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Sample records for rinderpest virus rpv

  1. The Use of Recombinant Hemagglutinine Protein of Rinderpest Virus in Enzyme Immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    BULUT, Hakan; BOLAT, Yusuf

    2003-01-01

    In this study, Rinderpest virus (RPV) recombinant hemagglutinine protein (rH) fused with protein A region of Staphylococcus aureus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by IgG affinity chromatography. rH protein was also used to establish enzyme immunoassay. Therefore, to prevent IgG binding to the protein A the wells coated with the rH proteins were blocked by human serum. Afterwards, RPV antigens were added to the wells to evaluate this assay. To this end, serum from mice immunized...

  2. Systemic and oral immunogenicity of hemagglutinin protein of rinderpest virus expressed by transgenic peanut plants in a mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandelwal, Abha; Renukaradhya, G.J.; Rajasekhar, M.; Sita, G. Lakshmi; Shaila, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Rinderpest causes a devastating disease, often fatal, in wild and domestic ruminants. It has been eradicated successfully using a live, attenuated vaccine from most part of the world leaving a few foci of disease in parts of Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. We have developed transgenic peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) plants expressing hemagglutinin (H) protein of rinderpest virus (RPV), which is antigenically authentic. In this work, we have evaluated the immunogenicity of peanut-expressed H protein using mouse model, administered parenterally as well as orally. Intraperitoneal immunization of mice with the transgenic peanut extract elicited antibody response specific to H. These antibodies neutralized virus infectivity in vitro. Oral immunization of mice with transgenic peanut induced H-specific serum IgG and IgA antibodies. The systemic and oral immunogenicity of plant-derived H in absence of any adjuvant indicates the potential of edible vaccine for rinderpest

  3. Characterization of membrane association of Rinderpest virus matrix protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhashri, R.; Shaila, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Paramyxovirus matrix protein is believed to play a crucial role in the assembly and maturation of the virus particle by bringing the major viral components together at the budding site in the host cell. The membrane association capability of many enveloped virus matrix proteins has been characterized to be their intrinsic property. In this work, we have characterized the membrane association of Rinderpest virus matrix (M) protein. The M protein of Rinderpest virus when expressed in the absence of other viral proteins is present both in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. When expressed as GFP fusion protein, the M protein gets localized into plasma membrane protrusions. High salt and alkaline conditions resulted in partial dissociation of M protein from cell membrane. Thus, M protein behaves like an integral membrane protein although its primary structure suggests it to be a peripheral membrane protein

  4. Development of marker vaccines for rinderpest virus using reverse genetics technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, S.; Walsh, E.P.; Anderson, J.; Baron, M.D.; Barrett, T.

    2005-01-01

    Rinderpest is an economically devastating disease of cattle (cattle plague), but a live-attenuated vaccine has been very successfully used in a global rinderpest eradication campaign. As a consequence, the endemic focus of the virus has been reduced to an area in eastern Africa known as the Kenya-Somali ecosystem. Although the vaccine is highly effective, it has a drawback in that vaccinated animals are serologically indistinguishable from those that have recovered from natural infection. In the final stages of the eradication campaign, when vaccination to control the spread of disease will only be used in emergencies to contain an outbreak, a marker vaccine would be a very useful tool to monitor possible wild virus spread outside the vaccination area. Marker vaccines for rinderpest, and other viruses with negative-sense RNA genomes, can now be produced using reverse genetics, and the development of such marker vaccines for rinderpest virus is described. (author)

  5. Rinderpest surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Rinderpest is probably the most lethal virus disease of cattle and buffalo and can destroy whole populations; damaging economies; undermining food security and ruining the livelihood of farmers and pastoralists. The disease can be eradicated by vaccination and control of livestock movement. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme, with technical support from the Joint FAO/IAEA Division to provide advice, training and materials to thirteen states through the 'Support for Rinderpest Surveillance in West Asia' project. (IAEA)

  6. Baculovirus display of fusion protein of Peste des petits ruminants virus and hemagglutination protein of Rinderpest virus and immunogenicity of the displayed proteins in mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masmudur Rahman, Md.; Shaila, M.S.; Gopinathan, Karumathil P.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedroviruses (BmNPV) displaying the immunodominant ectodomains of fusion glycoprotein (F) of Peste des petitis ruminants virus (PPRV) and the hemagglutinin protein (H) of Rinderpest virus (RPV), on the budded virions as well as the surface of the infected host cells have been constructed. The F and H protein sequences were inserted in-frame within the amino-terminal region of BmNPV envelope glycoprotein GP64 expressing under the strong viral polyhedrin (polh) promoter. We improved the recombinant virus selection in BmNPV by incorporating the green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as selection marker under a separate promoter within the transfer cassette harboring the desired genes. Following infection of the insect larvae or the host-derived BmN cells with these recombinant BmNPVs, the expressed GP64 fusion proteins were displayed on the host cell surface and the budded virions. The antigenic epitopes of the recombinant proteins were properly displayed and the recombinant virus particles induced immune response in mice against PPRV or RPV

  7. Studies on rinderpest disease in Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Mohamed Haroun [Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1999-10-01

    The pathogenesis and immunogenicity of two virulent rinderpest virus (RPV) field isolates and RPV vaccine strain (ROBK) were comparatively investigated in two groups of RP-susceptible calves of two cattle breeds. While the classical picture of RPV infection was reproduced in susceptible angus breed subgroup using the virulent RPV-saudi 1/81 strain, absence of one or more of the RPV cardinal signs was observed in the susceptible zebu breed calves infected with the virulent RPV-reedbuck (RPV-RB) strain. Successful recovery of the virulent RPV-saudi 1/81 strain from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was attained in B95a lymphoid and modified monocytes human cell lines from day two post infection till death on day eight. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using marina blue stain anti P monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), showed that PRV-P antigen was expressed on day four in case of PRV-saudi 1/81 infected B95a and MoMo cell lines. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was successfully used to retrieve PRV genomes from PBMCs of RPV-saudi 1/81on day two of infection till death on day eight and from their ocular and nasal swabs on days five, seven and nine post-infection. Viral genomes were retrieved from PBMCs of the subject vaccinated angus subgroup. Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) demonstrated that the two subject vaccinated angus breed calves responded positively to vaccination with the RBOK vaccine strain compared to 6/9 of the vaccinated zebu calves. None of the non-vaccinated control subgroups responded positively to challenge and the highest mean percentage inhibition (PI) was below 30. Stimulation indices (SIs) as high as 3.9 and 13.2 were showed by PBMCs from the vaccinated calves no. TQ94 and TQ95 on day 5 and 35 of vaccination, respectively. SI of 17.55 was shown by PBMCs from calf no. TQ94 two days postchallenge. Non of the non vaccinated control calves responded positively to the challenge virus. None of the vaccinated subgroups or the

  8. Studies on rinderpest disease in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, Mohamed Haroun

    1999-10-01

    The pathogenesis and immunogenicity of two virulent rinderpest virus (RPV) field isolates and RPV vaccine strain (ROBK) were comparatively investigated in two groups of RP-susceptible calves of two cattle breeds. While the classical picture of RPV infection was reproduced in susceptible angus breed subgroup using the virulent RPV-saudi 1/81 strain, absence of one or more of the RPV cardinal signs was observed in the susceptible zebu breed calves infected with the virulent RPV-reedbuck (RPV-RB) strain. Successful recovery of the virulent RPV-saudi 1/81 strain from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was attained in B95a lymphoid and modified monocytes human cell lines from day two post infection till death on day eight. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using marina blue stain anti P monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), showed that PRV-P antigen was expressed on day four in case of PRV-saudi 1/81 infected B95a and MoMo cell lines. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was successfully used to retrieve PRV genomes from PBMCs of RPV-saudi 1/81on day two of infection till death on day eight and from their ocular and nasal swabs on days five, seven and nine post-infection. Viral genomes were retrieved from PBMCs of the subject vaccinated angus subgroup. Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) demonstrated that the two subject vaccinated angus breed calves responded positively to vaccination with the RBOK vaccine strain compared to 6/9 of the vaccinated zebu calves. None of the non-vaccinated control subgroups responded positively to challenge and the highest mean percentage inhibition (PI) was below 30. Stimulation indices (SIs) as high as 3.9 and 13.2 were showed by PBMCs from the vaccinated calves no. TQ94 and TQ95 on day 5 and 35 of vaccination, respectively. SI of 17.55 was shown by PBMCs from calf no. TQ94 two days postchallenge. Non of the non vaccinated control calves responded positively to the challenge virus. None of the vaccinated subgroups or the

  9. The use of monoclonal antibodies in competitive ELISA for the detection of antibodies to rinderpest and peste des petits ruminants viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.; McKay, J.A.; Butcher, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against the haemagglutinin of rinderpest virus has been used in a competitive ELISA (C-ELISA) for the detection of antibodies to rinderpest virus in cattle, sheep, goat and game sera. Unlike the indirect ELISA and the virus neutralisation test (VNT), the C-ELISA detects only antibodies to rinderpest virus and gives no cross-reactivity with antibodies to peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus. Antibodies to a wide range of strains of rinderpest virus have been detected using this assay, suggesting its suitability for both sero-monitoring and sero-surveillance. Analysis of C-ELISA results from the examination of field sera shows a much greater separation of negative and positive populations as compared to the indirect ELISA. A further monoclonal antibody against the H protein of PPR has also been found suitable for use in a C-ELISA for the detection of antibodies to PPR virus. The use of these two C-ELISA's has made possible rapid differential sero-diagnosis without recourse to cross-VNT testing. The use of monoclonal antibody-based assays will allow much greater standardisation of rinderpest and PPR diagnosis, and following field-trials the C-ELISA will replace the indirect ELISA for sero-monitoring throughout the Pan African Rinderpest Campaign. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab

  10. Biosecurity management recommendations for rinderpest laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Benjamin H [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Caskey, Susan Adele [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arndt, William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Rinderpest is a virus that can affect cattle and other even toes ungulates; evidence of outbreaks from over 10,000 years ago highlights the potential impact of this virus. During the 18th century, Rinderpest caused huge losses in cattle throughout Europe. Starting in the mid 1900’s vaccination efforts seemed feasible and work was initiated to vaccinate large populations of cattle. Walter Plowright received numerous awards for updating the Rinderpest vaccine which many believed would be the key to eradication. Vaccination of the disease lead to a massive drop in outbreaks and the last confirmed case of Rinderpest in Asia was in 2000 and in Africa in 2001.1 At this point, Rinderpest has been declared eradicated from nature. However, stocks of the virus are still in many laboratories.2 Rinderpest was investigated as a biological weapon agent during the Second World War. However, following WWII, rinderpest was not considered a high risk as a biological weapon as there was no direct military advantage. Now, with the concern of the use of biological agents as weapons in acts of terrorism, concern regarding rinderpest has resurfaced. Since the eradication of this virus, cattle populations are highly susceptibility to the virus and the economic impacts would be significant. This paper will discuss the specific nature of the terrorism risks associated with rinderpest; and based upon those risks provide recommendations regarding biosecurity management. The biosecurity management measures will be defined in a manner to align with the CWA 15793: the laboratory biorisk management document.

  11. Allelic variation at the rpv1 locus controls partial resistance to Plum pox virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poque, S; Pagny, G; Ouibrahim, L; Chague, A; Eyquard, J-P; Caballero, M; Candresse, T; Caranta, C; Mariette, S; Decroocq, V

    2015-06-25

    Sharka is caused by Plum pox virus (PPV) in stone fruit trees. In orchards, the virus is transmitted by aphids and by grafting. In Arabidopsis, PPV is transferred by mechanical inoculation, by biolistics and by agroinoculation with infectious cDNA clones. Partial resistance to PPV has been observed in the Cvi-1 and Col-0 Arabidopsis accessions and is characterized by a tendency to escape systemic infection. Indeed, only one third of the plants are infected following inoculation, in comparison with the susceptible Ler accession. Genetic analysis showed this partial resistance to be monogenic or digenic depending on the allelic configuration and recessive. It is detected when inoculating mechanically but is overcome when using biolistic or agroinoculation. A genome-wide association analysis was performed using multiparental lines and 147 Arabidopsis accessions. It identified a major genomic region, rpv1. Fine mapping led to the positioning of rpv1 to a 200 kb interval on the long arm of chromosome 1. A candidate gene approach identified the chloroplast phosphoglycerate kinase (cPGK2) as a potential gene underlying the resistance. A virus-induced gene silencing strategy was used to knock-down cPGK2 expression, resulting in drastically reduced PPV accumulation. These results indicate that rpv1 resistance to PPV carried by the Cvi-1 and Col-0 accessions is linked to allelic variations at the Arabidopsis cPGK2 locus, leading to incomplete, compatible interaction with the virus.

  12. Rinderpest antibody detected in sheep and goats before an outbreak of rinderpest reported in cattle in northern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambura, P N; Mollel, J O; Moshy, D W; Mbise, A N; Taylor, W P

    1999-02-01

    In January 1997, serum samples from 1346 adult sheep and goats were tested by a competitive ELISA to determine the prevalence of rinderpest in the northern zone of Tanzania. Seroconversion rates of 20%, 13%, 9%, 7% and 3% in sheep and goats were recorded in Ngorongoro, Monduli, Hai, Arumeru and Simanjiro districts, respectively. The low profile and insidious nature of the rinderpest virus involved caused very mild disease in cattle in some of these area. The mild signs associated with this outbreak of rinderpest resulted in difficulty in its diagnosis. In these circumstances, the presence of rinderpest antibody in sheep and goats served as a valuable and effective indicator of the rinderpest outbreak in cattle.

  13. Performance indicators for rinderpest surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    In 1986, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated a programme of assistance to FAO and IAEA Member States for the development of effective, quality assured veterinary laboratory diagnostic services. This programme introduced the use of standardized and internationally validated ELISA-based systems for the diagnosis and surveillance of the major transboundary diseases that affect livestock. This approach has proved of immense value in the monitoring of national, regional and global animal disease control and eradication programmes. One such programme focuses on the global elimination of rinderpest. Co-ordinated by FAO through the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP) the joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has developed critical diagnostic and epidemiological tools to assist this effort. As the final stages of the global eradication of rinderpest are reached, it is fitting that the Joint Division should again take the lead in providing guidance to Member States on how best to meet the criteria for quality assurance of national disease surveillance programmes - a prerequisite for international acceptance of freedom from a particular disease. This publication is intended to provide countries involved in rinderpest eradication with a detailed protocol for using performance indicators in evaluating their disease surveillance system and making, where necessary, adjustments to meet the criteria for acceptance specified in the OIE Rinderpest Pathway - a pathway that leads to international recognition of freedom from rinderpest. An initial publication (IAEA-TECDOC-1161) described guidelines for the use of performance indicators in rinderpest surveillance programmes. This publication now describes in detail the protocols and the linked indicators which have been developed and field validated through a series of FAO/IAEA meetings and through IAEA expert assignments to countries in Africa.

  14. Performance indicators for rinderpest surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    In 1986, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated a programme of assistance to FAO and IAEA Member States for the development of effective, quality assured veterinary laboratory diagnostic services. This programme introduced the use of standardized and internationally validated ELISA-based systems for the diagnosis and surveillance of the major transboundary diseases that affect livestock. This approach has proved of immense value in the monitoring of national, regional and global animal disease control and eradication programmes. One such programme focuses on the global elimination of rinderpest. Co-ordinated by FAO through the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP) the joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has developed critical diagnostic and epidemiological tools to assist this effort. As the final stages of the global eradication of rinderpest are reached, it is fitting that the Joint Division should again take the lead in providing guidance to Member States on how best to meet the criteria for quality assurance of national disease surveillance programmes - a prerequisite for international acceptance of freedom from a particular disease. This publication is intended to provide countries involved in rinderpest eradication with a detailed protocol for using performance indicators in evaluating their disease surveillance system and making, where necessary, adjustments to meet the criteria for acceptance specified in the OIE Rinderpest Pathway - a pathway that leads to international recognition of freedom from rinderpest. An initial publication (IAEA-TECDOC-1161) described guidelines for the use of performance indicators in rinderpest surveillance programmes. This publication now describes in detail the protocols and the linked indicators which have been developed and field validated through a series of FAO/IAEA meetings and through IAEA expert assignments to countries in Africa

  15. Specific detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antibodies in sheep and goat sera by the luciferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berguido, F.J.; Bodjo, S.C.; Loitsch, A.; Diallo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious and often fatal transboundary animal disease affecting mostly sheep, goats and wild small ruminants. This disease is endemic in most of Africa, the Middle, Near East, and large parts of Asia. The casual agent is peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), which belongs to the genus Morbilivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. This genus also includes measles virus (MV), canine distemper virus (CDV) and rinderpest virus (RPV). All are closely related viruses with serological cross reactivity. In this study, we have developed a Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) for the rapid detection of antibodies against PPRV in serum samples and for specific differentiation from antibodies against RPV. PPR and rinderpest (RP) serum samples were assayed by PPR-LIPS and two commercially available PPR cELISA tests. The PPR-LIPS showed high sensitivity and specificity for the samples tested and showed no cross reactivity with RPV unlike the commercial PPR cELISA tests which did not cross react with RPV. Based on the results shown in this study, PPR-LIPS is presented as a good candidate for the specific serosurveillance of PPR. (author)

  16. Multiplex RT-PCR and Automated Microarray for Detection of Eight Bovine Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, O; Furukawa-Stoffer, T; Burton Hughes, K; Pasick, J; King, D P; Hodko, D

    2017-12-01

    Microarrays can be a useful tool for pathogen detection as it allow for simultaneous interrogation of the presence of a large number of genetic sequences in a sample. However, conventional microarrays require extensive manual handling and multiple pieces of equipment for printing probes, hybridization, washing and signal detection. In this study, a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR with an accompanying novel automated microarray for simultaneous detection of eight viruses that affect cattle [vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, bovine herpesvirus 1, bluetongue virus, malignant catarrhal fever virus, rinderpest virus (RPV) and parapox viruses] is described. The assay accurately identified a panel of 37 strains of the target viruses and identified a mixed infection. No non-specific reactions were observed with a panel of 23 non-target viruses associated with livestock. Vesicular stomatitis virus was detected as early as 2 days post-inoculation in oral swabs from experimentally infected animals. The limit of detection of the microarray assay was as low as 1 TCID 50 /ml for RPV. The novel microarray platform automates the entire post-PCR steps of the assay and integrates electrophoretic-driven capture probe printing in a single user-friendly instrument that allows array layout and assay configuration to be user-customized on-site. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

  17. The Entangled History of Sadoka (Rinderpest) and Veterinary Science in Tanzania and the Wider World, 1891-1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunseri, Thaddeus

    2015-01-01

    Scholarship on the Tanzanian Rinderpest epizootic of the 1890s has assumed that German colonizers understood from the start that they were confronting the same disease that had afflicted Eurasia for centuries. Outward indicators of the epizootic, known locally as sadoka, especially wildlife destruction, were unknown in Europe, leading German veterinarians to doubt that the African disease was Rinderpest. Financial constraints and conflicting development agendas, especially tension between ranching and pastoralism, deterred early colonial applications of veterinary science that might have led to an early diagnosis. European veterinarians, guarding their authority against medical researchers, opposed inoculation therapies in the case of Rinderpest in favor of veterinary policing despite recent breakthroughs in vaccine research. The virus was not identified before reaching South Africa in 1896, but this breakthrough had little influence on policy in East Africa. Yet emergent international disease conventions directed at bubonic plague entangled with veterinary policy in East Africa.

  18. Recommended procedures for disease and serological surveillance as part of the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    One important activity of GREP is to recommend to the Office International des Epizooties (OIE) Member Countries a zoosanitary approach for achieving rinderpest eradication and for determining the effectiveness of this achievement. To this end, a Consultants Meeting on Animal Disease Surveillance Systems was held in Vienna from 27 September to 1 October 1993 under the auspices of FAO and IAEA. This document represents the conclusions of the meeting and attempts to outline, in a highly practical manner, the various factors to be taken into account and steps to be undertaken by a country in the process of moving along a zoosanitary pathway culminating in a declaration of freedom from rinderpest virus. 14 refs, 5 figs, 8 tabs

  19. Evolutionary characteristics of morbilliviruses during serial passages in vitro: Gradual attenuation of virus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Zou, Yanli; Liu, Shan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-01

    The genus Morbillivirus is classified into the family Paramyxoviridae, and is composed of 6 members, namely measles virus (MV), rinderpest virus (RPV), peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV), canine distemper virus (CDV), phocine distemper virus (PDV) and cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV). The MV, RPV, PPRV and CDV have been successfully attenuated through their serial passages in vitro for the production of live vaccines. It has been demonstrated that the morbilliviral virulence in animals was progressively attenuated with their consecutive passages in vitro. However, only a few reports were involved in explanation of an attenuation-related mechanism on them until many years after the establishment of a quasispecies theory. RNA virus quasispecies arise from rapid evolution of viruses with high mutation rate during genomic replication, and play an important role in gradual loss of viral virulence by serial passages. Here, we overviewed the development of live-attenuated vaccine strains against morbilliviruses by consecutive passages in vitro, and further discussed a related mechanism concerning the relationship between virulence attenuation and viral evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution to the Eradication of Rinderpest in Somalia: the Experience of Terra Nuova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    A mild form of rinderpest was described and diagnosed in Tsavo East National Park in Kenya in 1994, and subsequently in Nairobi National Park (in 1994 to 1996). Initially the Tsavo rinderpest outbreak was thought to have originated from southern Sudan, but molecular evidence clearly showed that the Tsavo virus was genetically very different from the isolates from Nairobi National Park and fell into the African type 2 lineage. The exact location of this focus was uncertain, but it was suspected that the virus could have remained undetected for several years in the Northeast Province of Kenya and the neighbouring Trans Juba Region of southern Somalia. When the Siad Barre regime collapsed in 1991, all public institutions, services and assets were seriously disrupted or looted. This was followed by massive displacement of people inside and outside Somalia, widespread insecurity, serious famine, and the collapse of most formal economic activities. To alleviate the consequences of the humanitarian crisis and the collapse of the Somali state, the international community launched a significant response, with peacekeeping operations, direct assistance to displaced populations, restoration of local administrations, rehabilitation of public infrastructures, and support to economic activities. Given its socio-economic importance and prominence, the livestock industry was one of the sectors targeted for relief and rehabilitation interventions, through mass vaccination campaigns against infectious diseases, curative treatments, rehabilitation of watering facilities, and training of veterinary professionals and para-veterinarians. During this period, rinderpest was one of the target diseases, especially in light of global efforts to eradicate the disease from the African continent, and particularly from Somalia, which was one of the last suspected foci of infection. Terra Nuova, one of 12 international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) initially involved in the livestock

  1. RPV housed ATWS poison tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a boiling water reactor (BWR) wherein housed within a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a nuclear core and an upper steam dome connected to a steam outlet in the RPV. The improvement comprises: a pressurized vessel disposed in the steam dome containing a neutron poison effective for inactivating the core and a first line for assaying the poison which first line runs to the outside of the RPV, the vessel being vented to the steam dome to pressurize the poison contained therein, the vessel being connected by a second line terminating beneath the core, the second line containing a valve which is actuable to release the poison through the line upon its actuation

  2. Enhanced immunosurveillance for animal morbilliviruses using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; Dundon, William G; Diallo, Adama; Baron, Michael D; James Nyarobi, M; Cleaveland, Sarah; Keyyu, Julius; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-11-11

    The measurement of virus-specific neutralising antibodies represents the "gold-standard" for diagnostic serology. For animal morbilliviruses, such as peste des petits ruminants (PPRV) or rinderpest virus (RPV), live virus-based neutralisation tests require high-level biocontainment to prevent the accidental escape of the infectious agents. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of neutralising antibodies against animal morbilliviruses. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of PPRV on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Serological responses against the four distinct lineages of PPRV could be measured simultaneously and cross-neutralising responses against other morbilliviruses compared. Using this approach, we observed that titres of neutralising antibodies induced by vaccination with live attenuated PPRV were lower than those induced by wild type virus infection and the level of cross-lineage neutralisation varied between vaccinates. By comparing neutralising responses from animals infected with either PPRV or RPV, we found that responses were highest against the homologous virus, indicating that retrospective analyses of serum samples could be used to confirm the nature of the original pathogen to which an animal had been exposed. Accordingly, when screening sera from domestic livestock and wild ruminants in Tanzania, we detected evidence of cross-species infection with PPRV, canine distemper virus (CDV) and a RPV-related bovine morbillivirus, suggesting that exposure to animal morbilliviruses may be more widespread than indicated previously using existing diagnostic techniques. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Pesti Des Petits ruminants virus infection in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan H.C.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries morbillivirus infections have had a huge impact on both human beings and animals. Morbilliviruses are highly contagious pathogens that cause some of the most devastating viral diseases of humans and animals world wide. They include measles virus (MV, canine distemper virus (CDV, rinderpest virus (RPV and peste des petits ruminants (PPRV virus. Furthermore, new emerging infectious diseases of morbilliviruses with significant ecological consequences of marine mammals have been discovered in the past decades. Phocid distemper virus (PDV in seals and the cetacean morbillivirus (CMV have been found in dolphins, whales and porpoises. Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a highly contagious ,infectious , an acute or sub acute viral disease of domestic and wild small ruminants characterized by fever, oculonasal discharges, stomatitis, conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis and pneumonia. Goats are more severely affected than sheep. It is also known as pseudorinderpest of small ruminants, pest of small ruminants, pest of sheep and goats, kata, stomatitis- pneumoentritis syndrome, contagious pustular stomatitis and pneumoentritis complex. It is one of the major notifiable diseases of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE. [Vet. World 2009; 2(4.000: 150-155

  4. Soft RPV through the baryon portal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krnjaic, Gordan; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2014-01-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) models with R-parity generically predict sparticle decays with invisible neutralinos, which yield distinctive missing energy events at colliders. Since most LHC searches are designed with this expectation, the putative bounds on sparticle masses become considerably weaker if R-parity is violated so that squarks and gluinos decay to jets with large QCD backgrounds. Here we introduce a scenario in which baryonic R-parity violation (RPV) arises effectively from soft SUSY breaking interactions, but leptonic RPV remains accidentally forbidden to evade constraints from proton decay and FCNCs. The model features a global R-symmetry that initially forbids RPV interactions, a hidden R-breaking sector, and a heavy mediator that communicates this breaking to the visible sector. After R-symmetry breaking, the mediator is integrated out and an effective RPV A-term arises at tree level; RPV couplings between quarks and squarks arise only at loop level and receive additional suppression. Although this mediator must be heavy compared to soft masses, the model introduces no new hierarchy since viable RPV can arise when the mediator mass is near the SUSY breaking scale. In generic regions of parameter space, a light thermally-produced gravitino is stable and can be a viable dark matter candidate

  5. Eradication of Transboundary Animal Diseases: Can the Rinderpest Success Story be Repeated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, G R; Penrith, M-L

    2017-04-01

    A matrix system was developed to aid in the evaluation of the technical amenability to eradication, through mass vaccination, of transboundary animal diseases (TADs). The system involved evaluation of three basic criteria - disease management efficiency, surveillance and epidemiological factors - each in turn comprised of a number of elements (17 in all). On that basis, 25 TADs that have occurred or do occur in southern Africa and for which vaccines are available, in addition to rinderpest (incorporated as a yardstick because it has been eradicated worldwide), were ranked. Cluster analysis was also applied using the same criteria to the 26 diseases, creating division into three groups. One cluster contained only diseases transmitted by arthropods (e.g. African horse sickness and Rift Valley fever) and considered difficult to eradicate because technologies for managing parasitic arthropods on a large scale are unavailable, while a second cluster contained diseases that have been widely considered to be eradicable [rinderpest, canine rabies, the Eurasian serotypes of foot and mouth disease virus (O, A, C & Asia 1) and peste des petits ruminants] as well classical swine fever, Newcastle disease and lumpy skin disease. The third cluster contained all the other TADs evaluated with the implication that these constitute TADs that would be more difficult to eradicate. However, it is acknowledged that the scores assigned in the course of this study may be biased. The point is that the system proposed offers an objective method for assessment of the technical eradicability of TADs; the rankings and groupings derived during this study are less important than the provision of a systematic approach for further development and evaluation. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Diagnosis of rinderpest in Tanzania by a rapid chromatographic strip-test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambura, P N; Moshy, D W; Mbise, A N; Mollel, G O; Taylor, W P; Anderson, J; Bruning, A

    2000-06-01

    A simple chromatographic strip-test based on Clearview technology, is under development as a pen-side test for the detection of rinderpest antigen in eye swabs taken from cattle in the field. An outbreak of rinderpest occurred in the northern zone of Tanzania from late February to June 1997. The affected cattle exhibited very mild clinical signs, which made clinical diagnosis difficult. One hundred and seven eye swabs were collected from cattle suspected of infection with rinderpest. These were tested in the field using a prototype of the pen-side test and 13 (12.15%) of the samples were found to be positive for the presence of rinderpest antigen. These were confirmed by ICE. The positive cases were predominantly found in the Ngorongoro district. This demonstrates the usefulness of such a simple, rapid pen-side diagnostic assay, particularly when clinically 'mild' strains of rinderpest are present.

  7. Structural and Functional Studies on the Fusion and Attachment Envelope Glycoproteins of Nipah Virus and Hendra Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    including measles virus (MeV), mumps virus, Sendai virus (SeV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), rinderpest virus, canine distemper virus (CDV), human...Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD. Hut 102, MT2, MT4, and CEM human T cell lines were provided by Chou-Zen Giam, USUHS, Bethesda, MD. The human osteosarcoma

  8. The sero-monitoring of rinderpest throughout Africa. Phase two. Results for 1993. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting of the FAO/IAEA/SIDA/OAU/IBAR/PARC co-ordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    1993 has been a significant year for PARC with the initiation of the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP) providing a new emphasis in the drive towards the final elimination of rinderpest and its causative virus. For PARC this has culminated in a declaration by Egypt that it will cease vaccination at the beginning of 1994 and a strong commitment by a number of West African countries that they too will cease vaccination during 1994 and make the OIE Declarations of Provisional Freedom from Rinderpest. These significant steps forward in the eradication process would not have been possible without the information and confidence provided by the PARC sero-monitoring network. But even more important has been the clear demonstration that is possible to maintain the routine operation of an epidemiological network providing reliable results for a number of years in over 20 African countries. Such a system is vital if rinderpest is to be eradicated from the region and the bold move of a number of countries to now cease vaccinating is, in part, a testimony to the success of this network. This publication details the 1993 sero-monitoring results on a country to country basis, provides details of the external quality assurance programme and provides a series of conclusions and recommendations on the way to proceed in the future for this surveillance network. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. RPV SUSY searches at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Pettersson, Nora Emilia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Experimental searches for Supersymmetry (SUSY) at the Large Hadronic Collider (LHC) often assume R-Parity Conservation (RPC) to avoid proton decay. A consequence RPC is that it implies a stable SUSY-particle that cannot decay. The search strategies are strongly based on the hypothesize of weakly interacting massive particles escaping without detection - yielding missing transverse energy (MET) to the collision events. It is vital to explore all possibilities considering that no observation of SUSY has been made and that strong exclusions already have been placed on RPC-SUSY scenarios. Introducing individually baryon- and lepton-number violating couplings in R-Parity Violating (RPV) models would avoid rapid proton decay. The strong mass and cross-section exclusion set for RPC-SUSY are weaken if RPV couplings are allowed in the SUSY Lagrangian - as these standard searches lose sensitivity due to less expected MET. This talk aims to summarise a few of the experimental searches for both prompt and long-lived RPV ...

  10. Disease properties, geography, and mitigation strategies in a simulation spread of rinderpest across the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manore Carrie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For the past decade, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations has been working toward eradicating rinderpest through vaccination and intense surveillance by 2012. Because of the potential severity of a rinderpest epidemic, it is prudent to prepare for an unexpected outbreak in animal populations. There is no immunity to the disease among the livestock or wildlife in the United States (US. If rinderpest were to emerge in the US, the loss in livestock could be devastating. We predict the potential spread of rinderpest using a two-stage model for the spread of a multi-host infectious disease among agricultural animals in the US. The model incorporates large-scale interactions among US counties and the small-scale dynamics of disease spread within a county. The model epidemic was seeded in 16 locations and there was a strong dependence of the overall epidemic size on the starting location. The epidemics were classified according to overall size into small epidemics of 100 to 300 animals (failed epidemics, epidemics infecting 3 000 to 30 000 animals (medium epidemics, and the large epidemics infecting around one million beef cattle. The size of the rinderpest epidemics were directly related to the origin of the disease and whether or not the disease moved into certain key counties in high-livestock-density areas of the US. The epidemic size also depended upon response time and effectiveness of movement controls.

  11. Spanish RPV head penetrations. Regulatory status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, J.M.; Colino, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the actual status of inspection results on the Spanish PWR RPV CRD head penetrations (CRDH's), after two years of a whole program of inspections in all affected plants. Actual situation of penetrations pertaining to ALMARAZ 1 and 2, ASCO 1 and 2 and VANDELLOS 2 NPP's show any damage in those CRDH's inspected in 1993 and 1994 (roughly 20 out of 65 CRDH's at each unit). The paper presents a summary of CRDH characteristics, inspection methods and results obtained in each plant. TRILLO NPP has a different CRDH design (KWU-SIEMENS type) and for that reason is not considered an affected plant nor has conducted any inspection up to now. JOSE CABRERA (ZORITA) NPP has shown extensive damage, both in the lower side (weldment to the vessel) and in the upper free span area, near bimetallic weldment to SS 304, in active and nonactive penetrations and also in the vent nozzle. The paper comments extensively on the CRDH materials general data, root-cause analysis and structural analysis of degraded zones, inspection results, repair actions and other additional actions applied up to now. Finally, the paper deals with the regulatory actions taken by CSN on this topic, both for those NPP's actually non affected by the IGSCC phenomenon in the RPV CRDH's and for the specific safety case of ZORITA NPP. (author)

  12. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  13. Summary of flow and heat transfer in RPV under PTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Donghua; Wang Haijun; Chen Tingkuan; Luo Yushan

    2003-01-01

    PTS under loss of coolant accident (LOCA) has great effect on the safety of RPV. Many research works focusing on flow and heat transfer in RPV under PTS have been done in developed countries for many years, and a lot of results have been got both on experiment and numerical simulation. The safety of nuclear power plant is enhanced greatly by these research works. With the developing of nuclear power technology in China, RPV integration under PTS has been studied. The author summarizes research works at home and abroad in recent years. The problems existed in present work and research direction in the future are discussed

  14. Hydraulics in the RPV lower-plenum of EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barois, G.; Goreaud, N.; Nicaise, N.

    2001-01-01

    The in-core instrumentation penetrations of the European Pressurised water Reactor (EPR) have been removed from RPV-bottom to RPV-head, leaving empty the lower plenum of the RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel). In a lower plenum with no internal structure, huge vortices may appear, with negative consequences, such as high disturbance of the core inlet flow distribution, and high increase of the RPV pressure loss. FRAMATOME ANP developed a specific Flow Distribution Device (FDD), annular shaped, located in the RPV lower plenum below the core support plate, which prevents huge vortices from appearing and guarantees a satisfying flow distribution at core inlet in normal operating conditions. The design of the FDD has been optimised with a numerical approach, using the 3-D CFD-code STAR-CD, previously qualified on scale mockup tests. The model developed represents the EPR RPV from the cold leg to core inlet. Thus, the flow distribution at core inlet, the mixing between loop-flows upstream core inlet and the pressure loss in the lower plenum can be evaluated. The optimised FDD provides satisfying performances for all these relevant functional items. (author)

  15. Irradiation behavior of German PWR RPV steels under operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, J.; Hein, H. [AREVA NP Gmbh (Germany); Ganswind, J. [VGB PowerTech e.V. (Germany); Widera, M. [RWE Power AG (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In 2007, the last standard surveillance capsule of the original RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) surveillance programs of the 11 currently operating German PWR has been evaluated. With it the standard irradiation surveillance programs of these plants was completed. In the present paper, irradiation data of these surveillance programs will be presented and a final assessment of the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels with respect to current standards KTA 3203 and Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 will be given. Data from two units which are currently under decommissioning will also be included, so that data from all 13 German PWR manufactured by the former Siemens/KWU company (now AREVA NP GmbH) are shown. It will be shown that all surveillance data within the approved area of chemical composition verify the limit curve RT(limit) of the KTA 3203, which is the relevant safety standard for these plants. An analysis of the data shows, that the prediction formulas of Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2 Pos. 1 or from the TTS model tend to overestimate the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed. Additionally, the data will be compared to data from the research project CARISMA to demonstrate that these data are representative for the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels. Since the data of these research projects cover a larger neutron fluence range than the original surveillance data, they offer a future outlook into the irradiation behavior of the German PWR RPV steels under long term conditions. In general, as a consequence of the relatively large and beneficial water gap between core and RPV, especially in all Siemens/KWU 4-loop PWR, the EOL neutron fluence and therefore the irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties of the German PWR RPV materials are rather low. Moreover the irradiation data indicate that the optimized RPV materials specifications that have been applied in particular for the

  16. [Effects of the periodical spread of rinderpest on famine, epidemic, and tiger disasters in the late 17th Century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Jin; Yoo, Han Sang; Lee, Hang

    2014-04-01

    This study clarifies the causes of the repetitive occurrences of such phenomena as rinderpest, epidemic, famine, and tiger disasters recorded in the Joseon Dynasty Chronicle and the Seungjeongwon Journals in the period of great catastrophe, the late 17th century in which the great Gyeongsin famine (1670~1671) and the great Eulbyeong famine (1695~1696) occurred, from the perspective that they were biological exchanges caused by the new arrival of rinderpest in the early 17th century. It is an objection to the achievements by existing studies which suggest that the great catastrophes occurring in the late 17th century are evidence of phenomena in a little ice age. First of all, rinderpest has had influence on East Asia as it had been spread from certain areas in Machuria in May 1636 through Joseon, where it raged throughout the nation, and then to the west part of Japan. The new arrival of rinderpest was indigenized in Joseon, where it was localized and spread periodically while it was adjusted to changes in the population of cattle with immunity in accordance with their life spans and reproduction rates. As the new rinderpest, which showed high pathogenicity in the early 17th century, was indigenized with its high mortality and continued until the late 17th century, it broke out periodically in general. Contrastively, epidemics like smallpox and measles that were indigenized as routine ones had occurred constantly from far past times. As a result, the rinderpest, which tried a new indigenization, and the human epidemics, which had been already indigenized long ago, were unexpectedly overlapped in their breakout, and hence great changes were noticed in the aspects of the human casualty due to epidemics. The outbreak of rinderpest resulted in famine due to lack of farming cattle, and the famine caused epidemics among people. The casualty of the human population due to the epidemics in turn led to negligence of farming cattle, which constituted factors that triggered

  17. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of RPV-Stade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blauel, J.G.; Hodulak, L.; Siegele, D.; Nagel, G.; Hertlein, D.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation overviews the following issues: thermal shock analysis (thermohydraulics, temperatures and stresses, crack tip field parameters, cladding influence, methodology of fracture mechanics assessment); EOL safety evaluation for RPV Stade (initial conditions and input data, fracture toughness, load path diagrams, warm prestress effect, crack arrest, remaining load carrying capacity)

  18. Response of neutron-irradiated RPV steels to thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is to thermally anneal them to restore the fracture toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. This paper summarizes experimental results of work performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the annealing response of several irradiated RPV steels

  19. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of RPV-Stade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauel, J G; Hodulak, L; Siegele, D [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Nagel, G [PreussenElektra AG, Hannover (Germany); Hertlein, D [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation overviews the following issues: thermal shock analysis (thermohydraulics, temperatures and stresses, crack tip field parameters, cladding influence, methodology of fracture mechanics assessment); EOL safety evaluation for RPV Stade (initial conditions and input data, fracture toughness, load path diagrams, warm prestress effect, crack arrest, remaining load carrying capacity).

  20. Cattle plague in Shangri-La: observations on a severe outbreak of rinderpest in northern Pakistan 1994-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, P B; Hussain, M; Raja, R H; Moghul, W; Khan, Z; Broadbent, D W

    1998-07-11

    Between April 1994 and November 1995 the most severe epidemic of rinderpest reported in the world for over a decade affected domestic livestock in the Northern Areas of Pakistan. As many as 40,000 cattle and yaks died, more by some estimates, and mortality rates may have exceeded 80 per cent in these species in several villages. This report describes some of the clinicopathological and epidemiological features peculiar to the outbreak, including laboratory-confirmed rinderpest in a goat, and the difficulties encountered before the disease was eradicated. It also describes the human costs and emphasises the need to accelerate the global eradication of this most eradicable disease.

  1. Some aspects of experimental investigation of the RPV material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipka, J.; Hascik, J.; Groene, R.; Slugen, V.; Vitazek, K.; Hinca, R.; Toth, I.; Kupca, L.

