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Sample records for ringdown spectroscopy crds

  1. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  2. Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide in humid air using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Karion, A.; Rella, C. W.; Winderlich, J.; Gerbig, C.; Filges, A.; Newberger, T.; Sweeney, C.; Tans, P. P.

    2013-04-01

    Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) in humid air have been made using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The measurements of CO mole fractions are determined from the strength of its spectral absorption in the near-infrared region (~1.57 μm) after removing interferences from adjacent carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) absorption lines. Water correction functions that account for the dilution and pressure-broadening effects as well as absorption line interferences from adjacent CO2 and H2O lines have been derived for CO2 mole fractions between 360-390 ppm and for reported H2O mole fractions between 0-4%. The line interference corrections are independent of CO mole fractions. The dependence of the line interference correction on CO2 abundance is estimated to be approximately -0.3 ppb/100 ppm CO2 for dry mole fractions of CO. Comparisons of water correction functions from different analyzers of the same type show significant differences, making it necessary to perform instrument-specific water tests for each individual analyzer. The CRDS analyzer was flown on an aircraft in Alaska from April to November in 2011, and the accuracy of the CO measurements by the CRDS analyzer has been validated against discrete NOAA/ESRL flask sample measurements made on board the same aircraft, with a mean difference between integrated in situ and flask measurements of -0.6 ppb and a standard deviation of 2.8 ppb. Preliminary testing of CRDS instrumentation that employs improved spectroscopic model functions for CO2, H2O, and CO to fit the raw spectral data (available since the beginning of 2012) indicates a smaller water vapor dependence than the models discussed here, but more work is necessary to fully validate the performance. The CRDS technique provides an accurate and low-maintenance method of monitoring the atmospheric dry mole fractions of CO in humid air streams.

  3. High-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, H.; Winderlich, J.; Gerbig, C.; Hoefer, A.; Rella, C. W.; Crosson, E. R.; Van Pelt, A. D.; Steinbach, J.; Kolle, O.; Beck, V.; Daube, B. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Chow, V. Y.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    High-accuracy continuous measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) during the BARCA (Balancao Atmosferico Regional de Carbono na Amazonia) phase B campaign in Brazil in May 2009 were accomplished using a newly available analyzer based on the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. This

  4. Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide in humid air using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Chen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of carbon monoxide (CO in humid air have been made using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique. The measurements of CO mole fractions are determined from the strength of its spectral absorption in the near-infrared region (~1.57 μm after removing interferences from adjacent carbon dioxide (CO2 and water vapor (H2O absorption lines. Water correction functions that account for the dilution and pressure-broadening effects as well as absorption line interferences from adjacent CO2 and H2O lines have been derived for CO2 mole fractions between 360–390 ppm and for reported H2O mole fractions between 0–4%. The line interference corrections are independent of CO mole fractions. The dependence of the line interference correction on CO2 abundance is estimated to be approximately −0.3 ppb/100 ppm CO2 for dry mole fractions of CO. Comparisons of water correction functions from different analyzers of the same type show significant differences, making it necessary to perform instrument-specific water tests for each individual analyzer. The CRDS analyzer was flown on an aircraft in Alaska from April to November in 2011, and the accuracy of the CO measurements by the CRDS analyzer has been validated against discrete NOAA/ESRL flask sample measurements made on board the same aircraft, with a mean difference between integrated in situ and flask measurements of −0.6 ppb and a standard deviation of 2.8 ppb. Preliminary testing of CRDS instrumentation that employs improved spectroscopic model functions for CO2, H2O, and CO to fit the raw spectral data (available since the beginning of 2012 indicates a smaller water vapor dependence than the models discussed here, but more work is necessary to fully validate the performance. The CRDS technique provides an accurate and low-maintenance method of monitoring the atmospheric dry mole fractions of CO in humid air streams.

  5. Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) as a probe of macromolecule adsorption kinetics at functionalized interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Michael A; de Cuendias, Anne; Gayet, Florence; Shirley, Ian M; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Haddleton, David M; Unwin, Patrick R

    2012-05-01

    Evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) has been employed to study the interfacial adsorption kinetics of coumarin-tagged macromolecules onto a range of functionalized planar surfaces. Such studies are valuable in designing polymers for complex systems where the degree of interaction between the polymer and surface needs to be tailored. Three tagged synthetic polymers with different functionalities are examined: poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) (PSPMA), and a mannose-modified glycopolymer. Adsorption transients at the silica/water interface are found to be characteristic for each polymer, and kinetics are deduced from the initial rates. The chemistry of the adsorption interfaces has been varied by, first, manipulation of silica surface chemistry via the bulk pH, followed by surfaces modified by poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA) and cellulose, giving five chemically different surfaces. Complementary atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging has been used for additional surface characterization of adsorbed layers and functionalized interfaces to allow adsorption rates to be interpreted more fully. Adsorption rates for PSPMA and the glycopolymer are seen to be highly surface sensitive, with significantly higher rates on cellulose-modified surfaces, whereas PAA shows a much smaller rate dependence on the nature of the adsorption surface.

  6. Detecting Hydrogen Chloride (HCl) in the Polluted Marine Boundary Layer Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlani, T.; Dawe, K.; VandenBoer, T. C.; Young, C.

    2017-12-01

    Oxidation initiated with chlorine atoms yields more ozone than oxidation initiated with hydroxyl radicals. Reasons for this are not fully understood, but the implications for mechanisms of oxidation chemistry are significant.1,2 Chlorine atoms have not been directly measured to date in the atmosphere and its abundance is usually inferred through steady-state approximations from all known formation and loss processes. A major reservoir for chlorine in the troposphere is by proton abstraction of organic compounds to form HCl.3 HCl can also be formed heterogeneously via acid displacement reactions with ubiquitously-found sodium chloride (NaCl) on solid surfaces with nitric acid (HNO3). The majority of the available chloride in the marine boundary layer comes from the sea salt in and around marine derived sea-spray aerosols. HCl is not a perfect sink and can react with hydroxyl radicals or be photolyzed to form chlorine atoms. The balance between loss and formation processes of chlorine atoms from HCl is highly dependent on many external factors, such as the wet and dry deposition rate of HCl. Measuring HCl in the gas and aerosol phase is important to the understanding of chlorine chemistry in the polluted marine boundary layer. HCl levels in the polluted marine boundary layer are typically between 100pptv-1ppbv,3 requiring the sensitive and selective detection capabilities of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS).4 We measured HCl using a Picarro CRDS in the polluted marine boundary layer for the first time. Measurements were conducted during April and May of 2017 in St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador. The performance of the instrument will be discussed, as well as observations of HCl in the context of local conditions. References1Osthoff, H. D. et al. Nat. Geosci 1, 324-328 (2008). 2Young, C. J. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 14, 3427-3440 (2014). 3Crisp, T. a et al. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos. 6897-6915 (2014). 4Hagen, C. L. et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 7, 345-357 (2014).

  7. High-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4 using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Chow

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available High-accuracy continuous measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4 during the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia phase B campaign in Brazil in May 2009 were accomplished using a newly available analyzer based on the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS technique. This analyzer was flown without a drying system or any in-flight calibration gases. Water vapor corrections associated with dilution and pressure-broadening effects for CO2 and CH4 were derived from laboratory experiments employing measurements of water vapor by the CRDS analyzer. Before the campaign, the stability of the analyzer was assessed by laboratory tests under simulated flight conditions. During the campaign, a comparison of CO2 measurements between the CRDS analyzer and a nondispersive infrared (NDIR analyzer on board the same aircraft showed a mean difference of 0.22±0.09 ppm for all flights over the Amazon rain forest. At the end of the campaign, CO2 concentrations of the synthetic calibration gases used by the NDIR analyzer were determined by the CRDS analyzer. After correcting for the isotope and the pressure-broadening effects that resulted from changes of the composition of synthetic vs. ambient air, and applying those concentrations as calibrated values of the calibration gases to reprocess the CO2 measurements made by the NDIR, the mean difference between the CRDS and the NDIR during BARCA was reduced to 0.05±0.09 ppm, with the mean standard deviation of 0.23±0.05 ppm. The results clearly show that the CRDS is sufficiently stable to be used in flight without drying the air or calibrating in flight and the water corrections are fully adequate for high-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4.

  8. High-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Winderlich, J.; Gerbig, C.; Hoefer, A.; Rella, C. W.; Crosson, E. R.; van Pelt, A. D.; Steinbach, J.; Kolle, O.; Beck, V.; Daube, B. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Chow, V. Y.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2010-03-01

    High-accuracy continuous measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) during the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) phase B campaign in Brazil in May 2009 were accomplished using a newly available analyzer based on the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. This analyzer was flown without a drying system or any in-flight calibration gases. Water vapor corrections associated with dilution and pressure-broadening effects for CO2 and CH4 were derived from laboratory experiments employing measurements of water vapor by the CRDS analyzer. Before the campaign, the stability of the analyzer was assessed by laboratory tests under simulated flight conditions. During the campaign, a comparison of CO2 measurements between the CRDS analyzer and a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer on board the same aircraft showed a mean difference of 0.22±0.09 ppm for all flights over the Amazon rain forest. At the end of the campaign, CO2 concentrations of the synthetic calibration gases used by the NDIR analyzer were determined by the CRDS analyzer. After correcting for the isotope and the pressure-broadening effects that resulted from changes of the composition of synthetic vs. ambient air, and applying those concentrations as calibrated values of the calibration gases to reprocess the CO2 measurements made by the NDIR, the mean difference between the CRDS and the NDIR during BARCA was reduced to 0.05±0.09 ppm, with the mean standard deviation of 0.23±0.05 ppm. The results clearly show that the CRDS is sufficiently stable to be used in flight without drying the air or calibrating in flight and the water corrections are fully adequate for high-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4.

  9. Feasibility Study of Using Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (SWIR-CRDS) for Biological Agent Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aker, Pam M.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Williams, Richard M.; Valentine, Nancy B.

    2007-10-01

    This project focused on determining the feasibility of using short wave infrared (SWIR) cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) as a means for real-time detection of biological aerosols. The first part of the project involved identifying biological agent signatures that could be detected with SWIR CRDS. After an exhaustive search of the open literature it was determined that whole biological spores and/or cells would not be good candidates for direct SWIR CRDS probing because they have no unique SWIR signatures. It was postulated that while whole cells or spores are not good candidates for SWIR CRDS detection, their pyrolysis break-down products might be. A literature search was then conducted to find biological pyrolysis products with low molecular weights and high symmetry since these species most likely would have overtone and combination vibrational bands that can be detected in the SWIR. It was determined that pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide were good candidates for evaluation. These molecules are formed when proteins and porphyrins, proteins and dipicolinic acid, and dipicolinic acid are pyrolyzed, respectively. The second part of the project involved measuring quantitative SWIR spectra of pyrrole, pyridine and picolinamide in PNNL’s FTIR Spectroscopy Laboratory. Spectral information about these molecules, in the vapor phase is sparse – there were only a few prior studies that measured line positions and no information on absorption cross sections. Absorption cross sections are needed in order to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity, and line position determines what type of laser will be needed for the sensor. The results of the spectroscopy studies allowed us to estimate the SWIR CRDS detection sensitivity for pyrrole to be 3 x 1012 molec cm-3 or 0.1 ppmv, and for pyridine it was 1.5 x 1015 molec cm-3 or 0.6 ppmv. These detection sensitivity limits are close what we have measured for ammonia. Given these detection limits we then estimated the

  10. Test/QA Plan for Verification of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy Systems for Ammonia Monitoring in Stack Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) technology test and quality assurance plan is to specify procedures for a verification test applicable to commercial cavity ringdown spectroscopy technologies. The purpose of the verification test is to evaluate the performa...

  11. Miniature Chemical Sensor Combining Molecular Recognition with Evanescent Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.; Meuse, Curtis W.

    2002-01-01

    To address the chemical sensing needs of DOE, a new class of chemical sensors is being developed that enables qualitative and quantitative, remote, real-time, optical diagnostics of chemical species in hazardous gas, liquid, and semi-solid phases by employing evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (EW-CRDS). The sensitivity of EW-CRDS was demonstrated previously under Project No.60231. The objective of this project is to enhance the range of application and selectivity of the technique by combining EW-CRDS with refractive-index-sensitive nanoparticle optics, molecular recognition (MR) chemistry, and by utilizing the polarization-dependence of EW-CRDS. Research Progress and Implications

  12. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  13. Plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy for analytical measurement: Progress and prospectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sida; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiaohe; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-01

    Plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a powerful absorption technique for analytical measurement. It combines the inherent advantages of high sensitivity, absolute measurement, and relative insensitivity to light source intensity fluctuations of the cavity ringdown technique with use of plasma as an atomization/ionization source. In this review, we briefly describe the background and principles of plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy(CRDS) technology, the instrumental components, and various applications. The significant developments of the plasma sources, lasers, and cavity optics are illustrated. Analytical applications of plasma-CRDS for elemental detection and isotopic measurement in atomic spectrometry are outlined in this review. Plasma-CRDS is shown to have a promising future for various analytical applications, while some further efforts are still needed in fields such as cavity design, plasma source design, instrumental improvement and integration, as well as potential applications in radical and molecular measurements.

  14. A Plasma Based OES-CRDS Dual-mode Portable Spectrometer for Trace Element Detection: Emission and Ringdown Measurements of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan; Wang, Chuji

    2012-10-01

    Design and development of a plasma based optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode portable spectrometer for in situ monitoring of trace elements is described. A microwave plasma torch (MPT) has been utilized, which serves both as an atomization and excitation source for the two modes, viz. OES and CRDS, of the spectrometer. Operation of both modes of the instrument is demonstrated with initial measurements of elemental mercury (Hg). A detection limit of 44 ng mL-1 for Hg at 253.65 nm was determined with the emission mode of the instrument. Severe radiation trapping of 253.65 nm line hampers the measurement of Hg in higher concentration region (> 50 μg ml-1). Therefore, a different wavelength, 365.01 nm, is suggested to measure Hg in that region. Ringdown measurements of the metastable 6s6p ^3P0 state of Hg in the plasma using a 404.65 nm palm size diode laser was conducted to demonstrate the CRDS mode of the instrument. Along with being portable, dual-mode, and self-calibrated, the instrument is capable of measuring a wide range of concentration ranging from sub ng mL-1 to several μg ml-1 for a number of elements.

  15. Plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy for analytical measurement: Progress and prospectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sida; Liu, Wei [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Analytical and Testing Center, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Xiaohe [College of Water Resources and Hydropower, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Duan, Yixiang, E-mail: yduan@scu.edu.cn [Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Analytical and Testing Center, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2013-07-01

    Plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a powerful absorption technique for analytical measurement. It combines the inherent advantages of high sensitivity, absolute measurement, and relative insensitivity to light source intensity fluctuations of the cavity ringdown technique with use of plasma as an atomization/ionization source. In this review, we briefly describe the background and principles of plasma-cavity ringdown spectroscopy(CRDS) technology, the instrumental components, and various applications. The significant developments of the plasma sources, lasers, and cavity optics are illustrated. Analytical applications of plasma-CRDS for elemental detection and isotopic measurement in atomic spectrometry are outlined in this review. Plasma-CRDS is shown to have a promising future for various analytical applications, while some further efforts are still needed in fields such as cavity design, plasma source design, instrumental improvement and integration, as well as potential applications in radical and molecular measurements. - Highlights: • Plasma-based cavity ringdown spectroscopy • High sensitivity and high resolution • Elemental and isotopic measurements.

  16. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Goeroge P.; Winstead, Christopher B.

    2001-01-01

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the absorbed signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time

  17. High sensitivity detection of NO2 employing cavity ringdown spectroscopy and an external cavity continuously tunable quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2010-09-10

    A trace gas sensor for the detection of nitrogen dioxide based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) and a continuous wave external cavity tunable quantum cascade laser operating at room temperature has been designed, and its features and performance characteristics are reported. By measuring the ringdown times of the cavity at different concentrations of NO(2), we report a sensitivity of 1.2 ppb for the detection of NO(2) in Zero Air.

  18. Optical feedback in dfb quantum cascade laser for mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terabayashi, Ryohei, E-mail: terabayashi.ryouhei@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Sonnenschein, Volker, E-mail: volker@nagoya-u.jp; Tomita, Hideki, E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp; Hayashi, Noriyoshi, E-mail: hayashi.noriyoshi@h.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kato, Shusuke, E-mail: katou.shuusuke@f.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Jin, Lei, E-mail: kin@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Yamanaka, Masahito, E-mail: yamanaka@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Nishizawa, Norihiko, E-mail: nishizawa@nuee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan); Sato, Atsushi, E-mail: atsushi.sato@sekisui.com; Nozawa, Kohei, E-mail: kohei.nozawa@sekisui.com; Hashizume, Kenta, E-mail: kenta.hashizume@sekisui.com; Oh-hara, Toshinari, E-mail: toshinari.ohara@sekisui.com [Sekisui Medical Co., Ltd., Drug Development Solutions Center (Japan); Iguchi, Tetsuo, E-mail: t-iguchi@nucl.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University, Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    A simple external optical feedback system has been applied to a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB QCL) for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and a clear effect of feedback was observed. A long external feedback path length of up to 4m can decrease the QCL linewidth to around 50kHz, which is of the order of the transmission linewidth of our high finesse ring-down cavity. The power spectral density of the transmission signal from high finesse cavity reveals that the noise at frequencies above 20kHz is reduced dramatically.

  19. Quantifying Carbon-14 for Biology Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    McCartt, A. Daniel; Ognibene, Ted J.; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    A cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument was developed using mature, robust hardware for the measurement of carbon-14 in biological studies. The system was characterized using carbon-14 elevated glucose samples and returned a linear response up to 387 times contemporary carbon-14 concentrations. Carbon-14 free and contemporary carbon-14 samples with varying carbon-13 concentrations were used to assess the method detection limit of approximately one-third contemporary carbon-14 levels...

  20. Deep-ultraviolet cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneep, M.C.; Hannemann, S.; van Duijn, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitive optical detection technique of cavity ringdown spectroscopy is extended to the wavelength range 197-204 nm. A novel design narrowband Fourier-transform-limited laser is used, and the technique is applied to gas-phase extinction measurements in CO

  1. Sensitive and ultra-fast species detection using pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) is used to develop a novel, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity diagnostic for measuring species concentrations in shock tube experiments. The diagnostic is demonstrated by monitoring trace concentrations of ethylene in the mid-IR region near 949.47 cm-1. Each ringdown measurement is completed in less than 1 μs and the time period between successive pulses is 10 μs. The high sensitivity diagnostic has a noise-equivalent detection limit of 1.08 x 10-5 cm-1 which enables detection of 15 ppm ethylene at fuel pyrolysis conditions (1845 K and 2 bar) and 294 ppb ethylene under ambient conditions (297 K and 1 bar). To our knowledge, this is the first successful application of the cavity ringdown method to the measurement of species time-histories in a shock tube. © 2015 OSA.

  2. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  3. Determination of dissolved methane in natural waters using headspace analysis with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Hannah M.; Shiller, Alan M., E-mail: alan.shiller@usm.edu

    2015-01-26

    Highlights: • A method for determining low nanomolar dissolved CH{sub 4} was developed. • The methane detection utilizes cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). • Use of CRDS requires less time, materials and labor than typical of GC analysis. • Relative standard deviations of ∼4% were achieved at low nM CH{sub 4}. • Applications to seawater and river water are presented. - Abstract: Methane (CH{sub 4}) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) but is vastly understudied in comparison to carbon dioxide. Sources and sinks to the atmosphere vary considerably in estimation, including sources such as fresh and marine water systems. A new method to determine dissolved methane concentrations in discrete water samples has been evaluated. By analyzing an equilibrated headspace using laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), low nanomolar dissolved methane concentrations can be determined with high reproducibility (i.e., 0.13 nM detection limit and typical 4% RSD). While CRDS instruments cost roughly twice that of gas chromatographs (GC) usually used for methane determination, the process presented herein is substantially simpler, faster, and requires fewer materials than GC methods. Typically, 70-mL water samples are equilibrated with an equivalent amount of zero air in plastic syringes. The equilibrated headspace is transferred to a clean, dry syringe and then drawn into a Picarro G2301 CRDS analyzer via the instrument’s pump. We demonstrate that this instrument holds a linear calibration into the sub-ppmv methane concentration range and holds a stable calibration for at least two years. Application of the method to shipboard dissolved methane determination in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as river water is shown. Concentrations spanning nearly six orders of magnitude have been determined with this method.

  4. Miniature chemical sensor combining molecular recognition with evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C. R.

    2004-01-01

    A new chemical detection technology has been realized that addresses DOE environmental management needs. The new technology is based on a variant of the sensitive optical absorption technique, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Termed evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), the technology employs a miniature solid-state optical resonator having an extremely high Q-factor as the sensing element, where the high-Q is achieved by using ultra-low-attenuation optical materials, ultra-smooth surfaces, and ultra-high reflectivity coatings, as well as low-diffraction-loss designs. At least one total-internal reflection (TIR) mirror is integral to the resonator permitting the concomitant evanescent wave to probe the ambient environment. Several prototypes have been designed, fabricated, characterized, and applied to chemical detection. Moreover, extensions of the sensing concept have been explored to enhance selectivity, sensitivity, and range of application. Operating primarily in the visible and near IR regions, the technology inherently enables remote detection by optical fiber. Producing 11 archival publications, 5 patents, 19 invited talks, 4 conference proceedings, a CRADA, and a patent-license agreement, the project has realized a new chemical detection technology providing >100 times more sensitivity than comparable technologies, while also providing practical advantages

  5. Time resolved super continuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for multicomponent gas detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaema, Walter Morinobu

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a variation of the technique CRDS (Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) to obtain simultaneously a multicomponent absorption spectrum in a broad visible range. This new approach uses the Supercontinuum (SC) spectrum (resulting from irradiation of nonlinear media by femtosecond lasers, or simply generated by compact sources) as a light source to illuminate the cavity. In this context it is described the features of the modules assembling a MC-SC-CRDS (Multicomponent Supercontinuum Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy): a set of high reflectivity mirrors, the resonant cavity and the detection system. Some problems related to the multimode excitation, stray light, effective use of the dynamic range of the detector, the poor resolution of the instrument to resolve narrow absorption lines are issued. We present the absorption spectra of H 2 O (polyads 4υ, 4υ + δ) and O 2 (spin-forbidden b-X branch) measured simultaneously by this technique in the visible range and a comparison with the absorption lines based on HITRAN database is made to demonstrate the functionality of this method. (author)

  6. Development of a pulsed laser with emission at 1053 nm for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a pulsed and Q-switched laser resonator was developed using the double-beam mode-controlling technique. A Nd:LiYF4 crystal with 0,8mol% of doping concentration was used to generate a giant pulse with duration of 5,5 ns (FWHM), 1,2 mJ of energy and 220 kW peak power for the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The CRDS technique is used to measure absorption spectra for gases, liquids and solids. With the CRDS technique it is possible to measure losses with high degree of accuracy, underscoring the sensitivity that is confirmed by the use of mirrors with high reflectivity. With this technique, the losses by reflection and scattering of transparent materials were evaluated. By calibrating the resonant cavity, it was possible to measure the losses in the samples with resolution of 0,045%, the maximum being reached by 0,18%. The calibration was possible because there was obtained to measure a decay time of approximately 20 μs with the empty cavity. Besides was obtained a method for determining the refractive index of transparent materials with accuracy of five decimals. (author)

  7. An external-cavity quantum cascade laser operating near 5.2 µm combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy for multi-component chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Banik, Gourab; Maity, Abhijit; Som, Suman; Pal, Mithun; Pradhan, Manik

    2018-04-01

    We report on the performance of a widely tunable continuous wave mode-hop-free external-cavity quantum cascade laser operating at λ ~ 5.2 µm combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique for high-resolution molecular spectroscopy. The CRDS system has been utilized for simultaneous and molecule-specific detection of several environmentally and bio-medically important trace molecular species such as nitric oxide, nitrous oxide, carbonyl sulphide and acetylene (C2H2) at ultra-low concentrations by probing numerous rotationally resolved ro-vibrational transitions in the mid-IR spectral region within a relatively small spectral range of ~0.035 cm-1. This continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade laser-based multi-component CRDS sensor with high sensitivity and molecular specificity promises applications in environmental sensing as well as non-invasive medical diagnosis through human breath analysis.

  8. Physical and chemical study of single aerosol particles using optical trapping cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    scope that views the trapped particle walking through the ringdown beam step by step. (b) An image that shows the traces of the particle (MWCNT... walking through the RD beam . 5 a b c Fig.3 The OT-CRDS single particle scope views oscillations of a trapped particle. (a) Image of a trapped...and walking single carbon- nanotube particles of ?50 µm in size and viewing those properties via changes of ringdown time. This single- aerosol

  9. Toward real-time measurement of atmospheric mercury concentrations using cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Faïn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS is a direct absorption technique that utilizes path lengths up to multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell and has a significantly higher sensitivity than conventional absorption spectroscopy. This tool opens new prospects for study of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0 because of its high temporal resolution and reduced sample volume requirements (<0.5 l of sample air. We developed a new sensor based on CRDS for measurement of (Hg0 mass concentration. Sensor characteristics include sub-ng m−3 detection limit and high temporal resolution using a frequency-doubled, tuneable dye laser emitting pulses at ~253.65 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz. The dye laser incorporates a unique piezo element attached to its tuning grating allowing it to tune the laser on and off the Hg0 absorption line on a pulse-to-pulse basis to facilitate differential absorption measurements. Hg0 absorption measurements with this CRDS laboratory prototype are highly linearly related to Hg0 concentrations determined by a Tekran 2537B analyzer over an Hg0 concentration range from 0.2 ng m−3 to 573 ng m−3, implying excellent linearity of both instruments. The current CRDS instrument has a sensitivity of 0.10 ng Hg0 m−3 at 10-s time resolution. Ambient-air tests showed that background Hg0 levels can be detected at low temporal resolution (i.e., 1 s, but also highlight a need for high-frequency (i.e., pulse-to-pulse differential on/off-line tuning of the laser wavelength to account for instabilities of the CRDS system and variable background absorption interferences. Future applications may include ambient Hg0 flux measurements with eddy covariance techniques, which require measurements of Hg0 concentrations with sub-ng m−3 sensitivity and sub-second time

  10. Measurement of absolute concentrations of minor reactive species in flames by cavity ring down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS) method; Mesure de concentrations absolues d'especes reactives minoritaires dans les flammes par la technique d'absorption cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, X.

    2000-11-15

    Combustion processes, which represent our main source of energy today, arouse still numerous questioning. It likes essentially the complexity of the involved chemical mechanisms as well as in the inherent difficulty to the study of an environment which is the field of several thousand simultaneous reactions. Now, even if powerful models exist, allowing the simulation of complex chemical systems, they can not predict any process of combustion and the experimental approach of these ones is still essential for the improvement of the existing models. In particular, the quantitative measure of minor species in flames constitutes a fundamental stage in the validation of the chemical mechanisms with high temperature. It is in this optics that we developed a new technique for flames study, the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). This technique (appeared to the end of the 80's (O' Keefe and Deacon [1988]) within the framework of a spectroscopic study) is similar to a very high sensibility absorption method. The principle of the CRDS technique is based on the measure of the lifetime of an laser pulse injected in an optical cavity within which is an absorbing sample. in this report, we show the interest and the potentialities of the CRDS for the study of homogeneous flames. To do it, we clarify in detail the principle of the CRDS and the care to be taken for the measure of absolute concentrations. Besides, a comparison of the absolute concentrations profiles obtained by CRDS (of CN and CH notably) in a CH{sub 4} /O{sub 2} flame seeded with NO, with those stemming from the modelling by means of the software PREMIX is also presented. The very good agreement which reveals this comparison tends to show that the CRDS, because of its high sensibility and its direct quantitative character, is one of the most efficient methods for the measure of minor species absolute concentrations in homogeneous flames. (author)

  11. Infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy with a CW diode laser system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemerik, M.M.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Doebele, H.F.; Muraoka, K.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the first measurements with our CRDS setup. Although the diode laser system was out of order, we were able to test the most important parts with the use of a CO laser. The first results show a ring-down time of 1.54 ~is, which is in perfect agreement with the predicted reflectivity of

  12. Study of atmospheric air AC glow discharge using optical emission spectroscopy and near infrared diode laser cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nimisha; Wang, Chuji; Dibble, Theodore S.

    2008-11-01

    AC glow discharges were generated in atmospheric pressure by applying high voltage AC in the range of 3500-15000 V to a pair of stainless steel electrodes separated by an air gap. The discharges were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and continuous wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). The electronic (Tex), vibrational (Tv), and rotational (Tr) temperatures were measured. Spectral stimulations of the emission spectra of several vibronic bands of the 2^nd positive system of N2, the 1^st negative system of N2^+, the (0,1,2,3-0) bands of NO (A-X), and the (0-0) band of OH (A-X), which were obtained under various plasma operating conditions, show that Tr, Tv, and Tex are in the ranges of 2000 - 3800, 3500 - 5000, and 6000 - 10500^ K, respectively. Emission spectra show that OH concentration increases while NO concentration decreases with an increase of electrode spacing. The absorption spectra of H2O and OH overtone in the near infrared (NIR) were measured by the cw-CRDS with a telecommunications diode laser at wavelength near 1515 nm.

  13. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2012-09-01

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 109 (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 106 (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p 3P0 is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 1012 (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min-1; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements has been found to increase the detection limit to 131 ppb. These elements in lower

  14. S-Nitrosothiols Observed Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Mary Lynn; Gaston, Benjamin M.; Lehmann, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    The biological importance of nitric oxide has been known for nearly forty years due to its role in cardiovascular and nervous signaling. The main carrier molecules, s-nitrosothiols (RSNOs), are of additional interest due to their role in signaling reactions. Additionally, these compounds are related to several diseases including muscular dystrophy, stroke, myocardial infarction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. One of the main barriers to elucidating the role of these RSNOs is the low (nanomolar) concentration present in samples of low volume (typically ˜100 μL). To this end we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer tuned to observe ^{14}NO and ^{15}NO released from cell growth samples. To decrease the limit of detection we have implemented a laser locking scheme employing Zeeman modulation of NO in a reference cell and have tuned the polarization of the laser using a half wave plate to optimize the polarization for the inherent birefringence of the CRDS mirrors. Progress toward measuring RSNO concentration in biological samples will be presented.

  15. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yver Kwok, C.; Laurent, O.; Guemri, A.; Philippon, C.; Wastine, B.; Rella, C. W.; Vuillemin, C.; Truong, F.; Delmotte, M.; Kazan, V.; Darding, M.; Lebègue, B.; Kaiser, C.; Xueref-Rémy, I.; Ramonet, M.

    2015-09-01

    To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments) and in the field (15 instruments). The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  16. Comprehensive laboratory and field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring H2O, CO2, CH4 and CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yver Kwok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop an accurate measurement network of greenhouse gases, instruments in the field need to be stable and precise and thus require infrequent calibrations and a low consumption of consumables. For about 10 years, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS analyzers have been available that meet these stringent requirements for precision and stability. Here, we present the results of tests of CRDS instruments in the laboratory (47 instruments and in the field (15 instruments. The precision and stability of the measurements are studied. We demonstrate that, thanks to rigorous testing, newer models generally perform better than older models, especially in terms of reproducibility between instruments. In the field, we see the importance of individual diagnostics during the installation phase, and we show the value of calibration and target gases that assess the quality of the data. Finally, we formulate recommendations for use of these analyzers in the field.

  17. Eddy covariance flux measurements of gaseous elemental mercury using cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Ashley M; Moore, Christopher W; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Kljun, Natascha; Obrist, Daniel

    2015-02-03

    A newly developed pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) concentrations at high temporal resolution (25 Hz) was used to successfully conduct the first eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of GEM. GEM is the main gaseous atmospheric form, and quantification of bidirectional exchange between the Earth's surface and the atmosphere is important because gas exchange is important on a global scale. For example, surface GEM emissions from natural sources, legacy emissions, and re-emission of previously deposited anthropogenic pollution may exceed direct primary anthropogenic emissions. Using the EC technique for flux measurements requires subsecond measurements, which so far has not been feasible because of the slow time response of available instrumentation. The CRDS system measured GEM fluxes, which were compared to fluxes measured with the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) and a dynamic flux chamber (DFC). Measurements took place near Reno, NV, in September and October 2012 encompassing natural, low-mercury (Hg) background soils and Hg-enriched soils. During nine days of measurements with deployment of Hg-enriched soil in boxes within 60 m upwind of the EC tower, the covariance of GEM concentration and vertical wind speed was measured, showing that EC fluxes over an Hg-enriched area were detectable. During three separate days of flux measurements over background soils (without Hg-enriched soils), no covariance was detected, indicating fluxes below the detection limit. When fluxes were measurable, they strongly correlated with wind direction; the highest fluxes occurred when winds originated from the Hg-enriched area. Comparisons among the three methods showed good agreement in direction (e.g., emission or deposition) and magnitude, especially when measured fluxes originated within the Hg-enriched soil area. EC fluxes averaged 849 ng m(-2) h(-1), compared to DFC fluxes of 1105 ng m(-2) h(-1) and MBR fluxes

  18. Study of the effective inverse photon efficiency using optical emission spectroscopy combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingwei; Li, Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Zhiwei; Feng, Chunlei; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    The hydrocarbon impurities formation is inevitable due to wall erosion in a long pulse high performance scenario with carbon-based plasma facing materials in fusion devices. The standard procedure to determine the chemical erosion yield in situ is by means of inverse photon efficiency D/XB. In this work, the conversion factor between CH4 flux and photon flux of CH A → X transition (effective inverse photon efficiency PE-1) was measured directly using a cascaded arc plasma simulator with argon/methane. This study shows that the measured PE-1 is different from the calculated D/XB. We compared the photon flux measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calculated by electron impact excitation of CH(X) which was diagnosed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). It seems that charge exchange and dissociative recombination processes are the main channels of CH(A) production and removal which lead to the inconsistency of PE -1 and D/XB at lower temperature. Meanwhile, the fraction of excited CH(A) produced by dissociative recombination processes was investigated, and we found it increased with Te in the range from 4% to 13% at Te definition instead of D/XB since the electron impact excitation is not the only channel of CH(A) production. These results have an effect on evaluating the yield of chemical erosion in divertor of fusion device.

  19. Pressure optimization of an EC-QCL based cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument for exhaled NO detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sheng; Han, Yanling; Li, Bincheng

    2018-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled breath has gained increasing interest in recent years mainly driven by the clinical need to monitor inflammatory status in respiratory disorders, such as asthma and other pulmonary conditions. Mid-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using an external cavity, widely tunable continuous-wave quantum cascade laser operating at 5.3 µm was employed for NO detection. The detection pressure was reduced in steps to improve the sensitivity, and the optimal pressure was determined to be 15 kPa based on the fitting residual analysis of measured absorption spectra. A detection limit (1σ, or one time of standard deviation) of 0.41 ppb was experimentally achieved for NO detection in human breath under the optimized condition in a total of 60 s acquisition time (2 s per data point). Diurnal measurement session was conducted for exhaled NO. The experimental results indicated that mid-infrared CRDS technique has great potential for various applications in health diagnosis.

  20. An acetone breath analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy: an initial test with human subjects under various situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Surampudi, Anand B

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a portable breath acetone analyzer using cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). The instrument was initially tested by measuring the absorbance of breath gases at a single wavelength (266 nm) from 32 human subjects under various conditions. A background subtraction method, implemented to obtain absorbance differences, from which an upper limit of breath acetone concentration was obtained, is described. The upper limits of breath acetone concentration in the four Type 1 diabetes (T1D) subjects, tested after a 14 h overnight fast, range from 0.80 to 3.97 parts per million by volume (ppmv), higher than the mean acetone concentration (0.49 ppmv) in non-diabetic healthy breath reported in the literature. The preliminary results show that the instrument can tell distinctive differences between the breath from individuals who are healthy and those with T1D. On-line monitoring of breath gases in healthy people post-exercise, post-meals and post-alcohol-consumption was also conducted. This exploratory study demonstrates the first CRDS-based acetone breath analyzer and its potential application for point-of-care, non-invasive, diabetic monitoring

  1. The application of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to atmospheric and physical chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, James Mcchesney

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) is a sensitive form of absorption spectroscopy. Thousands of reflections between two multilayer dielectric mirrors give CRDS an extremely long path-length. The rate of decay of the signal is measured instead of the magnitude of attenuation, so laser intensity fluctuations do not affect the measurement. At 405.23 nm, NO2 had a detection limit of 150 ppt/10 s (3sigma). Particles were removed by a 0.45 mum filter. Water vapor had a 2.8 ppb NO 2 equivalent interference for 1% water vapor in air, with a simple quadratic dependence on water monomer concentration that might have been due to water dimer. Removing NO2 with an annular denuder coated with guiacol and sodium hydroxide, or reacting the NO2 and NO2 with ozone, allows for an interference measurement. An NOy measurement can be obtained after thermal decomposition of higher oxides and ozone. The interference was easier to accommodate than the quenching found in chemiluminescence. The water dimer hypothesis was supported by temperature studies resulting in thermodynamics consistent with theory. The oscillator strength at 409 nm was roughly three orders of magnitude stronger than the best available calculations, leading to a serious unanswered question of the possible source of the additional enhancement. Measurements at 532 nm found a similar response, and others have measured a response at 440 nm, suggesting the 6th, 7th and 8th overtones of water dimer occur at ˜532 nm, ˜440 nm and 409 nm with a similar magnitude that is possibly larger than the 3rd and 4th overtones that have not been detectable. The excellent NO2 detection sensitivity enabled the measurement of NO2 emitted by ambient particles from thermal decomposition. Gas phase interferences were removed with radial aerosol denuders. PANs, ANs, and ammonium nitrate were measured sequentially at 150°C, 215°C and 250°C by the emitted NO2. This technique was applied to ambient air during the Study of Organic Aerosols in

  2. System for δ13C-CO2 and xCO2 analysis of discrete gas samples by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Dane; Bodé, Samuel; Boeckx, Pascal

    2017-11-01

    A method was devised for analysing small discrete gas samples (50 mL syringe) by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). Measurements were accomplished by inletting 50 mL syringed samples into an isotopic-CO2 CRDS analyser (Picarro G2131-i) between baseline readings of a reference air standard, which produced sharp peaks in the CRDS data feed. A custom software script was developed to manage the measurement process and aggregate sample data in real time. The method was successfully tested with CO2 mole fractions (xCO2) ranging from 20 000 ppm and δ13C-CO2 values from -100 up to +30 000 ‰ in comparison to VPDB (Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite). Throughput was typically 10 samples h-1, with 13 h-1 possible under ideal conditions. The measurement failure rate in routine use was ca. 1 %. Calibration to correct for memory effects was performed with gravimetric gas standards ranging from 0.05 to 2109 ppm xCO2 and δ13C-CO2 levels varying from -27.3 to +21 740 ‰. Repeatability tests demonstrated that method precision for 50 mL samples was ca. 0.05 % in xCO2 and 0.15 ‰ in δ13C-CO2 for CO2 compositions from 300 to 2000 ppm with natural abundance 13C. Long-term method consistency was tested over a 9-month period, with results showing no systematic measurement drift over time. Standardised analysis of discrete gas samples expands the scope of application for isotopic-CO2 CRDS and enhances its potential for replacing conventional isotope ratio measurement techniques. Our method involves minimal set-up costs and can be readily implemented in Picarro G2131-i and G2201-i analysers or tailored for use with other CRDS instruments and trace gases.

  3. 4D Density Determination of NH Radicals in an MSE Microplasma Combining Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Martin; Schenk, Andreas; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    2010-10-01

    An application of microplasmas is surface modification under mild conditions and of small, well defined areas. For this, an understanding of the plasma composition is of importance. First results of our work on the production and detection of NH radicals in a capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) microplasma are presented. A microstructured comb electrode was used to generate a glow discharge in a hydrogen/nitrogen gas mixture by applying 13.56 MHz RF voltage. The techniques of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are used for space and time resolved, quantitative detection of the NH radical in the plasma. The rotational temperature was determined to be 820 K and, the density 5.1×1012 cm3. Also, time dependent behaviour of the NH production was observed.

  4. 4D Density Determination of NH Radicals in an MSE Microplasma Combining Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Martin; Schenk, Andreas; Gericke, Karl-Heinz

    2010-01-01

    An application of microplasmas is surface modification under mild conditions and of small, well defined areas. For this, an understanding of the plasma composition is of importance. First results of our work on the production and detection of NH radicals in a capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF) microplasma are presented. A microstructured comb electrode was used to generate a glow discharge in a hydrogen/nitrogen gas mixture by applying 13.56 MHz RF voltage. The techniques of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) are used for space and time resolved, quantitative detection of the NH radical in the plasma. The rotational temperature was determined to be 820 K and, the density 5.1x10 12 cm 3 . Also, time dependent behaviour of the NH production was observed.

  5. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Gaseous Fission Products Trace Measurements in Sodium Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Pailloux, A.; Doizi, D.; Aoust, G.; Jeannot, J.-P.

    2013-06-01

    Safety and availability are key issues of the generation IV reactors. Hence, the three radionuclide confinement barriers, including fuel cladding, must stay tight during the reactor operation. During the primary gaseous failure, fission products xenon and krypton are released. Their fast and sensitive detection guarantees the first confinement barrier tightness. In the frame of the French ASTRID project, an optical spectroscopy technique - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) - is investigated for the gaseous fission products measurement. A dedicated CRDS set-up is needed to detect the rare gases with a commercial laser. Indeed, the CRDS is coupled to a glow discharge plasma, which generates a population of metastable atoms. The xenon plasma conditions are optimized to 110 Pa and 1.3 W (3 mA). The production efficiency of metastable Xe is then 0.8 %, stable within 0.5% during hours. The metastable number density is proportional to the xenon over argon molar fraction. The spectroscopic parameters of the strong 823.16 nm xenon transition are calculated and/or measured in order to optimize the fit of the experimental spectra and make a quantitative measurement of the metastable xenon. The CRDS is coupled to the discharge cell. The laser intensity inside the cavity is limited by the optical saturation process, resulting from the strong optical pumping of the metastable state. The resulting weak CRDS signal requires a fast and very sensitive photodetector. A 600 ppt xenon molar fraction was measured by CRDS. With the present set-up, the detection limits are estimated from the baseline noise to approximately 20 ppt for each even isotope, 60 ppt for the 131 Xe and 55 ppt for the 129 Xe. This sensitivity matches the specifications required for gaseous leak measurement; approximately 100 ppt for 133 Xe (4 GBq/m 3 ) and 10 ppb for stable isotopes. The odd isotopes are selectively measured, whereas the even isotopes overlap, a spectroscopic feature that applies for stable or

  6. A Novel Method for Analysis of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentration and δ13C by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E.; Gonneea, M. E.; Boze, L. G.; Casso, M.; Pohlman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is the largest pool of carbon in the oceans and is where about half of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are being sequestered. Determining the concentration and stable carbon isotopic content (δ13C) of DIC allows us to delineate carbon sources that contribute to marine DIC. A simple and reliable method for measuring DIC concentration and δ13C can be used to apportion contributions from external sources and identify effects from biogeochemical reactions that contribute or remove DIC. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a discrete sample analysis module (DSAM) that interfaces to a Picarro G-2201i cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS, Picarro Inc.) to analyze CO2 and methane concentrations and δ13C from discrete gas samples. In this study, we adapted the USGS DSAM-CRDS analysis system to include an AutoMate prep device (Automate FX, Inc.) for analysis of DIC concentration and δ13C from aqueous samples. The Automate prep device was modified to deliver CO2 extracted from DIC to the DSAM, which conditions and transfers the gas to the CRDS. LabVIEW software (National Instruments) triggers the Automate Prep device, controls the DSAM and collects data from the CRDS. CO2 mass concentration data are obtained by numerical integration of the CO2 volumetric concentrations output by the CRDS and subsequent comparison to standard materials. CO2 carbon isotope values from the CRDS (iCO2) are converted to δ13C values using a slope and offset correction calibration procedure. The system design and operation was optimized using sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) standards and a certified reference material. Surface water and pore water samples collected from Sage Lot Pond, a salt marsh in Cape Cod MA, have been analyzed for concentration by coulometry and δ13C by isotope ratio mass spectrometry and will be used to validate the DIC-DSAM-CRDS method for field applications.

  7. System for δ13C–CO2 and xCO2 analysis of discrete gas samples by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Dickinson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A method was devised for analysing small discrete gas samples (50 mL syringe by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS. Measurements were accomplished by inletting 50 mL syringed samples into an isotopic-CO2 CRDS analyser (Picarro G2131-i between baseline readings of a reference air standard, which produced sharp peaks in the CRDS data feed. A custom software script was developed to manage the measurement process and aggregate sample data in real time. The method was successfully tested with CO2 mole fractions (xCO2 ranging from  <  0.1 to  >  20 000 ppm and δ13C–CO2 values from −100 up to +30 000 ‰ in comparison to VPDB (Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite. Throughput was typically 10 samples h−1, with 13 h−1 possible under ideal conditions. The measurement failure rate in routine use was ca. 1 %. Calibration to correct for memory effects was performed with gravimetric gas standards ranging from 0.05 to 2109 ppm xCO2 and δ13C–CO2 levels varying from −27.3 to +21 740 ‰. Repeatability tests demonstrated that method precision for 50 mL samples was ca. 0.05 % in xCO2 and 0.15 ‰ in δ13C–CO2 for CO2 compositions from 300 to 2000 ppm with natural abundance 13C. Long-term method consistency was tested over a 9-month period, with results showing no systematic measurement drift over time. Standardised analysis of discrete gas samples expands the scope of application for isotopic-CO2 CRDS and enhances its potential for replacing conventional isotope ratio measurement techniques. Our method involves minimal set-up costs and can be readily implemented in Picarro G2131-i and G2201-i analysers or tailored for use with other CRDS instruments and trace gases.

  8. Model-Based, Closed-Loop Control of PZT Creep for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A D; Ognibene, T J; Bench, G; Turteltaub, K W

    2014-09-01

    Cavity ring-down spectrometers typically employ a PZT stack to modulate the cavity transmission spectrum. While PZTs ease instrument complexity and aid measurement sensitivity, PZT hysteresis hinders the implementation of cavity-length-stabilized, data-acquisition routines. Once the cavity length is stabilized, the cavity's free spectral range imparts extreme linearity and precision to the measured spectrum's wavelength axis. Methods such as frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy have successfully mitigated PZT hysteresis, but their complexity limits commercial applications. Described herein is a single-laser, model-based, closed-loop method for cavity length control.

