease (CKD) (glomerular filtration rate, 20 g/day), coronary heart disease (CHD), and a family history of premature CHD. The risk of fatal CVEs was highest for elevated serum hs-CRP level, ≥ stage III CKD, a family history of premature CHD, hypercholesterolemia, upper quartile of serum uric acid levels (>552 µmol/l), and regular intake of allopurinol. In addition to the traditional risk factors of CV catastrophes, the presence of chronic inflammation and the impact of high serum uric acid levels may explain the high frequency of CV catastrophes.

  7. C-reactive protein as a predictor of chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erik J; Muller, Corinna L; Sartorius, Jennifer A; White, David R; Maslow, Arthur S

    2012-10-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CAM) affects many pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Finding a serum factor that could accurately predict the presence of CAM could potentially lead to more efficient management of PPROM and improved neonatal outcomes. To determine if C-reactive protein (CRP) is an effective early marker of CAM in patients with PPROM. A retrospective evaluation of pregnant women with PPROM at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania, between January 2005 and January 2009. Nonparametric statistical tests (ie, Wilcoxon rank sum and Spearman rank correlation) were used to compare distributions that were skewed. Characteristics of the study population were compared using 2-sample t tests for continuous variables and Fisher exact tests for discrete variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate receiver operating characteristic curves and obtain area under the curve estimates in stepwise fashion for predicting histologic CAM. A secondary analysis compared the characteristics among patients with clinical CAM, histologic CAM, or non-CAM. The total population of 73 women was subdivided into patients with histologic CAM (n=26) and patients without histologic CAM (ie, no evidence of CAM on placental pathology; n=47). There was no difference between groups in CRP levels, days of pregnancy latency, white blood cell count, smoking status, antibiotic administration, or steroid benefit. The group with histologic CAM delivered at earlier gestational ages: mean (standard deviation) age was 29.5 (4.4) weeks vs 31.9 (3.5) weeks (P=.02). For our primary analysis, we found no difference in CRP levels (P=.32). Receiver operating characteristic curve plots of CRP levels, temperature at delivery, and white blood cell count resulted in an area under the curve estimate of 0.696, which was 70% predictive of histologic CAM. In the secondary analysis, after adjusting for gestational age, the estimated hazard ratio for CRP change

  8. Baseline High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Predicts Macrovascular and Microvascular Complications of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Zahra; Ghajar, Alireza; Faghihi-Kashani, Sara; Afarideh, Mohsen; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2018-04-25

    This prospective study is aimed at examining the predictive value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) for coronary heart disease (CHD) events and microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A population-based study (NCT02958579) was conducted on 1,301 participants with T2DM (mean follow-up of 7.5 years). Risk assessment for vascular events was done at baseline, and serum hs-CRP was measured. End points of this study include CHD events, diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic kidney disease. Individuals with unavailable data or hs-CRP >20 mg/L were excluded. The discrimination and reclassification improvement of study end points were tested after addition of hs-CRP to traditional risk factors. Median serum hs-CRP was 2.00 ranging from 0.1 to 17 mg/L. Hazards ratio of each SD increment in baseline hs-CRP was 1.028 (1.024-1.032) for CHD, 1.025 (1.021-1.029) for diabetic neuropathy, 1.037 (1.030-1.043) for diabetic retinopathy, and 1.035 (1.027-1.043) for diabetic kidney disease. The addition of hs-CRP to traditional risk factors of vascular complications of T2DM improved discrimination of all end points (p < 0.001). Net reclassification improvement ranged from 8% for diabetic neuropathy to 31% for diabetic kidney disease (p < 0.05). Baseline hs-CRP predicts both of CHD events and microvascular complications of patients with T2D. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Impact of vitamin D status and obesity on C-reactive protein in kidney-transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewers, B.; Gasbjerg, A.; Zerahn, B.

    2008-01-01

    and Patients: Data were collected between December 2005 and April 2006 from 161 adult (aged >18 years) kidney-transplant patients (mean age, 53.1 years; SD, 11.5 years; females/males, 78/83), with a median kidney-graft age of 7.0 years and serum CRP levels :... was found. Fat mass correlated positively with CRP, suggesting that obesity may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft rejection in kidney-transplant patients. (C) 2008 by the National Kidney Foundation, Inc Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5......Objective: We examined whether vitamin D status and obesity are associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, as assessed by serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in an adult population of kidney-transplant patients. Design: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. Setting...

  10. A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugander Martin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Paleolithic diet has been suggested to be more in concordance with human evolutionary legacy than a cereal based diet. This might explain the lower incidence among hunter-gatherers of diseases of affluence such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to experimentally study the long-term effect of a Paleolithic diet on risk factors for these diseases in domestic pigs. We examined glucose tolerance, post-challenge insulin response, plasma C-reactive protein and blood pressure after 15 months on Paleolithic diet in comparison with a cereal based swine feed. Methods Upon weaning twenty-four piglets were randomly allocated either to cereal based swine feed (Cereal group or cereal free Paleolithic diet consisting of vegetables, fruit, meat and a small amount of tubers (Paleolithic group. At 17 months of age an intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed and pancreas specimens were collected for immunohistochemistry. Group comparisons of continuous variables were made by use of the t-test. P Results At the end of the study the Paleolithic group weighed 22% less and had 43% lower subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. No significant difference was seen in fasting glucose between groups. Dynamic insulin sensitivity was significantly higher (p = 0.004 and the insulin response was significantly lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.001. The geometric mean of C-reactive protein was 82% lower (p = 0.0007 and intra-arterial diastolic blood pressure was 13% lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.007. In evaluations of multivariate correlations, diet emerged as the strongest explanatory variable for the variations in dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin response, C-reactive protein and diastolic blood pressure when compared to other relevant variables such as weight and subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. There was no obvious immunohistochemical difference in pancreatic islets

  11. Distribution factors for reactive power in the presence of bilateral transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Tuglie, E.; Torelli, F.

    2004-01-01

    The twin factors of limited investment in electric transmission systems and the overexploitation of electrical resources results in an increase in the need for reactive power to support system voltage profile and to supply loads. It is reasonable to expect that generators and compensators, heavily involved in reactive support on a voluntary basis, will be remunerated for their service by market transactions. This remuneration will depend on the network topology, i.e. of buyers, sellers and reactive injection locations, on the active power exchanged and the reactive power required by loads. All these aspects are taken into account in developing a methodology based on circuit considerations. Using this approach, at a given system operating point characterised by a predefined set of transactions, reactive responsibilities can be formulated as the sum of two terms: one strictly related to transactions and the other dependent on electric network parameters. Test results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology in sharing reactive power responsibilities in a fair way among market participants. (author)

  12. [Risk Management of HBV Reactivation: Construction of Check System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, reactivation of HBV in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy or immunosuppressive therapy has been a problem. Generally, HBV-DNA levels are elevated prior to HBsAg concentration, and then hepatic dysfunction is observed in the process of hepatitis by HBV reactivation. Therefore, the monitoring of HBV-DNA is useful for the prediction of hepatic dysfunction, and nucleoside/nucleoside analogue (NA) administration is able to prevent this HBV reactivation. According to these facts, "Guidelines for the Prevention of HBV Reactivation in Patients Receiving Immunosuppressive Therapy or Chemotherapy", 2009 (revised as "JSH Guidelines for the Management of Hepatitis B Virus Infection", 2013) is established, and the diagnostic algorithm of HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, and HBV-DNA has relevant descriptions. Combination therapy with rituximab and steroid for malignant lymphoma has a high risk of leading to fulminant hepatitis and, consequently, the guidelines are widely followed in such cases. We introduced the improvement of electronic medical recording and ordering systems in collaboration with hepatologists, and such a system has been widely used. Although the monitoring of HBV-DNA levels is required every 1-3 months, the guidelines are not followed strictly in cases such as rheumatoid disease and solid tumors only with chemotherapy or steroid treatment. Since a DNA assay is complicated and expensive, cost-effective, time-saving, and highly sensitive/specific measurements are required as well. Therefore, Lumipulse HBsAg-HQ (CLIA method) with high sensitivity is expected to be used for the monitoring of HBV reactivation.

  13. Randomized controlled trial on the effects of legumes on cardiovascular risk factors in women with abdominal obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeiyan, Abdolrasoul; Pourghassem-Gargari, Bahram; Zarrin, Rasoul; Fereidooni, Javid; Alizadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effect of legume-based hypocaloric diet on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in women is unclear. This study provides an opportunity to find effects of high-legume diet on CVD risk factors in women who consumed high legumes at baseline. METHODS This randomized controlled trial was undertaken in 34 premenopausal women with central obesity. After 2 weeks of a run-in period on an isocaloric diet, subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: (1) hypocaloric diet enriched with legumes (HDEL) (n = 17) (two servings per day) and (2) hypocaloric diet without legumes (HDWL) (n = 17) for 6 weeks. The following variables were assessed before intervention, 3, and 6 weeks after it: Waist to hip ratio (WHR), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), high-sensitive-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), nitric oxides (NOx), and Malondialdehyde (MDA). RESULTS Both hypocaloric diets reduced hs-CRP in 3 weeks and returned it to basal values after 6 weeks (P = 0.004). HDWL significantly reduced WHR [P = 0.010 (3.2%)] and increased TC [P diets had any significant effects on NOx and MDA. CONCLUSION The study indicated that beneficial effects of legumes on TC, LDL-C, and hs-CRP were achieved by three servings per week, and consuming more amounts of these products had no more advantages. PMID:26405440

  14. Impaired Fasting Glucose in Nondiabetic Range: Is It a Marker of Cardiovascular Risk Factor Clustering?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Valentino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG through the nondiabetic range (100–125 mg/dL is not considered in the cardiovascular (CV risk profile. Aim. To compare the clustering of CV risk factors (RFs in nondiabetic subjects with normal fasting glucose (NFG and IFG. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study in 3739 nondiabetic subjects. Demographics, medical history, and CV risk factors were collected and lipid profile, fasting glucose levels (FBG, C-reactive protein (hsCRP, blood pressure (BP, anthropometric measurements, and aerobic capacity were determined. Results. 559 (15% subjects had IFG: they had a higher mean age, BMI, waist circumference, non-HDL cholesterol, BP, and hsCRP (p<0.0001 and lower HDL (p<0.001 and aerobic capacity (p<0.001. They also had a higher prevalence of hypertension (34% versus 25%; p<0.001, dyslipidemia (79% versus 74%; p<0.001, and obesity (29% versus 16%; p<0.001 and a higher Framingham risk score (8% versus 6%; p<0.001. The probability of presenting 3 or more CV RFs adjusted by age and gender was significantly higher in the top quintile of fasting glucose (≥98 mg/dL; OR = 2.02; 1.62–2.51. Conclusions. IFG in the nondiabetic range is associated with increased cardiovascular RF clustering.