    1996-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra (MS) and Electron-Positron Annihilation (EPA) spectra at room temperature have been measured on the samples from Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). Both types of measurements showed that the changes associated with the effects of neutron irradiation, as well as thermal treatment, can be detected by Moessbauer and Electron-Positron Annihilation spectroscopy. On base of a positive results achieved in MS and EPA measurements the complementary surveillance specimen program for the Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Study of the third and fourth units NPP Jaslovske Bohunice has been prepared. The complementary surveillance specimen program has started in May 1995. The samples with proper design from basic and welded RPV materials were measured by MS and EPA before placing into the reactor. After neutron irradiation the samples become radioactive because of 59 Co content. To eliminate the influence of 60 Co gamma radiation on the EPA angular correlation and time spectra a three detectors spectrometer has been introduced. (author)

  2. Russian practice of RPV integrity assessment under PTS conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piminov, V.; Dragunov, Yu.; Kostyrkin, S.; Akbachev, I.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the approach used by Gidopress (main designer of Russian WWER reactors) for RPV integrity assessment is presented. Recently performed calculations for RPVs of Novoronezh NPP, units 3 and 4, are used as an example of practical application of this approach. The calculations have been performed on the base of Russian regulatory requirements, at the same time the recommendations of IAEA Guidelines for PTS assessment was also taken into account. The scope of the work includes: Analysis of real state of NPP systems and PTS selection; analysis of material behavior including results of templets investigation; thermal hydraulic calculations; structural analyses for the leading transients; development of supplementary measures to reduce the risk of RPV fracture. 5 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  3. Russian practice of RPV integrity assessment under PTS conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piminov, V; Dragunov, Yu; Kostyrkin, S; Akbachev, I

    1997-09-01

    In this paper the approach used by Gidopress (main designer of Russian WWER reactors) for RPV integrity assessment is presented. Recently performed calculations for RPVs of Novoronezh NPP, units 3 and 4, are used as an example of practical application of this approach. The calculations have been performed on the base of Russian regulatory requirements, at the same time the recommendations of IAEA Guidelines for PTS assessment was also taken into account. The scope of the work includes: Analysis of real state of NPP systems and PTS selection; analysis of material behavior including results of templets investigation; thermal hydraulic calculations; structural analyses for the leading transients; development of supplementary measures to reduce the risk of RPV fracture. 5 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab.

  4. Long-term aging effects in RPV steel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, Frank; Ulbricht, Andreas; Wagner, Arne

    2014-01-01

    The BMWi project 1501393 aimed at contributing to the clarification of flux effects and late blooming effects in irradiated RPV steels by means of experimental techniques of sensitivity at the nm scale. The investigation of these effects was focussed on RPV steels, both base metal and weld of German reactors selected according to the objectives of the present project from two previous projects performed at AREVA GmbH. The complementary techniques of small-angle neutron scattering, atom probe tomography and positron annihilation spectroscopy were applied to detect and characterize the irradiation-induced nm-scale defect-solute clusters. A flux effect on the size of the irradiation-induced clusters but no flux effect on both cluster volume fraction and mechanical properties was found. For a low-Cu RPV weld, a late blooming effect was observed, which results in a steep slope of both cluster volume fraction and transition temperature shift after an initial stage of small or no change.

  5. Reduction of upper shelf energy of highly irradiated RPV steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otaka, M.; Osaki, T. [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    It is well known that as the embrittlement due to neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, there is the tendency of the decrease in Charpy absorbed energy at upper shelf region (USE), in addition to the shift of ductile-brittle transition temperature. Concerning to the regulation of the upper shelf region, no method is provided to evaluate integrity for RPV steels with USE of less than 68J in Japanese codes. Under the circumstance, the reduction tendency of USE using simulated Japanese RPV steels, irradiated by fast neutron up to 1 x 10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2}, E>1 MeV in the OECD Halden test reactor, was investigated to establish the basis of the USE prediction after 60 year plant operation for the integrity assessment of the RPVs. This paper describes the results of an atom probe tomography characterization of irradiated steels. A new form of USE prediction equation was developed based on the atom probe tomography characterization and the Charpy impact test results of the irradiated steels. And, the USE prediction equations have been determined through the regression analysis of the test reactor data combined with Japanese surveillance test data. (orig.)

  6. Rinderpest : an historical overview : historical overview : Onderstepoort and veterinary research in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Roeder

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Rinderpest is one of the few diseases which have changed the course of world history. Originally an Asian disease, for centuries it had a devastating impact in Europe when introduced by returning and marauding armies accompanied by cattle as well as by cattle trade. Nowhere was its impact more dramatically expressed than in Africa where the sequel to its introduction into the Horn of Africa was a devastating panzootic throughout sub-Saharan Africa during the last decade of the 19th century extending into the 20th century. Massive deaths of livestock, wild animals and the people dependent on them led to widespread human misery and changed the face of the African continent forever.

  7. Risk mapping of Rinderpest sero-prevalence in Central and Southern Somalia based on spatial and network risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Pelaez, Angel; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Tempia, Stefano; Otieno, F Tom; Aden, Hussein H; Costagli, Riccardo

    2010-04-28

    In contrast to most pastoral systems, the Somali livestock production system is oriented towards domestic trade and export with seasonal movement patterns of herds/flocks in search of water and pasture and towards export points. Data from a rinderpest survey and other data sources have been integrated to explore the topology of a contact network of cattle herds based on a spatial proximity criterion and other attributes related to cattle herd dynamics. The objective of the study is to integrate spatial mobility and other attributes with GIS and network approaches in order to develop a predictive spatial model of presence of rinderpest. A spatial logistic regression model was fitted using data for 562 point locations. It includes three statistically significant continuous-scale variables that increase the risk of rinderpest: home range radius, herd density and clustering coefficient of the node of the network whose link was established if the sum of the home ranges of every pair of nodes was equal or greater than the shortest distance between the points. The sensitivity of the model is 85.1% and the specificity 84.6%, correctly classifying 84.7% of the observations. The spatial autocorrelation not accounted for by the model is negligible and visual assessment of a semivariogram of the residuals indicated that there was no undue amount of spatial autocorrelation. The predictive model was applied to a set of 6176 point locations covering the study area. Areas at high risk of having serological evidence of rinderpest are located mainly in the coastal districts of Lower and Middle Juba, the coastal area of Lower Shabele and in the regions of Middle Shabele and Bay. There are also isolated spots of high risk along the border with Kenya and the southern area of the border with Ethiopia. The identification of point locations and areas with high risk of presence of rinderpest and their spatial visualization as a risk map will be useful for informing the prioritization of

  8. A sero-survey of rinderpest in nomadic pastoral systems in central and southern Somalia from 2002 to 2003, using a spatially integrated random sampling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempia, S; Salman, M D; Keefe, T; Morley, P; Freier, J E; DeMartini, J C; Wamwayi, H M; Njeumi, F; Soumaré, B; Abdi, A M

    2010-12-01

    A cross-sectional sero-survey, using a two-stage cluster sampling design, was conducted between 2002 and 2003 in ten administrative regions of central and southern Somalia, to estimate the seroprevalence and geographic distribution of rinderpest (RP) in the study area, as well as to identify potential risk factors for the observed seroprevalence distribution. The study was also used to test the feasibility of the spatially integrated investigation technique in nomadic and semi-nomadic pastoral systems. In the absence of a systematic list of livestock holdings, the primary sampling units were selected by generating random map coordinates. A total of 9,216 serum samples were collected from cattle aged 12 to 36 months at 562 sampling sites. Two apparent clusters of RP seroprevalence were detected. Four potential risk factors associated with the observed seroprevalence were identified: the mobility of cattle herds, the cattle population density, the proximity of cattle herds to cattle trade routes and cattle herd size. Risk maps were then generated to assist in designing more targeted surveillance strategies. The observed seroprevalence in these areas declined over time. In subsequent years, similar seroprevalence studies in neighbouring areas of Kenya and Ethiopia also showed a very low seroprevalence of RP or the absence of antibodies against RP. The progressive decline in RP antibody prevalence is consistent with virus extinction. Verification of freedom from RP infection in the Somali ecosystem is currently in progress.

  9. Development and Characterization of a Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out Supplemental Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed advanced rapid diagnostics that may be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the potential to improve our nation's ability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect animal populations of high economic importance in the United States. Under 2005 DHS funding we have developed multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based PCR assays that combine foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1 or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitus IBR), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus BPSV, Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). Under 2006 funding we have developed a Multiplexed PCR [MUX] porcine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for VESV and SVD foreign animal diseases in addition to one other domestic vesicular animal disease vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and one domestic animal disease of swine porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). We have also developed a MUX bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine foreign animal diseases malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitus virus (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV), and the Parapox

  10. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of RPV Support Cooling System for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Qi; Wu Xinxin; Li Xiaowei; Zhang Li; He Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Passive safety is now of great interest for future generation reactors because of its reduction of human interaction and avoidance of failures of active components. reactor pressure vessel (RPV) support cooling system (SCS) for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is a passive safety system and is used to cool the concrete seats for the four RPV supports at its bottom. The SCS should have enough cooling capacity to ensure the temperature of the concrete seats for the supports not exceeding the limit temperature. The SCS system is composed of a natural circulation water loop and an air cooling tower. In the water loop, there is a heat exchanger embedded in the concrete seat, heat is transferred by thermal conduction and convection to the cooling water. Then the water is cooled by the air cooler mounted in the air cooling tower. The driving forces for water and air are offered by the density differences caused by the temperature differences. In this paper, the thermal hydraulic analysis for this system was presented. Methods for decoupling the natural circulation and heat transfer between the water loop and air flow were introduced. The operating parameters for different working conditions and environment temperatures were calculated. (author)

  11. Estimating residual life of alloy 600 RPV penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, E.S.; White, G.A.; Pathania, R.; Arey, M.L.; Whitaker, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 penetrations PWR in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads has become a significant economic concern worldwide. PWSCC of these penetrations has led to extended maintenance outages, expensive inspections and repairs, and in some cases, replacement of the entire vessel head. This paper describes methodology developed to predict the remaining life of Alloy 600 penetrations in reactor vessel heads. Predictions of remaining life are an important input to planning models used by utilities to select a strategy for responding to the PWSCC issue at the lowest life cycle cost with an acceptably low risk of leakage. The remaining life of RPV penetrations is determined using the results of inspections of penetrations and statistical methods to predict future degradation. The analysis takes into account the effects of material properties, welding residual stresses, and operating temperature on PWSCC initiation and growth. The probability of developing cracks of various depths is assessed using Monte Carlo methods which provide for uncertainties in the input assumptions. For plants which have not yet performed inspections, remaining life predictions are based on inspection results from similar plants which have performed inspections with corrections made for known differences in design details, material properties and operating conditions

  12. The efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and cardiovascular risks of switching nevirapine to rilpivirine in HIV-1 patients: the RPV switch study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokx, C.; Blonk, M.; Verbon, A.; Burger, D.M.; Rijnders, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nevirapine (NVP) induces cytochrome P450 3A4 by which rilpivirine (RPV) is metabolized. Switching NVP to RPV could result in decreased RPV exposure with subsequent virological failure and dyslipidemia because NVP is regarded as the least dyslipidemic, non-nucleoside, reverse

  13. The influence of the crust layer on RPV structural failure under severe accident condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Jianfeng, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Li, Xiangqing [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Bao, Shiyi [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Luo, Lijia [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior. • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage mainly contribute to RPV failure. • An elastic core in RPV wall is essential for ensuring RPV integrity. • The multiaxial state of stress accelerates the total damage evolution. - Abstract: The so called ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is regarded as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy, which is widely used in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of IVR strategy is to employ the external water flooding to cool the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The RPV integrity has to be maintained within a required period during the IVR period. The degraded melting core is assumed to be arrested in the lower head (LH) to form the melting pool that is bounded by upper, side and lower crusts. Consequently, the existence of the crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior as well as failure process. In order to disclose this influence caused by the crust layer, a detailed investigation is conducted by using numerical simulation on the two RPVs with and without crust layer respectively. Taking the RPV without crust layer as a basis for the comparison, the present study assesses the likelihood and potential failure location, time and mode of the LH under the loadings of the critical heat flux (CHF) and slight internal pressure. Due to the high temperature melt on the inside and nucleate boiling on the outside, the RPV integrity is found to be compromised by melt-through, creep, elasticity, plasticity as well as thermal expansion. Through in-depth investigation, it is found that the creep and plasticity are of vital importance to the final structural failure, and the introduction of crust layer results in a significant change on field parameters in terms of temperature, deformation, stress(strain), triaxiality factor and total damage.

  14. The influence of the crust layer on RPV structural failure under severe accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Jianfeng; Li, Xiangqing; Bao, Shiyi; Luo, Lijia; Gao, Zengliang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior. • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage mainly contribute to RPV failure. • An elastic core in RPV wall is essential for ensuring RPV integrity. • The multiaxial state of stress accelerates the total damage evolution. - Abstract: The so called ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is regarded as a severe accident (SA) mitigation strategy, which is widely used in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of IVR strategy is to employ the external water flooding to cool the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The RPV integrity has to be maintained within a required period during the IVR period. The degraded melting core is assumed to be arrested in the lower head (LH) to form the melting pool that is bounded by upper, side and lower crusts. Consequently, the existence of the crust layer greatly affects the RPV structural behavior as well as failure process. In order to disclose this influence caused by the crust layer, a detailed investigation is conducted by using numerical simulation on the two RPVs with and without crust layer respectively. Taking the RPV without crust layer as a basis for the comparison, the present study assesses the likelihood and potential failure location, time and mode of the LH under the loadings of the critical heat flux (CHF) and slight internal pressure. Due to the high temperature melt on the inside and nucleate boiling on the outside, the RPV integrity is found to be compromised by melt-through, creep, elasticity, plasticity as well as thermal expansion. Through in-depth investigation, it is found that the creep and plasticity are of vital importance to the final structural failure, and the introduction of crust layer results in a significant change on field parameters in terms of temperature, deformation, stress(strain), triaxiality factor and total damage.

  15. Initial evaluation of ultrasonic attenuation measurements for estimating fracture toughness of RPV steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, A.L. Jr.; Green, R.E. Jr. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center for Nondestructive Evaluation

    1999-08-01

    Neutron bombardment of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes reductions in fracture toughness in these steels, termed neutron irradiation embrittlement. Currently, there are no accepted methods for nondestructive determination of the extent of the irradiation embrittlement nor the actual fracture toughness of the reactor pressure vessel. This paper provides initial results of an effort addressing the use of ultrasonic attenuation as a suitable parameter for nondestructive determination of irradiation embrittlement in RPV steels. (orig.)

  16. Structural integrity investigation for RPV with various cooling water levels under pressurized melting pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategy denoted as in-vessel retention (IVR is widely used in severe accident (SA management by most advanced nuclear power plants. The essence of IVR mitigation is to provide long-term external water cooling in maintaining the reactor pressure vessel (RPV integrity. Actually, the traditional IVR concept assumed that RPV was fully submerged into the water flooding, and the melting pool was depressurized during the SA. The above assumptions weren't seriously challenged until the occurrence of Fukushima accident on 2011, suggesting the structural behavior had not been appropriately assessed. Therefore, the paper tries to address the structure-related issue on determining whether RPV safety can be maintained or not with the effect of various water levels and internal pressures created from core meltdown accident. In achieving it, the RPV structural behaviors are numerically investigated in terms of several field parameters, such as temperature, deformation, stress, plastic strain, creep strain, and total damage. Due to the presence of high temperature melt on the inside and water cooling on the outside, the RPV failure is governed by the failure mechanisms of creep, thermal-plasticity and plasticity. The creep and plastic damages are interacted with each other, which further accelerate the failure process. Through detailed investigation, it is found that the internal pressure as well as water levels plays an important role in determining the RPV failure time, mode and site.

  17. Annealing of the RPV of unit 1 in Loviisa 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrand, R.; Kohopaeae, J.

    1997-01-01

    The critical circumferential core area weld of Loviisa 1 reactor pressure vessel was successfully annealed during the refueling and maintenance outage in August 1996. The weld was heated up to the annealing temperature of 475 deg.C and this temperature was maintained for 100 hours. The work was implemented by Skoda Nuclear Machinery Ltd as a main supplier representing consortium of Skoda Nuclear machinery Ltd from Czech Republic and Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant from Slovak Republic. Comprehensive material testing programs have been carried out to ensure the licensing of the annealing. Part of these programs have not yet been finished and are still going on. In the domestic programs sophisticated testing techniques including electric discharge machining and reconstitution techniques were used. Thus already tested surveillance specimens halves could be used as authentic material. The licensing work has been carried out mainly by VTT in Finland and Moht Otjig RM in Russia. A new comprehensive surveillance program has started to follow the embrittlement of the RPV after annealing. (author)

  18. Simulation of creep tests with French or German RPV-steel and investigation of a RPV-support against failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.-G.; Altstadt, E.; Sehgal, B.R.; Weiss, F.-P.

    2003-01-01

    Investigating the hypothetical core melt down scenario for a light water reactor (LWR) a possible failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its failure time has to be considered for a determination of the loadings on the containment. For pre- and post-test calculations of Lower Head Failure experiments like OLHF or FOREVER it is necessary to model creep and plasticity processes. Therefore a Finite Element Model is developed at the FZR using a numerical approach which avoids the use of a single creep law employing constants derived from the data for a limited stress and temperature range. Instead of this a numerical creep data base (CDB) is developed in which the creep strain rate is evaluated in dependence on the current total strain, temperature and equivalent stress. A main task for this approach is the generation and validation of the CDB. Additionally the implementation of all relevant temperature dependent material properties is performed. For the consideration of the tertiary creep stage and for the evaluation of the failure times a damage model according to an approach of Lemaitre is applied. The validation of the numerical model is performed by the simulation of and comparison with experiments. This is done in three levels: starting with the simulation of single uniaxial creep tests, which is considered as a 1D-problem. In the next level so called 'tube-failure-experiments' are modeled: the RUPTHER-14 and the 'MPA-Meppen'-experiment. These experiments are considered as 2D-problems. Finally the numerical model is applied to scaled 3D-experiments, where the lower head of a PWR is represented in its hemispherical shape, like in the FOREVER-experiments. An interesting question to be solved in this frame is the comparability of the French 16MND5 and the German 20MnMoNi5-5 RPV-steels, which are chemically nearly identical. Since these two steels show a similar behavior, it should be allowed to a limited extend to transfer experimental and numerical

  19. Investigation on multilayer failure mechanism of RPV with a high temperature gradient from core meltdown scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianfeng, Mao, E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Xiangqing, Li [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Shiyi, Bao, E-mail: bsy@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Lijia, Luo [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Zengliang, Gao [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Remanufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The multilayer failure mechanism is investigated for RPV under CHF. • Failure time and location of RPV are predicted under various SA scenarios. • The structural behaviors are analyzed in depth for creep and plasticity. • The effect of internal pressure and temperature gradient is considered. • The structural integrity of RPV is secured within the required 72 creep hours. - Abstract: The Fukushima accident shows that in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris has not been appropriately assessed, and a certain pressure (up to 8.0 MPa) still exists inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the traditional concept of IVR, the pressure is supposed to successfully be released, and the temperature distributed among the wall thickness is assumed to be uniform. However, this concept is seriously challenged by reality of Fukushima accident with regard to the existence of both internal pressure and high temperature gradient. Therefore, in order to make the IVR mitigation strategy succeed, the numerical investigation of the lower head behavior and its failure has been performed for several internal pressures under high temperature gradient. According to some requirements in severe accident (SA) management of RPV, it should be ensured that the IVR mitigation takes effect in preventing the failure of the structure within a period of 72 h. Subsequently, the failure time and location have to be predicted under the critical heat flux (CHF) loading condition for lower head, since the CHF is limit thermal boundary before the melt-through of RPV. In illustrating the so called ‘multilayer failure mechanism’, the structural behaviors of RPV are analyzed in terms of the stress, creep strain, deformation, damage on selected paths.

  20. Structure and function of the TIR domain from the grape NLR protein RPV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon John Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The N-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR domain has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for defence signalling in the model plants flax and Arabidopsis. In examples from these organisms, TIR domain self-association is required for signalling function, albeit through distinct interfaces. Here, we investigate these properties in the TIR domain containing resistance protein RPV1 from the wild grapevine Muscadinia rotundifolia. The RPV1 TIR domain, without additional flanking sequence present, is autoactive when transiently expressed in tobacco, demonstrating that the TIR domain alone is capable of cell-death signalling. We determined the crystal structure of the RPV1 TIR domain at 2.3 Å resolution. In the crystals, the RPV1 TIR domain forms a dimer, mediated predominantly through residues in the αA and αE helices (AE interface. This interface is shared with the interface discovered in the dimeric complex of the TIR domains from the Arabidopsis RPS4/RRS1 resistance protein pair. We show that surface-exposed residues in the AE interface that mediate the dimer interaction in the crystals are highly conserved among plant TIR domain-containing proteins. While we were unable to demonstrate self-association of the RPV1 TIR domain in solution or using yeast 2-hybrid, mutations of surface-exposed residues in the AE interface prevent the cell-death autoactive phenotype. In addition, mutation of residues known to be important in the cell-death signalling function of the flax L6 TIR domain were also shown to be required for RPV1 TIR domain mediated cell-death. Our data demonstrate that multiple TIR domain surfaces control the cell-death function of the RPV1 TIR domain and we suggest that the conserved AE interface may have a general function in TIR-NLR signalling.

  1. Investigation on multilayer failure mechanism of RPV with a high temperature gradient from core meltdown scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jianfeng, Mao; Xiangqing, Li; Shiyi, Bao; Lijia, Luo; Zengliang, Gao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The multilayer failure mechanism is investigated for RPV under CHF. • Failure time and location of RPV are predicted under various SA scenarios. • The structural behaviors are analyzed in depth for creep and plasticity. • The effect of internal pressure and temperature gradient is considered. • The structural integrity of RPV is secured within the required 72 creep hours. - Abstract: The Fukushima accident shows that in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris has not been appropriately assessed, and a certain pressure (up to 8.0 MPa) still exists inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the traditional concept of IVR, the pressure is supposed to successfully be released, and the temperature distributed among the wall thickness is assumed to be uniform. However, this concept is seriously challenged by reality of Fukushima accident with regard to the existence of both internal pressure and high temperature gradient. Therefore, in order to make the IVR mitigation strategy succeed, the numerical investigation of the lower head behavior and its failure has been performed for several internal pressures under high temperature gradient. According to some requirements in severe accident (SA) management of RPV, it should be ensured that the IVR mitigation takes effect in preventing the failure of the structure within a period of 72 h. Subsequently, the failure time and location have to be predicted under the critical heat flux (CHF) loading condition for lower head, since the CHF is limit thermal boundary before the melt-through of RPV. In illustrating the so called ‘multilayer failure mechanism’, the structural behaviors of RPV are analyzed in terms of the stress, creep strain, deformation, damage on selected paths.

  2. Study on structural failure of RPV with geometric discontinuity under severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J.F., E-mail: jianfeng-mao@163.com [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Zhu, J.W. [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Department of Mechanical and Electrical engineering, Huzhou Vocational & Technical College Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Bao, S.Y., E-mail: bsy@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China); Luo, L.J. [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Gao, Z.L. [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310032 (China); Engineering Research Center of Process Equipment and Re-manufacturing, Ministry of Education (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The RPV failure is investigated in depth under severe accident. • The creep and plastic damage are the major contributor to RPV failure. • A elastic core is found at the midpoint of the highly-eroded region. • Weakest location has some ‘accommodating’ quality to prevent ductile tearing. • The internal pressure is critical for the determination of structural failure. - Abstract: A severe accident management strategy known as ‘in-vessel retention (IVR)’ is widely adopted in most of advanced nuclear power plants. The IVR mitigation is assumed to be able to arrest the degraded melting core and maintain the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) within a prescribed period of time. This traditional concept of IVR without consideration of internal pressure effect wasn’t challenged until the occurrence of Fukushima accident on 2011, which showed that the structural behavior had not been appropriately assessed, and a certain pressure (up to 8.0 MPa) still existed inside the RPV. Accordingly, the paper tries to address the related issue on whether lower head (LH) integrity can be maintained, when the LH is subjected to the thermal-mechanical loads created during such a severe accident. Because of the presence of the high temperature melt (∼1300 °C) on the inside of RPV, some local material is melted down to create a unique RPV with geometric discontinuity, while the outside of RPV submerged in cavity water will remain in nucleate boiling (at ∼150 °C). Therefore, the failure mechanisms of RPV can span a wide range of structural behaviors, such as melt-through, creep damage, plastic yielding as well as thermal expansion. Through meticulous investigation, it is found that the RPV failure is mainly caused by creep and plasticity, especially for the inside of highly-eroded region. The elastic core (or layer) is found to exist in the proximity of mid-section of the highly-eroded wall. However, the elastic core is squeezed into

  3. Strategic Assessment of Causes, Impacts and Mitigation of Radiation Embrittlement of RPV steel in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Jubair Ahmed; Bhowmik, Palash Kumar; Gairola, Abhinav; Suh, Kune Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear power has been emerged as a proven technology in the present day world to beget electricity after its first successful demonstration in 1942. Due to world's increasing concern over the augmented concentration of 'Greenhouse Gas' emissions primarily caused by burning of fossil fuel, it is not surprising that there will be a galloping demand for nuclear power in near future. As per data of World Nuclear Association, there are currently 435 operable civil nuclear power reactors around the world, with a further 71 under construction, among which the most common type is LWR. Pressure vessel of LWR is the most vital pressure boundary component of Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) as it houses the core under elevated pressure and temperature. It also provides structural support to RPV internals and attempts to protect against possible rupture under all postulated transients that the NSSS may undergo. LWR pressure vessel experiences service at a temperature of 250-320 .deg. C and receives significant level of fast neutron fluence, ranging from about 5*10 22 to 3*10 24 n/m 2 depending on plant design. There are also differences in materials used for various designed reactors. Weldments also vary in type and impurity level. Accordingly, the assessment of degradation of major components such as RPV steel caused by aging and corrosion is a common objective for safe operation of all LWRs. The purpose of this paper is to assess how neutron irradiation contributes to the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV steel and how these effects can be minimized. Since RPV is the only irreplaceable component in NPPs, the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV is the life-limiting feature of LWR nuclear power plant operation. Although there are a number of ways (e.g. thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma-ray irradiation) that may contribute to the displacement of atoms (hence RPV embrittlement and degradation of mechanical properties), most of the

  4. Strategic Assessment of Causes, Impacts and Mitigation of Radiation Embrittlement of RPV steel in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Jubair Ahmed; Bhowmik, Palash Kumar; Gairola, Abhinav; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Nuclear power has been emerged as a proven technology in the present day world to beget electricity after its first successful demonstration in 1942. Due to world's increasing concern over the augmented concentration of 'Greenhouse Gas' emissions primarily caused by burning of fossil fuel, it is not surprising that there will be a galloping demand for nuclear power in near future. As per data of World Nuclear Association, there are currently 435 operable civil nuclear power reactors around the world, with a further 71 under construction, among which the most common type is LWR. Pressure vessel of LWR is the most vital pressure boundary component of Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) as it houses the core under elevated pressure and temperature. It also provides structural support to RPV internals and attempts to protect against possible rupture under all postulated transients that the NSSS may undergo. LWR pressure vessel experiences service at a temperature of 250-320 .deg. C and receives significant level of fast neutron fluence, ranging from about 5*10{sup 22} to 3*10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} depending on plant design. There are also differences in materials used for various designed reactors. Weldments also vary in type and impurity level. Accordingly, the assessment of degradation of major components such as RPV steel caused by aging and corrosion is a common objective for safe operation of all LWRs. The purpose of this paper is to assess how neutron irradiation contributes to the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV steel and how these effects can be minimized. Since RPV is the only irreplaceable component in NPPs, the degradation of mechanical properties of RPV is the life-limiting feature of LWR nuclear power plant operation. Although there are a number of ways (e.g. thermal neutrons, fast neutrons and gamma-ray irradiation) that may contribute to the displacement of atoms (hence RPV embrittlement and degradation of mechanical properties

  5. FP7 project LONGLIFE: Treatment of long-term irradiation embrittlement effects in RPV safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, J.; Hein, H.; Altstadt, E.; Bergner, F.; Viehrig, H.W.; Ulbricht, A.; Chaouadi, R.; Radiguet, B.; Cammelli, S.; Huang, H.; Wilford, K.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing age of European Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) and envisaged extensions of plant lifetimes from 40 up to 80 years require an improved understanding of ageing phenomena of RPV components. The Network of Excellence NULIFE (Nuclear Plant Life Prediction) has been established to advance the safe and economic long-term operation (LTO) of NPPs by facilitating increased co-operation for applied R and D amongst members of the European nuclear community. The accurate prediction and management of RPV neutron irradiation embrittlement connected with long-term operation is an important aspect of this co-operation. Phenomena that might become important at high neutron fluences (such as flux effects and late blooming effects) have to be considered adequately in safety assessments. However, the surveillance database for prolonged irradiation times and low neutron fluxes is sparse. Consequently, there are significant uncertainties in the treatment of long-term irradiation effects. Therefore, the project LONGLIFE (Treatment of long-term irradiation embrittlement effects in RPV safety assessment) was initiated under the Euratom 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission as an umbrella project of NULIFE. LONGLIFE aims at 1) improved understanding of long-term irradiation phenomena that might compromise RPV integrity, and thereby the LTO of European NPPs, and 2) assessment of the adequacy of current prediction tools, codes, standards and surveillance guidelines for supporting long-term RPV operation. The scope of the work comprises the analysis of LTO boundary conditions; microstructural investigations and supplementary mechanical tests on RPV steels, including RPV steels from decommissioned plants; training activities; and elaboration of recommendations for RPV materials assessment and embrittlement surveillance under LTO conditions. A key part of the technical work is the selection of relevant materials for examination, e.g. which contain different weld and base

  6. LYRA and other projects on RPV steel embrittlement study and mitigation of the AMES network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debarberis, L.; Estorff, U. von; Crutzen, S.; Beers, M.; Stamm, H.; Vries, M.I. de; Tjoa, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of the European Network AMES, Ageing Materials evaluation and Studies, a number of experimental works on RPV materials embrittlement are carried out at the Institute of Advanced Materials (AIM) of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). The objectives of AMES are mainly the understanding of the property degradation phenomena of RPV western reference steels like JRQ and HSST, eastern RPV steels like 15X2mFA and 15H2X15, and annealing possibilities. In order to conduct a very high quality irradiation rig, LYRA facility, has been designed and developed at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) Petten. An other dedicated rig, named LIMA, has been developed at the HFR Petten in order to irradiate RPV steels, internals and in-core materials under typical BWR/PWR conditions. The samples can be irradiated in pressurised water up to 160 bar, 320 deg. C, and the water chemistry fully controlled. For irradiation of standard or miniaturised LWR related materials samples, another group of well experienced irradiation devices with inert gas or liquid metals environment are employed. These devices are tailored to their various specific applications. This paper is intended to give information about the structure and the objectives of the existing European network AMES, and to present the various AMES main and spin-off projects, including a brief description on he modelling activities related to RPV materials embrittlement. (author)

  7. Virus incidence in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) seed production fields in the Willamette Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey was conducted over the course of three years (2014-2016) for the presence of Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV-MAV and BYDV-PAV), Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV-RPV), and Cocksfoot mottle virus (CfMV) in orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) fields in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. There was an ...

  8. Effects of ATR-2 Irradiation to High Fluence on Nine RPV Surveillance Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, Randy K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Odette, George R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Almirall, Nathan [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Robertson, Janet [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC (United States); Yamamoto, T. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Wells, Peter [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely degraded, with the degree of toughness loss dependent on the radiation sensitivity of the materials. The available embrittlement predictive models and our present understanding of radiation damage are not fully quantitative, and do not treat all potentially significant variables and issues, particularly considering extension of operation to 80y.

  9. The analysis of RPV fast neutron flux calculation for PWR with three-dimensional SN method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Shouhai; Chen Yixue; Wang Weijin; Shi Shengchun; Lu Daogang

    2011-01-01

    Discrete ordinates (S N ) method is one of the most widely used method for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) design. As the fast development of computer CPU speed and memory capacity and consummation of three-dimensional discrete-ordinates method, it is mature for 3-D S N method to be used to engineering design for nuclear facilities. This work was done specifically for PWR model, with the results of 3-D core neutron transport calculation by 3-D core calculation, 3-D RPV fast neutron flux distribution obtain by 3-D S N method were compared with gained by 1-D and 2-D S N method and the 3-D Monte Carlo (MC) method. In this paper, the application of three-dimensional S N method in calculating RPV fast neutron flux distribution for pressurized water reactor (PWR) is presented and discussed. (authors)

  10. Extension of the RPV irradiation surveillance program of NPP GKN II by T0 approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmes, J.; Keim, E.; Hein, H.; Koenig, G.

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear power plant (NPP) Neckarwestheim II (GKN II) started operation in 1989 and was designed for 40 years of operation. During the plant life time the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity is a main aspect for nuclear safety since the RPV is exposed to neutron irradiation affecting the mechanical material properties, in particular toughness. In this context the ductile to brittle transition reference temperature of the RPV materials can be determined either indirectly according to the RT(NDT) concept by means of comparative examinations of irradiated and unirradiated notched-bar impact specimens or directly according to the Master Curve concept by means of examination of irradiated fracture mechanic specimens and determination of an alternative reference temperature RT(T0). With the implementation and evaluation of the first irradiation surveillance program consisting of three sets, one unirradiated reference set (set 1) and two irradiated sets (set 2 and 3), the RPV safety could be proven for the assessment fluence (AF) of 8*10 18 cm -2 (E > 1 MeV) using the RT(NDT) concept. Against the background of a possible long term operation and the state-of-the-art of science and technology in 1998 the NPP GKN II initiated a supplemental irradiation surveillance program with two irradiation sets (set 4 and 5) containing fracture mechanic specimens for complementary proof of safety according to the Master Curve concept. The results of the first irradiated set 4 are presented and assessed by means of the reference temperatures according to the Master Curve concept and compared to the results of the irradiation sets 1 to 3 of the conventional irradiation surveillance program. As an important outcome the existing RPV integrity assessment could be ensured by the Master Curve results. The applied approach adapts to the state-of-the-art of science and technology and is best practice to ensure the safe operation of RPV supplementary. (authors)

  11. Formation of radiation induced precipitates in VVER RPV materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Chernobaeva, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of experimental results received in course of research of copper-enriched precipitates (Cu-precipitates) and nickel-manganese-silicon clusters (Ni-Mn-Si clusters), which are formed in steels of VVER-type reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) under neutron irradiation. Based on this analysis, a hypothetical model is suggested for cluster formation in course of evolution of a cascade region. The model presumes cluster formation in two stages. At the first stage, in course of cascade region crystallization, a stable cluster is formed in the center of the cascade region, which consists of vacancies and Cu atoms following the mechanism of the inverse Kirkendall effect. At the second stage, diffusion of Ni, Mn and P atoms with a flow of vacancies from the matrix takes place to form a cluster. The size of a cluster is limited by a balance of vacancies' flows entering and leaving the cluster. The paper also considers a possibility of stabilization of atomic-vacancy cluster due to uneven distribution of Ni, Mn and P atoms, which explains dependence of cluster density on the content of these elements. Kinetics of cluster formation and evolution presumed by suggested model is analyzed. It is demonstrated that a fall in cluster density and an increase in their size under high irradiation doses may be caused by a decrease of matrix supersaturation with vacancies resulting from high density of dislocation loops. - Highlights: • The analysis of the mechanism of formation of radiation-induced clusters in RPV steels has been done. • Radiation-induced clusters are formed after the mechanism based on the inverse Kirkendall effect in two stages. • At post-dynamic stage a flow of vacancies moving to the center of the cascade entrains Cu atoms contained and forms a stable atom-vacancies cluster. • At the 2nd stage Cu, Ni, Mn, Si atoms forming complexes with vacancies diffuse into a cluster driving out Fe and Cr atoms from the cluster. • The cluster

  12. Aquila Remotely Piloted Vehicle System Technology Demonstration (RPV-STD) Program. Volume 3. Field Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    FLIGHT TESTS Tis 8ootion sumarizes ech of the Crows Landln Flight Tests, hrm I to It Deoemiber 1975. 23 2.4.1 Flight 1 Aquila RPV 001 took off at 09.42...RC pilot In the stablied RC mode. To facilitate theme attempts, an automobile , with Its headlights on high beam, was positioned on each side of the...the vans. At approxi- mately 2 to 3 km, the actual automobile headlights would become visible. Then, the operator would attempt to reposition the RPV

  13. Simultaneous B and L violation: new signatures from RPV-SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faroughy, Cyrus; Prabhu, Siddharth; Zheng, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Studies of R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetry typically assume that nucleon stability is protected by approximate baryon number (B) or lepton number (L) conservation. We present a new class of RPV models that violate B and L simultaneously (BLRPV), without inducing rapid nucleon decay. These models feature an approximate Z 2 e ×Z 2 μ ×Z 2 τ flavor symmetry, which forbids 2-body nucleon decay and ensures that flavor antisymmetric LLE c couplings are the only non-negligible L-violating operators. Nucleons are predicted to decay through N→Keμν and n→eμν; the resulting bounds on RPV couplings are rather mild. Novel collider phenomenology arises because the superpartners can decay through both L-violating and B-violating couplings. This can lead to, for example, final states with high jet multiplicity and multiple leptons of different flavor, or a spectrum in which depending on the superpartner, either B or L violating decays dominate. BLRPV can also provide a natural setting for displaced ν̃→μe decays, which evade many existing collider searches for RPV supersymmetry.

  14. Simultaneous B and L violation: new signatures from RPV-SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faroughy, Cyrus [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University,Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Prabhu, Siddharth [Department of Physics, Yale University,New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Zheng, Bob [Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan,Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Studies of R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetry typically assume that nucleon stability is protected by approximate baryon number (B) or lepton number (L) conservation. We present a new class of RPV models that violate B and L simultaneously (BLRPV), without inducing rapid nucleon decay. These models feature an approximate Z{sub 2}{sup e}×Z{sub 2}{sup μ}×Z{sub 2}{sup τ} flavor symmetry, which forbids 2-body nucleon decay and ensures that flavor antisymmetric LLE{sup c} couplings are the only non-negligible L-violating operators. Nucleons are predicted to decay through N→Keμν and n→eμν; the resulting bounds on RPV couplings are rather mild. Novel collider phenomenology arises because the superpartners can decay through both L-violating and B-violating couplings. This can lead to, for example, final states with high jet multiplicity and multiple leptons of different flavor, or a spectrum in which depending on the superpartner, either B or L violating decays dominate. BLRPV can also provide a natural setting for displaced ν̃→μe decays, which evade many existing collider searches for RPV supersymmetry.

  15. Practical implications for RPV irradiation surveillance under long term operation based on latest research results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, H.; Keim, E.; Barthelmes, J.; Schnabel, H.

    2015-01-01

    The international programs CARISMA, CARINA and LONGLIFE belong to the research programs which have been performed during the last 10 years to study the irradiation behavior of RPV steels under long term operation of more than 60 years. Some characteristic but different irradiated RPV steels used in Pressurized Water Reactors have been extensively investigated in each of those three programs. Whereas the CARISMA and CARINA programs were mainly focused on material testing to study the irradiation-induced change of material properties in terms of fracture toughness, the main objective of LONGLIFE was to investigate the change of microstructure with various analysis techniques and to understand the mechanisms behind. In this way it was possible to get a comprehensive material characterization in terms of macro-physical properties and micro-structural features for a number of RPV steels which have been studied at different irradiation levels up to 8*10 19 cm -2 (E > 1 MeV). The essential macro-physical and micro-structural results are summarized, in particular regarding the impact of copper and nickel, and the neutron flux on the irradiation behavior and with respect to possible late irradiation effects under long term operation. Moreover, the change of material properties is linked with embrittlement mechanisms such as formation of element specific precipitations, segregations, and matrix defects. Well-known trend curves are also applied to the measured T 41 and T 0 data in order to assess their appropriateness for long term operation. Based on the comprehensive available data base, practical implications for RPV irradiation surveillance programs under long term operation are highlighted with respect to issues like material specific application of reference temperature concepts, data scattering, prediction of high fluence behavior and how to cope with possible late irradiation effects. Finally, best practices for RPV irradiation surveillance programs are suggested from

  16. Historical introgression of the downy mildew resistance gene Rpv12 from the Asian species Vitis amurensis into grapevine varieties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Venuti

    Full Text Available The Amur grape (Vitis amurensis Rupr. thrives naturally in cool climates of Northeast Asia. Resistance against the introduced pathogen Plasmopara viticola is common among wild ecotypes that were propagated from Manchuria into Chinese vineyards or collected by Soviet botanists in Siberia, and used for the introgression of resistance into wine grapes (Vitis vinifera L.. A QTL analysis revealed a dominant gene Rpv12 that explained 79% of the phenotypic variance for downy mildew resistance and was inherited independently of other resistance genes. A Mendelian component of resistance-a hypersensitive response in leaves challenged with P. viticola-was mapped in an interval of 0.2 cM containing an array of coiled-coil NB-LRR genes on chromosome 14. We sequenced 10-kb genic regions in the Rpv12(+ haplotype and identified polymorphisms in 12 varieties of V. vinifera using next-generation sequencing. The combination of two SNPs in single-copy genes flanking the NB-LRR cluster distinguished the resistant haplotype from all others found in 200 accessions of V. vinifera, V. amurensis, and V. amurensis x V. vinifera crosses. The Rpv12(+ haplotype is shared by 15 varieties, the most ancestral of which are the century-old 'Zarja severa' and 'Michurinets'. Before this knowledge, the chromosome segment around Rpv12(+ became introgressed, shortened, and pyramided with another downy mildew resistance gene from North American grapevines (Rpv3 only by phenotypic selection. Rpv12(+ has an additive effect with Rpv3(+ to protect vines against natural infections, and confers foliar resistance to strains that are virulent on Rpv3(+ plants.