  9. Evaluation of factors affecting accurate measurements of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 by wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, H.; Tanimoto, H.; Tohjima, Y.; Mukai, H.; Nojiri, Y.; Katsumata, K.; Rella, C.

    2012-07-01

    We examined potential interferences from water vapor and atmospheric background gases (N2, O2, and Ar), and biases by isotopologues of target species, on accurate measurement of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 by means of wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS). Variations in the composition of the background gas substantially impacted the CO2 and CH4 measurements: the measured amounts of CO2 and CH4 decreased with increasing N2 mole fraction, but increased with increasing O2 and Ar, suggesting that the pressure-broadening effects (PBEs) increased as Ar < O2 < N2. Using these experimental results, we inferred PBEs for the measurement of synthetic standard gases. The PBEs were negligible (up to 0.05 ppm for CO2 and 0.01 ppb for CH4) for gas standards balanced with purified air, although the PBEs were substantial (up to 0.87 ppm for CO2 and 1.4 ppb for CH4) for standards balanced with synthetic air. For isotopic biases on CO2 measurements, we compared experimental results and theoretical calculations, which showed excellent agreement within their uncertainty. We derived empirical correction functions for water vapor for three WS-CRDS instruments (Picarro EnviroSense 3000i, G-1301, and G-2301). Although the transferability of the functions was not clear, no significant difference was found in the water vapor correction values among these instruments within the typical analytical precision at sufficiently low water concentrations (< 0.3%V for CO2 and < 0.4%V for CH4). For accurate measurements of CO2 and CH4 in ambient air, we concluded that WS-CRDS measurements should be performed under complete dehumidification of air samples, or moderate dehumidification followed by application of a water vapor correction function, along with calibration by natural air-based standard gases or purified air-balanced synthetic standard gases with isotopic correction.

  10. Black hole spectroscopy: Systematic errors and ringdown energy estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibhav, Vishal; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Khanna, Gaurav

    2018-02-01

    The relaxation of a distorted black hole to its final state provides important tests of general relativity within the reach of current and upcoming gravitational wave facilities. In black hole perturbation theory, this phase consists of a simple linear superposition of exponentially damped sinusoids (the quasinormal modes) and of a power-law tail. How many quasinormal modes are necessary to describe waveforms with a prescribed precision? What error do we incur by only including quasinormal modes, and not tails? What other systematic effects are present in current state-of-the-art numerical waveforms? These issues, which are basic to testing fundamental physics with distorted black holes, have hardly been addressed in the literature. We use numerical relativity waveforms and accurate evolutions within black hole perturbation theory to provide some answers. We show that (i) a determination of the fundamental l =m =2 quasinormal frequencies and damping times to within 1% or better requires the inclusion of at least the first overtone, and preferably of the first two or three overtones; (ii) a determination of the black hole mass and spin with precision better than 1% requires the inclusion of at least two quasinormal modes for any given angular harmonic mode (ℓ , m ). We also improve on previous estimates and fits for the ringdown energy radiated in the various multipoles. These results are important to quantify theoretical (as opposed to instrumental) limits in parameter estimation accuracy and tests of general relativity allowed by ringdown measurements with high signal-to-noise ratio gravitational wave detectors.

  11. Rapid-swept CW cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for carbon isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Watanabe, Kenichi; Takiguchi, Yu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of developing a portable system for an in field isotope analysis, we investigate an isotope analysis based on rapid-swept CW cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy, in which the concentration of a chemical species is derived from its photo absorbance. Such a system can identify the isotopomer and still be constructed as a quite compact system. We have made some basic experimental measurements of the overtone absorption lines of carbon dioxide ( 12 C 16 O 2 , 13 C 16 O 2 ) by rapid-swept cavity ring-down spectroscopy with a CW infrared diode laser at 6,200 cm -1 (1.6 μm). The isotopic ratio has been obtained as (1.07±0.13)x10 -2 , in good agreement with the natural abundance within experimental uncertainty. The detection sensitivity in absorbance has been estimated to be 3x10 -8 cm -1 . (author)

  12. A free-flowing soap film combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a detection system for liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsang, Markus; Welsch, Thomas; Jones, Harold

    2010-05-07

    We have shown that a free-flowing soap film has sufficiently high-quality optical properties to allow it to be used in the cavity of a ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). The flow rates required to maintain a stable soap film were similar to those used in liquid chromatography and thus allowed interfacing with an HPLC system for use as an optical detector. We have investigated the properties of the system in a relevant analytical application. The soap film/CRDS combination was used at 355 nm as a detector for the separation of a mixture of nitroarenes. These compounds play a role in the residue analysis of areas contaminated with explosives and their decomposition products. In spite of the short absorption path length (9 microm) obtained by the soap film, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allowed a limit of detection of 4 x 10(-6) in absorption units (AU) or less than 17 fmol in the detection volume to be achieved. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Near Infrared Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Isotopic Analyses of CH4 on Future Martian Surface Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Mahaffy P.; Holmes, V.; Burris, J.; Morey, P.; Lehmann, K.K.; Lollar, B. Sherwood; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Onstott, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A compact Near Infrared Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (near-IR-cw-CRDS) was developed as a candidate for future planetary surface missions. The optical cavity was made of titanium with rugged quartz windows to protect the delicate super cavity from the harsh environmental changes that it would experience during space flight and a Martian surface mission. This design assured the long-term stability of the system. The system applied three distributed feedback laser diodes (DFB-LD), two of which were tuned to the absorption line peaks of (sup 12)CH4 and (sup 13)CH4 at 6046.954 inverse centimeters and 6049.121 inverse centimeters, respectively. The third laser was tuned to a spectral-lines-free region for measuring the baseline cavity loss. The multiple laser design compensated for typical baseline drift of a CRDS system and, thus, improved the overall precision. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was used instead of an Acousto-Optic Module (AOM) to initiate the cavity ring-down events. It maintained high acquisition rates such as AOM, but consumed less power. High data acquisition rates combined with improved long-term stability yielded precise isotopic measurements in this near-IR region even though the strongest CH4 absorption line in this region is 140 times weaker than that of the strongest mid-IR absorption band. The current system has a detection limit of 1.4 times 10( sup –12) inverse centimeters for (sup 13)CH4. This limit corresponds to approximately 7 parts per trillion volume of CH4 at 100 Torrs. With no further improvements the detection limit of our current near IR-cw-CRDS at an ambient Martian pressure of approximately 6 Torrs (8 millibars) would be 0.25 parts per billion volume for one 3.3 minute long analysis.

  14. Photodissociation of 1,2-dibromoethylene at 248 nm: Br2 molecular elimination probed by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Lee, Ping-Chen; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Sun, B J; Chang, A H H

    2008-06-02

    The Br2 elimination channel is probed for 1,2-C2H2Br2 in the B(3)Pi(+)ou-X(1)Sigma(+)g transition upon irradiation at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). The nascent vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is obtained to be 0.7+/-0.2, thus indicating that the Br2 fragment is produced in hot vibrational states. The obtained Br2 products are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground-state cis isomer via four-center elimination or from cis/trans isomers via three-center elimination, each mechanism involving a transition state that has a Br-Br distance much larger than that of ground state Br2. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathways that lead to Br2 elimination may proceed either through the electronic ground state by internal conversion or through the triplet state by intersystem crossing. Temperature-dependence measurements are examined, thereby supporting the pathway that involves internal conversion--which was excluded previously by using product translational spectroscopy (PTS). The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.120.1, being substantially contributed by the ground-state Br2 product. The discrepancy of this value from that (of 0.2) obtained by PTS may rise from the lack of measurements in probing the triplet-state Br2 product.

  15. Calibrated high-precision 17O-excess measurements using cavity ring-down spectroscopy with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Steig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available High-precision analysis of the 17O / 16O isotope ratio in water and water vapor is of interest in hydrological, paleoclimate, and atmospheric science applications. Of specific interest is the parameter 17O excess (Δ17O, a measure of the deviation from a~linear relationship between 17O / 16O and 18O / 16O ratios. Conventional analyses of Δ17O of water are obtained by fluorination of H2O to O2 that is analyzed by dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS. We describe a new laser spectroscopy instrument for high-precision Δ17O measurements. The new instrument uses cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS with laser-current-tuned cavity resonance to achieve reduced measurement drift compared with previous-generation instruments. Liquid water and water-vapor samples can be analyzed with a better than 8 per meg precision for Δ17O using integration times of less than 30 min. Calibration with respect to accepted water standards demonstrates that both the precision and the accuracy of Δ17O are competitive with conventional IRMS methods. The new instrument also achieves simultaneous analysis of δ18O, Δ17O and δD with precision of < 0.03‰, < 0.02 and < 0.2‰, respectively, based on repeated calibrated measurements.

  16. An inter-comparison of HO2 measured by Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion and Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy in the Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, A.; Onel, L. C.; Gianella, M.; Ronnie, G.; Aguila, A. L.; Hancock, G.; Whalley, L.; Seakins, P. W.; Ritchie, G.; Heard, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    HO2 is an important species in the atmosphere, as it is involved in the HOx radical reaction cycle that is critical to the oxidation of atmospheric pollutants and the ultimate cleaning of the troposphere. One of the most widely utilised methods to measure HO2 is Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE), which indirectly measures HO2 by sampling into a low pressure cell and titrating HO2 with NO to produce OH that is then detected by Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is an indirect and non-absolute detection technique that requires careful calibration to convert the measured signal into [HO2], which involves the photolysis of H2O at 185 nm to produce OH and HO2, and is subject to 30 % errors at 2σ level. The work presented here shows the validation of the FAGE technique and its calibration procedure through inter-comparison experiments between the non-absolute FAGE technique and Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS), an absolute absorption based method. The CRDS system was used to excite the first O-H overtone of the HO2 absorption band at 1506.43 nm, and features a cavity length of 1.2 m and a total path of 60 km. The experiments were performed inside the 2.25 m3 stainless steel Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC), using a synthetic air mixture at 150 and 1000 mbar of pressure and 298 K. HO2 was generated by photolysis of Cl2 at 365 nm in the presence of CH3OH and O2, and the [HO2] was monitored using both instruments. Additionally, monitoring the temporal decay of HO2 during its self-reaction provided an alternative calibration method for the FAGE instrument, and allowed the absorption cross section of HO2 at 1506.43 nm, σHO2, to be measured. FAGE calibration factors determined through the second order decays of HO2 at 1000 mbar agreed within 8 % of the H2O photolysis method, and determinations of σHO2 at 150 and 1000 mbar agree with previously reported data within 20 % and 12 % respectively. [HO2] correlation plots between the two

  17. Probing the ignored elimination channel of Br2 in the 248 nm photodissociation of 1,1-dibromoethylene by cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Chen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Hsiao, Ming-Kai; Lin, King-Chuen; Huang, C H; Chang, A H H

    2009-03-09

    In the photodissociation of 1,1-C(2)H(2)Br(2) at 248 nm, the Br(2) elimination channel is probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy (CRDS). In terms of spectral simulation, the vibrational population ratio of Br(2)(v = 1)/Br(2)(v = 0) is found to be 0.55+/-0.05, which indicates that the Br(2) fragment is vibrationally hot. The rotational population is thermally equilibrated with a Boltzmann temperature of 349+/-38 K. According to ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained fragments are anticipated to result primarily from photodissociation of the ground electronic state that undergoes 1) H migration followed by three-center elimination, and 2) isomerization forming either trans- or cis-1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2) from which Br(2) is eliminated. RRKM calculations predict that the Br(2) dissociation rates through the ground singlet state prevail over those through the triplet state. Measurements of temperature and Ar pressure dependence are examined to support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. The quantum yield for the Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.07+/-0.04. This result is smaller than that obtained in 1,2-C(2)H(2)Br(2), probably because the dissociation rates are slowed in the isomerization stage.

  18. New on-line method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-01-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us to simultaneously measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the on-line water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δD reliability. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δD and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed into a copper tube, attached to the line and after system stabilisation is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain δD and δ18O isotopic composition of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5‰ for δD and 0.4‰ for δ18O for water measurement for an extended range (-210 to 0‰ for δD and -27 to 0‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique.

  19. New online method for water isotope analysis of speleothem fluid inclusions using laser absorption spectroscopy (WS-CRDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, S.; Fleitmann, D.; Leuenberger, M.

    2014-07-01

    A new online method to analyse water isotopes of speleothem fluid inclusions using a wavelength scanned cavity ring down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) instrument is presented. This novel technique allows us simultaneously to measure hydrogen and oxygen isotopes for a released aliquot of water. To do so, we designed a new simple line that allows the online water extraction and isotope analysis of speleothem samples. The specificity of the method lies in the fact that fluid inclusions release is made on a standard water background, which mainly improves the δ D robustness. To saturate the line, a peristaltic pump continuously injects standard water into the line that is permanently heated to 140 °C and flushed with dry nitrogen gas. This permits instantaneous and complete vaporisation of the standard water, resulting in an artificial water background with well-known δ D and δ18O values. The speleothem sample is placed in a copper tube, attached to the line, and after system stabilisation it is crushed using a simple hydraulic device to liberate speleothem fluid inclusions water. The released water is carried by the nitrogen/standard water gas stream directly to a Picarro L1102-i for isotope determination. To test the accuracy and reproducibility of the line and to measure standard water during speleothem measurements, a syringe injection unit was added to the line. Peak evaluation is done similarly as in gas chromatography to obtain &delta D; and δ18O isotopic compositions of measured water aliquots. Precision is better than 1.5 ‰ for δ D and 0.4 ‰ for δ18O for water measurements for an extended range (-210 to 0 ‰ for δ D and -27 to 0 ‰ for δ18O) primarily dependent on the amount of water released from speleothem fluid inclusions and secondarily on the isotopic composition of the sample. The results show that WS-CRDS technology is suitable for speleothem fluid inclusion measurements and gives results that are comparable to the isotope ratio mass

  20. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy for enhanced detection of surface binding under flow injection analysis conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Sneppen, L.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.; Ubachs, W.

    2008-01-01

    In evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy, one (or more) of the re°ections inside the cavity is a total internal re°ection (TIR) event. Only the evanescent wave associated with this TIR is being used for prob-ing the sample. This technique is therefore highly surface-speci-c and attractive

  1. Measurements of the Weak UV Absorptions of Isoprene and Acetone at 261–275 nm Using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy for Evaluation of a Potential Portable Ringdown Breath Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang, Chuji

    2013-01-01

    The weak absorption spectra of isoprene and acetone have been measured in the wavelength range of 261–275 nm using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. The measured absorption cross-sections of isoprene in the wavelength region of 261–266 nm range from 3.65 × 10−21 cm2·molecule−1 at 261 nm to 1.42 × 10−21 cm2·molecule−1 at 266 nm; these numbers are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature. In the longer wavelength range of 270–275 nm, however, where attractive applications using a single wavelength compact diode laser operating at 274 nm is located, isoprene has been reported in the literature to have no absorption (too weak to be detected). Small absorption cross-sections of isoprene in this longer wavelength region are measured using cavity ringdown spectroscopy for the first time in this work, i.e., 6.20 × 10−23 cm2·molecule−1 at 275 nm. With the same experimental system, wavelength-dependent absorption cross-sections of acetone have also been measured. Theoretical detection limits of isoprene and comparisons of absorbance of isoprene, acetone, and healthy breath gas in this wavelength region are also discussed. PMID:23803787

  2. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado, Utah, and Texas using mobile isotopic methane analysis based on Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Chris; Winkler, Renato; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Crosson, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation, provided that the fugitive emissions of methane are kept under control. A key step in assessing these emissions in a given region is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis, using the isotopic carbon signature to distinguish between natural gas and landfills or ruminants. We present measurements of methane using a mobile spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in three intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah, and the Barnett Shale in Texas. Performance of the CRDS isotope analyzer is presented, including precision, calibration, stability, and the potential for measurement bias due to other atmospheric constituents. Mobile isotope measurements of individual sources and in the nocturnal boundary layer have been combined to establish the fraction of the observed methane emissions that can be attributed to natural gas activities. The fraction of total methane emissions in the Denver-Julesburg basin attributed to natural gas emissions is 78 +/- 13%. In the Uinta basin, which has no other significant sources of methane, the fraction is 96% +/- 15%. In addition, results from the Barnett shale are presented, which includes a major urban center (Dallas / Ft. Worth). Methane emissions in this region are spatially highly heterogeneous. Spatially-resolved isotope and concentration measurements are interpreted using a simple emissions model to

  3. CRDS with a VECSEL for broad-band high sensitivity spectroscopy in the 2.3 μm window

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čermák, P., E-mail: cermak@fmph.uniba.sk [University Grenoble Alpes, LIPhy, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LIPhy, UMR 5588, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská Dolina, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Chomet, B. [IES, CNRS, UMR5214, University Montpellier, F-34000 Montpellier (France); Innoptics, Institut d’Optique d’Aquitaine Rue François Mitterrand, 33400 Talence (France); Ferrieres, L.; Denet, S.; Lecocq, V. [Innoptics, Institut d’Optique d’Aquitaine Rue François Mitterrand, 33400 Talence (France); Vasilchenko, S. [University Grenoble Alpes, LIPhy, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LIPhy, UMR 5588, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Laboratory of Molecular Spectroscopy, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB Russian Academy of Science, 1 Academician Zuev Square, 634021 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A. [University Grenoble Alpes, LIPhy, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LIPhy, UMR 5588, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Myara, M.; Cerutti, L.; Garnache, A. [IES, CNRS, UMR5214, University Montpellier, F-34000 Montpellier (France)

    2016-08-15

    The integration of an industry ready packaged Sb-based Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting-Laser (VECSEL) into a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) is presented. The instrument operates in the important 2.3 μm atmospheric transparency window and provides a high sensitivity (minimum detectable absorption of 9 × 10{sup −11} cm{sup −1}) over a wide spectra range. The VECSEL performances combine a large continuous tunability over 120 cm{sup −1} around 4300 cm{sup −1} together with a powerful (∼5 mW) TEM{sub 00} diffraction limited beam and linewidth at MHz level (for 1 ms of integration time). The achieved performances are illustrated by high sensitivity recordings of the very weak absorption spectrum of water vapor in the region. The developed method gives potential access to the 2-2.7 μm range for CRDS.

  4. CRDS with a VECSEL for broad-band high sensitivity spectroscopy in the 2.3 μm window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čermák, P; Chomet, B; Ferrieres, L; Vasilchenko, S; Mondelain, D; Kassi, S; Campargue, A; Denet, S; Lecocq, V; Myara, M; Cerutti, L; Garnache, A

    2016-08-01

    The integration of an industry ready packaged Sb-based Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting-Laser (VECSEL) into a Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) is presented. The instrument operates in the important 2.3 μm atmospheric transparency window and provides a high sensitivity (minimum detectable absorption of 9 × 10(-11) cm(-1)) over a wide spectra range. The VECSEL performances combine a large continuous tunability over 120 cm(-1) around 4300 cm(-1) together with a powerful (∼5 mW) TEM00 diffraction limited beam and linewidth at MHz level (for 1 ms of integration time). The achieved performances are illustrated by high sensitivity recordings of the very weak absorption spectrum of water vapor in the region. The developed method gives potential access to the 2-2.7 μm range for CRDS.

  5. Effect of air composition (N2, O2, Ar, and H2O) on CO2 and CH4 measurement by wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy: calibration and measurement strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, H.; Tanimoto, H.; Tohjima, Y.; Mukai, H.; Nojiri, Y.; Katsumata, K.; Rella, C. W.

    2012-11-01

    We examined potential interferences from water vapor and atmospheric background gases (N2, O2, and Ar), and biases by isotopologues of target species, on accurate measurement of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 by means of wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS). Changes of the background gas mole fractions in the sample air substantially impacted the CO2 and CH4 measurements: variation of CO2 and CH4 due to relative increase of each background gas increased as Ar < O2 < N2, suggesting similar relation for the pressure-broadening effects (PBEs) among the background gas. The pressure-broadening coefficients due to variations in O2 and Ar for CO2 and CH4 are empirically determined from these experimental results. Calculated PBEs using the pressure-broadening coefficients are linearly correlated with the differences between the mole fractions of O2 and Ar and their ambient abundances. Although the PBEs calculation showed that impact of natural variation of O2 is negligible on the CO2 and CH4 measurements, significant bias was inferred for the measurement of synthetic standard gases. For gas standards balanced with purified air, the PBEs were estimated to be marginal (up to 0.05 ppm for CO2 and 0.01 ppb for CH4) although the PBEs were substantial (up to 0.87 ppm for CO2 and 1.4 ppb for CH4) for standards balanced with synthetic air. For isotopic biases on CO2 measurements, we compared experimental results and theoretical calculations, which showed excellent agreement within their uncertainty. We derived instrument-specific water correction functions empirically for three WS-CRDS instruments (Picarro EnviroSense 3000i, G-1301, and G-2301), and evaluated the transferability of the water correction function from G-1301 among these instruments. Although the transferability was not proven, no significant difference was found in the water vapor correction function for the investigated WS-CRDS instruments as well as the instruments reported in the past studies

  6. Effect of air composition (N2, O2, Ar, and H2O on CO2 and CH4 measurement by wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy: calibration and measurement strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Katsumata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined potential interferences from water vapor and atmospheric background gases (N2, O2, and Ar, and biases by isotopologues of target species, on accurate measurement of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 by means of wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS. Changes of the background gas mole fractions in the sample air substantially impacted the CO2 and CH4 measurements: variation of CO2 and CH4 due to relative increase of each background gas increased as Ar 2 2, suggesting similar relation for the pressure-broadening effects (PBEs among the background gas. The pressure-broadening coefficients due to variations in O2 and Ar for CO2 and CH4 are empirically determined from these experimental results. Calculated PBEs using the pressure-broadening coefficients are linearly correlated with the differences between the mole fractions of O2 and Ar and their ambient abundances. Although the PBEs calculation showed that impact of natural variation of O2 is negligible on the CO2 and CH4 measurements, significant bias was inferred for the measurement of synthetic standard gases. For gas standards balanced with purified air, the PBEs were estimated to be marginal (up to 0.05 ppm for CO2 and 0.01 ppb for CH4 although the PBEs were substantial (up to 0.87 ppm for CO2 and 1.4 ppb for CH4 for standards balanced with synthetic air. For isotopic biases on CO2 measurements, we compared experimental results and theoretical calculations, which showed excellent agreement within their uncertainty. We derived instrument-specific water correction functions empirically for three WS-CRDS instruments (Picarro EnviroSense 3000i, G-1301, and G-2301, and evaluated the transferability of the water correction function from G-1301 among these instruments. Although the transferability was not proven, no significant difference was found in the water vapor correction function for the investigated WS-CRDS instruments as well as the instruments reported in the past

  7. An intercomparison of HO2 measurements by fluorescence assay by gas expansion and cavity ring-down spectroscopy within HIRAC (Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Onel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The HO2 radical was monitored simultaneously using two independent techniques in the Leeds HIRAC (Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry atmospheric simulation chamber at room temperature and total pressures of 150 and 1000 mbar of synthetic air. In the first method, HO2 was measured indirectly following sampling through a pinhole expansion to 3 mbar when sampling from 1000 mbar and to 1 mbar when sampling from 150 mbar. Subsequent addition of NO converted it to OH, which was detected via laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using the FAGE (fluorescence assay by gas expansion technique. The FAGE method is used widely to measure HO2 concentrations in the field and was calibrated using the 185 nm photolysis of water vapour in synthetic air with a limit of detection at 1000 mbar of 1.6 × 106 molecule cm−3 for an averaging time of 30 s. In the second method, HO2 was measured directly and absolutely without the need for calibration using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, with the optical path across the entire ∼ 1.4 m width of the chamber, with excitation of the first O-H overtone at 1506.43 nm using a diode laser and with a sensitivity determined from Allan deviation plots of 3.0 × 108 and 1.5 × 109 molecule cm−3 at 150 and 1000 mbar respectively, for an averaging period of 30 s. HO2 was generated in HIRAC by the photolysis of Cl2 using black lamps in the presence of methanol in synthetic air and was monitored by FAGE and CRDS for ∼ 5–10 min periods with the lamps on and also during the HO2 decay after the lamps were switched off. At 1000 mbar total pressure the correlation plot of [HO2]FAGE versus [HO2]CRDS gave an average gradient of 0.84 ± 0.08 for HO2 concentrations in the range ∼ 4–100 × 109 molecule cm−3, while at 150 mbar total pressure the corresponding gradient was 0.90 ± 0.12 on average for HO2 concentrations in the range

  8. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy for Carbon Isotope Analysis with 2 μm Diode Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromoto, K.; Tomita, H.; Watanabe, K.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2009-01-01

    We have made a prototype based on CRDS with 2 μm diode laser for carbon isotope analysis of CO 2 in air. The carbon isotope ratio was obtained to be (1.085±0.012)x10 -2 which shows good agreement with the isotope ratio measured by the magnetic sector-type mass spectrometer within uncertainty. Hence, we demonstrated the carbon isotope analysis based on CRDS with 2 μm tunable diode laser.

  9. Validation of spectroscopic gas analyzer accuracy using gravimetric standard gas mixtures: impact of background gas composition on CO2 quantitation by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong Sik; Park, Miyeon; Lee, Jinbok; Lee, Jeongsoon

    2017-12-01

    The effect of background gas composition on the measurement of CO2 levels was investigated by wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectrometry (WS-CRDS) employing a spectral line centered at the R(1) of the (3 00 1)III ← (0 0 0) band. For this purpose, eight cylinders with various gas compositions were gravimetrically and volumetrically prepared within 2σ = 0.1 %, and these gas mixtures were introduced into the WS-CRDS analyzer calibrated against standards of ambient air composition. Depending on the gas composition, deviations between CRDS-determined and gravimetrically (or volumetrically) assigned CO2 concentrations ranged from -9.77 to 5.36 µmol mol-1, e.g., excess N2 exhibited a negative deviation, whereas excess Ar showed a positive one. The total pressure broadening coefficients (TPBCs) obtained from the composition of N2, O2, and Ar thoroughly corrected the deviations up to -0.5 to 0.6 µmol mol-1, while these values were -0.43 to 1.43 µmol mol-1 considering PBCs induced by only N2. The use of TPBC enhanced deviations to be corrected to ˜ 0.15 %. Furthermore, the above correction linearly shifted CRDS responses for a large extent of TPBCs ranging from 0.065 to 0.081 cm-1 atm-1. Thus, accurate measurements using optical intensity-based techniques such as WS-CRDS require TPBC-based instrument calibration or use standards prepared in the same background composition of ambient air.

  10. Quantification of Atmospheric Formaldehyde by Near-Infrared Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, C.; Hoffnagle, J.; Fleck, D.; Kim-Hak, D.

    2017-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an important species in atmospheric chemistry, especially in urban environments, where it is a decay product of methane and volatile hydrocarbons. It is also a toxic, carcinogenic compound that can contaminate ambient air from incomplete combustion, or outgassing of commercial products such as adhesives used to fabricate plywood or to affix indoor carpeting. Formaldehyde has a clearly resolved ro-vibrational absorption spectrum that is well-suited to optical analysis of formaldehyde concentration. We describe an instrument based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy for the quantitative analysis of formaldehyde concentration in ambient air. The instrument has a precision (1-sigma) of about 1 ppb at a measurement rate of 1 second, and provides measurements of less than 100 ppt with averaging. The instrument provides stable measurements (drift < 1 ppb) over long periods of time (days). The instrument has been ruggedized for mobile applications, and with a fast response time of a couple of seconds, it is suitable for ground-based vehicle deployments for fenceline monitoring of formaldehyde emissions. In addition, we report on ambient atmospheric measurements at a 10m urban tower, which demonstrate the suitability of the instrument for applications in atmospheric chemistry.

  11. A cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time Hall thruster erosion measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. C.; Huang, W.; Tao, L.; Yamamoto, N.; Yalin, A. P.; Gallimore, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    A continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy sensor for real-time measurements of sputtered boron from Hall thrusters has been developed. The sensor uses a continuous-wave frequency-quadrupled diode laser at 250 nm to probe ground state atomic boron sputtered from the boron nitride insulating channel. Validation results from a controlled setup using an ion beam and target showed good agreement with a simple finite-element model. Application of the sensor for measurements of two Hall thrusters, the H6 and SPT-70, is described. The H6 was tested at power levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 kW. Peak boron densities of 10 ± 2 × 10 14 m −3 were measured in the thruster plume, and the estimated eroded channel volume agreed within a factor of 2 of profilometry. The SPT-70 was tested at 600 and 660 W, yielding peak boron densities of 7.2 ± 1.1 × 10 14 m −3 , and the estimated erosion rate agreed within ∼20% of profilometry. Technical challenges associated with operating a high-finesse cavity in the presence of energetic plasma are also discussed

  12. Quantification of hydrogen sulfide by near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, C.; Hoffnagle, J.; Wahl, E. H.; Kim-Hak, D.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogen Sulfide is an important atmospheric sulfur species. Primary natural terrestrial sources of atmospheric H2S are volcanos and wetlands; primary anthropogenic sources are landfills; wastewater treatment facilities; sewer systems; natural gas extraction, production, and distribution; and paper manufacturing. The human nose is very sensitive to H2S and other sulfur species, leading to a significant negative impact of industrial processes in which H2S is emitted into the atmosphere. However, there is a relative lack of instrumentation capable of detecting and quantifying H2S at ppb levels and below. We describe an instrument based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy for the quantitative analysis of hydrogen sulfide concentration in ambient air. In addition to H2S, the instrument measures water vapor and methane. The instrument has a precision (1-sigma) of about 1 ppb at a measurement rate of 1 second, and provides measurements of less than 100 ppt with averaging. The instrument provides stable measurements (drift < 1 ppb) over long periods of time (days), and has a response time of just a couple of seconds. We report on ambient atmospheric measurements at a 10m urban tower, which demonstrate the suitability of the instrument for applications in urban sulfur emissions. This instrument is also suitable for soil flux measurements in a recirculating chamber, with predicted detection limit of about 0.6 μg H2S / m2 / hr and 0.45 μg CH4 / m2 / hr in a 10-minute chamber closure time.

  13. Detection of new VOC compounds with iCRDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Leen, J. B.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    The instrument at Los Gatos Research (a member of ABB Inc.) which is based on incoherent cavity ringdown spectroscopy (iCRDS) that operates in the mid-infrared (bands from 860-1060 cm-1 or 970-1280 cm-1) is capable of detecting a broad range of VOCs, in situ, continuously and autonomously, for example, BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene), including differentiation of xylene isomers. Previously, we have demonstrated the measurement of trichloroethylene (TCE) in zero air with a precision of 0.17 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes), and the measurement of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with a precision of 0.15 ppb (1σ in 4 minutes). Both of these measured precisions exceed the EPA's commercial building action limit, which for TCE is 0.92 ppb (5 µg/m3) and for PCE is 0.29 ppb (2 µg/m3). This ability has been fully demonstrated by the deployment of the instrument to the Superfund site at Moffett Naval Air Station in Mountain View, California where contaminated ground water results in vapor intrusion of TCE and PCE. For two weeks, the instrument operated continuously and autonomously, successfully measuring TCE and PCE concentrations in both the breathing zone and steam tunnel air, in excellent agreement with previous TO-15 data. In this poster, we present laboratory performance data targeting new toxic molecules with the same instrument. We have demonstrated the measurement of trichlorofluolomethane (Freon 11) in zero air with a precision of 1 ppb (3σ at 1075cm-1), and hexafluoropropene in zero air with a precision of about 0.3 ppb (3σ per spectrum). The iCRDS instrument has shown the ability to continuously and autonomously measure sub-ppb levels of toxic VOCs in the lab/field, offering an unprecedented picture of the short term dynamics associated with vapor intrusion and ground water pollution.

  14. Water stable isotope measurements of Antarctic samples by means of IRMS and WS-CRDS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Marzia; Bonazza, Mattia; Braida, Martina; Flora, Onelio; Dreossi, Giuliano; Stenni, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    In the last years in the scientific community there has been an increasing interest for the application of stable isotope techniques to several environmental problems such as drinking water safeguarding, groundwater management, climate change, soils and paleoclimate studies etc. For example, the water stable isotopes, being natural tracers of the hydrological cycle, have been extensively used as tools to characterize regional aquifers and to reconstruct past temperature changes from polar ice cores. Here the need for improvements in analytical techniques: the high request for information calls for technologies that can offer a great quantity of analyses in short times and with low costs. Furthermore, sometimes it is difficult to obtain big amount of samples (as is the case for Antarctic ice cores or interstitial water) preventing the possibility to replicate the analyses. Here, we present oxygen and hydrogen measurements performed on water samples covering a big range of isotopic values (from very negative antarctic precipitation to mid-latitude precipitation values) carried out with both the conventional Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) technique and with a new method based on laser absorption techniques, the Wavelenght Scanned Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (WS-CRDS). This study is focusing on improving the precision of the measurements carried out with WS-CRDS in order to extensively apply this method to Antarctic ice core paleoclimate studies. The WS-CRDS is a variation of the CRDS developed in 1988 by O'Keef and Deacon. In CRDS a pulse of light goes through a box with high reflective inner surfaces; when there is no sample in the box the light beam doesn't find any obstacle in its path, but the reflectivity of the walls is not perfect so eventually there will be an absorption of the light beam; when the sample is injected in the box there is absorption and the difference between the time of absorption without and with sample is proportional to the quantity

  15. Sensitive and ultra-fast species detection using pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    of ethylene in the mid-IR region near 949.47 cm-1. Each ringdown measurement is completed in less than 1 μs and the time period between successive pulses is 10 μs. The high sensitivity diagnostic has a noise-equivalent detection limit of 1.08 x 10-5 cm-1 which

  16. Continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy based on the control of cavity reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixin; Ma, Weiguang; Fu, Xiaofang; Tan, Wei; Zhao, Gang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Jia, Suotang

    2013-07-29

    A new type of continuous-wave cavity ringdown spectrometer based on the control of cavity reflection for trace gas detection was designed and evaluated. The technique separated the acquisitions of the ringdown event and the trigger signal to optical switch by detecting the cavity reflection and transmission, respectively. A detailed description of the time sequence of the measurement process was presented. In order to avoid the wrong extraction of ringdown time encountered accidentally in fitting procedure, the laser frequency and cavity length were scanned synchronously. Based on the statistical analysis of measured ringdown times, the frequency normalized minimum detectable absorption in the reflection control mode was 1.7 × 10(-9)cm(-1)Hz(-1/2), which was 5.4 times smaller than that in the transmission control mode. However the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption spectrum was only 3 times improved since the etalon effect existed. Finally, the peak absorption coefficients of the C(2)H(2) transition near 1530.9nm under different pressures showed a good agreement with the theoretical values.

  17. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and cavity ring-down (CRD) absorption spectroscopy of oil-contaminated jet fuel using fiber-optic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Hengameh; Barnes, Jack A; Dudelzak, Alexander E; Loock, Hans-Peter; Waechter, Helen

    2012-06-21

    Excitation emission matrix (EEM) and cavity ring-down (CRD) spectral signatures have been used to detect and quantitatively assess contamination of jet fuels with aero-turbine lubricating oil. The EEM spectrometer has been fiber-coupled to permit in situ measurements of jet turbine oil contamination of jet fuel. Parallel Factor (PARAFAC) analysis as well as Principal Component Analysis and Regression (PCA/PCR) were used to quantify oil contamination in a range from the limit of detection (10 ppm) to 1000 ppm. Fiber-loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a pulsed 355 nm laser was used to quantify the oil contamination in the range of 400 ppm to 100,000 ppm. Both methods in combination therefore permit the detection of oil contamination with a linear dynamic range of about 10,000.

  18. Laser Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Bililign

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lasers and laser spectroscopic techniques have been extensively used in several applications since their advent, and the subject has been reviewed extensively in the last several decades. This review is focused on three areas of laser spectroscopic applications in atmospheric and environmental sensing; namely laser-induced fluorescence (LIF, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, and photoluminescence (PL techniques used in the detection of solids, liquids, aerosols, trace gases, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs.

  19. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H3+ -dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H 3 + -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77–200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H 3 + on a relative population of para-H 2 in a source H 2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H 3 + ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H 3 + ions in a specific nuclear spin state. (paper)

  20. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H_3^+ -dominated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-04-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H_3^+ -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77-200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H_3^+ on a relative population of para-H2 in a source H2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H_3^+ ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H_3^+ ions in a specific nuclear spin state.

  1. Real-Tme Boron Nitride Erosion Measurements of the HiVHAc Thruster via Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian C.; Yalin, Azer P.; Gallimore, Alec; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani

    2013-01-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was used to make real-time erosion measurements from the NASA High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster. The optical sensor uses 250 nm light to measure absorption of atomic boron in the plume of an operating Hall thruster. Theerosion rate of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator thruster was measured for discharge voltages ranging from 330 to 600 V and discharge powers ranging from 1 to 3 kW. Boron densities as high as 6.5 x 10(exp 15) per cubic meter were found within the channel. Using a very simple boronvelocity model, approximate volumetric erosion rates between 5.0 x 10(exp -12) and 8.2 x 10(exp -12) cubic meter per second were found.

  2. Nonlinear estimation of ring-down time for a Fabry-Perot optical cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallapur, Abhijit G; Boyson, Toby K; Petersen, Ian R; Harb, Charles C

    2011-03-28

    This paper discusses the application of a discrete-time extended Kalman filter (EKF) to the problem of estimating the decay time constant for a Fabry-Perot optical cavity for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The data for the estimation process is obtained from a CRDS experimental setup in terms of the light intensity at the output of the cavity. The cavity is held in lock with the input laser frequency by controlling the distance between the mirrors within the cavity by means of a proportional-integral (PI) controller. The cavity is purged with nitrogen and placed under vacuum before chopping the incident light at 25 KHz and recording the light intensity at its output. In spite of beginning the EKF estimation process with uncertainties in the initial value for the decay time constant, its estimates converge well within a small neighborhood of the expected value for the decay time constant of the cavity within a few ring-down cycles. Also, the EKF estimation results for the decay time constant are compared to those obtained using the Levenberg-Marquardt estimation scheme.

  3. Measurements of the absolute concentrations of HCO and (CH2)-C-1 in a premixed atmospheric flat flame by cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evertsen, R.; Oijen, van J.A.; Hermanns, R.T.E.; Goey, de L.P.H.; Meulen, ter J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Singlet methylene (1CH2) and the formyl radical (HCO) have been studied in a premixed flat flame of CH4 and air by cavity ring-down spectroscopy at 1 atm. The absorption lines lie in the same spectral region for both species. The 1CH2 radicals were probed via the 1B1 (0,13,0) ¿ã1A1 (0,0,0) band at

  4. Comparison between IRMS and CRDS methods in the determination of isotopic ratios 2H/1H and 18O/16O in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, T. H. R.; Zucchi, M. R.; Lemaire, T.; Azevedo, A. E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the method used for measuring the isotope ratios is the Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometers (IRMS). A new method has been used to determine the isotopic abundances, the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). It consists of a technique of direct absorption, of high sensitivity, which is based on measuring the absorption ratio, as a function of time, of the light confined in a high finesse optical cavity, instead of the magnitude of light beam absorption. The values of 18 O/ 16 O and D/H ratios are determined with respect to international standards VSMOW, GISP and SLAP from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In this work, the IRMS and CRDS techniques are compared, verifying that the CRDS technique is promising and has some advantages compared to IRMS. It uses a smaller amount of sample, the isotope measurements are made simultaneously from the steam, reducing the analysis time. It also shows good reproducibility and accuracy, and it does not require a preliminary sample preparation.

  5. High Precision Continuous and Real-Time Measurement of Atmospheric Oxygen Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Hak, D.; Hoffnagle, J.; Rella, C.; Sun, M.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygen is a major and vital component of the Earth atmosphere representing about 21% of its composition. It is consumed or produced through biochemical processes such as combustion, respiration, and photosynthesis. Although atmospheric oxygen is not a greenhouse gas, it can be used as a top-down constraint on the carbon cycle. The variation observations of oxygen in the atmosphere are very small, in the order of the few ppm's. This presents the main technical challenge for measurement as a very high level of precision is required and only few methods including mass spectrometry, fuel cell, and paramagnetic are capable of overcoming it. Here we present new developments of a high-precision gas analyzer that utilizes the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy to measure oxygen concentration and oxygen isotope. Its compact and ruggedness design combined with high precision and long-term stability allows the user to deploy the instrument in the field for continuous monitoring of atmospheric oxygen level. Measurements have a 1-σ 5-minute averaging precision of 1-2 ppm for O2 over a dynamic range of 0-20%. We will present supplemental data acquired from our 10m tower measurements in Santa Clara, CA.

  6. Ultrasensitive, real-time trace gas detection using a high-power, multimode diode laser and cavity ringdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpf, Andreas; Qiao, Yuhao; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2016-06-01

    We present a simplified cavity ringdown (CRD) trace gas detection technique that is insensitive to vibration, and capable of extremely sensitive, real-time absorption measurements. A high-power, multimode Fabry-Perot (FP) diode laser with a broad wavelength range (Δλlaser∼0.6  nm) is used to excite a large number of cavity modes, thereby reducing the detector's susceptibility to vibration and making it well suited for field deployment. When detecting molecular species with broad absorption features (Δλabsorption≫Δλlaser), the laser's broad linewidth removes the need for precision wavelength stabilization. The laser's power and broad linewidth allow the use of on-axis cavity alignment, improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining its vibration insensitivity. The use of an FP diode laser has the added advantages of being inexpensive, compact, and insensitive to vibration. The technique was demonstrated using a 1.1 W (λ=400  nm) diode laser to measure low concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in zero air. A sensitivity of 38 parts in 1012 (ppt) was achieved using an integration time of 128 ms; for single-shot detection, 530 ppt sensitivity was demonstrated with a measurement time of 60 μs, which opens the door to sensitive measurements with extremely high temporal resolution; to the best of our knowledge, these are the highest speed measurements of NO2 concentration using CRD spectroscopy. The reduced susceptibility to vibration was demonstrated by introducing small vibrations into the apparatus and observing that there was no measurable effect on the sensitivity of detection.

  7. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votava, Ondřej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, A. E.; Jain, Ch.; Fittschen, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 4 (2012), 043110 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0422 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : CW-DIODE-LASER * DOWN SPECTROSCOPY * KINETICS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  8. Simultaneous multi-laser, multi-species trace-level sensing of gas mixtures by rapidly swept continuous-wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yabai; Kan, Ruifeng; Englich, Florian V; Liu, Wenqing; Orr, Brian J

    2010-09-13

    The greenhouse-gas molecules CO(2), CH(4), and H(2)O are detected in air within a few ms by a novel cavity-ringdown laser-absorption spectroscopy technique using a rapidly swept optical cavity and multi-wavelength coherent radiation from a set of pre-tuned near-infrared diode lasers. The performance of various types of tunable diode laser, on which this technique depends, is evaluated. Our instrument is both sensitive and compact, as needed for reliable environmental monitoring with high absolute accuracy to detect trace concentrations of greenhouse gases in outdoor air.

  9. δ13C and δ18O measurements of carbonate rocks using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucic, G.; Kim-Hak, D.; Curtis, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel, user friendly and cost effective method for the analysis of δ13C and δ18O in CO2 gas obtained from acid digestion of carbonate rocks. 2 to 3 milligrams of pure carbonate, ground to a powder, is digested in a pre-evacuated glass vial using 100% phosphoric acid at 70° C. Vials with the reacted samples are then loaded onto an automated carousel sampler where produced CO2 gas in the headspace is extracted and sent to a Picarro CRDS isotopic C and O analyzer. Once loaded onto the carousel, 49 samples may be analyzed automatically at a rate of one sample every 15 minutes. δ13C and δ18O of the sample are reported in real time with a precision of 0.2 and 0.4 per mil, respectively. The portability and simplicity of the autosampler and CRDS setup opens up potential for permanent and mobile deployments, enabling near-realtime sampling feedback in the lab or on the go in the field. Consumable and operating costs are small when compared to other technology in use, making the CRDS-Carbonate system suitable for large and small research labs. Finally, we present a summary results from a series of validation tests in which standards and natural carbonate rock samples were analyzed and compared to traditional Kiel-IRMS results.

  10. Improved CRDS δ13C Stability Through New Calibration Application For CO2 And CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Chris; Arata, Caleb; Saad, Nabil; Leggett, Graham; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, Scott; Davis, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of CO2 and CH4 provide valuable insight into global and regional sources and sinks of the two most important greenhouse gases. Methodologies based on Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have been developed and are capable of delivering δ13C measurements with a precision better than 0.12 permil for CO2 and 0.4 permil for CH4 (1 hour window, 5 minute average). Here we present a method to further improve this measurement stability. We have developed a two-point calibration method which corrects for δ13C drift due to a dependence on carbon species concentration. This method calibrates for both carbon species concentration as well as δ13C. In addition, we further demonstrate that this added stability is especially valuable when using carbon isotope data in linear regression models such as Keeling plots, where even small amounts of error can be magnified to give inconclusive results. Furthermore, we show how this method is used to validate multiple instruments simultaneously and can be used to create the standard samples needed for field calibrations.

  11. Afterglow Studies of H3+(v=0) Recombination using Time Resolved cw.Diode Laser Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macko, P.; Bánó, G.; Hlavenka, P.; Plašil, R.; Poterya, V.; Pysanenko, A.; Votava, Ondřej; Johnsen, R.; Glosík, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 233, 1/3 (2004), s. 299-304 ISSN 1387-3806 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/02/0610; GA ČR GA202/02/0948 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : recombination * H-3(+) ions * cavity ring-down Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.235, year: 2004

  12. Br2 molecular elimination in photolysis of (COBr)2 at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: A photodissociation channel being ignored

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Po-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Ying; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen; Francisco, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    A primary dissociation channel of Br 2 elimination is detected following a single-photon absorption of (COBr) 2 at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The technique contains two laser beams propagating in a perpendicular configuration. The tunable laser beam along the axis of the ring-down cell probes the Br 2 fragment in the B 3 Π ou + -X 1 Σ g + transition. The measurements of laser energy- and pressure-dependence and addition of a Br scavenger are further carried out to rule out the probability of Br 2 contribution from a secondary reaction. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population for v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.65 ± 0.09):(0.34 ± 0.07), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 893 ± 31 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br 2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.11 ± 0.06. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathway of molecular elimination is proposed on the energetic ground state (COBr) 2 via internal conversion. A four-center dissociation mechanism is followed synchronously or sequentially yielding three fragments of Br 2 + 2CO. The resulting Br 2 is anticipated to be vibrationally hot. The measurement of a positive temperature effect supports the proposed mechanism.