  15. Effects of Metformin on Tissue Oxidative and Dicarbonyl Stress in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Expressing Human C-Reactive Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Škop, V.; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), e0150924 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : inflammation * spontaneously hypertensive rat * transgenic * C-reactive protein * dicarbonyl stress * metformin Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  16. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Barbas, Carlos F; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  17. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Perdigão

    Full Text Available The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  18. Heated hatha yoga to target cortisol reactivity to stress and affective eating in women at risk for obesity-related illnesses: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopkins, L.B.; Medina, J.L.; Baird, S.O.; Rosenfield, D.; Powers, M.B.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cortisol reactivity to stress is associated with affective eating, an important behavioral risk factor for obesity and related metabolic diseases. Yoga practice is related to decreases in stress and cortisol levels, thus emerging as a potential targeted complementary intervention for

  19. Hematologic risk factors for stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa S.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmad A.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective was to explore the hematologic risk factors for stroke in cohort of Saudi children. We evaluated children at the Division of Pediatric Neurology at King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Investigations for suspected cases included neuroimaging, transcranial Dopppler (TCD) for cases of sickle cell diseases (SCD), and Duplex scan. Hemostatic assays included coagulation screening tests, tests of thrombin generation and fibrinolysis, coagulation inhibitors, and activated protein C resistance. During the study period, 104 Saudi children (aged one month to 12 years) with stroke were seen. The mean age of the cohort was 27.1 months (SD=39.3 months) and median was 6 months. Ischemic strokes accounted for the majority of cases (76%). A major risk factor was identified in 93 of 104 cases of stroke (89.4%). Hematologic disorders were the most common (46.2%), followed by prothrombic disorders (31.7%); microcystic hypochromic anemia (26%); sickle cell disease (SCD), or SCB-thalassemia, (11.5%), and factor IX deficiency (2.9%). Raised anticardiolipin antibodies (13/49, 26.5%) was the most frequent abnormality. Deficiencies of the natural anticoagulants (protein S, protein C and antithrombin III) were as follows: protein S (15/70, 21.4%); protein C (15/70,21.4%) and combined deficiency of 2 or more inhibitors (9/70, 12.9%). Activated protein C resistance has not been detected. Contrary to the findings of previous studies from Saudi Arabia, SCD is a common risk factor and is severe, as it resulted in multiple strokes. Moyamoya syndrome was diagnosed in 2 patients with SCD, one of whom had revascularization surgery (encephaldoduroarteriosynangiosis). Assessment of children with SCD at a risk of stroke was helped by the introduction of TCD followed by neuroimaging, using MRI and magnetic resonanceangiography

  20. Serum C-Reactive Protein (CRP, Target for Therapy or Trouble?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia B. Kraus

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available High sensitivity serum C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has come into clinical use as a marker of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. In addition to a role as a marker of disease, CRP has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of CVD. Specific small-molecule inhibitors of CRP have recently been developed with the intent of mitigating cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction. However, the use of CRP, both as a risk marker and a disease target are controversial for several reasons. Serum hs-CRP concentrations can be elevated on the basis of genetics, female gender, and non-Caucasian ethnicity. It is not clear, in these contexts, that elevations of hs-CRP have any pathological significance. As a non-specific indicator of inflammation, CRP is also not a specific indicator of a single disease state such as cardiovascular disease but elevated concentrations can be seen in association with other comorbidities including obesity and pulmonary disease. In sharp contrast to the proposed inhibition of CRP for cardiovascular disease treatment, the infusion of CRP has been shown to have profound therapeutic benefits for autoimmune disease and septic shock. The balance between the risks and benefits of these competing views of the role of CRP in disease and disease therapy is reminiscent of the ongoing controversy regarding the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs for musculoskeletal disease and their cardiovascular side effects. Soon, NSAIDs may not be the only agents about which Rheumatologists and Cardiologists may spar.

  1. C-reactive protein: an aid for diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.

    2017-01-01

    Delayed or wrong diagnosis of acute appendicitis in patients results in complications like perforation, gangrene, etc. which carries a significant amount of morbidity and mortality to the patients. Thus, timely diagnosis of acute appendicitis is crucial to prevent these complications. Recently, it was found that serum C-reactive protein (CRP) individually can be a useful marker, thus in resource limited settings (i.e., access to ultrasonography) simple laboratory investigation can be of extreme utility for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Current study aimed to ascertain and determine the role of C Reactive Protein (CRP) as a complementary test to decrease the rate of negative appendectomies in tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. Methods: Using non-probability consecutive sampling, 112 patients with the initial diagnosis of acute appendicitis on history and clinical examination were enrolled. A blood sample was taken for serum level of CRP. Results: Mean age was 20.8+-8.6 years and 51 (45.5 %) patients were males. Pathologic review revealed 100 cases (89.3%) of acute appendicitis, 4 patients (3.6%) had perforated appendix while 8 patients (7.1%) had normal appendix. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of C reactive protein >24 mg/lit taking histology as gold standard came out 25.9%, 100%, 100%, 9.4% and 31.25% respectively. Conclusion: It was concluded that CRP >48 mg/lit is an indication of perforated appendix and when the surgeon is in fix whether to go conservatively or apply some intervention, CRP can be a good diagnostic aid. (author)

  2. Response of Leptin and C-reactive Protein Serum Levels to 12 Weeks Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Obese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Ghiasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 12 weeks moderate intensity aerobic exercise on leptin and C-reactive protein serum levels in obese men. The study was conducted in Urmia- Iran in 2015. Twenty-four obese men with an aged range 40-50 yrs. were enrolled into the study. Subjects were randomized to one of 2 groups exercise (n=12 and control groups (n=12. The exercise group performed aerobic exercise training up to 50-70 % heart rate reserve, three times a week for 12 weeks. Leptin and CRP serum level was measured by ELISA method before and after the 12 weeks. After 12 weeks exercise training, leptin and CRP serum level in the exercise group compared to the control group, were decreased significantly (P<0.05. To sum up, 12 weeks moderate intensity aerobic exercise in the reduction of CRP and leptin concentration had a prominent role that might be effective in reducing weight and improving cardiovascular risk factors.

  3. The Influence of Sintering Temperature of Reactive Sintered (Ti, MoC-Ni Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Jõeleht

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Titanium-molybdenum carbide nickel cermets ((Ti, MoC-Ni were produced using high energy milling and reactive sintering process. Compared to conventional TiC-NiMo cermet sintering the parameters for reactive sintered cermets vary since additional processes are present such as carbide synthesis. Therefore, it is essential to acquire information about the suitable sintering regime for reactive sintered cermets. One of the key parameters is the final sintering temperature when the liquid binder Ni forms the final matrix and vacancies inside the material are removed. The influence of the final sintering temperature is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the material are characterized by transverse rupture strength, hardness and fracture toughness.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7179

  4. Risk factor management in a contemporary Australian population at increased cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D J; Coller, J M; Gong, F F; McGrady, M; Prior, D L; Boffa, U; Shiel, L; Liew, D; Wolfe, R; Owen, A J; Krum, H; Reid, C M

    2017-11-14

    Effective management of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease risk factors offers longer, healthier lives and savings in health care. We examined risk factor management in participants of the SCReening Evaluation of the Evolution of New Heart Failure (SCREEN-HF) study, a self-selected population at increased cardiovascular disease risk recruited from members of a health insurance fund in Melbourne and Shepparton, Australia. Inclusion criteria were age ≥60 years with one or more of self-reported ischaemic or other heart disease, irregular or rapid heart rhythm, cerebrovascular disease, renal impairment, or treatment for hypertension or diabetes for ≥2 years. Exclusion criteria were known heart failure or cardiac abnormality on echocardiography or other imaging. Medical history, clinical examination, full blood examination and biochemistry (without lipids and HbA1c) were performed for 3847 participants on enrolment, and blood pressure, lipids and HbA1c were measured 1-2 years after enrolment for 3202 participants. Despite 99% of 3294 participants with hypertension receiving antihypertensive medication, half had blood pressures >140/90 mmHg. Approximately 77% of participants were overweight or obese, with one third obese. Additionally, 74% of participants at high cardiovascular disease risk had low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels ≥2 mmol/l, one third of diabetic participants had HbA1c >7%, 22% had estimated glomerular filtration rate management of modifiable risk factors. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Vascular risk factor burden correlates with cerebrovascular reactivity but not resting state coactivation in the default mode network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; Crane, David E; Mikulis, David J; Anderson, Nicole D; Greenwood, Carol E; Black, Sandra E; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2015-11-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) are prevalent among older adults and are often associated with cognitive decline and increased risk of stroke and dementia. Vascular risk factors (VRFs) are linked to WMH, yet the impact of multiple VRFs on gray matter function is still unclear. The goal of this study was to test for associations between the number of VRFs and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and resting state (RS) coactivation among individuals with WMH. Twenty-nine participants with suspected WMH were grouped based on the number of VRFs (subgroups: 0, 1, or ≥2). CVR and RS coactivation were measured with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging on a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system during hypercapnia and rest, respectively. Default-mode (DMN), sensory-motor, and medial-visual networks, generated using independent component analysis of RS-BOLD, were selected as networks of interest (NOIs). CVR-BOLD was analyzed using two methods: 1) a model-based approach using CO2 traces, and 2) a dual-regression (DR) approach using NOIs as spatial inputs. Average CVR and RS coactivations within NOIs were compared between VRF subgroups. A secondary analysis investigated the correlation between CVR and RS coactivation. VRF subgroup differences were detected using DR-based CVR in the DMN (F20,2  = 5.17, P = 0.015) but not the model-based CVR nor RS coactivation. DR-based CVR was correlated with RS coactivation in the DMN (r(2)  = 0.28, P = 0.006) but not the sensory-motor nor medial-visual NOIs. In individuals with WMH, CVR in the DMN was inversely associated with the number of VRFs and correlated with RS coactivation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Risk factors predisposing to congenital heart defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul Haq, Faheem; Jalil, Fatima; Hashmi, Saman; Jumani, Maliha Iqbal; Imdad, Aamer; Jabeen, Mehnaz; Hashmi, Javad Tauseef; Irfan, Furqan Bin; Imran, Muhammad; Atiq, Mehnaz

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with multiple risk factors, consanguinity may be one such significant factor. The role of consanguinity in the etiology of CHD is supported by inbreeding studies, which demonstrate an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of some congenital heart defects. This study was done to find out the risk factors for CHD. A case-control study was done on pediatric patients at a tertiary care hospital, Aga Khan University Hospital, located in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 500 patients, 250 cases and 250 controls were included in the study. Amongst the 250 cases (i.e. those diagnosed with CHD), 122 patients (48.8%) were born of consanguineous marriages while in the controls (i.e. non-CHD) only 72 patients (28.9%) showed a consanguinity amongst parents. On multivariate analysis, consanguinity emerged as an independent risk factor for CHD; adjusted odds ratio 2.59 (95% C. I. 1.73 - 3.87). Other risk factors included low birth weight, maternal co-morbidities, family history of CHD and first born child. On the other hand, medications used by the mother during the index pregnancy, maternal age and gender of the child did not significantly increase the risk of developing CHD. Analyses of our results show that parental consanguinity, family history of CHD, maternal co-morbidities, first born child and low birth weight are independent risk factors for CHD

  7. Effect of the Gas6 c.834+7G>A polymorphism and the interaction of known risk factors on AMD pathogenesis in Hungarian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Losonczy

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the developed world. Numerous genetic factors contribute to the development of the multifactorial disease. We performed a case-control study to assess the risk conferred by known and candidate genetic polymorphisms on the development of AMD. We searched for genetic interactions and for differences in dry and wet AMD etiology. We enrolled 213 patients with exudative, 67 patients with dry AMD and 106 age and ethnically matched controls. Altogether 12 polymorphisms in Apolipoprotein E, complement factor H, complement factor I, complement component 3, blood coagulation factor XIII, HTRA1, LOC387715, Gas6 and MerTK genes were tested. No association was found between either the exudative or the dry form and the polymorphisms in the Apolipoprotein E, complement factor I, FXIII and MerTK genes. Gas6 c.834+7G>A polymorphism was found to be significantly protective irrespective of other genotypes, reducing the odds of wet type AMD by a half (OR = 0.50, 95%CI: 0.26-0.97, p = 0.04. Multiple regression models revealed an interesting genetic interaction in the dry AMD subgroup. In the absence of C3 risk allele, mutant genotypes of both CFH and HTRA1 behaved as strongly significant risk factors (OR = 7.96, 95%CI: 2.39 = 26.50, p = 0.0007, and OR = 36.02, 95%CI: 3.30-393.02, p = 0.0033, respectively, but reduced to neutrality otherwise. The risk allele of C3 was observed to carry a significant risk in the simultaneous absence of homozygous CFH and HTRA1 polymorphisms only, in which case it was associated with a near-five-fold relative increase in the odds of dry type AMD (OR = 4.93, 95%CI: 1.98-12.25, p = 0.0006. Our results suggest a protective role of Gas6 c.834+7G>A polymorphism in exudative AMD development. In addition, novel genetic interactions were revealed between CFH, HTRA1 and C3 polymorphisms that might contribute to the

  8. A review of C-reactive protein: A diagnostic indicator in periodontal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Devi Ramamoorthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a local inflammatory process mediating the destruction of periodontal tissues, triggered by bacterial insult. Recent evidence suggests the presence of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease may significantly affect systemic health conditions such as coronary heart disease, stroke, or adverse pregnancy outcome. C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase protein which reflects a measure of the acute phase response. CRP is used as one of the markers of choice in monitoring the acute phase response because it increases to a relatively high concentration compared to basal concentration. CRP has been shown to predict cardiovascular (CV mortality in recent studies, and elevated CRP levels have been observed in middle-aged patients with periodontitis. Combination of chronic infections like periodontitis with elevated CRP is associated with higher chronic heart diseases. The recognition of the relationship between periodontal diseases and atherosclerotic events is relatively recent and mostly based on the inflammatory hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Periodontal disease is one of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and possibly one of its causes. Hence, even associations of modest magnitude have a large impact. The cost to the society directly attributable to atherosclerotic sequelae is very large. Periodontitis is treatable; moreover, it is preventable. Experimental conformation of this shows that another widely prevalent and preventable contributor to the burden of cardiovascular disease would be added to the options available of the clinicians and public health practitioners for the control of the epidemic of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Chronic periodontitis with multiple risk factor syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoe, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Fusanori; Takashiba, Shogo

    2011-07-01

    Multiple risk factor syndrome is a clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity associated epidemiologically with insulin resistance. This report describes the clinical course of a patient suffering from severe periodontitis with multiple risk factor syndrome, and discusses the association between periodontal infection and systemic health. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension for over 10 years. At baseline, her hemoglobin A1 c was 8.1%. However, she had no diabetic complications except periodontitis. The IgG antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis FDC 381 and SU63 were elevated above the mean of healthy subjects +2 standard deviations. Intensive periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, was performed to reduce periodontal infection and bacteremia. Her systemic and periodontal conditions were evaluated longitudinally for 10 years. Following periodontal treatment, antibody titers against Porphyromonas gingivalis and hemoglobin A1c values were significantly improved. The other clinical data and medication for her systemic condition also remained stable during supportive periodontal therapy. However, she developed myocardial infarction, and showed continuous deterioration of hemoglobin A1 c level and periodontitis. The long-term clustering of risk factors, such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and periodontitis, are associated with the development of myocardial infarction. Treatment of systemic conditions in combination with comprehensive periodontal treatment is important in management of patients with multiple risk factor syndrome.