  17. Multi-hadron final states in RPV supersymmetric models with extra matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masaki; Sakurai, Kazuki; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2014-01-01

    The gluino mass has been constrained by various search channels at the LHC experiments and the recent analyses are even sensitive to the cases where gluinos decay to quarks at the end of the decay chains through the baryonic RPV operator. We argue that introduction of extra matter, which is partly motivated by cancelling anomalies of discrete R symmetry, may help to relax the gluino mass limit when the RPV hadronic gluino decays are considered. In the scenarios where the extra matter states appear in the gluino decay chains, the number of decay products increases and each jet becomes soft, making it difficult to distinguish the signal from backgrounds. We investigate the sensitivity of existing analyses to such scenarios and demonstrate that the gluino mass limit can be relaxed if the mass spectrum reconciles the sensitivities of high p T jet searches and large jet multiplicity searches

  18. Multi-hadron final states in RPV supersymmetric models with extra matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Asano

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The gluino mass has been constrained by various search channels at the LHC experiments and the recent analyses are even sensitive to the cases where gluinos decay to quarks at the end of the decay chains through the baryonic RPV operator. We argue that introduction of extra matter, which is partly motivated by cancelling anomalies of discrete R symmetry, may help to relax the gluino mass limit when the RPV hadronic gluino decays are considered. In the scenarios where the extra matter states appear in the gluino decay chains, the number of decay products increases and each jet becomes soft, making it difficult to distinguish the signal from backgrounds. We investigate the sensitivity of existing analyses to such scenarios and demonstrate that the gluino mass limit can be relaxed if the mass spectrum reconciles the sensitivities of high pT jet searches and large jet multiplicity searches.

  19. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The IAEA Specialists` Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs.

  20. Site ultrasonic measurement on RPV stud-bolt loading under hot transient of Qinshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jiadi; Dou Yikang; Zhu Shiming

    1994-08-01

    It expounds that the key of solving thermal transient sealing problem is to obtain the thermal increment of stud-bolt loading. This loading, as a primary stress loading, is directly related to the bolt fatigue life and transient loading spectrum for vessel analysis. The fundamental works and main results of ultrasonic measurement on RPV stud-bolt loading on Qinshan site are also presented. The measuring capability has exceeded 1 m in length and temperature of 280 degree C, therefore, it is possible to be used in the field of NPP. The paper is the continuation of research work for sealing analysis and tests on the RPV (see SMiRT-9, 10)

  1. Cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations. Working material. Proceedings of a specialists meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations was held at the ASTM Headquarters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on May 2-4, 1995. It was attended by 39 participants from 12 countries. The meeting was held in the framework of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) and was organized and sponsored by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of the meeting was to review experience in the field for ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. Presentations were aimed at achieving a better understanding of the behaviour of reactor component materials, providing guidance and recommendations to assure reliability and adequate performance, and proposing directions for further investigations. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Corrosion properties of sealing surface material for RPV under abnormal working conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinhua; Wen Yan; Zhang Xuemei; Hou Songmin; Gong Bin; He Yanchun

    2012-01-01

    Based on the corrosion issue of sealing surface material for RPV in some nuclear projects, the corrosion properties of sealing surface material for RPV under abnormal working conditions were investigated. The corrosion behavior of 308L stainless steel were studied by using autoclave in different contents of Cl - solutions, and these samples were observed and analyzed by means of the metalloscope and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results show that no pitting, crevice and stress corrosion occurred, when the content of Cl - was lower than 1 mg/L at the temperatures of 270℃ and the pressure of 5.5 MPa. However, with the increase of the content of Cl - , the susceptibility to pitting, crevice and stress corrosion of 308L was enhanced remarkably. (authors)

  3. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Kori-1 RPV Beltline Weld for a Long-Term Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bong-Sang; Kim, Min-Chul; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Kim, Byung-Chul; Hong, Jun-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of RPV (reactor pressure vessel) material is the most important aging issue for a long-term operation of nuclear power plants. KORI unit 1, which is the first PWR in Korea, is approaching its initial licensing life of 30 years. In order to operate the reactor for another 10 years and more, it should be demonstrated that the irradiation embrittlement of the reactor will be adequately managed by ensuring that the fracture toughness properties have a certain level of the safety margin. The current regulation requires Charpy V-notch impact data through conventional surveillance tests. It is based on the assumption that Charpy impact test results are well correlated with the fracture toughness properties of many engineering steels. However, Charpy V-notch impact data may not be adequate to estimate the fracture toughness of certain materials, such as Linde 80 welds. During the last decade, a tremendous number of fracture toughness data on many RPV steels have been produced in accordance with the new standard test method, the so-called master curve method. ASTM E1921 represents a revolutionary advance in characterizing fracture toughness of RPV steels, since it permits establishing the ductile to brittle transition portion of the fracture toughness curve with direct measurements on a relatively small number of relatively small specimens, such as pre-cracked Charpy specimens. Actual fracture toughness data from many different RPV steels revealed that the Charpy test estimations are generally conservative with the exception of a few cases. Recent regulation codes in USA permit the master curve fracture toughness methodology in evaluating an irradiation embrittlement of commercial nuclear reactor vessels

  4. Study of the flux effect nature for VVER-1000 RPV welds with high nickel content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleshova, E.A., E-mail: evgenia-orm@yandex.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe Highway 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gurovich, B.A.; Lavrukhina, Z.V.; Maltsev, D.A.; Fedotova, S.V.; Frolov, A.S.; Zhuchkov, G.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    This work extends the research of the basic regularities of segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The paper considers the influence of irradiation with different fast neutron fluxes on the structure, yield strength and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (T{sub K}) changes as well as on changes of the share of brittle intergranular fracture and development of segregation processes in the VVER-1000 RPV weld metal (WM). The obtained experimental results allow to separate the contribution of the hardening and non-hardening mechanisms to mechanical properties degradation of material irradiated at the operating temperature. It is shown that the difference in T{sub K} shift in WM irradiated to the same fluence with different fast neutron fluxes is mainly due to the difference in the GB accumulation kinetics of impurities and only to a small extent due to the material hardening. Phosphorus bulk diffusion coefficients were evaluated for the temperature exposure, accelerated irradiation and irradiation within surveillance specimens (SS) using a kinetic model of phosphorus GB accumulation in low-alloyed low-carbon steels under the influence of operational factors. The correlation between the GB segregation level of phosphorus and nickel, and the T{sub K} shift - in WM SS was obtained experimentally and indicates the non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels throughout its extended lifetime. - Highlights: • Structural elements in high Ni welds are studied at different irradiation fluxes. • AES study demonstrated different P GB kinetics at different irradiation fluxes. • Hardening and non-hardening mechanism contributions to the flux effect are assessed. • Correlation between ΔT{sub K} and P and Ni GB content is shown for VVER-1000 RPV welds.

  5. Validation of software components for the prediction of irradiation-induced damage of RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, Frank; Birkenheuer, Uwe; Ulbricht, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    The modelling of irradiation-induced damage of RPV steels from primary cascades up to the change of mechanical properties bridging length scales from the atomic level up to the macro-scale and time scales up to years contributes essentially to an improved understanding of the phenomenon of neutron embrittlement. In future modelling may become a constituent of the procedure to evaluate RPV safety. The selected two-step approach is based upon the coupling of a rate-theory module aimed at simulating the evolution of the size distribution of defect-solute clusters with a hardening module aimed at predicting the yield stress increase. The scope of the investigation consists in the development and validation of corresponding numerical tools. In order to validate these tools, the output of representative simulations is compared with results from small-angle neutron scattering experiments and tensile tests performed for neutron-irradiated RPV steels. Using the developed rate-theory module it is possible to simulate the evolution of size, concentration and composition of mixed Cu-vacancy clusters over the relevant ranges of size up to 10.000 atoms and time up to tens of years. The connection between the rate-theory model and hardening is based upon both the mean spacing and the strength of obstacles for dislocation glide. As a result of the validation procedure of the numerical tools, we have found that essential trends of the irradiation-induced yield stress increase of Cu-bearing and low-Cu RPV steels are displayed correctly. First ideas on how to take into account the effect of Ni on both cluster evolution and hardening are worked out.

  6. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists` meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J. [comps.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists` meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  7. Results of performance testing the Russian RPV temperature measurement probe used for annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakos, J.T.; Selsky, S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper provides information on three (3) topics related to temperature measurements in an annealing procedure: (1) results of a series of experiments performed by CNIITMASH of the Russian consortium MOHT on their reactor pressure vessel (RPV) temperature measurement probe, (2) a discussion regarding uncertainties and errors in RPV temperature measurements, and (3) predictions from a thermal model of a spherical RPV temperature measurement probe. MOHT teamed with MPR Associates and was to perform the Annealing Demonstration Project (ADP) on behalf of the US Department of Energy, ESEERCo, EPRI, CRIEPI, Framatome, and Consumers Power Co. at the Midland plant. Experimental results show that the CNIITMASH probe errors are a maximum of about 27 C (49 F) during a 15 C/hr (27 F/hr) heat-up but only about 3 C (5.4 F) (0.6%) during the hold portion at 470 C (878 F). These errors are much smaller than those obtained from a similar series of experiments performed by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The discussion about uncertainties and errors shows that results presented as a temperature difference provides a measure of the probe error. Qualitative agreement is shown between the model predictions, the experimental results of the CNIITMASH probe and the experimental results of a series of similar experiments performed by Sandia

  8. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists' meeting on cracking in LWR RPV head penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Raney, S.J.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains 17 papers that were presented in four sessions at the IAEA Specialists' meeting on Cracking in LWR RPV Head Penetrations held at ASTM Headquarters in Philadelphia on May 2-3, 1995. The papers are compiled here in the order that presentations were made in the sessions, and they relate to operational observations, inspection techniques, analytical modeling, and regulatory control. The goal of the meeting was to allow international experts to review experience in the field of ensuring adequate performance of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) heads and penetrations. The emphasis was to allow a better understanding of RPV material behavior, to provide guidance supporting reliability and adequate performance, and to assist in defining directions for further investigations. The international nature of the meeting is illustrated by the fact that papers were presented by researchers from 10 countries. There were technical experts present form other countries who participated in discussions of the results presented. This present document incorporates the final version of the papers as received from the authors. The final chapter includes conclusions and recommendations. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  9. Effect of lead factors on the embrittlement of RPV SA-508 cl 3 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempf, Rodolfo, E-mail: kempf@cnea.gov.ar [CNEA, Unidad Actividad Combustibles Nucleares, División Caracterización, Avda. Gral Paz 1499, C.P.B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Troiani, Horacio, E-mail: troiani@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Bariloche (CNEA) e Instituto Balseiro (UNCU), CONICET, Av. Bustillo 9500, CP 8400, Rio Negro (Argentina); Fortis, Ana Maria, E-mail: fortis@cnea.gov.ar [CNEA, Departamento Estructura y Comportamiento, UNSAM, Avda. Gral Paz 1499, C.P.B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-03-15

    This paper presents a project to study the effect of lead factors on the mechanical behaviour of the SA-508 type 3 Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steel used in the reactor under construction Atucha II in Argentina. Charpy-V notch specimens of this steel were irradiated at the RA1 experimental reactor at a temperature of 275 °C with two lead factors (186 and 93). The neutron flux was 3.71 × 10{sup 15} n m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and 1.85 × 10{sup 15} n m{sup −2} s{sup −1} (E > 1 MeV) respectively. In both cases, the fluence was 6.6 × 10{sup 21} n m{sup −2}, which is equivalent to that received by the PHWR Atucha II RPV in 10 years of full power irradiation. The results of Charpy tests revealed significant embrittlement both in the ΔT = 14 °C and ΔT = 21 °C shifts of the ductile–brittle transition temperatures (DBTT) and in the reduction of the maximum energy absorbed. This result shows that the shift of the DBTT with a lead factor of 93 is larger than that obtained with a lead factor of 186. Then, the results of irradiation in experimental reactors (MTR) with high lead factors may not be conservative with respect to the actual RPV embrittlement.

  10. Estimation of RPV material embrittlement for Ukrainian NPP based on surveillance test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revka, V.; Chyrko, L.; Chaikovsky, Yu.; Gulchuk, Yu.

    2012-01-01

    The WWER-1000 RPV material embrittlement has been evaluated using the surveillance test data for the nuclear power plant which is under operation in Ukraine. The RPV materials after the neutron (E > 0,5 MeV) irradiation up to fluence of 22,9.10 22 m -2 have been studied. Fracture toughness tests were performed using pre-cracked Charpy specimens for the beltline materials (base and weld metal). The maximum shift of T 0 reference temperature is equal to 44 o C. A radiation embrittlement rate, A F , for the RPV materials was estimated using the standard and reconstituted specimens. A comparison of the A F values has shown a good agreement between the specimen sets before and after reconstitution both for base and weld metal. Furthermore it has been revealed there is no nickel effect for the studied materials. In spite of the high nickel content the radiation embrittlement rate for weld metal is not higher than for base metal with low nickel content. Fracture toughness analysis has shown the Master curve shape describes well a temperature dependence of K Jc values. However a higher scatter of K Jc values is observed in comparison to 95 % tolerance bounds. (author)

  11. Structural Integrity Assessment of VVER-1000 RPV under Accidental Cool down Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastav, V.; Sen, R.N.; Yadav, R.S.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion, Fatigue and Irradiation embrittlement are the major degradation mechanisms responsible for ageing of RPV (and its internals) of a Pressurized Water Reactor. While corrosion and fatigue can generate cracks, irradiation damage can lead to brittle fracture initiating from these cracks. Ageing in nuclear power plants needs to be managed so as to ensure that design functions remain available throughout the life of the plant. From safety perspective, this implies that ageing degradation of systems, structures and components important to safety remain within acceptable limits. Reactor Pressure Vessel has been identified as the highest priority key component in plant life management for Pressurized Water Reactors. Therefore special attention is required to ensure its structural integrity during its lifetime. In this paper, structural integrity assessment for typical VVER-1000 RPV is carried out under severe accidental cool down transients using the Finite Element Method. Three different accidental scenarios are postulated and safety of the vessel is conservatively assessed under these transients using the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics approach. Transient thermo mechanical stress analysis of the core belt region of the RPV is carried out in presence of postulated cracks and stress intensity factors are calculated and compared with the material fracture toughness to assess the structural integrity of the vessel. The paper also include some parametric analyses to justify the methodology. (author)

  12. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasikov, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated

  13. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasikov, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 o C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 o C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 o C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which, together with associated management methods, will help

  14. Controlling RPV embrittlement through wet annealing in support of life attainment and life extension decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasikov, E. A. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    As a main barrier against radioactivity outlet reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is a key component in terms of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety. Therefore present-day demands in RPV reliability enhance have to be met by all possible actions for RPV in-service embrittlement mitigation. Annealing treatment is known to be the effective measure to restore the RPV metal properties deteriorated by neutron irradiation. Low temperature 'wet' annealing at a maximum coolant temperature which can be obtained using the reactor core or primary circuit pumps, although it cannot be expected to produce complete recovery, is more attractive from the practical point of view especially in cases when the removal of the internals is impossible. As a rule there is no recovery effect up to annealing and irradiation temperature difference of 70 deg. C. It is known, however, that along with radiation embrittlement neutron irradiation may mitigate the radiation damage in metals. Therefore we have tried to test the possibility to use the effect of radiation-induced ductilization in 'wet' annealing technology by means of nuclear heat utilization as heat and neutron irradiation sources at once. In support of the above-mentioned conception the 3-year duration reactor experiment on 15Cr3NiMoV type steel with preliminary irradiation at operating Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at 270 deg. C and following extra irradiation (87 h at 330 deg. C) at IR-8 test reactor was fulfilled. In fact, embrittlement was partly suppressed up to value equivalent to 1,5 fold neutron fluence decrease. The degree of recovery in case of radiation enhanced annealing is equal to 27% whereas furnace annealing results in zero effect under existing conditions. Mechanism of the radiation-induced damage mitigation is proposed. It is hoped that 'wet' annealing technology will help provide a better management of the RPV degradation as a factor affecting the lifetime of nuclear power plants which

  15. Genomic and proteomic analysis of Schizaphis graminum reveals cyclophilin proteins are involved in the transmission of cereal yellow dwarf virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Tamborindeguy

    Full Text Available Yellow dwarf viruses cause the most economically important virus diseases of cereal crops worldwide and are transmitted by aphid vectors. The identification of aphid genes and proteins mediating virus transmission is critical to develop agriculturally sustainable virus management practices and to understand viral strategies for circulative movement in all insect vectors. Two cyclophilin B proteins, S28 and S29, were identified previously in populations of Schizaphisgraminum that differed in their ability to transmit the RPV strain of Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV-RPV. The presence of S29 was correlated with F2 genotypes that were efficient virus transmitters. The present study revealed the two proteins were isoforms, and a single amino acid change distinguished S28 and S29. The distribution of the two alleles was determined in 12 F2 genotypes segregating for CYDV-RPV transmission capacity and in 11 genetically independent, field-collected S. graminum biotypes. Transmission efficiency for CYDV-RPV was determined in all genotypes and biotypes. The S29 isoform was present in all genotypes or biotypes that efficiently transmit CYDV-RPV and more specifically in genotypes that efficiently transport virus across the hindgut. We confirmed a direct interaction between CYDV-RPV and both S28 and S29 using purified virus and bacterially expressed, his-tagged S28 and S29 proteins. Importantly, S29 failed to interact with a closely related virus that is transported across the aphid midgut. We tested for in vivo interactions using an aphid-virus co-immunoprecipitation strategy coupled with a bottom-up LC-MS/MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. This analysis enabled us to identify a third cyclophilin protein, cyclophilin A, interacting directly or in complex with purified CYDV-RPV. Taken together, these data provide evidence that both cyclophilin A and B interact with CYDV-RPV, and these interactions may be important but not sufficient to mediate

  16. Development and Characterization of A Multiplexed RT-PCR Species Specific Assay for Bovine and one for Porcine Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Rule-Out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S M; Danganan, L; Tammero, L; Vitalis, B; Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-arani, P; Hindson, B

    2007-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) has developed candidate multiplexed assays that may potentially be used within the National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (Ames, Iowa) and the Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC). This effort has the ability to improve our nation's capability to discriminate between foreign animal diseases and those that are endemic using a single assay, thereby increasing our ability to protect food and agricultural resources with a diagnostic test which could enhance the nation's capabilities for early detection of a foreign animal disease. In FY2005 with funding from the DHS, LLNL developed the first version (Version 1.0) of a multiplexed (MUX) nucleic-acid-based RT-PCR assay that included signatures for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) detection with rule-out tests for two other foreign animal diseases (FADs) of swine, Vesicular Exanthema of Swine (VESV) and Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), and four other domestic viral diseases Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV), Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1), Bluetongue virus (BTV) and Parapox virus complex (which includes Bovine Papular Stomatitis Virus [BPSV], Orf of sheep, and Pseudocowpox). In FY06, LLNL has developed Bovine and Porcine species-specific panel which included existing signatures from Version 1.0 panel as well as new signatures. The MUX RT-PCR porcine assay for detection of FMDV includes the FADs, VESV and SVD in addition to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). LLNL has also developed a MUX RT-PCR bovine assay for detection of FMDV with rule out tests for the two bovine FADs malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), rinderpest virus (RPV) and the domestic diseases vesicular stomatitis

  17. Fracture mechanics analysis and evaluation for the RPV of the Chinese Qinshan 300 MW NPP and PTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yinbiao; Isozaki, Toshikuni

    2000-03-01

    One of the most severe accident conditions of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in service is the loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Cold safety injection water is pumped into the downcomer of the RPV through inlet nozzles, while the internal pressure may remain at high level. Such an accident is called pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient according to 10 CFR 50.61 definition. This paper illustrates the fracture mechanics analysis for the existing RPV of the Chinese Qinshan 300 MW nuclear power plant (NPP) under the postulated PTS transients that include SB-LOCA, LB-LOCA of Qinshan NPP and Rancho Seco transients. 3-D models with the flaw depth range a/w=0.05∼0.9 (a: flaw depth; w: wall thickness) were used to probe what kind of flaw and what kind of transient are most dangerous for the RPV in the end of life (EOF). Both the elastic and elastic-plastic material models were used in the stress analysis and fracture mechanics analysis. The different types of flaw and the influence of the stainless steel cladding on the fracture analysis were investigated for different PTS transients. comparing with the material initiation crack toughness K IC , the fracture evaluation for the RPV in question under PTS transients are performed in this paper. (author)

  18. Influence of segregations and hydrogen flakes on the mechanical properties of forged RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselt, C.C.; May, J.; Hein, H.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of relevant 1970s/80s German research programs (e.g. FKS research program on component safety and others), many investigations on large forgings manufactured from Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) materials such as 20 MnMoNi 5 5 and 22 NiMoCr 3 7 have been performed. Lately, after ultrasonic testing hydrogen flakes in connection with segregation zones have been observed in a few RPV forgings. The earlier R and D programs contained a number of special heats, which covered a defined defect state (lower bound heats) with relevance to the recent observations of numerous UT indications in RPV forgings of two PWRs. Therefore, the results of these former research programs were now reviewed. The studies included an evaluation of the effects of macro/micro segregations as well as hydrogen flakes on the mechanical properties. As part of the mechanical technological experiments Charpy impact tests in different orientations (e.g. L-T, T-L and S-T) together with fracture mechanics and large scale tensile tests were carried out in segregated and non segregated material zones. In this context the letters L,T,S indicate the longitudinal, transversal and short transverse (thickness) direction with respect to rolling direction of the forging axis. The first letter indicates the direction of the principal stress, while the second letter stands for the crack propagation direction [1]. Furthermore the irradiation behavior of segregated material regions was analyzed and compared to non segregated material regions. Key results of these analyses indicate that in most cases upper shelf levels are lowered in segregated material parts compared to non segregated areas. In addition the segregations cause a larger scattering of impact energies. A high hydrogen content in combination with segregations has overall detrimental effects on the mechanical properties. However, there seems to be no specific segregation influence on the materials' irradiation reaction.

  19. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Laurence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Jin-Yeon [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Qu, Jisnmin [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wall, Joe [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-11-02

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor – a sensor that can continuously monitor a material’s damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks: (1

  20. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Techniques to Monitor Radiation Damage in RPV and Internal Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Laurence; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jisnmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Wall, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate that nonlinear ultrasonics (NLU) can be used to directly and quantitatively measure the remaining life in radiation damaged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and internal components. Specific damage types to be monitored are irradiation embrittlement and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Our vision is to develop a technique that allows operators to assess damage by making a limited number of NLU measurements in strategically selected critical reactor components during regularly scheduled outages. This measured data can then be used to determine the current condition of these key components, from which remaining useful life can be predicted. Methods to unambiguously characterize radiation related damage in reactor internals and RPVs remain elusive. NLU technology has demonstrated great potential to be used as a material sensor - a sensor that can continuously monitor a material's damage state. The physical effect being monitored by NLU is the generation of higher harmonic frequencies in an initially monochromatic ultrasonic wave. The degree of nonlinearity is quantified with the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β, which is an absolute, measurable material constant. Recent research has demonstrated that nonlinear ultrasound can be used to characterize material state and changes in microscale characteristics such as internal stress states, precipitate formation and dislocation densities. Radiation damage reduces the fracture toughness of RPV steels and internals, and can leave them susceptible to IASCC, which may in turn limit the lifetimes of some operating reactors. The ability to characterize radiation damage in the RPV and internals will enable nuclear operators to set operation time thresholds for vessels and prescribe and schedule replacement activities for core internals. Such a capability will allow a more clear definition of reactor safety margins. The research consists of three tasks

  1. Mechanical properties and microstructure of long term thermal aged WWER 440 RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolluri, M., E-mail: kolluri@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kryukov, A. [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation); Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hähner, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Petrosyan, V. [Armenian Scientific Research Institute for Nuclear Plant Operation (ARMATOM), 0027 Yerevan (Armenia); Sevikyan, G. [Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP), 0911, Metsamor, Armavir Marz (Armenia); Szaraz, Z. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-04-01

    The integrity assessment of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is essential for the safe and Long Term Operation (LTO) of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Hardening and embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation and thermal ageing are main reasons for mechanical properties degradation during the operation of an NPP. The thermal ageing-induced degradation of RPV steels becomes more significant with extended operational lives of NPPs. Consequently, the evaluation of thermal ageing effects is important for the structural integrity assessments required for the lifetime extension of NPPs. As a part of NRG's research programme on Structural Materials for safe-LTO of Light Water Reactor (LWR) RPVs, WWER-440 surveillance specimens, which have been thermal aged for 27 years (∼200,000 h) at 290 °C in a surveillance channel of Armenian-NPP, are investigated. Results from the mechanical and microstructural examination of these thermal aged specimens are presented in this article. The results indicate the absence of significant long term thermal ageing effect of 15Cr2MoV-A steel. No age hardening was detected in aged tensile specimens compared with the as-received condition. There is no difference between the impact properties of as-received and thermal aged weld metals. The upper shelf energy of the aged steel remains the same as for the as-received material at a rather high level of about 120 J. The T{sub 41} value did not change and was found to be about 10 °C. The microstructure of thermal aged weld, consisting carbides, carbonitrides and manganese-silicon inclusions, did not change significantly compared to as-received state. Grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus in long term aged weld is not significant either which has been confirmed by the absence of intergranular fracture increase in the weld. Negligible hardening and embrittlement observed after such long term thermal ageing is attributed to the optimum chemical composition of 15Cr2MoV-A for high

  2. RUPTHER - an original experimental approach for creep failure study of RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainte Catherine, C.; Mongabure, Ph.; Cotoni, V.; Nicolas, L.; Devos, J.

    1998-01-01

    Rupter (Rupture Under Thermal Conditions) experiment is designed in order to get validated models for the degradation of RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) bottom head in case of a severe accident with corium flow. A simple experimental testing device has been designed in order to perform realistic thermo-mechanical loading on a cylinder. It is externally heated in its central part by induction (max. 1300 deg C) giving an axial thermal gradient. The cylinder is then mechanically loaded by internal pressure (max. 100 bars) until failure occurrence. (authors)

  3. Ultrasonic measurement on RPV stud-bolt loading under hot transient of Qinshan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jiadi; Dou Yikang; Zhu Shiming; Lu Jie; Wang Yingguan

    1994-01-01

    It is a continuation of research work for sealing analysis and tests on the PRV of PWR. It expounds that the key of solving thermal transient sealing problem lies in giving the thermal increment of stud-bolt fatigue life and transient loading spectrum for vessel analysis. The authors recounted the fundamental works and main results of ultrasonic measurement on RPV stud-bolt loading on the reactor of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant. The measuring capability exceeds 1 m length and 300 degree C temperature. Therefore, it is possible to be used in the field of NPP

  4. comparison of elastic-plastic FE method and engineering method for RPV fracture mechanics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yingxue; Zheng Bin; Zhang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    This paper described the FE analysis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for a crack in RPV belt line using ABAQUS code. It calculated and evaluated the stress intensity factor and J integral of crack under PTS transients. The result is also compared with that by engineering analysis method. It shows that the results using engineering analysis method is a little larger than the results using FE analysis of 3D elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, thus the engineering analysis method is conservative than the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics method. (authors)

  5. Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV) Two versus Three Level Maintenance Support Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-15

    Abri:.ms ML-C, Technic:al Arid lysi!;&2jp7 f D~onnie Joyce Al ler Ad:va-.ncecd Sys.tems Coric epts oft ic.e, -,Je etaty Robo r t Bac-et RPV Pti...en ter, Al TN Conccept,-* & [h ct norii ’’ t Fort Lee, VA 2D501 ,c ient f ii: Advisor , ATIN: ATCI. SP(A, At my C eq 1 t mPFr [ pp Ft VA :27: C.1. Do

  6. Strain measurement and analysis for the RPV of Qinshan NPP (unit I) at primary system hydrostatic test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Jiadi; Wang Peizhu; Xie Shiqiu; Chen Renchang; Sheng Xianke; Dou Yikang; Zhao Weiliang

    1994-01-01

    Hydrostatic test for RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) is not only a means to inspect the vessels and the associated systems but also an important way to verify the results of mechanical analysis. The loading obtained by measurement is useful for the establishment of loading spectrum. Some discussions on the shop hydrostatic test planning for the RPV of Qinshan NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) performed in Japan are presented. Comparisons between the results of hydrostatic test provided by vendor and those of primary system hydrostatic test conducted at Qinshan Site are also given. Some data obtained at Qinshan Site such as actual loading and technical data of the stud-bolt, are listed. The results of measurement for the flange rotation, important for the sealing characteristics of RPV, are specifically discussed. The authors point out some of the mistakes in the results of the shop hydrostatic test

  7. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  8. Shallow crack effect on brittle fracture of RPV during pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the study on behaviour of postulated shallow surface cracks in embrittled reactor pressure vessel subjected to pressurised thermal shock loading in an emergency core cooling. The study is related to the pressure vessel of a VVER-440 type reactor. Instead of a conventional fracture parameter like stress intensity factor or J integral the maximum principal stress distribution on a crack tip area is used as a fracture criteria. The postulated cracks locate circumferentially at the inner surface of the reactor pressure wall and they penetrate the cladding layer and open to the inner surface. Axisymmetric and semielliptical crack shapes were studied. Load is formed of an internal pressure acting also on crack faces and of a thermal gradient in the pressure vessel wall. Physical properties of material and loading data correspond real conditions in VVER-440 RPV. The study was carried out by making lot of 2D- and 3D- finite element calculations. Analysing principles and computer programs are explained. Except of studying the shallow crack effect, one objective of the study has also been to develop further expertise and the in-house developed computing system to make effectively elastic-plastic fracture mechanical analyses for real structures under complicated loads. Though the study concerns VVER-440 RPV, the results are of more general interest especially related to thermal loads. (orig.) (11 refs.)

  9. Neutron flux effect on the fracture toughness behavior of Tihange-III RPV material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, R.; Chaouadi, R.; Bertolis, D.

    2015-01-01

    The question whether material test reactor (MTR) data can be used to supplement power reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance data is still debated in the international community and its implications are particularly important in the perspective of long term operation (LTO). However, addressing the flux effect can be confusing if specific material and irradiation variables are not taken into account. This means that the answer to whether there is flux effect or not is neither 'no' nor 'yes' without specifying the application range. Indeed, neutron flux effect was recognized to occur in high Cu-containing steels in the low fluence range. But at high fluence, relevant for long term operation, it becomes difficult to clearly distinguish the differences between high flux and low flux. In this work, we irradiated the low Cu base metal and weld of the Tihange-III surveillance coupon in the BR2 reactor at high flux. The BR2 flux is about two orders of magnitude higher than the flux in the surveillance position. Tensile, Charpy impact and fracture toughness tests were performed on both the surveillance and MTR specimens and compared to assess the neutron flux effect. The results confirm that, at high fluence levels, the flux effect on mechanical properties is not significant, offering therefore the possibility of accelerated irradiation to investigate RPV embrittlement in the high fluence regime relevant for long term operation. (authors)

  10. Correlation between microstructural features and mechanical properties of irradiated LONGLIFE RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, M.; Hermandez-Mayoral, E.; Bergner, F.; Viehrig, H.W.; Altstadt, E.; Radiguet, B.; Lim, J.H.; Grovenor, C.R.M.; Meslin, E.; Van Renterghem, W.; Chaouadi, R.; Ortner, S.; Hein, H.; Gillemot, F.; Todeschini, P.; Planman, T.; Wilford, K.; Kocik, J.; Brumovsky, M.; Ruoden, J.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of extending the operational life of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) up to 80 years presents the problem of the availability of materials irradiated at high neutron fluence and low neutron flux. The ability of the existing trend curves to predict high fluence embrittlement is a question of debate, and a critical analysis of these curves should be based on a consistent microstructural examination of irradiated materials. Within the LONGLIFE 7FWP, neutron irradiated RPV materials, relevant for long term operation, some of them coming from surveillance programs, have been characterized by means of a combination of microstructural techniques (APT, SANS, TEM) and mechanical tests (hardness, tensile, impact and fracture toughness). In this paper the analysis of the links between microstructural features (solute nano-clusters, dislocation loops and voids) and hardening and embrittlement measurements by mechanical testing, is presented. Current hardening models, based on the contribution of precipitates, or nano-clusters, seem to underestimate irradiation hardening for very high fluences, mainly when matrix damage (dislocation loops) is observed. Regarding chemical composition effects, the predominant role of Ni and the synergism between Ni-Mn and Si are also identified. Low-Cu alloys show a threshold value of radiation induced features to produce an effect on mechanical properties which calls for further in-depth analyses. (authors)

  11. Comparison of irradiated and hydrogen implanted German RPV steels using PAS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecko, Stanislav, E-mail: stanislav.pecko@stuba.sk; Sojak, Stanislav; Slugeň, Vladimír

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • German RPV steels were originally studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. • Neutron irradiated and hydrogen ion implanted specimens were studied. • Both irradiation ways caused to increase of defect size. • We determined that the defect size was higher in implanted specimens. - Abstract: Radiation degradation of nuclear materials can be experimentally simulated via ion implantation. In our case, German reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This spectroscopic method is a really effective tool for the evaluation of microstructural changes and for the analysis of degradation of reactor steels due to irradiation. German commercial reactor pressure vessel steels, originally from CARISMA program, were used in our study. The German experimental reactor VAK was selected as the proper irradiation facility in the 1980s. A specimen in as-received state and 2 different irradiated cuts from the same material were measured by PALS and size of defects with their intensity was indentified. Afterwards there was prepared an experiment with concern in simulation of neutron irradiation by hydrogen ion implantation on a linear accelerator with energy of 100 keV. Results are concerning on comparison between defects caused by neutron irradiation and hydrogen implantation. The size and intensity of defects reached a similar level as in the specimens irradiated in the nuclear reactor due to hydrogen ions implantation.

  12. Fracture assessment of weld material from a full-thickness clad RPV shell segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    Fracture analysis was applied to full-thickness clad beam specimens containing shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) at beginning of life. The beam specimens were fabricated from a section of an RPV wall (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include gradients of material properties and residual stresses due to welding and cladding applications. Fracture toughness estimates were obtained from load vs load-line displacement and load vs crack-mouth-opening displacement data using finite-element methods and estimation schemes based on the η-factor method. One of the beams experienced a significant amount of precleavage stable ductile tearing. Effects of precleavage tearing on estimates of fracture toughness were investigated using continuum damage models. Fracture toughness results from the clad beam specimens were compared with other deep- and shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) data generated previously from A533 Grade B plate material. Range of scatter for the clad beam data is consistent with that from the laboratory-scale SENB specimens tested at the same temperature

  13. Effect of solute elements on hardening of thermally-aged RPV model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomoto, A.; Nishida, K.; Dohi, K.; Soneda, N.; Liu, L.; Sekimura, N.; Li, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Embrittlement correlation methods for irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been developed worldwide to predict the amount of embrittlement during plant operation. The effect of chemical composition on embrittlement is not fully understood, particularly the process of solute atom behavior during solute atom formation. In this series of slides we report the results of thermal ageing experiments of RPV model alloys in order to obtain information on the effect of chemical composition on the hardening process. We can draw the following conclusions. First, the addition of Ni or Si alone to Fe-Cu model alloys does not have clear effect but the addition of Mn to Fe-Cu-Ni alloy accelerates the cluster formation and hardening drastically, the effect of composition on the cluster strength is not clear. Secondly, the hardening process before the hardening peak has linear correlation with APT (Atom Probe Tomography) results and the RSS (Root-Sum-Square)sum model seems to explain the relationship between increase in hardness and APT data in a more consistent manner

  14. Development of the processing software package for RPV neutron fluence determination methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousov, S.; Kirilova, K.; Ilieva, K.

    2001-01-01

    According to the INRNE methodology the neutron transport calculation is carried out by two steps. At the first step reactor core eigenvalue calculation is performed. This calculation is used for determination of the fixed source for the next step calculation of neutron transport from the reactor core to the RPV. Both calculation steps are performed by state of the art and tested codes. The interface software package DOSRC developed at INRNE is used as a link between these two calculations. The package transforms reactor core calculation results to neutron source input data in format appropriate for the neutron transport codes (DORT, TORT and ASYNT) based on the discrete ordinates method. These codes are applied for calculation of the RPV neutron flux and its responses - induced activity, radiation damage, neutron fluence etc. Fore more precise estimation of the neutron fluence, the INRNE methodology has been supplemented by the next improvements: - implementation of more advanced codes (PYTHIA/DERAB) for neutron-physics parameter calculations; - more detailed neutron source presentation; - verification of neutron fluence by statistically treated experimental data. (author)

  15. Comparison report of RPV pressurised thermal shock - international comparative assessment study (PTS ICAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A summary of the recently completed International Comparative Assessment Study of Pressurized- Thermal-Shock in Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV PTS ICAS) is presented here to record the results in actual and comparative fashions. The ICAS Project brought together an international group of experts from research, utility and regulatory organizations to perform a comparative evaluation of analysis methodologies employed in the assessment of RPV integrity under PTS loading conditions. The Project was sponsored jointly by Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS), Koeln, Germany, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA, with assistance from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)/Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI)/Principal Working Group (PWG) No. 3 (Integrity of Components and Structures). The ICAS Project grew out of a strong interest expressed by participants in the previous FALSIRE II Project to proceed with further evaluations of analysis methods used in RPV integrity assessment. A Launch Meeting for the ICAS Project was held at GRS-Koeln, during June 1996, where an emphasis was placed on identifying the different approaches to RPV integrity assessment being employed within the international nuclear technology community. Also a Problem Statement was drafted that defined a Western type four-loop RPV with cladding on the inner surface. Also, a detailed task matrix was defined that included a set of transient thermal-mechanical loading conditions postulated to result from loss-of-coolant accidents. The primary focus of the analyses was on the behaviour of relatively shallow cracks under these conditions. The assessment activities based on the Problem Statement were divided under three tasks: deterministic fracture mechanics (DFM), probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) and thermal-hydraulic mixing (THM). An Intermediate Workshop was held at OECD/NEA-Paris during June 1997, to

  16. Analysis of the necessity for inserting new surveillance capsule into the Kori Unit 1 RPV to monitor material fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Taek Ho

    2007-01-01

    In association with monitoring of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) fracture toughness, surveillance capsule test specimens have been used to monitor the material property of nuclear reactor vessel. As far as Kori Unit 1 is concerned, 6 capsules were put into the vessel before commercial operation of the plant. Up to now, all the six capsules have been withdrawn to test and monitor the fracture toughness of RPV material. The last capsule has been withdrawn on June this year, and the Kori unit 1 has been shut downed since July 2007 and will be shut downed until December this year for about 6 months, preparing the life extension of the plant to operate the plant 10 more years. With the situation that all the surveillance capsules have been withdrawn, public ask the following question, 'To extend the life of Kori Unit 1 more than 10 years, is it necessary to insert new surveillance capsules into the Kori Unit 1 to monitor RPV material fracture toughness?' In connection with this issue, planning project have been carried out since spring this year. In this paper, it is described that inserting new surveillance capsule into the Kori Unit 1 RPV has some meaning in some public acceptance point of view and is not necessary in material engineering point of view

  17. Progress in RPV-examination of the Chooz-A vessel (and the French procedures, its new developments (MIS5))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samman, J; Martin, E; Lacroix, R [Electricite de France (EDF), 93 - Saint-Denis (France). Groupe des Labs.

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the French Chooz-A reactor. It describes the method used for in-service inspection of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). The ultrasonic testing procedure is described, showing its advantages and limitations. The supplementary ultrasonic examination is also described, as well as the validation of underclad cracks detection and sizing. Historical data is also provided. (TEC).