  13. Br2 molecular elimination in photolysis of (COBr)2 at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: a photodissociation channel being ignored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Lin, Hsiang-Chin; Chang, Yuan-Bin; Tsai, Po-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Ying; Fan, He; Lin, King-Chuen; Francisco, J S

    2011-12-21

    A primary dissociation channel of Br(2) elimination is detected following a single-photon absorption of (COBr)(2) at 248 nm by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. The technique contains two laser beams propagating in a perpendicular configuration. The tunable laser beam along the axis of the ring-down cell probes the Br(2) fragment in the B(3)Π(ou)(+)-X(1)Σ(g)(+) transition. The measurements of laser energy- and pressure-dependence and addition of a Br scavenger are further carried out to rule out the probability of Br(2) contribution from a secondary reaction. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population for v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.65 ± 0.09):(0.34 ± 0.07), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 893 ± 31 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.11 ± 0.06. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the pathway of molecular elimination is proposed on the energetic ground state (COBr)(2) via internal conversion. A four-center dissociation mechanism is followed synchronously or sequentially yielding three fragments of Br(2) + 2CO. The resulting Br(2) is anticipated to be vibrationally hot. The measurement of a positive temperature effect supports the proposed mechanism.

  14. The self- and foreign-absorption continua of water vapor by cavity ring-down spectroscopy near 2.35 μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelain, D; Vasilchenko, S; Čermák, P; Kassi, S; Campargue, A

    2015-07-21

    The room temperature self- and foreign-continua of water vapor have been measured near 4250 cm(-1) with a newly developed high sensitivity cavity ring down spectrometer (CRDS). The typical sensitivity of the recordings is αmin≈ 6 × 10(-10) cm(-1) which is two orders of magnitude better than previous Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) measurements in the spectral region. The investigated spectral interval is located in the low energy range of the important 2.1 μm atmospheric transparency window. Self-continuum cross-sections, CS, were retrieved from the quadratic dependence of the spectrum base line level measured for different water vapor pressures between 0 and 15 Torr, after subtraction of the local water monomer lines contribution calculated using HITRAN2012 line parameters. The CS values were determined with 5% accuracy for four spectral points between 4249.2 and 4257.3 cm(-1). Their values of about 3.2 × 10(-23) cm(2) molecule(-1) atm(-1) are found 20% higher than predicted by the MT_CKD V2.5 model but two times weaker than reported in the literature using FTS. The foreign-continuum was evaluated by injecting various amounts of synthetic air in the CRDS cell while keeping the initial water vapor partial pressure constant. The foreign-continuum cross-section, CF, was retrieved from a linear fit of the spectrum base line level versus the air pressure. The obtained CF values are larger by a factor of 4.5 compared to the MT_CKD values and smaller by a factor of 1.7 compared to previous FTS values. As a result, for an atmosphere at room temperature with 60% relative humidity, the foreign-continuum contribution to the water continuum near 4250 cm(-1) is found to be on the same order as the self-continuum contribution.

  15. Br2 elimination in 248-nm photolysis of CF2Br2 probed by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Yi; Huang, Hong-Yi; Lin, King-Chuen

    2005-10-01

    By using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy technique, we have observed the channel of Br2 molecular elimination following photodissociation of CF2Br2 at 248 nm. A tunable laser beam, which is crossed perpendicular to the photolyzing laser beam in a ring-down cell, is used to probe the Br2 fragment in the B 3Piou+-X1Sigmag+ transition. The vibrational population is obtained in a nascent state, despite ring-down time as long as 500-1000 ns. The population ratio of Br2(v=1)/Br2(v=0) is determined to be 0.4+/-0.2, slightly larger than the value of 0.22 evaluated by Boltzmann distribution at room temperature. The quantum yield of the Br2 elimination reaction is also measured to be 0.04+/-0.01. This work provides direct evidence to support molecular elimination occurring in the CF2Br2 photodissociation and proposes a plausible pathway with the aid of ab initio potential-energy calculations. CF2Br2 is excited probably to the 1B1 and 3B2 states at 248 nm. As the C-Br bond is elongated upon excitation, the coupling of the 1A'(1B1) state to the high vibrational levels of the ground state X 1A'(1A1) may be enhanced to facilitate the process of internal conversion. After transition, the highly vibrationally excited CF2Br2 feasibly surpasses a transition barrier prior to decomposition. According to the ab initio calculations, the transition state structure tends to correlate with the intermediate state CF2Br+Br(CF2Br...Br) and the products CF2+Br2. A sequential photodissociation pathway is thus favored. That is, a single C-Br bond breaks, and then the free-Br atom moves to form a Br-Br bond, followed by the Br2 elimination. The formed Br-Br bond distance in the transition state tends to approach equilibrium such that the Br2 fragment may be populated in cold vibrational distribution. Observation of a small vibrational population ratio of Br2(v=1)Br2(v=0) agrees with the proposed mechanism.

  16. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopic System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad Bin Saud

    2015-05-14

    A system and method for cavity ring-down spectroscopy can include a pulsed quantum cascade laser, an optical ring-down cavity, a photodetector, and an oscilloscope. The system and method can produce pulse widths of less than 200 ns with bandwidths greater than 300 pm, as well as provide temporal resolution of greater than 10 .mu.s.

  17. Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopic System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad Bin Saud; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    A system and method for cavity ring-down spectroscopy can include a pulsed quantum cascade laser, an optical ring-down cavity, a photodetector, and an oscilloscope. The system and method can produce pulse widths of less than 200 ns with bandwidths greater than 300 pm, as well as provide temporal resolution of greater than 10 .mu.s.

  18. Molecular elimination of Br2 in photodissociation of CH2BrC(O)Br at 248 nm using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, He; Tsai, Po-Yu; Lin, King-Chuen; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Yan, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shu-Wei; Chang, A H H

    2012-12-07

    The primary elimination channel of bromine molecule in one-photon dissociation of CH(2)BrC(O)Br at 248 nm is investigated using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy. By means of spectral simulation, the ratio of nascent vibrational population in v = 0, 1, and 2 levels is evaluated to be 1:(0.5 ± 0.1):(0.2 ± 0.1), corresponding to a Boltzmann vibrational temperature of 581 ± 45 K. The quantum yield of the ground state Br(2) elimination reaction is determined to be 0.24 ± 0.08. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, the obtained Br(2) fragments are anticipated to dissociate on the electronic ground state, yielding vibrationally hot Br(2) products. The temperature-dependence measurements support the proposed pathway via internal conversion. For comparison, the Br(2) yields are obtained analogously from CH(3)CHBrC(O)Br and (CH(3))(2)CBrC(O)Br to be 0.03 and 0.06, respectively. The trend of Br(2) yields among the three compounds is consistent with the branching ratio evaluation by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus method. However, the latter result for each molecule is smaller by an order of magnitude than the yield findings. A non-statistical pathway so-called roaming process might be an alternative to the Br(2) production, and its contribution might account for the underestimate of the branching ratio calculations.

  19. Self- and air-broadened cross sections of ethane (C2H6) determined by frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy near 1.68 µm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Zachary D.; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of ethane was measured by frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy over the wave number range 5950–5967 cm −1 . Spectra are reported for both pure ethane acquired at pressures near 3 Pa and mixtures of ethane in air at pressures ranging from 666 Pa to 101.3 kPa. Absorption cross sections are reported with a spectrum sampling period of 109 MHz and frequency resolution of 200 kHz. Atmospheric pressure cross sections agree fairly well with existing cross sections determined by FTS in nitrogen, but there are significant variations in cross sections at lower pressures. Source identification of fugitive methane emissions using spectroscopic measurements of the atmospheric ethane-to-methane ratio is also discussed. - Highlights: • We measured spectra of pure and air-broadened ethane in the 1.7 μm region. • Measured cross sections were substantially different than literature values. • Relative uncertainties of measured cross sections were less than 1 %. • These results can be used to quantify ethane/methane ratios for source apportionment

  20. 403 nm cavity ring-down measurements of brown carbon aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, D.; Grassian, V. H.; Kleiber, P.; Young, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol influences Earth's climate by absorbing and scattering incoming solar radiation and outgoing terrestrial radiation. One class of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), called brown carbon (BrC), has attracted attention for its wavelength dependent light absorbing properties with absorption coefficients that generally increase from the visible (Vis) to ultraviolet (UV) regions. Here we report results from our investigation of the optical properties of BrC aerosol products from the aqueous phase reaction of ammonium sulfate (AS) with methylglyoxal (MG) using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) at 403 nm wavelength. We have measured the optical constants of BrC SOA from the AS/MG reaction as a function of reaction time. Under dry flow conditions, we observed no apparent variation in the BrC refractive index with aging over the course of 22 days. The retrieved BrC optical constants are similar to those of AS with n = 1.52 for the real component. Despite significant UV absorption observed from the bulk BrC solution, the imaginary index value at 403 nm is below our minimum detection limit which puts an upper bound of k as 0.03. These observations are in agreement with results from our recent studies of the light scattering properties of this BrC aerosol.

  1. Evaluation of the accuracy of thermal dissociation CRDS and LIF techniques for atmospheric measurement of reactive nitrogen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Caroline C.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Veres, Patrick R.; Eilerman, Scott J.; Brock, Charles A.; Decker, Zachary C. J.; Zarzana, Kyle J.; Dube, William P.; Wild, Robert J.; Wooldridge, Paul J.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Brown, Steven S.

    2017-05-01

    The sum of all reactive nitrogen species (NOy) includes NOx (NO2 + NO) and all of its oxidized forms, and the accurate detection of NOy is critical to understanding atmospheric nitrogen chemistry. Thermal dissociation (TD) inlets, which convert NOy to NO2 followed by NO2 detection, are frequently used in conjunction with techniques such as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) to measure total NOy when set at > 600 °C or speciated NOy when set at intermediate temperatures. We report the conversion efficiency of known amounts of several representative NOy species to NO2 in our TD-CRDS instrument, under a variety of experimental conditions. We find that the conversion efficiency of HNO3 is highly sensitive to the flow rate and the residence time through the TD inlet as well as the presence of other species that may be present during ambient sampling, such as ozone (O3). Conversion of HNO3 at 400 °C, nominally the set point used to selectively convert organic nitrates, can range from 2 to 6 % and may represent an interference in measurement of organic nitrates under some conditions. The conversion efficiency is strongly dependent on the operating characteristics of individual quartz ovens and should be well calibrated prior to use in field sampling. We demonstrate quantitative conversion of both gas-phase N2O5 and particulate ammonium nitrate in the TD inlet at 650 °C, which is the temperature normally used for conversion of HNO3. N2O5 has two thermal dissociation steps, one at low temperature representing dissociation to NO2 and NO3 and one at high temperature representing dissociation of NO3, which produces exclusively NO2 and not NO. We also find a significant interference from partial conversion (5-10 %) of NH3 to NO at 650 °C in the presence of representative (50 ppbv) levels of O3 in dry zero air. Although this interference appears to be suppressed when sampling ambient air, we nevertheless recommend regular

  2. Flask sample measurements for CO2, CH4 and CO using cavity ring-down spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.-L.; Jacobson, G.; Rella, C. W.; Chang, C.-Y.; Liu, I.; Liu, W.-T.; Chew, C.; Ou-Yang, C.-F.; Liao, W.-C.; Chang, C.-C.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS) has been demonstrated to be a highly sensitive, stable and fast analytical technique for real-time in situ measurements of greenhouse gases. In this study, we propose the technique (which we call flask-CRDS) of analyzing whole air flask samples for CO2, CH4 and CO using a custom gas manifold designed to connect to a CRDS analyzer. Extremely stable measurements of these gases can be achieved over a large pressure range in the flask, from 175 to 760 Torr. The wide pressure range is conducive to flask sample measurement in three ways: (1) flask samples can be collected in low-pressure environments (e.g. high-altitude locations); (2) flask samples can be first analyzed for other trace gases with the remaining low-pressure sample for CRDS analysis of CO2, CH4 and CO; and (3) flask samples can be archived and re-analyzed for validation. The repeatability of this method (1σ of 0.07 ppm for CO2, 0.4 ppb for CH4, and 0.5 ppb for CO) was assessed by analyzing five canisters filled with the same air sample to a pressure of 200 Torr. An inter-comparison of the flask-CRDS data with in-situ CRDS measurements at a high-altitude mountain baseline station revealed excellent agreement, with differences of 0.10 ± 0.09 ppm (1σ) for CO2 and 0.9 ± 1.0 ppb for CH4. This study demonstrated that the flask-CRDS method was not only simple to build and operate but could also perform highly accurate and precise measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4 and CO in flask samples.

  3. Precise oxygen and hydrogen isotope determination in nanoliter quantities of speleothem inclusion water by cavity ring-down spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Ryu; Nakamoto, Masashi; Asami, Ryuji; Mishima, Satoru; Gibo, Masakazu; Masaka, Kosuke; Jin-Ping, Chen; Wu, Chung-Che; Chang, Yu-Wei; Shen, Chuan-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Speleothem inclusion-water isotope compositions are a promising new climatic proxy, but their applicability is limited by their low content in water and by analytical challenges. We have developed a precise and accurate isotopic technique that is based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). This method features a newly developed crushing apparatus, a refined sample extraction line, careful evaluation of the water/carbonate adsorption effect. After crushing chipped speleothem in a newly-developed crushing device, released inclusion water is purified and mixed with a limited amount of nitrogen gas in the extraction line for CRDS measurement. We have measured 50-260 nL of inclusion water from 77 to 286 mg of stalagmite deposits sampled from Gyokusen Cave, Okinawa Island, Japan. The small sample size requirement demonstrates that our analytical technique can offer high-resolution inclusion water-based paleoclimate reconstructions. The 1σ reproducibility for different stalagmites ranges from ±0.05 to 0.61‰ for δ18O and ±0.0 to 2.9‰ for δD. The δD vs. δ18O plot for inclusion water from modern stalagmites is consistent with the local meteoric water line. The 1000 ln α values based on calcite and fluid inclusion measurements from decades-old stalagmites are in agreement with the data from present-day farmed calcite experiment. Combination of coeval carbonate and fluid inclusion data suggests that past temperatures at 9-10 thousand years ago (ka) and 26 ka were 3.4 ± 0.7 °C and 8.2 ± 2.4 °C colder than at present, respectively.

  4. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leen, J. Brian, E-mail: b.leen@lgrinc.com; O’Keefe, Anthony [Los Gatos Research, 67 E. Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  5. 248 nm photolysis of CH2Br2 by using cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy: Br2 molecular elimination at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pei-Ying; Chang, Yuan-Ping; Lee, Wei-Bin; Hu, Zhengfa; Huang, Hong-Yi; Lin, King-Chuen; Chen, K T; Chang, A H H

    2006-10-07

    Following photodissociation of CH2Br2 at 248 nm, Br2 molecular elimination is detected by using a tunable laser beam, as crossed perpendicular to the photolyzing laser beam in a ring-down cell, probing the Br2 fragment in the B 3Piou+ -X 1Sigmag+ transition. The nascent vibrational population is obtained, yielding a population ratio of Br2(v = 1)Br2(v = 0) to be 0.7 +/- 0.2. The quantum yield for the Br2 elimination reaction is determined to be 0.2 +/- 0.1. Nevertheless, when CH2Br2 is prepared in a supersonic molecular beam under cold temperature, photofragmentation gives no Br2 detectable in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. With the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations, a plausible pathway is proposed. Upon excitation to the 1B1 or 3B1 state, C-Br bond elongation may change the molecular symmetry of Cs and enhance the resultant 1 1,3A'-X 1A' (or 1 1,3B1-X 1A1 as C2v is used) coupling to facilitate the process of internal conversion, followed by asynchronous concerted photodissociation. Temperature dependence measurements lend support to the proposed pathway.

  6. Fugitive Methane Emission Identification and Source Attribution: Ethane-to-Methane Analysis Using a Portable Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Hak, D.; Fleck, D.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gas analysis and methane specifically have become increasingly important by virtue of methane's 28-36x greenhouse warming potential compared to CO2 and accounting for 10% of total greenhouse gas emissions in the US alone. Additionally, large uncontrolled leaks, such as the recent one from Aliso Canyon in Southern California, originating from uncapped wells, storage facilities and coal mines have increased the total global contribution of methane missions even further. Determining the specific fingerprint of methane sources by quantifying the ethane to methane (C2:C1) ratios provides us with means to understand processes yielding methane and allows for sources of methane to be mapped and classified through these processes; i.e. biogenic or thermogenic, oil vs. gas vs. coal gas-related. Here we present data obtained using a portable cavity ring-down spectrometry analyzer weighing less than 25 lbs and consuming less than 35W that simultaneously measures methane and ethane in real-time with a raw 1-σ precision of plane gas propagation.

  7. First Continuous High Frequency in Situ Measurements of CO2 and CH4 in Rwanda Using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasore, J.; DeWitt, L. H.; Prinn, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Recent IPCC reports emphasize the lack of ground measurements of greenhouse gases on the African continent, despite Africa's significant emissions from agriculture and biomass burning as well as ongoing land use changes. We have established a greenhouse gas monitoring station in northern Rwanda that will be part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), a global network of high frequency long-term remote atmospheric measurement stations. Using a Picarro G2401 cavity ring-down analyzer, continuous measurements of CO2, CH4, and CO at a frequency of five seconds are being captured at this equatorial East African site. The measurement site is located near the Virunga mountains, a volcanic range in North-West Rwanda, on the summit of Mt. Mugogo (2507 m above sea level). Mt. Mugogo is located in a rural area 70km away from Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, and about 13km from the nearest town. From HYSPLIT 7-day back-trajectory calculations, we have determined that the station measures air masses originating from East and Central Africa, the Indian Ocean and occasionally from Southern Asia. Depending on the wind direction and local boundary layer height, measurements taken at Mt Mugogo are occasionally influenced by local sources, including emissions from the nearby city and wood fires from small rural settlements around the station. Here we present the first greenhouse gas measurement data from this unique and understudied location in Africa. Using the lagrangian transport and dispersion model FLEXPART, we derive the relationship between the observed mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 and our current knowledge of their sources and sinks, across this large African footprint.

  8. Lowest triplet (n, π*) electronic state of acrolein: Determination of structural parameters by cavity ringdown spectroscopy and quantum-chemical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, Nikolaus C.; McAnally, Michael O.; Drucker, Stephen

    2013-02-01

    The cavity ringdown absorption spectrum of acrolein (propenal, CH2=CH—CH=O) was recorded near 412 nm, under bulk-gas conditions at room temperature and in a free-jet expansion. The measured spectral region includes the 0^0_0 band of the T1(n, π*) ← S0 system. We analyzed the 0^0_0 rotational contour by using the STROTA computer program [R. H. Judge et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 5343 (1995)], 10.1063/1.470569, which incorporates an asymmetric rotor Hamiltonian for simulating and fitting singlet-triplet spectra. We used the program to fit T1(n, π*) inertial constants to the room-temperature contour. The determined values (cm-1), with 2σ confidence intervals, are A = 1.662 ± 0.003, B = 0.1485 ± 0.0006, C = 0.1363 ± 0.0004. Linewidth analysis of the jet-cooled spectrum yielded a value of 14 ± 2 ps for the lifetime of isolated acrolein molecules in the T1(n, π*), v = 0 state. We discuss the observed lifetime in the context of previous computational work on acrolein photochemistry. The spectroscopically derived inertial constants for the T1(n, π*) state were used to benchmark a variety of computational methods. One focus was on complete active space methods, such as complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and second-order perturbation theory with a CASSCF reference function (CASPT2), which are applicable to excited states. We also examined the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster and time-dependent density function theory excited-state methods, and finally unrestricted ground-state techniques, including unrestricted density functional theory and unrestricted coupled-cluster theory with single and double and perturbative triple excitations. For each of the above methods, we or others [O. S. Bokareva et al., Int. J. Quantum Chem. 108, 2719 (2008)], 10.1002/qua.21803 used a triple zeta-quality basis set to optimize the T1(n, π*) geometry of acrolein. We find that the multiconfigurational methods provide the best agreement with fitted inertial

  9. Measurement of size-dependent single scattering albedo of fresh biomass burning aerosols using the extinction-minus-scattering technique with a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and nephelometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning (BB aerosols have a significant effect on regional climate, and represent a significant uncertainty in our understanding of climate change. Using a combination of cavity ring-down spectroscopy and integrating nephelometry, the single scattering albedo (SSA and Ångstrom absorption exponent (AAE were measured for several North American biomass fuels. This was done for several particle diameters for the smoldering and flaming stage of white pine, red oak, and cedar combustion. Measurements were done over a wider wavelength range than any previous direct measurement of BB particles. While the offline sampling system used in this work shows promise, some changes in particle size distribution were observed, and a thorough evaluation of this method is required. The uncertainty of SSA was 6 %, with the truncation angle correction of the nephelometer being the largest contributor to error. While scattering and extinction did show wavelength dependence, SSA did not. SSA values ranged from 0.46 to 0.74, and were not uniformly greater for the smoldering stage than the flaming stage. SSA values changed with particle size, and not systematically so, suggesting the proportion of tar balls to fractal black carbon change with fuel type/state and particle size. SSA differences of 0.15–0.4 or greater can be attributed to fuel type or fuel state for fresh soot. AAE values were quite high (1.59–5.57, despite SSA being lower than is typically observed in wildfires. The SSA and AAE values in this work do not fit well with current schemes that relate these factors to the modified combustion efficiency of a burn. Combustion stage, particle size, fuel type, and fuel condition were found to have the most significant effects on the intrinsic optical properties of fresh soot, though additional factors influence aged soot.

  10. Evaluation of a cavity ring-down spectrometer for in situ observations of 13CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. J. Worthy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the emergence of wide-spread application of new optical techniques to monitor δ13C in atmospheric CO2 there is a growing need to ensure well-calibrated measurements. We characterized one commonly available instrument, a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS system used for continuous in situ monitoring of atmospheric 13CO2. We found no dependency of δ13C on the CO2 concentration in the range of 303–437 ppm. We designed a calibration scheme according to the diagnosed instrumental drifts and established a quality assurance protocol. We find that the repeatability (1-σ of measurements is 0.25‰ for 10 min and 0.15‰ for 20 min integrated averages, respectively. Due to a spectral overlap, our instrument displays a cross-sensitivity to CH4 of 0.42 ± 0.024‰ ppm−1. Our ongoing target measurements yield standard deviations of δ13C from 0.22‰ to 0.28‰ for 10 min averages. We furthermore estimate the reproducibility of our system for ambient air samples from weekly measurements of a long-term target gas to be 0.18‰. We find only a minuscule offset of 0.002 ± 0.025‰ between the CRDS and Environment Canada's isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS results for four target gases used over the course of one year.

  11. Application of NIR - CRDS for state selective study of recombination of para and ortho H3+ ions with electrons in low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varju, J.; Roučka, Š.; Kotrík, T.; Plašil, R.; Glosík, J.

    2010-05-01

    We present a study of H3+ recombination performed at 77 K on the two lowest rotational levels of this ion, which belong to its two different nuclear spin states of the studied ion. A near infrared cavity ring-down spectrometer (~1381 nm, CRDS arrangement) has been used to obtain the time evolution of concentration of both states. From the overall ion density decay during the afterglow we obtained the binary recombination rate coefficient αbin (77 K) = 1.2×10-7 cm3s-1. We have also observed ternary helium assisted recombination of both para and ortho H3+. The process is very slow (at 77 K) and the obtained ternary recombination rate coefficient is in contradiction with the theoretical prediction. It is the first time that the binary and ternary H3+ recombination rate coefficient was measured at a known population of para and ortho H3+ ions in decaying plasma.

  12. Application of NIR - CRDS for state selective study of recombination of para and ortho H3+ ions with electrons in low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varju, J; Roucka, S; KotrIk, T; Plasil, R; Glosik, J

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of H 3 + recombination performed at 77 K on the two lowest rotational levels of this ion, which belong to its two different nuclear spin states of the studied ion. A near infrared cavity ring-down spectrometer (∼1381 nm, CRDS arrangement) has been used to obtain the time evolution of concentration of both states. From the overall ion density decay during the afterglow we obtained the binary recombination rate coefficient α bin (77 K) = 1.2x10 -7 cm 3 s -1 . We have also observed ternary helium assisted recombination of both para and ortho H 3 + . The process is very slow (at 77 K) and the obtained ternary recombination rate coefficient is in contradiction with the theoretical prediction. It is the first time that the binary and ternary H 3 + recombination rate coefficient was measured at a known population of para and ortho H 3 + ions in decaying plasma.

  13. Effects of variation in background mixing ratios of N2, O2, and Ar on the measurement of δ18O-H2O and δ2H-H2O values by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer E.; Rella, Chris W.

    2017-08-01

    Cavity ring-down spectrometers have generally been designed to operate under conditions in which the background gas has a constant composition. However, there are a number of observational and experimental situations of interest in which the background gas has a variable composition. In this study, we examine the effect of background gas composition on a cavity ring-down spectrometer that measures δ18O-H2O and δ2H-H2O values based on the amplitude of water isotopologue absorption features around 7184 cm-1 (L2120-i, Picarro, Inc.). For background mixtures balanced with N2, the apparent δ18O values deviate from true values by -0.50 ± 0.001 ‰ O2 %-1 and -0.57 ± 0.001 ‰ Ar %-1, and apparent δ2H values deviate from true values by 0.26 ± 0.004 ‰ O2 %-1 and 0.42 ± 0.004 ‰ Ar %-1. The artifacts are the result of broadening, narrowing, and shifting of both the target absorption lines and strong neighboring lines. While the background-induced isotopic artifacts can largely be corrected with simple empirical or semi-mechanistic models, neither type of model is capable of completely correcting the isotopic artifacts to within the inherent instrument precision. The development of strategies for dynamically detecting and accommodating background variation in N2, O2, and/or Ar would facilitate the application of cavity ring-down spectrometers to a new class of observations and experiments.

  14. Effects of variation in background mixing ratios of N2, O2, and Ar on the measurement of δ18O–H2O and δ2H–H2O values by cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Johnson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cavity ring-down spectrometers have generally been designed to operate under conditions in which the background gas has a constant composition. However, there are a number of observational and experimental situations of interest in which the background gas has a variable composition. In this study, we examine the effect of background gas composition on a cavity ring-down spectrometer that measures δ18O–H2O and δ2H–H2O values based on the amplitude of water isotopologue absorption features around 7184 cm−1 (L2120-i, Picarro, Inc.. For background mixtures balanced with N2, the apparent δ18O values deviate from true values by −0.50 ± 0.001 ‰ O2 %−1 and −0.57 ± 0.001 ‰ Ar %−1, and apparent δ2H values deviate from true values by 0.26 ± 0.004 ‰ O2 %−1 and 0.42 ± 0.004 ‰ Ar  %−1. The artifacts are the result of broadening, narrowing, and shifting of both the target absorption lines and strong neighboring lines. While the background-induced isotopic artifacts can largely be corrected with simple empirical or semi-mechanistic models, neither type of model is capable of completely correcting the isotopic artifacts to within the inherent instrument precision. The development of strategies for dynamically detecting and accommodating background variation in N2, O2, and/or Ar would facilitate the application of cavity ring-down spectrometers to a new class of observations and experiments.

  15. Strong thermal nonequilibrium in hypersonic CO and CH4 probed by CRDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louviot, M; Suas-David, N; Boudon, V; Georges, R; Rey, M; Kassi, S

    2015-06-07

    A new experimental setup coupling a High Enthalpy Source (HES) reaching 2000 K to a cw-cavity ring-down spectrometer has been developed to investigate rotationally cold hot bands of polyatomic molecules in the [1.5, 1.7] μm region. The rotational and vibrational molecular degrees of freedom are strongly decoupled in the hypersonic expansion produced by the HES and probed by cavity ring-down spectroscopy. Carbon monoxide has been used as a first test molecule to validate the experimental approach. Its expansion in argon led to rotational and vibrational temperatures of 6.7 ± 0.8 K and 2006 ± 476 K, respectively. The tetradecad polyad of methane (1.67 μm) was investigated under similar conditions leading to rotational and vibrational temperatures of 13 ± 5 K and 750 ± 100 K, respectively. The rotationally cold structure of the spectra reveals many hot bands involving highly excited vibrational states of methane.

  16. IM-CRDS for the analysis of matrix-bound water isotopes: a streamlined (and updated) tool for ecohydrologists to probe small-scale variability in plants Yasuhara, S. (syasuhara@picarro.com)1,Carter, J.A. (jcarter@picarro.com)1, Dennis, K.J. (kdennis@picarro.com)1 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure the isotopic composition of matrix-bound water is valuable to many facets of earth and environmental sciences. For example, ecohydrologists use stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in plant and soil water, in combination with measurements of atmospheric water vapor, surface water and precipitation, to estimate budgets of evapotranspiration. Likewise, water isotopes of oceanic water, brines and other waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS, e.g., juices) are relevant to studying large-scale oceanic circulation, small-scale mixing, groundwater contamination, the balance of evaporation to precipitation, and the provenance of food. Conventionally matrix-bound water has been extracted using cryogenic distillation, whereby water is distilled from the material in question (e.g., a leaf sample) by heating under vacuum and collecting the resultant water vapor using liquid nitrogen. The water can then be analyzed for its stable isotopic composition by a variety of methods, including isotope ratio mass spectrometry and laser techniques, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). Here we present recent improvements in an alternative, and stream-lined, solution for integrated sample extraction and isotopic measurement using a Picarro Induction Module (IM) coupled to commercially-available CRDS analyzer from Picarro. This technique is also valuable for waters with high TDS, which can have detrimental effects on flash vaporization process, typically used for the introduction of water to Picarro CRDS water isotope analyzers. The IM works by inductively heating a sample held within a metal sample holder in a glass vial flushed with dry air. Tested samples include leaves, stems, twigs, calibration water, juices, and salt water. The heating process evolves water vapor which is then swept through the system at approximately 150 standard cubic centimeters per minute. The evolved water vapor passes through an activated charcoal cartridge for removal of

  17. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  18. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  19. Lamb dip CRDS of highly saturated transitions of water near 1.4 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassi, S.; Stoltmann, T.; Casado, M.; Daëron, M.; Campargue, A.

    2018-02-01

    Doppler-free saturated-absorption Lamb dips were measured at sub-Pa pressures on rovibrational lines of H216O near 7180 cm-1, using optical feedback frequency stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The saturation of the considered lines is so high that at the early stage of the ring down, the cavity loss rate remains unaffected by the absorption. By referencing the laser source to an optical frequency comb, transition frequencies are determined down to 100 Hz precision and kHz accuracy. The developed setup allows resolving highly K-type blended doublets separated by about 10 MHz (to be compared to a HWHM Doppler width on the order of 300 MHz). A comparison with the most recent spectroscopic databases is discussed. The determined K-type splittings are found to be very well predicted by the most recent variational calculations.

  20. Hydrogen and Oxygen stable isotope analysis of water in fruits and vegetables by using cavity ring-down spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yaeko

    2016-01-01

    We determined oxygen and hydrogen stable isotope ratios (δ"1"8O and δD) of water in fruits (citrus) and vegetables (ginger) using cavity ring-down spectrometry (CRDS) for assessment of their authenticity. The δ"1"8O and δD values of fruits and straight juice had higher than those of concentrated juice. The citrus fruits from Japan had relatively lower δ"1"8O and δD values of than those from Australia, South Africa and the United States. The δD values and d-excess of ginger samples from Japan were relatively higher than those of ginger samples from China. The δ"1"8O and δD values of water in fruits and vegetables would be representative of the ambient water, depending on geographical parameters such as the latitude and altitude. These results suggested that δ"1"8O and δD values of water in fruits and vegetables by using CRDS would be potentially useful for assessment of their authenticity. (author)

  1. Field-based cavity ring-down spectrometry of δ¹³C in soil-respired CO₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Davies, Kalu; Wurster, Chris M; Bass, Adrian M; Bird, Michael I

    2013-06-01

    Measurement of soil-respired CO₂ at high temporal resolution and sample density is necessary to accurately identify sources and quantify effluxes of soil-respired CO₂. A portable sampling device for the analysis of δ(13)C values in the field is described herein. CO₂ accumulated in a soil chamber was batch sampled sequentially in four gas bags and analysed by Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-down Spectrometry (WS-CRDS). A Keeling plot (1/[CO₂] versus δ(13)C) was used to derive δ(13)C values of soil-respired CO₂. Calibration to the δ(13)C Vienna Peedee Belemnite scale was by analysis of cylinder CO₂ and CO₂ derived from dissolved carbonate standards. The performance of gas-bag analysis was compared to continuous analysis where the WS-CRDS analyser was connected directly to the soil chamber. Although there are inherent difficulties in obtaining absolute accuracy data for δ(13)C values in soil-respired CO₂, the similarity of δ(13)C values obtained for the same test soil with different analytical configurations indicated that an acceptable accuracy of the δ(13)C data were obtained by the WS-CRDS techniques presented here. Field testing of a variety of tropical soil/vegetation types, using the batch sampling technique yielded δ(13)C values for soil-respired CO₂ related to the dominance of either C₃ (tree, δ(13)C=-27.8 to-31.9 ‰) or C₄ (tropical grass, δ(13)C=-9.8 to-13.6 ‰) photosynthetic pathways in vegetation at the sampling sites. Standard errors of the Keeling plot intercept δ(13)C values of soil-respired CO₂ were typically7-9 μmol m(-2) s(-1)).

  2. Lineshape test on overlapped transitions (R9F1, R9F2) of the 2v3 band of 12CH4 by frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Lin, H.; Plimmer, M. D.; Feng, X. J.; Zhang, J. T.

    2018-05-01

    The performances of a multi-spectral fit for the spectra of pressure-broadened overlapping lines (R9F1, R9F2) of 12CH4 in binary mixtures with N2 were studied by applying different lineshape models, from the simplest Voigt profile (VP) to the Harmann-Tran profile (HTP). Line-mixing was approximated in the first order in the spectral fits. Data were acquired using a high-resolution cavity ring-down spectrometer of minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 2.8 × 10-12 cm-1. The lines were observed with a signal-to-noise ratio of 19 365 for pressures from 5 to 40 kPa. The study reveals that the multi-spectral fits using the HTP and the speed-dependent Nelkin-Ghatak profile (SDNGP) yield the best among all tested. The two models gave the maximum relative residuals of less than 0.065 %. All things considered, the HTP and the SDNGP appear to be the most reliable models for treating the present case of multi-spectral fitting of unresolved dual-component spectra.

  3. Detecting and Eliminating Interfering Organic Compounds in Waters Analyzed for Isotopic Composition by Crds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, B. A.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rella, C.

    2010-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy based CRDS technology for isotopic analysis of δD and δ18O directly from liquid water has greatly increased the number and type of liquid samples analyzed. This increase has also revealed a previously unrecognized sample contamination problem. Recently West[1] and Brand[2] identified samples containing ethanol, methanol, plant extracts and other organic compounds analyzed by CRDS and other spectroscopy based techniques as yielding erroneous results for δD and δ18O (especially δD) due to spectroscopic interference. Not all organic compounds generate interference. Thus, identifying which samples are contaminated by which organic compounds is of key importance for data credibility and correction. To address this problem a new approach in the form of a software suite, ChemCorrect™, has been developed. A chemometrics component uses a spectral library of water isotopologues and interfering organic compounds to best fit the measured spectra. The best fit values provide a quantitative assay of the actual concentrations of the various species and are then evaluated to generate a visual flag indicating samples affected by organic contamination. Laboratory testing of samples spiked with known quantities of interfering organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and terpenes was performed. The software correctly flagged and identified type of contamination for all the spiked samples without any false positives. Furthermore the reported values were a linear function of actual concentration with an R^2>0.99 even for samples which contained multiple organic compounds. Further testing was carried out against a range of industrial chemical compounds which can contaminate ground water as well as a variety of plant derived waters and juices which were also analyzed by IRMS. The excellent results obtained give good insight into which organic compounds cause interference and which classes of plants are likely to contain interfering compounds. Finally

  4. The CO_2 absorption spectrum in the 2.3 µm transparency window by high sensitivity CRDS: (I) Rovibrational lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, S.; Konefal, M.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Čermák, P.; Tashkun, S.A.; Perevalov, V.I.; Campargue, A.

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of carbon dioxide is very weak near 2.3 µm which makes this transparency window of particular interest for the study of Venus’ lower atmosphere. As a consequence of the weakness of the transitions located in this region, previous experimental data are very scarce and spectroscopic databases provide calculated line lists which should be tested and validated by experiment. In this work, we use the Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technique for a high sensitivity characterization of the CO_2 absorption spectrum in two spectral intervals of the 2.3 µm window: 4248–4257 and 4295–4380 cm"−"1 which were accessed using a Distributed Feed Back (DFB) diode laser and a Vertical External Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VECSEL) as light sources, respectively. The achieved sensitivity (noise equivalent absorption, α_m_i_n, on the order of 5×10"−"1"0 cm"−"1) allowed detecting numerous new transitions with intensity values down to 5×10"−"3"0 cm/molecule. The rovibrational assignments were performed by comparison with available theoretical line lists in particular those obtained at IAO Tomsk using the global effective operator approach. Hot bands of the main isotopologue and "1"6O"1"2C"1"8O bands were found to be missing in the HITRAN database while they contribute importantly to the absorption in the region. Additional CRDS spectra of a CO_2 sample highly enriched in "1"8O were recorded in order to improve the spectroscopy of this isotopologue. As a result about 700 lines of "1"6O"1"2C"1"8O, "1"6O"1"2C"1"7O, "1"7O"1"2C"1"8O, "1"2C"1"8O_2 and "1"3C"1"8O_2 were newly measured. The status of the different databases (HITRAN, CDSD, variational calculations) in the important 2.3 µm transparency window is discussed. Possible improvements to correct evidenced deficiencies are suggested. - Highlights: • High sensitivity CRDS with a VECSEL in the 2.3 µm transparency window of CO_2. • Natural and "1"8O enriched CO_2 spectra recorded with

  5. Application of NIR - CRDS for state selective study of recombination of para and ortho H{sub 3}{sup +} ions with electrons in low temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varju, J; Roucka, S; KotrIk, T; Plasil, R; Glosik, J, E-mail: Juraj.Glosik@mff.cuni.c [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2010-05-01

    We present a study of H{sub 3}{sup +} recombination performed at 77 K on the two lowest rotational levels of this ion, which belong to its two different nuclear spin states of the studied ion. A near infrared cavity ring-down spectrometer ({approx}1381 nm, CRDS arrangement) has been used to obtain the time evolution of concentration of both states. From the overall ion density decay during the afterglow we obtained the binary recombination rate coefficient {alpha}{sub bin} (77 K) = 1.2x10{sup -7} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1}. We have also observed ternary helium assisted recombination of both para and ortho H{sub 3}{sup +}. The process is very slow (at 77 K) and the obtained ternary recombination rate coefficient is in contradiction with the theoretical prediction. It is the first time that the binary and ternary H{sub 3}{sup +} recombination rate coefficient was measured at a known population of para and ortho H{sub 3}{sup +} ions in decaying plasma.

  6. Black hole ringdown echoes and howls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Sago, Norichika; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    Recently the possibility of detecting echoes of ringdown gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers was shown. The presence of echoes is expected if the black hole is surrounded by a mirror that reflects gravitational waves near the horizon. Here, we present slightly more sophisticated templates motivated by a waveform which is obtained by solving the linear perturbation equation around a Kerr black hole with a complete reflecting boundary condition in the stationary traveling wave approximation. We estimate that the proposed template can bring about a 10% improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Mode coupling of Schwarzschild perturbations: Ringdown frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazos, Enrique; Brizuela, David; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Tiglio, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Within linearized perturbation theory, black holes decay to their final stationary state through the well-known spectrum of quasinormal modes. Here we numerically study whether nonlinearities change this picture. For that purpose we study the ringdown frequencies of gauge-invariant second-order gravitational perturbations induced by self-coupling of linearized perturbations of Schwarzschild black holes. We do so through high-accuracy simulations in the time domain of first and second-order Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli type equations, for a variety of initial data sets. We consider first-order even-parity (l=2, m=±2) perturbations and odd-parity (l=2, m=0) ones, and all the multipoles that they generate through self-coupling. For all of them and all the initial data sets considered we find that--in contrast to previous predictions in the literature--the numerical decay frequencies of second-order perturbations are the same ones of linearized theory, and we explain the observed behavior. This would indicate, in particular, that when modeling or searching for ringdown gravitational waves, appropriately including the standard quasinormal modes already takes into account nonlinear effects.

  8. NO2 Analyzer for Miniature Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Los Gatos Research (LGR) proposes to employ incoherent Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (iCRDS) to develop a...

  9. Design Of A Novel Open-Path Aerosol Extinction Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer And Initial Data From Deployment At NOAA's Atmospheric Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T. D.; Wagner, N. L.; Richardson, M.; Law, D. C.; Wolfe, D. E.; Brock, C. A.; Erdesz, F.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to frame effective climate change policy depends strongly on reducing the uncertainty in aerosol radiative forcing, which is currently nearly as great as best estimates of its magnitude. Achieving this goal will require significant progress in measuring aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and the effect of relative humidity on these properties for both fine and coarse particles. However both ground- and space-based instruments fail or are highly biased in the presence of clouds, severely limiting quantitative estimates of the radiative effects of aerosols where they are advected over low-level clouds. Moreover, many in situ aerosol measurements exclude the coarse fraction, which can be very important in and downwind of desert regions. By measuring the decay rate of a pulsed laser in an optically resonant cavity, cavity ringdown spectrometers (CRDSs) have been employed successfully in measuring aerosol extinction for particles in relative humidities below 90%. At very high humidities (as found in and near clouds), however, existing CRDSs perform poorly, diverging significantly from theoretical extinction values as humidities approach 100%. The new open-path aerosol extinction CRDS described in this poster measures extinction as aerosol is drawn through the sample cavity directly without inlets or tubing for channeling the flow, which cause particle losses, condensation at high RH and other artifacts. This poster presents the key elements of the new open-path CRDS design as well as comparisons with an earlier generation closed-path CRDS and preliminary data obtained during a field study at the 300 meter tower at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Colorado.

  10. Modern spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollas, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The latest edition of this highly acclaimed title introduces the reader to a wide range of spectroscopies, and includes both the background theory and applications to structure determination and chemical analysis.  It covers rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy, as well as EXAFs and the theory of lasers and laser spectroscopy. A  revised and updated edition of a successful, clearly written book Includes the latest developments in modern laser techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy and femtosecond lasers Provides numerous worked examples, calculations and questions at the end of chapters.

  11. Extreme gravity tests with gravitational waves from compact binary coalescences: (II) ringdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Emanuele; Yagi, Kent; Yang, Huan; Yunes, Nicolás

    2018-05-01

    The LIGO/Virgo detections of binary black hole mergers marked a watershed moment in astronomy, ushering in the era of precision tests of Kerr dynamics. We review theoretical and experimental challenges that must be overcome to carry out black hole spectroscopy with present and future gravitational wave detectors. Among other topics, we discuss quasinormal mode excitation in binary mergers, astrophysical event rates, tests of black hole dynamics in modified theories of gravity, parameterized "post-Kerr" ringdown tests, exotic compact objects, and proposed data analysis methods to improve spectroscopic tests of Kerr dynamics by stacking multiple events.

  12. High accuracy laboratory spectroscopy to support active greenhouse gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, D. A.; Bielska, K.; Cygan, A.; Havey, D. K.; Okumura, M.; Miller, C. E.; Lisak, D.; Hodges, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Recent carbon dioxide (CO2) remote sensing missions have set precision targets as demanding as 0.25% (1 ppm) in order to elucidate carbon sources and sinks [1]. These ambitious measurement targets will require the most precise body of spectroscopic reference data ever assembled. Active sensing missions will be especially susceptible to subtle line shape effects as the narrow bandwidth of these measurements will greatly limit the number of spectral transitions which are employed in retrievals. In order to assist these remote sensing missions we have employed frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS) [2], a high-resolution, ultrasensitive laboratory technique, to measure precise line shape parameters for transitions of O2, CO2, and other atmospherically-relevant species within the near-infrared. These measurements have led to new HITRAN-style line lists for both 16O2 [3] and rare isotopologue [4] transitions in the A-band. In addition, we have performed detailed line shape studies of CO2 transitions near 1.6 μm under a variety of broadening conditions [5]. We will address recent measurements in these bands as well as highlight recent instrumental improvements to the FS-CRDS spectrometer. These improvements include the use of the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme, a high bandwidth servo which enables measurements to be made at rates greater than 10 kHz [6]. In addition, an optical frequency comb will be utilized as a frequency reference, which should allow for transition frequencies to be measured with uncertainties below 10 kHz (3×10-7 cm-1). [1] C. E. Miller, D. Crisp, P. L. DeCola, S. C. Olsen, et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos. 112, D10314 (2007). [2] J. T. Hodges, H. P. Layer, W. W. Miller, G. E. Scace, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 849-863 (2004). [3] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, M. Okumura, C. E. Miller, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 111, 2021-2036 (2010). [4] D. A. Long, D. K. Havey, S. S. Yu, M. Okumura, et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc

  13. How well can ultracompact bodies imitate black hole ringdowns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glampedakis, Kostas; Pappas, George

    2018-02-01

    The ongoing observations of merging black holes by the instruments of the fledging gravitational wave astronomy has opened the way for testing the general-relativistic Kerr black hole metric and, at the same time, for probing the existence of more speculative horizonless ultracompact objects. In this paper we quantify the difference that these two classes of objects may exhibit in the post-merger ringdown signal. By considering rotating systems in general relativity and assuming an eikonal limit and a third-order Hartle-Thorne slow-rotation approximation, we provide the first calculation of the early ringdown frequency and damping time as a function of the body's multipolar structure. Using the example of a gravastar, we show that the main ringdown signal may differ by as much as a few percent with respect to that of a Kerr black hole, a deviation that could be probed by near-future Advanced LIGO/Virgo searches.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy with a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    this is a negligible shift as far as the performance of the spectrometers are concerned, knowledge of the shift would allow for compensation if...Safety and Health NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology ODS Optical Devices and Sensors Team OSHA Occupational Safety and Health

  15. Mid-Ir Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer for Biological Trace Nitric Oxide Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Vincent; Ragab, Ahemd; Stsiapura, Vitali; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2011-06-01

    S-nitrosothiols have received much attention in biochemistry and medicine as donors of nitrosonium ion (NO^+) and nitric oxide (NO) - physiologically active molecules involved in vasodilation and signal transduction. Determination of S-nitrosothiols content in cells and tissues is of great importance for fundamental research and medical applications. We will report on our ongoing development of a instrument to measure trace levels of nitric oxide gas (NO), released from S-nitrosothiols after exposure to UV light (340 nm) or reaction with L-Cysteine+CuCl mixture. The instrument uses the method of cavity ring-down spectroscopy, probing rotationally resolved lines in the vibrational fundamental transition near 5.2 μm. The laser source is a continuous-wave, room temperature external cavity quantum cascade laser. An acousto-optic modulator is used to abruptly turn off the optical power incident on the cavity when the laser and cavity pass through resonance.