  10. Cardiovascular risk prediction by N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide and high sensitivity C-reactive protein is affected by age and sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.H.; Hansen, T.W.; Christensen, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) predict cardiovascular events in a general population aged 41, 51, 61 or 71 years. This study investigated...

  11. Diabetes and Cirrhosis Are Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Successful Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenstierna, Magnus; Nangarhari, Ali; Weiland, Ola; Aleman, Soo

    2016-09-15

    Successful treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reduces the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but a risk remains. Current guidelines recommend continued HCC surveillance after sustained virologic response (SVR) has been achieved. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and incidence rates for HCC after SVR in HCV patients with pretreatment advanced liver disease (Metavir stage F3/F4). All patients with advanced liver disease successfully treated for HCV at Karolinska University Hospital during 1992-2013 (n = 399) were followed up for a median of 7.8 years. Data from national registries were used to minimize loss to follow-up. Incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for development of HCC were calculated by Cox regression analysis. Seventeen patients developed HCC during 3366 person-years (PY) of follow-up. The HCC incidence rate was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], .57-1.6) and 0.15 (95% CI, .05-.49) per 100 PY for patients with pretreatment F4 and F3, respectively. Patients with pretreatment cirrhosis and diabetes had a HR to develop HCC of 6.3, and an incidence rate of 7.9 per 100 PY (95% CI, 3.3-19) during the first 2 years of follow-up. The risk for HCC decreased significantly 2 years after SVR had been achieved. Diabetes mellitus and cirrhosis are strong risk factors for HCC development after SVR has been achieved. The risk to develop HCC diminishes significantly 2 years after SVR. Patients without cirrhosis have a low risk to develop HCC after SVR, and the benefit of HCC surveillance for this group is questionable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors in Blacks and Whites: Dissecting Racial Paradox of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Osei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain as the leading cause of mortality in the western world and have become a major health threat for developing countries. There are several risk factors that account for the CVD and the associated mortality. These include genetics, type 2 diabetes (T2DM, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension, and abnormal lipids and lipoproteins. The constellation of these risk factors has been termed metabolic syndrome (MetS. MetS varies among racial and ethnic populations. Thus, race and ethnicity account for some of the differences in the MetS and the associated CVD and T2DM. Furthermore, the relationships among traditional metabolic parameters and CVD differ, especially when comparing Black and White populations. In this regard, the greater CVD in Blacks than Whites have been partly attributed to other non-traditional CVD risk factors, such as subclinical inflammation (C-reactive protein, homocysteine, increased low-density lipoprotein oxidation, lipoprotein a, adiponectin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, etc. Thus, to understand CVD and T2DM differences in Blacks and Whites with MetS, it is essential to explore the contributions of both traditional and non-traditional CVD and T2DM risk factors in Blacks of African ancestry and Whites of Europoid ancestry. Therefore, in this mini review, we propose that non-traditional risk factors should be integrated in defining MetS as a predictor of CVD and T2DM in Blacks in the African diaspora in future studies.

  13. C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Interferon Gamma-Inducible Protein 10 (IP-10), and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Are Associated with Risk of Tuberculosis after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Mark W.; Gupte, Nikhil; Dowdy, David W.; Asmuth, David M.; Balagopal, Ashwin; Pollard, Richard B.; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Lama, Javier R.; Pillay, Sandy; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Pawar, Jyoti; Santos, Breno; Riviere, Cynthia; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Hakim, James G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Bollinger, Robert; Semba, Richard D.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Gupta, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association between pre-antiretroviral (ART) inflammation and immune activation and risk for incident tuberculosis (TB) after ART initiation among adults is uncertain. Design Nested case-control study (n = 332) within ACTG PEARLS trial of three ART regimens among 1571 HIV-infected, treatment-naïve adults in 9 countries. We compared cases (participants with incident TB diagnosed by 96 weeks) to a random sample of controls (participants who did not develop TB, stratified by country and treatment arm). Methods We measured pre-ART C-reactive protein (CRP), EndoCab IgM, ferritin, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interferon gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), soluble CD14 (sCD14), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and CD4/DR+/38+ and CD8/DR+/38+ T cells. Markers were defined according to established cutoff definitions when available, 75th percentile of measured values when not, and detectable versus undetectable for LPS. Using logistic regression, we measured associations between biomarkers and incident TB, adjusting for age, sex, study site, treatment arm, baseline CD4 and log10 viral load. We assessed the discriminatory value of biomarkers using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Seventy-seven persons (4.9%) developed incident TB during follow-up. Elevated baseline CRP (aOR 3.25, 95% CI: 1.55–6.81) and IP-10 (aOR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.05–3.39), detectable plasma LPS (aOR 2.39, 95% CI: 1.13–5.06), and the established TB risk factors anemia and hypoalbuminemia were independently associated with incident TB. In ROC analysis, CRP, albumin, and LPS improved discrimination only modestly for TB risk when added to baseline routine patient characteristics including CD4 count, body mass index, and prior TB. Conclusion Incident TB occurs commonly after ART initiation. Although associated with higher post-ART TB risk, baseline CRP, IP-10, and LPS add limited value to routine patient characteristics

  14. Role of plasma adiponectin /C-reactive protein ratio in obesity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Health Sciences ... Objective(s): We examined relations between fasting plasma adiponectin (ADIP), C-reactive protein (CRP) ... Methods: Fasting plasma ADIP, CRP, Insulin (IN), HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, body fat percent (%BF), waist ...

  15. Worldwide incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma cases attributable to major risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecker, Aileen; Liu, Xing; La Vecchia, Carlo; Zhang, Zuo-Feng

    2018-05-01

    To facilitate regionally specific liver cancer prevention and control, this study estimates the fraction of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases attributable to five major liver cancer risk factors by geographic region. Prevalence estimates of major HCC risk factors, including chronic infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C, alcohol drinking, tobacco smoking, obesity, and diabetes, were extracted for each country from the literature, along with recent incidence and risk estimate data, to calculate regionally specific population attributable fractions. Overall, 44% of HCC cases worldwide were attributable to chronic hepatitis B infection, with the majority of cases occurring in Asia. Hepatitis C was responsible for 21% of cases. Lifestyle risk factors such as alcohol drinking and obesity were responsible for a larger percentage of cases in North America and Western, Central, and Eastern Europe. In addition, strong sex disparities were observed when looking at lifestyle risk factors, particularly tobacco smoking, in Asia and Africa. Prominent risk factors for HCC vary depending on the region. Our findings provide useful data for developing regionally specific guidelines for liver cancer prevention and control worldwide.

  16. Risk factors of breast cancer in Mexican women Factores de riesco de cáncer de mama en mujeres mexicanas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Laura Calderón-Garcidueñas

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between family history (FH of neoplasia, gyneco-obstetric factors and breast cancer (BC in a case--control study. In cases, to analyze those variables in relation with early onset of BC, the manner of detection (self-examination, prompted by pain, or casual, the size of tumor, and the elapsed time to seek medical attention. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data from 151 prevalent BC cases and 235 age-matched controls were analyzed by multiple logistic regression, to assess the influence of BC risk factors. RESULTS: Ten per cent of patients and 1% of controls had first-degree relatives (FDR with BC. Family history of FDR with BC (OR, 11.2; 95% CI 2.42-51.92 or with gastric or pancreatic cancer (OR, 17.7; 95% CI 2.2-142.6 was associated with BC risk. Breastfeeding at or under 25 years of age was protective against BC (OR, 0.40; 95% CI 0.24-0.66. The manner of tumor detection did not influence its size at the time of diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that FH of BC and/or of gastric or pancreatic carcinoma are risk factors for BC, while lactation at 25 years of age or earlier is protective.OBJETIVO: Investigar la asociación entre la historia familiar de neoplasias, factores ginecobstétricos y cáncer mamario (CM en un estudio de casos y controles. Además, en los casos, estudiar estas variables en relación con inicio temprano del cáncer, forma de detección (autoexamen, exploración individual por dolor o casual, tamaño del tumor. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Entre enero y marzo de 1997 se estudiaron 151 casos prevalentes de CM y 235 controles pareados por edad provenientes del Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico del Noreste, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, o del Hospital Universitario de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, ambos localizados en Monterrey, México. Los factores de riesgo se analizaron con regresión logística múltiple. RESULTADOS: Diez por ciento de casos y 1% de controles

  17. INDIAN POINT REACTOR REACTIVITY AND FLUX DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batch, M. L.; Fischer, F. E.

    1963-11-15

    The reactivity of the Indian Point core was measured near zero reactivity at various shim and control rod patterns. Flux distribution measurements were also made, and the results are expressed in terms of power peaking factors and normalized detector response during rod withdrawal. (D.L.C.)

  18. Risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennery, M.; Dupont, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the development of risk management in the gas sector business: why a risk factor legal mention must precede any published financial information? Do gas companies have to face new risks? Is there specific risks bound to gas activities? Why companies want to master their risks? Is it mandatory or just a new habit? Do they expect a real benefit in return? These are the risk management questions that are analyzed in this article which is based on the public communication of 15 gas companies randomly selected over the world. The information comes from their annual reports or from documents available on their web sites. The intention of this document is not to be exhaustive or to make statistics but only to shade light on the risk factors of the gas sector. (J.S.)

  19. Generation of a C3c specific monoclonal antibody and assessment of C3c as a putative inflammatory marker derived from complement factor C3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palarasah, Yaseelan; Skjodt, Karsten; Brandt, Jette

    2010-01-01

    complex (C5b-C9) and quantification of complement split products by precipitation-in-gel techniques (e.g. C3d). We have developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) that is able to detect fluid phase C3c without interference from other products generated from the complement component C3. The C3c specific m....... The C3c mAb was confirmed to be C3c specific, as it showed no cross-reactivity with native (un-cleaved) C3, with C3b, iC3b, or with C3d. Also, no significant reaction was observed with C3 fragments in factor I deficient sera or plasma. This antibody forms the basis for the generation of a robust ELISA...... that allows for a quick and reliable evaluation of complement activation and consumption as a marker for inflammatory processes. We established the C3c plasma range in 100 healthy Danish blood donors with a mean of 3.47 μg/ml and a range of 2.12-4.92 μg/ml. We believe that such an antibody might...