  18. Irradiation Embrittlement Monitoring Programs of RPV's in the Slovak Republic NPP's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupca, Ludovik

    2006-01-01

    Four types of surveillance programs were (are) realized in Slovak NPP's: 'Standard Surveillance Specimen Program' (SSSP) was finished in Jaslovske Bohunice V-2 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Units 3 and 4, 'Extended Surveillance Specimen Program' (ESSP), was prepared for Jaslovske Bohunice NPP V-2 with aim to validate the SSSP results, For the Mochovce NPP Unit 1 and 2 was prepared completely new surveillance program 'Modern Surveillance Specimen Program' (MSSP), based on the philosophy that the results of MSSP must be available during all NPP service life, For the Bohunice V-1 NPP was finished 'New Surveillance Specimen Program' (NSSP) coordinated by IAEA, which gave arguments for prolongation of service life these units for minimum 20 years, New Advanced Surveillance Specimen Program (ASSP) for Bohunice V-2 NPP (units 3 and 4) and Mochovce NPP (units 1, 2) is approved now. ASSP is dealing with the irradiation embrittlement of heat affected zone (HAZ) and RPV's austenitic cladding, which were not evaluated till this time in surveillance programs. SSSP started in 1979 and was finished in 1990. ESSP program started in 1995 and will be finished in 2007, was prepared with aim of: increasing of neutron fluence measurement accuracy, substantial improvement the irradiation temperature measurement, fixed orientation of samples to the centre of the reactor core, minimum differences of neutron dose for all the Charpy-V notch and COD specimens, the dose rate effect evaluation. In the year 1996 was started the new surveillance specimen program for the Mochovce RPV's unit-1 and 2, based on the fundamental postulate - to provide the irradiation embrittlement monitoring till the end of units operation. The 'New Surveillance Specimen Program' (NSSP) prepared in the year 1999 for the Bohunice V-1 NPP was finished in the year 2004. Main goal of this program was to evaluate the weld material properties degradation due to the irradiation and recovery efficiency by annealing too. The

  19. Modelling of RPV lower head under core melt severe accident condition using OpenFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madokoro, Hiroshi; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei

    2017-01-01

    Although six years have been passed since the tragic severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi, still large uncertainties exist in modeling of core degradation and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. It is extremely important to obtain a better understanding of complex phenomena in the lower head in order to improve accident management measures. The possible failure mode of reactor pressure vessel and its failure time are especially a matter of importance. Thermal behavior of the molten pool can be simulated by the Phase-change Effective Convectivity Model (PECM), which is a distributed-parameter model developed in the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden. The model calculates convective currents not using a pure CFD approach but based on so called “characteristic velocities” that are determined by empirical correlations depending on the geometry and physical properties of the molten pool. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the PECM has been implemented in the open-source CFD software OpenFOAM in order to receive detailed predictions of a core melt behavior in the RPV lower head under severe accident conditions. An advantage of using OpenFOAM is that it is very flexible to add and modify models and physical properties. In the current work, the solver is extended to couple PECM with a structure analysis model of the vessel wall. The model considers thermal expansion, plasticity, creep and damage. The model and physical properties are based on those implemented in ANSYS. Although the previous implementation had restriction that the amount of and geometry of the melt cannot be changed, our coupled model allows flexibility of the melt amount and geometry. The extended solver was used to simulate the LIVE-L1 and -L7V experiments and has demonstrated good prediction of the temperature distribution in the molten pool and heat flux distribution through the vessel wall. Regarding the vessel failure the model was applied to one of the FOREVER tests

  20. Investigation of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition of RPV Materials by using the Pre-cracked Charpy Impact Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Bong Sang; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Much recent work in the field of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics has been directed to developing a mechanics-based relationship between the onset of cleavage fracture in structural components and that of Charpy V-notch specimens. The assessing processes of the cracks located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is described in the ASME code Sec. III, App. G and Sec. XI, App. A. The RTNDT obtained from the impact test using standard Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens is used as a reference temperature to assess the integrity of RPV materials. The initial RTNDT, for the Linde 80 weld, was determined by the 67.8J Charpy impact energy instead of drop weight test. Generally, Linde 80 weld has low upper-shelf energy. The initial RTNDT obtained from the Charpy impact energy curve has been considered overly conservative. Recently, master curve method has been investigated to assess the integrity of RPV materials directly. The initial RTT0 obtained from the master curve method is considered more realistic than the initial RTNDT obtained from impact test for low upper-shelf fracture toughness RPV materials. In this research, the correlation of transition regions between the master curves and the Charpy impact energy curves was investigated using the dynamic fracture toughness curve and the impact energy curve obtained from the impact test of pre-cracked Charpy (PCC) specimens. For the low toughness RPV material the ductile-to-brittle transition corresponding to the static master curve was anticipated using the invested correlation

  1. Status Summary of FY16 Atom Probe Tomography Studies on UCSB ATR-2 Irradiated RPV Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Peter [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Odette, G. Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara-2 RPV Steel Irradiation experiment was awarded in 2010 by the Nuclear Science User Facility (formerly ATR NSUF) through a competitive peer review proposal process. The experiment involved irradiation of nearly 1300 samples distributed over 13 capsules. The major objective of this experiment was to better understand embrittlement behavior of reactor pressure steels at doses beyond which available data exists yet may be achieved if reactor operating licenses are extended beyond 60 years. The experiment was instrumented during irradiation and active temperature control was used to maintain the temperature at the design temperature. Six samples were selected from a large matrix of materials to perform atom probe tomography (APT) to look at formation of high dose phases. The nature and formation behavior of these phases is discussed.

  2. Current understanding of the effects of enviromental and irradiation variables on RPV embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Wirth, B.; Liu, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation enhanced diffusion at RPV operating temperatures around 290 degrees C leads to the formation of various ultrafine scale hardening phases, including copper-rich and copper-catalyzed manganese-nickel rich precipitates. In addition, defect cluster or cluster-solute complexes, manifesting a range of thermal stability, develop under irradiation. These features contribute directly to hardening which in turn is related to embrittlement, manifested as shifts in Charpy V-notch transition temperature. Models based on the thermodynamics, kinetics and micromechanics of the embrittlement processes have been developed; these are broadly consistent with experiment and rationalize the highly synergistic effects of most important irradiation (temperature, flux, fluence) and metallurgical (copper, nickel, manganese, phosphorous and heat treatment) variables on both irradiation hardening and recovery during post-irradiation annealing. A number of open questions remain which can be addressed with a hierarchy of new theoretical and experimental tools

  3. Use of advanced inspection technology during the ISI of a US-RPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxbaum, S R; Pond, R B [Baltimore Gas and Electric Co., MD (United States); Stone, R M

    1988-12-31

    The Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) maintains a unique place among nuclear steam supply system components because its failure is unacceptable. The assumption of incredibility of vessel failure is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) requirement of plant design and operation. Therefore, accurate detection and characterization of vessel flaws are essential. In order to meet the needs for improved pressure vessel inspection, EPRI assisted in the development of the Ultrasonic Data Recording and Processing System (UDRPS). The EPRI NDE Center has supported the transfer to industry through demonstration and documentation of the original system capability and by assisting utilities in their initial applications. Baltimore Gas and Electric (BG and E) purchased a second generation UDRPS and has used the system during the 10 year ISI at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2. This presentation deals with the BG and E applications and the EPRI NDE Center support provided before and during the Calvert Cliffs ISI applications. (author).

  4. Device for investigating subcritical crack growth of RPV steel specimens under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, D.; Ahlf, J.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is being prepared to investigate the subcritical crack growth of RPV steel specimens under cyclic load and under the environmental conditions of a BWR with regard to primary water and irradiation. The experiment will be carried out in the VAK reactor Kahl which is a boiling water reactor operating at 71 bar, 286 0 C and generating 16 MW/sub e/. The experimental setup is composed of an open frame to which a string consisting of five compact tension speciments (40 mm thickness) and connecting links is fixed. The specimen chain is set under cyclic load by a pneumatically actuated bellows unit which is attached to the frame top. Specimen strain and crack opening are measured by linear differential transformers; for temperature distribution measurements in the specimens thermocouples are applied

  5. Statistical evaluation of fracture characteristics of RPV steels in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa

    1998-01-01

    The statistical analysis method was applied to the evaluation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region. Because cleavage fracture in steel is of a statistical nature, fracture toughness data or values show a similar statistical trend. Using the three-parameter Weibull distribution, a fracture toughness vs. temperature curve (K-curve) was directly generated from a set of fracture toughness data at a selected temperature. Charpy V-notch impact energy was also used to obtain the K-curve by a K IC -CVN (Charpy V-notch energy) correlation. Furthermore, this method was applied to evaluate the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel(RPV) steel. Most of the fracture toughness data were within the 95 percent confidence limits. The prediction of a transition temperature shift by statistical analysis was compared with that from the experimental data. (author)

  6. Neutrino masses in RPV models with two pairs of Higgs doublets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, Yuval [Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics, Cornell University,Ithaca, N.Y. (United States); Peset, Clara [Institut de Fisica d’Altes Energies (IFAE), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-07

    We study the generation of neutrino masses and mixing in supersymmetric R-parity violating models containing two pairs of Higgs doublets. In these models, new RPV terms H^{sub D{sub 1}}H^{sub D{sub 2}}E^ arise in the superpotential, as well as new soft terms. Such terms give new contributions to neutrino masses. We identify the different parameters and suppression/enhancement factors that control each of these contributions. At tree level, just like in the MSSM, only one neutrino acquires a mass due to neutrino-neutralino mixing. There are no new one loop effects. We study the two loop contributions and find the conditions under which they can be important.

  7. Vacancy defects in electron irradiated RPV steels studied by positron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, P; Li, X H [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee; Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, J C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    Specimens of French RPV (reactor pressure vessels) steels at different rates of segregation have been irradiated at 150 and 288 deg C with 3 MeV electrons (irradiation dose: 4*10{sup 19} e-/cm{sup 2}). Vacancy defects are studied by positron lifetime measurements before and after irradiation and at each step of isochronal annealing. After 150 deg C irradiation, a recovery step is observed in both specimens, for annealing treatments in the range 220-370 deg C and is attributed to the dissociation of vacancy-impurity complexes. The size of vacancy clusters never overcome 10 empty atomic volumes. If ``fresh`` dislocations are created just before irradiation, big vacancy clusters could be formed. After 288 deg C irradiation, small vacancy cluster of 4-10 empty atomic volumes are observed. (authors). 3 figs., 7 refs.

  8. Metallurgical characteristics and fracture mechanical properties of unirradiated Kori-1 RPV weld: Linde 80, WF-233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, B. S.; Oh, Y. J.; Chi, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, D. G.; Yoon, J. H.; Oh, J. M.

    2000-07-01

    The fracture toughness transition properties of the low upper shelf weld, Linde 80 WF-233, of Kori-1 RPV were evaluated by the master curve method, which is designated by ASTM E 1921, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T o , for ferritic steels in the transition range'. The reference temperature, T o =-83 deg C, was determined by PCVN specimens at -90 deg C. This value is similar to that of other high copper welds. The initial RT NDT was conservatively estimated as -26 deg F from the current fracture toughness results. From the studies on the chemistry and microstructure, the fracture mechanical properties of WF-233 weld is convincingly not worse than WF-70 and 72W welds

  9. Barley yellow dwarf virus: Luteoviridae or Tombusviridae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W Allen; Liu, Sijun; Beckett, Randy

    2002-07-01

    Summary Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV), the most economically important virus of small grains, features highly specialised relationships with its aphid vectors, a plethora of novel translation mechanisms mediated by long-distance RNA interactions, and an ambiguous taxonomic status. The structural and movement proteins of BYDV that confer aphid transmission and phloem-limitation properties resemble those of the Luteoviridae, the family in which BYDV is classified. In contrast, many genes and cis-acting signals involved in replication and gene expression most closely resemble those of the Tombusviridae. BYDV is in genus Luteovirus, family Luteoviridae. BYDV includes at least two serotypes or viruses: BYDV-PAV and BYDV-MAV. The former BYDV-RPV is now Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV). CYDV is in genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae. Genus Luteovirus shares many features with family Tombusviridae. Physical properties: approximately 25 nm icosahedral (T = 3) virions. One major (22 kDa) and one minor (50-55 kDa) coat protein. 5.6-5.8 kb positive sense RNA genome with no 5'-cap and no poly(A) tail. Most grasses. Most important in oats, barley and wheat. Also infects maize and rice. Yellowing and dwarfing in barley, stunting in wheat; reddening, yellowing and blasting in oats. Some isolates cause leaf notching and curling. Key attractions: Model for the study of circulative transmission of aphid-transmitted viruses. Plethora of unusual translation mechanisms. Evidence of recombination in recent evolutionary history creates taxonomic ambiguity. Economically important virus of wheat, barley and oats, worldwide. Useful websites/meetings: International symposium: 'Barley Yellow Dwarf Disease: Recent Advances and Future Strategies', CIMMYT, El Batan, Mexico, 1-5 September 2002, http://www.cimmyt.cgiar.org/Research/wheat/Conf_BYD_02/invitation.htm http://www.cimmyt.org/Research/wheat/BYDVNEWS/htm/BYDVNEWS.htm Aphid transmission animation: http://www.ppws.vt.edu/~sforza/tmv/bydv_aph.html.

  10. A phenomenological method of mechanical properties definition of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) steels VVER according to the ball indentation diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakirov, M. B.; Potapov, V.V.; Massoud, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This work presents specimen-free methods of a standard uniaxial tension diagram construction and RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steels VVER strength properties definition out of a continuous ball indentation diagram. A similarity phenomenon of uniaxial tension strain curves at a hardening area and an area of a ball indentation constitutes the ground of the methods. The methods are developed on the basis of the uniform graphic representation of elasto-plastic strain processes by indentation and tension and with the reception of the unified yield curve at a hardening area. The calculation results on the phenomenological method conducted for a wide range of RPV steels conditions of nuclear reactors have shown a good precision as far as strain curves construction by the uniaxial tension out of the elasto-plastic indentation diagram is concerned. (authors)

  11. Application of Bimodal Master Curve Approach on KSNP RPV steel SA508 Gr. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Kim, Minchul; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the standard MC approach and BMC are applied to the forging material of the KSNP RPV steel SA508 Gr. 3. A series of fracture toughness tests were conducted in the DBTT transition region, and fracture toughness specimens were extracted from four regions, i.e., the surface, 1/8T, 1/4T and 1/2T. Deterministic material inhomogeneity was reviewed through a conventional MC approach and the random inhomogeneity was evaluated by BMC. In the present paper, four regions, surface, 1/8T, 1/4T and 1/2T, were considered for the fracture toughness specimens of KSNP (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant) SA508 Gr. 3 steel to provide deterministic material inhomogeneity and review the applicability of BMC. T0 determined by a conventional MC has a low value owing to the higher quenching rate at the surface as expected. However, more than about 15% of the KJC values lay above the 95% probability curves indexed with the standard MC T0 at the surface and 1/8T, which implies the existence of inhomogeneity in the material. To review the applicability of the BMC method, the deterministic inhomogeneity owing to the extraction location and quenching rate is treated as random inhomogeneity. Although the lower bound and upper bound curve of the BMC covered more KJC values than that of the conventional MC, there is no significant relationship between the BMC analysis lines and measured KJC values in the higher toughness distribution, and BMC and MC provide almost the same T0 values. Therefore, the standard MC evaluation method for this material is appropriate even though the standard MC has a narrow upper/lower bound curve range from the RPV evaluation point of view. The material is not homogeneous in reality. Such inhomogeneity comes in the effect of material inhomogeneity depending on the specimen location, heat treatment, and whole manufacturing process. The conventional master curve has a limitation to be applied to a large scatted data of fracture toughness such as the weld region

  12. Investigation of coolant mixing in WWER-440/213 RPV with improved turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, B.; Aszodi, A.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed and complex RPV model of WWER-440/213 type reactor was developed in Budapest University of Technology and Economics Institute of Nuclear Techniques in the previous years. This model contains the main structural elements as inlet and outlet nozzles, guide baffles of hydro-accumulators coolant, alignment drifts, perforated plates, brake- and guide tube chamber and simplified core. With the new vessel model a series of parameter studies were performed considering turbulence models, discretization schemes, and modeling methods with ANSYS CFX. In the course of parameter studies the coolant mixing was investigated in the RPV. The coolant flow was 'traced' with different scalar concentration at the inlet nozzles and its distribution was calculated at the core bottom. The simulation results were compared with PAKS NPP measured mixing factors data (available from FLOMIX project. Based on the comparison the SST turbulence model was chosen for the further simulations, which unifies the advantages of two-equation (kω and kε) models. The most widely used turbulence models are Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models that are based on time-averaging of the equations. Time-averaging filters out all turbulent scales from the simulation, and the effect of turbulence on the mean flow is then re-introduced through appropriate modeling assumptions. Because of this characteristic of SST turbulence model a decision was made in year 2011 to investigate the coolant mixing with improved turbulence model as well. The hybrid SAS-SST turbulence model was chosen, which is capable of resolving large scale turbulent structures without the time and grid-scale resolution restrictions of LES, often allowing the use of existing grids created for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations. As a first step the coolant mixing was investigated in the downcomer only. Eddies are occurred after the loop connection because of the steep flow direction change. This turbulent, vertiginous flow was

  13. Application of the RTNDT- and RTT0- concept for the Borssele RPV considering 60 years of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmes, J.; Keim, E.; Hein, H. [AREVA NP Gmbh (Germany); Jong, A. de [EPZ Kerncentrale Borssele (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear power plant (NPP) Borssele started operation in 1973 and was designed for operation until 2014. In order to operate the plant beyond 2013 an assessment for long term operation (LTO) for 60 years was performed. For experimental validation of the RPV irradiation behavior, two irradiation surveillance programs, each consisting of one unirradiated and two irradiated sets, were implemented. Each set consists of capsules with representative material test specimens from the RPV core belt-line region, the base metal (BM) rings 03 and 04 and the weld metal (WM) W 03. The first surveillance program is already evaluated and was designed to cover safe operation for 40 years. With the test results from the two irradiation sets of the first surveillance program and from irradiation data of similar RPV steels a prediction of the adjusted reference temperatures at end of life (EoL), covering 60 years of operation, was carried out. The corresponding maximum accumulated theoretical fast neutron fluence (E> 1 MeV) at the inner RPV wall was calculated to 3.22 E+19 n/cm{sup 2} and 3.40 E+19 n/cm{sup 2}, considering no mixed oxide fuel (MOX) and anticipated MOX core loading management, respectively. The leading material in terms of irradiation induced aging is the WM with an adjusted reference temperature of 18 C according to the RTNDT concept and of 3 C according to the Master curve concept, respectively. The results have large safety margins to the KTA limit curve according to the German safety standard KTA 3203. The predicted data will be subject of experimental confirmation in a few years by the test data of the two irradiation sets of the second surveillance program. (authors)

  14. Experimental data base for assessment of irradiation induced ageing effects in pre-irradiated RPV materials of German PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, H.; Gundermann, A.; Keim, E.; Schnabel, H. [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Ganswind, J. [VGB PowerTech e.V (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The 5 year research program CARISMA which ended in 2008 has produced a data base to characterize the fracture toughness of pre-irradiated original RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) materials being representative for all four German PWR construction lines of former Siemens/KWU company. For this purpose tensile, Charpy-V impact, crack initiation and crack arrest tests have been performed for three base materials and four weld metals irradiated to neutron fluences beyond the designed EoL range. RPV steels with optimized chemical composition and with high copper as well as high nickel content were examined in this study. The RTNDT concept and the Master Curve approach were applied for the assessment of the generated data in order to compare both approaches. A further objective was to clarify in which extent crack arrest curves can be generated for irradiated materials and how crack arrest can be integrated into the Master Curve approach. By the ongoing follow-up project CARINA the experimental data base will be extended by additional representative materials irradiated under different conditions and with respect to the accumulated neutron fluences and specific impact parameters such as neutron flux and manufacturing effects. The irradiation data cover also the long term irradiation behavior of the RPV steels concerned. Moreover, most of the irradiated materials were and will be used for microstructural examinations to get a deeper insight in the irradiation embrittlement mechanisms and their causal relationship to the material property changes. By evaluation of the data base the applicability of the Master Curve approach for both crack initiation and arrest was confirmed to a large extent. Moreover, within both research programs progress was made in the development of crack arrest test techniques and in specific issues of RPV integrity assessment. (authors)

  15. Benchmarking of the computer code and the thirty foot side drop analysis for the Shippingport (RPV/NST package)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumpus, S.E.; Gerhard, M.A.; Hovingh, J.; Trummer, D.J.; Witte, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the benchmarking of a finite element computer code and the subsequent results from the code simulating the 30 foot side drop impact of the RPV/NST transport package from the decommissioned Shippingport Nuclear Power Station. The activated reactor pressure vessel (RPV), thermal shield, and other reactor external components were encased in concrete contained by the neutron shield tank (NST) and a lifting skirt. The Shippingport RPV/NST package, a Type B Category II package, weighs approximately 900 tons and has 17.5 ft diameter and 40.7 ft. length. For transport of the activated components from Shippingport to the burial site, the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) demonstrated that the package can withstand the hypothetical accidents of DOE Order 5480.3 including 10 CFR 71. Mathematical simulations of these accidents can substitute for actual tests if the simulated results satisfy the acceptance criteria. Any such mathematical simulation, including the modeling of the materials, must be benchmarked to experiments that duplicate the loading conditions of the tests. Additional confidence in the simulations is justified if the test specimens are configured similar to the package

  16. Temperatures, strains and crack behavior during local thermal shock tests on the RPV-cylinder of the HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubrech, G.E.; Goerner, F.; Siebler, T.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarises and critically discusses the results obtained from thermal shocks locally applied to the inner surface of the RPV-cylinder. This evaluation is based on on-line measurements (temperatures and strains at the RPV-wall during the thermal shock loading, non-destructive-testing), on materials investigations, and on theoretical investigations (finite element calculations, fracture mechanics analyses). The comparison between the corresponding measured and calculated results serves as a basis for subsequent assessments. It was the object of these tests to achieve the following primary aims: - Investigation of the loading conditions produced by local thermal shocks during realistic cooling processes. - A better understanding of the physical processes involved in crack initiation and propagation resulting from thermocyclic loading. - Assessment of non-destructive-testing methods with respect to detection and analysis of cracks as a basis for fracture mechanical evaluations. - Assessment of the reliability of the applied structural analysis methods. - Production of naturally formed deep cracks on the inner surface of the RPV-cylinder by means of excessive cooling processes. (orig./HP)

  17. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, St.

    2005-01-01

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  18. A micromechanical interpretation of the temperature dependence of Beremin model parameters for French RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Jean-Philippe; Inal, Karim; Berveiller, Sophie; Diard, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Local approach to brittle fracture for low-alloyed steels is discussed in this paper. A bibliographical introduction intends to highlight general trends and consensual points of the topic and evokes debatable aspects. French RPV steel 16MND5 (equ. ASTM A508 Cl.3), is then used as a model material to study the influence of temperature on brittle fracture. A micromechanical modelling of brittle fracture at the elementary volume scale already used in previous work is then recalled. It involves a multiscale modelling of microstructural plasticity which has been tuned on experimental inter-phase and inter-granular stresses heterogeneities measurements. Fracture probability of the elementary volume can then be computed using a randomly attributed defect size distribution based on realistic carbides repartition. This defect distribution is then deterministically correlated to stress heterogeneities simulated within the microstructure using a weakest-link hypothesis on the elementary volume, which results in a deterministic stress to fracture. Repeating the process allows to compute Weibull parameters on the elementary volume. This tool is then used to investigate the physical mechanisms that could explain the already experimentally observed temperature dependence of Beremin's parameter for 16MND5 steel. It is showed that, assuming that the hypothesis made in this work about cleavage micro-mechanisms are correct, effective equivalent surface energy (i.e. surface energy plus plastically dissipated energy when blunting the crack tip) for propagating a crack has to be temperature dependent to explain Beremin's parameters temperature evolution.

  19. An experimental study on coolability through the external reactor vessel cooling according to RPV insulation design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Rae Joon; Cho, Young Ro; Kim, Sang Baik

    2004-01-01

    LAVA-ERVC experiments have been performed to investigate the effect of insulation design features on the water accessibility and coolability in case of the external reactor vessel cooling. Alumina iron thermite melt was used as corium stimulant. And the hemispherical test vessel is linearly scaled-down of RPV lower plenum. 4 tests have been performed varying the melt composition and the configuration of the insulation system. Due to the limited steam venting capacity through the insulation, steam binding occurred inside the annulus in the LAVA- ERVC-1, 2 tests which were performed for simulating the KSNP insulation design. This steam binding brought about incident heat up of the vessel outer surface at the upper part in the LAVA-ERVC-1, 2 tests. On the contrary, in the LAVA-ERVC-3, 4 tests which were performed for simulating the APR1400 insulation design, the temperatures of the vessel outer surface maintained near saturation temperature. Sufficient water ingression and steam venting through the insulation lead to effective cooldown of the vessel characterized by nucleate boiling in the LAVA-ERVC-3, 4 tests. From the LAVA-ERVC experimental results, it could be preliminarily concluded that if pertinent modification of the insulation design focused on the improvement of water ingression and steam venting should be preceded the possibility of in-vessel corium retention through the external vessel cooling could be considerably increased.

  20. Overview of the RPV-2 and INTERN-1 packages: From primary damage to microplasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adjanor, G.; Bugat, S.; Domain, C.; Barbu, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the European project PERFECT, four multiscale simulation packages dedicated to the prediction of evolution of material properties were developed. Among them, the RPV-2 and INTERN-1 are two simulation sequences of similar structure dealing with radiation damage in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor internal structures, respectively. Both start at the atomic scale, where the neutron spectrum of the specified reactor is used to determine the energy distribution of the primary knocked-on atoms (PKA). A database of molecular dynamics results is then used to integrate the instantaneous production of defect clusters resulting from the displacement cascades initiated by each PKA. Depending on the type of calculation chosen to model long-term diffusion and reactions of defect clusters, precipitates and mixed-clusters, this primary damage enters either in rate equations or in Object Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The later correspond to a more accurate (but also more computationally demanding) physical model for diffusion as positions of objects on a lattice are explicitly treated. Finally, the increase of critical resolved shear stress is estimated from these cluster distributions either using an analytical model, taking into account the self and mutual dipole interactions of dislocations pinned on randomly dispersed unshearable obstacles, or by simulating the glide of a single dislocation line in its main slip system. Dislocation dynamics simulations were already used to validate some of the assumptions of the latter models, and will be fully integrated in the next versions of the packages.

  1. Mock-up experiments for the project of high dose irradiation on the RPV concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdarek, J.; Brabec, P.; Frybort, O.; Lahodova, Z.; Vit, J.; Stemberk, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aging of NPP's concrete structures comes into growing interest in connection with solution of life extension programmes of operated units. Securing continued safe operation of NPPs calls for additional proofs of suitable long term behaviour of loaded reinforced concrete structures. An irradiation test of concrete samples was performed in the core of the LVR-15 reactor. The irradiation capsule was hung in the irradiation channel and the cooling of the capsule was ensured through direct contact of the capsule wall with the primary circuit water. Cylindrical, serpentine concrete samples (50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length), representing composition of WWER RPV cavity, was chosen as a compromise of mechanical properties testing needs and dimension limitations of reactor irradiation channel. Heating during irradiation test was maintained under 93 Celsius degrees by cooling and was controlled by embedded thermocouple. Design of the cooling management was supported by computational analysis. The dependencies of heated concrete samples to the neutron fluence and the gamma heating were obtained by changing the thermal power of the reactor and by changing the vertical position of the sample in the irradiation channel. The irradiation capsule was filled with inert gas (helium) to allow the measurement of generated gas. The determination of concrete samples activity for long-term irradiation was performed on the principles of the Neutron Activation Analysis. Preliminary mock-up tests have proved the ability to fulfill technical needs for planned high dose irradiation experiment

  2. Fracture behavior of shallow cracks in full-thickness clad beams from an RPV wall section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in weld material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from an RPV shell segment that includes weld, plate and clad material. Metallurgical factors potentially influencing fracture toughness for shallow cracks in the beam specimens include material gradients and material inhomogeneities in welded regions. The shallow-crack clad beam specimens showed a significant loss of constraint similar to that of other shallow-crack single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens. The stress-based Dodds-Anderson scaling model appears to be effective in adjusting the test data to account for in-plane loss of constraint for uniaxially tested beams, but cannot predict the observed effects of out-of-plane biaxial loading on shallow-crack fracture toughness. A strain-based dual-parameter fracture toughness correlation (based on plastic zone width) performed acceptably when applied to the uniaxial and biaxial shallow-crack fracture toughness data

  3. Experimental device for investigating the crack growth behaviour of RPV steel under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, D.; Ahlf, J.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental device is developed to investigate the crack growth behaviour of RPV steel specimens under service conditions. It will be installed in the experimental power station VAK-Kahl (BWR, 16 MWe). The in pile part is composed of a stable frame with a hydraulically actuated load mechanism, the specimen chain and a measuring instrumentation. The specimen chain, fastened between load mechanism and a lower fixing point at the frame, is made up of five compact tensile specimens (CT40) and the associated connecting links. Specimen strain, crack opening and temperature are measured; for neutron dose monitoring activation wires are disposed. Out of pile, in the reactor hall, the hydraulic loading system is installed. The loading force is generated by a 100 kN-material testing machine; it moves a piston in the control cylinder, which is connected to the loading bellows of the in pile section. The measuring and control equipment and a desk computer serving for data preparation and reduction is placed in the reactor control room. (Auth.)

  4. Fracture toughness prediction for RPV Steels with various degree of embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margolin, B.; Gulenko, A.; Shvetsova, V.

    2003-01-01

    In the present report, predictions of the temperature dependence of cleavage fracture toughness are performed on the basis of the Master Curve approach and a probabilistic model named now the Prometey model. These predictions are performed for reactor pressure vessel steels in different states, the initial (as-produced), irradiated state with moderate degree of embrittlement and in the highly embrittled state. Calculations of the K IC (T) curves may be performed with both approaches on the basis of fracture toughness test results from pre-cracked Charpy specimens at some (one) temperature. The calculated curves are compared with test results. It is shown that the K IC (T) curves for the initial state calculated with the Master Curve approach and the probabilistic model show good agreement. At the same time, for highly embrittled RPV steel, the K IC (T) curve predicted with the Master Curve approach is not an adequate fit to the experimental data, whereas the agreement of the test results and the K IC (T) curve calculated with the probabilistic model is good. An analysis is performed for a possible variation of the K IC (T) curve shape and the scatter in K IC results. (author)

  5. Mild and severe cereal yellow dwarf viruses differ in silencing suppressor efficiency of the P0 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasi, Reza; Miller, W Allen; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique

    2015-10-02

    Viral pathogenicity has often been correlated to the expression of the viral encoded-RNA silencing suppressor protein (SSP). The silencing suppressor activity of the P0 protein encoded by cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV) and -RPS (CYDV-RPS), two poleroviruses differing in their symptomatology was investigated. CYDV-RPV displays milder symptoms in oat and wheat whereas CYDV-RPS is responsible for more severe disease. We showed that both P0 proteins (P0(CY-RPV) and P0(CY-RPS)) were able to suppress local RNA silencing induced by either sense or inverted repeat transgenes in an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated expression assay in Nicotiana benthamiana. P0(CY-RPS) displayed slightly higher activity. Systemic spread of the silencing signal was not impaired. Analysis of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) abundance revealed that accumulation of primary siRNA was not affected, but secondary siRNA levels were reduced by both CYDV P0 proteins, suggesting that they act downstream of siRNA production. Correlated with this finding we showed that both P0 proteins partially destabilized ARGONAUTE1. Finally both P0(CY-RPV) and P0(CY-RPS) interacted in yeast cells with ASK2, a component of an E3-ubiquitin ligase, with distinct affinities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moinereau, D.; Faidy, C.; Valeta, M.P.; Bhandari, S.; Guichard, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A; Lucon, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 10 11 n/cm 2 /s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 10 19 n/cm 2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 10 13 n/cm 2 /s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 10 19 n/cm 2 . The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT 0 , 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT 0 , were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  8. Analysis of a molten pool natural convection in the APR1400 RPV at a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Tae; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    2005-01-01

    During a hypothetical severe accident, reactor fuel rods and structures supporting them are melted and relocated in the lower head of the reactor vessel. These relocated molten materials could be separated by their density difference and construct metal/oxide stratified pools in the lower head. A decay heat generated from the fuel material is transferred to the vessel wall and upper structures remaining in the reactor vessel by natural convection. As shown in Fig. 1 two-layered stratified molten pool is developed in the reactor lower vessel. The oxidic pool usually constructed by the mixture of uranium oxide and zirconium oxide. The melting temperature of the oxidic material is very high compared to the steel vessel and metallic layer. And highly turbulent natural convection generated by the decay heat enhances heat transfer to the boundary of the oxidic pool. By this thermal mechanism, oxide curst is developed around the oxidic layer as shown in Fig. 1. The oxidic pool is bounded thermally and fluid-dynamically by the developed crust. By this boundedness, the heat transfer structure in the stratified oxidic/metallic pool can be solved separately. The thermal boundary condition of the oxidic pool is isothermal with constant melting temperature of the oxidic material. The decay heat is transfer to side wall and upper interface between oxidic and metallic layer. Turbulent natural convection is dominant heat transfer mechanism in the oxidic pool. The heat transferred from the bottom oxidic layer is imposed to the upper metallic layer. This transferred heat in the metallic pool is removed through side and upper surface, which is augmented also by natural convection developed in the pool. In this study, a molten pool natural convection in the APR1400 RPV during a severe accident is simulated using the Lilac code and the calculated heat flux distribution on the reactor vessel wall is compared with a lumped-parameter (LP) prediction

  9. FEM-calculation of different creep-tests with French and German RPV-steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.-G.; Altstadt, E.; Weiss, F.-P.; Sehgal, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    For calculations of Lower Head Failure experiments like FOREVER it is necessary to model creep and plasticity processes. Therefore a Finite Element Model is developed using a numerical approach which avoids the use of a single creep law employing constants derived from the data for a limited stress and temperature range. Instead of this a numerical creep data base (CDB) is developed where the creep strain rate is evaluated in dependence on the current total strain, temperature and equivalent stress. A main task for this approach is the generation and validation of the CDB. For an evaluation of the failure times a damage model according to an approach of Lemaitre is applied. The validation of the numerical model is performed by the simulation of and comparison with experiments. This is done in 3 levels: starting with the simulation of single uniaxial creep tests, which is considered as a 1D-problem. In the next level so called 'tube-failure-experiments' are modeled: the RUPTHER-14 and the 'MPA-Meppen'- experiment. These experiments are considered as 2D-problems. Finally the numerical model is applied to scaled 3D experiments, where the lower head of a PWR is represented in its hemispherical shape, like in the FOREVER experiments. An interesting question to be solved in this frame is the comparability of the French 16MND5 and the German 20MnMoNi55 RPV-steels, which are chemically nearly identical. If these 2 steels show a similar behavior, it should be allowed to transfer experimental and numerical data from one to the other. (author)

  10. Flaw distributions and use of ISI data in RPV integrity evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, V.; Ammirato, F.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic method for developing post-inspection flaw distributions has been developed that explicitly accounts for the capability of the inspection procedure to detect and size flaws. This methodology has been used to develop flaw distributions for calculating reactor vessel failure probability under postulated pressurized thermal shock (PTS) conditions. Realistic flaw distributions are important because plant-specific PTS safety assessments are very sensitive to assumptions made about major flaw parameters such as density, size, shape, and location. PTS analysis made in the past do not consider ISI. Two main reasons are (1) lack of a general and approved methodology which provides directions for involvement of ISI results in developing new flaw parameters and (2) lack of confidence in the capability of ISI procedures to detect critical flaws that may be present near the clad-to-base metal interface of the vessel, the location of most concern for PTS conditions. Recent developments in ISI practice, however, have led to substantial improvement in ISI capability and provide a basis for using ISI data to develop plant-specific post-inspection flaw distributions for vessel integrity evaluations. The key components of this evaluation are (1) the generic (preinspection) flaw distribution, (2) a probabilistic flaw detection model, and (3) Bayesian updating of the prior flaw distribution with the detection model to develop a post-inspection flaw distribution. Destructive analysis of RPV weld material was performed to develop data to support the pre-inspection flaw distributions. Since the probability of detection (POD) plays such an important role in the analysis and a high POD is needed to make significant reductions in probability of failure, a procedure was developed to achieve and demonstrate POD greater than 0.9 by using a combination of independent inspection techniques

  11. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moinereau, D [Electricite de France, Dept. MTC, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Faidy, C [Electricite de France, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France); Valeta, M P [Commisariat a l` Energie Atomique, Dept. DMT, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bhandari, S; Guichard, D [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1997-09-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs.

  12. RPV in-situ segmentation combined with off-site treatment for volume reduction and recycling - Proven In-Situ Segmentation Combined with Off-Site Treatment for Volume Reduction and Recycling. RPV case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Arne; Lidar, Per; Segerud, Per; Hedin, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants generates large volumes of radioactive or potentially radioactive waste. The proper management of the large components and the dismantling waste are key success factors in a decommissioning project. A large component of major interest is, due to its size and its span in radioactivity content, the RVP, which can be disposed as is or be segmented, treated, partially free released for recycling and conditioned for disposal in licensed packages. To a certain extent the decommissioning program have to be led by the waste management process. The costs for the plant decommissioning can be reduced by the usage of off-site waste treatment facilities as the time needed for performing the decommissioning project will be reduced as well as the waste volumes for disposal. Long execution times and delays due to problems with on-site waste management processes are major cost drivers for decommissioning projects. This involves also the RPV. In Sweden, the extension of the geological repository SFR plans for a potential disposal of whole RPVs. Disposal of whole RPVs is currently the main alternative but other options are considered. The target is to avoid extensive on-site waste management of RPVs to reduce the risk for delays. This paper describes in-situ RPV segmentation followed by off-site treatment aiming for free release for recycling of a substantial amount of the material, and volume efficient conditioning of the remaining parts. Real data from existing LWR RPVs was used for this study. Proven segmentation methods are intended to be used for the in situ segmentation followed by proven methods for packaging, transportation, treatment, recycling and conditioning for disposal. The expected volume reduction for disposal can be about 90% compared to whole RPV disposal. In this respect the in-situ segmentation of the RVPs to large pieces followed by off-site treatment is an interesting alternative that fits very well with the objective

  13. Possible means to manage and store the BKAB RPV and other Swedish large radioactive components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Beside a pressurised heavy water reactor in Aagesta that was permanently shut down in 1974, and two test reactors in Studsvik, that were permanently shut down in 2005, two BWR units in Barsebaeck were permanently closed in 1999 and 2005, respectively. Both of the latter reactors, with 615 MWe each, have been prepared for a care and maintenance period awaiting dismantling, which has been planned as a joint five-year project starting in 2020 to be carried out according to the Swedish system, thus requiring the repository for dismantling waste to be operational before the demolition begins. The goal is for the Barsebaeck site, together with its remaining buildings and equipment to be released for free use, after which the site owner shall be responsible to decide which will be the future fate of the buildings and land area as a whole. All decommissioning projects have to be co-ordinated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering - SKB) in conjunction with NPP owners, who are responsible for establishing the decommissioning strategy and taking care of the dismantling itself. On the other hand, the transportation, interim storage and disposal of spent fuel and radioactive waste from Swedish NPPs are the responsibility of SKB. One major part of the overall dismantling project involves the deconstruction of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and of its internals (RVI). In the case of Swedish NPPs, there are two major optional strategies for dismantling RPVs and RVIs: the first one is to segment the RPV and its RVIs, while the second is to remove the whole RPV without its internals. Barsebaeck has chosen to even study a third option that covers removal of single pieces, including RVIs. Both Barsebaeck RPVs are 20.7 m long and 5.5 m in diameter. The total weight to be transported, without RVIs, equals 540 t, but jumps to 715 t, if internals and the required radiation shielding are added. Different radiological analyses and

  14. Results from Project on Enhancement of Aging Management and Maintenance in Nuclear Power Plants - Irradiation Embrittlement of RPV Steels -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hiroaki; Onizawa, Kunio; Katsuyama, Jinya; Murakami, Kenta; Iwai, Takeo; Iwata, Tadao; Katano, Yoshio; Sekimura, Naoto; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Toyama, Takeshi; Tamura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    As one of the NISA Project on Enhancement of Aging Management and Maintenance in Nuclear Power Plants, we have performed research on the irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, especially focusing on irradiation embrittlement on heat affected zone (HAZ) and on applications of ion beams to deduce fundamental insights irradiation-induced embrittlement. The results obtained from the project are summarized as follows. In order to obtain the technical basis to judge the necessity of surveillance specimens from HAZ, the neutron irradiation program was performed at JRR-3, JAEA. The samples were carefully designed based on the insights from finite element analysis, metallography, 3D atom probe and positron annihilation methods, and were fabricated so as to simulate both heat treatment history and microstructure for typical HAZ from as-fabricated RPV steels which also have variation of impurity levels. The fracture toughness of the unirradiated HAZ specimens was equivalent to or better than that of base metals. Irradiation embrittlement and hardening were roughly identical to those of base metals, while some of the fine-grained HAZ microstructure was susceptible to it. The probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis was applied to the structural integrity assessment taking into account the heterogeneous microstructure as well as susceptibility for irradiation embrittlement of each HAZ microstructure under the variation of welding parameter and PTS condition. It was shown that crack propagation at the fine-grained HAZ, but the discontinuous distribution of the microstructure retards the further propagation. For the precise correlation of irradiation embrittlement of RPV steels for the long term operations, accumulations of high-dose data are required. Ion beam irradiation is one of the solutions for the regime and for mechanism-based descriptions. Another interest of ours was to describe irradiation hardening and embrittlement in terms of

  15. JAEA's research on the effects of seawater and radiation on corrosion of Zircaloy and PCV/RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Takashi; Motooka, Takafumi; Nakano, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In order to implement successfully a lot of work for the extraction of fuel assemblies from spent fuel pool (SFP) and also for the removal of fuel debris from reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and primary containment vessel (PCV) at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) of Tokyo Electric Power Co., it is necessary to investigate and to prevent the degradation of structural materials of the fuel assemblies and PCV/RPV which are exposed to the gamma radiation and water containing seawater ingredient, because those factors are influencing and possibly accelerating corrosion of the materials. Therefore, at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), we are carrying out the research related to the corrosion issues which may affect the integrity of fuel assemblies and reactor vessels, i.e. PCV and reactor pressure vessel (RPV), from a viewpoint of the effect of gamma radiation and diluted seawater on corrosion behavior as described in this review. In SFP, hydrazine (N_2H_4) was added to salt-containing water in order to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO). Therefore, deoxygenation behavior by N_2H_4 addition was investigated at the ambient temperature. To evaluate the effects of radiolysis on the initiation of pitting corrosion on Zircaloy-2 in water containing sea salt, the pitting potentials of Zircaloy-2 were evaluated. The experimental results showed that the pitting potential under irradiation was slightly higher than that under conditions in which no radiation was present. Corrosion tests of PCV/RPV steels were conducted in diluted seawater at 50degC under gamma-ray irradiation of dose rates of 4.4 and 0.2 kGy/h. To assess the effect of N_2H_4 as an oxygen scavenger under gamma-ray irradiation in PCV condition, 10 and 100 mg/L N_2H_4 were added to the diluted seawater. When gas phase in test flask was replaced with N_2, corrosion weight loss of the steels decreased remarkably. (author)

  16. Mechanisms of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steel at irradiation temperatures of (50–400)°C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleshova, E.A., E-mail: evgenia-orm@yandex.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe Highway 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Gurovich, B.A.; Bukina, Z.V.; Frolov, A.S.; Maltsev, D.A.; Krikun, E.V.; Zhurko, D.A.; Zhuchkov, G.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    This work summarizes and analyzes our recent research results on the effect of irradiation temperature within the range of (50–400)°C on microstructure and properties of 15Kh2NMFAA class 1 steel (VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base metal). The paper considers the influence of accelerated irradiation with different temperature up to different fluences on the carbide and irradiation-induced phases, radiation defects, yield strength changes and critical brittleness temperature shift (ΔT{sub K}) as well as on changes of the fraction of brittle intergranular fracture and segregation processes in the steel. Low temperature irradiation resulted solely in formation of radiation defects – dislocation loops of high number density, the latter increased with increase in irradiation temperature while their size decreased. In this regard high embrittlement rate observed at low temperature irradiation is only due to the hardening mechanism of radiation embrittlement. Accelerated irradiation at VVER-1000 RPV operating temperature (∼300 °C) caused formation of radiation-induced precipitates and dislocation loops, as well as some increase in phosphorus grain boundary segregation. The observed ΔT{sub K} shift being within the regulatory curve for VVER-1000 RPV base metal is due to both hardening and non-hardening mechanisms of radiation embrittlement. Irradiation at elevated temperature caused more intense phosphorus grain boundary segregation, but no formation of radiation-induced precipitates or dislocation loops in contrast to irradiation at 300 °C. Carbide transformations observed only after irradiation at 400 °C caused increase in yield strength and, along with a contribution of the non-hardening mechanism, resulted in the lowest ΔT{sub K} shift in the studied range of irradiation temperature and fluence. - Highlights: •Structural elements in RPV steel are studied at different irradiation temperatures. •Highest number density dislocation loops are

  17. Influence of specimen size/type on the fracture toughness of five irradiated RPV materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lucon, Enrico [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program had previously irradiated five reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels/welds at fast neutron fluxes of about 4 to 8 x 1011 n/cm2/s (>1 MeV) to fluences from 0.5 to 3.4 1019 n/cm2 and at 288 °C. The unirradiated fracture toughness tests were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with 12.7-mm and 25.4-mm thick (0.5T and 1T) compact specimens, while the HSSI Program provided tensile and 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens to SCK-CEN for irradiation in the in-pile section of the Belgian Reactor BR2 at fluxes > 1013 n/cm2/s and subsequent testing by SCK-CEN. The BR2 irradiations were conducted at about 2 and 4 x 1013 n/cm2/s with irradiation temperature between 295 °C and 300 °C (water temperature), and to fluences between 6 and 10 x 1019n/cm2. The irradiation-induced shifts of the Master Curve reference temperatures, ΔT0, for most of the materials deviated from the embrittlement correlations much more than expected, motivating the testing of 5 x 10-mm three-point bend specimens of all five materials in the unirradiated condition to eliminate specimen size and geometry as a variable. Tests of the unirradiated small bend specimens resulted in Master Curve reference temperatures, T0, 25 °C to 53 °C lower than those from the larger compact specimens, meaning that the irradiation-induced reference temperature shifts, ΔT0, were larger than the initial measurements, resulting in much improved agreement between the measured and predicted fracture toughness shifts.