  16. Simultaneous Measurements of Soil CO2 and CH4 Fluxes Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachhpal S. Jassal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a method of simultaneously measuring soil CO and CH fluxes using a laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS coupled to an automated non-steady-state chamber system. The differential equation describing the change in the greenhouse gas (GHG mixing ratio in the chamber headspace following lid closure is solved for the condition when a small flow rate of chamber headspace air is pulled through the CRDS by an external pump and exhausted to the atmosphere. The small flow rate allows calculation of fluxes assuming linear relationships between the GHG mixing ratios and chamber lid closure times of a few minutes. We also calibrated the chambers for effective volume ( and show that adsorption of the GHGs on the walls of the chamber caused to be 7% higher than the geometric volume, with the near-surface soil porosity causing another 4% increase in .

  17. The CO_2 absorption spectrum in the 2.3 µm transparency window by high sensitivity CRDS: (II) Self-absorption continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondelain, D.; Vasilchenko, S.; Čermák, P.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    The CO_2 absorption continuum near 2.3 µm is determined for a series of sub atmospheric pressures (250–750 Torr) by high sensitivity Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy. An experimental procedure consisting in injecting successively a gas flow of CO_2 and synthetic air, keeping constant the gas pressure in the CRDS cell, has been developed. This procedure insures a high stability of the spectra baseline by avoiding changes of the optical alignment due to pressure changes. The CO_2 continuum was obtained as the difference between the CO_2 absorption coefficient and a local lines simulation using a Voigt profile truncated at ±25 cm"−"1. Following the results of the preceding analysis of the CO_2 rovibrational lines (Vasilchenko S et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer (10.1016/j.jqsrt.2016.07.002), a CO_2 line list with intensities obtained by variational calculations and empirical line positions was preferred to the HITRAN line list. A quadratic pressure dependence of the absorption continuum is observed, with an average binary absorption coefficient increasing from 2 to 4×10"−"8 cm"−"1 amagat"−"2 between 4320 and 4380 cm"−"1. The obtained continuum is found in good agreement with a previous measurement using much higher densities (20 amagat) and a low resolution grating spectrograph and is consistent with values currently used in the analysis of Venus spectra. - Highlights: • The CO_2 absorption continuum is measured by CRDS in the 2.3 µm window. • The achieved sensitivity and stability allow measurements at sub-atmospheric pressure. • The absorption coefficient is on the order of 3×10"−"8 cm"−"1 amagat"−"2 near 4350 cm"−"1. • A good agreement is obtained with previous results at much higher density (20 amagat).

  18. Pulse labelling for carbon turnover measurements with a CRDS for wetlands - challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozecki, Marcin; Samson, Mateusz; Chojnicki, Bogdan H.; Leśny, Jacek; Moni, Christophe; Urbaniak, Marek; Olejnik, Janusz; Juszczak, Radosław; Silvennoinnen, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    Carbon turnover in peatlands has commonly been studied by estimating carbon allocation and decomposition rates by litterbags, assessing changes in carbon stocks and by measuring the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon gases with various chamber methods or by eddy covariance. In addition, C turnover rates have been measured with pulse labelling methods using 13C and 14C (e.g. Bahn et al. 2009). Pulse labeling (PL) studies in wetlands are, however, sparse (e.g. Gao et al. 2015), presumably as descriptive high water table levels and relatively low productivity render successful tracing difficult. Quite low cost fast-gas-analyzers (Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry, CRDS) make PL experiments more cost-worthy, but their applicability at wetland field and further for measuring elevated 13C - levels is challenging. We carried out a PL as a pre-experiment for a larger labelling campaign of the Wetman-project at Rzecin wetland in Poland. We aimed at defining 1) The optimum labeling for the peatland site, 2) The importance of dissolved 13CO2 both for the loss of the pulse label and for the potential bias to respiratory flux, 3) The reliability of the 13CO2 and 13CH4 measurements when using dynamic closed chambers with a factory calibrated CRDS. We labelled the study area by a transparent chamber combined to Picarro CRDS G2201-i (C input during labelling 4.9 μg 13C). After labelling, we monitored the respiratory 13CO2 flux and the 13CO2 content in the peat water over a 10d- period. In addition, we measured the vegetation13C before labelling and 10 days after. Plants assimilated 2.1 μg C of the added 13C. Half of the recovered 13CO2 (3.6 μg C) originated from respiration. Nearly one third of added 13CO2 immediately dissolved in the water, which at the end of the experiment retained 0.5 μg 13C. Finally, 127 % of the added label was recovered. The high recovery was mainly caused by overestimation in the δ13C. The results of our pre-experiment indicate that 1) Measuring

  19. Is the Gravitational-Wave Ringdown a Probe of the Event Horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Franzin, Edgardo; Pani, Paolo

    2016-04-29

    It is commonly believed that the ringdown signal from a binary coalescence provides a conclusive proof for the formation of an event horizon after the merger. This expectation is based on the assumption that the ringdown waveform at intermediate times is dominated by the quasinormal modes of the final object. We point out that this assumption should be taken with great care, and that very compact objects with a light ring will display a similar ringdown stage, even when their quasinormal-mode spectrum is completely different from that of a black hole. In other words, universal ringdown waveforms indicate the presence of light rings, rather than of horizons. Only precision observations of the late-time ringdown signal, where the differences in the quasinormal-mode spectrum eventually show up, can be used to rule out exotic alternatives to black holes and to test quantum effects at the horizon scale.

  20. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  1. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  2. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  3. The CO2 absorption spectrum in the 2.3 μm transparency window by high sensitivity CRDS: (II) Self-absorption continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelain, D.; Vasilchenko, S.; Čermák, P.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    The CO2 absorption continuum near 2.3 μm is determined for a series of sub atmospheric pressures (250-750 Torr) by high sensitivity Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy. An experimental procedure consisting in injecting successively a gas flow of CO2 and synthetic air, keeping constant the gas pressure in the CRDS cell, has been developed. This procedure insures a high stability of the spectra baseline by avoiding changes of the optical alignment due to pressure changes. The CO2 continuum was obtained as the difference between the CO2 absorption coefficient and a local lines simulation using a Voigt profile truncated at ±25 cm-1. Following the results of the preceding analysis of the CO2 rovibrational lines (Vasilchenko S et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2016.07.002, a CO2 line list with intensities obtained by variational calculations and empirical line positions was preferred to the HITRAN line list. A quadratic pressure dependence of the absorption continuum is observed, with an average binary absorption coefficient increasing from 2 to 4×10-8 cm-1 amagat-2 between 4320 and 4380 cm-1. The obtained continuum is found in good agreement with a previous measurement using much higher densities (20 amagat) and a low resolution grating spectrograph and is consistent with values currently used in the analysis of Venus spectra.

  4. Impôts Français : CRDS - French version only

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Avis de dégrèvements IMPORTANT : Cette note d'information concerne uniquement : - les membres du personnel de nationalité française ou résidents permanents1 , domiciliés en France dans le département de l'Ain et rémunérés par le CERN (titulaires, boursiers, attachés payés et de projet) ; - Les anciens membres du personnel de l'Organisation, bénéficiaires de la Caisse de Pensions du CERN, domiciliés ou ayant été domiciliés en France dans le département de l'Ain. Ces personnes ont récemment reçu, ou sont sur le point de recevoir, un avis de dégrèvement émanant de la Direction des Services Fiscaux de l'Ain (DSFA) et portant sur la Contribution au Remboursement de la Dette Sociale (CRDS). I. Informations général...

  5. CERNois et contributions sociales françaises CSG et CRDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Les informations données dans cet article sont fournies à titre purement indicatif et n’engagent pas la responsabilité de l’Association du Personnel du CERN. Nous invitons les personnes intéressées à solliciter une consultation juridique professionnelle avant toute démarche légale. Les revenus du patrimoine des CERNois résidant en France sont actuellement soumis à la « contribution sociale généralisée » (CSG) et la « contribution pour le remboursement de la dette sociale » (CRDS). D’après un jugement récent de la Cour de justice de l’Union européenne (CJUE, Arrêt C-623/13) et l’Accord de sécurité sociale de 1970 régissant les relations entre le CERN et l’Etat hôte en mati&egra...

  6. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  7. Is black-hole ringdown a memory of its progenitor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaretsos, Ioannis; Hannam, Mark; Sathyaprakash, B S

    2012-10-05

    We perform an extensive numerical study of coalescing black-hole binaries to understand the gravitational-wave spectrum of quasinormal modes excited in the merged black hole. Remarkably, we find that the masses and spins of the progenitor are clearly encoded in the mode spectrum of the ringdown signal. Some of the mode amplitudes carry the signature of the binary's mass ratio, while others depend critically on the spins. Simulations of precessing binaries suggest that our results carry over to generic systems. Using Bayesian inference, we demonstrate that it is possible to accurately measure the mass ratio and a proper combination of spins even when the binary is itself invisible to a detector. Using a mapping of the binary masses and spins to the final black-hole spin allows us to further extract the spin components of the progenitor. Our results could have tremendous implications for gravitational astronomy by facilitating novel tests of general relativity using merging black holes.

  8. High-accuracy waveforms for binary black hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheel, Mark A.; Boyle, Michael; Chu, Tony; Matthews, Keith D.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Kidder, Lawrence E.

    2009-01-01

    The first spectral numerical simulations of 16 orbits, merger, and ringdown of an equal-mass nonspinning binary black hole system are presented. Gravitational waveforms from these simulations have accumulated numerical phase errors through ringdown of f /M=0.951 62±0.000 02, and the final black hole spin is S f /M f 2 =0.686 46±0.000 04.

  9. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... characterized by using phenotypic, API and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. One hundred and fifty-seven (157) strains were isolated from 13 cheese samples, and identification test was performed for 83 strains. At the end of the study, a total of 22 Lactococcus sp., 36 Enterecoccus ...

  10. Time-domain fiber loop ringdown sensor and sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Malik

    Optical fibers have been mostly used in fiber optic communications, imaging optics, sensing technology, etc. Fiber optic sensors have gained increasing attention for scientific and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. In this study, fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) sensors were fabricated for scientific, SHM, and sensor networking applications. FLRD biosensors were fabricated for both bulk refractive index (RI)- and surface RI-based DNA sensing and one type of bacteria sensing. Furthermore, the effect of glucose oxidase (GOD) immobilization at the sensor head on sensor performance was evaluated for both glucose and synthetic urine solutions with glucose concentration between 0.1% and 10%. Detection sensitivities of the glucose sensors were achieved as low as 0.05%. For chemical sensing, heavy water, ranging from 97% to 10%, and several elemental solutions were monitored by using the FLRD chemical sensors. Bulk index-based FLRD sensing showed that trace elements can be detected in deionized water. For physical sensing, water and cracking sensors were fabricated and embedded into concrete. A partially-etched single-mode fiber (SMF) was embedded into a concrete bar for water monitoring while a bare SMF without any treatment was directly embedded into another concrete bar for monitoring cracks. Furthermore, detection sensitivities of water and crack sensors were investigated as 10 ml water and 0.5 mm surface crack width, respectively. Additionally fiber loop ringdown-fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors were developed in the laboratory; two sensor units for water, crack, and temperature sensing were deployed into a concrete cube in a US Department of Energy test bed (Miami, FL). Multi-sensor applications in a real concrete structure were accomplished by testing the six FLRD sensors. As a final stage, a sensor network was assembled by multiplexing two or three FLRD sensors in series and parallel. Additionally, two FLRD sensors were combined in series and

  11. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of a Pulsed Supersonic Uniform Flow for Kinetics and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suas-David, Nicolas; Thawoos, Shameemah; Broderick, Bernadette M.; Suits, Arthur

    2017-06-01

    The current CPUF (Chirped Pulse Uniform Flow) and the new UF-CRDS (Uniform Flow Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) setups relie mostly on the production of a good quality supersonic uniform flow. A supersonic uniform flow is produced by expanding a gas through a Laval nozzle - similar to the nozzles used in aeronautics - linked to a vacuum chamber. The expansion is characterized by an isentropic core where constant very low kinetic temperature (down to 20K) and constant density are observed. The relatively large diameter of the isentropic core associated with homogeneous thermodynamic conditions makes it a relevant tool for low temperature spectroscopy. On the other hand, the length along the axis of the flow of this core (could be longer than 50cm) allows kinetic studies which is one of the main interest of this setup (CRESU technique. The formation of a uniform flow requires an extreme accuracy in the design of the shape of the nozzle for a set of defined temperature/density. The design is based on a Matlab program which retrieves the shape of the isentropic core according to the method of characteristics prior to calculate the thickness of the boundary layer. Two different approaches are used to test the viability of a new nozzle derived from the program. First, a computational fluid dynamic software (OpenFOAM) models the distribution of the thermodynamic properties of the expansion. Then, fabricated nozzles using 3-D printing are tested based on Pitot measurements and spectroscopic analyses. I will present comparisons of simulation and measured performance for a range of nozzles. We will see how the high level of accuracy of numerical simulations provides a deeper knowledge of the experimental conditions. J. M. Oldham, C. Abeysekera, J. Joalland, L. N. Zack, K. Prozument, I. R. Sims, G. Barrat Park, R. W. Filed and A. G. Suits, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 154202, (2014). I. Sims, J. L. Queffelec, A. Defrance, C. Rebrion-Rowe, D. Travers, P. Bocherel, B. Rowe, I. W. Smith

  12. Decoding Mode-mixing in Black-hole Merger Ringdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal extraction of information from gravitational-wave observations of binary black-hole coalescences requires detailed knowledge of the waveforms. Current approaches for representing waveform information are based on spin-weighted spherical harmonic decomposition. Higher-order harmonic modes carrying a few percent of the total power output near merger can supply information critical to determining intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the binary. One obstacle to constructing a full multi-mode template of merger waveforms is the apparently complicated behavior of some of these modes; instead of settling down to a simple quasinormal frequency with decaying amplitude, some |m| = modes show periodic bumps characteristic of mode-mixing. We analyze the strongest of these modes the anomalous (3, 2) harmonic mode measured in a set of binary black-hole merger waveform simulations, and show that to leading order, they are due to a mismatch between the spherical harmonic basis used for extraction in 3D numerical relativity simulations, and the spheroidal harmonics adapted to the perturbation theory of Kerr black holes. Other causes of mode-mixing arising from gauge ambiguities and physical properties of the quasinormal ringdown modes are also considered and found to be small for the waveforms studied here.

  13. The gravitational-wave recoil from the ringdown phase of coalescing black hole binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tiec, Alexandre; Blanchet, Luc; Will, Clifford M

    2010-01-01

    The gravitational recoil or 'kick' of a black hole formed from the merger of two orbiting black holes, and caused by the anisotropic emission of gravitational radiation, is an astrophysically important phenomenon. We combine (i) an earlier calculation, using post-Newtonian theory, of the kick velocity accumulated up to the merger of two non-spinning black holes, (ii) a 'close-limit approximation' calculation of the radiation emitted during the ringdown phase, and based on a solution of the Regge-Wheeler and Zerilli equations using initial data accurate to second post-Newtonian order. We prove that ringdown radiation produces a significant 'anti-kick'. Adding the contributions due to inspiral, merger and ringdown phases, our results for the net kick velocity agree with those from numerical relativity to 10-15% over a wide range of mass ratios, with a maximum velocity of 180 km s -1 at a mass ratio of 0.38. (fast track communication)

  14. Sensitivity enhancement of fiber loop cavity ring-down pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yajun; Yang, Dexing; Tang, Daqing; Zhao, Jianlin

    2009-11-10

    We present a theoretical and experimental study on sensitivity enhancement of a fiber-loop cavity ring-down pressure sensor. The cladding of the sensing fiber is etched in hydrofluoric acid solution to enhance its sensitivity. The experimental results demonstrate that the pressure applied on the sensing fiber is linearly proportional to the difference between the reciprocals of the ring-down time with and without pressure, and the relative sensitivity exponentially increases with decreasing the cladding diameter. When the sensing fiber is etched to 41.15 microm, its sensitivity is about 36 times that of nonetched fiber in the range of 0 to 32.5 MPa. The measured relative standard deviation of the ring-down time is about 0.15% and, correspondingly, the least detectable loss is about 0.00069 dB.

  15. Parameter estimation of compact binaries using the inspiral and ringdown waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, Manuel; Sintes, Alicia M

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the problem of parameter estimation for compact binary systems that could be detected by ground-based gravitational wave detectors. So far, this problem has only been dealt with for the inspiral and the ringdown phases separately. In this paper, we combine the information from both signals, and we study the improvement in parameter estimation, at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio, by including the ringdown signal without making any assumption on the merger phase. The study is performed for both initial and advanced LIGO and VIRGO detectors

  16. First measurement of the Rayleigh cross section

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2000-01-01

    Rayleigh cross section for N2, Ar and SF6 was performed using the technique of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The experiment was based on the assumption that scattering cross section is equal to the extinction in the absence of absorption. The theory explains the molecular origin of

  17. The IAGOS-core greenhouse gas package : a measurement system for continuous airborne observations of CO2, CH4, H2O and CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filges, Annette; Gerbig, Christoph; Chen, Huilin; Franke, Harald; Klaus, Christoph; Jordan, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of IAGOS-ERI (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System - European Research Infrastructure), a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS)-based measurement system for the autonomous measurement of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) CO2 and CH4, as well as CO and water vapour was

  18. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085,. India. *Corresponding author. E-mail: gsridhar@barc.gov.in. Abstract. A simple, accurate and reliable method for measuring the reflectivity of laser- ... Keywords. Cavity ring-down method; reflectivity measurement; optical resonator.

  19. Cavity ring-down technique for measurement of reflectivity of high

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    grade mirrors ( > 99.5 %) based on cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has been success-fully demonstrated in our laboratory using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A fast photomultiplier tube with an oscilloscope was used to detect and analyse the CRD ...

  20. Bandwidth-limited control and ringdown suppression in high-Q resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Troy W; Cory, David G

    2012-12-01

    We describe how the transient behavior of a tuned and matched resonator circuit and a ringdown suppression pulse may be integrated into an optimal control theory (OCT) pulse-design algorithm to derive control sequences with limited ringdown that perform a desired quantum operation in the presence of resonator distortions of the ideal waveform. Inclusion of ringdown suppression in numerical pulse optimizations significantly reduces spectrometer deadtime when using high quality factor (high-Q) resonators, leading to increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of inductive measurements. To demonstrate the method, we experimentally measure the free-induction decay of an inhomogeneously broadened solid-state free radical spin system at high Q. The measurement is enabled by using a numerically optimized bandwidth-limited OCT pulse, including ringdown suppression, robust to variations in static and microwave field strengths. We also discuss the applications of pulse design in high-Q resonators to universal control of anisotropic-hyperfine coupled electron-nuclear spin systems via electron-only modulation even when the bandwidth of the resonator is significantly smaller than the hyperfine coupling strength. These results demonstrate how limitations imposed by linear response theory may be vastly exceeded when using a sufficiently accurate system model to optimize pulses of high complexity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Portable Real-Time Ringdown Breath Acetone Analyzer: Toward Potential Diabetic Screening and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chenyu; Sun, Meixiu; Wang, Zhennan; Chen, Zhuying; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2016-07-30

    Breath analysis has been considered a suitable tool to evaluate diseases of the respiratory system and those that involve metabolic changes, such as diabetes. Breath acetone has long been known as a biomarker for diabetes. However, the results from published data by far have been inconclusive regarding whether breath acetone is a reliable index of diabetic screening. Large variations exist among the results of different studies because there has been no "best-practice method" for breath-acetone measurements as a result of technical problems of sampling and analysis. In this mini-review, we update the current status of our development of a laser-based breath acetone analyzer toward real-time, one-line diabetic screening and a point-of-care instrument for diabetic management. An integrated standalone breath acetone analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique has been developed. The instrument was validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The linear fittings suggest that the obtained acetone concentrations via both methods are consistent. Breath samples from each individual subject under various conditions in total, 1257 breath samples were taken from 22 Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, 312 Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients, which is one of the largest numbers of T2D subjects ever used in a single study, and 52 non-diabetic healthy subjects. Simultaneous blood glucose (BG) levels were also tested using a standard diabetic management BG meter. The mean breath acetone concentrations were determined to be 4.9 ± 16 ppm (22 T1D), and 1.5 ± 1.3 ppm (312 T2D), which are about 4.5 and 1.4 times of the one in the 42 non-diabetic healthy subjects, 1.1 ± 0.5 ppm, respectively. A preliminary quantitative correlation (R = 0.56, p acetone concentration and the mean individual BG levels does exist in 20 T1D subjects with no ketoacidosis. No direct correlation is observed in T1D subjects, T2D subjects, and healthy subjects. The results

  2. Determination of breath acetone in 149 type 2 diabetic patients using a ringdown breath-acetone analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Chen, Zhuying; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Chenyu; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Zhennang; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-02-01

    Over 90% of diabetic patients have Type 2 diabetes. Although an elevated mean breath acetone concentration has been found to exist in Type 1 diabetes (T1D), information on breath acetone in Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has yet to be obtained. In this study, we first used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to validate a ringdown breath-acetone analyzer based on the cavity-ringdown-spectroscopy technique, through comparing breath acetone concentrations in the range 0.5-2.5 ppm measured using both methods. The linear fitting of R = 0.99 suggests that the acetone concentrations obtained using both methods are consistent with a largest standard deviation of ±0.4 ppm in the lowest concentration of the range. Next, 620 breath samples from 149 T2D patients and 42 healthy subjects were collected and tested using the breath analyzer. Four breath samples were taken from each subject under each of four different conditions: fasting, 2 h post-breakfast, 2 h post-lunch, and 2 h post-dinner. Simultaneous blood glucose levels were also measured using a standard diabetic-management blood-glucose meter. For the 149 T2D subjects, their exhaled breath acetone concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 19.8 ppm; four different ranges of breath acetone concentration, 0.1-19.8, 0.1-7.1, 0.1-6.3, and 0.1-9.5 ppm, were obtained for the subjects under the four different conditions, respectively. For the 42 healthy subjects, their breath acetone concentration ranged from 0.1 to 2.6 ppm; four different ranges of breath acetone concentration, 0.3-2.6, 0.1-2.6, 0.1-1.7, and 0.3-1.6 ppm, were obtained for the four different conditions. The mean breath acetone concentration of the 149 T2D subjects was determined to be 1.5 ± 1.5 ppm, which was 1.5 times that of 1.0 ± 0.6 ppm for the 42 healthy subjects. No correlation was found between the breath acetone concentration and the blood glucose level of the T2D subjects and the healthy volunteers. This study using a relatively large number of

  3. On detection of black hole quasinormal ringdowns: Detection efficiency and waveform parameter determination in matched filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Tatsumi, Daisuke; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ando, Masaki; Sasaki, Misao; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational radiation from a slightly distorted black hole with ringdown waveform is well understood in general relativity. It provides a probe for direct observation of black holes and determination of their physical parameters, masses and angular momenta (Kerr parameters). For ringdown searches using data of gravitational wave detectors, matched filtering technique is useful. In this paper, we describe studies on problems in matched filtering analysis in realistic gravitational wave searches using observational data. Above all, we focus on template constructions, matches or signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), detection probabilities for Galactic events, and accuracies in evaluation of waveform parameters or black hole hairs. In template design for matched filtering, search parameter ranges and template separations are determined by requirements from acceptable maximum loss of SNRs, detection efficiencies, and computational costs. In realistic searches using observational data, however, effects of nonstationary noises cause decreases of SNRs, and increases of errors in waveform parameter determinations. These problems will potentially arise in any matched filtering searches for any kind of waveforms. To investigate them, we have performed matched filtering analysis for artificial ringdown signals which are generated with Monte-Carlo technique and injected into the TAMA300 observational data. We employed an efficient method to construct a bank of ringdown filters recently proposed by Nakano et al., and use a template bank generated from a criterion such that losses of SNRs of any signals do not exceed 2%. We found that this criterion is fulfilled in ringdown searches using TAMA300 data, by examining distribution of SNRs of simulated signals. It is also shown that with TAMA300 sensitivity, the detection probability for Galactic ringdown events is about 50% for black holes of masses greater than 20M · with SNR>10. The accuracies in waveform parameter estimations are

  4. Molecular Laser Spectroscopy as a Tool for Gas Analysis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javis Anyangwe Nwaboh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used the traceable infrared laser spectrometric amount fraction measurement (TILSAM method to perform absolute concentration measurements of molecular species using three laser spectroscopic techniques. We report results performed by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS, and cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS, all based on the TILSAM methodology. The measured results of the different spectroscopic techniques are in agreement with respective gravimetric values, showing that the TILSAM method is feasible with all different techniques. We emphasize the data quality objectives given by traceability issues and uncertainty analyses.

  5. Real time interrogation technique for fiber Bragg grating enhanced fiber loop ringdown sensors array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Li, Ruoming; Shi, Yuechun; Zhang, Jintao; Chen, Xiangfei; Liu, Shengchun

    2015-06-01

    A novel fiber Bragg grating aided fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) sensor array and the wavelength-time multiplexing based interrogation technique for the FLRD sensors array are proposed. The interrogation frequency of the system is formulated and the interrelationships among the parameters of the system are analyzed. To validate the performance of the proposed system, a five elements array is experimentally demonstrated, and the system shows the capability of real time monitoring every FLRD element with interrogation frequency of 125.5 Hz.

  6. Cavity ring down spectroscopy of CH, CH2, HCO, and H2CO in a premixed flat flame at both atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evertsen, R.; Staicu, A.D.; Oijen, van J.A.; Dam, N.J.; Goey, de L.P.H.; Meulen, ter J.J.; Cheauveau, C.; Vovelle, C.

    2003-01-01

    Density distributions of CH, CH2, HCO and H2CO have been measured in a premixed CH4/air flat flame by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). At atmospheric pressure problems are encountered due to the narrow spatial distribution of these species. Rotational flame Temperatures have been derived from

  7. Dual-etalon cavity ring-down frequency-comb spectroscopy with broad band light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W; Strecker, Kevin E

    2014-04-01

    In an embodiment, a dual-etalon cavity-ring-down frequency-comb spectrometer system is described. A broad band light source is split into two beams. One beam travels through a first etalon and a sample under test, while the other beam travels through a second etalon, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges ("FSR") of the two etalons are not identical, the interference pattern at the detector will consist of a series of beat frequencies. By monitoring these beat frequencies, optical frequencies where light is absorbed may be determined.

  8. Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties by Integrating Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and Nephelometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Getachew Tedela North Carolina A&T State University 1601 East Market Street Greensboro, NC 27411 -3209 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE b. ABSTRACT UU c. THIS...2.1013 3.273 )( P TSTPgasKgasK  (18) Where, the standard temperature and pressure ( STP ) are 273.2 k and 1013.2 mb

  9. Sky Localization of Complete Inspiral-Merger-Ringdown Signals for Nonspinning Black Hole Binaries with LISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Lang, Ryan N.; Baker, John G.; Thorpe, James Ira

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the capability of LISA to measure the sky position of equal-mass, nonspinning black hole binaries, including for the first time the entire inspiral-merger-ringdown signal, the effect of the LISA orbits, and the complete three-channel LISA response. For an ensemble of systems near the peak of LISA's sensitivity band, with total rest mass of 2 x l0(exp 6) Stellar Mass at a redshift of z = 1 with random orientations and sky positions, we find median sky localization errors of approximately approx. 3 arcminutes. This is comparable to the field of view of powerful electromagnetic telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope, that could be used to search for electromagnetic signals associated with merging black holes. We investigate the way in which parameter errors decrease with measurement time, focusing specifically on the additional information provided during the merger-ringdown segment of the signal. We find that this information improves all parameter estimates directly, rather than through diminishing correlations with any subset of well-determined parameters.

  10. Black-hole ringdown search in TAMA300: matched filtering and event selections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Tatsumi, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    Detecting gravitational ringdown waves provides a probe for direct observation of astrophysical black holes. The masses and angular momenta of black holes can be determined from the waveforms by using the black-hole perturbation theory. In this paper we present data analysis methods to search for black-hole ringdowns of fundamental quasi-normal modes with interferometric gravitational wave detectors, and report an application to the TAMA300 data. Our method is based upon matched filtering by which we calculate cross-correlations between detector outputs and reference waveforms. In a search for gravitational signals, fake reductions and event identifications are of most importance. We developed two methods to reject spurious triggers in filter outputs in the time domain and examined their reduction powers. It is shown that by using the methods presented here the number of fake triggers can be reduced by an order with a false dismissal probability of 5%. We also discuss the possibility of using the higher order quasi-normal modes for event selection

  11. Resposta do detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg ao "ringdown" de buraco negros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, C. A.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    2003-08-01

    Acredita-se que quando duas estrelas de nêutrons coalescem, elas, eventualmente, formam um buraco negro com massa igual a soma das massas dos objetos originais. Durante a formação do buraco negro, o espaço-tempo em torno do sistema sofre perturbações que se propagam na forma de radiação gravitacional. A forma de onda associada a radiação gravitacional, durante este estágio, aproxima-se a uma senóide exponencialmente amortecida. Este tipo de sinal é conhecido como "ringdown", e seu comportamento e parametrização são muito bem conhecidos. Neste trabalho, simulamos computacionalmente sinais provenientes do "ringdown" de buracos negros, com a finalidade de testar o desempenho do detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg em observá-los, quando entrar em funcionamento. Este primeiro teste teórico ajudou-nos a criar estratégias de detecção de sinais imersos no ruído instrumental. Calculamos a relação sinal-ruído como uma função da frequência, bem como sua integral dentro da faixa de sensibilidade do detector. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que o detector Schenberg terá sensibilidade suficiente para detectar este tipo de sinal, proveniente de fontes astrofísicas localizadas dentro de um raio de ~100kpc.

  12. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant ...

  13. Inspiral, merger, and ring-down of equal-mass black-hole binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonanno, Alessandra; Cook, Gregory B.; Pretorius, Frans

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics and gravitational-wave (GW) emission in the binary merger of equal-mass black holes as obtained from numerical relativity simulations. The simulations were performed with an evolution code based on generalized harmonic coordinates developed by Pretorius, and used quasiequilibrium initial-data sets constructed by Cook and Pfeiffer. Results from the evolution of three sets of initial data are explored in detail, corresponding to different initial separations of the black holes, and exhibit between 2-8 GW cycles before coalescence. We find that to a good approximation the inspiral phase of the evolution is quasicircular, followed by a 'blurred, quasicircular plunge' lasting for about 1-1.5 GW cycles. After this plunge the GW frequency decouples from the orbital frequency, and we define this time to be the start of the merger phase. Roughly 10-15 M separates the time between the beginning of the merger phase and when we are able to extract quasinormal ring-down modes from gravitational waves emitted by the newly formed black hole. This suggests that the merger lasts for a correspondingly short amount of time, approximately 0.5-0.75 of a full GW cycle. We present first-order comparisons between analytical models of the various stages of the merger and the numerical results--more detailed and accurate comparisons will need to await numerical simulations with higher accuracy, better control of systemic errors (including coordinate artifacts), and initial configurations where the binaries are further separated. During the inspiral, we find that if the orbital phase is well modeled, the leading order Newtonian quadrupole formula is able to match both the amplitude and phase of the numerical GW quite accurately until close to the point of merger. We provide comparisons between the numerical results and analytical predictions based on the adiabatic post-Newtonian (PN) and nonadiabatic resummed-PN models (effective-one-body and Pade models). For all

  14. A low-volume cavity ring-down spectrometer for sample-limited applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowasser, C.; Farinas, A. D.; Ware, J.; Wistisen, D. W.; Rella, C.; Wahl, E.; Crosson, E.; Blunier, T.

    2014-08-01

    In atmospheric and environmental sciences, optical spectrometers are used for the measurements of greenhouse gas mole fractions and the isotopic composition of water vapor or greenhouse gases. The large sample cell volumes (tens of milliliters to several liters) in commercially available spectrometers constrain the usefulness of such instruments for applications that are limited in sample size and/or need to track fast variations in the sample stream. In an effort to make spectrometers more suitable for sample-limited applications, we developed a low-volume analyzer capable of measuring mole fractions of methane and carbon monoxide based on a commercial cavity ring-down spectrometer. The instrument has a small sample cell (9.6 ml) and can selectively be operated at a sample cell pressure of 140, 45, or 20 Torr (effective internal volume of 1.8, 0.57, and 0.25 ml). We present the new sample cell design and the flow path configuration, which are optimized for small sample sizes. To quantify the spectrometer's usefulness for sample-limited applications, we determine the renewal rate of sample molecules within the low-volume spectrometer. Furthermore, we show that the performance of the low-volume spectrometer matches the performance of the standard commercial analyzers by investigating linearity, precision, and instrumental drift.

  15. Carbon isotope systematics of Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica, using a portable cavity ring-down spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malowany, K. S.; Stix, J.; de Moor, J. M.; Chu, K.; Lacrampe-Couloume, G.; Sherwood Lollar, B.

    2017-07-01

    Over the past two decades, activity at Turrialba volcano, Costa Rica, has shifted from hydrothermal to increasingly magmatic in character, with enhanced degassing and eruption potential. We have conducted a survey of the δ13C signatures of gases at Turrialba using a portable field-based CRDS with comparison to standard IRMS techniques. Our δ13C results of the volcanic plume, high-temperature vents, and soil gases reveal isotopic heterogeneity in the CO2 gas composition at Turrialba prior to its recent phase of eruptive activity. The isotopic value of the regional fault system, Falla Ariete (-3.4 ± 0.1‰), is in distinct contrast with the Central crater gases (-3.9 ± 0.1‰) and the 2012 high-temperature vent (-4.4 ± 0.2‰), an indication that spatial variability in δ13C may be linked to hydrothermal transport of volcanic gases, heterogeneities in the source composition, or magmatic degassing. Isotopic values of CO2 samples collected in the plume vary from δ13C of -5.2 to -10.0‰, indicative of mixing between atmospheric CO2 (-9.2 ± 0.1‰), and a volcanic source. We compare the Keeling method to a traditional mixing model (hyperbolic mixing curve) to estimate the volcanic source composition at Turrialba from the plume measurements. The predicted source compositions from the Keeling and hyperbolic methods (-3.0 ± 0.5‰ and -3.9 ± 0.4‰, respectively) illustrate two potential interpretations of the volcanic source at Turrialba. As of the 29 October 2014, Turrialba has entered a new eruptive period, and continued monitoring of the summit gases for δ13C should be conducted to better understand the dominant processes controlling δ13C fractionation at Turrialba.

  16. Photodissociation action spectroscopy of ozonized films of undecylenic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Anthony; Li, Ao; Wlaser, Maggie; Britigan, Nicole; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2005-03-01

    Photochemical studies of thin films of oxidized undecylenic acid and its salts will be presented. The films are first partially oxidized by ozone, and then irradiated with a wavelength tunable UV source in an inert atmosphere. The escaping gas-phase photochemical products are detected by cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a function of the excitation frequency. The film composition is analyzed by chromatography and mass spectrometry. The data provide critical new insights into the mechanisms of ozonolysis and photolysis of oxidized undecylenic acid, and have serious implications for atmospheric chemistry of organic aerosol particles.

  17. The Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties Using Continuous Wave Cavity Ring-Down Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Owano, T.; Castaneda, R.; Baer, D. S.; Paldus, B. A.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects that aerosols have on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This abstract describes the use of continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) technology to address this problem. The innovations in this instrument are the use of CW-CRD to measure aerosol extinction coefficient, the simultaneous measurement of scattering coefficient, and small size suitable for a wide range of aircraft applications. Our prototype instrument measures extinction and scattering coefficient at 690 nm and extinction coefficient at 1550 nm. The instrument itself is small (60 x 48 x 15 cm) and relatively insensitive to vibrations. The prototype instrument has been tested in our lab and used in the field. While improvements in performance are needed, the prototype has been shown to make accurate and sensitive measurements of extinction and scattering coefficients. Combining these two parameters, one can obtain the single-scattering albedo and absorption coefficient, both important aerosol properties. The use of two wavelengths also allows us to obtain a quantitative idea of the size of the aerosol through the Angstrom exponent. Minimum sensitivity of the prototype instrument is 1.5 x 10(exp -6)/m (1.5/Mm). Validation of the measurement of extinction coefficient has been accomplished by comparing the measurement of calibration spheres with Mie calculations. This instrument and its successors have potential to help reduce uncertainty currently associated with aerosol optical properties and their spatial and temporal variation. Possible applications include studies of visibility, climate forcing by aerosol, and the validation of aerosol retrieval schemes from satellite data.

  18. Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in a Salt-Wedge Estuary Revealed by High Resolution Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Douglas R; Maher, Damien T; Wong, WeiWen; Santos, Isaac R; Sadat-Noori, Mahmood; Holloway, Ceylena; Cook, Perran L M

    2017-12-05

    Estuaries are an important source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, but uncertainties remain in the flux rates and production pathways of greenhouse gases in these dynamic systems. This study performs simultaneous high resolution measurements of the three major greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) as well as carbon stable isotope ratios of carbon dioxide and methane, above and below the pycnocline along a salt wedge estuary (Yarra River estuary, Australia). We identified distinct zones of elevated greenhouse gas concentrations. At the tip of salt wedge, average CO 2 and N 2 O concentrations were approximately five and three times higher than in the saline mouth of the estuary. In anaerobic bottom waters, the natural tracer radon ( 222 Rn) revealed that porewater exchange was the likely source of the highest methane concentrations (up to 1302 nM). Isotopic analysis of CH 4 showed a dominance of acetoclastic production in fresh surface waters and hydrogenotrophic production occurring in the saline bottom waters. The atmospheric flux of methane (in CO 2 equivalent units) was a major (35-53%) contributor of atmospheric radiative forcing from the estuary, while N 2 O contributed <2%. We hypothesize that the release of bottom water gases when stratification episodically breaks down will release large pulses of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

  19. Performance assessment of a cavity ring-down laser spectrometer: achieving better precision and accuracy in the measurement of δ18O and δ2H in liquid water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prado-Pérez, A J; Rodríguez-Arévalo, J; Díaz-Teijeiro, M F

    2014-01-01

    The development of new isotopic laser-based analyzers currently represents a clear alternative to conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometers. However, this analytical technique also suffers some disadvantages such as the memory effect, problems related to the overall stability of the equipment and other issues associated with the injection system, essentially regarding the syringe's longevity. This paper aims to minimize these disadvantages in order to increase the overall performance, in terms of precision and accuracy, of these kinds of analyzers. The main results of the experiments carried out in this paper have shown that: (i) the minimum number of discarded injections needed to eliminate the memory effect can be determined just considering the expected isotopic signature difference between two consecutive samples; (ii) both accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurements increase with increasing injection volume up to 2.1–2.2 µL; (iii) it is possible to extend the syringe lifetime by almost a factor of 6 by using n-methyl 2-pyrrolidone as a lubricant. Besides, it has been concluded that, by using the appropriate procedure, the main disadvantages associated with CRDS laser spectroscopy analyzers can be minimized, achieving measurement accuracy and precision of the order of ±0.05 ‰ for δ 18 O and ±0.3 ‰ for δ 2 H. (paper)

  20. Search for Gravitational Wave Ringdowns from Perturbed Intermediate Mass Black Holes in LIGO-Virgo Data from 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency 50 less than or equal to italic f0/Hz less than or equal to 2000 and decay timescale 0.0001 approximately less than t/s approximately less than 0.1 characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass 50 less than or equal to M/solar mass less than or equal to 450 and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass 100 less than or equal to M/solar mass 150, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of 6:9 x 10(exp 8) Mpc(exp -3)yr(exp -1). We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, l=m=2, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  1. Evanescent-wave and ambient chiral sensing by signal-reversing cavity ringdown polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, Dimitris; Bougas, Lykourgos; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2014-10-02

    Detecting and quantifying chirality is important in fields ranging from analytical and biological chemistry to pharmacology and fundamental physics: it can aid drug design and synthesis, contribute to protein structure determination, and help detect parity violation of the weak force. Recent developments employ microwaves, femtosecond pulses, superchiral light or photoionization to determine chirality, yet the most widely used methods remain the traditional methods of measuring circular dichroism and optical rotation. However, these signals are typically very weak against larger time-dependent backgrounds. Cavity-enhanced optical methods can be used to amplify weak signals by passing them repeatedly through an optical cavity, and two-mirror cavities achieving up to 10(5) cavity passes have enabled absorption and birefringence measurements with record sensitivities. But chiral signals cancel when passing back and forth through a cavity, while the ubiquitous spurious linear birefringence background is enhanced. Even when intracavity optics overcome these problems, absolute chirality measurements remain difficult and sometimes impossible. Here we use a pulsed-laser bowtie cavity ringdown polarimeter with counter-propagating beams to enhance chiral signals by a factor equal to the number of cavity passes (typically >10(3)); to suppress the effects of linear birefringence by means of a large induced intracavity Faraday rotation; and to effect rapid signal reversals by reversing the Faraday rotation and subtracting signals from the counter-propagating beams. These features allow absolute chiral signal measurements in environments where background subtraction is not feasible: we determine optical rotation from α-pinene vapour in open air, and from maltodextrin and fructose solutions in the evanescent wave produced by total internal reflection at a prism surface. The limits of the present polarimeter, when using a continuous-wave laser locked to a stable, high

  2. Simultaneous analysis of 17O/16O, 18O/16O and 2H/1H of gypsum hydration water by cavity ring‐down laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Ian; Rolfe, James; Evans, Nicholas P.; Herwartz, Daniel; Staubwasser, Michael; Hodell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The recent development of cavity ring‐down laser spectroscopy (CRDS) instruments capable of measuring 17O‐excess in water has created new opportunities for studying the hydrologic cycle. Here we apply this new method to studying the triple oxygen (17O/16O, 18O/16O) and hydrogen (2H/1H) isotope ratios of gypsum hydration water (GHW), which can provide information about the conditions under which the mineral formed and subsequent post‐depositional interaction with other fluids. Methods We developed a semi‐automated procedure for extracting GHW by slowly heating the sample to 400°C in vacuo and cryogenically trapping the evolved water. The isotopic composition (δ17O, δ18O and δ2H values) of the GHW is subsequently measured by CRDS. The extraction apparatus allows the dehydration of five samples and one standard simultaneously, thereby increasing the long‐term precision and sample throughput compared with previous methods. The apparatus is also useful for distilling brines prior to isotopic analysis. A direct comparison is made between results of 17O‐excess in GHW obtained by CRDS and fluorination followed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) of O2. Results The long‐term analytical precision of our method of extraction and isotopic analysis of GHW by CRDS is ±0.07‰ for δ17O values, ±0.13‰ for δ18O values and ±0.49‰ for δ2H values (all ±1SD), and ±1.1‰ and ±8 per meg for the deuterium‐excess and 17O‐excess, respectively. Accurate measurement of the 17O‐excess values of GHW, of both synthetic and natural samples, requires the use of a micro‐combustion module (MCM). This accessory removes contaminants (VOCs, H2S, etc.) from the water vapour stream that interfere with the wavelengths used for spectroscopic measurement of water isotopologues. CRDS/MCM and IRMS methods yield similar isotopic results for the analysis of both synthetic and natural gypsum samples within analytical error of the two methods. Conclusions We

  3. Technical note: Coupling infrared gas analysis and cavity ring down spectroscopy for autonomous, high-temporal-resolution measurements of DIC and δ13C-DIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Mitchell; Schulz, Kai G.; Carvalho, Matheus C.; Santos, Isaac R.; Maher, Damien T.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach to autonomously determine concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its carbon stable isotope ratio (δ13C-DIC) at high temporal resolution is presented. The simple method requires no customised design. Instead it uses two commercially available instruments currently used in aquatic carbon research. An inorganic carbon analyser utilising non-dispersive infrared detection (NDIR) is coupled to a Cavity Ring-down Spectrometer (CRDS) to determine DIC and δ13C-DIC based on the liberated CO2 from acidified aliquots of water. Using a small sample volume of 2 mL, the precision and accuracy of the new method was comparable to standard isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) methods. The system achieved a sampling resolution of 16 min, with a DIC precision of ±1.5 to 2 µmol kg-1 and δ13C-DIC precision of ±0.14 ‰ for concentrations spanning 1000 to 3600 µmol kg-1. Accuracy of 0.1 ± 0.06 ‰ for δ13C-DIC based on DIC concentrations ranging from 2000 to 2230 µmol kg-1 was achieved during a laboratory-based algal bloom experiment. The high precision data that can be autonomously obtained by the system should enable complex carbonate system questions to be explored in aquatic sciences using high-temporal-resolution observations.

  4. Sensitive Spectroscopic Analysis of Biomarkers in Exhaled Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, A.; Bounds, J.; Zhu, F.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Kaya, N.; Aluauee, E.; Amani, M.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2018-06-01

    We have developed a novel optical setup which is based on a high finesse cavity and absorption laser spectroscopy in the near-IR spectral region. In pilot experiments, spectrally resolved absorption measurements of biomarkers in exhaled breath, such as methane and acetone, were carried out using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). With a 172-cm-long cavity, an efficient optical path of 132 km was achieved. The CRDS technique is well suited for such measurements due to its high sensitivity and good spectral resolution. The detection limits for methane of 8 ppbv and acetone of 2.1 ppbv with spectral sampling of 0.005 cm-1 were achieved, which allowed to analyze multicomponent gas mixtures and to observe absorption peaks of 12CH4 and 13CH4. Further improvements of the technique have the potential to realize diagnostics of health conditions based on a multicomponent analysis of breath samples.

  5. A method for estimating time-frequency characteristics of compact binary mergers to improve searches for inspiral, merger and ring-down phases separately

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Chad; Megevand, Miguel; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ochsner, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in the description of compact binary systems have produced gravitational waveforms that include inspiral, merger and ring-down phases. Comparing results from numerical simulations with those of post-Newtonian, and related, expansions has provided motivation for employing post-Newtonian waveforms in near merger epochs when searching for gravitational waves and has encouraged the development of analytic fits to full numerical waveforms. Until searches employ full waveforms as templates, data analysts can still conduct separate inspiral, merger and ring-down searches. Improved knowledge about the end of the inspiral phase, the beginning of the merger and the ring-down frequencies will increase the efficiency of searches over each phase separately without needing the exact waveform. We will show that knowledge of the final spin, of which there are many theoretical models and analytic fits to simulations, may give an insight into the time-frequency properties of the merger. We also present implications on the ability to probe the tidal disruption of neutron stars through gravitational waves.