  20. Cognitive patterns in relation to biomarkers of cerebrovascular disease and vascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; López-Oloriz, Jorge; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Barrios, Maite; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Galán, Amparo; Cáceres, Cynthia; Alzamora, Maite; Pera, Guillem; Toran, Pere; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Risk factors for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) are the same as traditional risk factors for cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Early identification of subjects at higher risk of VCI is important for the development of effective preventive strategies. In addition to traditional vascular risk factors (VRF), circulating biomarkers have emerged as potential tools for early diagnoses, as they could provide in vivo measures of the underlying pathophysiology. While VRF have been consistently linked to a VCI profile (i.e., deficits in executive functions and processing speed), the cognitive correlates of CVD biomarkers remain unclear. In this population-based study, the aim was to study and compare cognitive patterns in relation to VRF and circulating biomarkers of CVD. The Barcelona-AsIA Neuropsychology Study included 747 subjects older than 50, without a prior history of stroke or coronary disease and with a moderate to high vascular risk (mean age, 66 years; 34.1% women). Three cognitive domains were derived from factoral analysis: visuospatial skills/speed, verbal memory and verbal fluency. Multiple linear regression was used to assess relationships between cognitive performance (multiple domains) and a panel of circulating biomarkers, including indicators of inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP) and resistin, endothelial dysfunction, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), thrombosis, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), as well as traditional VRF, metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance (homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance index). Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, years of education and depressive symptoms. Traditional VRF were related to lower performance in verbal fluency, insulin resistance accounted for lower performance in visuospatial skills/speed and the metabolic syndrome predicted lower performance in both cognitive domains. From the biomarkers of CVD, CRP was negatively related to verbal fluency performance and increasing ADMA

  1. Frequency and risk factors of hepatitis b and c in afghan patients presenting to tertiary care hospital in peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To document the frequency and risk factors of Hepatits B and C in Afghan patients presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Peshawar. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Rehman Medical Institute (RMI), Peshawar from 1st January, 2012 to 31st December, 2012. Patients and Methods: A total of 2166 Afghan national were included in the study who underwent surgery in RMI through consecutive, non-probability sampling. Hepatits B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV antibody tests were performed by ELISA method. All patients who were positive for either of the two or both were investigated by a researcher-administered questionnaire to find the risk factors for seropositivity of hepatitis. Results: Out of a total of 2166 patients, 104 patients (4.8%) were found to be positive. Seventy-eight patients (75%) were HepBsAg positive while 24 patients (23%) were anti-HCV antibodies positive while 2 patients were positive for both viruses. Re-use of unsterilized syringes (23%) and history of previous surgery (19.2%) were the most common risk factors whereas no risk factor could be identified in 15 patients (14%). Seventy nine patients (76%) were newly diagnosed at time of test while 25 patients (24%) were known cases of either HBV or HCV. Only one patient had clinical/laboratory features of chronic liver disease while no patient had underwent Hep B vaccination or had hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusion: A high seroprevalance of HBV and HCV was found in this study. Reuse of unsterilized syringes, history of previous surgery and tattoos piercing were found to be the most common risk factors. (author)

  2. Correlates of High Serum C-Reactive Protein Levels in a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals from low socioeconomic backgrounds are disproportionately affected by the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD, yet data regarding risk factors in this population are lacking, particularly regarding emerging biomarkers of CVD such as C-reactive protein (CRP. We measured high-sensitivity CRP and examined its association with demographic and lifestyle factors in a sample of 792 participants aged 40–79 years from the Southern Community Cohort Study, which has an over-representation of socioeconomically disadvantaged individuals (over 60% with a total annual household income 3 mg/L varied significantly by sex, race, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI. The multivariable-adjusted prevalence odds ratios (ORs (95% CIs for having elevated CRP were 1.6 (1.1–2.3 for women vs. men, 1.4 (0.9–2.0 for African Americans vs. whites, 2.3 (1.4–3.8 for African American women vs. white men, 1.8 (1.2–2.7 for current smokers vs. non-smokers, and 4.2 (2.7–6.6 for obese (BMI 30.0–44.9 kg/m2 vs. healthy-weight (BMI 18.3–24.9 kg/m2 participants. Further stratified analyses revealed that the association between BMI and elevated CRP was stronger among African Americans than whites and women than men, with prevalence ORs (95% CI comparing obese vs. healthy-weight categories reaching 22.8 (7.1–73.8 for African American women. In conclusion, in this socioeconomically disadvantaged population, sex, race, smoking, and BMI were associated with elevated CRP. Moreover, inflammatory response to obesity differed by race and sex, which may contribute to CVD disparities.

  3. C-reactive protein a better indicator of inflammation after third molar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operative pain and pre-operative levels of C-reactive and post-operative pain and swelling in impacted third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study subjects were patients indicated for mandibular third molar extraction.

  4. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). C- reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with institution of measures to treat ...

  5. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... SUMMARY. Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease. (CKD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with ...

  6. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... 1Department of Internal Medicine, Kidney Care Centre, Ondo, Ondo State, Nigeria. ... C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. ... Methods: This was a case-control study involving 80 consecutive CKD patients and 40 control subjects without.

  7. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphism (C677T) as a Risk Factor for Arterial Thrombosis in Georgian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garakanidze, Sopio; Costa, Elísio; Bronze-Rocha, Elsa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Nikolaishvili, Giorgi; Nakashidze, Irina; Kakauridze, Nona; Glonti, Salome; Khukhunaishvili, Rusudan; Koridze, Marina; Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2018-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ( MTHFR) gene polymorphism (C677T)] is a well-recognized genetic risk factor for venous thrombosis; however, its association with arterial thrombosis is still under debate. Herein, we evaluated the prevalence of MTHFR C677T polymorphism in Georgian patients in comparison with healthy individuals and its association with arterial thrombosis. We enrolled 214 participants: 101 with arterial thrombosis (71.3% males; mean age: 66.3 ± 12.1 years) and 113 controls (67.3% males; mean age: 56.6 ± 11.3 years). Genomic DNA was extracted from dry blood spot on Whatman filter paper. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine MTHFR C677T polymorphism. Frequency of C677T allele polymorphism in controls was 21.2%, which corresponded to heterozygous and homozygous stage frequencies of 35.4% and 3.5%, respectively. In patient group, an allelic frequency of 33.2% was found, which corresponded to the presence of 48.5% of heterozygous and 8.9% of homozygous individuals. Comparing the frequency of mutated alleles between the 2 groups, a significantly high frequency of mutated alleles was found in patient group ( P < .05). In conclusion, high frequency of MTHFR C677T polymorphism found in arterial thrombosis patient group suggests that this polymorphism might increase the risk of arterial thrombosis in Georgian patients.

  8. [C-reactive protein changes with antihypertensive and statin treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, Enrique; Gómez-Belda, Ana; Costa, José A; Aragó, Miriam; Miralles, Amparo; González, Carmen; Pascual, José M

    2005-10-29

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the modifications of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) with antihypertensive and statin treatment in a hypertensive population with a wide range of coronary risks (CR). Retrospective follow-up study in 665 hypertensive patients: 556 (52% male) without dyslipidemia and CR (Framingham at 10 years) of 8.3 (7.6) as a control group (C) and 109 (61% male) with dyslipidemia and CR of 13.1 (8.8) who were treated with statins (T). Statins treatment was established according to NCEP-ATP-III. In both groups, the antihypertensive treatment was optimized in order to achieve blood pressure (BP) control (< 140/90 mmHg). A lipid profile and high sensitivity CRP (analyzed by nephelometry) was performed at the beginning and at the end of follow up [14.3 (3.6) months]. CRP levels were reduced in the T group -0.17 (0.2) mg/L vs. 0.14 (0.09) mg/L (p = 0.003, Mann-Whitney) in C. The lessening of CRP was not related to the reduction of lipids levels: total cholesterol (r = 0.06; p = 0.49), LDL-C (r = 0.11; p = 0.24), triglycerides (r = -0.02; p = 0.81) (Spearman), or to the reduction of systolic BP (r = -0.07; p = 0.44) and diastolic BP (r = -0.121; p = 0.21). The T group was treated with more antihypertensive drugs than C (2.2 [2.3] vs. 2.5 [1.2]; p = 0.02). Patients treated with ECA inhibitors or angiotensin II antagonist showed a tendency to decreasing the CRP levels more (p = 0.08). In hypertensive populations, statins induce a reduction of CRP levels. The reduction is not related to the lowering of lipids levels or BP values. The effect of statins on the reduction of CRP in hypertensive patients is not related to the lowering of lipids or BP.

  9. IgE and IgG cross-reactivity among Lol p I and Lol p II/III. Identification of the C-termini of Lol p I, II, and III as cross-reactive structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ree, R; van Leeuwen, W A; van den Berg, M; Weller, H H; Aalberse, R C

    1994-04-01

    In this study, the homologous C-termini of Lol p I, Lol p II, and Lol p III were shown to contain cross-reactive B-cell epitopes. This was demonstrated by inhibition studies with purified Lol p I, II, and III and synthetic peptides of their C-termini. It was ruled out that the observed cross-reactivity was caused by cross-contamination of the purified allergens. Both human IgE and IgG bound to the C-terminus of Lol p I. These antibodies were cross-reactive with Lol p II and, more specifically, with its C-terminus. Within a small panel of allergic patients, no cross-reactivity with Lol p III was found. A hyperimmune polyclonal rabbit antiserum against Lol p I also recognized the Lol p I C-terminus. As for human antibodies, cross-reactivity with Lol p II and its C-terminus was demonstrated. Cross-reactivity with Lol p III was demonstrated with C-terminal peptides, but not with native Lol p III. A polyclonal rabbit antiserum against Lol p II bound to the C-terminal peptides of both Lol p II and III. This binding was inhibited with Lol p I, confirming that cross-reactive structures exist not only on the C-termini of Lol p II and Lol p I, but also of Lol p III and Lol p I. The existence of cross-reactivity between Lol p I and Lol p II and III possibly contributes to the frequently observed cosensitization for these allergens in grass-pollen-allergic patients.

  10. Association between Dietary Patterns and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study from 2003 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Rau, Hsiao-Hsien; Chao, Jane C-J

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality and loss of disability-adjusted life years in developed countries. This study derived a dietary pattern using an a priori method and additionally derived dietary patterns using a posteriori methods, and assessed the relationship with CVD risk factors in Taiwanese middle-aged and elderly adults. Methods Cross-sectional analyses of 62,965 subjects aged 40 years and above from the Mei Jau (MJ) database collected between 2003 and 2012 in Taiwan. Diet was assessed using a 22 item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Using this information, three dietary patterns were generated. The a priori diet was labeled the Taiwanese dietary pattern and was derived using hypothesized effect of 22 food groups, while two a posteriori dietary patterns, “vegi-fruits” and “meat-processed”, were derived using principal component analysis. The association between dietary patterns and a range of CVD risk factors (i.e. blood lipids, blood glucose and C-reactive protein) was evaluated using linear regression. Results The results showed that high intake (Q5, quintile 5) of Taiwanese diet was negatively associated with CVD risk factors at (p dietary pattern (Q5) was negatively associated with CVD risk factors (p dietary pattern (Q5) was positively associated with CVD risk factors (p dietary patterns and CVD risk factors, while a positive association was found between meat-processed dietary pattern and CVD risk factors. The findings suggested that a diet rich in vegetables and fruits has a beneficial effect in the management of CVD risk factors. PMID:27366909

  11. Shared Risk Factors for the Perpetration of Physical Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment Among Adolescents Exposed to Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton Reyes, H. Luz; Chen, May S.; Ennett, Susan T.; Basile, Kathleen C.; DeGue, Sarah; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M.; Moracco, Kathryn E.; Bowling, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The high risk of perpetrating physical dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment by adolescents exposed to domestic violence points to the need for programs to prevent these types of aggression among this group. This study of adolescents exposed to domestic violence examined whether these forms of aggression share risk factors that could be targeted for change in single programs designed to prevent all three types of aggression. Analyses were conducted on 399 mother victims of domestic violence and their adolescents, recruited through community advertising. The adolescents ranged in age from 12 to 16 years; 64 % were female. Generalized estimating equations was used to control for the covariation among the aggression types when testing for shared risk factors. Approximately 70 % of the adolescents reported perpetrating at least one of the three forms of aggression. In models examining one risk factor at a time, but controlling for demographics, adolescent acceptance of sexual violence, mother–adolescent discord, family conflict, low maternal monitoring, low mother–adolescent closeness, low family cohesion, depressed affect, feelings of anger, and anger reactivity were shared across all three aggression types. In multivariable models, which included all of the risk factors examined and the demographic variables, low maternal monitoring, depressed affect and anger reactivity remained significant shared risk factors. Our findings suggest that programs targeting these risk factors for change have the potential to prevent all three forms of aggression. In multivariable models, poor conflict management skills was a risk for bullying and sexual harassment, but not dating violence; acceptance of dating violence was a risk for dating violence and bullying, but not sexual harassment; and none of the examined risk factors were unique to aggression type. The study’s implications for the development of interventions and future research are discussed. PMID:26746242

  12. Shared Risk Factors for the Perpetration of Physical Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment Among Adolescents Exposed to Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshee, Vangie A; McNaughton Reyes, H Luz; Chen, May S; Ennett, Susan T; Basile, Kathleen C; DeGue, Sarah; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M; Moracco, Kathryn E; Bowling, J Michael

    2016-04-01

    The high risk of perpetrating physical dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment by adolescents exposed to domestic violence points to the need for programs to prevent these types of aggression among this group. This study of adolescents exposed to domestic violence examined whether these forms of aggression share risk factors that could be targeted for change in single programs designed to prevent all three types of aggression. Analyses were conducted on 399 mother victims of domestic violence and their adolescents, recruited through community advertising. The adolescents ranged in age from 12 to 16 years; 64 % were female. Generalized estimating equations was used to control for the covariation among the aggression types when testing for shared risk factors. Approximately 70 % of the adolescents reported perpetrating at least one of the three forms of aggression. In models examining one risk factor at a time, but controlling for demographics, adolescent acceptance of sexual violence, mother-adolescent discord, family conflict, low maternal monitoring, low mother-adolescent closeness, low family cohesion, depressed affect, feelings of anger, and anger reactivity were shared across all three aggression types. In multivariable models, which included all of the risk factors examined and the demographic variables, low maternal monitoring, depressed affect and anger reactivity remained significant shared risk factors. Our findings suggest that programs targeting these risk factors for change have the potential to prevent all three forms of aggression. In multivariable models, poor conflict management skills was a risk for bullying and sexual harassment, but not dating violence; acceptance of dating violence was a risk for dating violence and bullying, but not sexual harassment; and none of the examined risk factors were unique to aggression type. The study's implications for the development of interventions and future research are discussed.