  18. Miniature Precracked Charpy Specimens for Measuring the Master Curve Reference Temperature of RPV Steels at Impact Loading Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucon, E.; Scibetta, M.; Puzzolante, L.

    2008-10-15

    In the framework of the 2006 Convention, we investigated the applicability of fatigue precracked miniature Charpy specimens of KLST type (MPCC - B = 3 mm, W = 4 mm and L = 27 mm) for impact toughness measurements, using the well-characterized JRQ RPV steel. In the ductile to-brittle transition region, MPCC tests analyzed using the Master Curve approach and compared to data previously obtained from PCC specimens had shown a more ductile behavior and therefore un conservative results. In the investigation presented in this report, two additional RPV steels have been used to compare the performance of impact-tested MPCC and PCC specimens in the transition regime: the low-toughness JSPS steel and the high-toughness 20MnMoNi55 steel. The results obtained (excellent agreement for 20MnMoNi55 and considerable differences between T0 values for JSPS) are contradictory and do not presently allow qualifying the MPCC specimens as a reliable alternative to PCC samples for impact toughness measurements.

  19. Assessment of the fracture behavior of weld material from a full-thickness clad RPV shell segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bass, B.R.; Keeney, J.A.; McAfee, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    A testing program is described that utilizes full-thickness clad beam specimens to quantify fracture toughness for shallow cracks in material for which metallurgical conditions are prototypic of those found in reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). The beam specimens are fabricated from a section of an RPV shell (removed from a canceled nuclear plant) that includes weld, plate, and clad material. A summary of the testing program includes a description of the specimen geometry, material properties, the testing procedure, and the experimental results from three specimens. The yield strength of the weld material was determined to be 36% higher than the base material. The high yield strength for prototypic weld material may be implications for RPV integrity assessments. Fracture toughness data from three clad beam specimens are compared with other shallow- and deep-crack beam cruciform data generated previously from A 533 Grade B plate material. Difficulties with interpreting lower-bound fracture toughness curves constructed from the shallow-crack data are essentially resolved by adopting a single normalizing temperature parameter, namely, the nil-ductility transition temperature (NDT)

  20. Fracture mechanics assessment of surface and sub-surface cracks in the RPV under non-symmetric PTS loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, E; Shoepper, A; Fricke, S [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    One of the most severe loading conditions of a reactor pressure vessel (rpv) under operation is the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) condition. Cold water is injected through nozzles in the downcomer of the rpv, while the internal pressure may remain at a high level. Complex thermal hydraulic situations occur and the fluid and downcomer temperatures as well as the fluid to wall heat transfer coefficient at the inner surface are highly non-linear. Due to this non-symmetric conditions, the problem is investigated by three-dimensional non-linear finite element analyses, which allow for an accurate assessment of the postulated flaws. Transient heat transfer analyses are carried out to analyze the effect of non-symmetrical cooling of the inner surface of the pressure vessel. In a following uncoupled stress analysis the thermal shock effects for different types of defects, surface flaws and sub-surface flaws are investigated for linear elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviour. The obtained fracture parameters are calculated along the crack fronts. By a fast fracture analysis the fracture parameters at different positions along the crack front are compared to the material resistance. Safety margins are pointed out in an assessment diagram of the fracture parameters and the fracture resistance versus the transient temperature at the crack tip position. (author). 4 refs, 10 figs.

  1. Morbillivirus v proteins exhibit multiple mechanisms to block type 1 and type 2 interferon signalling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Chinnakannan

    Full Text Available Morbilliviruses form a closely related group of pathogenic viruses which encode three non-structural proteins V, W and C in their P gene. Previous studies with rinderpest virus (RPV and measles virus (MeV have demonstrated that these non-structural proteins play a crucial role in blocking type I (IFNα/β and type II (IFNγ interferon action, and various mechanisms have been proposed for these effects. We have directly compared four important morbilliviruses, rinderpest (RPV, measles virus (MeV, peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV and canine distemper virus (CDV. These viruses and their V proteins could all block type I IFN action. However, the viruses and their V proteins had varying abilities to block type II IFN action. The ability to block type II IFN-induced gene transcription correlated with co-precipitation of STAT1 with the respective V protein, but there was no correlation between co-precipitation of either STAT1 or STAT2 and the abilities of the V proteins to block type I IFN-induced gene transcription or the creation of the antiviral state. Further study revealed that the V proteins of RPV, MeV, PPRV and CDV could all interfere with phosphorylation of the interferon-receptor-associated kinase Tyk2, and the V protein of highly virulent RPV could also block the phosphorylation of another such kinase, Jak1. Co-precipitation studies showed that morbillivirus V proteins all form a complex containing Tyk2 and Jak1. This study highlights the ability of morbillivirus V proteins to target multiple components of the IFN signalling pathways to control both type I and type II IFN action.

  2. A Physically Based Correlation of Irradiation-Induced Transition Temperature Shifts for RPV Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eason, Ernest D. [Modeling and Computing Services, LLC; Odette, George Robert [UCSB; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Yamamoto, Takuya [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) of commercial nuclear power plants are subject to embrittlement due to exposure to high-energy neutrons from the core, which causes changes in material toughness properties that increase with radiation exposure and are affected by many variables. Irradiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials is currently evaluated using Regulatory Guide 1.99 Revision 2 (RG1.99/2), which presents methods for estimating the shift in Charpy transition temperature at 30 ft-lb (TTS) and the drop in Charpy upper shelf energy (ΔUSE). The purpose of the work reported here is to improve on the TTS correlation model in RG1.99/2 using the broader database now available and current understanding of embrittlement mechanisms. The USE database and models have not been updated since the publication of NUREG/CR-6551 and, therefore, are not discussed in this report. The revised embrittlement shift model is calibrated and validated on a substantially larger, better-balanced database compared to prior models, including over five times the amount of data used to develop RG1.99/2. It also contains about 27% more data than the most recent update to the surveillance shift database, in 2000. The key areas expanded in the current database relative to the database available in 2000 are low-flux, low-copper, and long-time, high-fluence exposures, all areas that were previously relatively sparse. All old and new surveillance data were reviewed for completeness, duplicates, and discrepancies in cooperation with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee E10.02 on Radiation Effects in Structural Materials. In the present modeling effort, a 10% random sample of data was reserved from the fitting process, and most aspects of the model were validated with that sample as well as other data not used in calibration. The model is a hybrid, incorporating both physically motivated features and empirical calibration to the U.S. power reactor surveillance

  3. SCK-CEN Contribution to the IAEA Round Robin Exercise on WWER-440 RPV Weld Metal Irradiation Embrittlement, annealing and Re-Embrittlement. Second Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.; Chaouadi, R.; Scibetta, M.; Lucon, E.; Weber, M.

    1999-07-01

    The report gives the actual status of the contribution of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN to the IAEA Round Robin Exercise on WWER-440 RPV Weld Material Irradiation, Annealing and Re-Embrittlement. Results from the reference testing of unirradiated material as well as the results of the CHIVAS-7 experiment are discussed

  4. FE-simulation of the viscoplastic behaviour of different RPV steels in the frame of in-vessel melt retentions scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altstadt, E.; Willschuetz, H.G.; Mueller, G.

    2004-01-01

    Assuming the hypothetical scenario of a severe accident with subsequent core meltdown and formation of a melt pool in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) leads to the question about the behavior of the RPV. One accident management strategy could be to stabilize the in-vessel debris configuration in the RPV as one major barrier against uncontrolled release of heat and radio nuclides. To get an improved understanding and knowledge of the melt pool convection and the vessel creep and possible failure processes and modes occurring during the late phase of a core melt down accident the FOREVER-experiments (Failure Of REactor VEssel Retention) have been performed at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety of the Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm. These experiments are simulating the behavior of the lower head of the RPV under the thermal loads of a convecting melt pool with decay heating, and under the pressure loads that the vessel experiences in a depressurization scenario. The geometrical scale of the experiments is 1:10 compared to a common LWR. This paper deals with the experimental, numerical, and metallographical results of the creep failure experiment EC-FOREVER-4, where the American pressure vessel steel SA533B was applied for the lower head. For comparison the results of the experiment EC-FOREVER-3B, build of the French 16MND5 steel, are discussed, too. Emphasis is put on the differences in the viscoplastic behaviour of different heats of the RPV steel. For this purpose, the creep tests in the frame of the LHF/OLHF experiments are reviewed, too. As a hypothesis it is stated that the sulphur content could be responsible for differences in the creep behaviour. (orig.)

  5. In-vessel core melt retention by RPV external cooling for high power PWR. MAAP 4 analysis on a LBLOCA scenario without SI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, C.; Gandrille, P.

    1999-01-01

    In-, ex-vessel reflooding or both simultaneously can be envisaged as Accident Management Measures to stop a Severe Accident (SA) in vessel. This paper addresses the possibility of in-vessel core melt retention by RPV external flooding for a high power PWR (4250 MWth). The reactor vessel is assumed to have no lower head penetration and thermal insulation is neglected. The effects of external cooling of high power density debris, where the margin for such a strategy is low, are investigated with the MAAP4 code. MAAP4 code is used to verify the system capability to flood the reactor pit and to predict simultaneously the corium relocation into the lower head with the thermal and mechanical response of the RPV in transient conditions. The corium pool cooling and holding in the RPV lower head is analysed. Attention is paid to the internal heat exchanges between corium components. This paper focuses particularly the heat transfer between oxidic and metallic phases as well as between the molten metallic phase and the RPV wall of utmost importance for challenging the RPV integrity in vicinity of the metallic phase. The metal segregation has a decisive influence upon the attack of the vessel wall due to a very strong peaking of the lateral flux ('focusing effect'). Thus, the dynamics of the formation of the metallic layer characterized by a growing inventory of steel, both from a partial vessel ablation and the degradation of internals steel structures by the radiative heat flux from the debris, is displayed. The analysed sequence is a surge line rupture near the hot leg (LBLOCA) leading to the fastest accident progression

  6. The effect of frequency and environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of SA508 Cl.III RPV steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilles, R.D.; Bulloch, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of frequency and environment on the fatigue crack growth behaviour of SA508 Cl. III RPV steel. The study has shown that the effect of the Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) environment is directly related to the frequency and the level of applied stress intensity of the test; these results further showed that the lower the frequency the greater the environmental effect, especially at low ΔK levels. No such frequency effect was observed in either the laboratory air or ultra-high purity argon environments. At a frequency of 0.1 Hz the PWR water test exhibited characteristic EAC growth, i.e. plateau growth behaviour. Fractographical examination of the fracture surface revealed that the fracture mode during plateau growth was intergranular failure. The experimental results are described and discussed in terms of the hydrogen assisted cracking mechanism. (author)

  7. Effects of the Microstructure on Segregation behavior of Ni-Cr-Mo High Strength Low Alloy RPV Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has an improved fracture toughness and strength, compared to commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy RPV steel SA508 Gr.3. Higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels could be achieved by adding Ni and Cr. So there are several researches on SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a RPV application. The operation temperature and time of a reactor pressure vessel is more than 300 .deg. C and over 40 years. Therefore, in order to apply the SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a reactor pressure vessel, it requires a resistance of thermal embrittlement in the high temperature range including temper embrittlement resistance. S. Raoul reported that the susceptibility to temper embrittlement was increasing a function of the cooling rate in SA533 steel, which suggests the martensitic microstructures resulting from increased cooling rates are more susceptible to temper embrittlement. However, this result has not been proved yet. So the comparison of temper embrittlement behavior was made between martensitic microstructure and bainitic microstructure with a viewpoint of boundary features in SA508 Gr.4N, which have mixture of tempered bainite/martensite. In this study, we have compared temper embrittlement behaviors of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with changing volume fraction of martensite. The mechanical properties of these low alloy steels) were evaluated after a long-term heat treatment(450 .deg. C, 2000hr. Then, the images of the segregated boundaries were observed and segregation behavior was analyzed by AES. In order to compare the misorientation distributions of model alloys, grain boundary structures were measured with EBSD

  8. Final report on the reactor pressure vessel pressurized-thermal-shock. International comparative assessment study (RPV PTS ICAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievers, J.; Schulz, H.; Bass, R.; Pugh, C.

    1999-10-01

    A summary of the recently completed International Comparative Assessment Study of Pressurized-Thermal-Shock in Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV PTS ICAS) is presented here to record the results in actual and comparative fashions. Within the DFM task, where account was taken of material properties and boundary conditions, reasonable agreement was obtained in linear-elastic and elastic-plastic analysis results. Linear elastic analyses and J-estimation schemes were shown to provide conservative estimates of peak crack driving force when compared with those obtained using complex three-dimensional (3D) finite element analyses. Predictions of RT NDT generally showed less scatter than that observed in crack driving force calculations due to the fracture toughness curve used for fracture assessment in the transition temperature region. Observed scatter in some analytical results could be traced mainly to a misinterpretation of the thermal expansion coefficient data given for the cladding and base metal. Also, differences in some results could be due to a quality assurance problem related to procedures for approximating the loading data given in the Problem Statement. For the PFM task, linear-elastic solutions were again shown to be conservative with respect to elastic-plastic solutions (by a factor of 2 to 4). Scatter in solutions obtained using the same computer code was generally attributable to differences in input parameters, e.g. standard deviations for the initial value of RT NDT , as well as for nickel and copper content. In the THM task, while there was a high degree of scatter during the early part of the transient, reasonable agreement in results was obtained during the latter part of the transient. Generally, the scatter was due to differences in analytical approaches used by participants, which included correlation-based engineering methods, system codes and three-dimensional computational fluids dynamics codes. Some of the models used to simulate condensation

  9. PSI contribution to the CASTOC round robin on EAC of low-alloy RPV steels under BWR conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S

    2001-08-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack growth (EAC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR power operation conditions by 6 European laboratories. The present report contains a summary of the PSI contribution to the Working Package 1 (WP1) of this project. WP1 is an interlaboratory round robin EAC test in simulated BWR/NWC environment under cyclic and static loading conditions. The round robin shall demonstrate the applicability of the used advanced test technique and establishes the technical basis for the decision of test conditions in the other working packages. In the first part of the report, the PSI testing facility/measurement instruments and the applied test and evaluation procedure are discussed in detail. In the second part, the exact test conditions and test results with detailed post-test fractographical evaluation in the SEM are presented. The test results are compared with other PSI results, literature data and nuclear codes. Stable and stationary test conditions within the specified range could be achieved in the PSI test during the whole conditioning and experimental phase. The cyclic crack growth rate results agree well with recent PSI results at a higher dissolved oxygen content of 8 ppm and are slightly below the 'high-sulphur line' of the PLEDGE-model. The crack growth rates are significantly above the ASME XI 'wet' curve. Compared to fatigue crack growth rates in air under otherwise identical test conditions, the effect of the high-temperature water environment resulted in an acceleration of crack growth by a factor of 150-250 under these low-cyclic loading conditions. The test results at constant load confirm the extremely low susceptibility to SCC crack growth under static load at 288 {sup o}C observed in tests at MPA, PSI and in a European Round Robin. They agree well with the RPV

  10. PSI contribution to the CASTOC round robin on EAC of low-alloy RPV steels under BWR conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2001-08-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack growth (EAC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state BWR power operation conditions by 6 European laboratories. The present report contains a summary of the PSI contribution to the Working Package 1 (WP1) of this project. WP1 is an interlaboratory round robin EAC test in simulated BWR/NWC environment under cyclic and static loading conditions. The round robin shall demonstrate the applicability of the used advanced test technique and establishes the technical basis for the decision of test conditions in the other working packages. In the first part of the report, the PSI testing facility/measurement instruments and the applied test and evaluation procedure are discussed in detail. In the second part, the exact test conditions and test results with detailed post-test fractographical evaluation in the SEM are presented. The test results are compared with other PSI results, literature data and nuclear codes. Stable and stationary test conditions within the specified range could be achieved in the PSI test during the whole conditioning and experimental phase. The cyclic crack growth rate results agree well with recent PSI results at a higher dissolved oxygen content of 8 ppm and are slightly below the 'high-sulphur line' of the PLEDGE-model. The crack growth rates are significantly above the ASME XI 'wet' curve. Compared to fatigue crack growth rates in air under otherwise identical test conditions, the effect of the high-temperature water environment resulted in an acceleration of crack growth by a factor of 150-250 under these low-cyclic loading conditions. The test results at constant load confirm the extremely low susceptibility to SCC crack growth under static load at 288 o C observed in tests at MPA, PSI and in a European Round Robin. They agree well with the RPV operating experience

  11. Weld residual stresses near the bimetallic interface in clad RPV steel: A comparison between deep-hole drilling and neutron diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, M.N., E-mail: mjames@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Marine Science and Engineering, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Newby, M.; Doubell, P. [Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd, Lower Germiston Road, Rosherville, Johannesburg (South Africa); Hattingh, D.G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Serasli, K.; Smith, D.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Queen' s Building, University Walk, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Identification of residual stress trends across bimetallic interface in stainless clad RPV. • Comparison between deep hole drilling (DHD – stress components in two directions) and neutron diffraction (ND – stress components in three directions). • Results indicate that both techniques can assess the trends in residual stress across the interface. • Neutron diffraction gives more detailed information on transient residual stress peaks. - Abstract: The inner surface of ferritic steel reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is clad with strip welded austenitic stainless steel primarily to increase the long-term corrosion resistance of the ferritic vessel. The strip welding process used in the cladding operation induces significant residual stresses in the clad layer and in the RPV steel substrate, arising both from the thermal cycle and from the very different thermal and mechanical properties of the austenitic clad layer and the ferritic RPV steel. This work measures residual stresses using the deep hole drilling (DHD) and neutron diffraction (ND) techniques and compares residual stress data obtained by the two methods in a stainless clad coupon of A533B Class 2 steel. The results give confidence that both techniques are capable of assessing the trends in residual stresses, and their magnitudes. Significant differences are that the ND data shows greater values of the tensile stress peaks (∼100 MPa) than the DHD data but has a higher systematic error associated with it. The stress peaks are sharper with the ND technique and also differ in spatial position by around 1 mm compared with the DHD technique.

  12. Weld residual stresses near the bimetallic interface in clad RPV steel: A comparison between deep-hole drilling and neutron diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.N.; Newby, M.; Doubell, P.; Hattingh, D.G.; Serasli, K.; Smith, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Identification of residual stress trends across bimetallic interface in stainless clad RPV. • Comparison between deep hole drilling (DHD – stress components in two directions) and neutron diffraction (ND – stress components in three directions). • Results indicate that both techniques can assess the trends in residual stress across the interface. • Neutron diffraction gives more detailed information on transient residual stress peaks. - Abstract: The inner surface of ferritic steel reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is clad with strip welded austenitic stainless steel primarily to increase the long-term corrosion resistance of the ferritic vessel. The strip welding process used in the cladding operation induces significant residual stresses in the clad layer and in the RPV steel substrate, arising both from the thermal cycle and from the very different thermal and mechanical properties of the austenitic clad layer and the ferritic RPV steel. This work measures residual stresses using the deep hole drilling (DHD) and neutron diffraction (ND) techniques and compares residual stress data obtained by the two methods in a stainless clad coupon of A533B Class 2 steel. The results give confidence that both techniques are capable of assessing the trends in residual stresses, and their magnitudes. Significant differences are that the ND data shows greater values of the tensile stress peaks (∼100 MPa) than the DHD data but has a higher systematic error associated with it. The stress peaks are sharper with the ND technique and also differ in spatial position by around 1 mm compared with the DHD technique

  13. Investigation on the effects of geometric variables on the residual stresses and PWSCC growth in the RPV BMI penetration nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Ra, Myoung Soo; Lee, Kyoung Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of various geometric variables on the residual stresses and PWSCC growth of RPV BMI penetration nozzles. An FE residual stress analysis procedure was developed and validated from the viewpoint of FFS assessment. The validated FE residual stress analysis procedure and the PWSCC growth assessment procedure in the ASME B and PV Code, Sec.XI were applied to the BMI penetration nozzles with specified ranges of the geometric variables. The total stresses at steady state during normal operation including welding residual stresses increase with increasing inclination angle of the BMI nozzles, and with tilt angle, depth, and root width of the J-groove weld. The lifetime from the assumed initial crack to the acceptance criteria according to the ASME B and PV Code, Sec.XI also decreases under these conditions. The total stresses decrease and the lifetime increases with increasing nozzle thickness, but outer radius of the BMI nozzles has an insignificant effect on both of these factors.

  14. Phase and structural transformations in VVER-440 RPV base metal after long-term operation and recovery annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Maltsev, D. A.; Frolov, A. S.; Bukina, Z. V.; Fedotova, S. V.; Saltykov, M. A.; Krikun, E. V.; Erak, D. Yu; Zhurko, D. A.; Safonov, D. V.; Zhuchkov, G. M.

    2018-04-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the possibility of 1st generation VVER-440 reactors lifetime extension by recovery re-annealing with the respect to base metal (BM). Comprehensive studies of the structure and properties of BM templates (samples cut from the inner surface of the shells in beltline region) of operating VVER-440 reactor (after primary standard recovery annealing 475 °C/150 h and subsequent long-term re-irradiation within reactor pressure vessel (RPV)) were conducted. These templates were also subjected to laboratory re-annealing 475 °C/150 h. TEM, SEM and APT studies of BM after laboratory re-annealing revealed significant recovery of radiation-induced hardening elements (Cu-rich precipitates and dislocation loops). Simultaneously a process of strong phosphorus accumulation at grain boundaries occurs since annealing temperature corresponds to the maximum reversible temper brittleness development. The latter is not observed for VVER-440 weld metal (WM). Comparative assessment of the properties return level for the beltline BM templates after recovery re-annealing 475 °C/150 h showed that it does not reach the one typical for beltline WM after the same annealing.

  15. Comparison of different experimental and analytical measures of the thermal annealing response of neutron-irradiated RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The thermal annealing response of several materials as indicated by Charpy transition temperature (TT) and upper-shelf energy (USE), crack initiation toughness, K Jc , predictive models, and automated-ball indentation (ABI) testing are compared. The materials investigated are representative reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels (several welds and a plate) that were irradiated for other tasks of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program and are relatively well characterized in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. They have been annealed at two temperatures, 343 and 454 C (650 and 850 F) for varying lengths of time. The correlation of the Charpy response and the fracture toughness, ABI, and the response predicted by the annealing model of Eason et al. for these conditions and materials appears to be reasonable. The USE after annealing at the temperature of 454 C appears to recover at a faster rate than the TT, and even over-recovers (i.e., the recovered USE exceeds that of the unirradiated material)

  16. Screening of peste des petits ruminants virus in a population of district Khairpur, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitlo, A K; Ujan, J A; Ujjan, S A; Ruk, M; Memon, B A; Mahar, A A; Ujjan, A A

    2017-09-28

    Goats are the Pakistan's fastest growing ruminants, and Pakistan is the third largest goat producer in the world after India and China. Goat meat preference is the main reason for its increased demand. In the country, there are 25 goat breeds and two wild relatives such as Mark and Goats. At present, Pakistan has 53.8 million goats, according to the 2006 GOP report, and their population growth rate was more than 3% per year (37, 23, 22, and 18% of the goat population in Punjab, Sindh, Balochistan, and NWFP, respectively). Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and is considered to be one of the major constraints on increasing the productivity of goats and sheep in the areas where they exist and become local. It is closely related to cattle and buffalo rinderpest virus, dogs and other wild predator distemper virus, human measles virus, and marine mammalian measles virus. The present study aimed to determine the screening of the PPRV, Capra Hircus Lin. population, in the Khairpur Mirs District, Sindh, Pakistan. We selected 290 goats for serum sample collection and analysis using competitive ELISA kits according to the manufacturer's instructions. Our results showed that 59 (64%) of the 92 clinical cases were positive and 33 (36%) were seronegative. The study concluded that PPR might be more prevalent in the Khairpur District. Furthermore, it is highly recommended to use homologous PPR-attenuated vaccines to prevent lethal virus attacks that control PPR in the country.

  17. Characterization by notched and precracked Charpy tests of the in-service degradation of RPV steel fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-01-01

    The current engineering and regulatory practice to estimate fracture toughness safety margins for nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) relies heavily on the CVN impact test. Techniques to estimate in-service toughness degradation directly using a variety of precracked specimens are under development worldwide. Emphasis is on their miniaturization. In the nuclear context, it is essential to address many issues such as representativity of the surveillance programs with respect to the vessel in terms of materials and environment, transferability of test results to the structure (constraint and size effects), lower bound toughness certification, creadibility relative to trends of exising databases. An enhanced RPV surveillance strategy in under development in Belgium. It combines state-of-the-art micromechanical and damage modelling to the evaluation of CVN load-deflection signals, tensile stress-strain curves and slow-bend tests of reconstituted precracked Charpy specimens. A probabilistic micromechanical model has been established for static and dynamic transgranular cleavage initiation fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature range. This model allows to project toughness bounds for any steel embrittlement condition from the corresponding CVN and static tensile properties, using a single scaling factor defined by imposing agreement with toughness tests in a single condition. The outstanding finding incorporated by this toughness transfer model is that the microcleavage fracture stress is affected by temperature in the ductile-brittle transition and that this influence is strongly correlated to the flow stress: this explains the shape of the K{sub Ic}n K{sub Id} temperature curves as well as the actual magnitude of the strain rate and irradiation effects. Furthermore, CVN crack arrest loads and fracture appearance are also taken advantage of in order to estimate K{sub Ia} degradation. Finally, the CVN-tensile load-temperature diagram

  18. Characterization by notched and precracked Charpy tests of the in-service degradation of RPV steel fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabry, A.

    1997-01-01

    The current engineering and regulatory practice to estimate fracture toughness safety margins for nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) relies heavily on the CVN impact test. Techniques to estimate in-service toughness degradation directly using a variety of precracked specimens are under development worldwide. Emphasis is on their miniaturization. In the nuclear context, it is essential to address many issues such as representativity of the surveillance programs with respect to the vessel in terms of materials and environment, transferability of test results to the structure (constraint and size effects), lower bound toughness certification, creadibility relative to trends of exising databases. An enhanced RPV surveillance strategy in under development in Belgium. It combines state-of-the-art micromechanical and damage modelling to the evaluation of CVN load-deflection signals, tensile stress-strain curves and slow-bend tests of reconstituted precracked Charpy specimens. A probabilistic micromechanical model has been established for static and dynamic transgranular cleavage initiation fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature range. This model allows to project toughness bounds for any steel embrittlement condition from the corresponding CVN and static tensile properties, using a single scaling factor defined by imposing agreement with toughness tests in a single condition. The outstanding finding incorporated by this toughness transfer model is that the microcleavage fracture stress is affected by temperature in the ductile-brittle transition and that this influence is strongly correlated to the flow stress: this explains the shape of the K Ic n K Id temperature curves as well as the actual magnitude of the strain rate and irradiation effects. Furthermore, CVN crack arrest loads and fracture appearance are also taken advantage of in order to estimate K Ia degradation. Finally, the CVN-tensile load-temperature diagram provides substantial

  19. Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Charpy-V (C V ) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288 degree C (550 degree F) irradiated (I), 288 degree C (550 degree F) irradiated + 454 degree C (850 degree F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288 degree C (550 degree F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 x 10 19 n/cm 2 and 4.18 x 10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 x 10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C V upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C V 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C V transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared

  20. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  1. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels; RPV-1: un premier reacteur virtuel pour simuler les effets d'irradiation dans les aciers de cuve des reacteurs a eau legere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jumel, St

    2005-01-15

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  2. Effects of the phase fractions on the carbide morphologies, Charpy and tensile properties in SA508 Gr.4N High Strength Low Alloy RPV Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    To improve the strength and toughness of RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steels for nuclear power plants, an effective way is the change of material specification from tempered bainitic SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel into tempered martensitic/bainitic SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. It is known that the phase fractions of martensitic/bainitic steels are very sensitive to the austenitizing cooling rates. Kim reported that there are large differences of austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations in RPV due to its thickness of 250mm. Hence, the martensite/bainite fractions would be changed in different locations, and it would affect the microstructure and mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. These results may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics after austenitizing. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite/bainite fractions on microstructure and mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined. The changes in phase fractions of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel with different cooling rates were analyzed, and then the phase fractions were correlated with its microstructural observation and mechanical properties

  3. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behaviour of low-alloy RPV steels at different temperatures and loading frequencies under BWR/NWC environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    The strain-induced corrosion cracking or low-frequency corrosion fatigue (LFCF) crack growth behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and of a RPV weld filler/weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) material were characterized under simulated transient boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions by cyclic fatigue tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200, or 150 deg. C. Modern high-temperature water loops, on-line crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographic analysis by SEM were used to quantify the cracking response. Under low-flow and highly oxidising conditions (ECP > 0 mV SHE , O 2 = 0.4 ppm) the cycle-based LFCF crack growth rates (CGR) Δa/ΔN increased with decreasing loading frequency and increasing temperature with a maximum/plateau at/above 250 deg. C. Sustained environmentally-assisted crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10 -5 Hz. The LFCF CGR of low- and high-sulphur steels and of the weld filler/HAZ material were comparable over a wide range of loading conditions and conservatively covered by the 'high-sulphur line' of the General Electric-model. The 'ASME XI wet fatigue CGR curves' could be significantly exceeded in all materials by cyclic fatigue loading at low frequencies ( -2 Hz) at high and low load ratios R. (authors)

  4. An evaluation of analysis methodologies for predicting cleavage arrest of a deep crack in an RPV subjected to PTS loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney-Walker, J.; Bass, B.R.

    1992-01-01

    Several calculational procedures are compared for predicting cleavage arrest of a deep crack in the wall of a prototypical reactor pressure vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) types of loading conditions. Three procedures examined in this study utilized the following models: (1) a static finite-element model (full bending); (2) a radially constrained static model; and (3) a thermoelastic dynamic finite-element model. A PTS transient loading condition was selected that produced a deep arrest of an axially-oriented initially shallow crack according to calculational results obtained from the static (full-bending) model. Results from the two static models were compared with those generated from the detailed thermoelastic dynamic finite-element analysis. The dynamic analyses modeled cleavage-crack propagation using node-release technique and an application-mode methodology based on dynamic fracture toughness curves generated from measured data. Comparisons presented here indicate that the degree to which dynamic solutions can be approximated by static models is highly dependent on several factors, including the material dynamic fracture curves and the propensity for cleavage reinitiation of the arrested crack under PTS loading conditions. Additional work is required to develop and validate a satisfactory dynamic fracture toughness model applicable to postcleavage arrest conditions in an RPV

  5. SCK-CEN Contribution to the IAEA Round Robin Exercise on WWER-440 RPV Weld Material Irradiation, Annealing and Re-Embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Fabry, A.; Van de Velde, J.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN to the IAEA Round Robin Exercise on WWER-440 RPV weld material is reported. The objective of this contribution is twofold: (1) to gain experience in the field of the testing of WWER-440 steels; (2) to analyse the round-robin data according to in-house developed on used models in order to check their validity and applicability. Results from testing on unirradiated material are reported including data obtained from chemical analysis, Charpy-V impact testing, tensile testing and fracture toughness determination. Finally, irradiation strategies that can be used in the program to obtain irradiated, irradiated-annealed and irradiated-annealed-reirradiated conditions are outlined

  6. Comparison of the segregation behavior between tempered martensite and tempered bainite in Ni-Cr-Mo high strength low alloy RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Hyung Jun; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel has an superior fracture toughness and strength, compared to commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy RPV steel SA508 Gr.3. Higher strength and fracture toughness of low alloy steels could be obtained by adding Ni and Cr. So several were performed on researches on SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a RPV application. The operation temperature and term of a reactor pressure vessel is more than 300 .deg. C and over 40 years. Therefore, in order to apply the SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel for a reactor pressure vessel, the resistance of thermal embrittlement in the high temperature range including temper embrittlement is required. S. Raoul reported that the susceptibility to temper embrittlement was increasing a function of the cooling rate in SA533 steel, which suggests the martensitic microstructures resulting from increased cooling rates are more susceptible to temper embrittlement. However, this result has not been proved yet. So the comparison of temper embrittlement behavior was made between martensitic microstructure and bainitic microstructure with a viewpoint of boundary features in SA508 Gr.4N, which have mixture of tempered bainite/martensite. We have compared temper embrittlement behaviors of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with changing volume fraction of martensite. The mechanical properties of these low alloy steels were evaluated after a long-term heat treatment. Then, the the segregated boundaries were observed and segregation behavior was analyzed by AES. In order to compare the misorientation distributions of model alloys, grain boundary structures were measured with EBSD

  7. Nano-structural changes in the RPV steels irradiated in MTR to high doses. 3D atom probe and positron annihilation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Kenji; Soneda, Naoki; Nomoto, Akiyoshi; Ishino, Shiori

    2005-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels of life-extended light water reactors are to be exposed to higher neutron fluence. The understanding of radiation embrittlement of RPV steels is very important in order to improve prediction of the embrittlement. The radiation embrittlement is mainly cased by copper-enriched cluster (CEC) and matrix damage (MD) due to irradiation. The state-or-the art technique such as three dimensional atom probe (3DAP) and positron annihilation (PA) has enabled to observe these microstructural features. The effect of highly dose irradiation on the formation of clusters in a low copper base metal and a high copper weld metal is investigated by means of the 3DAP and PA observations in this paper. The materials were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 10 20 n/cm 2 at 290 degC in a test reactor. The 3DAP observation shows that high dense CRCs in size of about 2 nm are formed in the high Cu weld metal. The CRCs consist of Si in addition to Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. Solute atom clusters below 2 nm are also observed in low Cu base metal, but the clusters include a large amount of Si and free from Cu. These clusters may be peculiar to highly irradiated materials because of no literature reporting such the clusters in the similar steels irradiated at the lower fluence. The data of the positron annihilation coincidence Doppler broadening measurement for both materials also shows the formation of clusters containing Cu, Ni, Mn, and Si. This means the clusters observed by 3DAP are uniformly distributed in the materials. Hardness tests and PA measurement combined with isochronal annealing show that defects, e.g. dislocation loop etc., having a positron lifetime of about 140 psec influence on mechanical properties of the steels. (author)

  8. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  9. Morbillivirus vaccines: recent successes and future hopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczkowski, Hubert; Muniraju, Murali; Parida, Satya; Banyard, Ashley C

    2014-05-30

    The impact of morbilliviruses on both human and animal populations is well documented in the history of mankind. Indeed, prior to the development of vaccines for these diseases, morbilliviruses plagued both humans and their livestock that were heavily relied upon for food and motor power within communities. Measles virus (MeV) was responsible for the death of millions of people annually across the world and those fortunate enough to escape the disease often faced starvation where their livestock had died following infection with rinderpest virus (RPV) or peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Canine distemper virus has affected dog populations for centuries and in the past few decades appears to have jumped species, now causing disease in a number of non-canid species, some of which are been pushed to the brink of extinction by the virus. During the age of vaccination, the introduction and successful application of vaccines against rinderpest and measles has led to the eradication of the former and the greater control of the latter. Vaccines against PPR and canine distemper have also been generated; however, the diseases still pose a threat to susceptible species. Here we review the currently available vaccines against these four morbilliviruses and discuss the prospects for the development of new generation vaccines. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of a Chloride Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P.

    2002-11-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5 t h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the second test of working package (WP) 3 with a NaCl transient, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack with a crack growth rate (CGR) in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC line' of the GE-model was generated by periodical partial unloading (PPU) in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 o C, DO = 8 ppm). Then a chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - was applied for ∼40 h. After this transient, the load level was reduced and the loading conditions were changed to pure cyclic loading. Thereupon a second transient with a chloride concentration of 49 ppb was applied. In both RPV steels, the first chloride transient of 49 ppb Cl - resulted in an acceleration of the EAC crack growth by more than one order of magnitude and in fast, stationary SCC crack growth during the constant load phase of the PPU cycles at K I values 1/2 . 3 h after adding chloride to the high-purity water, the EAC CGR started to increase in the high-sulphur RPV steel during the constant load phase of a PPU cycle and after 20 h a stationary EAC CGR value in the range of the 'high-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model was reached. After 5 h in high-purity water, the crack growth began to slow down after a partial unloading cycle and 15 h later it reached again a stationary CGR value in the range of the 'low-sulphur SCC curve' of the GE-model. The second chloride transient did not result in an acceleration of the crack growth in both investigated specimens. This was explained by crack closure effects, which occurred in both specimens after the reduction of the load. The CGR

  11. Results of work in the hot cells of Laboratory Testing Materials Irradiated Areva of Carina project for the expansion of the database of mechanical characteristics of fractures in materials of RPV German irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmes, J.; Schabel, H.; Hein, H.; Kein, E.; Eiselt, C.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the already completed research projects CARINA and its predecessor CARISMA a data base was created for pre-irradiated original RPV steels of German PWRs which allowed to examine the consequences if the Master Curve (T 0 ) approach instead of the RT N OT concept is applied to the RPV safety assessment. Furthermore in CARINA different irradiation conditions with respect to the accumulated neutron fluences and specific impact parameters were investigated. Besides a brief introduction of the CARINA project and an overview of the main results an overview on the requirements of the hot laboratory work in terms of specimen manufacturing and material testing is given and examples for realization are shown. (Author)

  12. Generation of a high temperature material data base and its application to creep tests with French or German RPV-steel. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willschuetz, H.G.; Altstadt, E.

    2002-08-01

    Considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario for a light water reactor (LWR) a possible failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its failure time has to be investigated for a determination of the loadings on the containment. Numerous experiments have been performed accompanied with material properties evaluation, theoretical, and numerical work /REM 1993/, /THF 1997/, /CHU 1999/. For pre- and post-test calculations of Lower Head Failure experiments like OLHF or FOREVER it is necessary to model creep and plasticity processes. Therefore a Finite Element Model is developed at the FZR using a numerical approach which avoids the use of a single creep law employing constants derived from the data for a limited stress and temperature range. Instead of this a numerical creep data base (CDB) is developed where the creep strain rate is evaluated in dependence on the current total strain, temperature and equivalent stress. A main task for this approach is the generation and validation of the CDB. Additionally the implementation of all relevant temperature dependent material properties has been performed. For an evaluation of the failure times a damage model according to an approach of Lemaitre is applied. The validation of the numerical model is performed by the simulation of and comparison with experiments. This is done in 3 levels: starting with the simulation of single uniaxial creep tests, which is considered as a 1D-problem. In the next level so called ''tube-failure-experiments'' are modeled: the RUPTHER-14 and the ''MPA-Meppen''-experiment. These experiments are considered as 2D-problems. Finally the numerical model is applied to scaled 3D-experiments, where the lower head of a PWR is represented in its hemispherical shape, like in the FOREVER-experiments. This report deals with the 1D- and 2D-simulations. An interesting question to be solved in this frame is the comparability of the French 16MND5 and the German 20MnMoNi55 RPV-steels, which are

  13. Results of work in the hot cells of Laboratory Testing Materials Irradiated Areva of Carina project for the expansion of the database of mechanical characteristics of fractures in materials of RPV German irradiated; Resultados del trabajo en las celdas calientes del Laboratorio de Ensayos de Materiales Irradiados de Areva del proyecto Carina para la ampliacion de la base de datos de caracteristicas mecanicas de las fracturas en materiales de RPV alemanas irradiados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelmes, J.; Schabel, H.; Hein, H.; Kein, E.; Eiselt, C.