  6. Electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  7. Gamma Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Butz, Tilman; Ertl, G.; Knözinger, H.; Schüth, F.

    2008-01-01

    No abstract. The sections in this article are 1 Introduction 2 Mössbauer Spectroscopy 3 Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) 4 Conclusions and Outlook Keywords: Mössbauer spectroscopy; gamma spectroscopy; perturbed angular correlation; TDPAC

  8. Imprint of the merger and ring-down on the gravitational wave background from black hole binaries coalescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Corvino, G.; Ferrari, V.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2011-12-01

    We compute the gravitational wave background (GWB) generated by a cosmological population of black hole-black hole (BH-BH) binaries using hybrid waveforms recently produced by numerical simulations of (BH-BH) coalescence, which include the inspiral, merger, and ring-down contributions. A large sample of binary systems is simulated using the population synthesis code SeBa, and we extract fundamental statistical information on (BH-BH) physical parameters (primary and secondary BH masses, orbital separations and eccentricities, formation, and merger time scales). We then derive the binary birth and merger rates using the theoretical cosmic star formation history obtained from a numerical study which reproduces the available observational data at redshifts zrate of 0.85Mpc-3Myr-1. Third generation detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope (ET), could reveal the GWB from the inspiral phase predicted by any of the considered models. In addition, ET could sample the merger phase of the evolution at least for models which predict local merger rates between [0.053-0.85]Mpc-3Myr-1, which are more than a factor 2 lower than the upper limit inferred from the analysis of the LIGO S5 run [J. Abadie , Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 83, 122005 (2011)10.1103/PhysRevD.83.122005]. The frequency dependence and amplitude of the GWB generated during the coalescence is very sensitive to the adopted core mass threshold for BH formation. This opens up the possibility to better understand the final stages of the evolution of massive stellar binaries using observational constraints on the associated gravitational wave emission.

  9. High-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) during BARCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Winderlich, J.; Gerbig, C.; Hoefer, A.; Rella, C. W.; Crosson, E. R.; van Pelt, A. D.; Steinbach, J.; Kolle, O.; Beck, V.; Daube, B. C.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Chow, V. Y.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    High-accuracy continuous measurements of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) during the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) phase B campaign in Brazil in May 2009 were accomplished using a newly available analyzer based on the cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. This analyzer was flown without a drying system or any in-flight calibration gases. Water vapor corrections associated with dilution and pressure-broadening effects for CO2 and CH4 were derived from laboratory experiments employing measurements of water vapor by the CRDS analyzer. Before the campaign, the stability of the analyzer was assessed by laboratory tests under simulated flight conditions. During the campaign, a comparison of CO2 measurements between the CRDS analyzer and a nondispersive infrared (NDIR) analyzer on board the same aircraft showed a mean difference of 0.22±0.09 ppm for all flights over the Amazon rain forest. At the end of the campaign, CO2 concentrations of the synthetic calibration gases used by the NDIR analyzer were determined by the CRDS analyzer. After correcting for the isotope and the pressure-broadening effects that resulted from changes of the composition of synthetic vs. ambient air, and applying those concentrations as calibrated values of the calibration gases to reprocess the CO2 measurements made by the NDIR, the mean difference between the CRDS and the NDIR during BARCA was reduced to 0.05±0.09 ppm, with the mean standard deviation of 0.23±0.05 ppm. The results clearly show that the CRDS is sufficiently stable to be used in flight without drying the air or calibrating in flight and the water corrections are fully adequate for high-accuracy continuous airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4.

  10. Molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokh, Eh.; Zonntag, B.

    1981-01-01

    The latest investigation results on molecular spectroscopy with application of synchrotron radiation in the region of vacuum ultraviolet are generalized. Some results on investigation of excited, superexcited and ionized molecule states with the use of adsorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, by fluorescent and mass-spectrometric methods are considered [ru

  11. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  14. High-resolution Measurements of Gas-Phase Hydrogen Chloride (HCl) in the Atmosphere by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffnagle, John; Chen, Hongbing; Lee, Jim; Rella, Chris; Kim-Hak, David; Winkler, Renato; Markovic, Milos; Veres, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Halogen radical species, such as chlorine and bromine atoms and their oxides, can greatly affect the chemical composition of the troposphere. Hydrogen chloride is the dominant (gas-phase) contributor to the tropospheric chlorine inventory. Real time in situ observations of HCl can provide an important window into the complex photochemical reaction pathways for chlorine in the atmosphere, including heterogeneous reactions on aerosol surfaces. In this work, we report a novel, commercially-available HCl gas-phase analyzer (G2108, Picarro Inc. Santa Clara, CA, USA) based upon Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) in the near-infrared, and discuss its performance. With a measurement interval of approximately 2 seconds, a precision of better than 40 parts-per-trillion (1 sigma, 30 seconds), and a response time of approximately 1-2 minutes (10 - 90% rise time or 90 - 10% fall time), this analyzer is well-suited for measurements of atmospherically-relevant concentrations of HCl, in both laboratory and field. CRDS provides very stable measurements and low drift, requiring infrequent calibration of the instrument, and can therefore be operated remotely for extended periods of time. In this work we also present results from a laboratory intercomparison of the Picarro G2108 analyzer and an iodide ion time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), and the results of the analyzer time response tests.

  15. Linear and nonlinear surface spectroscopy of supported size selected metal clusters and organic adsorbates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thaemer, Martin Georg

    2012-03-08

    The spectroscopic investigation of supported size selected metal clusters over a wide wavelength range plays an important role for understanding their outstanding catalytic properties. The challenge which must be overcome to perform such measurements is the difficult detection of the weak spectroscopic signals from these samples. As a consequence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are applied, such as surface Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy and surface Second Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy. The spectroscopic apparatus developed is shown to have a sensitivity which is high enough to detect sub-monolayer coverages of adsorbates on surfaces. In the measured spectra of small supported silver clusters of the sizes Ag{sub 4}2, Ag{sub 2}1, Ag{sub 9}, and Ag atoms a stepwise transition from particles with purely metallic character to particles with molecule-like properties can be observed within this size range.

  16. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  17. Novel Miniature Spectrometer For Remote Chemical Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipino, Andrew C.R.

    2000-01-01

    New chemical sensing technologies are critically important for addressing many of EM's priority needs as discussed in detail at http://emsp.em.doe.gov/needs. Many technology needs were addressed by this research. For example, improved detection strategies are needed for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL's), such as PCE (Cl2C=CCl2) and TCE (HClC=CCl2), which persist in the environment due their highly stable structures. By developing a miniature, ultra-sensitive, selective, and field-deployable detector for NAPL's, the approximate source location could be determined with minimal investigative expense. Contaminant plumes could also be characterized in detail. The miniature spectrometer developed under Project No.60231 could also permit accurate rate measurements in less time, either in the field or the laboratory, which are critically important in the development, testing, and ultimate utilization of models for describing contaminant transport. The technology could also be used for long-term groundwater monitoring or long-term stewardship in general. Many science needs are also addressed by the Project 60231, since the effort significantly advances the measurement science of chemical detection. Developed under Project No.60231, evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) is a novel form of CRDS, which is an the emerging optical absorption technique. Several review articles on CRDS, which has been generally applied only to gas-phase diagnostics, have been published1-3. EW-CRDS4-10 forms the basis for a new class of chemical sensors that extends CRDS to other states of matter and leads to a miniaturized version of the concept. EW-CRDS uses miniature solid-state optical resonators that incorporate one or more total internal reflection (TIR) surfaces, which create evanescent waves. The evanescent waves emanate from the TIR surfaces, sampling the surrounding medium. The utility of evanescent waves in chemical analysis forms the basis for the field of attenuated

  18. Laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letokhov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    This article describes recent progress in the application of laser atomic spectroscopy to study parameters of nuclei available in very small quantities; radioactive nuclei, rare isotopes, nuclear isomers, etc, for which study by conventional spectroscopic methods is difficult. (author)

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonser, U.

    1975-01-01

    This book is addressed to persons interested in learning about what has been done and what can be done with Moessbauer spectroscopy. In an introductory chapter the basic principle is explained and the general parameters governing Moessbauer spectroscopy are tabulated. For the following chapters various disciplines are chosen and the wide applicability of this measuring technique is demonstrated. The second chapter discusses a few representative examples of chemical interesting information being reflected by isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings, particularly with respect to bonding and structural properties. The third chapter deals with some applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy for characterizing magnetic compounds and its use for magnetic structure investigations, particularly by making use of polarized radiation. The fourth chapter describes the use of the Moessbauer spectroscopy for studying iron in biological molecules. As an example of recent applications to mineralogy and geology the results of the studies of lunar samples are reviewed in the fifth chapter. Finally, in the last chapter, work is described on the use of Moessbauer spectroscopy in physical metallurgy, particularly quantitative analyses which have enabled metallurgists to solve many old problems. (orig./FW) [de

  1. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... information about chemical equilibria, kinetics and molecular motion by monitoring changes in optical properties of the system. The five presented research projects are largely unrelated to each other both in aim and in what property is probed, however they are all connected in that they are fluorophore...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  2. Optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianarosa, P.; Demers, Y.; Gagne, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced optogalvanic spectroscopy in a hollow cathode-produced plasma has been used to resolve the isotopic structure of some absorption lines in uranium. We have shown that the optogalvanic signal associated with any isotope can be related to the concentration of that isotope in a multi-isotopic sample. From the results we have obtained, optogalvanic spectroscopy of sputtered samples appears to be an interesting approach to the isotopic analysis of both natural and enriched uranium and could easily be applied to the analysis of other fissile elements, such as the plutonium isotopes

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, W.C.

    1974-01-01

    A survey is given of the development of x-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Applications of photoelectron spectroscopy to studies of atomic electronic configurations are discussed, including photoelectron spectra of hydrides isoelectronic with the inert gases; photoelectron spectra of the halogen derivatives of methane; photoelectron spectra of multiple bonded diatomic molecules; spectra and structure of some multiple bonded polyatomic molecules; spectra and structure of triatomic molecules; and methods of orbital assignment of bands in photoelectron spectra. Physical aspects are considered, including intensities; selection rules; dependence of cross section on photoelectron energy; autoionization; angular distribution of photoelectrons; electron-molecule interactions; and transient species. (26 figures, 54 references) (U.S.)

  4. Isotope Investigations at an Alpine Karst Aquifer by Means of On-Site Measurements with High Time Resolution and Near Real-Time Data Availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leis, A.; Plieschnegger, M.; Harum, T.; Stadler, H.; Schmitt, R.; Pelt, A. Van; Zerobin, W.

    2011-01-01

    For numerous hydrological investigations as the characterization of storage and discharge dynamics at karst springs on-site isotopic measurements with high time resolution could improve the significance of the investigations. Conventional isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS) can only be used in laboratories because of their technical complexity. Since a short time more compact laser based instruments, the so called cavity ringdown spectrometers (CRDS) are commercially available. For on-site use of such an instrument several adaptations are necessary. This concerns especially a direct sample injection from the outflow of the spring, because this is originally not intended. The studied alpine and mountainous karst system is located in the so called Northern Calcareous Alps in Austria reaching altitudes up to approx. 2300 masl. The spring is situated in the Salza-valley at an altitude of approximately 650 masl. The investigated karst spring is a typical limestone spring type according to having well developed karst conduits. The isotopic composition of the water samples were measured by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy with a WS-CRDS (Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy) instrument (Picarro, Inc.). In order to adapt the System for on-site isotope measurements at the spring the laser spectrometer was coupled to an automatic injection module for continuous measurements of liquid samples based on a VALCO valve. The device replaces the auto-sampler and allows quasi-continuous injections of a 2 ul-water samples into the Picarro L1102-iso-water analyzer via the Picarro vaporizer module.

  5. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  6. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    causes relaxation processes with characteristic contributions to the frequency-dependent complex dielectric constant. These dipolar relaxations were initially described by Debye (Polare Molekeln 1929). They are the basis of impedance spectroscopy (K’Owino and Sadik Electroanalysis 17(23):2101–2113, 2005...

  7. Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties During the Asian Dust Above Monterey Experiment and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Provencal, R.; Castaneda, R.; Bucholtz, A.; Schmid, B.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300/Mm with an estimated precision of 0.1/Mm for 1550 nm light and 0.2/Mm for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects. We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those from a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  8. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, A.

    1982-01-01

    In this work examples of the various aspects of photoelectron spectroscopy are given. The investigation was started with the development of an angle-resolved spectrometer so that the first chapters deal with angle-resolved ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. To indicate the possibilities and pitfalls of the technique, in chapter II the theory is briefly reviewed. In chapter III the instrument is described. The system is based on the cylindrical mirror deflection analyzer, which is modified and improved for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. In combination with a position sensitive detector, a spectrometer is developed with which simultaneously several angle-resolved spectra can be recorded. In chapter IV, the results are reported of angle-integrated UPS experiments on dilute alloys. Using the improved energy resolution of the instrument the author was able to study the impurity states more accurately and shows that the photoemission technique has become an important tool in the study of impurities and the interactions involved. XPS and Auger results obtained from dilute alloys are presented in chapter V. It is shown that these systems are especially suited for the study of correlation effects and can provide interesting problems related to the satellite structure and the interaction of the impurity with the host. In chapter VI, the valence bands of ternary alloys are studied with UPS and compared to recent band structure calculation. The core level shifts are analyzed in a simple, thermodynamic scheme. (Auth.)

  9. Fusion spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, N.J.

    1995-09-01

    This article traces developments in the spectroscopy of high temperature laboratory plasma used in controlled fusion research from the early 1960's until the present. These three and a half decades have witnessed many orders of magnitude increase in accessible plasma parameters such as density and temperature as well as particle and energy confinement timescales. Driven by the need to interpret the radiation in terms of the local plasma parameters, the thrust of fusion spectroscopy has been to develop our understanding of (i) the atomic structure of highly ionised atoms, usually of impurities in the hydrogen isotope fuel; (ii) the atomic collision rates and their incorporation into ionization structure and emissivity models that take into account plasma phenomena like plasma-wall interactions, particle transport and radiation patterns; (iii) the diagnostic applications of spectroscopy aided by increasingly sophisticated characterisation of the electron fluid. These topics are discussed in relation to toroidal magnetically confined plasmas, particularly the Tokamak which appears to be the most promising approach to controlled fusion to date. (author)

  10. Measurement of N2O and CH4 soil fluxes from garden, agricultural and natural soils using both closed and open chamber systems coupled with high-precision CRDS analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yonggang; Jacobson, Gloria; Alexander, Chris; Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagel, John; Del Campo, Bernardo; Rella, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Studying the emission and uptake of greenhouse gases from soil is essential for understanding, adapting to and ultimately mitigating the effects of climate change. To-date, majority of such studies have been focused on carbon dioxide (CO2 ) , however, in 2006 the EPA estimated that "Agricultural activities currently generate the largest share, 63 percent, of the world's anthropogenic non-carbon dioxide (non-CO2) emissions (84 percent of nitrous oxide [N2O] and 52 percent of methane[CH4]), and make up roughly 15 percent of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions" (Prentice et al., 2001). Therefore, enabling accurate N2O and CH4 flux measurements in the field are clearly critical to our ability to better constrain carbon and nitrogen budgets, characterize soil sensitivities, agricultural practices, and microbial processes like denitrification and nitrification. To aide in these studies, Picarro has developed a new analyzer based on its proven, NIR technology platform, which is capable of measuring both N2O and CH4 down to ppb levels in a single, field-deployable analyzer. This analyzer measures N2O with a 1-sigma, precision of 3.5 ppb and CH4 with a 1-sigma precision of 3ppb on a 5 minute average. The instrument also has extremely low drift to enable accurate measurements with infrequent calibrations. The data rate of the analyzer is on the order of 5 seconds in order to capture fast, episodic emission events. One of the keys to making accurate CRDS measurements is to thoroughly characterize and correct for spectral interfering species. This is especially important for closed system soil chambers used on agricultural soils where a variety of soil amendments may be applied and gases not usually present in ambient air could concentrate to high levels. In this work, we present the results of analyzer interference testing and corrections completed for the interference of carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, and water on N2O. In addition, we

  11. Comb-assisted cavity ring down spectroscopy of 17O enriched water between 7443 and 7921 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelain, D.; Mikhailenko, S. N.; Karlovets, E. V.; Béguier, S.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-12-01

    The room temperature absorption spectrum of water vapor highly enriched in 17O has been recorded by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) between 7443 and 7921 cm-1. Three series of recordings were performed with pressure values around 0.1, 1 and 10 Torr. The frequency calibration of the present spectra benefited of the combination of the CRDS spectrometer to a self-referenced frequency comb. The resulting CRD spectrometer combines excellent frequency accuracy over a broad spectral region with a high sensitivity (Noise Equivalent Absorption, αmin∼ 10-11-10-10 cm-1). The investigated spectral region corresponds to the high energy range of the first hexade. The assignments were performed using known experimental energy levels as well as calculated line lists based on the results of Partridge and Schwenke. Overall about 4150 lines were measured and assigned to 4670 transitions of six water isotopologues (H216O, H217O, H218O, HD16O, HD17O and HD18O). Their intensities span six orders of magnitude from 10-28 to 10-22 cm/molecule. Most of the new results concern the H217O and HD17O isotopologues for which about 1600 and 400 transitions were assigned leading to the determination of 329 and 207 new energy levels, respectively. For comparison only about 300 and four transitions of H217O and HD17O were previously known in the region, respectively. By comparison to highly accurate H216O line positions available in the literature, the average accuracy on our line centers is checked to be on the order of 3 MHz (10-4 cm-1) or better for not weak well isolated lines. This small uncertainty represents a significant improvement of the line center determination of many H216O lines included in the experimental list provided as Supplementary Material.

  12. Spectral analysis software improves confidence in plant and soil water stable isotope analyses performed by isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, A G; Goldsmith, G R; Matimati, I; Dawson, T E

    2011-08-30

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for large errors to occur when analyzing waters containing organic contaminants using isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy (IRIS). In an attempt to address this problem, IRIS manufacturers now provide post-processing spectral analysis software capable of identifying samples with the types of spectral interference that compromises their stable isotope analysis. Here we report two independent tests of this post-processing spectral analysis software on two IRIS systems, OA-ICOS (Los Gatos Research Inc.) and WS-CRDS (Picarro Inc.). Following a similar methodology to a previous study, we cryogenically extracted plant leaf water and soil water and measured the δ(2)H and δ(18)O values of identical samples by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) and IRIS. As an additional test, we analyzed plant stem waters and tap waters by IRMS and IRIS in an independent laboratory. For all tests we assumed that the IRMS value represented the "true" value against which we could compare the stable isotope results from the IRIS methods. Samples showing significant deviations from the IRMS value (>2σ) were considered to be contaminated and representative of spectral interference in the IRIS measurement. Over the two studies, 83% of plant species were considered contaminated on OA-ICOS and 58% on WS-CRDS. Post-analysis, spectra were analyzed using the manufacturer's spectral analysis software, in order to see if the software correctly identified contaminated samples. In our tests the software performed well, identifying all the samples with major errors. However, some false negatives indicate that user evaluation and testing of the software are necessary. Repeat sampling of plants showed considerable variation in the discrepancies between IRIS and IRMS. As such, we recommend that spectral analysis of IRIS data must be incorporated into standard post-processing routines. Furthermore, we suggest that the results from spectral analysis be

  13. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  14. Laboratory Spectroscopy of Large Carbon Molecules and Ions in Support of Space Missions. A New Generation of Laboratory & Space Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Tan, Xiaofeng; Cami, Jan; Biennier, Ludovic; Remy, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. A long-standing and major challenge for laboratory astrophysics has been to measure the spectra of large carbon molecules in laboratory environments that mimic (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that are associated with the interstellar emission and absorption regions [1]. This objective has been identified as one of the critical Laboratory Astrophysics objectives to optimize the data return from space missions [2]. An extensive laboratory program has been developed to assess the properties of PAHs in such environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space. We present and discuss the gas-phase electronic absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs measured in the UV-Visible-NIR range in astrophysically relevant environments and discuss the implications for astrophysics [1]. The harsh physical conditions of the interstellar medium characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - have been simulated in the laboratory by associating a pulsed cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) with a supersonic slit jet seeded with PAHs and an ionizing, penning-type, electronic discharge. We have measured for the {\\it first time} the spectra of a series of neutral [3,4] and ionized [5,6] interstellar PAHs analogs in the laboratory. An effort has also been attempted to quantify the mechanisms of ion and carbon nanoparticles production in the free jet expansion and to model our simulation of the diffuse interstellar medium in the laboratory [7]. These experiments provide {\\it unique} information on the spectra of free, large carbon-containing molecules and ions in the gas phase. We are now, for the first time, in the position to directly compare laboratory spectral data on free, cold, PAH ions and carbon nano-sized carbon particles with astronomical observations in the

  15. Quantification of atmospheric formaldehyde by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffnagle, John; Fleck, Derek; Rella, Chris; Kim-Hak, David

    2017-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a toxic, carcinogenic compound that can contaminate ambient air as a result of combustion or outgassing of commercial products such as adhesives used to fabricate plywood and to affix indoor carpeting. Like many small molecules, formaldehyde has an infrared absorption spectrum exhibiting bands of ro-vibrational transitions that are well resolved at low pressure and therefore well suited for optical analysis of formaldehyde concentration. We describe progress in applying cavity ring-down spectroscopy of the 2v5 band (the first overtone of the asymmetric C-H stretch, origin at 1770 nm) to the quantitative analysis of formaldehyde concentration in ambient air. Preliminary results suggest that a sensitivity of 1-2 ppb in a measurement interval of a few seconds, and 0.1-0.2 ppb in a few minutes, should be achievable with a compact, robust, and field-deployable instrument. Finally, we note that recent satellites monitoring snapshots of formaldehyde columns give insights into global formaldehyde production, migration and lifetime. The ability to monitor formaldehyde with a small and portable analyzer has the potential to aid in validation of these snapshots and to provide complementary data to show vertical dispersions with high spatial accuracy.

  16. NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenert, J.

    1989-01-01

    The book reviews the applications of NMR-spectroscopy in medicine and biology. The first chapter of about 40 pages summarizes the history of development and explains the chemical and physical fundamentals of this new and non-invasive method in an easily comprehensible manner. The other chapters summarize diagnostic results obtained with this method in organs and tissues, so that the reader will find a systematic overview of the available findings obtained in the various organ systems. It must be noted, however, that ongoing research work and new insight quite naturally will necessitate corrections to be done, as is the case here with some biochemical interpretations which would need adjustment to latest research results. NMR-spectroscopy is able to measure very fine energy differences on the molecular level, and thus offers insight into metabolic processes, with the advantage that there is no need of applying ionizing radiation in order to qualitatively or quantitatively analyse the metabolic processes in the various organ systems. (orig./DG) With 40 figs., 4 tabs [de

  17. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igi, K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper is related to mini-rapporteur talk on baryonium spectroscopy. First of all, the models of baryonium, namely the diquark model, the string picture, the linear baryonium and the bag model, are described. All of these models so far discussed are highly suggestive. In this paper, discussions are confined to the spectroscopy of the string and the bag models. Because of the color degree of freedom, the bag model has mock diquonium and mock mesonium besides true baryonium. It might be possible that the string model takes into account only a part of them. The constraints among baryonium, baryon and boson trajectories using duality and unitarity were proposed as a guide for classifying various spectra. Inequalities were derived as the modest and reliable constraints on baryonium intercepts from baryon and boson intercepts by imposing unitarity and Regge behaviors on scattering amplitudes. As a consequence of residue factorization and duality, the baryonium slopes were derived. The spin of S (1936) was also obtained. The baryonium containing s or c quarks can also be studied. Topics such as the EXD patterns of baryons, linear baryons, linear Regge trajectories for all Q-anti Q families, and the Al and two Q mesons, are presented in this paper. Comments on di-baryon are described. (Kato, T.)

  18. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Spectra of hadrons show various and complex structures due to the strong coupling constants of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) constituting its fundamental theory. For their understandings, two parameters, i.e., (1) the quark mass and (2) their excitation energies are playing important roles. In low energies, for example, rather simple structures similar to the positronium appear in the heavy quarks such as charms and bottoms. It has been, however, strongly suggested by the recent experiments that the molecular resonant state shows up when the threshold to decay to mesons is exceeded. On the other hand, chiral symmetry and its breaking play important roles in the dynamics of light quarks. Strange quarks are in between and show special behaviors. In the present lecture, the fundamental concept of the hadron spectroscopy based on the QCD is expounded to illustrate the present understandings and problems of the hadron spectroscopy. Sections are composed of 1. Introduction, 2. Fundamental Concepts (hadrons, quarks and QCD), 3. Quark models and exotic hadrons, 4. Lattice QCD and QCD sum rules. For sections 1 to 3, only outline of the concepts is described because of the limited space. Exotic hadrons, many quark pictures of light hadrons and number of quarks in hadrons are described briefly. (S. Funahashi)

  19. Diagnostics of atmospheric pressure air plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, C.O.; Kruger, C.H.; Zare, R.N.

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure air plasmas are often thought to be in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) owing to fast interspecies collisional exchanges at high pressure. As will be seen here, this assumption cannot be relied upon, particularly with respect to optical diagnostics. Large velocity gradients in flowing plasmas and/or elevated electron temperatures created by electrical discharges can result in large departures from chemical and thermal equilibrium. Diagnostic techniques based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) have been developed and applied at Stanford University to the investigation of atmospheric pressure plasmas under conditions ranging from thermal and chemical equilibrium to thermochemical nonequilibrium. This article presents a review of selected temperature and species concentration measurement techniques useful for the study of air and nitrogen plasmas

  20. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemcik, T.

    1984-01-01

    The emission and absorption of photons taking place without changes in the frequency spectrum of the crystal lattice are known as the Moessbauer effect. It takes place in the low energy levels of heavy nuclei in solid lattices at low temperatures. On the basis of the hyperfine structure of Moessbauer spectra the notions are explained of isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic splitting. The principle and function are explained of Moessbauer spectrometers and the methods of graphical processing of spectra, also the use of the least square fit. Moessbauer spectroscopy is nondestructive, highly sensitive and selective and makes structural resolution possible. It is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Examples are given of the use of this method for mineralogical and crystallo-chemical analysis of lunar minerals and rocks, for analysis of corrosion products of iron and for phase analysis of alloys. (M.D.)

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in photoelectron spectroscopy at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: the orientation of CO on Pt(III) and Ni(III) surfaces from angle-resolved photoemission; photoemission from CO on Pt(III) in the range 40 eV less than or equal to dirac constant ω less than or equal to 150 eV; photoemission studies of electron states at clean surfaces using synchrotron radiation; angle and energy dependent photoemission studies of plasmon loss structure in Al and In; d-orbital directed photoemission from copper; interpretation of angle-resolved x-ray photoemission from valence bands; atomic cross-section effects in soft x-ray photoemission from Ag, Au, and Pt valence bands; x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of transition metal difluorides; x-ray photoemission investigation of the density of states of B'-NiAl; the electronic structure of SrTiO 3 and some simple related oxides; fluorescence lifetime measurements of np 5 (n+1)S' states in krypton and xenon; Zeeman beats in the resonance fluorescence of the 3P 1 , states in krypton and xenon; lifetime measurements of rare-gas dimers; configuration interaction effects in the atomic photoelectron spectra of Ba, Sm, Eu, and Yb; glow discharge lamps as electron sources for electron impact excitation; electron impact excitation of electron correlation states in Ca, Sr, and Ba; photoelectron spectroscopy of atomic and molecular bismuth; relativistic effects in the uv photoelectron spectra of group VI diatomic molecules; and relative gas-phase acidities and basicities from a proton potential model

  2. Development of ball surface acoustic wave trace moisture analyzer using burst waveform undersampling circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Oizumi, Toru; Fukushi, Hideyuki; Takeda, Nobuo; Akao, Shingo; Tsukahara, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2018-05-01

    The measurement and control of trace moisture, where the water concentration is lower than 1 ppmv [-76.2 °C for the frost point (°CFP)], are essential for improving the yield rate of semiconductor devices and for ensuring their reliability. A ball surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor with a sol-gel silica coating exhibited useful characteristics for a trace moisture analyzer (TMA) when the temperature drift of the delay time output was precisely compensated using two-frequency measurement (TFM), where the temperature-compensated relative delay time change (RDTC) was obtained by subtracting the RDTC at the fundamental frequency from that at the third harmonic frequency on an identical propagation path. However, the cost of the measurement circuit was a problem. In this study, a burst waveform undersampling (BUS) circuit based on the theory of undersampling measurement was developed as a practical means. The BUS circuit was useful for precise temperature compensation of the RDTC, and the ball SAW TMA was prototyped by calibrating the RDTC using a TMA based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), which is the most reliable method for trace moisture measurement. The ball SAW TMA outputted a similar concentration to that obtained by the CRDS TMA, and its response time at a set concentration in N2 with a flow rate of 1 l/min was about half that of the CRDS TMA, suggesting that moisture of -80 °CFP was measured within only 1 min. The detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was estimated to be 0.05 ppbv, comparable with that of the CRDS TMA. From these results, it was demonstrated that a practical ball SAW TMA can be realized using the developed BUS circuit.

  3. SIMP spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, Yonit [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kuflik, Eric [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Center for Japanese Studies, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e{sup +}e{sup −} colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  4. SIMP spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e + e − colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  5. Planetary spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, U.

    1988-01-01

    The main goal of the research is charge coupled device (CCD) spectroscopic and imaging studies of the solar system in support of spacecraft investigations. Studies include the physical behavior of comets, the atmosphere of the gaseous planets, and the solid surfaces of satellites and asteroids. The major observing program consisted of approximately 50 nights of photometry of Comet Halley in order to resolve the controversy over this comet's rotation period. This data is presently being analyzed. Additional observing projects included the spectroscopic occultation of Charon by Pluto, reflection spectroscopy of Mercury, and a spectrum of the satellite Oberon. Mercury data does not corroborate the Fe(++) absorption feature reported by McCord and Clark at 8800 A but instead potentially shows a weaker feature at longer wavelengths. This position is in much closer accord with expectations for Mercury since a band center near 8800 A implies too little Fe(++) on Mercury, especially if band shifts with temperature are considered. The Pluto project proved that the deep methane absorptions visible in their combined specta are due soley to Pluto with Charon showing a flat and featureless spectrum. It appears that if Charon ever contained a substantial methane component, the satellite's low surface gravity could not hold it and the methane evaporated and escaped

  6. Intermolecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbart, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    In this article some of the theoretical background is presented for the following papers on 'Intermolecular Spectroscopy and Dynamical Properties of Dense Systems'. In Section 1 we outline a simple semi-classical description of the interaction between optical radiation and matter. The motion of a many-body polarizability is introduced; limiting forms of this complicated quantity lead to the familiar cases of light scattering spectra. In Section 2 we consider the linear response approximation, and the equation of motion for the many-body density matrix is solved to first order in the matter-radiation interaction. The often quoted fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the time-dependent, equilibrium correlation functions are discussed. Section 3 treats the problem of the local field. In Section 4 we consider the special case of collision-induced light scattering by atomic fluids in the low-density limit. This allows us to focus on determining the interaction polarizability for simple gases. Finally, in Section 5 we distinguish between collision-induced and multiple light scattering, and discuss the double-light-scattering analyses which provide new information about critical and thermodynamically unstable fluids. (KBE)

  7. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  8. Auger electron spectroscopy, ionization loss spectroscopy, appearance potential spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riwan, R.

    1973-01-01

    The spectroscopy of surfaces using an incident electron beam is studied. The fundamental mechanisms are discussed together with the parameters involved in Auger emission: excitation of the atom, de-excitation by electron emission, and the migration of electrons towards the surface and their ejection. Some examples of applications are given (surface structures, metallurgy, chemical information). Two new techniques for analyzing surfaces are studied: ionization spectroscopy, and appearance potential spectroscopy [fr

  9. Intercomparison of measurements of NO2 concentrations in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the NO3Comp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available NO2 concentrations were measured by various instruments during the NO3Comp campaign at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, in June 2007. Analytical methods included photolytic conversion with chemiluminescence (PC-CLD, broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS, pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBB\\-CEAS, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. All broadband absorption spectrometers were optimized for the detection of the main target species of the campaign, NO3, but were also capable of detecting NO2 simultaneously with reduced sensitivity. NO2 mixing ratios in the chamber were within a range characteristic of polluted, urban conditions, with a maximum mixing ratio of approximately 75 ppbv. The overall agreement between measurements of all instruments was excellent. Linear fits of the combined data sets resulted in slopes that differ from unity only within the stated uncertainty of each instrument. Possible interferences from species such as water vapor and ozone were negligible under the experimental conditions.

  10. Analytical applications of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creaser, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    This book provides an up to date overview of recent developments in analytical spectroscopy, with a particular emphasis on the common themes of chromatography - spectroscopy combinations, Fourier transform methods, and data handling techniques, which have played an increasingly important part in the development of all spectroscopic techniques. The book contains papers originally presented at a conference entitled 'Spectroscopy Across The Spectrum' held jointly with the first 'International Near Infrared Spectroscopy Conference' at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, in July 1987, which have been edited and rearranged with some additional material. Each section includes reviews of key areas of current research as well as short reports of new developments. The fields covered are: Near Infrared Spectroscopy; Infrared Spectroscopy; Mass Spectroscopy; NMR Spectroscopy; Atomic and UV/Visible Spectroscopy; Chemometrics and Data Analysis. (author)

  11. A new cavity ring-down instrument for airborne monitoring of N2O5, NO3, NO2 and O3 in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Brown, Steven S.; Dinesan, Hemanth; Dubé, William P.; Goulette, Marc; Hübler, Gerhard; Orphal, Johannes; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The chemistry of NO3 and N2O5 is important to the regulation of both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. In situ detection of NO3 and N2O5 in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS) represents a new scientific direction as the only previous measurements of these species in this region of the atmosphere has been via remote sensing techniques. Because both the sources and the sinks for NO3 and N2O5 are potentially stratified spatially, their mixing ratios, and their influence on nitrogen oxide and ozone transport and loss at night can show large variability as a function of altitude. Aircraft-based measurements of heterogeneous N2O5 uptake in the lower troposphere have uncovered a surprising degree of variability in the uptake coefficient [1], but there are no corresponding high altitude measurements.The UTLS is routinely sampled by the IAGOS-CARIBIC program (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com), a European infrastructural program with the aim of studying the chemistry and transport across this part of the atmosphere. An airfreight container with 15 different automated instruments from 8 European research partners is utilized on board a commercial Lufthansa airbus 340-600 to monitor ~ 100 atmospheric species (trace gases and aerosol parameters) in the UTLS. The instrumentation in the CARIBIC container is now to be supplemented by a new cavity ring-down device for monitoring nitrogen oxides, jointly developed by researchers from Cork (Ireland), Boulder (USA) and Karlsruhe (Germany). The compact and light-weight instrument is designed to monitor not only NO3 and N2O5, but also NO2 and O3. The detection is based on 4 high-finesse optical cavities (cavity length ~ 44 cm). Two cavities are operated at 662 nm (maximum absorption of NO3), the other two at 405 nm (maximum absorption of NO2). The inlet to one of the (662)-cavities is heated in order to thermally decompose N2O5

  12. Introductory Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    2012-01-01

    Praise for Introductory Raman Spectroscopy Highlights basic theory, which is treated in an introductory fashion Presents state-of-the-art instrumentation Discusses new applications of Raman spectroscopy in industry and research.

  13. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, tunable cw sources, and Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy. Discusses saturation spectroscopy; continuous wave saturation spectroscopy in the ultraviolet; and two-photon spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen 1S-2S. Focuses on Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of gaseous samples. Explains that in saturation spectroscopy, a monochromatic laser beam ''labels'' a group of atoms within a narrow range of axial velocities through excitation or optical pumping, and a Doppler-free spectrum of these selected atoms is observed with a second, counterpropagating beam. Notes that in two-photon spectroscopy it is possible to record Doppler-free spectra without any need for velocity selection by excitation with two counterpropagating laser beams whose first order Doppler shifts cancel

  14. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  15. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  16. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  17. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  18. Black Hole Spectroscopy with Coherent Mode Stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Yagi, Kent; Blackman, Jonathan; Lehner, Luis; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-04-21

    The measurement of multiple ringdown modes in gravitational waves from binary black hole mergers will allow for testing the fundamental properties of black holes in general relativity and to constrain modified theories of gravity. To enhance the ability of Advanced LIGO/Virgo to perform such tasks, we propose a coherent mode stacking method to search for a chosen target mode within a collection of multiple merger events. We first rescale each signal so that the target mode in each of them has the same frequency and then sum the waveforms constructively. A crucial element to realize this coherent superposition is to make use of a priori information extracted from the inspiral-merger phase of each event. To illustrate the method, we perform a study with simulated events targeting the ℓ=m=3 ringdown mode of the remnant black holes. We show that this method can significantly boost the signal-to-noise ratio of the collective target mode compared to that of the single loudest event. Using current estimates of merger rates, we show that it is likely that advanced-era detectors can measure this collective ringdown mode with one year of coincident data gathered at design sensitivity.

  19. Spectroscopy in catalysis : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    Spectroscopy in Catalysis describes the most important modern analytical techniques used to investigate catalytic surfaces. These include electron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS, AES, EELS), ion spectroscopy (SIMS, SNMS, RBS, LEIS), vibrational spectroscopy (infrared, Raman, EELS), temperature-programmed

  20. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  1. Characterizing Interferences in an NOy Thermal Dissociation Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, C.; Veres, P. R.; Brock, C. A.; Neuman, J. A.; Eilerman, S. J.; Zarzana, K. J.; Dube, W. P.; Wild, R. J.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO and NO2) are emitted into the troposphere by various anthropogenic and natural sources, and contribute to increased levels of ambient ozone. Reactive nitrogen species (NOy), which include nitric acid, peroxy acetyl and organic nitrates, and other species, serve as reservoirs and sinks for NOx, thus influencing O3 production. Their detection is therefore critical to understanding ozone chemistry. However, accurate measurements of NOy have proven to be difficult to obtain, and measurements of total NOy sometimes do not agree with the sum of measurements of its individual components. In recent years, quartz thermal dissociation (TD) inlets have been used to thermally convert all NOy species to NO2, followed by detection by techniques such as laser induced fluorescence (LIF) or cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS). Here we discuss recent work in characterizing the NOy channel of our four-channel TD-CRDS instrument. In particular, we have examined the thermal conversion efficiency of several representative NOy species under a range of experimental conditions. We find that under certain conditions, the conversion efficiency is sensitive to inlet residence time and to the concentration of other trace gases found in ambient sampling, such as ozone. We also report the thermal dissociation curves of N2O5 and ammonium nitrate aerosol, and discuss the interferences observed when ammonia and ozone are co-sampled in the inlet.

  2. Widely-tunable and sensitive optical sensor for multi-species detection in the mid-IR

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2017-10-05

    Pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) technique was used to develop a novel widely-tunable laser-based sensor for sensitive measurements of ethylene, propene, 1-butene and allene in the mid-IR. The use of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) enabled the sensor to cover a wide wavelength range from 10 to 11.1 µm (900 – 1000 cm-1) to detect multiple gases relevant to combustion and environment. The sensor operation was validated in a room-temperature static cell using well-characterized absorption lines of carbon dioxide near 938.69 cm-1 and 974.62 cm-1. Detection limits for ethylene, propene, 1-butene, and allene were measured to be 17, 134, 754 and 378 ppb, respectively, at 296 K and 760 Torr for a single-pass path-length of 70 cm. The excellent sensitivity of the optical sensor enabled it to measure the aforementioned gases at levels smaller than 1% of their recommended exposure limits. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first successful applications of the pulsed CRDS technique to measure trace levels of multiple gases in the 10 – 11 µm wavelength region.

  3. High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Richard N.; Kuramoto, Douglas S.; Haase, Christa; Tan, Sze M.; Crosson, Eric R.; Saad, Nabil M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A continuous-flow cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system integrating a chromatographic separation technique, a catalytic combustor, and an isotopic 13C/12C optical analyzer is described for the isotopic analysis of a mixture of organic compounds. A demonstration of its potential is made for the geochemically important class of short-chain hydrocarbons. The system proved to be linear over a 3-fold injection volume dynamic range with an average precision of 0.95‰ and 0.67‰ for ethane and propane, respectively. The calibrated accuracy for methane, ethane, and propane is within 3‰ of the values determined using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), which is the current method of choice for compound-specific isotope analysis. With anticipated improvements, the low-cost, portable, and easy-to-use CRDS-based instrumental setup is poised to evolve into a credible challenge to the high-cost and complex IRMS-based technique. PMID:19564619

  4. Widely-tunable and sensitive optical sensor for multi-species detection in the mid-IR

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad; Alsaif, Bidoor; Farooq, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) technique was used to develop a novel widely-tunable laser-based sensor for sensitive measurements of ethylene, propene, 1-butene and allene in the mid-IR. The use of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) enabled the sensor to cover a wide wavelength range from 10 to 11.1 µm (900 – 1000 cm-1) to detect multiple gases relevant to combustion and environment. The sensor operation was validated in a room-temperature static cell using well-characterized absorption lines of carbon dioxide near 938.69 cm-1 and 974.62 cm-1. Detection limits for ethylene, propene, 1-butene, and allene were measured to be 17, 134, 754 and 378 ppb, respectively, at 296 K and 760 Torr for a single-pass path-length of 70 cm. The excellent sensitivity of the optical sensor enabled it to measure the aforementioned gases at levels smaller than 1% of their recommended exposure limits. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first successful applications of the pulsed CRDS technique to measure trace levels of multiple gases in the 10 – 11 µm wavelength region.

  5. Progress in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.J.; Kleinpoppen, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents reviews by leading experts in the field covering areas of research at the forefront of atomic spectroscopy. Topics considered include the k ordering of atomic structure, multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations for complex atoms, new methods in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, resonance ionization spectroscopy (inert atom detection), trapped ion spectroscopy, high-magnetic-field atomic physics, the effects of magnetic and electric fields on highly excited atoms, x rays from superheavy collision systems, recoil ion spectroscopy with heavy ions, investigations of superheavy quasi-atoms via spectroscopy of electron rays and positrons, impact ionization by fast projectiles, and amplitudes and state parameters from ion- and atom-atom excitation processes

  6. New Hadronic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccini, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few years the field of hadron spectroscopy has seen renewed interest due to the publication, initially mostly from B-Factories, of evidences of states that do not match regular spectroscopy, but are rather candidates for bound states with additional quarks or gluons (four quarks for tetraquarks and molecules and two quarks and gluons for hybrids). A huge effort in understanding the nature of this new states and in building a new spectroscopy is ongoing. This paper reviews the experimental and theoretical state of the art on heavy quarkonium exotic spectroscopy, with particular attention on the steps towards a global picture.

  7. Advances in DUV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mogensen, Claus Tilsted

    The would-be advantages of deep UV (DUV) spectroscopy are well known, but the potential applications have so far not been fully realized due to technological limitations and, perhaps, lack of bright ideas. However, new components and new knowledge about DUV spectra and spectroscopic methods...... combined with increasing needs for solutions to practical problems in environmental protection, medicine and pollution monitoring promise a new era in DUV spectroscopy. Here we shall review the basis for DUV spectroscopy, both DUV fluorescence and DUV Raman spectroscopy, and describe recent advances...

  8. Spectroscopy for Dummies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René

    This presentation will give short introduction to the most pertinent topics of optical spectroscopy. The following topics will be discussed: • The origin of spectra in UV, VIS and IR spectral range • Spectroscopic methods like absorption, luminescence and Raman • Wavelength dispersive optical...... components • Materials for use optical spectroscopy • Spectrometer geometries • Detectors for use in spectrometer • Practical examples of optical spectroscopy The objective of this presentation is to give the audience a good feel for the range of possibilities that optical spectroscopy can provide....

  9. Deep-UV high resolution cavity ring-down spectroscopy of the Schumann-Runge bands in O-16(2) and O-18(2) at wavelengths 197-203 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannemann, S.; van Duijn, E.J.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    With the use of a novel titanium:sapphire laser source delivering, upon fourth harmonic generation, narrowband and tunable radiation in the deep-UV, spectroscopic studies were performed on weak Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen. Improved values for rotational and fine structure molecular parameters for

  10. Local- and regional-scale measurements of CH4, δ13CH4, and C2H6 in the Uintah Basin using a mobile stable isotope analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, C. W.; Hoffnagle, J.; He, Y.; Tajima, S.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative CH4, δ13CH4, and C2H6 instrument based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The design and performance of the analyzer is presented in detail. The instrument is capable of precision of less than 1 ‰ on δ13CH4 with 1 in. of averaging and about 0.1 ‰ in an hour. Using this instrument, we present a comprehensive approach to atmospheric methane emissions attribution. Field measurements were performed in the Uintah Basin (Utah, USA) in the winter of 2013, using a mobile lab equipped with the CRDS analyzer, a high-accuracy GPS, a sonic anemometer, and an onboard gas storage and playback system. With a small population and almost no other sources of methane and ethane other than oil and gas extraction activities, the Uintah Basin represents an ideal location to investigate and validate new measurement methods of atmospheric methane and ethane. We present the results of measurements of the individual fugitive emissions from 23 natural gas wells and six oil wells in the region. The δ13CH4 and C2H6 signatures that we observe are consistent with the signatures of the gases found in the wells. Furthermore, regional measurements of the atmospheric CH4, δ13CH4, and C2H6 signatures throughout the basin have been made, using continuous sampling into a 450 m long tube and laboratory reanalysis with the CRDS instrument. These measurements suggest that 85 ± 7 % of the total emissions in the basin are from natural gas production.