  13. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  14. Abdominal obesity: causal factor or simply a symptom of obesity-related health risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sechang Oh,1 Kiyoji Tanaka,2 Jin-won Noh,3 Rina So,2,4 Takehiko Tsujimoto,2 Hiroyuki Sasai,1,4 Mijung Kim,5 Junichi Shoda11Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 2Faculty of Health and Sports Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Department of Healthcare Management, Eulji University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea; 4Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan; 5Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, JapanBackground: Abdominal fat (AF reduction is advocated in the treatment of obesity-related diseases. Nonetheless, recent studies have shown additional beneficial effects against obesity-related health risks, independent of AF reduction. Therefore it is important to determine whether AF plays a causal role in promoting metabolic disorders or is simply a symptom of increased obesity-related health risk factors. Clarification of the primary role of AF in the pathogenesis of obesity-related disease is also important.Objective: This retrospective study was conducted with the objectives of 1 comparison between groups exhibiting equivalent amounts of AF loss that resulted from distinct treatments (exercise and dietary restriction with respect to degrees of improvement in obesity-related health risk factors and 2 determination of definite differences in the outcomes of obesity-related health risk in subjects receiving identical treatment (exercise but exhibiting a remarkable difference in AF reduction.Design: In 66 subjects who completed a 12-week exercise or dietary restriction program, 17 parameters (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP]; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]; leptin, adiponectin, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, interleukin [IL]-6; alanine aminotransferase [ALT], gamma glutamyl transpeptidase [γGT]; lipid profile: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLC], triglyceride [TG

  15. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease.......To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease....

  16. Atherogenic Risk Factors and Hearing Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas Winther; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Stokholm, Zara Ann

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from c...

  17. Comparison of pre- and post-levothyroxine high-sensitivity c-reactive protein and fetuin-a levels in subclinical hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Bilgir

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this trial was to determine the levels of inflammatory markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A pre- and post-levothyroxine treatment in cases of subclinical hypothyroidism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism and a control group of 30 healthy individuals were tested for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A, followed by the administration of 50 µg of levothyroxine in the patient group for 3 months. During the post-treatment stage, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A levels in the patient group were re-assessed and compared with pre-treatment values. RESULTS: Pre-treatment levels of both high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and fetuin-A were observed to be higher in the patient group than in the control group. The decrease in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels during the post-treatment stage was not statistically significant. However, the decrease observed in post-treatment fetuin-A levels was found to be statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The decrease in fetuin-A levels in subclinical hypothyroidism cases indicates that levothyroxine treatment exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Although the decrease in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels was statistically non-significant, it is predicted to reach significance with sustained treatment.

  18. Influence of cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity levels on cardiometabolic risk factors during menopause transition: A MONET study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Abdulnour

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To determine the influence of cardiorespiratory fitness (hereafter “fitness” and physical activity levels on cardiometabolic risk factors in premenopausal women going through the menopause transition. An ancillary study including 66 premenopausal women who participated to a 5-year observational, longitudinal study (2004 to 2009 in Ottawa on the effects of menopause transition on body composition and cardiometabolic risk factors. Women underwent a graded exercise test on treadmill to measure peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak at year 1 and 5 and physical activity levels were measured using accelerometers. Cardiometabolic risk factors included: waist circumference, fasting plasma lipids, glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR score, c-reactive protein, apolipoprotein B (apoB and resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Change in fitness was not associated with changes in cardiometabolic risk factors. The changes in total physical activity levels on the other hand showed a significant negative association with apoB levels. Three-way linear mixed model repeated measures, showed lower values of waist circumference, fasting triglycerides, insulin levels, HOMA-IR score, apoB and diastolic blood pressure in women with a fitness ≥30.0 mlO2 kg−1 min−1 compared to women with a fitness <30.0 mlO2 kg−1 min−1 (P < 0.05. However, only fasting triglycerides was lower in women with physical activity levels ≥770.0 Kcal/day (P < 0.05. Between fitness and physical activity levels, fitness was associated with more favorable values of cardiometabolic risk factors in women followed for 5 years during the menopause transition.

  19. Risk Factors for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here: Home For Patients Risk Factors Risk Factors for Scleroderma The cause of scleroderma is ... what biological factors contribute to scleroderma pathogenesis. Genetic Risk Scleroderma does not tend to run in families ...

  20. Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  1. C-reactive Protein and Disease Outcome in Nigerian Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence suggests that sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a chronic inflammatory state. C.reactive protein (CRP) is known to modulate inflammation. Its role in the chronic inflammation of SCD may make it valuable as a therapeutic target. Aim: The aim was to determine CRP levels in SCD subjects in ...

  2. Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels were determined among HIV patients visiting St Camillus Hospital, Uromi, Edo State, Nigeria, between January to March, 2013. Fifty (50) HIV patients (20 males; 30 females) and 50 control subjects (24 males; 26 females) were enrolled for this study. The clinical status of ...

  3. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 Control Reactive Oxygen Species Release, Mitochondrial Autophagy and C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase/P38 Phosphorylation During Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naira Baregamian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress and inflammation may contribute to the disruption of the protective gut barrier through various mechanisms; mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from inflammatory and oxidative injury may potentially be a significant source of apoptosis during necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. Tumor necrosis factor (TNFα is thought to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS and activate the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/p38 pathway. Hence, the focus of our study was to examine the effects of TNFα/ROs on mitochondrial function, ASK1-JNK/p38 cascade activation in intestinal epithelial cells during NEC.

  4. Cardiovascular risk factors in a population of Brazilian schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Rodrigues

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that a judicious diet, regular physical activity and blood pressure (BP monitoring must start in early childhood to minimize the impact of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors. This study was designed to evaluate BP and metabolic parameters of schoolchildren from Vitória, Espírito Santo State, Brazil, and correlate them with cardiovascular risk factors. The study was conducted on 380 students aged 10-14 years (177 boys, 203 girls enrolled in public schools. Baseline measurements included body mass index, BP and heart rate. The students were submitted to exercise spirometry on a treadmill. VO2max was obtained from exercise testing to voluntary exhaustion. Fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides (TG, and glucose were measured. Nine point nine percent of the boys and 11.7% of the girls were hypertensive or had pre-hypertensive levels. There was no significant correlation between VO2max and TC, LDL-C, or TG in prepubertal children, but a slight negative correlation was detected in post-pubertal boys for HDL-C and TG. In addition, children with hypertension (3.4% or pre-hypertensive levels (6.6% also had comorbidity for overweight and blood lipid abnormalities (14% for triglycerides, 44.7% for TC, 25.9% for LDL-C, 52% for low HDL-C. The present study shows for the first time high correlations between prehypertensive blood pressure levels and the cardiovascular risk factors high TC, high LDL-C, low HDL-C in schoolchildren. These are important for the formulation of public health policies and strategies.

  5. Predicting risk of cancer during HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borges, Álvaro H; Silverberg, Michael J; Wentworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between inflammatory [interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP)] and coagulation (D-dimer) biomarkers and cancer risk during HIV infection.......To investigate the relationship between inflammatory [interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP)] and coagulation (D-dimer) biomarkers and cancer risk during HIV infection....

  6. Papel de la proteína c reactiva en las enfermedades cardiovasculares Role of C-reactive protein in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Manzur

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La proteína C-reactiva (PCR, un marcador sensible de inflamación, es un predictor independiente de enfermedad cardiovascular futura (ECV, que es una de las principales causas de muerte en todo el mundo. El papel de la inflamación en esta entidad ha sido bien documentado en la última década, y se ha demostrado inflamación en todas las fases de la aterosclerosis, desde el inicio y el crecimiento, hasta la ruptura de la placa. La PCR es una proteína de fase aguda, altamente sensible como marcador de inflamación general. En estudios experimentales, se ha determinado la presencia de PCR en arterias que presentan lesiones ateroscleróticas. También se ha demostrado que, en forma directa, la PCR induce la producción de otras células inflamatorias y que disminuye la expresión de la óxido nítrico sintetasa. Es decir, desde el punto de vista biológico, la PCR participa en el proceso aterogénico. En adultos, la PCR, detectada con técnicas ultrasensibles (PCRus, se asocia con los factores de riesgo tradicionales y su concentración predice eventos cardiovasculares.C-reactive protein (CRP, a sensitive marker of inflammation is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, which is one of the main causes of death worldwide. The role of inflammation in cardiovascular disease has been well documented in the last decade, and inflammation has been demonstrated in all stages of atherosclerosis, from its beginning and growth to the plaque rupture. CRP is an acute phase protein, highly sensitive as a marker of general inflammation. The presence of CRP has been determined in experimental studies in arteries with atherosclerotic lesions. It has been demonstrated as well that CRP induces directly the production of other inflammatory cells and decreases the expression of nitric oxide synthase. This means that from the biological standpoint CRP takes part in the atherogenic process. In adults, CRP detected through high sensitive CRP

  7. Individual and couple-level risk factors for hepatitis C infection among heterosexual drug users: a multilevel dyadic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, James M; Pouget, Enrique R; Tortu, Stephanie

    2007-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common bloodborne pathogen in the United States and is a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Although it is known that HCV is most commonly transmitted among injection drug users, the role of sexual transmission in the spread of HCV remains controversial because of inconsistent findings across studies involving heterosexual couples. A novel multilevel modeling technique designed to overcome the limitations of previous research was performed to assess multiple risk factors for HCV while partitioning the source of risk at the individual and couple level. The analysis was performed on risk exposure and HCV screening data obtained from 265 drug-using couples in East Harlem, New York City. In multivariable analysis, significant individual risk factors for HCV included a history of injection drug use, tattooing, and older age. At the couple level, HCV infection tended to cluster within couples, and this interdependence was accounted for by couples' drug-injection behavior. Individual and couple-level sexual behavior was not associated with HCV infection. Our results are consistent with prior research indicating that sexual contact plays little role in HCV transmission. Rather, couples' injection behavior appears to account for the clustering of HCV within heterosexual dyads.

  8. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc

  9. Risks factoring business: accounting measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.V. Gutsaylyuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper carried out the identification of risk factors for the development of possible accounting software management. Studied theoretical and methodological aspects of the risk classification of factoring operations in the part of the risk assessment factors. It is proposed to consider the risks factors as the risk that is acceptable controlled by accounting instruments and the risks that can not be taken into account in the accounting records. To minimize the risk factor, accounting-driven tools, a method of self-insurance, which is a factor in the creation of provision for factoring transactions designed to cover unexpected expenses and losses. Provision for factoring factor will establish more stable conditions of financial activity and avoid the fluctuations of profit factor in relation to the writing off of losses on factoring operatsіyam.Developed proposals allow for further research to improve the organizational and methodological basis of accounting and analysis of information as a basis for providing risk management factor, particularly in terms of improving the evaluation questions such risks and their qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  10. Evaluation of Serum Levels of Pregnancy Associated Plasma Protein-A, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Highly Sensitive C-Reactive Protein in Diabetic Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Messeih, PH.L.; El-safie, A.I.; Said, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence favours the primary role of cellular auto immunity and its humoral mediators in the pathogenesis and follow up of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1 DM). The present study is carried out to investigate serum levels of pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha ) and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in children with type 1 DM. Potential role of body mass index (BMI) was evaluated. Circulating levels of TNF-alpha, PAPP-A and hs-CRP are significantly increased in children with type 1 DM as compared with healthy subjects suggesting activation of inflammatory immune response system. A significant negative correlation was obtained between TNF-alpha and BMI in diabetic patients. This is highly suggestive of the availability of these non invasive indices to help further examining type 1 DM pathophysiology and monitoring pharmacological interventions to interfere with disease development and progression.