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of the already completed research projects CARINA and its predecessor CARISMA a data base was created for pre-irradiated original RPV steels of German PWRs which allowed to examine the consequences if the Master Curve (T{sub 0}) approach instead of the RT{sub N}OT concept is applied to the RPV safety assessment. Furthermore in CARINA different irradiation conditions with respect to the accumulated neutron fluences and specific impact parameters were investigated. Besides a brief introduction of the CARINA project and an overview of the main results an overview on the requirements of the hot laboratory work in terms of specimen manufacturing and material testing is given and examples for realization are shown. (Author)

  14. Epidemiology and integrated management of persistently transmitted aphid-borne viruses of legume and cereal crops in West Asia and North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkouk, Khaled M; Kumari, Safaa G

    2009-05-01

    Cool-season food legumes (faba bean, lentil, chickpea and pea) and cereals (bread and durum wheat and barley) are the most important and widely cultivated crops in West Asia and North Africa (WANA), where they are the main source of carbohydrates and protein for the majority of the population. Persistently transmitted aphid-borne viruses pose a significant limitation to legume and cereal production worldwide. Surveys conducted in many countries in WANA during the last three decades established that the most important of these viruses are: Faba bean necrotic yellows virus (FBNYV: genus Nanovirus; family Nanoviridae), Bean leafroll virus (BLRV: genus Luteovirus; family Luteoviridae), Beet western yellows virus (BWYV: genus Polerovirus; family Luteoviridae), Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV: genus Luteovirus; family Luteoviridae) and Chickpea chlorotic stunt virus (CpCSV: genus Polerovirus; family Luteoviridae) which affect legume crops, and Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV (BYDV-PAV: genus Luteovirus; family Luteoviridae), Barley yellow dwarf virus-MAV (BYDV-MAV: genus Luteovirus; family Luteoviridae) and Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV: genus Polerovirus; family Luteoviridae) which affect cereal crops. Loss in yield caused by these viruses is usually high when infection occurs early in the growing season. Many aphid vector species for the above-mentioned viruses are reported to be prevalent in the WANA region. In addition, in this region many wild species (annual or perennial) were found infected with these viruses and may play an important role in their ecology and spread. Fast spread of these diseases was always associated with high aphid vector populations and activity. Although virus disease management can be achieved by combining several control measures, development of resistant genotypes is undoubtedly one of the most appropriate control methods. Over the last three decades barley and wheat genotypes resistant to BYDV, faba bean genotypes resistant to BLRV, and

  15. Prediction of the brittle fracture toughness value of a RPV steel from the analysis of a limited set of Charpy results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forget, P.; Marini, B.; Verdiere, N.

    2001-01-01

    Our objective is to establish a method to be able to determine fracture toughness of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) by using the small number of Charpy specimens used in the reactor surveillance program. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to determine fracture toughness from Charpy tests. Another point is to determine if statistical effects are compatible with a restricted number of specimens, this paper deals with this point and presents a methodology that is applicable to the case of irradiated materials from the surveillance program. Several conclusions can be drawn from this study: -) When determining failure parameters, we gain most accuracy by increasing the number of samples from 3 to about 6; -) it is possible to evaluate brittle fracture toughness using local approach, either by using Beremin or Renevey model; -) The effect of using a small number of Charpy specimens to determine fracture toughness in brittle fracture is evaluated. The error in the evaluation of fracture toughness is much smaller than the experimental dispersion itself. (A.C.)

  16. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  17. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  18. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  19. Selective constraints, molecular recombination structure and phylogenetic reconstruction of isometric plant RNA viruses of the families Luteoviridae and Tymoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulila, Moncef

    2011-02-01

    In an effort to enhance the knowledge on molecular evolution of currently the known members of the families Luteoviridae and Tymoviridae, in-depth molecular investigations in the entire genome of 147 accessions retrieved from the international databases, were carried out. Two algorithms (RECCO and RDP version 3.31β) adapted to the mosaic structure of viruses were utilized. The recombination frequency along the sequences was dissected and demonstrated that the three virus genera of the family Luteoviridae comprise numerous members subjected to recombination. It has pointed out that the major viruses swapped a few but long genomic segments. In addition, in Barley yellow dwarf virus, heredity material might be exchanged between two different serotypes. Even more, putative recombination events occurred between two different genera. Based on Fisher's Exact Test of Neutrality, positive selection acting on protein expression was detected only in the poleroviruses Cereal yellow dwarf virus, Potato leafroll virus and Wheat yellow dwarf virus. In contrast, several components of the family Tymoviridae were highly recombinant. Genomic portion exchange arose in many positions consisting of short fragments. Furthermore, no positive selection was detected. The evolutionary history showed, in the Luteoviridae, that all screened isolates split into three clusters corresponding to the three virus genera forming this family. Moreover, in the serotype PAV of Barley yellow dwarf virus, two major clades corresponding to PAV-USA and PAV-China, were delineated. Similarly, in the Tymoviridae, all analyzed isolates fell into four groups corresponding to the three virus genera composing this family along with the unclassified Tymoviridae. Inferred phylogenies reshuffled the existing classification and showed that Wheat yellow dwarf virus-RPV was genetically closely related to Cereal yellow dwarf virus and the unclassified Tymoviridae Grapevine syrah virus-1 constituted an integral part of

  20. Effect of a Sulphate Transient on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Test 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H. P

    2002-03-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5th EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. Within WP 3 of this project, the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) investigates the effect of water chemistry transients on the EAC crack growth behaviour under periodical partial unloading (PPU) conditions. The present report is a summary of the first PSI test of WP 3 with a Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} transient. In the first part of the report, the theoretical background on crack growth mechanisms, crack chemistry, mass transport and water chemistry transients as well as a brief literature survey on other water chemistry transient investigations is given. Furthermore, the experimental equipment and test procedure is presented, followed by a summary of the results of PSI test 1 of WP 3. Finally the results are discussed in detail and compared to literature data. In the first part of the experiment, an actively growing EAC crack was generated by PPU in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 288 {sup o}C, DO = 8 ppm, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} < 0.6 ppb). Then a sulphate transient was applied. The duration ({approx} 300 h) and the amount of sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = 368 ppb) of the applied sulphate transient conservatively covered all sulphate transients, which might occur in BWR/normal water chemistry (NWC) practice. After the transient, outlet conductivity was lowered from ca. 1 {mu}S/cm to less than 0.15 {mu}S/cm within 2.6 h by a 'two-loop technique'. No accelerating effect of the sulphate transient on the EAC crack growth of both tested fracture mechanics specimens under highly oxidising BWR/NWC conditions was observed, making it impossible to deterrnine incubation or delay times. The EAC crack growth rates (CGR) before, during and after the

  1. Morbillivirus nucleoprotein possesses a novel nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-independent nuclear export signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroki; Masuda, Munemitsu; Miura, Ryuichi; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2006-01-01

    Morbilliviruses, which belong to the Mononegavirales, replicate its RNA genome in the cytoplasm of the host cell. However, they also form characteristic intranuclear inclusion bodies, consisting of nucleoprotein (N), in infected cells. To analyze the mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic transport of N protein, we characterized the nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) signals of canine distemper virus (CDV) N protein by deletion mutation and alanine substitution of the protein. The NLS has a novel leucine/isoleucine-rich motif (TGILISIL) at positions 70-77, whereas the NES is composed of a leucine-rich motif (LLRSLTLF) at positions 4-11. The NLS and NES of the N proteins of other morbilliviruses, that is, measles virus (MV) and rinderpest virus (RPV), were also analyzed. The NLS of CDV-N protein is conserved at the same position in MV-N protein, whereas the NES of MV-N protein is located in the C-terminal region. The NES of RPV-N protein is also located at the same position as CDV-N protein, whereas the NLS motif is present not only at the same locus as CDV-N protein but also at other sites. Interestingly, the nuclear export of all these N proteins appears to proceed via a CRM1-independent pathway

  2. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    explore the potential of this infection crossing the species barrier and thereby .... The virus targets mainly the brain of the unborn animal resulting in neurological ... The virus is located in the blood of the adult infected animal or in the central ...

  4. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Zika Virus Credit: NIAID A female Aedes mosquito. This type of mosquito can transmit Zika, ... transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Zika virus can be transmitted from an infected pregnant woman ...

  5. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  6. Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudeep, A B; Jadi, R S; Mishra, A C

    2009-11-01

    Ganjam virus (GANV), a member of genus Nairovirus of family Bunyavirdae is of considerable veterinary importance in India. Though, predominantly tick borne, GANV was also isolated from mosquitoes, man and sheep. Neutralizing and complement fixing antibodies to GANV have been detected in animal and human sera collected from different parts of the country. Thirty three strains of GANV have been isolated from India, mainly from Haemaphysalis ticks. The virus replicated in certain vertebrate and mosquito cell lines and found pathogenic to laboratory animals. One natural infection and five laboratory-acquired infections in men were also reported. GANV is antigenically related to Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) of Africa, which is highly pathogenic for sheep and goats causing 70-90 per cent mortality among the susceptible population. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated that GANV is an Asian variant of NSDV and both these viruses are related to the dreaded Crimean Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) group viruses. The versatility of the virus to replicate in different arthropod species, its ability to infect sheep, goat and man makes it an important zoonotic agent.

  7. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan Virus Disease Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for ... Virus Disease Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan virus is a tickborne flavivirus that is ...

  8. Crop-associated virus reduces the rooting depth of non-crop perennial native grass more than non-crop-associated virus with known viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Carolyn M; Bigelow, Patrick; Trębicki, Piotr; Busch, Anna K; Friel, Colleen; Cole, Ellen; Abdel-Azim, Heba; Phillippo, Colin; Alexander, Helen M

    2017-09-15

    As agricultural acreage expanded and came to dominate landscapes across the world, viruses gained opportunities to move between crop and wild native plants. In the Midwestern USA, virus exchange currently occurs between widespread annual Poaceae crops and remnant native perennial prairie grasses now under consideration as bioenergy feedstocks. In this region, the common aphid species Rhopalosiphum padi L. (the bird cherry-oat aphid) transmits several virus species in the family Luteoviridae, including Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV-PAV, genus Luteovirus) and Cereal yellow dwarf virus (CYDV-RPV and -RPS, genus Polerovirus). The yellow dwarf virus (YDV) species in these two genera share genetic similarities in their 3'-ends, but diverge in the 5'-regions. Most notably, CYDVs encode a P0 viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) absent in BYDV-PAV. Because BYDV-PAV has been reported more frequently in annual cereals and CYDVs in perennial non-crop grasses, we examine the hypothesis that the viruses' genetic differences reflect different affinities for crop and non-crop hosts. Specifically, we ask (i) whether CYDVs might persist within and affect a native non-crop grass more strongly than BYDV-PAV, on the grounds that the polerovirus VSR could better moderate the defenses of a well-defended perennial, and (ii) whether the opposite pattern of effects might occur in a less defended annual crop. Because previous work found that the VSR of CYDV-RPS possessed greater silencing suppressor efficiency than that of CYDV-RPV, we further explored (iii) whether a novel grass-associated CYDV-RPS isolate would influence a native non-crop grass more strongly than a comparable CYDV-RPV isolate. In growth chamber studies, we found support for this hypothesis: only grass-associated CYDV-RPS stunted the shoots and crowns of Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass), a perennial native North American prairie grass, whereas crop-associated BYDV-PAV (and coinfection with BYDV-PAV and CYDV-RPS) most

  9. Isolation, identification and retrospective study of foot-and-mouth disease virus from affected Mithun (Bos frontalis) in north-eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, B; Deka, P; Sharma, K; Baro, S; Hazarika, A K; Das, C; Garam, G B; Boro, P; Ltu, K

    2018-02-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals that causes substantial and perpetual economic loss. Apart from the contagious nature of the disease, the FMD virus can establish in a "carrier state" among all cloven-hoofed animals. The Mithun (Bos frontalis), popularly called the "Cattle of Mountain," is found in the geographically isolated, hilly region of north-east India: Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram. Despite the geographical inaccessibility, infection by FMD virus has emerged as the single most devastating disease among Mithun after the eradication of rinderpest from this region. Samples from outbreaks of FMD in Mithun were analysed by sandwich ELISA, multiplex RT-PCR (MRT-PCR) and liquid-phase blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and isolated in the BHK-21 cell line. The results indicate the presence of FMDV serotype "O." The sequencing and molecular phylogenies have revealed close relationships in the lineage of type "O" isolates from Bangladesh. The findings will provide useful information for further research and development of a sustainable programme for the progressive control of FMD in the Mithun population. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Analysis of the procedure proposed by AREVA to prove adequate toughness of the domes of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head and closure head. Session of 30 September 2015. Public version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catteau, R.; Cadet-Mercier, S.

    2015-01-01

    AREVA has asked ASN to evaluate the conformity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) for the Flamanville 3 EPR in application of the order reference [6]. The domes of the Flamanville 3 RPV closure head and lower head were manufactured in 2006 and 2007. AREVA identified that these components displayed a risk of heterogeneity of their characteristics and therefore carried out a technical qualification. At the end of 2014, AREVA informed ASN of lower-than-expected results of impact tests conducted as part of this technical qualification on test specimens taken from a dome representative of those intended for Flamanville 3. The values measured on two series of three test specimens give a mean value of 52 joules which does not attain the quality standard expected by AREVA. This mean value is also lower than the bending rupture energy value of 60 joules mentioned in point 4 of appendix 1 of the order reference [6], with which compliance would have been sufficient to prove the toughness of the material. AREVA carried out investigations to determine the origin of these noncompliant values. The carbon concentration measurements taken at the surface of the representative dome by portable spectrometry revealed the presence of a zone of major positive segregation (high concentration of carbon) over a diameter of about one meter. Furthermore, the examinations show that the segregation extends to a depth exceeding a quarter of the thickness of the dome. AREVA explains the non-compliance with the bending rupture energy criterion by the presence of this major positive segregation which came from the ingot used for the forging and was not completely eliminated by the cropping operations. To deal with this deviation, AREVA plans proving that the material is sufficiently tough by conducting new tests on a material that is representative of the lower and upper domes of the Flamanville EPR reactor. The body of the Flamanville 3 RPV, of which the lower dome is a part, has already

  11. CFD investigations of natural circulation between the RPV and the cooling pond of VVER-440 type reactors in incidental conditions during maintenance performed with the code CFX-4.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legradi, G.; Aszodi, A.

    2002-01-01

    During the annual maintenance of the VVER-440 type reactors, the RPV, the cooling pond and the transfer pond form a connected flow domain. The reactor is cooled by the natural circulation, which develops in one or two main loops. The cooling pond has its own cooling loops. CFD calculations have been performed with the CFX-4.3 code to investigate whether it is possible to cool the reactor core in case the main loops are lost and other emergency systems are not available. The results point out that the cooling system of the cooling pond is not capable of cooling the reactor core with the present connection. Therefore, modifications of the cooling system are investigated which would make it suitable for removing the remanent heat from the core.(author)

  12. Ebola Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Rangare Lakshman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The disease Ebola takes its name from the Ebola River situated near a village in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the disease first appeared in 1976. It is caused by a virus from the Filoviridae family (filovirus. The present outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD concerns four countries in West Africa, namely Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria till date. Further to widespread transmission of the disease, it has been declared as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organisation on 8 August 2014. As of 4 August 2014, countries have reported 1,711 cases (1,070 confirmed, 436 probable, 205 suspect, including 932 deaths. This review paper enlightens about the awareness of Ebola virus and its preventive measures. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(3.000: 296-305

  13. SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... consequence.Protein spike similar. HE gene absent. 2787 nucleotides. Largest genome. Jumps species by genetic deletion. < 300 compounds screened. Glycyrrhizin (liquorics/mullatha) seems attractive. Antivirals not effective. Vaccines – animal model only in monkeys. Killed corona or knockout weakened virus as targets.

  14. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Influenza (Flu) Viruses Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... influenza circulate and cause illness. More Information about Flu Viruses Types of Influenza Viruses Influenza A and ...

  15. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  16. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  17. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  18. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  19. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  20. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  1. Small specimen test results and application of advanced models for fracture mechanics assessment of RPV integrity; Ergebnisse von Kleinproben und Anwendung von Modellansaetzen zur bruchmechanischen Bewertung der RDB-Integritaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, Elisabeth; Huemmer, Matthias [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Hoffmann, Harald [VGB (Germany); Nagel, Gerhard [e-on Kernkraft (Germany); Kuester, Karin [VENE (Germany); Koenig, Guenter; Ilg, Ulf [EnBW (Germany); Widera, Martin [RWE (Germany); Rebsamen, Daniel [KKW Goesgen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    For the RPV (reactor pressure vessel) integrity assessment the transferability of specimen test results to components is of main importance. The international project TIMES (transferability of fracture toughness of irradiated materials to components and structures) is focussed on the transferability of fracture mechanical characteristics of irradiated materials to components or structures, in order to allow the quantification of differences between sample and component characteristics based on experiments and calculations. The studies were performed for the brittle and brittle-ductile regions of the material characteristics using specimens from original RPV materials in different conditions. Based on case studies the consequence of a component assessment with postulated defects are shown when specimen-related materials properties are used. Since it is not possible to prove the transferability for an RPV in detail, component-similar effects were investigated that allow in combination with numerical modelling to quantify the safety margin. Samples and experimental procedures were developed that simulated the real component situation. The effects of crack depth and multiaxial loads, relevant for real components, were investigated with these samples. A micromechanical model was developed based on the weakest link theory and the statistical failure probability; this model is used for the prediction of fracture toughness of samples and components with defects. For a component with postulated defects the safety margin was assessed using different methodologies, based on standard fracture mechanical samples, taking into account component specific aspects. [German] Fuer die Bewertung der RDB-Integritaet ist die Uebertragbarkeit von Probenkennwerten auf Bauteile von grosser Bedeutung. Dazu wurde das Projekt ''TIMES'' - ein internationales Projekt zur Uebertragbarkeit von Bruchzaehigkeitskennwerten von bestrahlten Materialien auf Komponenten und Strukturen - durchgefuehrt, um

  2. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  3. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  4. Full Genome Sequencing Reveals New Southern African Territories Genotypes Bringing Us Closer to Understanding True Variability of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecka-Dykes, Lidia; Wright, Caroline F.; Di Nardo, Antonello; Logan, Grace; Mioulet, Valerie; Jackson, Terry; Tuthill, Tobias J.; Knowles, Nick J.; King, Donald P.

    2018-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hooved animals that poses a constant burden on farmers in endemic regions and threatens the livestock industries in disease-free countries. Despite the increased number of publicly available whole genome sequences, FMDV data are biased by the opportunistic nature of sampling. Since whole genomic sequences of Southern African Territories (SAT) are particularly underrepresented, this study sequenced 34 isolates from eastern and southern Africa. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two novel genotypes (that comprised 8/34 of these SAT isolates) which contained unusual 5′ untranslated and non-structural encoding regions. While recombination has occurred between these sequences, phylogeny violation analyses indicated that the high degree of sequence diversity for the novel SAT genotypes has not solely arisen from recombination events. Based on estimates of the timing of ancestral divergence, these data are interpreted as being representative of un-sampled FMDV isolates that have been subjected to geographical isolation within Africa by the effects of the Great African Rinderpest Pandemic (1887–1897), which caused a mass die-out of FMDV-susceptible hosts. These findings demonstrate that further sequencing of African FMDV isolates is likely to reveal more unusual genotypes and will allow for better understanding of natural variability and evolution of FMDV. PMID:29652800

  5. Epstein - Barr Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Štorkánová, Lenka

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus Bachelor thesis summarizes the findings of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), its general characteristics, transmission and spread of the virus, symptoms of disease and subsequent therapy and recovery. More specifically, it focuses on infectious mononucleosis, as well as more generally to other diseases, which the Epstein-Barr virus causes. It includes details of the vaccine against EB virus. There are the statistics on the incidence of infectious mononucleosis.

  6. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  7. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  8. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Marschang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  9. Zika virus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel I Al-Afaleq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the virus family Flaviviridae. The virus was isolated in 1947 from a rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest of Uganda. The virus causes sporadic mild human infections in Africa and later in Asia. However, by 2007 a major shift in its infection pattern was noticed and thousands of human infections were reported in the State of Yap and Federated States of Micronesia. In the last 3 years, major outbreaks have continued to occur and the virus has spread to several Pacific and American countries. These outbreaks were mostly asymptomatic; however, there were more severe clinical signs associated with the infections. Those signs included microcephaly and Guillain–Barre syndrome. It is believed that various species of mosquitoes can biologically transmit the virus. However, Aedes aegypti is most widely associated with the Zika virus. Recently, new modes of virus transmission have been reported, including mother-to-fetus, sexual, blood transfusion, animal bites, laboratory exposure and breast milk. Differential diagnosis is very important as some other arboviruses such as yellow fever virus, West Nile virus, dengue virus, and chikungunya virus have similar clinical manifestations to the Zika virus infection as well as relating serologically to some of these viruses. Established laboratory diagnostic tests to detect the Zika virus are limited, with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction being the most widely used test. Taking into consideration the quickness of the spread of infection, size of the infected population and change of the infection severity pattern, the Zika virus infection merits collective efforts on all levels to prevent and control the disease. Limited research work and data, concurrent infection with other arboviruses, involvement of biological vectors, mass crowd events, human and trade movements and lack of vaccines are some of the challenges that we face in our efforts to prevent and

  10. German RPV safety assessment. Underpinning of the procedure by complementary test results measured in the hot cells; Der deutsche RDB-Sicherheitsnachweis. Untermauerung der Vorgehensweise durch ergaenzende Kennwertermittlung in den Heissen Zellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, Elisabeth; Hein, Hieronymus; Gundermann, Arnulf [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Hoffmann, Harald [VGB (Germany); Koenig, Guenter; Ilg, Ulf [EnBW (Germany); Nagel, Gerhard [e-on Kernkraft (Germany); Widera, Martin [RWE (Germany); Rebsamen, Daniel [KKW Goesgen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In Germany the assessment of the RPV (reactor pressure vessel) integrity is regulated by the German Code KTA 3201.2, based on a deterministic concept. The material characteristics are indexed by the reference temperature RTNDT which is determined by mechanical tests. The comparison with fracture mechanical characteristics shows that the fracture toughness curve KIc (T-RTNDT) is an envelope of the experimental data. Worldwide a tendency is observed to implement besides the established RTNDT concept another concept based on fracture mechanical characteristics. The advantage of the new concept is a direct determination of the ductile-brittle transition temperature using fracture mechanical tests, which is supposed to allow a more realistic transferability to the component. In order to integrate the Master-curve-concept into the German standards several questions have to be answered: for instance the relation to a representative data base of irradiated German RPV materials and the influence of the specimen shape and size. There is still a necessity to compare the established concept with the new concept und to clarify whether crack arrest curves of irradiated materials could be assessed and integrated into the master curve concept. Within the project CARISMA a data base of fracture toughness values of irradiated original RPV materials representative for all four German PWR generations was compiled. The RTNDT and the master-curve concept were used for the evaluation of the generic data in order to allow the comparison of both concepts. The main results are the following: The lower-bound ASME KIc curve for crack initiation (brittle failure) was confirmed by the measured fracture toughness data of the irradiated materials. The significant influence of copper and nickel on the irradiation behaviour of RPC materials was confirmed. The transition temperature shifts ?T41 and ?T0 show relatively good correlation. Fracture mechanical specimens type SE(B) 10 mm x 10 mm are

  11. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) is a rare and deadly disease ...

  12. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  13. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  14. Zika virus disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May 2015, the virus was discovered for the first time in Brazil. It has now spread to many territories, states, and countries in: Caribbean Islands Central America Mexico South America Pacific Islands Africa The virus ...

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Credit: CDC This is the ... the United States. Why Is the Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) a Priority for NIAID? In ...

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  17. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  18. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  19. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  20. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  1. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  2. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy ...

  3. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  4. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  5. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  6. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth / For Kids / What's West Nile Virus? Print en español ¿Qué es el Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West ...

  7. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  8. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is caused by a virus transmitted primarily by Aedes mosquitoes. People with Zika virus disease can have symptoms including mild fever, skin ... framework. Q&A: Zika virus and complication ... mosquito from the Aedes genus, mainly Aedes aegypti in tropical regions. Aedes ...

  9. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  10. Switch to Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Single-Tablet Regimen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 RNA-Suppressed Patients, Agence Nationale de Recherches sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazanave, Charles; Reigadas, Sandrine; Mazubert, Cyril; Bellecave, Pantxika; Hessamfar, Mojgan; Le Marec, Fabien; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Peytavin, Gilles; Bruyand, Mathias; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Neau, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 virologically suppressed patients who switched to rilpivirine (RPV)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) as a single-tablet regimen (STR). Methods.  A retrospective multicenter cohort study was performed between September 2012 and February 2014 in Bordeaux University Hospital-affiliated clinics. Patients with a plasma HIV viral load (VL) lower than 50 copies/mL and switching to STR were evaluated at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months from switch time (M3, M6, M9, M12) for VL and other biological parameters. Change from baseline in CD4 cell counts was evaluated at M6 and M12. Virological failure (VF) was defined as 2 consecutive VL >50 copies/mL. Results.  Three hundred four patients were included in the analysis. Single-tablet regimen switch was proposed to 116 patients with adverse events, mostly efavirenz (EFV)-based (n = 59), and to 224 patients for cART simplification. Thirty of 196 patients with available genotype resistance test results displayed virus with ≥1 drug resistance mutation on reverse-transcriptase gene. After 12 months of follow-up, 93.4% (95.5% confidence interval, 89.9-96.2) of patients remained virologically suppressed. There was no significant change in CD4 cell count. During the study period, 5 patients experienced VF, one of them harboring RPV resistance mutation. Clinical cART tolerability improved in 79 patients overall (29.9%) at M6, especially neurological symptoms related to EFV. Fasting serum lipid profiles improved, but a significant estimated glomerular function rate decrease (-11 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P < 10(-4)) was observed. Conclusions.  Overall, virologic suppression was maintained in patients after switching to RPV/TDF/ FTC. This STR strategy was associated with improved tolerability.

  11. Dynamics of a morbillivirus at the domestic–wildlife interface: Canine distemper virus in domestic dogs and lions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Mafalda; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Halliday, Jo; Packer, Craig; Craft, Meggan E.; Hampson, Katie; Czupryna, Anna; Dobson, Andrew P.; Dubovi, Edward J.; Ernest, Eblate; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hoare, Richard; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Horton, Daniel L.; Kaare, Magai T.; Kanellos, Theo; Lankester, Felix; Mentzel, Christine; Mlengeya, Titus; Mzimbiri, Imam; Takahashi, Emi; Willett, Brian; Haydon, Daniel T.; Lembo, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Morbilliviruses cause many diseases of medical and veterinary importance, and although some (e.g., measles and rinderpest) have been controlled successfully, others, such as canine distemper virus (CDV), are a growing concern. A propensity for host-switching has resulted in CDV emergence in new species, including endangered wildlife, posing challenges for controlling disease in multispecies communities. CDV is typically associated with domestic dogs, but little is known about its maintenance and transmission in species-rich areas or about the potential role of domestic dog vaccination as a means of reducing disease threats to wildlife. We address these questions by analyzing a long-term serological dataset of CDV in lions and domestic dogs from Tanzania’s Serengeti ecosystem. Using a Bayesian state–space model, we show that dynamics of CDV have changed considerably over the past three decades. Initially, peaks of CDV infection in dogs preceded those in lions, suggesting that spill-over from dogs was the main driver of infection in wildlife. However, despite dog-to-lion transmission dominating cross-species transmission models, infection peaks in lions became more frequent and asynchronous from those in dogs, suggesting that other wildlife species may play a role in a potentially complex maintenance community. Widespread mass vaccination of domestic dogs reduced the probability of infection in dogs and the size of outbreaks but did not prevent transmission to or peaks of infection in lions. This study demonstrates the complexity of CDV dynamics in natural ecosystems and the value of long-term, large-scale datasets for investigating transmission patterns and evaluating disease control strategies. PMID:25605919

  12. Dynamics of a morbillivirus at the domestic-wildlife interface: Canine distemper virus in domestic dogs and lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Mafalda; Cleaveland, Sarah; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Halliday, Jo; Packer, Craig; Craft, Meggan E; Hampson, Katie; Czupryna, Anna; Dobson, Andrew P; Dubovi, Edward J; Ernest, Eblate; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hoare, Richard; Hopcraft, J Grant C; Horton, Daniel L; Kaare, Magai T; Kanellos, Theo; Lankester, Felix; Mentzel, Christine; Mlengeya, Titus; Mzimbiri, Imam; Takahashi, Emi; Willett, Brian; Haydon, Daniel T; Lembo, Tiziana

    2015-02-03

    Morbilliviruses cause many diseases of medical and veterinary importance, and although some (e.g., measles and rinderpest) have been controlled successfully, others, such as canine distemper virus (CDV), are a growing concern. A propensity for host-switching has resulted in CDV emergence in new species, including endangered wildlife, posing challenges for controlling disease in multispecies communities. CDV is typically associated with domestic dogs, but little is known about its maintenance and transmission in species-rich areas or about the potential role of domestic dog vaccination as a means of reducing disease threats to wildlife. We address these questions by analyzing a long-term serological dataset of CDV in lions and domestic dogs from Tanzania's Serengeti ecosystem. Using a Bayesian state-space model, we show that dynamics of CDV have changed considerably over the past three decades. Initially, peaks of CDV infection in dogs preceded those in lions, suggesting that spill-over from dogs was the main driver of infection in wildlife. However, despite dog-to-lion transmission dominating cross-species transmission models, infection peaks in lions became more frequent and asynchronous from those in dogs, suggesting that other wildlife species may play a role in a potentially complex maintenance community. Widespread mass vaccination of domestic dogs reduced the probability of infection in dogs and the size of outbreaks but did not prevent transmission to or peaks of infection in lions. This study demonstrates the complexity of CDV dynamics in natural ecosystems and the value of long-term, large-scale datasets for investigating transmission patterns and evaluating disease control strategies.

  13. Viruses of asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Judson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  15. Protoplasts and plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakishi, H.; Lesney, M.S.; Carlson, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of protoplasts in the study of plant viruses has attracted considerable attention since its inception in the late 1960s. This article is an attempt to assess the current status of protoplasts (primarily) and all cell cultures (in some instances) in studies of virus infection, virus replication, cytopathology, cross-protection, virus resistance, and the use of in vitro methods and genetic engineering to recover virus-resistant plants. These areas of study proved difficult to do entirely with whole plants or plant parts. However, because protoplasts could be synchronously infected with virus, they provided a valuable alternative means of following biochemical and cytological events in relation to the virus growth cycle in a more precise manner than previously possible

  16. Barley yellow dwarf virus in barley crops in Tunisia: prevalence and molecular characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma NAJAR

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A field survey was conducted in Tunisia in the North-Eastern regions (Bizerte, CapBon and Zaghouan, the North-Western region (Kef and the Central-Eastern region (Kairouan during the 2011/2012 growing season, in order to determine the incidence and the geographic distribution of Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDVs in barley fields. Tissue blot immunoassays (TBIA showed that BYDV was most common in Zaghouan (incidence 14%, Cap Bon (14% and Bizerte (35%, in randomly collected samples from these three locations.Among the different BYDVs identified, BYDV-PAV (64% was the most common followed by BYDV-MAV (16% and CYDV-RPV (3%. The coat protein gene sequences of six isolates collected from different regions shared >98% pairwise similarity. In comparisons with other BYDV sequences from around the world, the Tunisian sequences shared greatest homology with isolates 109 and ASL1 from the United States of America and Germany (≈97%, and <90% with all other isolate sequences available in public databases.

  17. Fracture mechanics based assessment of postulated flaws in the nozzle region of RPV-KKS under loss of coolant accidents; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von postulierten Fehlern im Stutzenbereich des RDB-KKS bei Kuehlmittelverlust-Stoerfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, D.; Hodulak, L.; Varfolomeyev, I. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (IWM), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Nagel, G. [Preussen Elektra AG, Hannover (Germany). Hauptverwaltung

    1998-11-01

    Safety assessment of reactor components has to encompass the nozzles, as in the event of a LOCA, the nozzle areas are subject to heavy thermal stresses due to the low temperature there of the cooling agent. The paper refers to three-dimensional, elasto-plastic FEM analyses of the integer RPV and calculations of the J-integral for various crack locations and geometries, for derivation of realistic transients. The J-integral and K values calculated with FEM have been compared with stress intensity factors determined by means of enhanced analytical methods. Calculations for description of the integer nozzle yield plastifications in the cladded and the ferritic areas, so that the K concept of linear-elastic fracture mechanics is restricted in applicability. For postulated cracks beneath the integer cladding, J-integral values are determined which are below the initiating value J{sub 1} of the material used, which excludes crack initiation. For the largest postulated, 20 mm deep surface crack and through-cladding damage, a crack growth of 0.1 mm is derived according to the crack resistance curve. The analytical method for calculating the stress intensity factors has been expanded to also include application to evaluation of nozzle edge cracks under the cladding. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Bei der sicherheitstechnischen Bewertung von Reaktorkomponenten sind auch die Stutzen zu beruecksichtigen, da der Stutzenbereich bei Kuehlmittelverlust-Faellen, bedingt durch die dort vorliegenden tiefen Temperaturen des Kuehlmediums, hohen thermischen Beanspruchungen ausgesetzt ist. Fuer realistische Transienten werden dreidimensionale, elastisch-plastische FEM-Analysen fuer den integren RDB und Berechnungen des J-Integrals fuer verschiedene Risslagen und Rissgeometrien durchgefuehrt. Die mit FEM berechneten J-Integral- und K-Werte werden mit nach weiterentwickelten analytischen Methoden ermittelten Spannungsintensitaetsfatoren verglichen. Die Berechnungen fuer den integren Stutzen ergeben

  18. [The great virus comeback].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Viruses have been considered for a long time as by-products of biological evolution. This view is changing now as a result of several recent discoveries. Viral ecologists have shown that viral particles are the most abundant biological entities on our planet, whereas metagenomic analyses have revealed an unexpected abundance and diversity of viral genes in the biosphere. Comparative genomics have highlighted the uniqueness of viral sequences, in contradiction with the traditional view of viruses as pickpockets of cellular genes. On the contrary, cellular genomes, especially eukaryotic ones, turned out to be full of genes derived from viruses or related elements (plasmids, transposons, retroelements and so on). The discovery of unusual viruses infecting archaea has shown that the viral world is much more diverse than previously thought, ruining the traditional dichotomy between bacteriophages and viruses. Finally, the discovery of giant viruses has blurred the traditional image of viruses as small entities. Furthermore, essential clues on virus history have been obtained in the last ten years. In particular, structural analyses of capsid proteins have uncovered deeply rooted homologies between viruses infecting different cellular domains, suggesting that viruses originated before the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). These studies have shown that several lineages of viruses originated independently, i.e., viruses are polyphyletic. From the time of LUCA, viruses have coevolved with their hosts, and viral lineages can be viewed as lianas wrapping around the trunk, branches and leaves of the tree of life. Although viruses are very diverse, with genomes encoding from one to more than one thousand proteins, they can all be simply defined as organisms producing virions. Virions themselves can be defined as infectious particles made of at least one protein associated with the viral nucleic acid, endowed with the capability to protect the viral genome and ensure its

  19. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  20. APT characterization of high nickel RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Russell, K.F

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The microstructures of several high nickel content pressure vessel steels have been characterized by atom probe tomography. The purposes of this study were to investigate the influence of high nickel levels on the response to neutron irradiation of high and low copper pressure vessel steels and to establish whether any additional phases were present after neutron irradiation. The nickel levels in these steels were at least twice that typically found in Western pressure vessel steels. Two different types of pressure vessel steels with low and high copper contents were selected for this study. The first set of alloys was low copper (∼0.05% Cu) base (15Ch2NMFAA) and weld (12Ch2N2MAA) materials used in a VVER-1000 reactor. The composition of the lower nickel VVER-1000 base material was Fe- 0.17 wt% C, 0.30% Si, 0.46% Mn, 2.2% Cr, 1.26% Ni, 0.05% Cu, 0.01% S, 0.008% P, 0.10% V and 0.50% Mo. The composition of the higher nickel VVER-1000 weld material was Fe- 0.06 wt % C, 0.33% Si, 0.80% Mn, 1.8% Cr, 1.78% Ni, 0.07% Cu, 0.009% S, 0.005% P, and 0.63% Mo. The VVER-1000 steels were irradiated in the HSSI Program's irradiation facilities at the University of Michigan, Ford Nuclear Reactor at a temperature of 288 o C for 2,137 h at an average flux of 7.08 x 10 11 cm 2 s -1 for a fluence of 5.45 x 10 18 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV) and for 5,340 h at an average flux of 4.33 x 10 11 cm -2 s -1 for a fluence of 8.32 x 10 1 28 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV). Therefore, the total fluence was 1.38 x 10 19 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV). The second type of pressure vessel steel was a high copper (0.20% Cu) weld from the Palisades reactor. The average composition of the Palisades weld was Fe- 0.11 wt% C, 0.18% Si, 1.27% Mn, 0.04% Cr, 1.20% Ni, 0.20% Cu, 0.017% S, 0.014% P, 0.003% V and 0.55% Mn. The Palisades weld, designated weldment 'B' from weld heat 34B009, was irradiated at a temperature of 288 o C and a flux of ∼7 x 10 11 cm -2 s -1 to a fast fluence of 1.4 x 10 19 n cm -2 (E >1 MeV). These three alloys were characterized with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory local electrode atom probe. Atom probe tomography revealed nickel-, manganese-, and silicon-enriched precipitates in both the VVER 1000 base and weld materials after neutron irradiation. A high number density of copper-, nickel-, manganese-, silicon- and phosphorus-enriched precipitates were observed in the Palisades weld after neutron irradiation. Atom probe tomography also revealed high levels of phosphorus segregation to the dislocations in all three materials. Full details of the differences in the size, number density and composition of the precipitates in the three materials will be presented. (author)

  1. VVER-1000 RPV Head Examination Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erak, Z.; Gortan, K.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the electronic system used for automated NDT examination of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel Head (RPVH). The control system drives the inspection tool with end-effectors to needed position. When the final position is reached, the eddy current and ultra sound acquisition system performs the data acquisition. The system is composed of 3 layers. The first layer is the hardware layer consisting of motors driving the tool and end-effectors along with sensors needed to obtain the positioning data. The second layer is the MAC-8 control system performing basic monitoring and control routines as an interconnection between first and third layer. The third layer is the control software, running on PC, which is used as a human-machine-interface. Presentation contains details of examination techniques with focus on eddy current examination as well as details on manipulator and end effectors developed by Inetec for VVER-1000 RPVH examination.(author)

  2. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  3. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  4. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  5. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) What is Ebola Virus Disease? ...

  6. Yeast for virus research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Richard Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    Budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) are two popular model organisms for virus research. They are natural hosts for viruses as they carry their own indigenous viruses. Both yeasts have been used for studies of plant, animal and human viruses. Many positive sense (+) RNA viruses and some DNA viruses replicate with various levels in yeasts, thus allowing study of those viral activities during viral life cycle. Yeasts are single cell eukaryotic organisms. Hence, many of the fundamental cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation or programed cell death are highly conserved from yeasts to higher eukaryotes. Therefore, they are particularly suited to study the impact of those viral activities on related cellular activities during virus-host interactions. Yeasts present many unique advantages in virus research over high eukaryotes. Yeast cells are easy to maintain in the laboratory with relative short doubling time. They are non-biohazardous, genetically amendable with small genomes that permit genome-wide analysis of virologic and cellular functions. In this review, similarities and differences of these two yeasts are described. Studies of virologic activities such as viral translation, viral replication and genome-wide study of virus-cell interactions in yeasts are highlighted. Impacts of viral proteins on basic cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation and programed cell death are discussed. Potential applications of using yeasts as hosts to carry out functional analysis of small viral genome and to develop high throughput drug screening platform for the discovery of antiviral drugs are presented. PMID:29082230

  7. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-07-01

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of SLAM and PVRL4 and identification of pro-HB-EGF as cell entry receptors for wild type phocine distemper virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M Melia

    Full Text Available Signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM has been identified as an immune cell receptor for the morbilliviruses, measles (MV, canine distemper (CDV, rinderpest and peste des petits ruminants (PPRV viruses, while CD46 is a receptor for vaccine strains of MV. More recently poliovirus like receptor 4 (PVRL4, also known as nectin 4, has been identified as a receptor for MV, CDV and PPRV on the basolateral surface of polarised epithelial cells. PVRL4 is also up-regulated by MV in human brain endothelial cells. Utilisation of PVRL4 as a receptor by phocine distemper virus (PDV remains to be demonstrated as well as confirmation of use of SLAM. We have observed that unlike wild type (wt MV or wtCDV, wtPDV strains replicate in African green monkey kidney Vero cells without prior adaptation, suggesting the use of a further receptor. We therefore examined candidate molecules, glycosaminoglycans (GAG and the tetraspan proteins, integrin β and the membrane bound form of heparin binding epithelial growth factor (proHB-EGF,for receptor usage by wtPDV in Vero cells. We show that wtPDV replicates in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells expressing SLAM and PVRL4. Similar wtPDV titres are produced in Vero and VeroSLAM cells but more limited fusion occurs in the latter. Infection of Vero cells was not inhibited by anti-CD46 antibody. Removal/disruption of GAG decreased fusion but not the titre of virus. Treatment with anti-integrin β antibody increased rather than decreased infection of Vero cells by wtPDV. However, infection was inhibited by antibody to HB-EGF and the virus replicated in CHO-proHB-EGF cells, indicating use of this molecule as a receptor. Common use of SLAM and PVRL4 by morbilliviruses increases the possibility of cross-species infection. Lack of a requirement for wtPDV adaptation to Vero cells raises the possibility of usage of proHB-EGF as a receptor in vivo but requires further investigation.