  11. Comparison of measured and modelled negative hydrogen ion densities at the ECR-discharge HOMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauner, D.; Kurutz, U.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    As the negative hydrogen ion density nH- is a key parameter for the investigation of negative ion sources, its diagnostic quantification is essential in source development and operation as well as for fundamental research. By utilizing the photodetachment process of negative ions, generally two different diagnostic methods can be applied: via laser photodetachment, the density of negative ions is measured locally, but only relatively to the electron density. To obtain absolute densities, the electron density has to be measured additionally, which induces further uncertainties. Via cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the absolute density of H- is measured directly, however LOS-averaged over the plasma length. At the ECR-discharge HOMER, where H- is produced in the plasma volume, laser photodetachment is applied as the standard method to measure nH-. The additional application of CRDS provides the possibility to directly obtain absolute values of nH-, thereby successfully bench-marking the laser photodetachment system as both diagnostics are in good agreement. In the investigated pressure range from 0.3 to 3 Pa, the measured negative hydrogen ion density shows a maximum at 1 to 1.5 Pa and an approximately linear response to increasing input microwave powers from 200 up to 500 W. Additionally, the volume production of negative ions is 0-dimensionally modelled by balancing H- production and destruction processes. The modelled densities are adapted to the absolute measurements of nH- via CRDS, allowing to identify collisions of H- with hydrogen atoms (associative and non-associative detachment) to be the dominant loss process of H- in the plasma volume at HOMER. Furthermore, the characteristic peak of nH- observed at 1 to 1.5 Pa is identified to be caused by a comparable behaviour of the electron density with varying pressure, as ne determines the volume production rate via dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  12. Implementation of a Novel Laser System for Simultaneous Measurement of 13C/12C and D/H to Food Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, N.; Hoffnagle, J.

    2012-04-01

    Olive oil samples were analyzed using the world's first simultaneous δ13C + δD instrument, the 13C+D Combustion Module-Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CM-CRDS) Isotope Analyzer. Simultaneous measurements of δ13C and δD of the whole oil have been performed on commercially available olive oils produced in Greece, Spain, Italy, California, Lebanon, Israel, Australia and Turkey. Together, the measurements of isotopic ratios of carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) produce statistically significant differentiation between olive oils from different locations around the globe. Stable isotope ratios are exquisitely sensitive to the biochemistry of plant species and the nutrients available to them in a particular geographical location. Isotope ratios provide detailed knowledge useful for forensic applications through a combination of stable-isotope measurements of carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) isotopes of organic matter and can help the associations among specific geographic areas through the measurement of these dual isotopes. We report here on the development of a novel laser spectroscopy based system for the simultaneous analysis of the stable isotope ratios of carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) that is robust, easy-to-use, and is the first stable isotope ratio analysis system to combine the measurement of 13C/12C and D/H in one simple analysis from a bulk organic sample. The system comprises a combustion module to convert the organic sample into CO2 and H2O and a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) that analyzes the combustion species inside an optical cavity based on the molecular absorption of individual isotopomers. The CRDS uses dual lasers to target the four isotpomers of interest: 12CO2, 13CO2, H2O and HDO. The system delivers a typical precision of 0.1permil for δ13C and 1.5 permil for δD that parallels that achieved by IRMS, but with an unprecedented simplicity that allows scientists to leverage the science and map out the provenance of the analyzed

  13. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Matulková, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2010), s. 408-420 ISSN 1230-3402 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FTIR spectroscopy * absorption spectroscopy * laser diodes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2010

  14. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  15. Coherent atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, W.R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Argonne Spectroscopy Laboratory, initiated and advanced over several decades by F.S. Tomkins and M. Fred, has been a major international facility. A range of collaborative work in atomic spectroscopy is selected to illustrate advances in experimental physics which have been made possible by combination of the talents of Tomkins and Fred with the unique facilities of the Argonne Laboratory. (orig.)

  16. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V.

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  17. High resolution and high precision absorption spectroscopy using high finesse cavities: application to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest; Cavites de haute finesse pour la spectroscopie d'absorption haute sensibilite et haute precision: application a l'etude de molecules d'interet atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V

    2005-12-15

    High finesse cavities are used to measure very weak absorption features. Two different methodologies are investigated and applied to the study of molecules with atmospheric interest. First, Continuous Wave - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CW-CRDS) is used to study the atmospheric spectra of water vapour in the near infrared range. These measurements are performed for temperature and pressure of atmospheric relevance for DIAL applications (Differential Absorption Lidar). This study, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA), goes with the WALES mission (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). The experimental setup was conceived in order to control pressure, temperature and relative humidity conditions. A particular attention is done to characterize and describe the spectrometer. Then, measurements of red Oxygen B band are performed to demonstrate the huge performance of Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS). The desired optical feedback is obtained by light injection into the high finesse cavity through a glass plate placed inside the cavity and closed to the Brewster angle. We show a measurement dynamical range of 5 orders of magnitude (10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10} /cm) and a sensitivity of 10{sup -10} /cm/{radical} Hz. Also, sampling absorption spectra by the super linear cavity frequency comb allows very precise frequency measurements. This is demonstrated by the determination of Oxygen pressure shifts with an absolute accuracy of around 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -1}/atm. To our knowledge, we provide the highest accuracy ever reported for this parameter. (author)

  18. Homogeneity spoil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Boesch, C.; Martin, E.; Grutter, R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the problems of in vivo MR spectroscopy of P-31 is spectra localization. Surface coil spectroscopy, which is the method of choice for clinical applications, suffers from the high-intensity signal from subcutaneous muscle tissue, which masks the spectrum of interest from deeper structures. In order to suppress this signal while maintaining the simplicity of surface coil spectroscopy, the authors introduced a small sheet of ferromagnetically dotted plastic between the surface coil and the body. This sheet destroys locally the field homogeneity and therefore all signal from structures around the coil. The very high reproducibility of the simple experimental procedure allows long-term studies important for monitoring tumor therapy

  19. Baryon spectroscopy at KAON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comyn, Martin

    1992-07-01

    The unique opportunities for the study of baryon spectroscopy at the TRIUMF KAON Factory are outlined. Related issues in other areas of hadron spectroscopy are discussed. The complex of accelerators that comprise the TRIUMF KAON Factory, and the properties of the separated beams that will be available to experimenters, are described. Initial design considerations for detectors to be used in the study of hadron spectroscopy are presented, along with a proposed detector configuration. The progress towards realization of the TRIUMF KAON Factory is examined, and the timetable for the determination of the initial experimental programme and facilities is explained. 23 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. IR Spectroscopy. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzler, H.; Gremlich, H.U.

    2002-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: absorption and molecular design, spectrometers, sample preparation, qualitative spectral interpretation and assertions, near-infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy, reference spectra and expert systems

  1. Charmonium spectroscopy, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The state of charmonium spectroscopy is reviewed. All analyses proceed from a spin-dependent, non-relativistic Schroedinger equation. Many of the possible branching ratios for charm like states are investigated. 17 refs

  2. Dual THz comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    Optical frequency combs are innovative tools for broadband spectroscopy because a series of comb modes can serve as frequency markers that are traceable to a microwave frequency standard. However, a mode distribution that is too discrete limits the spectral sampling interval to the mode frequency spacing even though individual mode linewidth is sufficiently narrow. Here, using a combination of a spectral interleaving and dual-comb spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, we achieved a spectral sampling interval equal to the mode linewidth rather than the mode spacing. The spectrally interleaved THz comb was realized by sweeping the laser repetition frequency and interleaving additional frequency marks. In low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved an improved spectral sampling density of 2.5 MHz and enhanced spectral accuracy of 8.39 × 10-7 in the THz region. The proposed method is a powerful tool for simultaneously achieving high resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage in THz spectroscopy.

  3. Multidimensional high harmonic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruner, Barry D; Soifer, Hadas; Shafir, Dror; Dudovich, Nirit; Serbinenko, Valeria; Smirnova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) has opened up a new frontier in ultrafast science where attosecond time resolution and Angstrom spatial resolution are accessible in a single measurement. However, reconstructing the dynamics under study is limited by the multiple degrees of freedom involved in strong field interactions. In this paper we describe a new class of measurement schemes for resolving attosecond dynamics, integrating perturbative nonlinear optics with strong-field physics. These approaches serve as a basis for multidimensional high harmonic spectroscopy. Specifically, we show that multidimensional high harmonic spectroscopy can measure tunnel ionization dynamics with high precision, and resolves the interference between multiple ionization channels. In addition, we show how multidimensional HHG can function as a type of lock-in amplifier measurement. Similar to multi-dimensional approaches in nonlinear optical spectroscopy that have resolved correlated femtosecond dynamics, multi-dimensional high harmonic spectroscopy reveals the underlying complex dynamics behind attosecond scale phenomena. (paper)

  4. Foundations of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stenholm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    A simple presentation of the theoretical foundations of steady-state laser spectroscopy, this text helps students to apply theory to calculations with a systematic series of examples and exercises. 1984 edition.

  5. Surface vibrational spectroscopy (EELS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Adsorbed states of hydrogen on metal surfaces have been studied by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). In this article, typical spectra and analysis as well as recent development are introduced. (author)

  6. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  7. Positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, C.S.; Viswanathan, B.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of positron annihilation spectroscopy, the experimental techniques and its application to studies on defects and electronic structure of materials is presented. The scope of this paper is to present the requisite introductory material, that will enable a better appreciation of the subsequent specialized articles on the applications of positron annihilation spectroscopy to investigate various problems in materials science. (author). 31 refs., 3 figs

  8. Ultrafast infrared vibrational spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fayer, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The past ten years or so have seen the introduction of multidimensional methods into infrared and optical spectroscopy. The technology of multidimensional spectroscopy is developing rapidly and its applications are spreading to biology and materials science. Edited by a recognized leader in the field and with contributions from top researchers, including experimentalists and theoreticians, this book presents the latest research methods and results and will serve as an excellent resource for other researchers.

  9. Spectroscopy stepping stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, M.R.; Sturman, B.T.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the elemental composition of samples has long been a basic task of analytical science. Some very powerful and convenient approaches are based on the wavelength-specific absorption or emission of light by gas-phase atoms. Techniques briefly described as examples of analytical atomic spectrometry include atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma emission and mass spectroscopy and laser induced breakdown spectrometry

  10. Fast antihydrogen beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, R.

    1989-01-01

    The motivation for production and precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen atoms is outlined. An experimental configuration is considered, concerning laser-microwave spectroscopy of a fast hydrogen beam with characteristics similar to those of an antihydrogen beam emanating from an antiproton-positron overlap region in an antiproton storage ring. In particular, a possible experiment for the measurement of the ground state hyperfine structure splitting is described. (orig.)

  11. Binary and ternary recombination of D3+ ions at 80-130 K: Application of laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, Petr; Hejduk, Michal; Rubovič, Peter; Varju, Jozef; Roučka, Štěpán; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-11-01

    Recombination of D_3^+ ions with electrons at low temperatures (80-130 K) was studied using spectroscopic determination of D_3^+ ions density in afterglow plasmas. The use of cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy enabled an in situ determination of the abundances of the ions in plasma and the translational and the rotational temperatures of the recombining ions. Two near infrared transitions at (5792.70 ± 0.01) cm-1 and at (5793.90 ± 0.01) cm-1 were used to probe the number densities of the lowest ortho state and of one higher lying rotational state of the vibrational ground state of D_3^+ ion. The results show that D_3^+ recombination with electrons consists of the binary and the third-body (helium) assisted process. The obtained binary recombination rate coefficients are in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction for electron-ion plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium with αbin(80 K) = (9.2 ± 2.0) × 10-8 cm3 s-1. The measured helium assisted ternary rate coefficients KHe are in agreement with our previously measured flowing afterglow data giving a value of KHe(80 K) = (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10-25 cm6 s-1.

  12. Binary and ternary recombination of D3+ ions at 80-130 K: application of laser absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohnal, Petr; Hejduk, Michal; Rubovič, Peter; Varju, Jozef; Roučka, Štěpán; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-11-21

    Recombination of D(3)(+) ions with electrons at low temperatures (80-130 K) was studied using spectroscopic determination of D(3)(+) ions density in afterglow plasmas. The use of cavity ring-down absorption spectroscopy enabled an in situ determination of the abundances of the ions in plasma and the translational and the rotational temperatures of the recombining ions. Two near infrared transitions at (5792.70 ± 0.01) cm(-1) and at (5793.90 ± 0.01) cm(-1) were used to probe the number densities of the lowest ortho state and of one higher lying rotational state of the vibrational ground state of D(3)(+) ion. The results show that D(3)(+) recombination with electrons consists of the binary and the third-body (helium) assisted process. The obtained binary recombination rate coefficients are in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction for electron-ion plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium with α(bin)(80 K) = (9.2 ± 2.0) × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1). The measured helium assisted ternary rate coefficients K(He) are in agreement with our previously measured flowing afterglow data giving a value of K(He)(80 K) = (1.2 ± 0.3) × 10(-25) cm(6) s(-1).

  13. In vivo spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.R.; Cady, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    The technique which the authors describe in this chapter provides alternative information to imaging, although based upon the same physical principles. The experiments are carried out differently and have instrumental requirements which are not met by a standard imaging system. Furthermore, although the clinical efficacy of NMR imaging has been proven, clinical spectroscopy is very much in its infancy. With the exception of some specific /sup 31/P applications not is not even clear how spectroscopic investigations will be performed. This is particularly true with regard to localization techniques for investigating other than superficial organs and and in the use of /sup 1/H spectroscopy. They attempt to show what information spectroscopy can provide in principle and point out some of the problems associated with such investigations. NMR has come to the notice of the clinical community mainly through its use as an imaging technique, and many may consider spectroscopy as a secondary discipline. NMR spectroscopy, however, has a longer history than imaging and has been a standard technique in chemistry laboratories for more than two decades. It is a technique without peer for structural analysis of molecules and no new chemical compound is discovered or synthesized without an NMR spectrum being taken. The influence of molecular structure on resonant frequency has been termed the chemical shift

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopy. Tutorial book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Langouche, Guido

    2013-01-01

    First textbook on Moessbauer Spectroscopy covering the complete field. Offers a concise introduction to all aspects of Moessbauer spectroscopy by the leading experts in the field. Tutorials on Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Since the discovery of the Moessbauer Effect many excellent books have been published for researchers and for doctoral and master level students. However, there appears to be no textbook available for final year bachelor students, nor for people working in industry who have received only basic courses in classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, chemistry and materials science. The challenge of this book is to give an introduction to Moessbauer Spectroscopy for this level. The ultimate goal of this book is to give this audience not only a scientific introduction to the technique, but also to demonstrate in an attractive way the power of Moessbauer Spectroscopy in many fields of science, in order to create interest among the readers in joining the community of Moessbauer spectroscopists. This is particularly important at times where in many Moessbauer laboratories succession is at stake.

  15. Autobalanced Ramsey Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanner, Christian; Huntemann, Nils; Lange, Richard; Tamm, Christian; Peik, Ekkehard

    2018-01-01

    We devise a perturbation-immune version of Ramsey's method of separated oscillatory fields. Spectroscopy of an atomic clock transition without compromising the clock's accuracy is accomplished by actively balancing the spectroscopic responses from phase-congruent Ramsey probe cycles of unequal durations. Our simple and universal approach eliminates a wide variety of interrogation-induced line shifts often encountered in high precision spectroscopy, among them, in particular, light shifts, phase chirps, and transient Zeeman shifts. We experimentally demonstrate autobalanced Ramsey spectroscopy on the light shift prone Yb+ 171 electric octupole optical clock transition and show that interrogation defects are not turned into clock errors. This opens up frequency accuracy perspectives below the 10-18 level for the Yb+ system and for other types of optical clocks.

  16. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitler, Axel; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    "This book presents the current state of knowledge in the field of terahertz spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive source of information for beginners and experienced researchers alike whose interests lie in this area. The book aims to explain the fundamental physics that underpins terahertz  technology and to describe its key applications. Highlights of scientific research in the field of terahertz science are also outlined in some chapters, providing an overview as well as giving an insight into future directions for research.  Over the past decade terahertz spectroscopy has developed into one of the most rapidly growing areas of its kind, gaining an important impact across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Due to substantial advances in femtosecond laser technology, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has established itself as the dominant spectroscopic technique for experimental scientists interested in measurements at this frequency range. In solids and liquids THz radiation is in reso...

  17. Application of Allan Deviation to Assessing Uncertainties of Continuous-measurement Instruments, and Optimizing Calibration Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gloria; Rella, Chris; Farinas, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Technological advancement of instrumentation in atmospheric and other geoscience disciplines over the past decade has lead to a shift from discrete sample analysis to continuous, in-situ monitoring. Standard error analysis used for discrete measurements is not sufficient to assess and compare the error contribution of noise and drift from continuous-measurement instruments, and a different statistical analysis approach should be applied. The Allan standard deviation analysis technique developed for atomic clock stability assessment by David W. Allan [1] can be effectively and gainfully applied to continuous measurement instruments. As an example, P. Werle et al has applied these techniques to look at signal averaging for atmospheric monitoring by Tunable Diode-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) [2]. This presentation will build on, and translate prior foundational publications to provide contextual definitions and guidelines for the practical application of this analysis technique to continuous scientific measurements. The specific example of a Picarro G2401 Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer used for continuous, atmospheric monitoring of CO2, CH4 and CO will be used to define the basics features the Allan deviation, assess factors affecting the analysis, and explore the time-series to Allan deviation plot translation for different types of instrument noise (white noise, linear drift, and interpolated data). In addition, the useful application of using an Allan deviation to optimize and predict the performance of different calibration schemes will be presented. Even though this presentation will use the specific example of the Picarro G2401 CRDS Analyzer for atmospheric monitoring, the objective is to present the information such that it can be successfully applied to other instrument sets and disciplines. [1] D.W. Allan, "Statistics of Atomic Frequency Standards," Proc, IEEE, vol. 54, pp 221-230, Feb 1966 [2] P. Werle, R. Miicke, F. Slemr, "The Limits

  18. Water vapor self-continuum absorption measurements in the 4.0 and 2.1 μm transparency windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, L.; Vasilchenko, S.; Mondelain, D.; Ventrillard, I.; Romanini, D.; Campargue, A.

    2017-11-01

    In a recent contribution [A. Campargue, S. Kassi, D. Mondelain, S. Vasilchenko, D. Romanini, Accurate laboratory determination of the near infrared water vapor self-continuum: A test of the MT_CKD model. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 121,13,180-13,203, doi:10.1002/2016JD025531], we reported accurate water vapor absorption continuum measurements by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Optical-Feedback-Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) at selected spectral points of 4 near infrared transparency windows. In the present work, the self-continuum cross-sections, CS, are determined for two new spectral points. The 2491 cm-1 spectral point in the region of maximum transparency of the 4.0 μm window was measured by OF-CEAS in the 23-52 °C temperature range. The 4435 cm-1 spectral point of the 2.1 μm window was measured by CRDS at room temperature. The self-continuum cross-sections were determined from the pressure squared dependence of the continuum absorption. Comparison to the literature shows a reasonable agreement with 1970 s and 1980 s measurements using a grating spectrograph in the 4.0 μm window and a very good consistency with our previous laser measurements in the 2.1 μm window. For both studied spectral points, our values are much smaller than previous room temperature measurements by Fourier Transform Spectroscopy. Significant deviations (up to about a factor 4) are noted compared to the widely used semi empirical MT_CKD model of the absorption continuum. The measured temperature dependence at 2491 cm-1 is consistent with previous high temperature measurements in the 4.0 μm window and follows an exp(D0/kT) law, D0 being the dissociation energy of the water dimer.

  19. Dye lasers in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Luther, J.; Steudel, A.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of dye lasers which are relevant to atomic spectroscopy are discussed. Several experiments made possible by tunable dye lasers are discussed. Applications of high spectral density dye lasers are covered in areas such as absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photoionization and photodetachment, and two- and multi-photon processes. Applications which take advantage of the narrow bandwidth of tunable dye lasers are discussed, including saturation spectroscopy, fluorescence line narrowing, classic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, nonoptical detection of optical resonances, heterodyne spectroscopy, and nonlinear coherent resonant phenomena. (26 figures, 180 references) (U.S.)

  20. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko; Nakamura, Masato

    1995-01-01

    Photoacoustic and photothermal spectroscopy methods can be effectively applied to the analysis of microparticles in condensed matter. A more violent photothermal conversion phenomenon of a particle, laser breakdown and accompanying plasma and acoustic emission, was applied to individual detection and analysis of ultrafine particles in ultrapure water. Laser-like nonlinear emission from the plasma was observed. (author)

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  3. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Perspectives in hadron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, J.M. [Universite Joseph Fourier-IN2P3-CNRS, Lab. de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-07-01

    A brief survey is presented of selected recent results on hadron spectroscopy and related theoretical studies. Among the new hadron states, some of them are good candidates for exotic structures: chiral partners of ground-states, hybrid mesons (quark, antiquark and constituent gluon), four-quark states, or meson-meson molecules.

  5. Outlook for baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    The review of baryon spectroscopy includes a number of new generation experiments with greatly improved statistics which have emerged and are enhancing experimental knowledge of baryon resonances. The future research directions are pointed out, and some problems and deficiencies which can be resolved with contemporary techniques are mentioned

  6. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  7. Astronomical Spectroscopy -24 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    growth of spectroscopy and its application to the study of .... Cesium was discovered ten years earlier, in 1859; it is the ... Kirchhoff and Bunsen's discovery; he was spared the pain of seeing ... We will have to go back about twenty years.

  8. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  9. Surface vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erskine, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A brief review of recent studies which combine measurements of surface vibrational energies with lattice dynamical calculations is presented. These results suggest that surface vibrational spectroscopy offers interesting prospects for use as a molecular-level probe of surface geometry, adsorbate bond distances and molecular orientations

  10. Spectroscopy of new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, G.

    1977-08-01

    A review of the spectroscopy of the ''psions'' with hidden charm or charm quantum number ch = o is followed by a discussion of charmed mesons and baryons. The anomalous C-μ events and the heavy lepton hypothesis are briefly considered

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  12. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  13. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  14. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  15. Ultrabroadband spectroscopy for security applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Sunniva; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrabroadband spectroscopy is a promising novel approach to overcome two major hurdles which have so far limited the application of THz spectroscopy for security applications: the increased bandwidth enables to record several characteristic spectroscopic features and the technique allows...

  16. Comparisons of continuous atmospheric CH4, CO2 and N2O measurements - results from a travelling instrument campaign at Mace Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardag, S.N.; Hammer, S.; Levin, I.; O'Doherty, S.; Spain, T.G.; Wastine, B.; Jordan, A.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-month measurement campaign with a Fourier transform infrared analyser as a travelling comparison instrument (TCI) was performed at the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) station at Mace Head, Ireland. The aim was to evaluate the compatibility of atmospheric methane (CH 4 ), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O) measurements of the routine station instrumentation, consisting of a gas chromatograph (GC) for CH 4 and N 2 O as well as a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for CH 4 and CO 2 . The advantage of a TCI approach for quality control is that the comparison covers the entire ambient air measurement system, including the sample intake system and the data evaluation process. For initial quality and performance control, the TCI was run in parallel with the Heidelberg GC before and after the measurement campaign at Mace Head. Median differences between the Heidelberg GC and the TCI were well within the WMO inter-laboratory compatibility target for all three greenhouse gases. At Mace Head, the median difference between the station GC and the TCI were -0.04 nmol mol -1 for CH 4 and -0.37 nmol mol -1 for N 2 O (GC-TCI). For N 2 O, a similar difference (-0.40 nmol mol -1 ) was found when measuring surveillance or working gas cylinders with both instruments. This suggests that the difference observed in ambient air originates from a calibration offset that could partly be due to a difference between the WMON2O X2006a reference scale used for the TCI and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO-1998) scale used at Mace Head and in the whole AGAGE network. Median differences between the CRDS G1301 and the TCI at Mace Head were 0.12 nmol mol -1 for CH 4 and 0.14 μmol mol -1 for CO 2 (CRDS G1301 - TCI). The difference between both instruments for CO 2 could not be explained, as direct measurements of calibration gases show no such difference. The CH 4

  17. Mid-infrared upconversion spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Andersen, H. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is emerging as an attractive alternative to near-infrared or visible spectroscopy. MIR spectroscopy offers a unique possibility to probe the fundamental absorption bands of a large number of gases as well as the vibrational spectra of complex molecules. In this paper...

  18. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Testera, G; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Nesteruk, K P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  19. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  20. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, J.V.

    1991-12-01

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  1. Hadron spectroscopy in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Palano, Antimo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed. In particular the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the $J/\\psi p$ system, the possible existence of four-quark states decaying to $J/\\psi \\phi$ and the confirmation of resonant nature of the $Z_c(4430)^−$ mesonic state are discussed. In the sector of charmed baryons, the observation of five new $\\Omega_c$ states, the observation of the $\\Xi^+_{cc}$ and the study of charmed baryons decaying to $D^0 p$ are presented.

  2. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and includes chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells. Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field Covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy Contains chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells.

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  4. Precision muonium spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, Klaus P.

    2016-01-01

    The muonium atom is the purely leptonic bound state of a positive muon and an electron. It has a lifetime of 2.2 µs. The absence of any known internal structure provides for precision experiments to test fundamental physics theories and to determine accurate values of fundamental constants. In particular ground state hyperfine structure transitions can be measured by microwave spectroscopy to deliver the muon magnetic moment. The frequency of the 1s–2s transition in the hydrogen-like atom can be determined with laser spectroscopy to obtain the muon mass. With such measurements fundamental physical interactions, in particular quantum electrodynamics, can also be tested at highest precision. The results are important input parameters for experiments on the muon magnetic anomaly. The simplicity of the atom enables further precise experiments, such as a search for muonium–antimuonium conversion for testing charged lepton number conservation and searches for possible antigravity of muons and dark matter. (author)

  5. Basic Principles of Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy deals with the production, measurement, and interpretation of spectra arising from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are many different spectroscopic methods available for solving a wide range of analytical problems. The methods differ with respect to the species to be analyzed (such as molecular or atomic spectroscopy), the type of radiation-matter interaction to be monitored (such as absorption, emission, or diffraction), and the region of the electromagnetic spectrum used in the analysis. Spectroscopic methods are very informative and widely used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Spectroscopic methods based on the absorption or emission of radiation in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), infrared (IR), and radio (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR) frequency ranges are most commonly encountered in traditional food analysis laboratories. Each of these methods is distinct in that it monitors different types of molecular or atomic transitions. The basis of these transitions is explained in the following sections.

  6. Mössbauer spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Boi Hanh

    2011-01-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has contributed significantly to the studies of Fe-containing proteins. Early applications yielded detailed electronic characterizations of hemeproteins, and thus enhanced our understanding of the chemical properties of this important class of proteins. The next stage of the applications was marked by major discoveries of several novel Fe clusters of complex structures, including the 8Fe7S P cluster and the mixed metal 1Mo7Fe M center in nitrogenase. Since early 1990 s, rapid kinetic techniques have been used to arrest enzymatic reactions for Mössbauer studies. A number of reaction intermediates were discovered and characterized, both spectroscopically and kinetically, providing unprecedented detailed molecular-level mechanistic information. This chapter gives a brief summary of the historical accounts and a concise description of some experimental and theoretical elements in Mössbauer spectroscopy that are essential for understanding Mössbauer spectra. Major biological applications are summarized at the end.

  7. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  8. Theory and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, John F.

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between quantum-mechanical theory and spectroscopy is one of the most fertile interfaces in all of science, and has a richly storied history. Of course it was spectroscopy that provided essentially all of the evidence that not all was well (or, perhaps more correctly put, complete) with the world of 19th century classical physics. From the discoveries of the dark lines in the solar spectrum by Fraunhöfer in 1814 to the curiously simple geometric formula discovered seventy years later that described the hydrogen atom spectrum, spectroscopy and spectroscopists have consistently identified the areas of atomic and molecular science that are most in need of hard thinking by theoreticians. The rest of the story, of course, is well-known: spectroscopic results were used to understand and motivate the theory of radioactivity and ultimately the quantum theory, first in its immature form that was roughly contemporaneous with the first World War, and then the Heisenberg-Schrödinger-Dirac version that has withstood the test of time. Since the basic principles of quantum mechanics ware first understood, the subject has been successfully used to understand the patterns found in spectra, and how these relate to molecular structure, symmetry, energy levels, and dynamics. But further understanding required to attain these intellectual achievements has often come only as a result of vital and productive interactions between theoreticians and spectroscopists (of course, many people have strengths in both areas). And indeed, a field that might be termed "theoretical spectroscopy" was cultivated and is now an important part of modern molecular science.

  9. NEUROFEEDBACK USING FUNCTIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    OpenAIRE

    Hinds, Oliver; Wighton, Paul; Tisdall, M. Dylan; Hess, Aaron; Breiter, Hans; van der Kouwe, André

    2014-01-01

    Neurofeedback based on real-time measurement of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal has potential for treatment of neurological disorders and behavioral enhancement. Commonly employed methods are based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequences that sacrifice speed and accuracy for whole-brain coverage, which is unnecessary in most applications. We present multi-voxel functional spectroscopy (MVFS): a system for computing the BOLD signal from multiple volumes of...

  10. Total Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of determining the distribution of beta decay strength (B(GT)) as a function of excitation energy in the daughter nucleus is discussed. Total Absorption Spectroscopy is shown to provide a way of determining the B(GT) precisely. A brief history of such measurements and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique, is followed by examples of two recent studies using the technique. (authors)

  11. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  12. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  13. Layman friendly spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentic, Stipo; Sessions, Sharon

    Affordable consumer grade spectroscopes (e.g. SCiO, Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE) are becoming more available to the general public. We introduce the concepts of spectroscopy to the public and K12 students and motivate them to delve deeper into spectroscopy in a dramatic participatory presentation and play. We use diffraction gratings, lasers, and light sources of different spectral properties to provide a direct experience of spectroscopy techniques. Finally, we invite the audience to build their own spectroscope--utilizing the APS SpectraSnapp cell phone application--and study light sources surrounding them in everyday life. We recontextualize the stigma that science is hard (e.g. ``Math, Science Popular Until Students Realize They're Hard,'' The Wall Street Journal) by presenting the material in such a way that it demonstrates the scientific method, and aiming to make failure an impersonal scientific tool--rather than a measure of one's ability, which is often a reason for shying away from science. We will present lessons we have learned in doing our outreach to audiences of different ages. This work is funded by the APS Outreach Grant ``Captain, we have matter matters!'' We thank New Mexico Tech Physics Department and Physics Club for help and technical equipment.

  14. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  15. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Role of vibrational spectroscopy in solving problems related to astrobiology will be discussed. Vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for identifying molecules. Theoretical approach used in this work is based on direct computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities from electronic structure codes. One of the applications of this computational technique is possible identification of biological building blocks (amino acids, small peptides, DNA bases) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Identifying small biological molecules in the ISM is very important from the point of view of origin of life. Hybrid (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) theoretical techniques will be discussed that may allow to obtain accurate vibrational spectra of biomolecular building blocks and to create a database of spectroscopic signatures that can assist observations of these molecules in space. Another application of the direct computational spectroscopy technique is to help to design and analyze experimental observations of ice surfaces of one of the Jupiter's moons, Europa, that possibly contains hydrated salts. The presence of hydrated salts on the surface can be an indication of a subsurface ocean and the possible existence of life forms inhabiting such an ocean.

  16. Spectroscopic detection, characterization and dynamics of free radicals relevant to combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Terry [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-04

    Combustion chemistry is enormously complex. The chemical mechanisms involve a multitude of elementary reaction steps and a comparable number of reactive intermediates, many of which are free radicals. Computer simulations based upon these mechanisms are limited by the validity of the mechanisms and the parameters characterizing the properties of the intermediates and their reactivity. Spectroscopy can provide data for sensitive and selective diagnostics to follow their reactions. Spectroscopic analysis also provides detailed parameters characterizing the properties of these intermediates. These parameters serve as experimental gold standards to benchmark predictions of these properties from large-scale, electronic structure calculations. This work has demonstrated the unique capabilities of near-infrared cavity ringdown spectroscopy (NIR CRDS) to identify, characterize and monitor intermediates of key importance in complex chemical reactions. Our studies have focussed on the large family of organic peroxy radicals which are arguably themost important intermediates in combustion chemistry and many other reactions involving the oxidation of organic compounds. Our spectroscopic studies have shown that the NIR Ã - ˜X electronic spectra of the peroxy radicals allows one to differentiate among chemical species in the organic peroxy family and also determine their isomeric and conformic structure in many cases. We have clearly demonstrated this capability on saturated and unsaturated peroxy radicals and β-hydroxy peroxy radicals. In addition we have developed a unique dual wavelength CRDS apparatus specifically for the purpose of measuring absolute absorption cross section and following the reaction of chemical intermediates. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by measuring the cross-section and self-reaction rate constant for ethyl peroxy.

  17. The water vapour self-continuum absorption in the infrared atmospheric windows: new laser measurements near 3.3 and 2.0 µm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lechevallier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The amplitude, the temperature dependence, and the physical origin of the water vapour absorption continuum are a long-standing issue in molecular spectroscopy with direct impact in atmospheric and planetary sciences. In recent years, we have determined the self-continuum absorption of water vapour at different spectral points of the atmospheric windows at 4.0, 2.1, 1.6, and 1.25 µm, by highly sensitive cavity-enhanced laser techniques. These accurate experimental constraints have been used to adjust the last version (3.2 of the semi-empirical MT_CKD model (Mlawer-Tobin_Clough-Kneizys-Davies, which is widely incorporated in atmospheric radiative-transfer codes. In the present work, the self-continuum cross-sections, CS, are newly determined at 3.3 µm (3007 cm−1 and 2.0 µm (5000 cm−1 by optical-feedback-cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFCEAS and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, respectively. These new data allow extending the spectral coverage of the 4.0 and 2.1 µm windows, respectively, and testing the recently released 3.2 version of the MT_CKD continuum. By considering high temperature literature data together with our data, the temperature dependence of the self-continuum is also obtained.

  18. The water vapour self-continuum absorption in the infrared atmospheric windows: new laser measurements near 3.3 and 2.0 µm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechevallier, Loic; Vasilchenko, Semen; Grilli, Roberto; Mondelain, Didier; Romanini, Daniele; Campargue, Alain

    2018-04-01

    The amplitude, the temperature dependence, and the physical origin of the water vapour absorption continuum are a long-standing issue in molecular spectroscopy with direct impact in atmospheric and planetary sciences. In recent years, we have determined the self-continuum absorption of water vapour at different spectral points of the atmospheric windows at 4.0, 2.1, 1.6, and 1.25 µm, by highly sensitive cavity-enhanced laser techniques. These accurate experimental constraints have been used to adjust the last version (3.2) of the semi-empirical MT_CKD model (Mlawer-Tobin_Clough-Kneizys-Davies), which is widely incorporated in atmospheric radiative-transfer codes. In the present work, the self-continuum cross-sections, CS, are newly determined at 3.3 µm (3007 cm-1) and 2.0 µm (5000 cm-1) by optical-feedback-cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFCEAS) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), respectively. These new data allow extending the spectral coverage of the 4.0 and 2.1 µm windows, respectively, and testing the recently released 3.2 version of the MT_CKD continuum. By considering high temperature literature data together with our data, the temperature dependence of the self-continuum is also obtained.

  19. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  20. Theory overview on spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed

    2011-08-01

    A theoretical overview of the exotic spectroscopy in the charm and beauty quark sector is presented. These states are unexpected harvest from the e + e - and hadron colliders and a permanent abode for the majority of them has yet to be found. We argue that some of these states, in particular the Y b (10890) and the recently discovered states Z b (10610) and Z b (10650), discovered by the Belle collaboration are excellent candidates for tetraquark states [bq][ anti b anti q], with q=u,d light quarks. Theoretical analyses of the Belle data carried out in the tetraquark context is reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Hadron spectroscopy 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    With much particle physics research using particle beams to probe the behaviour of the quark constituents deep inside nucleons and other strongly interacting particles (hadrons), it is easy to overlook the progress being made through hadron spectroscopy – the search for and classification of rare particles – and the way it has increased our understanding of quark physics. One way of remedying this was to attend the stimulating and encouraging Hadron 87 meeting held earlier this year at the Japanese KEK Laboratory, where Jonathan Rosner from Chicago's Enrico Fermi Institute gave the concluding talk

  2. Hadron spectroscopy 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1987-09-15

    With much particle physics research using particle beams to probe the behaviour of the quark constituents deep inside nucleons and other strongly interacting particles (hadrons), it is easy to overlook the progress being made through hadron spectroscopy – the search for and classification of rare particles – and the way it has increased our understanding of quark physics. One way of remedying this was to attend the stimulating and encouraging Hadron 87 meeting held earlier this year at the Japanese KEK Laboratory, where Jonathan Rosner from Chicago's Enrico Fermi Institute gave the concluding talk.

  3. Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalaraman, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    General features of electron excited Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) which is a nondestructive technique for the analysis of surfaces upto about 15 Adeg depth with a detection limit of about 0.1% of a monolayer. Methods of measuring the Auger electron energies and recent improvements in the instrumentation are reviewed. Typical energy resolution is found to be about 0.5% which is specially suited for the detection of light elements. It is widely used in metallurgy, surface chemistry and thin film studies. (K.B.)

  4. Spectroscopy of 212Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Poletti, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    Excited states of 212 Rn have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following the reactions 208 Pb( 9 Be, 5n) and 204 Hg( 13 C,5n). With the exception of the energy of the yrast 8 + → 6 + transition, the previously proposed level scheme has been verified. New transitions have been placed in the level scheme and new lifetime and g-factor results obtained. The level scheme and electromagnetic properties of selected isomeric states are compared with the results of shell model and semi-empirical shell-model calculations, including coupling to octupole vibrations. (orig.)

  5. Spectroscopy of 212Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuchbery, A.E.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Byrne, A.P.; Poletti, A.R.

    1988-06-01

    Excited states of 212 Rn have been studied using γ-ray and electron spectroscopy following the reactions 208 Pb ( 9 Be,5n) and 204 Hg( 13 C,5n). With the exception of the energy of the yrast 8 + → 6 + transition, the previously proposed level scheme has been verified. New transitions have been placed in the level scheme and new lifetime and g-factor results obtained. The level scheme and electromagnetic properties of selected isomeric states are compared with the results of shell model and semi-empirical shell-model calculations, including coupling to octupole vibrations

  6. MR spectroscopy in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, T.; Gerigk, L.; Giesel, F.; Schuster, L.; Essig, M.

    2010-01-01

    With an increasingly aging population we are faced with the problem of an increasing number of dementia patients. In addition to clinical, neuropsychological and laboratory procedures, MRI plays an important role in the early diagnosis of dementia. In addition to various morphological changes functional changes can also help in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia. Overall the diagnosis of dementia can be improved by using parameters from MR spectroscopy. This article focuses on MR spectroscopic changes in the physiological aging process as well as on changes in mild cognitive impairment a precursor of Alzheimer's dementia, in Alzheimer's dementia, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. (orig.) [de

  7. Fourier transforms in spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2000-01-01

    This modern approach to the subject is clearly and logically structured, and gives readers an understanding of the essence of Fourier transforms and their applications. All important aspects are included with respect to their use with optical spectroscopic data. Based on popular lectures, the authors provide the mathematical fundamentals and numerical applications which are essential in practical use. The main part of the book is dedicated to applications of FT in signal processing and spectroscopy, with IR and NIR, NMR and mass spectrometry dealt with both from a theoretical and practical poi

  8. Statistical nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of nuclear spectroscopy is to study properties of nuclear energy levels and transitions (electromagnetic, particle transfer, etc.) between these levels. Traditionally, the properties that involve a single level or a few levels have theoretically been investigated using models e.g. shell model, self-consistent field approximation, collective model (RPA, Generator Coordinate) and so on. Basically from these models, one obtains eigenvalues and eigenfunctions (or expectation values and transfer strengths) which can be compared with data. The choice of the model depends upon the properties that one wants to examine and the usefulness of the model depends upon its ability to explain observations and make predictions

  9. EASY: a simple tool for simultaneously removing background, deadtime and acoustic ringing in quantitative NMR spectroscopy--part I: basic principle and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Christian; Hemmann, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Elimination of Artifacts in NMR SpectroscopY (EASY) is a simple but very effective tool to remove simultaneously any real NMR probe background signal, any spectral distortions due to deadtime ringdown effects and -specifically- severe acoustic ringing artifacts in NMR spectra of low-gamma nuclei. EASY enables and maintains quantitative NMR (qNMR) as only a single pulse (preferably 90°) is used for data acquisition. After the acquisition of the first scan (it contains the wanted NMR signal and the background/deadtime/ringing artifacts) the same experiment is repeated immediately afterwards before the T1 waiting delay. This second scan contains only the background/deadtime/ringing parts. Hence, the simple difference of both yields clean NMR line shapes free of artefacts. In this Part I various examples for complete (1)H, (11)B, (13)C, (19)F probe background removal due to construction parts of the NMR probes are presented. Furthermore, (25)Mg EASY of Mg(OH)2 is presented and this example shows how extremely strong acoustic ringing can be suppressed (more than a factor of 200) such that phase and baseline correction for spectra acquired with a single pulse is no longer a problem. EASY is also a step towards deadtime-free data acquisition as these effects are also canceled completely. EASY can be combined with any other NMR experiment, including 2D NMR, if baseline distortions are a big problem. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, J.E.; Omenetto, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) and its Applications was held in Varese, Italy, 16-21 September 1990. Interest in RIS and its applications continues to grow, and RIS is expanding into a more diverse and mature field of study. This maturity was evident in this meeting both in the basic science and understanding of RIS processes and in the number of new and improved applications and techniques. The application of RIS techniques to molecular detection problems made remarkable progress since the last meeting two years ago. Subtle effects pertaining to isotopic discrimination received more theoretical attention, and there now seems to be good understanding of these effects, which can lead to correction procedures and/or methods to avoid isotopic effects. RIS applications were presented in which significant, real world problems were addressed, demonstrating its capability to solve problems that previously could not be accurately solved by other more traditional techniques. The contributions to the conference are grouped under the following major topic headings: physics applications of rare atoms; laser ionization mechanisms - spectroscopy; atomic, molecular and ion sources; molecular RIS; atomic RIS - Rydberg states; environmental trace analysis; biological and medical applications; state selected chemistry; new laser sources and techniques; ultra-high resolution and isotopic selectivity; surface and bulk analysis. (Author)

  11. Charmonium(like) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiqing [Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Since its discovery in 1974, charmonium spectroscopy has always been an important probe to study strong interactions and the structure of hadronic matter. Below open-charm threshold, the charmonium spectrum is well established now. Also our understanding of charmonium states above the open-charm threshold has seen a big progress during recent years. However, the most surprising was the discovery of charmonium-like states, which have a similar mass scale as charmonium states but can not be classified as conventional states easily. Indeed, charmonium-like states are good candidates for the so-called exotic hadron states, i.e. particles with a quark content different from normal mesons and baryons, such as multi-quark states, hybrid states or molecule states. Although neutral charmonium-like states are more difficult to be identified, the observation of charged states provide us a convincing evidence. In this talk, I review the recent progress on charmonium and charmonium-like spectroscopy from BESIII, Belle, BABAR, CLEO-c and LHCb and the prospect for future experiments at Belle II and PANDA.

  12. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunsing, F.

    2005-06-01

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  13. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  14. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 μm were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO 2 laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m 2 /g at 1087 cm -1 . The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10 -8 cm -1 . The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations

  15. Raman spectroscopy in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, L.M.; Pimenta, M.A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent Raman scattering studies in different types of graphene samples are reviewed here. We first discuss the first-order and the double resonance Raman scattering mechanisms in graphene, which give rise to the most prominent Raman features. The determination of the number of layers in few-layer graphene is discussed, giving special emphasis to the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to distinguish a monolayer from few-layer graphene stacked in the Bernal (AB) configuration. Different types of graphene samples produced both by exfoliation and using epitaxial methods are described and their Raman spectra are compared with those of 3D crystalline graphite and turbostratic graphite, in which the layers are stacked with rotational disorder. We show that Resonance Raman studies, where the energy of the excitation laser line can be tuned continuously, can be used to probe electrons and phonons near the Dirac point of graphene and, in particular allowing a determination to be made of the tight-binding parameters for bilayer graphene. The special process of electron-phonon interaction that renormalizes the phonon energy giving rise to the Kohn anomaly is discussed, and is illustrated by gated experiments where the position of the Fermi level can be changed experimentally. Finally, we discuss the ability of distinguishing armchair and zig-zag edges by Raman spectroscopy and studies in graphene nanoribbons in which the Raman signal is enhanced due to resonance with singularities in the density of electronic states.

  16. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr +3 :LaF 3 verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the 3 H 4 , 3 H 6 , and 3 P 0 levels of the praseodymium ions

  17. Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and it strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99930 ± 0.00003 (1- reflectivity = 700 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.43 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 1.02 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1 min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non-absolute detection methods. In addition to

  18. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed

  19. Molecular studies by electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansteen, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Experience gained in experimental nuclear physics has played a large role in the development of electron spectroscopy as a powerful tool for studying chemical systems. The use of ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) for the mapping of molecular properties connected with inner as well as outer electron shells is reviewed, mainly from a phenomological point of view. Molecular Auger electron spectroscopy is described as a means of gaining information on details in molecular structure, simultaneously being extensively applied for surface studies. Future highly promising research areas for molecular electron spectroscopy are suggested to be (e,2e) processes as well as continued exploitation of synchrotron radiation from high energy nuclear devices. (Auth.)

  20. High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arko, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) covers a very broad range of measurements, disciplines, and interests. As the next generation light source, the FEL will result in improvements over the undulator that are larger than the undulater improvements over bending magnets. The combination of high flux and high inherent resolution will result in several orders of magnitude gain in signal to noise over measurements using synchrotron-based undulators. The latter still require monochromators. Their resolution is invariably strongly energy-dependent so that in the regions of interest for many experiments (h upsilon > 100 eV) they will not have a resolving power much over 1000. In order to study some of the interesting phenomena in actinides (heavy fermions e.g.) one would need resolving powers of 10 4 to 10 5 . These values are only reachable with the FEL

  1. Near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue ischaemia can be a significant contributor to increased morbidity and mortality. Conventional oxygenation monitoring modalities measure systemic oxygenation, but regional tissue oxygenation is not monitored. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive monitor for measuring regional oxygen saturation which provides real-time information. There has been increased interest in the clinical application of NIRS following numerous studies that show improved outcome in various clinical situations especially cardiac surgery. Its use has shown improved neurological outcome and decreased postoperative stay in cardiac surgery. Its usefulness has been investigated in various high risk surgeries such as carotid endarterectomy, thoracic surgeries, paediatric population and has shown promising results. There is however, limited data supporting its role in neurosurgical population. We strongly feel, it might play a key role in future. It has significant advantages over other neuromonitoring modalities, but more technological advances are needed before it can be used more widely into clinical practice.