  11. Stroke - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oxygen. Brain cells can die, causing lasting damage. Risk factors are things that increase your chance of ... a disease or condition. This article discusses the risk factors for stroke and things you can do ...

  12. Work and diet-related risk factors of cardiovascular diseases: comparison of two occupational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Danielle; Stadeler, Martina; Grieshaber, Romano; Keller, Sylvia; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2010-03-22

    Although work related risk factors associated with Cardiovascular Diseases (CD) have been well researched, there is no detailed knowledge regarding disparate occupational groups each with a different risk exposition. Therefore, two occupational groups (chefs and office workers) were compared with a focus on nutritional and psychosocial factors. Two groups of subjects were tested for work and diet-related risks of CD (45 chefs and 48 office workers). The groups matched both for gender (male) and age (30 to 45 years). The study included a medical check-up, bioelectrical impedance analysis as well as an evaluation of questionnaires on health, nutritional behaviour and coping capacity. In addition, volunteers were required to compile a 7-day-dietary-record and collect their urine 24 h prior to their check-up. Blood samples drawn were analysed for glucose and lipid metabolism, homocysteine, vitamin B12, folic acid; C-reactive protein, uric acid, red blood cell fatty acids, plant sterols, antioxidative capacity and oxidative stress. On average, the chefs showed one risk factor more compared to the office workers. The most frequent risk factors in both groups included overweight/obesity (chef group [CG]: 62.2%; office group [OG]: 58.3%) and elevated TC (CG: 62.2%; OG: 43.8%]. Moreover, although the chefs often had higher CRP-concentrations (40.0%), more office workers suffered from hypertension (37.5%).Chefs showed significant higher concentrations of saturated fatty acids and oleic acid, whereas docosahexaenoic acid, Omega-6- and trans fatty acids were found more frequently in the red blood cell membranes of office workers. While there were no significant differences in analysed plant sterols between the two occupational groups, 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine was significantly increased in office workers.Concerning the work-related psychosocial factors, the chefs were characterised by a stronger subjective importance of work, a greater degree of professional

  13. Post-challenge hyperglycemia is a significant risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Mizuta, Toshihiko; Eguchi, Yuichiro

    2011-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive patients. However, it is unclear whether or not post-challenge hyperglycemia is a risk factor. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between post-challenge hyperglycemia and hepatocarcinogenesis in HCV-positive patients. A total of 203 HCV-RNA-positive subjects (108 males, mean age 54.3±10.8 years; 95 females, mean age 56.6±10.3 years; genotype 1b/2a/2b/3a: 152/38/12/1) who underwent liver biopsy and a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and who were treated with interferon (IFN) were enrolled in this study. None of the subjects had been treated with antidiabetic drugs. The subjects underwent ultrasonography and/or computed tomography every 6 months after the end of the IFN therapy. Thirteen patients, including one patient who achieved a sustained viral response (SVR) with IFN, developed HCC. On multivariate analysis, male sex, age >65 years, excessive alcohol consumption, non-SVR, liver steatosis area >5% in liver specimens, and 120-min post-challenge hyperglycemia were risk factors for the development of HCC. After matching subjects for sex, age, alcohol intake, and response to the IFN therapy, advanced fibrosis stages [hazard ratio (HR) 2.8], liver steatosis (HR 5.4), and 120-min post-challenge hyperglycemia (HR 4.9) were significant risk factors for the development of HCC. Furthermore, after matching for the fibrosis stage, liver steatosis (HR 5.7) and 120-min post-challenge hyperglycemia (HR 6.9) remained as significant factors for HCC development. Post-challenge hyperglycemia is an independent risk factor for HCC in HCV-positive patients. (author)

  14. Association between cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness in prepubertal Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazolla, Fernanda Mussi; Neves Bordallo, Maria Alice; Madeira, Isabel Rey; de Miranda Carvalho, Cecilia Noronha; Vieira Monteiro, Alexandra Maria; Pinheiro Rodrigues, Nádia Cristina; Borges, Marcos Antonio; Collett-Solberg, Paulo Ferrez; Muniz, Bruna Moreira; de Oliveira, Cecilia Lacroix; Pinheiro, Suellen Martins; de Queiroz Ribeiro, Rebeca Mathias

    2015-05-01

    Early exposure to cardiovascular risk factors creates a chronic inflammatory state that could damage the endothelium followed by thickening of the carotid intima-media. To investigate the association of cardiovascular risk factors and thickening of the carotid intima. Media in prepubertal children. In this cross-sectional study, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 129 prepubertal children aged from 5 to 10 year. Association was assessed by simple and multivariate logistic regression analyses. In simple logistic regression analyses, body mass index (BMI) z-score, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were positively associated with increased left, right, and average cIMT, whereas diastolic blood pressure was positively associated only with increased left and average cIMT (p<0.05). In multivariate logistic regression analyses increased left cIMT was positively associated to BMI z-score and SBP, and increased average cIMT was only positively associated to SBP (p<0.05). BMI z-score and SBP were the strongest risk factors for increased cIMT.

  15. Preparation and comparison of a-C:H coatings using reactive sputter techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keunecke, M., E-mail: martin.keunecke@ist.fraunhofer.d [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Weigel, K.; Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Cremer, R.; Fuss, H.-G. [CemeCon AG, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2009-12-31

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings are widely used in several industrial applications. These coatings commonly will be prepared by plasma activated chemical vapor deposition (PACVD). The main method used to prepare a-C:H coating in industrial scale is based on a glow discharge in a hydrocarbon gas like acetylene or methane using a substrate electrode powered with medium frequency (m.f. - some 10 to 300 kHz). Some aims of further development are adhesion improvement, increase of hardness and high coating quality on complex geometries. A relatively new and promising technique to fulfil these requirements is the deposition of a-C:H coatings by a reactive d.c. magnetron sputter deposition from a graphite target with acetylene as reactive gas. An advancement of this technique is the deposition in a pulsed magnetron sputter process. Using these three mentioned techniques a-C:H coatings were prepared in the same deposition machine. For adhesion improvement different interlayer systems were applied. The effect of different substrate bias voltages (d.c. and d.c. pulse) was investigated. By applying the magnetron sputter technique in the d.c. pulse mode, plastic hardness values up to 40 GPa could be reached. Besides hardness other mechanical properties like resistance against abrasive wear were measured and compared. Cross sectional SEM images showed the growth structure of the coatings.

  16. Fracture Risk and Risk Factors for Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürer, Christian; Wallaschofski, Henri; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Schober, Hans-Christof; Hannemann, Anke

    2015-05-25

    As the population ages, diseases of the elderly are becoming more common, including osteoporosis. Ways to assess the risk of fracture and the distribution and effects of known risk factors for osteoporosis will be important in planning for future healthcare needs, as well as in the development of preventive strategies. The study population included 6029 men and women aged 20-90 who underwent examination in the second follow-up wave of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-2) or in the basal SHIP-Trend Study. The risk of fracture was estimated on the basis of quantitative ultrasonography of the calcaneus. Prior fractures and risk factors for osteoporosis were ascertained in standardized interviews. 4.6% of the male subjects and 10.6% of the female subjects were judged to have an elevated risk of fracture. The corresponding percentages among subjects over age 65 were 8.8% for men and 28.2% for women. Even among subjects under age 55, risk factors for osteoporosis were associated with lower bone stiffness: the mean stiffness index was 103/98 (men/women) without risk factors, 99/96 with one risk factor, and 93/95 with more than one risk factor. Logistic regression analysis yielded an odds ratio of 1.89 (95% confidence interval: 1.44-2.50; p<0.01) for prevalent fractures among subjects aged 75 and older compared to subjects under age 55. The data indicate a high prevalence of osteoporosis from age 65 onward. These findings are consistent with those of other studies from Germany and across Europe. Younger men and women should already begin taking steps to counteract modifiable risk factors.

  17. Clinical Significance of Contralateral Reactive Lesion in Vocal Fold Polyp and Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung-Hae; Choi, Yong-Sug; Joo, Young-Hoon; Park, Young-Hak; Sun, Dong-Il

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the clinical significance of contralateral reactive lesions in patients undergoing laryngeal microsurgery for benign vocal fold lesions such as vocal polyps and cysts. This was a retrospective, single institution cohort study. Patient medical records were reviewed for demographic characteristics; acoustic, aerodynamic, and perceptual analyses; and Voice Handicap Index score before and after laryngeal microsurgery. Definitive diagnoses were made via intraoperative microlaryngoscopic evaluations. Clinical parameters were assessed to identify risk factors for contralateral reactive lesions. We evaluated surgical outcome using voice analysis. We enrolled 268 patients (109 men and 159 women) with benign vocal fold lesions. A total of 195 (72.8%) had a contralateral reactive vocal fold lesion. A multivariable analysis revealed that being a never smoker and having a hoarseness duration ≥6 months, vocal polyps, and small primary lesions were independent risk factors for contralateral reactive lesions (P vocal fold lesions are frequently detected in patients with vocal polyp and cyst. The reactive lesions had an adverse effect on voice quality. Simultaneous excision of primary and contralateral reactive lesions may be an alternative treatment for better voice outcome. Copyright © 2018 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of Cervical Dysplasia and Associated Risk Factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To asess the prevalence and risk factors for abnormal cervical cancer screening amongst patients of ..... IV. 101 (36.1). V. 40 (14.3). Income. Above the poverty line (>4500 naira monthly) ..... and hence tend to have nutritional deficiency of Vitamins A,. C .... Edwards SK, Sonnex C. Influence of genital infection on cervical.

  19. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c : a study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and

  20. The prevalence of deranged C-reactive protein and albumin in patients with incurable cancer approaching death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah; Axelsson, Bertil

    2018-01-01

    Amongst patients with incurable cancer approaching death, cachexia is common and associated with adverse outcomes. The term cachexia lacks a universally accepted definition and there is no consensus regarding which variables are to be measured. Furthermore, an elevated C-reactive protein is a common clinical challenge in this patient group. This study aims to add to the ongoing discussion regarding the definition of cancer cachexia and to study the role of C-reactive protein and s-albumin in this context. A 1-year cohort, consisting of 155 cancer patients enrolled in a specialized palliative home care team in the city of Östersund, Sweden, that were deceased during the year of 2015 was studied. Laboratory measures were studied within 0-30 and 31-60 days prior to death. C-reactive protein >10 mg/L and coinciding s-albumin death was noted. The prevalence of "laboratory cachexia" was 85% 0-30 days prior to death compared to 66% 31-60 days prior to death (pdeath, with a median of 47 days. The median values for C-reactive protein and s-albumin within 0-30 days prior to death were 84mg/L and 23g/L respectively. Could markedly deranged values of C-reactive protein and s-albumin, such as found in this study, signal a relatively short remaining survival time in patients with incurable cancer and no clinical signs of ongoing infection? The role of "laboratory cachexia" in this context as well as the cut off values for the laboratory measures included may be further discussed.

  1. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  2. Established and potential risk factors for clostridum difficile infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnavi C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the aetiological agent for almost all cases of pseudo membranous colitis and 15-25% of antibiotic associated diarrhoea. In recent years, C. difficile associated disease (CDAD has been increasing in frequency and severity due to the emergence of virulent strains. Severe cases of toxic mega colon may be associated with mortality rates of 24-38%. The prevalence of CDAD is global and the incidence varies considerably from place to place. In the initial stages of its discovery, C. difficile infection was regarded mainly as an outcome of antibiotic intake and not as a life threatening disease. Intervention by man has produced conditions making C. difficile a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The recent outbreak of CDAD in Quebec has sent the alarm bells ringing. Apart from a threefold increase in the incidence of CDAD, clinicians have also reported a higher number of cases involving toxic mega colon, colectomy or death. Among all the risk factors, inclusive of the host and the environmental factors, antibiotics are the most important ones. Surgical patients comprise 55-75% of all patients with CDAD due to the fact that perioperative prophylaxis requires the use of antibiotics. However, other drugs such as immunosuppressants and proton pump inhibitors are also important risk factors. Thus CDAD is a growing nosocomial and public health challenge. Additionally, the recognition of community acquired CDAD signals the presence of several risk factors. In this review, the established and potential risk factors of CDAD, along with the epidemiology, diagnostic modalities, management and preventive measures of the disease have been elaborated.