  9. Pepino mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a relatively new plant virus that has become a signifi cant agronomical problem in a relatively short period of time. It is a member of the genus Potexvirus within the family Flexiviridae and is readily mechanically transmissible. It is capable of infecting tomato

  10. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  11. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  12. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  13. Tobacco ringspot virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), and its vector, the dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum and related species) are widely distributed throughout the world. Cucumber, melon, and watermelon are particularly affected by TRSV. Symptoms can vary with plant age, the strain of the virus, and environment...

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.

  15. Viruses in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  16. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of small enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of 9000-13 000 bases. Most infect mammals and birds. Many flaviviruses are host-specific and pathogenic, such as hepatitis C virus in the genus Hepacivirus. The majority of known members in the genus Flavivirus are arthropod...

  17. ICTV virus taxonomy profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purdy, Michael A.; Harrison, Tim J.; Jameel, S.; Meng, X.J.; Okamoto, H.; Poel, Van Der W.H.M.; Smith, Donald B.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Davison, Andrew J.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Michael J.; Smith, Donald B.; Orton, Richard J.; Knowles, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    The family Hepeviridae includes enterically transmitted small non-enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses. It includes the genera Piscihepevirus, whose members infect fish, and Orthohepevirus, whose members infect mammals and birds. Members of the genus Orthohepevirus include hepatitis E virus, which

  18. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil sh...

  19. Effect of Loading Transients on the EAC Crack Growth Behaviour of Low-Alloy RPV Steels under Simulated BWR Operating Conditions (CASTOC WP 3, PSI Tests 3 and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.-P

    2003-04-01

    Within the CASTOC-project (5{sup t}h EU FW programme), the environmentally-assisted crack (EAC) growth behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels is experimentally investigated under simulated transient and steady-state boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation conditions by six European laboratories. The present report is a summary of the third and fourth test of working package (WP) 3 with loading transients, performed at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). Two different low-alloy steels (20 MnMoNi 5 5, 0.015 wt.% S and 22 NiMoCr 3 7, 0.007 wt. %S) were investigated in oxygenated high-temperature, high-purity water (T = 240 {sup o}C, DO = 400 ppb) in a daisy chain at two different load ratios (R = 0.8 and 0.2). In the first part of the experiments, asymmetrical saw tooth loading with different rise times {delta}t{sub R} of the load and different loading frequencies were applied. Then the loading conditions were changed to an asymmetrical trapezoid waveform loading (periodical partial unloading, PPU) and the hold time {delta}t{sub H} at maximum load was varied. In the final phase of WP 3 PSI tests 3 and 4 the SCC behaviour was investigated under constant load. With decreasing loading frequency the corrosion fatigue (CF) crack advance per cycle {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} of material A increased. Sustained EAC crack growth could be maintained down to low frequencies of 10{sup -5} Hz. The time-based crack growth rate (CGR) da/dt{sub EAC} decreased with decreasing frequency. In material B no effect of the loading frequency could be resolved. Up to a hold time of 1 h at maximum constant load the CGR da/dt{sub EAC} seemed to be independent of the hold time. Above hold times of 1 h the CGR decreased and dropped down to CGR values in the range or below the BWR VIP 60 SCC disposition lines. This behaviour was observed in both investigated materials. The cycle-based CGR {delta}a/{delta}N{sub EAC} remained approximately constant with increasing hold time. The

  20. Strategy as a Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obed Madsen, Søren

    This article is based on virus theory (Røvik, 2007, 2011), and proposes to develop a framework that defines technology as a virus that penetrates the organism of an organization. The framework develops a new vocabulary, which can help in analyzing technologies and their negative effects on actors...... and organizations. In this paper, the virus theory is used to analyze a strategy process in an organization as an example of a technology. It shows how the strategy over time creates a memory loss, where the managers who are exposed to the virus forget their critique of the new strategy concept. The article also...... shows how resistant can be understood as being immune to a virus, since the strategy concepts bears resemblance to a former strategy concept. The article also argues that there should be more focus on the negative impacts of management tool and especially how organizations and managers are dealing...

  1. Development and validation of an epitope-blocking ELISA using an anti-haemagglutinin monoclonal antibody for specific detection of antibodies in sheep and goat sera directed against peste des petits ruminants virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodjo, Sanne Charles; Baziki, Jean-de-Dieu; Nwankpa, Nick; Chitsungo, Ethel; Koffi, Yao Mathurin; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Diop, Mariame; Gizaw, Daniel; Tajelser, Idris Badri Adam; Lelenta, Mamadou; Diallo, Adama; Tounkara, Karim

    2018-07-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious and economically important disease affecting production of small ruminants (i.e., sheep and goats). Taking into consideration the lessons learnt from the Global Rinderpest Eradication Programme (GREP), PPR is now targeted by the international veterinary community as the next animal disease to be eradicated. To support the African continental programme for the control of PPR, the Pan African Veterinary Vaccine Centre of the African Union (AU-PANVAC) is developing diagnostics tools. Here, we describe the development of a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) that allows testing of a large number of samples for specific detection of antibodies directed against PPR virus in sheep and goat sera. The PPR bELISA uses an anti-haemagglutinin (H) monoclonal antibody (MAb) as a competitor antibody, and tests results are interpreted using the percentage of inhibition (PI) of MAb binding generated by the serum sample. PI values below or equal to 18% (PI ≤ 18%) are negative, PI values greater than or equal to 25% (PI ≥ 25%) are positive, and PI values greater than 18% and below 25% are doubtful. The diagnostic specificity (DSp) and diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) were found to be 100% and 93.74%, respectively. The H-based PPR-bELISA showed good correlation with the virus neutralization test (VNT), the gold standard test, with a kappa value of 0.947. The H-based PPR-bELISA is more specific than the commercial kit ID Screen® PPR Competition (N-based PPR-cELISA) from IDvet (France), but the commercial kit is slightly more sensitive than the H-based PPR-bELISA. The validation process also indicated good repeatability and reproducibility of the H-based PPR-bELISA, making this new test a suitable tool for the surveillance and sero-monitoring of the vaccination campaign.

  2. Genetics coupled to quantitative intact proteomics links heritable aphid and endosymbiont protein isoform expression to polerovirus transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellow dwarf viruses in the family Luteoviridae, such as Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV (CYDV-RPV), are vectored by aphids and cause the most economically important virus disease of cereal crops worldwide. The identification of aphid proteins mediating virus transmission will better define transmiss...

  3. Computer Viruses: Pathology and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, John R.; Lamon, William E.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how computer viruses were originally created, how a computer can become infected by a virus, how viruses operate, symptoms that indicate a computer is infected, how to detect and remove viruses, and how to prevent a reinfection. A sidebar lists eight antivirus resources. (four references) (LRW)

  4. Zika virus infection: a public health emergency!

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Muhammad Salman Haider; Qureshi, Bakhtawar Wajeeha; Khan, Ramsha

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus belongs to the family of Flaviviridae. The Flaviviridae family also includes other human pathogens like West Nile virus (WNV), Yellow fever virus (YFV), mosquito transmitted Dengue virus (DENV), Tick borne encephalitic virus (TBEV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Zika virus is a mosquito-borne disease and is transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquito.

  5. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Kselikova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125 I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  6. Ocular Tropism of Respiratory Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Paul A.; Tumpey, Terrence M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism. PMID:23471620

  7. VHS virus - present situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    of the worldwide distribution of the disease will be given. Virus evolution: Recent studies indicate that only a few amino acid changes in the structural proteins of VHSV can change the virulence patterns significantly, thereby coming closer to assessing the risk of none to low virulent viruses becoming high...... virulent. Virulence factors both depend on the ability of VHSV to enter a cell and on the speed and efficiencyof virus replication in the cells. Apparently the viral nucleocapsid protein plays a very important role for the later and seems to be the target for determination of a virulence marker....

  8. Zika virus in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veasna Duong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored.

  9. Zika virus in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Veasna Duong; Philippe Dussart; Philippe Buchy

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of...

  10. Zika virus in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Veasna; Dussart, Philippe; Buchy, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Viruses in reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Ellen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself. 1. Introduction 2. Methods for working with reptilian viruses 3. Reptilian viruses described by virus families 3.1. Herpesviridae 3.2. Iridoviridae 3.2.1 Ranavirus 3.2.2 Erythrocytic virus 3.2.3 Iridovirus 3.3. Poxviridae 3.4. Adenoviridae 3.5. Papillomaviridae 3.6. Parvoviridae 3.7. Reoviridae 3.8. Retroviridae and inclusion body disease of Boid snakes 3.9. Arboviruses 3.9.1. Flaviviridae 3

  12. BS-virus-finder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shengjie; Hu, Xuesong; Xu, Fengping

    2018-01-01

    Background: DNA methylation plays a key role in the regulation of gene expression and carcinogenesis. Bisulfite sequencing studies mainly focus on calling SNP, DMR, and ASM. Until now, only a few software tools focus on virus integration using bisulfite sequencing data. Findings: We have developed...... a new and easy-to-use software tool, named BS-virus-finder (BSVF, RRID:SCR_015727), to detect viral integration breakpoints in whole human genomes. The tool is hosted at https://github.com/BGI-SZ/BSVF. Conclusions: BS-virus-finder demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity. It is useful in epigenetic...

  13. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.

  14. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG ... Virus and Pregnancy Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates Practice ...

  15. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ...

  16. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ... pregnant. Related: Zika Virus and Pregnancy Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal ...

  17. CLASSIFICATION OF VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CLASSIFICATION OF VIRUSES. On basis of morphology. On basis of chemical composition. On basis of structure of genome. On basis of mode of replication. Notes:

  18. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and ... on Patient Safety For Patients Patient FAQs Spanish Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & Governance ...

  19. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ... and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September ...

  20. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ... Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice ... Coding Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your ...

  1. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  2. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ... pregnant. Related: Zika Virus and Pregnancy ... Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal ...

  3. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before the discovery of hepatitis E virus (HEV), many epidemics of hepatitis in ... HEV was discovered in 1983 in the ... HEV infection is increased by HIV infection in pregnancy. (Caron et al. .... immunosuppressive therapy on the natural history.

  4. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy ... Council on Patient Safety For Patients Patient FAQs Spanish Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Login My ACOG Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ...

  6. VIRUS instrument enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, T.; Allen, R.; Mondrik, N.; Rheault, J. P.; Sauseda, M.; Boster, E.; James, M.; Rodriguez-Patino, M.; Torres, G.; Ham, J.; Cook, E.; Baker, D.; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Hill, G. J.; Perry, D.; Savage, R. D.; Good, J. M.; Vattiat, Brian L.

    2014-08-01

    The Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument will be installed at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope† in the near future. The instrument will be housed in two enclosures that are mounted adjacent to the telescope, via the VIRUS Support Structure (VSS). We have designed the enclosures to support and protect the instrument, to enable servicing of the instrument, and to cool the instrument appropriately while not adversely affecting the dome environment. The system uses simple HVAC air handling techniques in conjunction with thermoelectric and standard glycol heat exchangers to provide efficient heat removal. The enclosures also provide power and data transfer to and from each VIRUS unit, liquid nitrogen cooling to the detectors, and environmental monitoring of the instrument and dome environments. In this paper, we describe the design and fabrication of the VIRUS enclosures and their subsystems.

  7. The virus of management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Peter; Frankel, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The virus metaphor may be used in studies of management knowledge not only as a way ofdescribing diffusion processes but also as a way of thinking about viral elements of knowledgeproduction. In the present article, organizational viruses are viewed as ensembles of basicdistinctions...... that are constitutive of concrete bodies of knowledge and which form mutable enginesof organizational self-descriptions. Organizational viruses, we contend, are both characterized bystability in terms of their basic productive configuration, while at the same time allowing for a highdegree of variation in terms...... of concrete management knowledge and practice. The article isstructured as follows. After the introduction, we first develop the notion of organizational virus asinto an analytical approach. Second, we discern in the work of Frederick Taylor on scientificmanagement and Max Weber on bureaucracy, two quite...

  8. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and ... Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates ... Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG Meetings Calendar Congressional ...

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  10. Genome packaging in viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Siyang; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy structures became available. Here we discu...

  11. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Jussi Oskari; Jacobson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous disease that develops as an interplay between the immune system and environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible individuals. There is increasing evidence that viruses may play a role in MS pathogenesis acting as these environmental triggers. However, it is not known if any single virus is causal, or rather several viruses can act as triggers in disease development. Here, we review the association of different viruses to MS with an emphasis on two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). These two agents have generated the most impact during recent years as possible co-factors in MS disease development. The strongest argument for association of EBV with MS comes from the link between symptomatic infectious mononucleosis and MS and from seroepidemiological studies. In contrast to EBV, HHV-6 has been found significantly more often in MS plaques than in MS normal appearing white matter or non-MS brains and HHV-6 re-activation has been reported during MS clinical relapses. In this review we also suggest new strategies, including the development of new infectious animal models of MS and antiviral MS clinical trials, to elucidate roles of different viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease. Furthermore, we introduce the idea of using unbiased sequence-independent pathogen discovery methodologies, such as next generation sequencing, to study MS brain tissue or body fluids for detection of known viral sequences or potential novel viral agents. PMID:22583435

  12. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  13. Evolutionary ecology of virus emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, John J

    2017-02-01

    The cross-species transmission of viruses into new host populations, termed virus emergence, is a significant issue in public health, agriculture, wildlife management, and related fields. Virus emergence requires overlap between host populations, alterations in virus genetics to permit infection of new hosts, and adaptation to novel hosts such that between-host transmission is sustainable, all of which are the purview of the fields of ecology and evolution. A firm understanding of the ecology of viruses and how they evolve is required for understanding how and why viruses emerge. In this paper, I address the evolutionary mechanisms of virus emergence and how they relate to virus ecology. I argue that, while virus acquisition of the ability to infect new hosts is not difficult, limited evolutionary trajectories to sustained virus between-host transmission and the combined effects of mutational meltdown, bottlenecking, demographic stochasticity, density dependence, and genetic erosion in ecological sinks limit most emergence events to dead-end spillover infections. Despite the relative rarity of pandemic emerging viruses, the potential of viruses to search evolutionary space and find means to spread epidemically and the consequences of pandemic viruses that do emerge necessitate sustained attention to virus research, surveillance, prophylaxis, and treatment. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombinant Vaccinia Virus: Immunization against Multiple Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkus, Marion E.; Piccini, Antonia; Lipinskas, Bernard R.; Paoletti, Enzo

    1985-09-01

    The coding sequences for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen, the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, and the influenza virus hemagglutinin were inserted into a single vaccinia virus genome. Rabbits inoculated intravenously or intradermally with this polyvalent vaccinia virus recombinant produced antibodies reactive to all three authentic foreign antigens. In addition, the feasibility of multiple rounds of vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus was demonstrated.

  16. Viruses, definitions and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libia Herrero-Uribe

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are known to be abundant, ubiquitous, and to play a very important role in the health and evolution of life organisms. However, most biologists have considered them as entities separate from the realm of life and acting merely as mechanical artifacts that can exchange genes between different organisms. This article reviews some definitions of life organisms to determine if viruses adjust to them, and additionally, considers new discoveries to challenge the present definition of viruses. Definitions of life organisms have been revised in order to validate how viruses fit into them. Viral factories are discussed since these mini-organelles are a good example of the complexity of viral infection, not as a mechanical usurpation of cell structures, but as a driving force leading to the reorganization and modification of cell structures by viral and cell enzymes. New discoveries such as the Mimivirus, its virophage and viruses that produce filamentous tails when outside of their host cell, have stimulated the scientific community to analyze the current definition of viruses. One way to be free for innovation is to learn from life, without rigid mental structures or tied to the past, in order to understand in an integrated view the new discoveries that will be unfolded in future research. Life processes must be looked from the complexity and trans-disciplinarity perspective that includes and accepts the temporality of the active processes of life organisms, their interdependency and interrelation among them and their environment. New insights must be found to redefine life organisms, especially viruses, which still are defined using the same concepts and knowledge of the fifties. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (3: 993-998. Epub 2011 September 01.Los virus son abundantes, ubicuos, y juegan un papel muy importante en la salud y en la evolución de los organismos vivos. Sin embargo, la mayoría de los biólogos los siguen considerado como entidades separadas

  17. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola, about 166 000 individuals are living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% ...

  18. [Viruses and civilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastel, C

    1999-01-01

    A few million years ago, when primates moved from the east African forest to the savannah, they were already infected with endogenous viruses and occultly transmitted them to the prime Homo species. However it was much later with the building of the first large cities in Mesopotamia that interhuman viral transmission began in earnest. Spreading was further enhanced with the organization of the Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Arab empires around the Mediterranean. Discovery of the New World in 1492 led to an unprecedented clash of civilizations and the destruction of pre-Columbian Indian civilizations. It also led to a rapid spread of viruses across the Atlantic Ocean with the emergence of yellow fever and appearance of smallpox and measles throughout the world. However the greatest opportunities for worldwide viral development have been created by our present, modern civilization. This fact is illustrated by epidemic outbreaks of human immunodeficiency virus, Venezuela hemorrhagic fever, Rift valley fever virus, and monkey pox virus. Close analysis underscores the major role of human intervention in producing these events.

  19. Nipah Virus (NiV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Nipah Virus (NiV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae , ...

  20. Epstein-Barr virus test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003513.htm Epstein-Barr virus antibody test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect ...

  1. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gisder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus, or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus, and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach applied in the field.

  2. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field. PMID:26702462

  3. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  4. Zika virus: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Rawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Zika virus has been in the news for quite some time due to the ongoing recent outbreak in the Southern America, which started in December 2015. It has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization in February 2016 owing to its association with the congenital deformities, particularly microcephaly in infants borne to the infected mothers. The rapid spread of the virus throughout the United States of America and subsequently to Asia has raised serious international concerns. Its spread to countries neighboring India is a serious threat to the Indian population. This review article gives an overview about the virus, its diagnosis, clinical features, and the management.

  5. Archaeal virus-host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis provides novel insights in several aspects of the molecular

    biology of archaea, bacteria and their viruses.

    Three fundamentally different groups of viruses are associated with the three domains of life.

    Archaeal viruses are

  6. Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Parainfluenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miltiadis Douvoyiannis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus is the most frequently reported viral cause of rhabdomyolysis. A 7-year-old child is presented with rhabdomyolysis associated with parainfluenza type 2 virus. Nine cases of rhabdomyolysis associated with parainfluenza virus have been reported. Complications may include electrolyte disturbances, acute renal failure, and compartment syndrome.

  7. Global emergence of Zika virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Tjan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV belongs to the flaviviruses (family Flaviviridae, which includes dengue, yellow fever, West Nile, and Japanese encephalitis viruses. Zika virus was isolated in 1947, in the Zika forest near Kampala, Uganda, from one of the rhesus monkeys used as sentinel animals in a yellow fever research program.

  8. Control of Newcastle disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also know as avian paramyxovirus serotype 1, is an important poultry pathogen worldwide. In naive poultry, the virulent forms of the virus cause high mortality. Because of this the virus is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health and can be an important ...

  9. An introduction to computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

  10. SARS – virus jumps species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SARS – virus jumps species. Coronavirus reshuffles genes; Rotteir et al, Rotterdam showed the virus to jump from cats to mouse cells after single gene mutation ? Human disease due to virus jumping from wild or domestic animals; Present favourite animal - the cat; - edible or domestic.

  11. Computer Bytes, Viruses and Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Teddy B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a history of computer viruses, explains various types of viruses and how they affect software or computer operating systems, and describes examples of specific viruses. Available vaccines are explained, and precautions for protecting programs and disks are given. (nine references) (LRW)

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, E.; Dietzgen, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since antigenic properties of plant viruses were discovered antisera have been raised and used for plant virus diagnosis and for the analysis of virus structure as well. From the early qualitative diagnosis method of precipitating the virus in clarified sap of an infected plant and the first quantitative application of the precipitin test vast progress has been made with regard to the development of highly sensitive and highly quantitative methods for virus detection. Of equal importance was the improvement of methods for separating virus from host cell components since the specificity of antisera raised against a virus could be increased by using an antigen for immunization highly concentrated and largely freed from contaminating host substances. The introduction of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) into plant virology allows detection of virus in nanogram quantities. Still, the conventionally raised antisera, no matter how pure an antigen was used for immunization, are polyclonal. They contain products of thousands of different antibody-secreting plasma cell clones which can be directed against all antigenic determinants (epitopes) of the virus, but also against antigens of the host plant that may not have been entirely separated from the immunizing virus during the purification procedure. Even after cross adsorption of polyclonal antisera some residual heterogeneity can be expected to remain. Within these boundaries the information gained with polyclonal antisera on virus structure and on virus diagnosis has to be interpreted

  13. Virus Nilam: Identifikasi, Karakter Biologi dan Fisik, Serta Upaya Pengendaliannya

    OpenAIRE

    Miftakhurohmah, Miftakhurohmah; Noveriza, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Infeksi virus pada tanaman nilam dapat menyebabkan penurunan produksi dan kualitas minyak. Sembilan jenis virus diidentifikasi menginfeksi tanaman nilam, yaitu Patchouli mosaic virus (PatMoV), Patchouli mild mosaic virus (PatMMV), Telosma mosaic virus (TeMV), Peanut stripe virus (PStV), Patchouli yellow mosaic virus (PatYMV), Tobacco necrosis virus (TNV), Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), dan Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). Kesembilan virus tersebut memiliki genom ...

  14. Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hoar, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) is a complicated disease to discuss as it can result in a wide variety of disease problems from very mild to very severe. BVD can be one of the most devastating diseases cattle encounter and one of the hardest to get rid of when it attacks a herd. The viruses that cause BVD have been grouped into two genotypes, Type I and Type II. The disease syndrome caused by the two genotypes is basically the same, however disease caused by Type II infection is often more severe...

  15. Virus en Endodoncia

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández Vigueras, Scarlette; Salazar Navarrete, Luis; Pérez Tomás, Ricardo; Segura Egea, Juan José; Viñas, Miguel; López-López, José

    2014-01-01

    La infección endodóntica es la infección que afecta al sistema de conductos radiculares y, sin duda, es el principal agente etiológico de las periodontitis apicales. Además, de las bacterias patógenas endodónticas, se ha buscado en los últimos años asociar la presencia de virus en distintos tipos de patología endodóntica. Los virus que más se han buscado y asociado son los pertenecientes a la familia herpesvirus, los cuales se han encontrado presentes en patologías periapicales principalmente...

  16. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways.......Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...

  17. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  18. Epidemiology of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Zika virus is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family known to cause mild clinical symptoms similar to those of dengue and chikungunya. Zika is transmitted by different species of Aedes mosquitoes. Nonhuman primates and possibly rodents play a role as reservoirs. Direct interhuman transmission has also been reported. Human cases have been reported in Africa and Asia, Easter Island, the insular Pacific region, and Brazil. Its clinical profile is that of a dengue-like febrile illness, but recently associated Guillain-Barre syndrome and microcephaly have appeared. There is neither a vaccine nor prophylactic medications available to prevent Zika virus infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Viruses in renovated waters

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nupen, EM

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available , for permission to present this paper. ?8? References 1. REPORT. CONMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ANAGEMEZIT OF PME SANITARY ENGINEERING DIVISION (1970). Engineering evaluation of virus hazard in water. Jour. Eng. Div. Proc. Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. SA 1, 7112... Water Systems, Austin, Texas, 1974 13. CARESON, G.F., WOODA.RD, F.E., WENTWORTII, D.P. and SPRODI, O.J. (1968) Virus inactivation on clay particles in natural waters. Journ. Wat. Pollut. Cont. Fed., 4Q R39, 7116. 14. MOSJ~EY, J.W. (1967...

  20. Tenosinovitis por virus Chikungunya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Seijo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta a la consulta un hombre proveniente de la República Dominicana con una tenosinovitis del extensor del dedo medio derecho; en la convalecencia inmediata, segunda curva febril luego de 48 horas de permanecer asintomático de una enfermedad febril aguda, y marcada astenia, exantema pruriginoso, poliartralgias con impotencia funcional y rigidez articular generalizada. Los exámenes bioquímicos no aportaron datos de interés para el diagnóstico. La serología para virus dengue fue negativa. La detección de IgM y de anticuerpos neutralizantes para virus Chikungunya (CHIKV fueron positivos.

  1. Resistance to Two Heterologous Neurotropic Oncolytic Viruses, Semliki Forest Virus and Vaccinia Virus, in Experimental Glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Lemay, Chantal; De Silva, Naomi; Diallo, Jean-Simon; Cox, Julie; Becker, Michelle; Choi, Youngmin; Ananth, Abhirami; Sellers, Clara; Breton, Sophie; Roy, Dominic; Falls, Theresa; Brun, Jan; Hemminki, Akseli; Hinkkanen, Ari; Bell, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Attenuated Semliki Forest virus (SFV) may be suitable for targeting malignant glioma due to its natural neurotropism, but its replication in brain tumor cells may be restricted by innate antiviral defenses. We attempted to facilitate SFV replication in glioma cells by combining it with vaccinia virus, which is capable of antagonizing such defenses. Surprisingly, we found parenchymal mouse brain tumors to be refractory to both viruses. Also, vaccinia virus appears to be sensitive to SFV-induced antiviral interference. PMID:23221568

  2. RNA viruses in the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andrew S; Rise, Matthew L; Culley, Alexander I; Steward, Grieg F

    2009-03-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous in the sea and appear to outnumber all other forms of marine life by at least an order of magnitude. Through selective infection, viruses influence nutrient cycling, community structure, and evolution in the ocean. Over the past 20 years we have learned a great deal about the diversity and ecology of the viruses that constitute the marine virioplankton, but until recently the emphasis has been on DNA viruses. Along with expanding knowledge about RNA viruses that infect important marine animals, recent isolations of RNA viruses that infect single-celled eukaryotes and molecular analyses of the RNA virioplankton have revealed that marine RNA viruses are novel, widespread, and genetically diverse. Discoveries in marine RNA virology are broadening our understanding of the biology, ecology, and evolution of viruses, and the epidemiology of viral diseases, but there is still much that we need to learn about the ecology and diversity of RNA viruses before we can fully appreciate their contributions to the dynamics of marine ecosystems. As a step toward making sense of how RNA viruses contribute to the extraordinary viral diversity in the sea, we summarize in this review what is currently known about RNA viruses that infect marine organisms.

  3. Zika Virus: An Emerging Worldwide Threat

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan A. Rather; Jameel B. Lone; Vivek K. Bajpai; Woon K. Paek; Jeongheui Lim

    2017-01-01

    ZIKA virus (ZIKV) poses a severe threat to the world. Recent outbreaks of ZIKV after 2007 along with its quick transmission have made this virus a matter of international concern. The virus shows symptoms that are similar to those caused in the wake of dengue virus (DENV) and other flaviviruses, which makes it difficult to discern the viral infection. Diagnosis is further complicated as the virus cross-reacts with antibodies of other viruses. Currently, molecular diagnosis of the virus is bei...

  4. Ebola virus acceptors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... genome sequencing centre; HSP, High scoring Segment pair;. NHGRI, National ... the genome of the rhesus monkey (rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta). The sequencing and comparative analysis was funded by the National ... Definition. Accession ..... Marburg virus genomics and association with a large.

  5. Zika virus and placenta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus infection is the new arboviral infection problem. The serious outcome of infection and induction of abnormal infant become the big issue in reproductive medicine. The pathogenesis and pathology of the placenta in the affected case is an interesting issue. Here, the authors focus and discuss on this topic in this short article.

  6. Viruses of haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Alison W S; Williams, Timothy J; Erdmann, Susanne; Papke, R Thane; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2014-11-13

    In hypersaline environments, haloarchaea (halophilic members of the Archaea) are the dominant organisms, and the viruses that infect them, haloarchaeoviruses are at least ten times more abundant. Since their discovery in 1974, described haloarchaeoviruses include head-tailed, pleomorphic, spherical and spindle-shaped morphologies, representing Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Pleolipoviridae, Sphaerolipoviridae and Fuselloviridae families. This review overviews current knowledge of haloarchaeoviruses, providing information about classification, morphotypes, macromolecules, life cycles, genetic manipulation and gene regulation, and host-virus responses. In so doing, the review incorporates knowledge from laboratory studies of isolated viruses, field-based studies of environmental samples, and both genomic and metagenomic analyses of haloarchaeoviruses. What emerges is that some haloarchaeoviruses possess unique morphological and life cycle properties, while others share features with other viruses (e.g., bacteriophages). Their interactions with hosts influence community structure and evolution of populations that exist in hypersaline environments as diverse as seawater evaporation ponds, to hot desert or Antarctic lakes. The discoveries of their wide-ranging and important roles in the ecology and evolution of hypersaline communities serves as a strong motivator for future investigations of both laboratory-model and environmental systems.

  7. Viruses of Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison W. S. Luk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In hypersaline environments, haloarchaea (halophilic members of the Archaea are the dominant organisms, and the viruses that infect them, haloarchaeoviruses are at least ten times more abundant. Since their discovery in 1974, described haloarchaeoviruses include head-tailed, pleomorphic, spherical and spindle-shaped morphologies, representing Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Pleolipoviridae, Sphaerolipoviridae and Fuselloviridae families. This review overviews current knowledge of haloarchaeoviruses, providing information about classification, morphotypes, macromolecules, life cycles, genetic manipulation and gene regulation, and host-virus responses. In so doing, the review incorporates knowledge from laboratory studies of isolated viruses, field-based studies of environmental samples, and both genomic and metagenomic analyses of haloarchaeoviruses. What emerges is that some haloarchaeoviruses possess unique morphological and life cycle properties, while others share features with other viruses (e.g., bacteriophages. Their interactions with hosts influence community structure and evolution of populations that exist in hypersaline environments as diverse as seawater evaporation ponds, to hot desert or Antarctic lakes. The discoveries of their wide-ranging and important roles in the ecology and evolution of hypersaline communities serves as a strong motivator for future investigations of both laboratory-model and environmental systems.

  8. Apple mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV), a member of the ilarvirus group, naturally infects Betula, Aesculus, Humulus, and several crop genera in the family Rosaceae (Malus, Prunus, Rosa and Rubus). ApMV was first reported in Rubus in several blackberry and raspberry cultivars in the United States and subsequentl...

  9. ICTV virus taxonomy profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, María Laura; Bó, Dal Elena; Graça, da John V.; Gago-Zachert, Selma; Hammond, John; Moreno, Pedro; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Pallás, Vicente; Navarro, Jose A.; Reyes, Carina A.; Luna, Gabriel Robles; Sasaya, Takahide; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E.; Vaira, Anna María; Verbeek, Martin; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Davison, Andrew J.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Michael J.; Smith, Donald B.; Orton, Richard J.; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    The Ophioviridae is a family of filamentous plant viruses, with single-stranded negative, and possibly ambisense, RNA genomes of 11.3-12.5 kb divided into 3-4 segments, each encapsidated separately. Virions are naked filamentous nucleocapsids, forming kinked circles of at least two different contour

  10. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological featur...

  11. Animal Models of Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael P; Nagamine, Claude M

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus has garnered great attention over the last several years, as outbreaks of the disease have emerged throughout the Western Hemisphere. Until quite recently Zika virus was considered a fairly benign virus, with limited clinical severity in both people and animals. The size and scope of the outbreak in the Western Hemisphere has allowed for the identification of severe clinical disease that is associated with Zika virus infection, most notably microcephaly among newborns, and an association with Guillian–Barré syndrome in adults. This recent association with severe clinical disease, of which further analysis strongly suggested causation by Zika virus, has resulted in a massive increase in the amount of both basic and applied research of this virus. Both small and large animal models are being used to uncover the pathogenesis of this emerging disease and to develop vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Here we review the animal-model–based Zika virus research that has been performed to date. PMID:28662753

  12. Archaeal viruses of the sulfolobales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2015-01-01

    in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs...... with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition...... and the techniques used both to infect laboratory strains with these virus mixtures and to obtain purified virus particles. Secondly, we present the experimental conditions required for activating SMV1-induced spacer acquisition in two different Sulfolobus species....

  13. Evolutionary relationship of alfalfa mosaic virus with cucumber mosaic virus and brome mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Savithri, HS; Murthy, MRN

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the non-structural protein (molecular weight 35,000; 3a protein) from three plant viruses - cucumber mosaic, brome mosaic and alfalfa mosaic have been systematically compared using the partial genomic sequences for these three viruses already available. The 3a protein of cucumber mosaic virus has an amino acid sequence homology of 33.7% with the corresponding protein of brome mosaic virus. A similar protein from alfalfa mosaic virus has a homology of 18.2% and 14.2...

  14. Hepatitis E virus coinfection with hepatotropic viruses in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Maysaa El Sayed; Salama, Osama Saad; Mansour, Fathy Awaad; Hossein, Shaimaa

    2008-06-01

    Major hepatotropic viruses continue to be important causes of acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. This work was carried out to detect the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) markers in children with acute viral hepatitis due to hepatotropic viruses (A, B and C) and non-A, non-B, non-C acute hepatitis, and to ascertain the influence of HEV superinfection in individuals infected with hepatitis viruses (A, B and C). We studied prospectively 162 children with sporadic acute hepatitis who reported to our hospital. Thirteen healthy controls were also included in the study. Laboratory investigations were performed, including complete liver function tests. Complete serological profiles for hepatitis viruses A, B, C and E were evaluated. HEV immunoglobulin G was detected with highest percentage among patients with hepatitis B (56.7%), followed by patients with hepatitis C virus (52.0%), hepatitis A virus (34.1%) and combined hepatitis B and C viruses (30.0%). The detection rate among patients with non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis was 7.1%. HEV immunoglobulin M was found in 4.5% of hepatitis A virus patients and in 3.3% of hepatitis B patients. The prevalence of HEV immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M correlated with the levels of hepatic aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in patients with dual markers of infection with hepatitis E and other viruses compared to patients with acute hepatitis due to A and C viruses. HEV serological markers are common among children with acute viral hepatitis, especially from hepatitis C and B viruses. There may be increased sensitivity to HEV coinfection in association with hepatitis B and C infections. Dual infection with HEV and other hepatotropic viruses was associated with greater elevation of aspartate and alanine aminotransferases.

  15. Avian influenza viruses in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik Peiris, J S

    2009-04-01

    Past pandemics arose from low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. In more recent times, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, LPAI H9N2 and both HPAI and LPAI H7 viruses have repeatedly caused zoonotic disease in humans. Such infections did not lead to sustained human-to-human transmission. Experimental infection of human volunteers and seroepidemiological studies suggest that avian influenza viruses of other subtypes may also infect humans. Viruses of the H7 subtype appear to have a predilection to cause conjunctivitis and influenza-like illness (ILI), although HPAI H7N7 virus has also caused fatal respiratory disease. Low pathogenic H9N2 viruses have caused mild ILI and its occurrence may be under-recognised for this reason. In contrast, contemporary HPAI H5N1 viruses are exceptional in their virulence for humans and differ from human seasonal influenza viruses in their pathogenesis. Patients have a primary viral pneumonia progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Over 380 human cases have been confirmed to date, with an overall case fatality of 63%. The zoonotic transmission of avian influenza is a rare occurrence, butthe greater public health concern is the adaptation of such viruses to efficient human transmission, which could lead to a pandemic. A better understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses and the biological determinants of transmissibility and pathogenicity in humans is important for pandemic preparedness.

  16. Detection of selected plant viruses by microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    HRABÁKOVÁ, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this master thesis was the simultaneous detection of four selected plant viruses ? Apple mosaic virus, Plum pox virus, Prunus necrotic ringspot virus and Prune harf virus, by microarrays. The intermediate step in the process of the detection was optimizing of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

  17. Virus-host interaction in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, Sueli Akemi; Figueiredo, Andreza Soriano; Araujo, João Pessoa

    2013-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has been the focus of several studies because this virus exhibits genetic and pathogenic characteristics that are similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). FIV causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in cats, nevertheless, a large fraction of infected cats remain asymptomatic throughout life despite of persistent chronic infection. This slow disease progression may be due to the presence of factors that are involved in the natural resistance to infection and the immune response that is mounted by the animals, as well as due to the adaptation of the virus to the host. Therefore, the study of virus-host interaction is essential to the understanding of the different patterns of disease course and the virus persistence in the host, and to help with the development of effective vaccines and perhaps the cure of FIV and HIV infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Single virus genomics: a new tool for virus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zeigler Allen

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification and sequencing of single microbial cells has significantly influenced genomics and microbial ecology by facilitating direct recovery of reference genome data. However, viral genomics continues to suffer due to difficulties related to the isolation and characterization of uncultivated viruses. We report here on a new approach called 'Single Virus Genomics', which enabled the isolation and complete genome sequencing of the first single virus particle. A mixed assemblage comprised of two known viruses; E. coli bacteriophages lambda and T4, were sorted using flow cytometric methods and subsequently immobilized in an agarose matrix. Genome amplification was then achieved in situ via multiple displacement amplification (MDA. The complete lambda phage genome was recovered with an average depth of coverage of approximately 437X. The isolation and genome sequencing of uncultivated viruses using Single Virus Genomics approaches will enable researchers to address questions about viral diversity, evolution, adaptation and ecology that were previously unattainable.

  19. Understanding Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John S

    2017-01-01

    This article describes what pediatric healthcare professionals should know about Zika virus (ZIKV). ZIKV is classified as an arthropod-borne, single-stranded RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family and genus Flavivirus. ZIKV is not new. The virus was first discovered almost 70 years ago in Uganda. The first isolate of the virus was found in rhesus monkeys in the Zika Forrest, hence the nomenclature. The primary route of ZIKV transmission to humans is through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito-primarily Aedes aegypti. When the mosquito bites individuals infected with the virus, mosquitos then become the vector of transmitting the infection to others. Women can also pass ZIKV to their fetus during pregnancy and at the time of delivery. ZIKV can also be transmitted through sexual activity from an individual who is infected with the virus to his or her partners. It is estimated that approximately 18% of individuals infected with ZIKV will go on to develop symptoms. When symptoms develop, it is usually within 3-12 days, although this may vary. Most often, symptoms are mild and self-limited. The most common symptoms are fever, arthralgia, maculopapular rash, and conjunctivitis lasting up to seven days. Less frequent symptoms include headache, vertigo, myalgia, vomiting, and diarrhea. At present, there is no vaccine available to prevent ZIKV and no specific antiviral treatment. Supportive care consisting of rest, hydration, analgesics, antihistamines, and antipyretics is recommended as needed. Given that there is no vaccine or treatment for ZIKV, considerable efforts must be focused on prevention. One of the most effective ways of preventing ZIKV infection is through avoiding mosquito bites, especially when traveling to or residing in areas where transmission is present. Precautions should include wearing appropriate attire with the objective of having as little skin exposed as possible, use of screens for windows and doors, and use of insect repellent. What is

  20. Dengue Virus and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Heaton

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Several independent groups have published that autophagy is required for optimal RNA replication of dengue virus (DENV. Initially, it was postulated that autophagosomes might play a structural role in replication complex formation. However, cryo-EM tomography of DENV replication complexes showed that DENV replicates on endoplasmic reticulum (ER cisternae invaginations and not on classical autophagosomes. Recently, it was reported that autophagy plays an indirect role in DENV replication by modulating cellular lipid metabolism. DENV-induced autophagosomes deplete cellular triglycerides that are stored in lipid droplets, leading to increased β-oxidation and energy production. This is the first example of a virus triggering autophagy to modulate cellular physiology. In this review, we summarize these data and discuss new questions and implications for autophagy during DENV replication.

  1. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus capable of causing large outbreaks of encephalitis in humans and horses. In North America, EEEV infection has a very high mortality rate in humans, and survivors often suffer severe neurological sequelae. Interestingly, EEEV infections from South American isolates are generally subclinical. Although EEEV is divided into two antigenic varieties and four lineages, only eleven isolates have been sequenced and eight of these are from the North American variety (Lineage I). Most sequenced strains were collected from mosquitoes and only one human isolate has been sequenced. EEEV isolates exist from a variety of hosts, vectors, years, and geographical locations and efforts should focus on sequencing strains that represent this diversity.

  2. Uukuniemi virus, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna; Zelená, Hana; Papadopoulou, Elpida; Mrázek, Jakub

    2018-04-20

    Following the identification of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome and Heartland viruses, the interest on tick-borne phleboviruses has increased rapidly. Uukuniemi virus has been proposed as a model for tick-borne phleboviruses. However, the number of available sequences is limited. In the current study we performed whole-genome sequencing on two Uukuniemi viral strains isolated in 2000 and 2004 from Ixodes ricinus ticks in the Czech Republic. Both strains cluster together with Potepli63 strain isolated in the country in 1963. Although the Czech strains were isolated many years apart, a high identity was seen at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, suggesting that UUKV has a relatively stable genome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Robert A.; Karron, Ruth A.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRI) in infants and children worldwide and causes significant LRI in the elderly and in immunocompromised patients. The goal of RSV vaccination is to prevent serious RSV-associated LRI. There are several obstacles to the development of successful RSV vaccines, including the need to immunize very young infants, who may respond inadequately to vaccination; the existence of two antigenically d...