  2. Transit spectroscopy with GTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osorio M.R. Zapatero

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to different ground-based surveys and space missions, nowadays we have a fairly large sample of discovered extra-solar planets to study and, without a doubt, this number will increase in the future. One of the most succesful techniques that allows us to prove the physical properties and atmospheric composition of these exoplanets is transmission spectroscopy. The level of precision that is require to measure these effects provides a technical challenge that is solved by using big telescopes and stable instruments to reach low noise levels. In this article, we will discuss the use of the 10m class telescope GTC to observed planetary transits in spectroscopic mode and some of the results that we are currently obtaining.

  3. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  4. Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Ken M

    2011-01-01

    Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs is a complete guide for amateur astronomers who are looking for a new challenge beyond astrophotography. The book provides a brief overview of the history and development of the spectroscope, then a short introduction to the theory of stellar spectra, including details on the necessary reference spectra required for instrument testing and spectral comparison. The various types of spectroscopes available to the amateur are then described. Later sections cover all aspects of setting up and using various types of commercially available and home-built spectroscopes, starting with basic transmission gratings and going through more complex models, all the way to the sophisticated Littrow design. The final part of the text is about practical spectroscope design and construction. This book uniquely brings together a collection of observing, analyzing, and processing hints and tips that will allow the amateur to build skills in preparing scientifically acceptable spectra data. It...

  5. Introduction to NSE spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, C.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) spectroscopy allows for reaching the highest energy resolution in inelastic neutron scattering while keeping the high intensity advantage of a beam which is only 10-20% monochromatic. Most spectroscopic methods determine separately the energies of the incident (ω 0 ) and scattered beams (ω) in order to deduce the energy transfer (Δω = ω-ω 0 ), which is the relevant parameter in inelastic neutron scattering. The accuracy in the determination of ω 0 and ω also determines the lowest limit for Δω, which can reach 10 -3 , but with the cost of a high incident beam monocromatisation. In NSE the precession of neutron spins in a magnetic field is used as a stop-watch, which is carried by each neutron individually and measures directly, with an accuracy of 10 -5 to 10 -3 , the difference in energy before and after the scattering process at the sample. (R.P.)

  6. Fast beam radiofrequency spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipkin, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The combination of a fast atom or ion beam derived from a small accelerator with radiofrequency spectroscopy methods provides a powerful method for measuring the fine structure of atomic and molecular systems. The fast beam makes possible measurements in which two separated oscillatory fields are used to obtain resonance lines whose widths are less than the natural line width due to the lifetimes of the states. The separated oscillatory field lines have, in addition, a number of features which make possible measurements with greater precision and less sensitivity to systematic errors. The fast beam also makes accessible multiple photon radiofrequency transitions whose line width is intrinsically narrower than that of the single photon transitions and which offer great potential for high precision measurements. This report focuses on the techniques and their promise. Recent measurements of the fine structure of H and He + are used as illustrations

  7. Baryon spectroscopy in COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austregesilo, Alexander; Chung, Suh-Urk; Ketzer, Bernhard; Neubert, Sebastian; Paul, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E18, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. During in total 9 weeks in 2008 and 2009, a 190 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target has been used primarily to study the production of exotic mesons and glueball candidates at central rapidities. As no bias on the rapidity was introduced by the trigger system, the data also yield the unique possibility to study diffractive dissociation of the beam proton while an inert target is assumed. To this end exclusive events with three charged particles including one proton in the final state have been extracted. We report on the status of the event selection studies and discuss the prospect of using partial wave analysis techniques, which have been successfully applied for diffractive dissociation reactions of pions in COMPASS.

  8. Bragg Curve Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, C.R.

    1981-05-01

    An alternative utilization is presented for the gaseous ionization chamber in the detection of energetic heavy ions, which is called Bragg Curve Spectroscopy (BCS). Conceptually, BCS involves using the maximum data available from the Bragg curve of the stopping heavy ion (HI) for purposes of identifying the particle and measuring its energy. A detector has been designed that measures the Bragg curve with high precision. From the Bragg curve the range from the length of the track, the total energy from the integral of the specific ionization over the track, the dE/dx from the specific ionization at the beginning of the track, and the Bragg peak from the maximum of the specific ionization of the HI are determined. This last signal measures the atomic number, Z, of the HI unambiguously

  9. Laboratory molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolis, J.

    1982-04-01

    The precision required in making spectroscopic measurements is discussed. Remarks are directed specifically to vibration-rotation spectra rather than continuum absorptions. The ultimate precision that is required for line positions is related to the width of the lines which may be no narrower than the Doppler width. The spectroscopic methods considered are those which are of the most general value to the astronomers, those which acquire and can handle large volumes of spectra in digital form, or in a form which is compatible with computer analysis, and in a form which is at least internally consistent. The use of dye laser, grating instruments, and the most versatile instrument for laboratory spectroscopy, the Fourier transform spectrometer is discussed

  10. EXAFS spectroscopy of quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menushenkov, A. P.; Rakshun, Ya. V.

    2007-01-01

    The results of the investigation of the features of the local structure of quasicrystalline materials by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy with the use of synchrotron radiation are analyzed. The advantages of this method from the point of view of deriving information about the local shifts of the atoms forming an icosahedral structure are demonstrated. The rearrangement of the local environment of copper and iron in Al-Fe-Cu ternary alloys at a transition from the crystalline to the quasicrystalline phase has been investigated. It is established that the nearest copper coordination retains the symmetry characteristic of the crystal; however, rotation and small displacements of copper matrix atoms lead to significant rearrangement of aluminum atoms around iron atoms. As a result, icosahedral clusters with pentagonal symmetry are formed around iron atoms and violation of the translational symmetry is accompanied by the transition of Al-Fe-Cu to the quasicrystalline state

  11. Intermediate valence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Schoenhammer, K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of intermediate valence compounds are studied using the Anderson model. Due to the large orbital and spin degeneracy N/sub f/ of the 4f-level, 1/N/sub f/ can be treated as a small parameter. This approach provides exact T = 0 results for the Anderson impurity model in the limit N/sub f/ → ∞, and by adding 1/N/sub f/ corrections some properties can be calculated accurately even for N/sub f/ = 1 or 2. In particular valence photoemission and resonance photoemission spectroscopies are studied. A comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra provides an estimate of the parameters in the model. Core level photoemission spectra provide estimates of the coupling between the f-level and the conduction states and of the f-level occupancy. With these parameters the model gives a fair description of other electron spectroscopies. For typical parameters the model predicts two structures in the f-spectrum, namely one structure at the f-level and one at the Fermi energy. The resonance photoemission calculation gives a photon energy dependence for these two peaks in fair agreement with experiment. The peak at the Fermi energy is partly due to a narrow Kondo resonance, resulting from many-body effects and the presence of a continuous, partly filled conduction band. This resonance is related to a large density of low-lying excitations, which explains the large susceptibility and specific heat observed for these systems at low temperatures. 38 references, 11 figures, 2 tables

  12. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  13. Calibration and field testing of cavity ring-down laser spectrometers measuring CH4, CO2, and δ13CH4 deployed on towers in the Marcellus Shale region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Miles

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Four in situ cavity ring-down spectrometers (G2132-i, Picarro, Inc. measuring methane dry mole fraction (CH4, carbon dioxide dry mole fraction (CO2, and the isotopic ratio of methane (δ13CH4 were deployed at four towers in the Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction region of Pennsylvania. In this paper, we describe laboratory and field calibration of the analyzers for tower-based applications and characterize their performance in the field for the period January–December 2016. Prior to deployment, each analyzer was tested using bottles with various isotopic ratios, from biogenic to thermogenic source values, which were diluted to varying degrees in zero air, and an initial calibration was performed. Furthermore, at each tower location, three field tanks were employed, from ambient to high mole fractions, with various isotopic ratios. Two of these tanks were used to adjust the calibration of the analyzers on a daily basis. We also corrected for the cross-interference from ethane on the isotopic ratio of methane. Using an independent field tank for evaluation, the standard deviation of 4 h means of the isotopic ratio of methane difference from the known value was found to be 0.26 ‰ δ13CH4. Following improvements in the field tank testing scheme, the standard deviation of 4 h means was 0.11 ‰, well within the target compatibility of 0.2 ‰. Round-robin style testing using tanks with near-ambient isotopic ratios indicated mean errors of −0.14 to 0.03 ‰ for each of the analyzers. Flask to in situ comparisons showed mean differences over the year of 0.02 and 0.08 ‰, for the east and south towers, respectively. Regional sources in this region were difficult to differentiate from strong perturbations in the background. During the afternoon hours, the median differences of the isotopic ratio measured at three of the towers, compared to the background tower, were &minus0.15 to 0.12 ‰ with standard deviations of the 10

  14. Calibration and field testing of cavity ring-down laser spectrometers measuring CH4, CO2, and δ13CH4 deployed on towers in the Marcellus Shale region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Natasha L.; Martins, Douglas K.; Richardson, Scott J.; Rella, Christopher W.; Arata, Caleb; Lauvaux, Thomas; Davis, Kenneth J.; Barkley, Zachary R.; McKain, Kathryn; Sweeney, Colm

    2018-03-01

    Four in situ cavity ring-down spectrometers (G2132-i, Picarro, Inc.) measuring methane dry mole fraction (CH4), carbon dioxide dry mole fraction (CO2), and the isotopic ratio of methane (δ13CH4) were deployed at four towers in the Marcellus Shale natural gas extraction region of Pennsylvania. In this paper, we describe laboratory and field calibration of the analyzers for tower-based applications and characterize their performance in the field for the period January-December 2016. Prior to deployment, each analyzer was tested using bottles with various isotopic ratios, from biogenic to thermogenic source values, which were diluted to varying degrees in zero air, and an initial calibration was performed. Furthermore, at each tower location, three field tanks were employed, from ambient to high mole fractions, with various isotopic ratios. Two of these tanks were used to adjust the calibration of the analyzers on a daily basis. We also corrected for the cross-interference from ethane on the isotopic ratio of methane. Using an independent field tank for evaluation, the standard deviation of 4 h means of the isotopic ratio of methane difference from the known value was found to be 0.26 ‰ δ13CH4. Following improvements in the field tank testing scheme, the standard deviation of 4 h means was 0.11 ‰, well within the target compatibility of 0.2 ‰. Round-robin style testing using tanks with near-ambient isotopic ratios indicated mean errors of -0.14 to 0.03 ‰ for each of the analyzers. Flask to in situ comparisons showed mean differences over the year of 0.02 and 0.08 ‰, for the east and south towers, respectively. Regional sources in this region were difficult to differentiate from strong perturbations in the background. During the afternoon hours, the median differences of the isotopic ratio measured at three of the towers, compared to the background tower, were &minus0.15 to 0.12 ‰ with standard deviations of the 10 min isotopic ratio differences of 0.8

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attekum, P.M.T.M. van.

    1979-01-01

    The methods and results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in the study of plasmons, alloys and gold compounds are discussed. After a comprehensive introduction, seven papers by the author, previously published elsewhere, are reprinted and these cover a wide range of the uses of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. (W.D.L.)

  16. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  17. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  18. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  19. Laser Spectroscopy and Frequency Combs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of a frequency comb, commonly generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser consists of several hundred thousand precisely evenly spaced spectral lines. Such laser frequency combs have revolutionized the art measuring the frequency of light, and they provide the long-missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks. The invention of the frequency comb technique has been motivated by precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom. The availability of commercial instruments is facilitating the evolution of new applications far beyond the original purpose. Laser combs are becoming powerful instruments for broadband molecular spectroscopy by dramatically improving the resolution and recording speed of Fourier spectrometers and by creating new opportunities for highly multiplexed nonlinear spectroscopy, such as two-photon spectroscopy or coherent Raman spectroscopy. Other emerging applications of frequency combs range from fundamental research in astronomy, chemistry, or attosecond science to telecommunications and satellite navigation

  20. Greenhouse gas measurements from a UK network of tall towers: technical description and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kieran M.; Grant, Aoife; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Manning, Alistair J.; Stavert, Ann R.; Spain, T. Gerard; Salameh, Peter K.; Harth, Christina M.; Simmonds, Peter G.; Sturges, William T.; Oram, David E.; Derwent, Richard G.

    2018-03-01

    A network of three tall tower measurement stations was set up in 2012 across the United Kingdom to expand measurements made at the long-term background northern hemispheric site, Mace Head, Ireland. Reliable and precise in situ greenhouse gas (GHG) analysis systems were developed and deployed at three sites in the UK with automated instrumentation measuring a suite of GHGs. The UK Deriving Emissions linked to Climate Change (UK DECC) network uses tall (165-230 m) open-lattice telecommunications towers, which provide a convenient platform for boundary layer trace gas sampling. In this paper we describe the automated measurement system and first results from the UK DECC network for CO2, CH4, N2O, SF6, CO and H2. CO2 and CH4 are measured at all of the UK DECC sites by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) with multiple inlet heights at two of the three tall tower sites to assess for boundary layer stratification. The short-term precisions (1σ on 1 min means) of CRDS measurements at background mole fractions for January 2012 to September 2015 is sampling temperatures. Automated alerts are generated and emailed to site operators when instrumental parameters are not within defined set ranges. Automated instrument shutdowns occur for critical errors such as carrier gas flow rate deviations. Results from the network give good spatial and temporal coverage of atmospheric mixing ratios within the UK since early 2012. Results also show that all measured GHGs are increasing in mole fraction over the selected reporting period and, except for SF6, exhibit a seasonal trend. CO2 and CH4 also show strong diurnal cycles, with night-time maxima and daytime minima in mole fractions.

  1. Do birds of like feather flock together? The use of a novel 13C+D combustion isotope analyzer to track bird migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, N.

    2011-12-01

    Information on spring migration routes, geographic linkages among winter, spring, and breeding locations, and potential geographic effects on arrival body condition of a variety of avian species is so far little known. Stable isotope ratios are exquisitely sensitive to the biochemistry of living organisms and the nutrients available to them. Isotope ratios provide detailed knowledge useful in a variety of fields, including birds migration, through a combination of stable-isotope measurements of carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) isotopes of flight feathers and breast feathers of tissues representing different periods of dietary integration and body composition analyses. Associations among specific geographic areas, habitat use, and arrival condition can be elucidated through the measurement of these dual isotopes. We report here on the development of a novel laser spectroscopy based system for the simultaneous analysis of the stable isotope ratios of carbon (13C/12C) and hydrogen (D/H) that is robust, easy-to-use, and is the first stable isotope ratio analysis system to combine the measurement of 13C/12C and D/H in one simple analysis from a bulk organic sample with an application to bird migration. The system comprises a combustion module to convert the organic sample into CO2 and H2O and a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) that analyzes the combustion species inside an optical cavity based on the molecular absorption of individual isotopomers. This CRDS uses dual lasers to target the four isotpomers of interest: 12CO2, 13CO2, H2O and HDO. The system delivers a typical precision of 0.1 permil for δ13C and 1.5 permil for δD that parallels that achieved by IRMS, but with an unprecedented simplicity that allows ecologists to leverage the science and elucidate the avian migration patterns.

  2. Simultaneous measurements of work function and H‒ density including caesiation of a converter surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, S.; Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    Negative hydrogen ion sources rely on the surface conversion of neutral atomic hydrogen and positive hydrogen ions to H-. The efficiency of this process depends on the actual work function of the converter surface. By introducing caesium into the source the work function decreases, enhancing the negative ion yield. In order to study the impact of the work function on the H- surface production at similar conditions to the ones in ion sources for fusion devices like ITER and DEMO, fundamental investigations are performed in a flexible laboratory experiment. The work function of the converter surface can be absolutely measured by photoelectric effect, while a newly installed cavity ring-down spectroscopy system (CRDS) measures the H- density. The CRDS is firstly tested and characterized by investigations on H- volume production. Caesiation of a stainless steel sample is then performed in vacuum and the plasma effect on the Cs layer is investigated also for long plasma-on times. A minimum work function of (1.9±0.1) eV is reached after some minutes of plasma treatment, resulting in a reduction by a value of 0.8 eV compared to vacuum measurements. The H- density above the surface is (2.1±0.5)×1015 m-3. With further plasma exposure of the caesiated surface, the work function increases up to 3.75 eV, due to the impinging plasma particles which gradually remove the Cs layer. As a result, the H- density decreases by a factor of at least 2.

  3. Transient Infrared Emission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Roger W.; McClelland, John F.

    1989-12-01

    Transient Infrared Emission Spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new technique that reduces the occurrence of self-absorption in optically thick solid samples so that analytically useful emission spectra may be observed. Conventional emission spectroscopy, in which the sample is held at an elevated, uniform temperature, is practical only for optically thin samples. In thick samples the emission from deep layers of the material is partially absorbed by overlying layers.1 This self-absorption results in emission spectra from most optically thick samples that closely resemble black-body spectra. The characteristic discrete emission bands are severely truncated and altered in shape. TIRES bypasses this difficulty by using a laser to heat only an optically thin surface layer. The increased temperature of the layer is transient since the layer will rapidly cool and thicken by thermal diffusion; hence the emission collection must be correlated with the laser heating. TIRES may be done with both pulsed and cw lasers.2,3 When a pulsed laser is used, the spectrometer sampling must be synchronized with the laser pulsing so that only emission during and immediately after each laser pulse is observed.3 If a cw laser is used, the sample must move rapidly through the beam. The hot, transient layer is then in the beam track on the sample at and immediately behind the beam position, so the spectrometer field of view must be limited to this region near the beam position.2 How much self-absorption the observed emission suffers depends on how thick the heated layer has grown by thermal diffusion when the spectrometer samples the emission. Use of a pulsed laser synchronized with the spectrometer sampling readily permits reduction of the time available for heat diffusion to about 100 acs .3 When a cw laser is used, the heat-diffusion time is controlled by how small the spectrometer field of view is and by how rapidly the sample moves past within this field. Both a very small field of view and a

  4. Aerosol Observing System Greenhouse Gas (AOS GhG) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reichl, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Greenhouse Gas (GhG) Measurement system is a combination of two systems in series: (1) the Tower Gas Processing (TGP) System, an instrument rack which pulls, pressurizes, and dries air streams from an atmospheric sampling tower through a series of control and monitoring components, and (2) the Picarro model G2301 cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS), which measures CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor; the primary measurements of the GhG system.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy in space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingelhoefer, G [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Held, P [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Teucher, R [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Schlichting, F [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Foh, J [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Kankeleit, E [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    1995-03-01

    Nearly 40 years after the discovery of the Moessbauer effect for the first time a Moessbauer spectrometer will leave our planet to explore in situ the surface of another solar system body: the red planet Mars [1]. We are currently developing a miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer (MIMOS) which is part of the scientific payload of the Russian Mars96 mission, to be launched within the next 2-4 years [2,3]. To fulfill the requirements for a space mission to the planet Mars, all parts of the spectrometer had to be extremely miniaturized and ruggedized to withstand the space flight and Mars environmental conditions. The relevant parts (e.g. drive, detector system, electronics etc.) will be described in more detail and its characteristics compared to standard systems. Because of this new development there now is a growing interest to include a Moessbauer (MB) instrument in future space missions to other solar system bodies as for instance Venus, the terrestrial Moon, and a comet nucleus. Because of extremely different environmental conditions (e.g. nearly zero gravity on the surface of a comet nucleus, high pressure and temperature on the surface of Venus, etc.) different instrument designs and concepts are required for different missions. We will present some ideas for various types of missions, as well as the motivation for using Moessbauer spectroscopy in these cases. (orig.)

  7. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) is a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) aimed at studying the structure and spectrum of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer has a good acceptance for charged as well as neutral particles over a wide kinematic range and thus allows to access a wide range of reactions. Light mesons are studied with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The spectrum of light mesons is investigated in various final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions at squared four-momentum transfers to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to search for new states. Among these is a new resonance-like signal, t...

  8. Heavy quark spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    New experimental and theoretical developments in heavy quark spectroscopy are reviewed. From studies of J/psi decays, the eta' is found to have some ''glue'' or other inert component, while the iota (a glueball candidate) probably contains some quarks as well. The xi(2.2) persists in new Mark III data, but is not seen by the DM2 collaboration. The production of charmonium states by anti pp reactions is reviewed. First evidence for a P- wave charmed meson, D(2420), has been presented by the ARGUS group. Radiative UPSILON decay studies fail to confirm the zeta(8.3) and begin to place useful limits on Higgs bosons. First results from an experiment at Fermilab on low-background hadronic production of UPSILON states are shown. Accurate measurements of chi/sub b/(1P) masses by the ARGUS collaboration are noted, and interpreted as favoring scalar quark confinement. Studies of t and other heavy quarks will probe the q anti q interaction below 0.05 fm, are likely to be strongly affected by t anti t-Z interference, and can provide varied information on Higgs bosons. 144 refs., 21 figs

  9. Optogalvanic photoionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, S.; Gagne, J.-M.; Babin, F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents, for the first time, a systematic study of an optogalvanic method for photoionization spectroscopy. The method is particularly attractive for refractory and complex atoms, such as lanthanides and actinides. The relevant characteristics of the hollow cathode discharges used for this study are discussed in detail, along with the experimental protocol for this spectroscopic method. The rapid optogalvanic effect, which results solely from photoionization, is also described. Finally, we present as an example of the application of this method, a table containing some of the recorded uranium photoionization lines in the 16 300-20 500 cm -1 range, along with typical samples of the uranium single-colour photoionization spectrum recorded using the rapid optogalvanic technique. A brief discussion of the sensitivity of the rapid optogalvanic effect is also presented. It appears that the rapid optogalvanic effect is very effective in the detection of highly excited levels. This technique permitted the observation of many new single-colour resonant ionization uranium lines. (Author)

  10. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with 13 C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system

  11. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-09-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. Interest in this field may be provisionally divided into two general classes: Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states; open flavor states: The D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; and charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note we emphasize that there are many missing states in both categories -- states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to us would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular states. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner bar B decay remains to be seen. We suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  12. Heavy flavor spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Marques, J.; Spiegel, L.

    1993-01-01

    As a useful by-product of the unfolding searches for mixing and CP-violation effects in the beauty sector there will accrue very large data samples for the study of heavy flavor spectroscopy. (I) Hidden flavor states, i.e. c bar c and b bar b onium states. (II) Open flavor states (a) the D, D s , B, B s , and B c meson systems; (b) Charm and beauty flavored baryons. In this brief note the authors emphasize that there are many missing (undiscovered) states in both categories - states which are not readily produced exclusively due to quantum number preferences or states which are not readily observed inclusively due to experimentally difficult decay channels. As recorded luminosities increase it may be possible to fill in some of the holes in the present listings of heavy flavor states. Of particular interest to the authors would be the identification of heavy flavor mesons which are not easily explained in terms of a q bar q paradigm but rather may be evidence for hadro-molecular status. At Snowmass 1993 the topic of self-tagging schemes in B meson production was very much in vogue. Whether or not excited B-meson flavor-tagging will prove to be competitive with traditional methods based on the partner B decay remains to be seen. The authors suggest however that the richness of the excited B-system may undetermine the efficacy of self-tagging schemes

  13. (e,2e) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Weigold, E.

    1976-01-01

    We present a detailed treatment of the theoretical and experimental aspects of the symmetric (e,2e) reaction in atoms, molecules and solids. Two experimental arrangements are described for measuring angular correlations and separation energy spectra, the one arrangement employing coplanar and the other noncoplanar symmetric kinematics. The latter arrangement is shown to be particularly suitable for extracting structure information. The basic approximation, the factorized distorted-wave off-shell impulse approximation with fully distorted waves, is shown to correctly describe the reaction in some test cases, as does the phase distortion approximation. At energies of the order of 1200 eV the simple eikonal and plane wave approximations adequately describe the valence shell cross sections for light atoms and molecules containing first row elements. Energy independent structure information is obtained on: (a) shapes and magnitudes of the square of the momentum space wave functions for individual electron orbitals; (b) separation energies for individual ion eigenstates; (c) the characteristic orbital of each state; and (d) spectroscopic factors describing the probability that an eigenstate contains the principal configuration of a hole in the characteristic orbital for each eigenstate. Comparison is made with photoelectron spectroscopy and Compton scattering, since they separately yield some of the information obtained by the (e,2e) method. A brief summary is given of other electron-electron coincidence experiments. (author)

  14. Meson Spectroscopy at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Grube, Boris

    2016-11-29

    The goal of the COMPASS experiment at CERN is to study the structure and dynamics of hadrons. The two-stage spectrometer used by the experiment has large acceptance and covers a wide kinematic range for charged as well as neutral particles and can therefore measure a wide range of reactions. The spectroscopy of light mesons is performed with negative (mostly $\\pi^-$) and positive ($p$, $\\pi^+$) hadron beams with a momentum of 190 GeV/$c$. The light-meson spectrum is measured in different final states produced in diffractive dissociation reactions with squared four-momentum transfer $t$ to the target between 0.1 and 1.0 $(\\text{GeV}/c)^2$. The flagship channel is the $\\pi^-\\pi^-\\pi^+$ final state, for which COMPASS has recorded the currently world's largest data sample. These data not only allow to measure the properties of known resonances with high precision, but also to observe new states. Among these is a new axial-vector signal, the $a_1(1420)$, with unusual properties. Novel analysis techniques have been...

  15. Recon Spectroscopy with TRES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, David W.; TRES Team

    2018-01-01

    The Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) on the 1.5-m Tillinghast Reflector at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins has been a workhorse for reconnaissance spectroscopy of transiting-planet candidates identified by a variety of ground- and space-based photometric surveys, including Vulcan, TrES, HATNet, KELT, QES, Kepler, and K2. In support of NASA missions, quick-look classifications of effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, line broadening due to rotation, and absolute radial velocity have been uploaded to ExoFOP at NExScI on a timely schedule. More careful results derived using the Stellar Parameter Classification (SPC) tool can be provided in support of publications. For example, SPC results for effective temperature and metallicity have been used extensively to help constrain asteroseismic analyses of Kepler and K2 targets. TRES has also been used effectively for orbital solutions, Rossiter-McLaughlin observations, and Doppler tomography of large planets orbiting brighter. We look forward to continuing this work on TESS Objects of Interest.

  16. No influence of CO2 on stable isotope analyses of soil waters with off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-03-15

    It was recently shown that the presence of CO 2 affects the stable isotope (δ 2 H and δ 18 O values) analysis of water vapor via Wavelength-Scanned Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy. Here, we test how much CO 2 is emitted from soil samples and if the CO 2 in the headspace influences the isotope analysis with the direct equilibration method by Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS). The headspace above different amounts of sparkling water was sampled, and its stable isotopic composition (δ 2 H and δ 18 O values) and CO 2 concentration were measured by direct equilibration and by gas chromatography, respectively. In addition, the headspace above soil samples was analyzed in the same way. Furthermore, the gravimetric water content and the loss on ignition were measured for the soil samples. The experiment with the sparkling water showed that CO 2 does not influence the stable isotope analysis by OA-ICOS. CO 2 was emitted from the soil samples and correlated with the isotopic fractionation signal, but no causal relationship between the two was determined. Instead, the fractionation signal in pore water isotopes can be explained by soil evaporation and the CO 2 can be related to soil moisture and organic matter which both enhance microbial activity. We found, despite the high CO 2 emissions from soil samples, no need for a post-correction of the pore water stable isotope analysis results, since there is no relation between CO 2 concentrations and the stable isotope results of vapor samples obtained with OA-ICOS. © 2016 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  18. VMEbus interface for spectroscopy ADCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeaeskelaeinen, M.

    1987-01-01

    A high performance VMEbus interface for spectroscopy ADCs and other similar devices used in nuclear spectroscopy coincidence experiments has been developed. This new module can be used to interface existing spectroscopy ADCs with fast parallel data transfer into the industry standard multiprocessor VMEbus. The unit provides a fast direct readout of the ADC data into the VMEbus memory. The interface also has built-in capabilities that enable it to be used in coincidence experiments for slow data timing and ADC pattern recognition. (orig.)

  19. Admittance spectroscopy or deep level transient spectroscopy: A contrasting juxtaposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Joachim; Venter, Andre

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of defects in semiconductors remains of primary importance. In this paper the effectiveness of two of the most commonly used semiconductor defect spectroscopy techniques, viz. deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and admittance spectroscopy (AS) are reviewed. The analysis of defects present in commercially available SiC diodes shows that admittance spectroscopy allows the identification of deep traps with reduced measurement effort compared to deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS). Besides the N-donor, well-studied intrinsic defects were detected in these diodes. Determination of their activation energy and defect density, using the two techniques, confirm that the sensitivity of AS is comparable to that of DLTS while, due to its well defined peak shape, the spectroscopic resolution is superior. Additionally, admittance spectroscopy can analyze faster emission processes which make the study of shallow defects more practical and even that of shallow dopant levels, possible. A comparative summary for the relevant spectroscopic features of the two capacitance methods are presented.

  20. Lecture II. Charmed particle spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The discussion of charmed particle spectroscopy covers the particle properties and interrelations from a charmed quark composition point of view including SU(4)-symmetry generalities, mesons, baryons, charmed particle masses, and decays of charmed particles. 6 references

  1. Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Noy, Aleksandr

    2008-01-01

    "...Noy's Handbook of Molecular Force Spectroscopy is both a timely and useful summary of fundamental aspects of molecular force spectroscopy, and I believe it would make a worthwhile addition to any good scientific library. New research groups that are entering this field would be well advisedto study this handbook in detail before venturing into the exciting and challenging world of molecular force spectroscopy." Matthew F. Paige, University of Saskatchewan, Journal of the American Chemical Society Modern materials science and biophysics are increasingly focused on studying and controlling intermolecular interactions on the single-molecule level. Molecular force spectroscopy was developed in the past decade as the result of several unprecedented advances in the capabilities of modern scientific instrumentation, and defines a number of techniques that use mechanical force measurements to study interactions between single molecules and molecular assemblies in chemical and biological systems. Examples of these...

  2. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The publication in electronic form has been set up as proceedings of the conference dealing with applications of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in material science. Twenty-three abstracts and twenty-two presentations are included.

  3. New results from old spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemingway, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A report is presented of some of the major experimental results during the last year in the field of old spectroscopy. Included are properties, quark model, multiplets, particle interactions, and cross sections. 34 references

  4. High-resolution reflection spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducloy, Martial

    1997-01-01

    In this article some recent developments in selective reflection spectroscopy is reviewed and the various ways to extend Doppler free techniques to this spectroscopic field is discussed. Its main feature is to probe atomic gas close to the cell boundaries

  5. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  6. Intermultiplet transitions using neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborn, R.; Lovesey, S.W.; Taylor, A.D.; Balcar, E.

    1989-12-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering is used here to attempt to obtain optical spectra for lanthanide metals and compounds. Intermultiplet spectroscopy provides information about transitions from different electronic configurations and hybridisation of the 4f shell. This report discusses the relatively limited contribution that neutron scattering has played in intermultiplet spectroscopy, and covers spin-orbit transitions and coulomb transitions Racah algebra is developed in calculating the scattering cross sections. (author)

  7. ESR spectroscopy and electron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    EPR spectroscopy can map out the electron distribution in a molecule, in much the same way as proton NMR spectroscopy can map out the proton distribution, and it provides some of the most direct evidence for the principal concepts underlying the electronic theory of organic structure and mechanism. This is illustrated for phenomena of conjugation, hyper-conjugation, substituent effects in annulenes, Hueckel theory, ring strain, the Mills-Nixon effect, and ion pairing. (author)

  8. Semiconductor optoelectronic infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingworth, A.R.

    2001-08-01

    We use spectroscopy to study infrared optoelectronic inter and intraband semiconductor carrier dynamics. The overall aim of this thesis was to study both III-V and Pb chalcogenide material systems in order to show their future potential use in infrared emitters. The effects of bandstructure engineering have been studied in the output characteristics of mid-IR III-V laser diodes to show which processes (defects, radiative, Auger and phonon) dominate and whether non-radiative processes can be suppressed. A new three-beam pump probe experiment was used to investigate interband recombination directly in passive materials. Experiments on PbSe and theory for non-parabolic near-mirror bands and non-degenerate statistics were in good agreement. Comparisons with HgCdTe showed a reduction in the Auger coefficient of 1-2 orders of magnitude in the PbSe. Using Landau confinement to model spatial confinement in quantum dots (QDs) 'phonon bottlenecking' was studied. The results obtained from pump probe and cyclotron resonance saturation measurements showed a clear suppression in the cooling of carriers when Landau level separation was not resonant with LO phonon energy. When a bulk laser diode was placed in a magnetic field to produce a quasi quantum wire device the resulting enhanced differential gain and reduced Auger recombination lowered I th by 30%. This result showed many peaks in the light output which occurred when the LO phonon energy was a multiple of the Landau level separation. This showed for the first time evidence of the phonon bottleneck in a working laser device. A new technique called time resolved optically detected cyclotron resonance, was used as a precursor to finding the carrier dynamics within a spatially confined quantum dot. By moving to the case of a spatial QD using an optically detected intraband resonance it was possible to measure the energy separation interband levels and conduction and valence sublevels within the dot simultaneously. Furthermore

  9. Unquenched lattice upsilon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcantonio, L.M.

    2001-03-01

    A non-relativistic effective theory of QCD (NRQCD) is used in calculations of the upsilon spectrum. Simultaneous multi-correlation fitting routines are used to yield lattice channel energies and amplitudes. The lattice configurations used were both dynamical, with two flavours of sea quarks included in the action; and quenched, with no sea quarks. These configurations were generated by the UKQCD collaboration. The dynamical configurations used were ''matched'', having the same lattice spacing, but differing in the sea quark mass. Thus, it was possible to analyse trends of observables with sea quark mass, in the certainty that the trend isn't partially due to varying lattice spacing. The lattice spacing used for spectroscopy was derived from the lattice 1 1 P 1 - 1 3 S 1 splitting. On each set of configurations two lattice bare b quark masses were used, giving kinetic masses bracketing the physical Υ mass. The only quantity showing a strong dependence on these masses was the hyperfine splitting, so it was interpolated to the real Υ mass. The radial and orbital splittings gave good agreement with experiment. The hyperfine splitting results showed a clear signal for unquenching and the dynamical hyperfine splitting results were extrapolated to a physical sea quark mass. This result, combined with the quenched result yielded a value for the hyperfine splitting at n f = 3, predicting an η b mass of 9.517(4) GeV. The NRQCD technique for obtaining a value of the strong coupling constant in the M-barS-bar scheme was followed. Using quenched and dynamical results a value was extrapolated to n f = 3. Employing a three loop beta function to run the coupling, with suitable matching conditions at heavy quark thresholds, the final result was obtained for n f = 5 at a scale equal to the Z boson mass. This result was α(5)/MS(Mz)=0.110(4). Two methods for finding the mass of the b quark in the MS scheme were employed. The results of both methods agree within error but the

  10. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin [eds.

    2012-07-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  11. Advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012). Abstract book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerstendorf, Harald; Mueller, Katharina; Steudtner, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The abstract book of the International workshop on advanced techniques for actinide spectroscopy (ATAS 2012) include contributions concerning the following issues: environmental applications, NMR spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and theory, technical application: separation processes, emission spectroscopy.

  12. Photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.L.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is an epoch making event for photoemission spectroscopy that the light sources of continuous wavelength from vacuum ultra-violet to X-ray region have become available by the advent of synchrotron radiation. Specifically the progress after stable intense light has become obtainable from storage rings is very significant. One of the features of these synchrotron radiation is its extreme polarization of radiating pattern. Though the elementary processes of photoemission out of solids are the basic themes, phenomenalistic 3-stage model is usually applied to the analysis of experiments. In this model, the process of photoemission is considered by dividing into three stages, namely the generation of photoelectrons due to optical transition between electron status -- the transportation of photoelectrons to solid surfaces -- breaking away from the surfaces. The spectrometers, the energy analyzers of photoelectrons, and sample-preparing room used for photoemission spectroscopy are described. Next, energy distribution curves are explained. At the end, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, CFS (constant final energy spectroscopy) and CIS (constant initial energy spectroscopy), Auger yield and interatomic Auger yield, the determination of surface structure by normal emission CIS, and surface EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) are described. As seen above, the application specifically to surface physics is promising in the future. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmakoff, Andrei [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Champion, Paul [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Heilweil, Edwin J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Nelson, Keith A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ziegler, Larry [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2009-05-14

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE's Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all fiveof DOE's grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  14. Sensitive Mid-IR Laser Sensor Development and Mass Spectrometric Measurements in Shock Tube and Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2016-11-01

    With global emission regulations becoming stringent, development of new combustion technologies that meet future emission regulations is essential. In this vein, this dissertation presents the application of sensitive diagnostic tools to validate and improve chemical kinetic mechanisms that play a fundamental role in the design of new combustion technologies. First, a novel high sensitivity laser-based sensor with a wide frequency tuning range (900 – 1000 cm-1) was developed utilizing pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. The novel laser-based sensor was illustrated by measuring trace amounts of multiple combustion intermediates, namely ethylene, propene, allene, and 1-butene in a static cell at ambient conditions. Subsequently, pulsed CRDS technique was utilized to develop an ultra-fast, high sensitivity diagnostic to monitor trace concentrations of ethylene in shock tube pyrolysis experiments. This diagnostic represented the first ever successful application of CRDS technique to transient species measurements in a shock tube. The high sensitivity and fast time response (10μs) diagnostic may be utilized for measuring other key neutrals and radicals which are crucial in the oxidation chemistry of practical fuels. Secondly, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) was employed to measure relative cation mole fractions in atmospheric and low-pressure (30 Torr) flames of methane/oxygen diluted in argon. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames were 4 examined to evaluate the dependence of ion chemistry on flame stoichiometry. Spatial distribution of cations was compared with predictions of an existing ion chemistry model. Based on the extensive measurements carried out in this work, modifications were suggested to improve the ion chemistry model to enhance the fidelity of such mechanisms. In-depth understanding of flame ion chemistry is vital to model the interaction of flames with electric fields and thereby pave the way to enable active combustion control

  15. Comparison of measured and modelled negative hydrogen ion densities at the ECR-discharge HOMER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauner, D.; Kurutz, U.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); AG Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Universität Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2015-04-08

    As the negative hydrogen ion density n{sub H{sup −}} is a key parameter for the investigation of negative ion sources, its diagnostic quantification is essential in source development and operation as well as for fundamental research. By utilizing the photodetachment process of negative ions, generally two different diagnostic methods can be applied: via laser photodetachment, the density of negative ions is measured locally, but only relatively to the electron density. To obtain absolute densities, the electron density has to be measured additionally, which induces further uncertainties. Via cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), the absolute density of H{sup −} is measured directly, however LOS-averaged over the plasma length. At the ECR-discharge HOMER, where H{sup −} is produced in the plasma volume, laser photodetachment is applied as the standard method to measure n{sub H{sup −}}. The additional application of CRDS provides the possibility to directly obtain absolute values of n{sub H{sup −}}, thereby successfully bench-marking the laser photodetachment system as both diagnostics are in good agreement. In the investigated pressure range from 0.3 to 3 Pa, the measured negative hydrogen ion density shows a maximum at 1 to 1.5 Pa and an approximately linear response to increasing input microwave powers from 200 up to 500 W. Additionally, the volume production of negative ions is 0-dimensionally modelled by balancing H{sup −} production and destruction processes. The modelled densities are adapted to the absolute measurements of n{sub H{sup −}} via CRDS, allowing to identify collisions of H{sup −} with hydrogen atoms (associative and non-associative detachment) to be the dominant loss process of H{sup −} in the plasma volume at HOMER. Furthermore, the characteristic peak of n{sub H{sup −}} observed at 1 to 1.5 Pa is identified to be caused by a comparable behaviour of the electron density with varying pressure, as n{sub e} determines

  16. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  17. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, N. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Cairns, E.; Moussa, S. G.; Liggio, J.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone) in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK), diisopropyl ketone (DIPK), or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK), respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN), peroxypropionic (PPN), peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN), or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN) from NO in high yield (> 90%). Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) were carried out to rationalize products yields and to identify side products. The use of UV-LED arrays offers many advantages over conventional Hg lamp setups, including greater light output over a narrower wavelength range, lower power consumption, and minimal generation of heat.

  18. Efficient photochemical generation of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides with ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, N. D.; Taha, Y. M.; Odame-Ankrah, C. A.; Huo, J. A.; Tokarek, T. W.; Cairns, E.; Moussa, S. G.; Liggio, J.; Osthoff, H. D.

    2015-07-01

    Photochemical sources of peroxycarboxylic nitric anhydrides (PANs) are utilized in many atmospheric measurement techniques for calibration or to deliver an internal standard. Conventionally, such sources rely on phosphor-coated low-pressure mercury (Hg) lamps to generate the UV light necessary to photo-dissociate a dialkyl ketone (usually acetone) in the presence of a calibrated amount of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). In this manuscript, a photochemical PAN source in which the Hg lamp has been replaced by arrays of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) is described. The output of the UV-LED source was analyzed by gas chromatography (PAN-GC) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). Using acetone, diethyl ketone (DIEK), diisopropyl ketone (DIPK), or di-n-propyl ketone (DNPK), respectively, the source produces peroxyacetic (PAN), peroxypropionic (PPN), peroxyisobutanoic (PiBN), or peroxy-n-butanoic nitric anhydride (PnBN) from NO in high yield (> 90 %). Box model simulations with a subset of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) were carried out to rationalize product yields and to identify side products. The present work demonstrates that UV-LED arrays are a viable alternative to current Hg lamp setups.

  19. Characterization of Turkish honeys regarding of physicochemical properties, and their adulteration analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyda KIVRAK

    Full Text Available Abstract This work was conducted to evaluate the quality of 54 honey samples from eighteen different origins from Turkey. Physicochemical properties were examined according to AOAC methods, total phenolic and flavonoid contents by a spectrophotometric method and authenticity of honeys by Combustion Module - Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CM-CRDS. The microscopic analysis of honey sediment (mellissopalynology was carried out to identify and count the pollen to provide qualitative indicators to confirm botanical origin. The moisture, electrical conductivity and free acidity of honeys ranged from 15.56 to 18.39%, 0.143 to 2.006 mS.cm-1, 16.05 meq.kg-1 and 34.10 meq.kg-1, respectively. Diastase activity of sideritis honey was found highest. Honeys showed HMF level below 40 mg.kg-1. The highest proline was determined in thyme honey. The results showed that honeys contained eminent amounts of phenolics and flavonoids. δ13C values of honeys were more negative than -23.5‰. The C4% sugar ratios were lower than 7% value. The lowest glucose-fructose content was observed in eucalyptus, cedar and pine honey samples. The results obtained for physicochemical characteristics, total phenolic and flavonoid contents an authenticity analysis of Turkish honeys indicate a good quality level, adequate processing, good maturity and freshness. The discrimination between honey types was achieved by PCA.

  20. Surface emissions of heat, water and GHGs from a NYC greenroof

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis, W. R.; Jacobson, G.; Culligan, P.; Gaffin, S.; Carson, T.; Marasco, D.; Hsueh, D.; Rella, C.

    2012-04-01

    The budgets of heat, water, and GHGs from greenroofs in New York City, needed for adaptation and sustainable policy and infrastructure strategies, requires an accurate measure of their surface emissions. A high speed, Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) based analyzer for measuring carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water (H2O) and an ultrasonic wind and temperature anemometer for measuring heat and momentum is used to assess greenroof performance during seasonal, diurnal, and episodic weather conditions. The flux instrument has proven capable of raw 10 Hz precision (one standard deviation) better than 110 parts-per-billion (ppbv) for carbon dioxide, better than 3 ppbv for methane and better than 6 ppmv +0.3% of reading for water vapor. In the water and heat budget, comparison and reconciliation of greenroof evapotranspiration (ET) using micrometeorological techniques, water balance, and heat balance was conducted. The water balance (month timescales), the heat balance (week timescale) show agreement to the micrometeorological surface ET (hour timescale). By using boundary layer flux measurements of ET, the fundamental performance of greenroofs on climate and weather conditions can be explored. These boundary layer measured surface fluxes provide critical information on the physiology of the built environment in New York City. Faced with sewage failures due to water management and exacerbated heating, the accurate assessment of greenroof performance on high spatial and temporal scales in required for the urban environment. Results will be presented and discussed.

  1. Optimized spectroscopic scheme for enhanced precision CO measurements with applications to urban source attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottrott, A.; Hoffnagle, J.; Farinas, A.; Rella, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an urban pollutant generated by internal combustion engines which contributes to the formation of ground level ozone (smog). CO is also an excellent tracer for emissions from mobile combustion sources. In this work we present an optimized spectroscopic sampling scheme that enables enhanced precision CO measurements. The scheme was implemented on the Picarro G2401 Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer which measures CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O at 0.2 Hz. The optimized scheme improved the raw precision of CO measurements by 40% from 5 ppb to 3 ppb. Correlations of measured CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O from an urban tower were partitioned by wind direction and combined with a concentration footprint model for source attribution. The application of a concentration footprint for source attribution has several advantages. The upwind extent of the concentration footprint for a given sensor is much larger than the flux footprint. Measurements of mean concentration at the sensor location can be used to estimate source strength from a concentration footprint, while measurements of the vertical concentration flux are necessary to determine source strength from the flux footprint. Direct measurement of vertical concentration flux requires high frequency temporal sampling and increases the cost and complexity of the measurement system.

  2. Offline estimation of decay time for an optical cavity with a low pass filter cavity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallapur, Abhijit G; Boyson, Toby K; Petersen, Ian R; Harb, Charles C

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents offline estimation results for the decay-time constant for an experimental Fabry-Perot optical cavity for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The cavity dynamics are modeled in terms of a low pass filter (LPF) with unity DC gain. This model is used by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) along with the recorded light intensity at the output of the cavity in order to estimate the decay-time constant. The estimation results using the LPF cavity model are compared to those obtained using the quadrature model for the cavity presented in previous work by Kallapur et al. The estimation process derived using the LPF model comprises two states as opposed to three states in the quadrature model. When considering the EKF, this means propagating two states and a (2×2) covariance matrix using the LPF model, as opposed to propagating three states and a (3×3) covariance matrix using the quadrature model. This gives the former model a computational advantage over the latter and leads to faster execution times for the corresponding EKF. It is shown in this Letter that the LPF model for the cavity with two filter states is computationally more efficient, converges faster, and is hence a more suitable method than the three-state quadrature model presented in previous work for real-time estimation of the decay-time constant for the cavity.

  3. Dark spectroscopy at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2018-03-01

    Rich and complex dark sectors are abundant in particle physics theories. Here, we propose performing spectroscopy of the mass structure of dark sectors via mono-photon searches at lepton colliders. The energy of the mono-photon tracks the invariant mass of the invisible system it recoils against, which enables studying the resonance structure of the dark sector. We demonstrate this idea with several well-motivated models of dark sectors. Such spectroscopy measurements could potentially be performed at Belle II, BES-III and future low-energy lepton colliders.