  3. Effect of nigella sativa seeds extract on serum c-reactive protein in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M.U.; Qureshi, H.

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein. It predicts future risk of cardiovascular diseases. Different medicinal plants and their active ingredients possess the ability to reduce serum CRP levels and hence inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular diseases. In our study, ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds was evaluated in albino rats for its possible effect on serum CRP levels. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on an acute inflammatory biomarker/mediator, C-reactive protein (CRP) in albino rats. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial (RCT). Place and Duration of Study: Physiology Department, Services Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Lahore; from September to November, 2009. Subjects and Methods: The study was carried out on 90 male albino rats. Five percent (5%) formalin in a dose of 50 meu1 was injected into sub-plantar surface of right hind paw of each rat to produce inflammation. The rats were randomly divided into three groups of thirty each. Group A was given normal saline (control); group B was given Nigella sativa seed extract; and group C received diclofenac sodium, as a reference drug. CRP levels in each group were measured from blood samples taken 25 hours after giving formalin. Results: The ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds, given intraperitoneally, caused highly significant (p<0.001) reduction in serum CRP levels as compared to control group. The reduction in CRP levels by ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa was also significantly (p<0.05) more than that produced by diclofenac sodium. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Nigella sativa possesses ability to reduce serum CRP levels significantly, after production of artificial inflammation, in albino rats. (author)

  4. Individual psychological and social risk factors for violent criminal behavior in adolescents with organic mental disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubkova A.A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the risk factors for criminal aggression in adolescents with an organic mental disorder depending on the level of social deviations or severity of pathopsychological factor. The study involved 113 male adolescents aged 15 to 17 years. The main group consisted of juvenile offenders with organic mental disorder. We used the methods of investigation to determine the individual psychological characteristics, we also used structured risk assessment methods. It is shown that risk factors for criminal aggressive behavior in adolescents with organic mental disorder are a high level of proactive and reactive aggression, combined with underdeveloped mechanisms deter aggressive intentions. With the increase of organic disease, these features become more stable. An important role in shaping the aggressive criminal behavior plays an unsuccessful social environment. Interfamily problems, social deprivation, learning difficulties, communication in antisocial groups and substance abuse - all this increases the risk of aggressive illegal actions.

  5. The Effect of 4 Weeks of Flaxseed Extract Supplementation on Serum Concentration of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Nazari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Omega-3 Supplementation has different effects on the body. Terefore, this study was carried out with the aim of investigating the effect of 4 weeks of flaxseed extract supplementation on serum concentrations of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and C-reactive protein (CRP. Methods: In this double-blind study, 24 male students (mean age, 23.21±1.98 were randomly divided into two groups, including flaxseed extract (n=12 and placebo (n=12. After 4 weeks of supplementation with flaxseed extract, serum levels of BDNF and CRP was measured in fasting state. BDNF level was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit, and CRP level was measured using an immunoturbidimetric assay kit. Data were analyzed using t-test. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: After four weeks of supplementation with flaxseed extract the mean serum level of BDNF significantly increased (p<0.001, but no significant change was observed in the serum level of CRP (p<0.591. Conclusion: It seems that supplementation with flaxseed extract through increasing BDNF level is useful for the improvement of cognitive and functional benefits of the brain.

  6. Risk factors for an additional port in single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy in patients with cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kenichiro; Shirabe, Ken; Watanabe, Akira; Kubo, Norio; Sasaki, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hideki; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Although single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now widely performed in patients with cholecystitis, some cases require an additional port to complete the procedure. In this study, we focused on risk factor of additional port in this surgery. We performed single-incision cholecystectomy in 75 patients with acute cholecystitis or after cholecystitis between 2010 and 2014 at Gunma University Hospital. Surgical indications followed the TG13 guidelines. Our standard procedure for single-incision cholecystectomy routinely uses two needlescopic devices. We used logistic regression analysis to identify the risk factors associated with use of an additional full-size port (5 or 10 mm). Surgical outcome was acceptable without biliary injury. Nine patients (12.0%) required an additional port, and one patient (1.3%) required conversion to open cholecystectomy because of severe adhesions around the cystic duct and common bile duct. In multivariate analysis, high C-reactive protein (CRP) values (>7.0 mg/dl) during cholecystitis attacks were significantly correlated with the need for an additional port (P = 0.009), with a sensitivity of 55.6%, specificity of 98.5%, and accuracy of 93.3%. This study indicated that the severe inflammation indicated by high CRP values during cholecystitis attacks predicts the need for an additional port. J. Med. Invest. 64: 245-249, August, 2017.

  7. Evaluation of plasma C-reactive protein levels in pregnant women with and without periodontal disease: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anupriya; Ramesh, Amitha; Thomas, Biju

    2009-09-01

    Circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are a marker of systemic inflammation and are associated with periodontal disease, a chronic bacterial infection associated with elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins. CRP has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, including preterm delivery, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Furthermore, periodontal disease has been associated with increased risk of preterm low birth weight, low birth weight, and preterm birth. The present study was conducted to assess plasma CRP levels in pregnant women with and without periodontal disease; to evaluate the effect of periodontal therapy on the incidence of preterm delivery; and to compare the incidence of preterm delivery in pregnant women with and without periodontal disease. A total of 90 pregnant women aged between 18-35 years with gestational age between 12-28 weeks were recruited and divided into three equal groups (control group, study group, treatment group) of 30 each. Blood samples were taken for estimation of C-reactive protein levels from all groups at 12-20 weeks of gestation, determined using ultrasensitive turbidimetric immunoassay (QUANTIA-CRP US). The treatment group comprised plaque control, scaling, and root planning and daily rinsing with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth before 28 weeks of gestation. The mean value of C-reactive protein levels in subjects with periodontal disease was higher compared to control group i.e., 1.20 +/- 0.247 mg/dl and 1.22 +/- 0.250 mg/dl, respectively, compared to 0.713 +/- 0.139 mg/ dl (P = 0.001). The mean value of CRP levels before treatment was greater than the mean value after treatment i.e., 1.22 +/- 0.25 compared to 0.84 +/- 0.189 (P periodontal disease group (study group) compared to 8.3% in the control group (P = 0.001). The incidence of preterm delivery in the treatment group was 15.0% compared to 31.7% in the nontreatment group (study group). The findings from the study suggest that

  8. EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS IN ACUTE STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cerebrovascular disease is the third most common cause of death in the developed world after cancer and ischemic heart disease. In India, community surveys have shown a crude prevalence rate of 200 per 100000 population for hemiplegia. Aims and objectives: Identification of risk factors for c erebrovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Inclusion Criteria: Cases of acute stroke admitted in S.V.R.R.G.G.H, Tirupati were taken for the study. Exclusion Criteria: Head injury cases, neoplasm cases producing cerebrovascular disease were excluded. Re sults: Stroke was more common in male, 54% patients were male 46% were female. It was more common in 6 th and 7 th decade. More common risk factors were hypertension followed by smoking, diabetes mellitus. More common pathology was infarction. Conclusion: Com mon risk factors for acute stroke are hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, obesity, cardiac disease. Stroke was confirmed by CT scan of brain.

  9. Effects of periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein, sE-selectin, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by peripheral blood-derived macrophages in diabetes. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, E; Kaplan, S; Yang, J; Roth, G A; Papapanou, P N; Greenberg, S

    2007-06-01

    Diabetes is associated with an increased risk for vascular disease and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of periodontal treatment in diabetes with respect to alterations in the pro-inflammatory potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ten patients with diabetes and moderate to severe periodontitis received full-mouth subgingival debridement. Blood samples for serum/plasma and mononuclear cell isolation were collected prior to and 4 wk after therapy. Mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or ionomycin/phorbol ester to determine the pro-inflammatory capacity of macrophages and lymphocytes, respectively. Following periodontal treatment, all patients demonstrated a significant improvement in clinical periodontal status (p C-reactive protein significantly decreased by 37% (p periodontal therapy and a potential impact on atherosclerosis-related complications in diabetic individuals.

  10. Canine Pancreas-Specific Lipase and C-reactive Protein in Dogs Treated With Anticonvulsants (Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Viviana; Teles, Mariana; Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Rodón, Jaume; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Animals treated with anticonvulsant drugs may have increased canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPLI) values. Inflammatory conditions and specifically acute pancreatitis are of major concern in these animals. Elevation in C-reactive protein is being associated with inflammatory status in dogs and it has been correlated with the clinical severity of pancreatitis. In the present study, we investigated if there is a correlation between the cPLI increase, changes in C-reactive protein and hepatic enzymes, as well as the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) in dogs with anticonvulsant treatment (phenobarbital, or potassium bromide or both). Increased values of pancreas-specific lipase were found in 6.8% of the animals in treatment with anticonvulsants, and this increase is correlated with the increase in triglycerides, alkaline phosphatase, and alanine aminotransferase but not with C-reactive protein levels, which suggests a possible induction or release phenomenon rather than a clear severe AP. C-reactive protein levels did not affect cPLI values on the population studied. Only 2 animals had clinical and analytical data suggestive of AP, indicating a low prevalence (0.6%). In conclusion, cPLI may be increased in a low percentage of animals with anticonvulsants treatment and its increase may not be associated with severe AP. It may be induced by the anticonvulsants drugs; however, further studies are advised to rule out other possible causes that increased cPLI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic properties of C-reactive protein for detecting pneumonia in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.J.; Broekhuizen, B.D.L.; Minnaard, M.C.; Balemans, W.A.; Hopstaken, R.M.; de Jong, P.A.; Verheij, Th.J.M.

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic value of C-reactive protein (CRP) level for pneumonia in children is unknown. As a first step in the assessment of the value of CRP, a diagnostic study was performed in children at an emergency department (ED). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data were

  12. Caesarean Risk Factors in Northern Region of Bangladesh: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the measurement of a scale of caesarean (C-section) risk factors and degree of risk contribution in different health facilities and to determine a suitable graphical representation (image) of caesarean cases. Methods: Based on seventeen indicators, a composite index was computed for each respondent ...

  13. Familial risk for mood disorder and the personality risk factor, neuroticism, interact in their association with frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, Vibe Gedsø; Vinberg, Maj; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    Life stress is a robust risk factor for later development of mood disorders, particularly for individuals at familial risk. Likewise, scoring high on the personality trait neuroticism is associated with an increased risk for mood disorders. Neuroticism partly reflects stress vulnerability...... stress reactivity in individuals at high familial risk for mood disorders might enhance the effect of neuroticism in shaping the impact of potential environmental stress and thereby influence serotonergic neurotransmission....... and is positively correlated to frontolimbic serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor binding. Here, we investigate whether neuroticism interacts with familial risk in relation to frontolimbic 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Twenty-one healthy twins with a co-twin history of mood disorder and 16 healthy twins without a co...

  14. Gender, obesity and repeated elevation of C-reactive protein: data from the CARDIA cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ishii

    Full Text Available C-reactive Protein (CRP measurements above 10 mg/L have been conventionally treated as acute inflammation and excluded from epidemiologic studies of chronic inflammation. However, recent evidence suggest that such CRP elevations can be seen even with chronic inflammation. The authors assessed 3,300 participants in The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study, who had two or more CRP measurements between 1992/3 and 2005/6 to a investigate characteristics associated with repeated CRP elevation above 10 mg/L; b identify subgroups at high risk of repeated elevation; and c investigate the effect of different CRP thresholds on the probability of an elevation being one-time rather than repeated. 225 participants (6.8% had one-time and 103 (3.1% had repeated CRP elevation above 10 mg/L. Repeated elevation was associated with obesity, female gender, low income, and sex hormone use. The probability of an elevation above 10 mg/L being one-time rather than repeated was lowest (51% in women with body mass index above 31 kg/m(2, compared to 82% in others. These findings suggest that CRP elevations above 10 mg/L in obese women are likely to be from chronic rather than acute inflammation, and that CRP thresholds above 10 mg/L may be warranted to distinguish acute from chronic inflammation in obese women.

  15. Effects of tibolone on the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in postmenopausal women

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    Jeremić Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Tibolone is a preparation that belongs to the group of steroidal substances. The effects of the use of the use of tibolone are the consequence of the activities of its metabolities, considering that their hormonal activity depends on the type of tissue in which they develop. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the use of tibolone on risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases in postmenopausal women. Methods. A prospective observational stady included 94 patients who had the concentration of l7ß estradiol < 50 pg/ml, and who was in menopause more than a year. Out of the total number of patients, 63 accepted to receive tibolone 2.5 mg daily (tibolone group, while 31 of the patients refused to take tibolone (control group. We measured the concentration of lipids (cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglicerides, antitrombin III, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein, before and after the treatment within a 6-month period. Then, we compared the difference between the values of concentrations and tested the statistical significance of the difference. We also evaluated the changes of values in the concentrations of the examinated parameters inside a 6-month period in the control group. Results. In 31 patients of the control group, from the control group there were no significant changes in the values of the defined parameters as compared to their initial values after six months. But there were changes of statistical significance (p < 0.001 in values of the concentrations of the exeminated parameters before and after the treatment in the tibolone group. In fact, we recorded decreases in the total cholesterol by 17.8%, HDL cholesterol by 27%, LDL cholesterol by 4% (without statistical significance p > 0.05 and triglicerids by 35%. There were no statistical differences in the concentrations of antitrombin III, fibrionogen, and C-reactive proteine in the tibolone group before and after the

  16. Understanding suicide risk within the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework: A meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Catherine R; Kleiman, Evan M; Cha, Christine B; Deming, Charlene A; Franklin, Joseph C; Nock, Matthew K

    2018-01-01

    The field is in need of novel and transdiagnostic risk factors for suicide. The National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) provides a framework that may help advance research on suicidal behavior. We conducted a meta-analytic review of existing prospective risk and protective factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviors (ideation, attempts, and deaths) that fall within one of the five RDoC domains or relate to a prominent suicide theory. Predictors were selected from a database of 4,082 prospective risk and protective factors for suicide outcomes. A total of 460 predictors met inclusion criteria for this meta-analytic review and most examined risk (vs. protective) factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The overall effect of risk factors was statistically significant, but relatively small, in predicting suicide ideation (weighted mean odds ratio: wOR = 1.72; 95% CI: 1.59-1.87), suicide attempt (wOR = 1.66 [1.57-1.76), and suicide death (wOR = 1.41 [1.24-1.60]). Across all suicide outcomes, most risk factors related to the Negative Valence Systems domain, although effect sizes were of similar magnitude across RDoC domains. This study demonstrated that the RDoC framework provides a novel and promising approach to suicide research; however, relatively few studies of suicidal behavior fit within this framework. Future studies must go beyond the "usual suspects" of suicide risk factors (e.g., mental disorders, sociodemographics) to understand the processes that combine to lead to this deadly outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. C-reactive protein in patients with aggressive periodontitis

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    Jaroslav Mysak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the systemic levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in peripheral blood samples of patients with aggressive periodontitis during the first twelve months of periodontal treatment, at exactly six month interval measurements, and compare them with clinical periodontal parameters. Materials and methods: All patients (N = 45 were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into two groups GAgP (Generalised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 23 and group LAgP (Localised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 22. Control group (CON included 60 individuals with healthy periodontium. The levels of CRP were determined in both groups GAgP and LAgP three times in 6 month intervals during the periodontal treatment. Results: CRP is a plasma protein that reflects the extent of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice for monitoring this response. In our study, CRP levels decreased in course of periodontal treatment in both groups (GAgP and LAgP in a similar way as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD indices. Conclusion: Our study results showed that CRP levels, as well as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD, indices decreased in course of periodontal treatment in patients with generalised and localised aggressive periodontitis. Therefore this marker might be exploitable as a means to evaluate periodontal health in patients with aggressive periodontitis. Keywords: aggressive periodontitis, C-reactive protein, periodontal index, cardiovascular diseases

  18. White fish reduces cardiovascular risk factors in patients with metabolic syndrome: the WISH-CARE study, a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, C; Botella-Carretero, J I; Corella, D; Fiol, M; Lage, M; Lurbe, E; Richart, C; Fernández-Real, J M; Fuentes, F; Ordóñez, A; de Cos, A I; Salas-Salvadó, J; Burguera, B; Estruch, R; Ros, E; Pastor, O; Casanueva, F F

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of cardiovascular risk with high consumption of fish in diet is still a matter of debate, and concerns about heavy metal contamination have limited consumption of oily fish. We aimed to evaluate the effect of regular ingestion of white fish on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with metabolic syndrome. Multicenter randomized crossover clinical trial including 273 individuals with metabolic syndrome. An 8-week only-one dietary intervention: 100 g/d of white fish (Namibia hake) with advice on a healthy diet, compared with no fish or seafood with advice on a healthy diet. Outcomes were lipid profile, individual components of the metabolic syndrome, serum insulin concentrations, homeostasis model of insulin resistance, serum C-reactive protein and serum fatty acid levels. We found a significant lowering effect of the intervention with white fish on waist circumference (P rise (P syndrome, regular consumption of hake reduces LDL cholesterol concentrations, waist circumference and blood pressure components of the metabolic syndrome. White Fish for Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome Study, Registered under ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01758601. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-12-18

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chronic asymmetric sacroileitis. Physicians should be aware of possible reactive arthritis after staphylococcal coagulase negative bacteremia.

  20. Risk factors for tuberculosis in inflammatory bowel disease: anti-tumor necrosis factor and hospitalization

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    Sabino Riestra

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine risk factors for active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods: Retrospective, case-control study at 4 referral hospitals in Spain. Cases developed tuberculosis after a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Controls were inflammatory bowel disease patients who did not develop tuberculosis. For each case, we randomly selected 3 controls matched for sex, age (within 5 years and time of inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis (within 3 years. Inflammatory bowel disease characteristics, candidate risk factors for tuberculosis and information about the tuberculosis episode were recorded. Multivariate analysis and a Chi-squared automatic interaction detector were used. Results: Thirty-four cases and 102 controls were included. Nine of the 34 cases developed active tuberculosis between 1989 and 1999, and 25 became ill between 2000 and 2012. Multivariate regression showed an association between active tuberculosis and anti-TNF (tumor necrosis factor therapy in the previous 12 months (OR 7.45; 95% CI, 2.39-23.12; p = 0.001; hospitalization in the previous 6 months (OR 4.38; 95% CI, 1.18-16.20; p = 0.027; and albumin levels (OR 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.95; p = 0.001. The median time between the start of biologic therapy and the onset of active tuberculosis was 13 (interquartile range, 1-58 months. Tuberculosis developed after a year of anti-TNF therapy in 53%, and late reactivation occurred in at least 3 of 8 patients. Conclusions: The main risks factors for developing tuberculosis were anti-TNF therapy and hospitalization. Over half the cases related to anti-TNF treatment occurred after a year.

  1. Incidence, risk factors and clinical course of pancreatic fluid collections in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mei Lan; Kim, Kook Hyun; Kim, Ho Gak; Han, Jimin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jung, Min Kyu; Cho, Chang Min; Kim, Tae Nyeun

    2014-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of other regional tissues or remote organ systems. Acute fluid collections and pseudocyst formation are the most frequent complications of acute pancreatitis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of pancreatic fluid collections and pseudocyst formation following acute pancreatitis. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in five participating centers with 302 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis from January 2011 to July 2012. The incidence of pancreatic fluid collections and pseudocyst was 42.7 and 6.3 %, respectively. Patients with fluid collections were significantly younger, compared to those without fluid collections (51.5 ± 15.9 vs. 60.4 ± 16.5 years, P = 0.000). The proportion of alcoholic etiology (54.3 %) in patients with fluid collections was significantly higher compared to other etiologies (P = 0.000). C-reactive protein (CRP) (48 h) was significantly higher in patients with fluid collections, compared to patients without fluid collections (39.2 ± 77.4 vs. 15.1 ± 36.2 mg/dL, P = 0.016). LDH (48 h) was significantly higher in patients with pseudocyst formation, compared to patients with complete resolution (1,317.6 ± 706.4 vs. 478.7 ± 190.5 IU/L, P = 0.000). Pancreatic fluid collections showed spontaneous resolution in 69.8 % (90/129) and 84.2 % of the pseudocysts disappeared or decreased in size during follow up. Age, CRP (48 h), and alcohol etiology are risk factors for pancreatic fluid collections. LDH (48 h) appears to be a risk factor for pseudocyst formation. Most pseudocysts showed a decrease in size or spontaneous resolution with conservative management.

  2. Pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome: Host factors in Down syndrome and the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, M.

    2013-01-01

    We find that Down syndrome is an important risk factor for developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children, but the reason why remains to be elucidated. In addition, we find several differences between adult and pediatric ARDS. The association between C-reactive protein (CRP)

  3. Prognostic significance of smoking in addition to established risk factors in patients with Dukes B and C colorectal cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, N; Xynos, I D; Amptulah, S; Karadima, M; Skopelitis, H; Tsavaris, N

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic significance of smoking in addition to established risk factors in patients with Dukes stage B and C colorectal cancer (CRC). 291 consecutive non-selected CRC patients were studied retrospectively. Twenty-three variables were examined using a regression statistical model to identify relevant prognostic factors related to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On multivariate analysis DFS was found to be negatively affected in patients with a smoking history of ≤10 pack-years vs. non-smokers (p<0.016). Additionally, performance status (PS)<90 (p<0.001), Dukes stage C (p<0.001) and elevated tumor markers (p<0.001) at the time of diagnosis were found to adversely affect DFS. Smoking also had a significant association with relapse. Patients with a smoking history of ≤10 pack-years had 2.45 (p<0.018) higher risk of recurrence compared to patients with no smoking history. OS was influenced by Karnofsky performance status (PS), Dukes stage, and elevated tumor markers. In particular patients with PS< 90 had a 4.69-fold higher risk of death (p<0.001) than patients with better PS. Stage C disease was associated with 2.27-fold higher risk of death (p<0.001) than stage B disease, and patients with elevated tumor markers at the time of diagnosis had 2.74-fold higher risk of death (p<0.014) when compared to those whose tumor markers were normal at presentation. Our study associates smoking and relapse incidence in non-clinical- trial CRC patients and reiterates the prognostic significance of PS, stage and tumor markers at the time of diagnosis.

  4. Seroprevalence and factors associated with hepatitis C coinfection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study estimated the hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence in a population of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected pregnant women, compared women who were positive or negative for HCV and described risk factors associated with HCV infection. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, case control study ...

  5. The value of C-reactive protein in emergency medicine

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    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is a commonly used tool in emergency department (ED, especially in febrile and infectious patients. It was identified in 1930 and was subsequently classified into an “acute phase protein”, an early indicator of infectious or inflammatory situations in the ED, CRP must be a diagnostic reference and no single value can be indicated to rule in or rule out a specific diagnosis or disease. CRP is a comprehensively assisted tool for evaluation and diagnosis of tissue damage (rheumatologic diseases, stroke, cancer, pancreatitis, burn injury, sepsis and gout and infection (urinary tract infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, meningitis and lung infection. It can be used for treatment monitoring and severity evaluation in pneumonia, pancreatitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, and urinary tract infections (UTI. Otherwise, it also plays the role of prognostic indicator of acute coronary syndrome. C-reactive protein adds little to the diagnosis of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and pancreatitis. A single CRP value should not straightly make the decision to treat these patients. That is, CRP has no role in diagnosing these clinical entities, and a normal CRP level should never delay antibiotic coverage in ED. Faster and more interpretable tools such as image studies (X-ray, sonography and computed tomography are available to help diagnose suspected cases of aortic dissection, appendicitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, pneumonia and stroke in ED.

  6. Sleep and cognitive performance: the role of income and respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Lori; Hinnant, J Benjamin; Buckhalt, Joseph; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2014-11-01

    A health disparities view suggests that low family income status acts as a risk factor for poor cognitive functioning. A biosystems view suggests that poor sleep and poor stress response system functioning are also risk factors. These views are rarely integrated to test multiplicative risk or protective effects from social-cultural and biological variables. We investigated interactions among familial income, children's sleep and respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity (RSA reactivity, indexing parasympathetic nervous system reactivity) in the prediction of cognitive performance of school-aged children. Participants were 282 children (146 boys; 35% African American and 65% European American; M age = 9.42 years, SD = .71). Mothers reported on family income. Children's sleep quality (efficiency) and duration (minutes) were assessed via a week of actigraphy. Children's RSA reactivity to an attention demanding and frustrating star tracing challenge was assessed in the lab. Children completed standardized cognitive assessments examining attention, processing speed, and crystallized cognitive functioning. Findings show that more optimal sleep efficiency and RSA reactivity interact to confer protection against poor cognitive performance, particularly for children from lower income homes. Results build on the literature and suggest that interac