  4. Raman Spectroscopy of Microbial Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Howell G. M.; Oren, Aharon

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid nondestructive technique providing spectroscopic and structural information on both organic and inorganic molecular compounds. Extensive applications for the method in the characterization of pigments have been found. Due to the high sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy for the detection of chlorophylls, carotenoids, scytonemin, and a range of other pigments found in the microbial world, it is an excellent technique to monitor the presence of such pigments, both in pure cultures and in environmental samples. Miniaturized portable handheld instruments are available; these instruments can be used to detect pigments in microbiological samples of different types and origins under field conditions. PMID:24682303

  5. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  6. Time-resolved ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckert, D.

    1986-06-01

    The time-resolved ESR spectroscopy is one of the modern methods in radiospectroscopy and plays an important role in solving various problems in chemistry and biology. Proceeding from the basic ideas of time-resolved ESR spectroscopy the experimental equipment is described generally including the equipment developed at the Central Institute of Isotope and Radiation Research. The experimental methods applied to the investigation of effects of chemically induced magnetic polarization of electrons and to kinetic studies of free radicals in polymer systems are presented. The theory of radical pair mechanism is discussed and theoretical expressions are summarized in a computer code to compute the theoretical polarization for each pair of the radicals

  7. Laser Spectroscopy : XII International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Allegrini, Maria; Sasso, Antonio

    1996-01-01

    This text includes all the recent advances in the field of laser spectroscopy. Major results span from the control of matter by electromagnetic fields (trapping and coding) to high precision measurements on simple atomic systems and to quantum optics with single atoms. It includes a report of the Bose-Einstein condensation achieved by laser-cooling of rubidium atoms. Achievements in the technology of tunable sources, in particular of miniaturized solid state devices, are also reported. Most recent advances in molecular spectroscopy are illustrated with emphasis on "cooled" spectra, clusters and high accuracy frequency references. Topics such as atomic interferometry and microcavity quantum optics are also covered.

  8. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  9. Annual reports on NMR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Graham A; McCarthy, M J

    1995-01-01

    Over recent years, no other technique has grown to such importance as that of NMR spectroscopy. It is used in all branches of science where precise structural determination is required and where the nature of interactions and reactions in solution is being studied. Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy has established itself as a means for the specialist and non-specialist alike to become familiar with new applications of the technique in all branches of chemistry, including biochemistry, and pharmaceutics. This volume focuses on theoretical aspects of NMR nuclear shielding and on applications of

  10. Applications of Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Asoka-Kumar , P.; Lynn , K.

    1995-01-01

    We describe the application of Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) to some selected technologically important systems. The method involves a nondestructive probe to detect low levels of open-volume defects. The discussion shows the application of PAS to a wide range of advanced material systems.

  11. Astronomical Spectroscopy A Short History

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Astronomical Spectroscopy A Short History. J C Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 24-29. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/003/05/0024-0029 ...

  12. NMR spectroscopy and drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craik, D.; Munro, S.

    1990-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for structural and conformational studies on drug molecules, the three-dimensional investigation of proteins structure and their interactions with ligands are discussed. In-vivo NMR studies of the effects of drugs on metabolism in perfused organs and whole animals are also briefly presented. 5 refs., ills

  13. Gluonic excitations in hadronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1983-09-01

    Theoretical expectations are described for new forms of hadronic matter containing gluons as excitable degrees of freedom. Particular attention is paid to hybrid states containing both quarks and gluons. Recent work on the spectroscopy of hybrid mesons and hybrid baryons is reviewed. Comparisons of bag model, lattice QCD and QCD sum rule predictions are made and some confrontation with data attempted. (author)

  14. Superconducting microphone for photoacoustic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, P.C.; Labrunie, M.; Weid, J.P. von der; Symko, O.G.

    1982-07-01

    A superconducting microphone has been developed for photoacoustic spectroscopy at low temperatures. The microphone consists of a thin mylar membrane coated with a film of lead whose motion is detected by a SQUID magnetometer. For the simple set-up presented here, the limiting pressure sensitivity is 7.5x10 -14 atmospheres/√Hz. (Author) [pt

  15. Evanescent spectroscopy - theory and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Karabchevsky, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Outline1 Introduction2 Literature Overview3 Photonic-Plasmonic WaveguideStructureModellingTheory4 ResultsOptical TransmittanceLoss of Fundamental Mode in a Gold RegionOptical Surface Intensity5 NIR Spectroscopy - Experiment6 Conclusions7 Acknowledgements

  16. Trends in resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    The author reviews the history of resonance ionization spectroscopy and then comments on the delineations of RIS with reference to many related laser processes. The substance of the paper deals with the trends in RIS and especially how the needs for sensitive analytical methods have overshadowed the orginal plan to study excited species. 9 refs., 1 fig

  17. High-spin nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    High-spin spectroscopy is the study of the changes in nuclear structure, properties, and behavior with increasing angular momentum. It involves the complex interplay between collective and single-particle motion, between shape and deformation changes, particle alignments, and changes in the pairing correlations. A review of progress in theory, experimentation, and instrumentation in this field is given

  18. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2017-05-24

    Vibrational spectroscopy has continued use as a powerful tool to characterize ionic liquids since the literature on room temperature molten salts experienced the rapid increase in number of publications in the 1990's. In the past years, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies have provided insights on ionic interactions and the resulting liquid structure in ionic liquids. A large body of information is now available concerning vibrational spectra of ionic liquids made of many different combinations of anions and cations, but reviews on this literature are scarce. This review is an attempt at filling this gap. Some basic care needed while recording IR or Raman spectra of ionic liquids is explained. We have reviewed the conceptual basis of theoretical frameworks which have been used to interpret vibrational spectra of ionic liquids, helping the reader to distinguish the scope of application of different methods of calculation. Vibrational frequencies observed in IR and Raman spectra of ionic liquids based on different anions and cations are discussed and eventual disagreements between different sources are critically reviewed. The aim is that the reader can use this information while assigning vibrational spectra of an ionic liquid containing another particular combination of anions and cations. Different applications of IR and Raman spectroscopies are given for both pure ionic liquids and solutions. Further issues addressed in this review are the intermolecular vibrations that are more directly probed by the low-frequency range of IR and Raman spectra and the applications of vibrational spectroscopy in studying phase transitions of ionic liquids.

  19. Principles of electron tunneling spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, E L

    2012-01-01

    Electron tunnelling spectroscopy as a research tool has strongly advanced understanding of superconductivity. This book explains the physics and instrumentation behind the advances illustrated in beautiful images of atoms, rings of atoms and exotic states in high temperature superconductors, and summarizes the state of knowledge that has resulted.

  20. Ultrafast spectroscopy of biological photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Groot, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    We review recent new insights on reaction dynamics of photoreceptors proteins gained from ultrafast spectroscopy. In Blue Light sensing Using FAD (BLUF) domains, a hydrogen-bond rearrangement around the flavin chromophore proceeds through a radical-pair mechanism, by which light-induced electron and

  1. Current status of baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wali, K.C.

    1975-08-01

    In this review of baryon spectroscopy, the basic ideas of some of the current models and the experimental data for their claims to success are discussed including realistic or constituent quark models, experimental comparison, the experimental and theoretical basis for the assignments, algebraic quark models, and confinement schemes

  2. Towards laser spectroscopy of antihydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walz, J.; Pahl, A.; Eikema, K.S.E.; Hansch, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of the first continuous coherent source at 121.56 nm is described. Radiation at this wavelength of Lyman-alpha can be used for laser-cooling of antihydrogen on the strong 1S-2P transition. It also opens up a possibility for precision spectroscopy that requires just a few antihydrogen

  3. More seminars on muonium spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.F.J.

    1984-12-01

    The paper concerns topics which illustrate the use of muonium spectroscopy in four major areas. The experimental method -muon spin rotation (muSR) is employed in the four topics, which include: muSR studies in magnetism, muons in metals and metal hydrides, muonium in semiconductors and muSR studies in chemistry. (U.K.)

  4. Spectroscopy in catalysis : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2007-01-01

    Spectroscopy in Catalysis is an introduction to the most important analytical techniques that are nowadays used in catalysis and in catalytic surface chemistry. The aim of the book is to give the reader a feeling for the type of information that characterization techniques provide about questions

  5. MR spectroscopy in clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1994-01-01

    MR spectroscopy (MRS) offers unique possibilities for non-invasive evaluation of biochemistry in vivo. During recent years there has been a growing body of evidence from clinical research studies on human beings using 31P and 1H MRS. The results indicate that it is possible to evaluate phosphorous...

  6. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  7. Erratum: Quantum corrections and black hole spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Han, Yan; Cai, Xu

    2012-06-01

    In my paper [Qing-Quan Jiang, Yan Han, Xu Cai, Quantum corrections and black hole spectroscopy, JHEP 08 (2010) 049], there was an error in deriving the black hole spectroscopy. In this erratum, we attempt to rectify them.

  8. Imaging spectroscopy for characterisation of grass swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Imaging spectroscopy, imaging spectrometry, remote sensing, reflection, reflectance, grass sward, white clover, recognition, characterisation, ground cover, growth monitoring, stress detection, heterogeneity quantification

    The potential of imaging spectroscopy as a tool for

  9. PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY USING A SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JACKSON, R.S.; MICHAELIAN, K.H.; HOMES, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the use of a synchrotron as a source for infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. A synchrotron has an intrinsically high radiance, which is beneficial when photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied to small samples, especially at long wavelengths

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy of solids and surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, S.P.

    1976-01-01

    The use of photoelectron spectroscopy, primarily x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, to obtain information on the electronic structure of a wide variety of solids (especially the bulk electronic structure of solids) is covered. Both valence band and core-level spectra, as well as a few cases of photon excited Auger electron spectroscopy, are employed in the investigations to derive information on N(E). The effect of several modulations inherent in the measured I(E)'s, such as final state band structure, cross section, and relaxation, is discussed. Examples of many-electron interactions in PES are given. Some experimental aspects of PES and AES studies are given with emphasis on sample preparation techniques. Multiple splitting of core levels is examined using the Mn levels in MnF 2 as a detailed case study. Core level splittings in transition metals, rare earth metals, transition metal halides and several alloys are also reported. The application of PES to the study of the chemical bond in some crystalline semiconductors and insulators, A/sup N/B/sup 8-N/ and A/sup N/B/sup 10-N/ compounds is treated, and a spectroscopic scale of ionicity for these compounds is developed from the measured ''s-band'' splitting in the valence band density of states

  11. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-01-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 10 12 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 10 18 . While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  12. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K, E-mail: M.Lyatti@fz-juelich.d, E-mail: Y.Divin@fz-juelich.d [Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T{sub c} Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  13. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyatti, M.; Divin, Y.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.

    2009-11-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- Tc Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  14. Liquid identification by Hilbert spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyatti, M; Divin, Y; Poppe, U; Urban, K

    2009-01-01

    Fast and reliable identification of liquids is of great importance in, for example, security, biology and the beverage industry. An unambiguous identification of liquids can be made by electromagnetic measurements of their dielectric functions in the frequency range of their main dispersions, but this frequency range, from a few GHz to a few THz, is not covered by any conventional spectroscopy. We have developed a concept of liquid identification based on our new Hilbert spectroscopy and high- T c Josephson junctions, which can operate at the intermediate range from microwaves to THz frequencies. A demonstration setup has been developed consisting of a polychromatic radiation source and a compact Hilbert spectrometer integrated in a Stirling cryocooler. Reflection polychromatic spectra of various bottled liquids have been measured at the spectral range of 15-300 GHz with total scanning time down to 0.2 s and identification of liquids has been demonstrated.

  15. Femtosecond Broadband Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Y; Yoon, Sagwoon; Mathies, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is a new technique where a narrow bandwidth picosecond Raman pump pulse and a red-shifted broadband femtosecond Stokes probe pulse (with or without time delay between the pulses) act on a sample to produce a high resolution Raman gain spectrum with high efficiency and speed, free from fluorescence background interference. It can reveal vibrational structural information and dynamics of stationary or transient states. Here, the quantum picture for femtosecond broadband stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) is used to develop the semiclassical coupled wave theory of the phenomenon and to derive an expression for the measurable Raman gain in FSRS. The semiclassical theory is applied to study the dependence of lineshapes in FSRS on the pump-probe time delay and to deduce vibrational dephasing times in cyclohexane in the ground state

  16. Supercurrent Spectroscopy of Andreev States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bretheau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We measure the excitation spectrum of a superconducting atomic contact. In addition to the usual continuum above the superconducting gap, the single-particle excitation spectrum contains discrete, spin-degenerate Andreev levels inside the gap. Quasiparticle excitations are induced by a broadband on-chip microwave source and detected by measuring changes in the supercurrent flowing through the atomic contact. Since microwave photons excite quasiparticles in pairs, two types of transitions are observed: Andreev transitions, which consist of putting two quasiparticles in an Andreev level, and transitions to odd states with a single quasiparticle in an Andreev level and the other one in the continuum. In contrast to absorption spectroscopy, supercurrent spectroscopy allows detection of long-lived odd states.

  17. Nuclear spectroscopy with lithium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, C.

    1977-02-01

    A survey of the state of nuclear spectroscopy with lithium ions is given. Proceeding from the physical and nuclear properties the specific topics arising by the acceleration of these ions are discussed. The results obtained from measurements of excitation functions of different lithium reactions, particularly of compound reactions, with several target nuclei are summarized. Besides compound reactions direct reactions are important, especially transfer reactions, elastic and inelastic scattering and exchange reactions. The results on high spin states obtained by in-beam gamma-spectroscopy are discussed in detail. Finally the possibilities are considered for accelerating lithium ions in the cyclotron U-120 and in the tandem generator EGP-10 of the ZfK. (author)

  18. Development of atomic spectroscopy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Hyung Ki; Song, Kyu Seok; Yang, Ki Ho; Baik, Dae Hyun; Lee, Young Joo; Yi, Jong Hoon; Jeong, Do Young; Jeong, Eui Chang; Yoo, Byung Duk; Cha, Byung Heon; Kim, Seong Ho; Nam, Seong Mo; Kim, Sun Kuk; Lee, Byung Cheol; Choi, Hwa Lim; Ko, Dok Yung; Han, Jae Min; Rho, Si Pyo; Lim, Chang Hwan; Choi, An Seong

    1992-12-01

    This project is aimed for the 'Development of extraction and separation techniques for stable isotopes by atomic laser spectroscopy technique'. The project is devided by two sub-projects. One is the 'Development of the selective photoionization technology' and the other is 'Development of ultrasensitive spectroscopic analysis technololgy'. This year studies on Hg and Yb, both of which have 7 isotopes, have been performed and, as a result, it was proved that specific isotopes of these elements could be selectively extracted. In addition study on plasma extraction technique, development of atomizers, design of electron gun have been the result of the project in 1992. In second sub-project trace determination of Pb has been performed with laser resonance ionization spectroscopy. As a result 20 picogram of detection limit has been obtained. In addition to these results, design of high sensitive laser induced fluorescence detection system as well as remote sensing DIAL system have been done. (Author)

  19. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rule, Gordon S

    2006-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful technique to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Fundamentals of Protein NMR Spectroscopy is a comprehensive textbook that guides the reader from a basic understanding of the phenomenological properties of magnetic resonance to the application and interpretation of modern multi-dimensional NMR experiments on 15N/13C-labeled proteins. Beginning with elementary quantum mechanics, a set of practical rules is presented and used to describe many commonly employed multi-dimensional, multi-nuclear NMR pulse sequences. A modular analysis of NMR pulse sequence building blocks also provides a basis for understanding and developing novel pulse programs. This text not only covers topics from chemical shift assignment to protein structure refinement, as well as the analysis of protein dynamics and chemical kinetics, but also provides a practical guide to many aspects of modern spectrometer hardware, sample preparation, experimental set-up, and data pr...

  20. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs

  1. Blood analysis by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enejder, Annika M K; Koo, Tae-Woong; Oh, Jeankun; Hunter, Martin; Sasic, Slobodan; Feld, Michael S; Horowitz, Gary L

    2002-11-15

    Concentrations of multiple analytes were simultaneously measured in whole blood with clinical accuracy, without sample processing, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were acquired with an instrument employing nonimaging optics, designed using Monte Carlo simulations of the influence of light-scattering-absorbing blood cells on the excitation and emission of Raman light in turbid medium. Raman spectra were collected from whole blood drawn from 31 individuals. Quantitative predictions of glucose, urea, total protein, albumin, triglycerides, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were made by means of partial least-squares (PLS) analysis with clinically relevant precision (r(2) values >0.93). The similarity of the features of the PLS calibration spectra to those of the respective analyte spectra illustrates that the predictions are based on molecular information carried by the Raman light. This demonstrates the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy for quantitative measurements of biomolecular contents in highly light-scattering and absorbing media.

  2. Laser spectroscopy of radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otten, E.W.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of using the laser spectroscopy in investigations radioactive beams is considered. The main attention is payed to the isotope shift of nuclear charge radii delta 2 >. The general trend of delta 2 > is discussed. Predictions for delta>r 2 < in the framework of the droplet model are given. It is noted that two parameter interpretation of the isotope shift based on the droplet model works the better, the further the distance spans and the clearer the nuclear structure is

  3. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  4. Developments in inverse photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheils, W.; Leckey, R.C.G.; Riley, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    In the 1950's and 1960's, Photoemission Spectroscopy (PES) established itself as the major technique for the study of the occupied electronic energy levels of solids. During this period the field divided into two branches: X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) for photon energies greater than ∼l000eV, and Ultra-violet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS) for photon energies below ∼100eV. By the 1970's XPS and UPS had become mature techniques. Like XPS, BIS (at x-ray energies) does not have the momentum-resolving ability of UPS that has contributed much to the understanding of the occupied band structures of solids. BIS moved into a new energy regime in 1977 when Dose employed a Geiger-Mueller tube to obtain density of unoccupied states data from a tantalum sample at a photon energy of ∼9.7eV. At similar energies, the technique has since become known as Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy (IPS), in acknowledgment of its complementary relationship to UPS and to distinguish it from the higher energy BIS. Drawing on decades of UPS expertise, IPS has quickly moved into areas of interest where UPS has been applied; metals, semiconductors, layer compounds, adsorbates, ferromagnets, and superconductors. At La Trobe University an IPS facility has been constructed. This presentation reports on developments in the experimental and analytical techniques of IPS that have been made there. The results of a study of the unoccupied bulk and surface bands of GaAs are presented

  5. Liquid microjet for photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy from highly volatile liquids, especially from water and aqueous solutions, has recently become possible due to the development of the vacuum liquid microjet in combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation. The present status of this rapidly growing field is reported here, with an emphasize on the method's sensitivity for detecting local electronic structure, and for monitoring ultrafast dynamical processes in aqueous solution exploiting core-level resonant excitation.

  6. Liquid microjet for photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Bernd [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, and BESSY, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.winter@bessy.de

    2009-03-21

    Photoelectron spectroscopy from highly volatile liquids, especially from water and aqueous solutions, has recently become possible due to the development of the vacuum liquid microjet in combination of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation. The present status of this rapidly growing field is reported here, with an emphasize on the method's sensitivity for detecting local electronic structure, and for monitoring ultrafast dynamical processes in aqueous solution exploiting core-level resonant excitation.

  7. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation

  8. Spectroscopy, scattering, and KK molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, J. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The author presents a pedagogical description of a new theoretical technique, based on the multichannel Schroedinger equation, for simultaneously applying the quark model to both meson spectroscopy and meson-meson scattering. This is an extension of an earlier analysis which led to the prediction that the f{sub o}(975) and a{sub o}(980) scalar mesons are K{bar K} molecular states.

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopy principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hüfner, Stefan

    1995-01-01

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy presents an up-to-date introduction to the field by treating comprehensively the electronic structures of atoms, molecules, solids and surfaces Brief descriptions are given of inverse photoemission, spin-polarized photoemission and photoelectron diffraction Experimental aspects are considered throughout the book, and the results are carefully interpreted by theory A wealth of measured data is presented in the form of tables for easy use by experimentalists

  10. Neutron spectroscopy for confinement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorn, R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is an important method for the study of microscopic dynamics because it captures the spatial as well as the temporal aspects of the atomic or molecular motion. In this article techniques will be presented which are of special importance for the study of confined systems. Many of these are based on the fact that neutron scattering is isotope-dependent. Possible sources of systematic errors in measurements of confined systems will be pointed out. (author)

  11. Accurate deuterium spectroscopy for fundamental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, P.; Thibault, F.; Zaborowski, M.; Wójtewicz, S.; Cygan, A.; Kowzan, G.; Masłowski, P.; Komasa, J.; Puchalski, M.; Pachucki, K.; Ciuryło, R.; Lisak, D.

    2018-07-01

    We present an accurate measurement of the weak quadrupole S(2) 2-0 line in self-perturbed D2 and theoretical ab initio calculations of both collisional line-shape effects and energy of this rovibrational transition. The spectra were collected at the 247-984 Torr pressure range with a frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectrometer linked to an optical frequency comb (OFC) referenced to a primary time standard. Our line-shape modeling employed quantum calculations of molecular scattering (the pressure broadening and shift and their speed dependencies were calculated, while the complex frequency of optical velocity-changing collisions was fitted to experimental spectra). The velocity-changing collisions are handled with the hard-sphere collisional kernel. The experimental and theoretical pressure broadening and shift are consistent within 5% and 27%, respectively (the discrepancy for shift is 8% when referred not to the speed averaged value, which is close to zero, but to the range of variability of the speed-dependent shift). We use our high pressure measurement to determine the energy, ν0, of the S(2) 2-0 transition. The ab initio line-shape calculations allowed us to mitigate the expected collisional systematics reaching the 410 kHz accuracy of ν0. We report theoretical determination of ν0 taking into account relativistic and QED corrections up to α5. Our estimation of the accuracy of the theoretical ν0 is 1.3 MHz. We observe 3.4σ discrepancy between experimental and theoretical ν0.

  12. Laser spectroscopy probes the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, J.; Billowes, J.

    1998-01-01

    Extremely sensitive optical measurements are shedding new light on the shape and size of nuclei, and the properties of nuclear matter far from stability. Of the 7000 or so isotopes known to nuclear physicists, less than 270 are stable. In general isotopes become more and more unstable as we move away from the so-called valley of stability, and therefore become more difficult to study in experiments. The tests of the theory also become more demanding. Laser spectroscopy is one of the techniques that is helping to explore the properties of these isotopes and improve our understanding of the forces inside the nucleus. High-resolution laser spectroscopy of short-lived radioactive atoms now makes it possible to measure the nuclear charge radius of many elements, including many isotopes far from stability. The method can reveal fine details of the sizes, shapes and structures of nuclei. In addition, laser spectroscopy is making significant contributions to our understanding of the nuclear force in unstable nuclei with unusual, or extreme, proton-neutron ratios. In this article the authors discuss the latest advances in studying heavy nuclei. (author)

  13. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... properties, API CHL50 kit are useful at genus-species level but ... After growing the isolates in the appropriate media, they were centrifuged at ... scanned 64 times at 4 cm-¹ resolution. The study ..... New York, 142 p. Sandine ...

  14. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Jason R.

    Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely upon measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent upon its chemical composition. One technology that has been used extensively in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies to measure the chemical composition of bone is Raman spectroscopy. This spectroscopic technique provides chemical information about a sample by probing its molecular vibrations. In the case of bone tissue, Raman spectra provide chemical information about both the inorganic mineral and organic matrix components, which each contribute to bone strength. To explore the relationship between bone strength and chemical composition, our laboratory has contributed to ex vivo, exposed-bone animal studies of rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, and prolonged lead exposure. All of these studies suggest that Raman-based predictions of biomechanical strength may be more accurate than those produced by the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. The utility of Raman spectroscopy in ex vivo, exposed-bone studies has inspired attempts to perform bone spectroscopy transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make non-invasive, in vivo measurements of bone that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based upon fitting with spectral libraries derived from separately-acquired measurements of the underlying tissue components. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both soft tissue and bone and was applied to experimental data in order to transcutaneously detect, to our knowledge for the first time, age- and disease-related spectral

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkowitz, J.

    1974-01-01

    The history of physical science is replete with examples of phenomena initially discovered and investigated by physicists, which have subsequently become tools of the chemist. It is demonstrated in this paper that the field of photoelectron spectroscopy may develop in a reverse fashion. After a brief introduction to the subject, the properties characterized as physical ones, are discussed. These are intensities and angular distributions, from which one can infer transition probabilities and phase shifts. Three separate experiments are described which involve accurate intensity measurements and it is shown how an interpretation of the results by appropriate theory has given new insight into the photoionization process. (B.R.H.)

  16. Neutron molecular spectroscopy: future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkinson, J.; Carlile, C.J.; Krishna, P.S.R.

    1994-07-01

    The recent revolution in Neutron Molecular Spectroscopy, caused by extending the spectral range, is briefly reviewed. The need to constantly improve the spectral resolution is underlined and the likely benefits are identified. Recent work on improving the energy resolution on TFXA is presented and three future options for TFXA are outlined. Some preliminary high resolution results, from a mock-up spectrometer, are reported. These clearly show that narrow bands are available in solids and improved resolutions can be achieved to observe them. (Author)

  17. Spectroscopy after the new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1975-06-01

    Conventional spectroscopy was reexamined, and the puzzles and paradoxes which have arisen in attempting to describe the properties of the known particles are sought. It is noted that these may offer clues to the missing elements necessary for the description of the new particles. The minimum number of elementary building blocks, charm and color, the colored quark model for saturation, spin splittings in the meson spectrum, three kinds of quarks, the Melosh transformation and the Jackson frame, the Zweig rule mystery, new particles and old symmetries, f--A2 interference, and nonleptonic decay. (U.S.)

  18. Atomic spectroscopy with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tino, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    Some applications of semiconductor diode lasers in atomic spectroscopy are discussed by describing different experiments performed with lasers emitting in the visible and in the near-infrared region. I illustrate the results obtained in the investigation of near-infrared transitions of atomic oxygen and of the visible intercombination line of strontium. I also describe how two offset-frequency-locked diode lasers can be used to excite velocity selective Raman transitions in Cs. I discuss the spectral resolution, the accuracy of frequency measurements, and the detection sensitivity achievable with diode lasers. (orig.)

  19. Laser excitation spectroscopy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solarz, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Laser excitation spectroscopy, recently applied to uranium enrichment research at LLL, has produced a wealth of new and vitally needed information about the uranium atom and its excited states. Among the data amassed were a large number of cross sections, almost a hundred radiative lifetimes, and many level assignments. Rydberg states, never before observed in uranium or any of the actinides, have been measured and cataloged. This work puts a firm experimental base under laser isotope separation, and permits a choice of the laser frequencies most appropriate for practical uranium enrichment

  20. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution measurements on γ rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author)

  2. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  3. Supraconductor magnet for optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, G.; Buhler, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superconductive magnet system for optic spectroscopy has been built. It includes an elaborate support structure, a LN2/LHe cryostat with its supplies and controls and a superconductive magnet of the split pole type equipped with a superconductive switch. A vertically introduced sample in the LHe bath, on request subcooled down to 2.2K is observed through two optical passages. Magnet characteristics are as follows : - clear bore 35mm - clear split 20mm - central field 6.33 Teslas - homogeneity over 10mm D.S.V.: 1% [fr

  4. [Meson spectroscopy and particle astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoSecco, J.M.

    1993-07-01

    Progress in the design and construction of a light meson spectroscopy experiment is reported. The experiment will run in 1993. Some non- accelerator, activities and plans for the future are also discussed. Results of a Brookhaven beam test with a subset of the final detector are described. The test has been quite promising both in the speed with which results have been obtained and in the quality of the data itself. The status of the CsI veto is reported The target region, in particular the CsI veto experiment is Notre Dame's primary hardware responsibility on this experiment

  5. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  6. electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerton, R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of a commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article describes the use of electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The physical and chemical properties of materials can be studied by considering the energy that electrons use as they travel through a solid, often in conjunction with other analytical techniques. The technique is often combined with electron diffraction and high-resolution imaging and can be used to provide elemental identification down to the atomic scale. 6 figs

  7. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerton, R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the commemorative series of articles to mark the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of the electron, this article discusses electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The physical and chemical properties of materials can be studied by considering the energy that electrons use as they travel through a solid, often in conjunction with other analytical techniques. The technique is often combined with electron diffraction and high-resolution imaging and can be used to provide elemental identification down to the atomic scale. (UK)

  8. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for analytical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisch, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Many different techniques, such as UV/vis absorption, IR spectroscopy, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are routinely applied in chemical (micro-)analysis and chemical imaging, and a large variety of instruments is commercially available. Up to now, opto- or photoacoustic (PA) and other optothermal (OT) methods are less common and only a limited number of instruments reached a level of application beyond prototypes in research laboratories. The underlying principle of all these techniques is the detection of local heating due to the conversion of light into heat by optical absorption. Considering the versatility, robustness and instrumental simplicity of many PA techniques, it is surprising that the number of commercial instruments based on such approaches is so sparse. The impetus of this review is to summarize basic principles and possible applications described in the literature, in order to foster routine application of these techniques in industry, process analysis and environmental screening. While the terms OT and PA methods cover a very wide range of methods and physical phenomena, this review will concentrate on techniques with applications for analytical measurements. (topical review)

  9. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styczen, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The contributions given hereafter to this Annual Report cover a broad activity of the Department in 1999 both in the pure nuclear spectroscopy and in the applied spectroscopy investigations. That activity is then assembled in the two main groups: the nuclear structure studies with the application of the multidetector systems such as GASP, GAMMASPHERE, EUROBALL and the RFD - as its ancillary device, and investigations of condensed matter properties with the use of nuclear methods. In addition, non-nuclear methods such as the atomic force microscopy provided several new encouraging results. The nice data obtained are due to the great skill and hard work of all members of the staff, and a vast cooperation both with international and national institutes and institutions. When anticipated for calling the attractive results of the past year, I would rather admit that all data given here pretend to be those. To meet with, I refer directly to the short presentations given in the next pages. (author)

  10. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  11. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  12. General Remarks about mossbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzababayev, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    More than forty years have passed since the discovery of Mossbauer effect; one of the most brilliant findings in modern physics. This effect proved itself to be the powerful tool in almost all disciplines of the natural sciences and technology. Its unique feature is that it gives the possibility to get the results which cannot be obtained by any other physical methods. Mossbauer effect has been used as a key to unlock some basic physical, chemical and biological phenomena, as a guide for finding the new ways of solving applied scientific and technical problems of electronics, metallurgy, civil engineering, and even fine arts and archaeology. Very few scientific techniques can claim entry into as many countries as Mossbauer spectroscopy. Due to its wide application in an education and research processes the community of Mossbauer spectroscopists extends to almost 100 different countries. Laboratory equipment necessary for conducting gamma resonance spectroscopy, do not require large investments, premises, personnel. The spectrometer is rather small in size and could be installed on the ordinary laboratory table. That is why Mossbauer effect is widely used at numerous Universities all over the world as an universal instrument for tuition and research

  13. Spectroscopy of antiproton helium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2005-01-01

    Antiproton helium atom is three-body system consisting of an antiproton, electrons and a helium nucleus (denoted by the chemical symbol, p-bar H + ). The authors produced abundant atoms of p-bar 4 He + , and p-bar 3 He + in a cooled He gas target chamber stopping the p-bar beam decelerated to approximately 100 keV in the Antiproton Decelerator at CERN. A precision laser spectroscopy on the atomic transitions in the p-bar 4 He + , and in p-bar 3 He + was performed. Principle of laser spectroscopy and various modifications of the system to eliminate factors affecting the accuracy of the experiment were described. Deduced mass ratio of antiproton and proton, (|m p -bar - m p |)/m p reached to the accuracy of 10 ppb (10 -8 ) as of 2002, as adopted in the recent article of the Particle Data Group by P.J. Mohr and B.N. Taylor. This value is the highest precise data for the CPT invariance in baryon. In future, antihydrogen atoms will be produced in the same facility, and will provide far accurate value of antiproton mass thus enabling a better confirmation of CPT theorem in baryon. (T. Tamura)

  14. Perspectives of shaped pulses for EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Philipp E.; Schöps, Philipp; Kallies, Wolfgang; Glaser, Steffen J.; Prisner, Thomas F.

    2017-07-01

    This article describes current uses of shaped pulses, generated by an arbitrary waveform generator, in the field of EPR spectroscopy. We show applications of sech/tanh and WURST pulses to dipolar spectroscopy, including new pulse schemes and procedures, and discuss the more general concept of optimum-control-based pulses for applications in EPR spectroscopy. The article also describes a procedure to correct for experimental imperfections, mostly introduced by the microwave resonator, and discusses further potential applications and limitations of such pulses.

  15. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  16. XXII Conference on spectroscopy. Summaries of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    XXII Conference on spectroscopy took place 8-12 October 2001 in Zvenigorod, Moscow region. The recent advantages in the field of atomic and molecular spectroscopy were discussed. The current methods for elemental spectra analysis were considered. They are based on both traditional atomic emission, adsorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques and on introduction of the mass spectroscopy with the high-temperature plasma atomizer. The particular attention was given the application of spectroscopic methods for plasma diagnostics and air pollution control [ru

  17. Modern luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gaft, Michael; Panczer, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence Spectroscopy of Minerals and Materials presents an overview of the general concepts in luminescence spectroscopy as well as experimental methods and their interpretation. Special emphasis is laid on the fluorescence lifetime and the determination of time-resolved spectra. This method enables the exposure of new luminescence in minerals previously hidden by more intensive centers. Specialists in the fields of solid state physics, chemistry and spectroscopy will find a wealth of new information in this unique book.

  18. HOMES - Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HOMES (Holographic Optical Method for Exoplanet Spectroscopy) is a space telescope that employs a double dispersion architecture, using a holographic optical element...

  19. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  20. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy in turbid media using fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, Arjen; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Robinson, Dominic J.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new technique, fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy (FDPS), that enables the quantitative investigation of fluorophores in turbid media. FDPS measurements are made with the same probe geometry as differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) measurements. Phantom

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, U.

    1994-01-01

    The short pulse nature of synchrotron radiation makes it possible to perform Moessbauer spectroscopy in the time domain, i.e. instead of measuring the transmitted intensity time integrated as a function of source/absorber velocity, the intensity of the scattered radiation is measured time differential. The resulting time spectrum is essentially source independent and complications in the data analysis which are related to the radioactive source are completely removed. Furthermore, the large brightness and well defined polarization of the synchrotron radiation can, e.g., speed up the data collection and facilitate studies of polarization phenomena. To illustrate these new spectroscopic possibilities, measurements of the temperature dependence and polarization dependence of forward scattering from alpha - sup 5 sup 7 Fe nuclei are presented and discussed 26 refs., 5 figs. (author)

  2. Nuclear level mixing resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coussement, R.; Put, P.; Scheveneels, G.; Hardeman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The existent methods for measuring quadrupole interactions are not suited to nuclei with lifetimes in the micro-seconds to minutes region. AD/NQR, a possible candidate in this lifetime gap, has not yet succeeded in overcoming its predicted difficulties. A new resonant method, recently developed and based on the principles of level mixing (cfr atomic spectroscopy) covers this less accessible lifetime range. Many other kinds of resonances can be described according to the level mixing formalism. The particular example of NMR as a level mixing resonance (LMR) is discussed. The underlying theory of LMR and its important consequences, leading to some interesting features of the method, is briefly formulated. Two successfully performed measurements demonstrate the feasibility and the predicted characteristics of this new promising method. (orig.)

  3. Molecular Force Spectroscopy on Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Molecular force spectroscopy has become a powerful tool to study how mechanics regulates biology, especially the mechanical regulation of molecular interactions and its impact on cellular functions. This force-driven methodology has uncovered a wealth of new information of the physical chemistry of molecular bonds for various biological systems. The new concepts, qualitative and quantitative measures describing bond behavior under force, and structural bases underlying these phenomena have substantially advanced our fundamental understanding of the inner workings of biological systems from the nanoscale (molecule) to the microscale (cell), elucidated basic molecular mechanisms of a wide range of important biological processes, and provided opportunities for engineering applications. Here, we review major force spectroscopic assays, conceptual developments of mechanically regulated kinetics of molecular interactions, and their biological relevance. We also present current challenges and highlight future directions.

  4. On Impedance Spectroscopy of Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchaikin, V. V.; Sibatov, R. T.; Ambrozevich, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    Supercapacitors are often characterized by responses measured by methods of impedance spectroscopy. In the frequency domain these responses have the form of power-law functions or their linear combinations. The inverse Fourier transform leads to relaxation equations with integro-differential operators of fractional order under assumption that the frequency response is independent of the working voltage. To compare long-term relaxation kinetics predicted by these equations with the observed one, charging-discharging of supercapacitors (with nominal capacitances of 0.22, 0.47, and 1.0 F) have been studied by means of registration of the current response to a step voltage signal. It is established that the reaction of devices under study to variations of the charging regime disagrees with the model of a homogeneous linear response. It is demonstrated that relaxation is well described by a fractional stretched exponent.

  5. Laser spectroscopy and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziemski, L.J.; Solarz, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy has applications in diverse fields ranging from combustion studies and trace-sample detection to biological research. At the same time, it has also contributed greatly to the discovery of hundreds of new lasers. This symbiotic relationship has promoted an especially rapid expansion of the field. This book provides a review of the subject. It includes, for example, chapters on laser isotope separation techniques, enabling scientists to compare their relative advantages and drawbacks. This volume also gives numerous tables that summarize important features of lasers, experiments, and parameters for quick reference. In addition, it presents diagrams for visualizing rotational molecular energy levels of high J in order to enhance our understanding of molecular motions and their relationship to molecular energy levels. Offering insights into how experts think this technology will improve, it considers research and development in each topic discussed

  6. Fission fragment spins and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durell, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Prompt γ-ray coincidence experiments have been carried out on γ-rays emitted from post-neutron emission fission fragments produced by the aup 19F + 197 Au and 18 O + 232 Th reactions. Decay schemes have been established for even-even nuclei ranging from 78 Se to 148 Nd. Many new states with spin up to ∼ 12h have been observed. Apart from providing a wealth of new information on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei, the data have been analyzed to determine the average spin of primary fission fragments as a function of fragment mass. The results suggest that the fragment spins are determined by the temperature and shape of the primary fragments at or near to scission

  7. The COMPASS Hadron Spectroscopy Programme

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, A

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS for the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a large acceptance and high momentum resolution spectrometer including particle identification and calorimetry and is therefore ideal to access a broad range of different final states. Following the promising observation of a spin-exotic resonance during an earlier pilot run, COMPASS focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the years 2008 and 2009. A data set, world leading in terms of statistics and resolution, has been collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on either liquid hydrogen or nuclear targets. Spin-exotic meson and glueball candidates formed in both diffractive dissociation and central production are presently studied. Since the beam composition includes protons, the excited baryon spectrum is also accessible. Furthermore, Primakoff reactions have the potential to determine radiative widths of the resonances and to probe chiral pe...

  8. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M

    2005-01-01

    When antiprotons (i.e. the antimatter counterpart of protons) are stopped in helium gas, 97% of them annihilate within picoseconds by reacting with the helium nuclei; a 3% fraction, however, survive with an anomalously long lifetime of several microseconds. This longevity is due to the formation of antiprotonic helium, which is a three-body Rydberg atom composed of an antiproton, electron, and helium nucleus. The ASACUSA experimental collaboration has recently synthesized large numbers of these atoms using CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility, and measured the atom's transition frequencies to 60 parts per billion by laser spectroscopy. By comparing the experimental results with recent three-body QED calculations and the known antiproton cyclotron frequency, we were able to show that the antiproton mass and charge are the same as the corresponding proton values to a precision of 10 parts per billion. Ongoing and future series of experiments will further improve the experimental precision by using chirp-compe...

  9. High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Buckin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy (HR-US is an analytical technique for direct and non-destructive monitoring of molecular and micro-structural transformations in liquids and semi-solid materials. It is based on precision measurements of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in analysed samples. The application areas of HR-US in research, product development, and quality and process control include analysis of conformational transitions of polymers, ligand binding, molecular self-assembly and aggregation, crystallisation, gelation, characterisation of phase transitions and phase diagrams, and monitoring of chemical and biochemical reactions. The technique does not require optical markers or optical transparency. The HR-US measurements can be performed in small sample volumes (down to droplet size, over broad temperature range, at ambient and elevated pressures, and in various measuring regimes such as automatic temperature ramps, titrations and measurements in flow.

  10. Spectroscopy after the new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    Conventional spectroscopy is reexamined in a search for puzzles and paradoxes which have arisen in attempting to describe the properties of the known particles. These may offer clues to the missing elements necessary for the description of the new particles. The minimum number of elementary building blocks, charm and color, the colored quark model for saturation, spin splittings in the meson spectrum, three kinds of quarks, the Melosh transformation and the Jackson frame, beyond the single-quark transition--the Zweig rule mystery, new particles and old symmetries, the f--A2 interference, and tests of the Zweig rule by rho--ω and f--A2--f' interference are considered

  11. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.E.

    1977-10-01

    The use of modulation spectroscopy to study the electronic properties of solids has been very productive. The construction of a wide range Wavelength Modulation Spectrometer to study the optical properties of solids is described in detail. Extensions of the working range of the spectrometer into the vacuum ultraviolet are discussed. Measurements of the reflectivity and derivative reflectivity spectra of the lead chalcogenides, the chalcopyrite ZnGeP/sub 2/, the layer compounds GaSe and GaS and their alloys, the ferroelectric SbSI, layer compounds SnS/sub 2/ and SnSe/sub 2/, and HfS/sub 2/ were made. The results of these measurements are presented along with their interpretation in terms of band structure calculations.

  12. Ultraviolet, Visible, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) range is one of the most commonly encountered laboratory techniques in food analysis. Diverse examples, such as the quantification of macrocomponents (total carbohydrate by the phenol-sulfuric acid method), quantification of microcomponents, (thiamin by the thiochrome fluorometric procedure), estimates of rancidity (lipid oxidation status by the thiobarbituric acid test), and surveillance testing (enzyme-linked immunoassays), are presented in this text. In each of these cases, the analytical signal for which the assay is based is either the emission or absorption of radiation in the UV-Vis range. This signal may be inherent in the analyte, such as the absorbance of radiation in the visible range by pigments, or a result of a chemical reaction involving the analyte, such as the colorimetric copper-based Lowry method for the analysis of soluble protein.

  13. Laser spectroscopy on a ''shoestring''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, J.C.; Klimcak, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    The advent of tunable lasers has had a profound influence on both experimental and theoretical physics. Unfortunately, since these laser systems are typically hazardous and expensive, the physics student at the undergraduate or first-year graduate level has no real familiarity with their application in modern physics; and thus cannot fully appreciate their significance. Tunable single mode laser diodes, however, may offer a remedy to this situation. To demonstrate their applicability, we have designed a relatively simple and inexpensive experiment of laser diode spectroscopy in an atomic beam which illustrates the effect of hyperfine structure and the isotope shift in the rubidium D 1 transition (5 2 S/sub 1/2/-5 2 P/sub 1/2/). Furthermore, this experiment demonstrates the possibility of investigating basic physics without major expenditures for laser systems and laboratory facilities

  14. Auger electron spectroscopy of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijers, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis describes how the surface compositions of some alloys can be determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). The motivation for this research and the reasons for the choice of alloy systems studied are formulated. The theoretical background of AES is briefly discussed and the apparatus used and the experimental procedures applied are described. Four alloy systems have been investigated in this thesis - Ni-Cu and Pd - Ag (consisting of a component active in most cataytic reactions - Ni and Pd; and a component which is almost inactive for a number of reactions - Cu and Ag) and Pt - Pd and Pt-Ir (consisting of two active components). Knowledge of the surface composition of the various alloy systems is shown to be essential for the interpretation of catalytic results. (Auth./C.F.)

  15. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  16. Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styczen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Spectroscopy Department is the largest department of the Institute. It merges a variety of research groups having been performing investigations with a rich diversity of methods: from pure studies of the structure of nucleus and of nuclear properties through applied nuclear spectroscopy in condensed matter research, to the complex biophysical investigations of biological tissues. The nuclear structure experiments were performed mainly in European Large Scale Facilities (ALPIINFN-Legnaro, VIVITRON-IReS-Strasbourg, JYFL-K100-Cyclotron) with the use of the GASP, EUROBALL IV, RITU systems and with application of ancillary detectors - HECTOR+HELENA, RFD. Some data were obtained with the GAMMASPHERE in USA. Other research has been based on our own instrumentation - VdG, AFM, Dual-Beam-Implanter, PAC, Moessbauer spectrometers etc., in a strong co-operation with Polish and European institutions, of course. The atomic studies were done on the ESR at GSI in Darmastadt. In several pages which follow, some important results of the investigations in the Department are presented. In 2001, Dr hab. Jerzy Dryzek and Dr hab. Adam Maj were granted the Associated Professor positions, and Miss Agnieszka Kulinska and Mrs Maria Kmiecik - the Ph.D. degrees. Dr Kmiecik was also awarded the Henryk Niewodniczanski prize for studies of 147 Eu compound nucleus shape evolution. Some of us became (continued to be) members of International Committees - the PHINUFY (R. Broda), the Steering Committee of RISING at GSI (J. Styczen), the PAC of the VIVITRON at Strasbourg (J. Styczen). We organized an International Conference on Condensed Matter Studies (100 participants), which belonged to the well known series of Zakopane School of Physics. It's Proceedings appeared as a volume of the Acta Physica Polonica A journal. (author)

  17. Baryonic spectroscopy and its immediate future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The quark model is reviewed briefly for baryons and the various versions of SU(6) symmetry which were proposed and used in connection with baryon spectroscopy are reviewed. A series of basic questions are reviewed which experimental work in this field should aim to settle, as a minimal program. One also heralds the beginning of a new baryon spectroscopy associated with psi physics

  18. Biochemical applications of FT-IR spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, A.M.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of (FT-)IR spectroscopy in general biochemical research. In chapter 3, IR spectroscopy is used in the quantitation of residual detergent after reconstitution of an integral membrane protein in a pre-defined lipid matrix. This chapter discusses the choice of the

  19. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-01

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering

  20. Battery impedance spectroscopy using bidirectional grid connected ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shimul Kumar Dam

    Keywords. Impedance spectroscopy; grid connection; battery converter; state of charge; health monitoring. 1. Introduction .... the load should be within the safe range of operation specified by the ... A split capacitor damping scheme is adopted here as shown in ...... spectroscopy testing on the Advanced Technology Devel-.