  4. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-08

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.  Created: 8/8/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/8/2014.

  5. Thermoactivation of viruses by microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnel, H.; von Brodorotti, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different viruses, suspended in drinking water, were examined for their ability to be inactivated by microwaves from a microwave oven. Up to a virus content of 10/sup 5/ TCID/sub 50//ml inactivation was successful within a few minutes of microwave treatment and occurred in parallel to the heat stability of the viruses. Evidence for direct effects of microwaves on viruses could not be detected. 7 of the viruses studied were inactivated rapidly when temperatures of 50 to 65/sup 0/C under microwave treatment were reached in the flowing water, while a bovine parvovirus was only inactivated by temperatures above 90/sup 0/C. The advantages of a thermal virus-decontamination of fluids and material by microwaves are discussed.

  6. [Nosocomial virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, H J

    1986-12-01

    Enveloped viruses, e.g. influenza- or varicella viruses may cause highly contagious airborne infections. Their spread is difficult to control, also in hospitals. In the case of influenza and varicella immune prophylaxis and chemotherapy/chemoprophylaxis are possible. This is of particular significance, since varicella and zoster are of increasing importance for immunocompromized patients. Diarrhea is caused to a large extent by viruses. Rotavirus infections play an important role in infancy, and are frequently acquired in the hospital. In a study on infectious gastroenteritis of infants in a hospital we were able to show that 30 percent of all rotavirus infections were of nosocomial origin. Admission of a rotavirus-excreting patient (or personnel) may start a long chain of rotavirus infections on pediatric wards. Even careful hygienic measures in the hospital can hardly prevent the spread of enterovirus infections. Such infections may be severe and lethal for newborns, as shown by us in a study on an outbreak of echovirus 11 disease on a maternity ward. We have recently obtained data on the "stickiness" of enteroviruses on human skin. This could explain essential features of the spread of enteroviruses in the population.

  7. Viruses manipulate the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Forest; Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2009-05-14

    Marine viruses affect Bacteria, Archaea and eukaryotic organisms and are major components of the marine food web. Most studies have focused on their role as predators and parasites, but many of the interactions between marine viruses and their hosts are much more complicated. A series of recent studies has shown that viruses have the ability to manipulate the life histories and evolution of their hosts in remarkable ways, challenging our understanding of this almost invisible world.

  8. Virus Information Update CIAC-2301

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-21

    a tune through a sound card. Byway is reported to be in the wild internationally, especially in Venezuela, Mexico , Bulgaria, UK and USA. REMOVAL NOTE...1482, Varicella Type: Program. Disk Location: Features: Damage: Size: See Also: Notes: v6-146: This virus was written to hurt users of the TBCLEAN...antivirus package. If you have a file infected with the Varicella virus, and if you tried to clean this virus infected file with tbclean, what would

  9. Advances in virus research. Volume 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauffer, M.A.; Maramorosch, K.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains nine chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular Biology of Wound Tumor Virus; The Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Study of Viruses; Prions: Novel Infectious Pathogens; and Monoclonal Antibodies Against Plant Viruses

  10. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  11. About Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthcare Professionals Clinical Overview Laboratory Diagnosis HPIV Seasons Resources & References About Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Symptoms & Illnesses Lists symptoms and ...

  12. Virus Diseases Infecting Almond Germplasm in Lebanon

    OpenAIRE

    Adeeb Saad; Yusuf Abou-Jawdah; Zahi Kanaan-Atallah

    2000-01-01

    Cultivated and wild almond species were surveyed for virus diseases. Four viruses infected cultivated almonds (Prunus dulcis): Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), Prune dwarf virus (PDV), Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) and Apple mosaic virus (ApMV). Only ACLSV and ApMV were detected on wild almonds, (Prunus orientalis and P. korschinskii). The occurence of PNRSV or PDV on seeds used for the production of rootstocks, on seedlings in nurseries, and on mother plants reve...

  13. Computer virus information update CIAC-2301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, W.J.

    1994-01-15

    While CIAC periodically issues bulletins about specific computer viruses, these bulletins do not cover all the computer viruses that affect desktop computers. The purpose of this document is to identify most of the known viruses for the MS-DOS and Macintosh platforms and give an overview of the effects of each virus. The authors also include information on some windows, Atari, and Amiga viruses. This document is revised periodically as new virus information becomes available. This document replaces all earlier versions of the CIAC Computer virus Information Update. The date on the front cover indicates date on which the information in this document was extracted from CIAC`s Virus database.

  14. Prevention of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Transmission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in hemodialysis (HD) patients are associated with adverse outcomes, especially after kidney transplantation. Review: In the HD setting, cross-contamination to patients via environmental surfaces, supplies, equipment, multiple-dose medication vials ...

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: Investigation of the Genetic Diversity and Virulent ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... DNA sequencing, and bioinformatics tools for sequence management and analysis.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitus B virus co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitus B virus co-infection amog patients in Kano Nigeria. EE Nwokedi, MA Emokpae, AI Dutse. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Medicine Vol. 15(3) July-September 2006: 227-229. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  17. General properties of grapevine viruses occurring in Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Eszter Cseh; András Takács; László Kocsis; Richard Gáborjányi

    2012-01-01

    The past fifty years important advances have been made in the field of grapevine virus research, including characterization of pathogens and control measurements. Still the occurrence of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Tomato black ring virus (TBRV), Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Grapevine Bulgarian latent virus (GBLV), Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV), Grapevine leafroll- associated viruses (GLRaV1-4), Grapevine virus A (GVA), Grape...

  18. 76 FR 61227 - Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act of 2002; Biennial Review and Republication of the Select...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... representing the Federal life sciences, public health, law enforcement, security, and intelligence communities...-mouth disease virus and rinderpest virus due to the particular dangers posed by these two viruses. Foot... products or ingestion of contaminated milk, artificial insemination, and inhalation of infectious aerosols...

  19. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    virus in blood donors: investigation of type-specific differences in serologic reactivity and rate of alanine aminotransferase abnormalities. Transfusion 1993;. 33: 7-13. 45. McFarlane IG, Smith HM, Johnson PJ, Bray GP, Vergani 0, Williams R. Hepatitis. C virus antibodies in chronic active hepatitis: pathogenetic factor or false-.

  20. Autophagy in Measles Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Rozières

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a biological process that helps cells to recycle obsolete cellular components and which greatly contributes to maintaining cellular integrity in response to environmental stress factors. Autophagy is also among the first lines of cellular defense against invading microorganisms, including viruses. The autophagic destruction of invading pathogens, a process referred to as xenophagy, involves cytosolic autophagy receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 (Sequestosome 1 or NDP52/CALCOCO2 (Nuclear Dot 52 KDa Protein/Calcium Binding And Coiled-Coil Domain 2, which bind to microbial components and target them towards growing autophagosomes for degradation. However, most, if not all, infectious viruses have evolved molecular tricks to escape from xenophagy. Many viruses even use autophagy, part of the autophagy pathway or some autophagy-associated proteins, to improve their infectious potential. In this regard, the measles virus, responsible for epidemic measles, has a unique interface with autophagy as the virus can induce multiple rounds of autophagy in the course of infection. These successive waves of autophagy result from distinct molecular pathways and seem associated with anti- and/or pro-measles virus consequences. In this review, we describe what the autophagy–measles virus interplay has taught us about both the biology of the virus and the mechanistic orchestration of autophagy.

  1. antibodies against Herpes simplex virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    171. 5. Celum, C. L. The Interaction between Herpes Sim- plex Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Her- pes, 2004; 1: 36A-44A. 6. Brown, Z.A., Selke, S., Zeh, J., Kopelman, J., Maslow,. A., Ashley, R.L., Watts, D.H., Berry, S., Herd, M. and.

  2. Crenarchaeal Viruses: Morphotypes and Genomes,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, P.; Basta, P.; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2008-01-01

    In this article we present our current knowledge about double-stranded (dsDNA) viruses infecting hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeaota, the organisms which predominate in hot terrestrial springs with temperatures over 80 °C. These viruses exhibit extraordinary diversity of morphotypes most of which have...

  3. Epidemic of cell phone virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; González, Marta; Barabási, Albert-László.

    2008-03-01

    Standard operating systems and Bluetooth technology will be a trend for future cell phone features. These will enable cell phone viruses to spread either through SMS or by sending Bluetooth requests when cell phones are physically close enough. The difference in spreading methods gives these two types of viruses' different epidemiological characteristics. SMS viruses' spread is mainly based on people's social connections, whereas the spreading of Bluetooth viruses is affected by people's mobility patterns and population distribution. Using cell phone data recording calls, SMS and locations of more than 6 million users, we study the spread of SMS and Bluetooth viruses and characterize how the social network and the mobility of mobile phone users affect such spreading processes.

  4. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  5. [Ebola virus disease: Update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Arsuaga-Vicente, Marta; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arnalich-Fernandez, Francisco; Arribas, Jose Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The first known Ebola outbreak occurred in 1976. Since then, 24 limited outbreaks had been reported in Central Africa, but never affecting more than 425 persons. The current outbreak in Western Africa is the largest in history with 28,220 reported cases and 11,291 deaths. The magnitude of the epidemic has caused worldwide alarm. For the first time, evacuated patients were treated outside Africa, and secondary cases have occurred in Spain and the United States. Since the start of the current epidemic, our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical picture, laboratory findings, and virology of Ebola virus disease has considerably expanded. For the first time, experimental treatment has been tried, and there have been spectacular advances in vaccine development. A review is presented of these advances in the knowledge of Ebola virus disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome Sequence of Bivens Arm Virus, a Tibrovirus Belonging to the Species Tibrogargan virus (Mononegavirales: Rhabdoviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauck, Michael; Yú, Shu Qìng; Caì, Yíngyún; Hensley, Lisa E; Chiu, Charles Y; O'Connor, David H; Kuhn, Jens H

    2015-03-19

    The new rhabdoviral genus Tibrovirus currently has two members, Coastal Plains virus and Tibrogargan virus. Here, we report the coding-complete genome sequence of a putative member of this genus, Bivens Arm virus. A genomic comparison reveals Bivens Arm virus to be closely related to, but distinct from, Tibrogargan virus. Copyright © 2015 Lauck et al.

  7. Viruses in the Oceanic Basement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Olivia D; Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Miranda, Jaclyn A; Schvarcz, Christopher R; Rappé, Michael S; Steward, Grieg F

    2017-03-07

    Microbial life has been detected well into the igneous crust of the seafloor (i.e., the oceanic basement), but there have been no reports confirming the presence of viruses in this habitat. To detect and characterize an ocean basement virome, geothermally heated fluid samples (ca. 60 to 65°C) were collected from 117 to 292 m deep into the ocean basement using seafloor observatories installed in two boreholes (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program [IODP] U1362A and U1362B) drilled in the eastern sediment-covered flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Concentrations of virus-like particles in the fluid samples were on the order of 0.2 × 10 5 to 2 × 10 5  ml -1 ( n = 8), higher than prokaryote-like cells in the same samples by a factor of 9 on average (range, 1.5 to 27). Electron microscopy revealed diverse viral morphotypes similar to those of viruses known to infect bacteria and thermophilic archaea. An analysis of virus-like sequences in basement microbial metagenomes suggests that those from archaeon-infecting viruses were the most common (63 to 80%). Complete genomes of a putative archaeon-infecting virus and a prophage within an archaeal scaffold were identified among the assembled sequences, and sequence analysis suggests that they represent lineages divergent from known thermophilic viruses. Of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-containing scaffolds in the metagenomes for which a taxonomy could be inferred (163 out of 737), 51 to 55% appeared to be archaeal and 45 to 49% appeared to be bacterial. These results imply that the warmed, highly altered fluids in deeply buried ocean basement harbor a distinct assemblage of novel viruses, including many that infect archaea, and that these viruses are active participants in the ecology of the basement microbiome. IMPORTANCE The hydrothermally active ocean basement is voluminous and likely provided conditions critical to the origins of life, but the microbiology of this vast habitat is not

  8. Sensitive radioimmunosorbent assay for the detection of plant viruses. [Cauliflower mosaic virus, lettuce mosaic virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghabrial, S A; Shepherd, R J [Kentucky Univ., Lexington (USA); California Univ., Davis (USA))

    1980-06-01

    A simple and highly sensitive radioimmunosorbent assay (RISA) for the detection of plant viruses is described. The RISA procedure is a microplate method based on the principle of 'double-antibody sandwich' and follows essentially the protocol of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Clark and Adams, 1977), with the exception that /sup 125/I-labelled ..gamma..-globulin is substituted for the ..gamma..-globulin enzyme conjugate; the bound /sup 125/I-..gamma..-globulin is dissociated by acidification from the double-antibody sandwich. The radioactivity is proportional to virus concentration, and cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) could be detected at concentrations as low as 5 and 2 ng/ml, respectively. Direct evidence of the adverse effects of conjugation with enzyme on the binding abilities of antibodies is presented. The RISA procedure should prove valuable with viruses for which the ELISA values are too low to be dependable.

  9. Plant virus sensitivity to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergyne Czeck, B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary experiments for prevention were conducted with weakened plant viruses, namely with Arabis mosaic virus isolated from strawberries and tobacco mosaic virus. Treatment 24 hours prior to the infection with the radiation-weakened virus resulted in a 60-70% infection prevention. (author)

  10. Pandemic swine influenza virus: Preparedness planning | Ojogba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The novel H1N1 influenza virus that emerged in humans in Mexico in early 2009 and transmitted efficiently in the human population with global spread was declared a pandemic strain. The introduction of different avian and human influenza virus genes into swine influenza viruses often result in viruses of increased fitness ...

  11. Getah Virus Infection among Racehorses, Japan, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kikuchi, Takuya; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of Getah virus infection occurred among racehorses in Japan during September and October 2014. Of 49 febrile horses tested by reverse transcription PCR, 25 were positive for Getah virus. Viruses detected in 2014 were phylogenetically different from the virus isolated in Japan in 1978. PMID:25898181

  12. Ebola virus host cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuteru

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is an enveloped virus with filamentous structure and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in human and nonhuman primates. Host cell entry is the first essential step in the viral life cycle, which has been extensively studied as one of the therapeutic targets. A virus factor of cell entry is a surface glycoprotein (GP), which is an only essential viral protein in the step, as well as the unique particle structure. The virus also interacts with a lot of host factors to successfully enter host cells. Ebola virus at first binds to cell surface proteins and internalizes into cells, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles to intracellular acidic compartments. There, host proteases process GPs, which can interact with an intracellular receptor. Then, under an appropriate circumstance, viral and endosomal membranes are fused, which is enhanced by major structural changes of GPs, to complete host cell entry. Recently the basic research of Ebola virus infection mechanism has markedly progressed, largely contributed by identification of host factors and detailed structural analyses of GPs. This article highlights the mechanism of Ebola virus host cell entry, including recent findings.

  13. DIAGNOSTICS OF VIRUS PHYTOPATHOGENS FRUIT TREE PLUM POX VIRUS, PRUNUS NECROTIC RINGSPOT VIRUS AND PRUNUS DWARF VIRUS BY BIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Július Rozák

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of viral phytopathogen Plum pox virus, Prunus necrotic ringspot virus and Prunus dwarf virus in selected localities of Slovakia and diagnose them using a molecular and biological methods. Forty samples of fruit trees of the genus Prunus, twenty samples from intensive plantings and twenty samples from wild subject were analysed. Biological diagnostic by using biological indicators Prunus persica cv. GF 305, Prunus serrulata cv. Schirofugen and molecular diagnostic by mRT-PCR were applied. Five samples with Plum pox virus were infected. The two samples positive for Prunus necrotic ringspot virus and one sample for Prunus dwarf virus were confirmed. The two samples were found to be infected with two viruses Prunus necrotic ringspot virus and Prunus dwarf virus. This work focuses on two techniques, their application to the diagnosis of stone fruit viruses and their routinely used for sanitary and certification programmes.

  14. Viruses in the Oceanic Basement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia D. Nigro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial life has been detected well into the igneous crust of the seafloor (i.e., the oceanic basement, but there have been no reports confirming the presence of viruses in this habitat. To detect and characterize an ocean basement virome, geothermally heated fluid samples (ca. 60 to 65°C were collected from 117 to 292 m deep into the ocean basement using seafloor observatories installed in two boreholes (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program [IODP] U1362A and U1362B drilled in the eastern sediment-covered flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Concentrations of virus-like particles in the fluid samples were on the order of 0.2 × 105 to 2 × 105 ml−1 (n = 8, higher than prokaryote-like cells in the same samples by a factor of 9 on average (range, 1.5 to 27. Electron microscopy revealed diverse viral morphotypes similar to those of viruses known to infect bacteria and thermophilic archaea. An analysis of virus-like sequences in basement microbial metagenomes suggests that those from archaeon-infecting viruses were the most common (63 to 80%. Complete genomes of a putative archaeon-infecting virus and a prophage within an archaeal scaffold were identified among the assembled sequences, and sequence analysis suggests that they represent lineages divergent from known thermophilic viruses. Of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR-containing scaffolds in the metagenomes for which a taxonomy could be inferred (163 out of 737, 51 to 55% appeared to be archaeal and 45 to 49% appeared to be bacterial. These results imply that the warmed, highly altered fluids in deeply buried ocean basement harbor a distinct assemblage of novel viruses, including many that infect archaea, and that these viruses are active participants in the ecology of the basement microbiome.

  15. Defining the Antigenic Structure of the Henipavirus Attachment (G) Glycoprotein: Implications for the Fusion Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Morbillivirus Measles Virus Canine Distemper virus Rinderpest virus Respirovirus Bovine Parainfluenzavirus 3 Human Parainfluenzavirus 1,3...M. D. Curran, and B. K. Rima. 1997. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the large (L) genes of Phocine Distemper virus and Canine Distemper virus...components of Canine Distemper virus. J Gen Virol 66 ( Pt 3):443-56. 115. Parashar, U. D., L. M. Sunn, F. Ong, A. W. Mounts, M. T. Arif, T. G. Ksiazek

  16. A new looming of Zika virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nirav R Soni

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a member of the virus family Flaviviridae and the genus Flavivirus, transmitted by daytime-active Aedes mosquitoes, such as A. aegypti. ZIKV will continue to spread and it will be difficult to determine how the virus will spread over time. Sign and symptoms of ZIKAVD (Zika virus disease) were conjunctivitis (red eyes), back pain, birth defect-abnormal brain development known as microcephaly and it is diagnosed through PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and virus isolation from blood samples.

  17. Ebola virus: bioterrorism for humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramodkumar Pyarelal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal, zoonotic infection caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family (genus Ebolavirus. Ebola virus (EBOV spreads by human to human transmission through contacts with body fluids from infected patients. Initial stages of EBOV are non-specific which makes the differential diagnosis broad. Here in this review article we focused on to show the details of EBOV, from its first case right up to the possible targets to cure this lethal disease. In this study we have shown the statistical survey, epidemiology, disease ontology, different genes coding for different proteins in EBOV and future aspects of it.

  18. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Maria Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  19. "The evil virus cell": Students‘ knowledge and beliefs about viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzinger, Sonja M.; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p students and grade 10 high school students. Students enrolled in university-level biology outperformed all other groups, even though they had not yet encountered this topic at their courses; part of this phenomenon might be due to their affinity for learning about biological topics. However, even many first-year biology students had a high number of severe misconceptions, e.g., defining a virus as a pro- or eukaryotic cell, or falsely naming malaria as a viral disease. Since there was no significant difference in virus-related knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients

  20. "The evil virus cell": Students' knowledge and beliefs about viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K; Enzinger, Sonja M; Fink, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Education about virus biology at school is of pivotal interest to raise public awareness concerning means of disease transmission and, thus, methods to prevent infection, and to reduce unnecessary antibiotic treatment due to patient pressure on physicians in case of viral diseases such as influenza. This study aimed at making visible the knowledge of Austrian high school and university students with respect to virus biology, virus structure and health-education issues. The data presented here stem from comprehensive questionnaire analyses, including the task to draw a virus, from a cross-sectional study with 133 grade 7 and 199 grade 10 high school students, and 133 first-year biology and 181 first-year non-biology university students. Analyses were performed both quantitatively and qualitatively. ANOVA revealed a highly significant group effect for total knowledge relating to virus biology and health issues (F(3, 642) = 44.17, p students and grade 10 high school students. Students enrolled in university-level biology outperformed all other groups, even though they had not yet encountered this topic at their courses; part of this phenomenon might be due to their affinity for learning about biological topics. However, even many first-year biology students had a high number of severe misconceptions, e.g., defining a virus as a pro- or eukaryotic cell, or falsely naming malaria as a viral disease. Since there was no significant difference in virus-related knowledge between high schools, virus biology seems to have been taught similarly among the tested schools. However, the majority of participants stated that the virus-related knowledge they had acquired at school was not sufficient. Based on the results presented here we urgently suggest improving and intensifying teaching this topic at school, since virus-related knowledge was by far too fragmentary among many participants. Such lack of health-relevant knowledge may contribute to pressure on physicians by patients

  1. Das Epstein-Barr-Virus ( = Epstein-Barr virus)

    OpenAIRE

    Niller, H. H.; Wolf, Hans J.

    1993-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is an ubiquitous humanpathogenic herpesvirus. It has been identified as the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis. In addition it is associated with the cancers nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Burkitt's lymphoma. Like other herpesviruses it infects cells in a lytic way or it persists in a latent state. Classically, the serologic diagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infections is done by the agglutination of sheep erythrocytes according to Paul and Bunnell as a rapid testing m...

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  3. A REVIEW ON ZIKA VIRUS (ZIKV) -A DREADFUL MEMBER OF THE VIRUS FAMILY FLAVIVIRIDAE

    OpenAIRE

    1Rafiya Begum, 2 Raafia Aseena, 3Nuha Rasheed and 4 Abdul Saleem Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Research on zika virus examine the virus that is spread to humans through a mosquito bite, with symptoms that include fever, rash, joint pain, and conjuctivities. For most people zika virus is not necessarily anything to worry, as it is not fatal and symptoms are generally mild for period up to a week. Hospitalization because of zika virus is almost always not necessary. However, the zika virus can be extremely dangerous to pregnant womes. Key Words: Zika, virus, transmission, fatal, flavivir...

  4. Electron microscopic identification of Zinga virus as a strain of Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, O D; Baigent, C L; Mueller, G; Tomori, O; Schmitz, H

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopic examination of a negatively stained suspension of Zinga virus showed particles 90-100 nm in diameter, enveloped with spikes 12-20 nm in length and 5 nm in diameter. Further identification of the virus by immune electron microscopy showed the reactivity of human Rift Valley fever virus-positive serum with Zinga virus. Results of this study are in agreement with earlier reports that Zinga virus is a strain of Rift Valley fever virus.

  5. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  6. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Pneumoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Bert; Collins, Peter; Easton, Andrew; Fouchier, Ron; Kurath, Gael; Lamb, Robert A; Lee, Benhur; Maisner, Andrea; Rota, Paul; Wang, Linfa; Ictv Report Consortium

    2017-12-01

    The family Pneumoviridae comprises large enveloped negative-sense RNA viruses. This taxon was formerly a subfamily within the Paramyxoviridae, but was reclassified in 2016 as a family with two genera, Orthopneumovirus and Metapneumovirus. Pneumoviruses infect a range of mammalian species, while some members of the Metapneumovirus genus may also infect birds. Some viruses are specific and pathogenic for humans, such as human respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus. There are no known vectors for pneumoviruses and transmission is thought to be primarily by aerosol droplets and contact. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of the Pneumoviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/pneumoviridae.

  7. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Hepeviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Michael A; Harrison, Tim J; Jameel, S; Meng, X-J; Okamoto, H; Van der Poel, W H M; Smith, Donald B; Ictv Report Consortium

    2017-11-01

    The family Hepeviridae includes enterically transmitted small non-enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses. It includes the genera Piscihepevirus, whose members infect fish, and Orthohepevirus, whose members infect mammals and birds. Members of the genus Orthohepevirus include hepatitis E virus, which is responsible for self-limiting acute hepatitis in humans and several mammalian species; the infection may become chronic in immunocompromised individuals. Extrahepatic manifestations of Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, glomerulonephritis and pancreatitis have been described in humans. Avian hepatitis E virus causes hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome in chickens. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of the Hepeviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/hepeviridae.

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  9. Mayaro virus: the jungle flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izurieta RO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo O Izurieta,1 David A DeLacure,1 Andres Izurieta,2 Ismael A Hoare,1 Miguel Reina Ortiz,1,3 1Department of Global Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Fundación Raíces, Esmeraldas, Ecuador Abstract: Mayaro fever is an emerging acute viral disease endemic in Central and South America. Mayaro virus (MAYV is classified in the Semliki Forest virus antigenic complex and shares similarities with the alphavirus Chikungunya virus and the flavivirus Dengue virus. MAYV is an arbovirus transmitted by Haemagogus janthinomys, with competence also demonstrated in Aedes aegypti, Aedes scapularis, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Outbreaks and small epidemics of Mayaro fever have occurred in several countries in northern South America and the Caribbean. In addition, travel-associated cases have been reported in European nationals returning from endemic areas. Clinical features of Mayaro fever include fever, chills, persistent arthralgia, retro-orbital pain, maculopapular rash, itching, dizziness, and, rarely, lymphadenopathy. Methods of control for MAYV are similar to those used for other sylvatic arboviruses. Although MAYV was discovered as long ago as the 1950s and continues to be prevalent in the tropical areas of the Americas, it remains neglected and under-studied. This paper provides a thorough and current review of the published MAYV literature ranging from its original description to modern outbreaks, and from the basic virus characteristics to the clinical and epidemiological aspects of this disease. Keywords: Mayaro virus, emerging arbovirus, dengue-like virus, arthrogenic virus

  10. Zika virus and assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Christina N; Bano, Rashda; Washington Cross, Chantel I; Segars, James H

    2017-06-01

    Due to the fact that the Zika virus can be sexually transmitted, there is a potential risk for disease transmission at several stages of assisted reproduction. Such a possibility poses a serious challenge to couples pursing fertility with reproductive technologies. Here, we discuss what is known regarding Zika virus infection with respect to sexual transmission and correlate this knowledge with recent recommendations in the realm of infertility treatment. Zika virus can be transmitted from infected men and women through vaginal, oral or anal intercourse. Zika virus RNA has been detected in blood, semen, cervical mucus and vaginal fluid. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control recommends that infected men wait 6 months, and infected women 8 weeks, prior to attempting pregnancy. Reproductive tissue donors should wait 6 months before giving a specimen. Further study of Zika virus transmission in different reproductive tissues and establishment of validated testing methods for viral disease transmissibility are urgently needed. Reproductive technologists need to establish screening, testing and laboratory protocols aimed to reduce the risk of Zika virus transmission during assisted reproduction.

  11. Archaeal Viruses from High-Temperature Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson-McGee, Jacob H; Snyder, Jamie C; Young, Mark J

    2018-02-27

    Archaeal viruses are some of the most enigmatic viruses known, due to the small number that have been characterized to date. The number of known archaeal viruses lags behind known bacteriophages by over an order of magnitude. Despite this, the high levels of genetic and morphological diversity that archaeal viruses display has attracted researchers for over 45 years. Extreme natural environments, such as acidic hot springs, are almost exclusively populated by Archaea and their viruses, making these attractive environments for the discovery and characterization of new viruses. The archaeal viruses from these environments have provided insights into archaeal biology, gene function, and viral evolution. This review focuses on advances from over four decades of archaeal virology, with a particular focus on archaeal viruses from high temperature environments, the existing challenges in understanding archaeal virus gene function, and approaches being taken to overcome these limitations.

  12. Archaeal Viruses from High-Temperature Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob H. Munson-McGee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal viruses are some of the most enigmatic viruses known, due to the small number that have been characterized to date. The number of known archaeal viruses lags behind known bacteriophages by over an order of magnitude. Despite this, the high levels of genetic and morphological diversity that archaeal viruses display has attracted researchers for over 45 years. Extreme natural environments, such as acidic hot springs, are almost exclusively populated by Archaea and their viruses, making these attractive environments for the discovery and characterization of new viruses. The archaeal viruses from these environments have provided insights into archaeal biology, gene function, and viral evolution. This review focuses on advances from over four decades of archaeal virology, with a particular focus on archaeal viruses from high temperature environments, the existing challenges in understanding archaeal virus gene function, and approaches being taken to overcome these limitations.

  13. Hepatitis E Virus and Related Viruses in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, D; Mauroy, A; Pavio, N; Purdy, M A; Rose, N; Thiry, E; de Oliveira-Filho, E F

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis E is an acute human liver disease in healthy individuals which may eventually become chronic. It is caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV) and can have a zoonotic origin. Nearly 57,000 people die yearly from hepatitis E-related conditions. The disease is endemic in both developing and developed countries with distinct epidemiologic profiles. In developing countries, the disease is associated with inadequate water treatment, while in developed countries, transmission is associated with animal contact and the ingestion of raw or uncooked meat, especially liver. All human HEV are grouped into at least four genotypes, while HEV or HEV-related viruses have been identified in an increasing number of domestic and wild animal species. Despite a high genetic diversity, only one single HEV serotype has been described to date for HEV genotypes 1-4. The discovery of new HEV or HEV-related viruses leads to a continuing increase in the number of genotypes. In addition, the genome organization of all these viruses is variable with overlapping open reading frames (ORF) and differences in the location of ORF3. In spite of the role of some domestic and wild animals as reservoir, the origin of HEV and HEV-related viruses in humans and animals is still unclear. This review discusses aspects of the detection, molecular virology, zoonotic transmission and origin of HEV and HEV-related viruses in the context of 'One Health' and establishes a link between the previous and the new taxonomy of this growing virus family. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Circulating avian influenza viruses closely related to the 1918 virus have pandemic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tokiko; Zhong, Gongxun; Russell, Colin A.; Nakajima, Noriko; Hatta, Masato; Hanson, Anthony; McBride, Ryan; Burke, David F.; Takahashi, Kenta; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Tomita, Yuriko; Maher, Eileen A.; Watanabe, Shinji; Imai, Masaki; Neumann, Gabriele; Hasegawa, Hideki; Paulson, James C.; Smith, Derek J.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Wild birds harbor a large gene pool of influenza A viruses that have the potential to cause influenza pandemics. Foreseeing and understanding this potential is important for effective surveillance. Our phylogenetic and geographic analyses revealed the global prevalence of avian influenza virus genes whose proteins differ only a few amino acids from the 1918 pandemic influenza virus, suggesting that 1918-like pandemic viruses may emerge in the future. To assess this risk, we generated and characterized a virus composed of avian influenza viral segments with high homology to the 1918 virus. This virus exhibited higher pathogenicity in mice and ferrets than an authentic avian influenza virus. Further, acquisition of seven amino acid substitutions in the viral polymerases and the hemagglutinin surface glycoprotein conferred respiratory droplet transmission to the 1918-like avian virus in ferrets, demonstrating that contemporary avian influenza viruses with 1918 virus-like proteins may have pandemic potential. PMID:24922572

  15. Contact Mechanics of a Small Icosahedral Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Dragnea, Bogdan; Ma, Xiang; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2017-07-01

    A virus binding to a surface causes stress of the virus cage near the contact area. Here, we investigate the potential role of substrate-induced structural perturbation in the mechanical response of virus particles to adsorption. This is particularly relevant to the broad category of viruses stabilized by weak noncovalent interactions. We utilize atomic force microscopy to measure height distributions of the brome mosaic virus upon adsorption from solution on atomically flat substrates and present a continuum model that captures our observations and provides estimates of elastic properties and of the interfacial energy of the virus, without recourse to indentation.

  16. Structure of viruses: a short history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Michael G

    2013-05-01

    This review is a partially personal account of the discovery of virus structure and its implication for virus function. Although I have endeavored to cover all aspects of structural virology and to acknowledge relevant individuals, I know that I have favored taking examples from my own experience in telling this story. I am anxious to apologize to all those who I might have unintentionally offended by omitting their work. The first knowledge of virus structure was a result of Stanley's studies of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the subsequent X-ray fiber diffraction analysis by Bernal and Fankuchen in the 1930s. At about the same time it became apparent that crystals of small RNA plant and animal viruses could diffract X-rays, demonstrating that viruses must have distinct and unique structures. More advances were made in the 1950s with the realization by Watson and Crick that viruses might have icosahedral symmetry. With the improvement of experimental and computational techniques in the 1970s, it became possible to determine the three-dimensional, near-atomic resolution structures of some small icosahedral plant and animal RNA viruses. It was a great surprise that the protecting capsids of the first virus structures to be determined had the same architecture. The capsid proteins of these viruses all had a 'jelly-roll' fold and, furthermore, the organization of the capsid protein in the virus were similar, suggesting a common ancestral virus from which many of today's viruses have evolved. By this time a more detailed structure of TMV had also been established, but both the architecture and capsid protein fold were quite different to that of the icosahedral viruses. The small icosahedral RNA virus structures were also informative of how and where cellular receptors, anti-viral compounds, and neutralizing antibodies bound to these viruses. However, larger lipid membrane enveloped viruses did not form sufficiently ordered crystals to obtain good X-ray diffraction

  17. Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus: Emerging and Re-Emerging Enterically Transmitted Hepatitis Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Stanley M; Walker, Christopher M

    2018-05-07

    Over the past two decades, progress in understanding human infections with hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) has been eclipsed by the priority of combating persistent hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. During that time, the global burden of liver disease caused by enteric hepatitis viruses has not abated. Because of vaccines, hepatitis A has become increasingly a disease of adults instead of early childhood in many regions of the world, resulting in an age-related shift toward more severe disease. HEV has remained endemic in many developing countries, and in well-developed, economically advanced countries it is now recognized as a cause of chronic, progressive liver disease in individuals with compromised immunity. The goal of this collection of articles is to review recent progress and to shine a bright light on gaps in our understanding of how these viruses replicate, cause disease, interact with the liver and host immune system, and are transmitted, along with prospects for improved control in human populations. Renewed efforts to study and compare HAV and HEV biology in humans and animal models have high potential to enhance our understanding of host-pathogen balance in the liver, and may contribute ultimately to the control of other infectious diseases of the liver. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  18. Ebola virus: recommendations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service has been closely following, in particular via the WHO, the development of the Ebola virus outbreak currently affecting some African countries. This infectious disease may be passed on through direct contact with the bodily fluids of a sick person.   Based on the recommendations of the WHO and the two Host States, Switzerland and France, as updated on their respective websites, so far there has been no ban on travel to the countries concerned. However, unless it is absolutely essential, you are advised not to visit any of the countries affected by Ebola (Guinea, Republic of Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria). The two Host States have established an alert system, and a check is carried out on departure from the airports of those countries. It is strongly recommended that you contact the Medical Service if you are travelling to those countries. We remind you to observe the basic rules of hygiene such as frequent hand washing, whatever your destination. The Medical Service is...

  19. Autophagic machinery activated by dengue virus enhances virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.-R.; Lei, H.-Y.; Liu, M.-T.; Wang, J.-R.; Chen, S.-H.; Jiang-Shieh, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-S.; Yeh, T.-M.; Liu, C.-C.; Liu, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular response against stresses which include the infection of viruses and bacteria. We unravel that Dengue virus-2 (DV2) can trigger autophagic process in various infected cell lines demonstrated by GFP-LC3 dot formation and increased LC3-II formation. Autophagosome formation was also observed under the transmission electron microscope. DV2-induced autophagy further enhances the titers of extracellular and intracellular viruses indicating that autophagy can promote viral replication in the infected cells. Moreover, our data show that ATG5 protein is required to execute DV2-induced autophagy. All together, we are the first to demonstrate that DV can activate autophagic machinery that is favorable for viral replication

  20. [Bats and Viruses: complex relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-10-01

    With more than 1 200 species, bats and flying foxes (Order Chiroptera) constitute the most important and diverse order of Mammals after Rodents. Many species of bats are insectivorous while others are frugivorous and few of them are hematophagous. Some of these animals fly during the night, others are crepuscular or diurnal. Some fly long distances during seasonal migrations. Many species are colonial cave-dwelling, living in a rather small home range while others are relatively solitary. However, in spite of the importance of bats for terrestrial biotic communities and ecosystem ecology, the diversity in their biology and lifestyles remain poorly known and underappreciated. More than sixty viruses have been detected or isolated in bats; these animals are therefore involved in the natural cycles of many of them. This is the case, for instance, of rabies virus and other Lyssavirus (Family Rhabdoviridae), Nipah and Hendra viruses (Paramyxoviridae), Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV (Coronaviridae). For these zoonotic viruses, a number of bat species are considered as important reservoir hosts, efficient disseminators or even directly responsible of the transmission. Some of these bat-borne viruses cause highly pathogenic diseases while others are of potential significance for humans and domestic or wild animals; so, bats are an important risk in human and animal public health. Moreover, some groups of viruses developed through different phylogenetic mechanisms of coevolution between viruses and bats. The fact that most of these viral infections are asymptomatic in bats has been observed since a long time but the mechanisms of the viral persistence are not clearly understood. The various bioecology of the different bat populations allows exchange of virus between migrating and non-migrating conspecific species. For a better understanding of the role of bats in the circulation of these viral zoonoses, epidemiologists must pay attention to

  1. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV), Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV), Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S; Salmons, Brian; Glenn, Wendy K

    2018-01-01

    Although the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), human papilloma viruses (HPVs), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-also known as human herpes virus type 4). Each of these viruses has documented oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to inform the scientific and general community about this recent evidence. MMTV and human breast cancer-the evidence is detailed and comprehensive but cannot be regarded as conclusive. BLV and human breast cancer-the evidence is limited. However, in view of the emerging information about BLV in human breast cancer, it is prudent to encourage the elimination of BLV in cattle, particularly in the dairy industry. HPVs and breast cancer-the evidence is substantial but not conclusive. The availability of effective preventive vaccines is a major advantage and their use should be encouraged. EBV and breast cancer-the evidence is also substantial but not conclusive. Currently, there are no practical means of either prevention or treatment. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition, and cancer in general is a culmination of events, there is no evidence that inherited genetic traits are causal. The influence of oncogenic viruses is currently the major plausible hypothesis for a direct cause of human breast cancer.

  2. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV, Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV, and Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Lawson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, bovine leukemia virus (BLV, human papilloma viruses (HPVs, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-also known as human herpes virus type 4. Each of these viruses has documented oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to inform the scientific and general community about this recent evidence.The evidenceMMTV and human breast cancer—the evidence is detailed and comprehensive but cannot be regarded as conclusive. BLV and human breast cancer—the evidence is limited. However, in view of the emerging information about BLV in human breast cancer, it is prudent to encourage the elimination of BLV in cattle, particularly in the dairy industry. HPVs and breast cancer—the evidence is substantial but not conclusive. The availability of effective preventive vaccines is a major advantage and their use should be encouraged. EBV and breast cancer—the evidence is also substantial but not conclusive. Currently, there are no practical means of either prevention or treatment. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition, and cancer in general is a culmination of events, there is no evidence that inherited genetic traits are causal.ConclusionThe influence of oncogenic viruses is currently the major plausible hypothesis for a direct cause of human breast cancer.

  3. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Peters

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity.

  4. Viruses and thyroiditis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hober Didier

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral infections are frequently cited as a major environmental factor involved in subacute thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid diseases This review examines the data related to the role of viruses in the development of thyroiditis. Our research has been focused on human data. We have reviewed virological data for each type of thyroiditis at different levels of evidence; epidemiological data, serological data or research on circulating viruses, direct evidence of thyroid tissue infection. Interpretation of epidemiological and serological data must be cautious as they don't prove that this pathogen is responsible for the disease. However, direct evidence of the presence of viruses or their components in the organ are available for retroviruses (HFV and mumps in subacute thyroiditis, for retroviruses (HTLV-1, HFV, HIV and SV40 in Graves's disease and for HTLV-1, enterovirus, rubella, mumps virus, HSV, EBV and parvovirus in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, it remains to determine whether they are responsible for thyroid diseases or whether they are just innocent bystanders. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between viruses and thyroid diseases, in order to develop new strategies for prevention and/or treatment.

  5. Viruses and thyroiditis: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desailloud, Rachel; Hober, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections are frequently cited as a major environmental factor involved in subacute thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid diseases This review examines the data related to the role of viruses in the development of thyroiditis. Our research has been focused on human data. We have reviewed virological data for each type of thyroiditis at different levels of evidence; epidemiological data, serological data or research on circulating viruses, direct evidence of thyroid tissue infection. Interpretation of epidemiological and serological data must be cautious as they don't prove that this pathogen is responsible for the disease. However, direct evidence of the presence of viruses or their components in the organ are available for retroviruses (HFV) and mumps in subacute thyroiditis, for retroviruses (HTLV-1, HFV, HIV and SV40) in Graves's disease and for HTLV-1, enterovirus, rubella, mumps virus, HSV, EBV and parvovirus in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, it remains to determine whether they are responsible for thyroid diseases or whether they are just innocent bystanders. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between viruses and thyroid diseases, in order to develop new strategies for prevention and/or treatment. PMID:19138419

  6. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-07

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.

  7. Fungal transmission of plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R N

    1996-01-01

    Thirty soilborne viruses or virus-like agents are transmitted by five species of fungal vectors. Ten polyhedral viruses, of which nine are in the family Tombusviridae, are acquired in the in vitro manner and do not occur within the resting spores of their vectors, Olpidium brassicae and O. bornovanus. Fungal vectors for other viruses in the family should be sought even though tombusviruses are reputed to be soil transmitted without a vector. Eighteen rod-shaped viruses belonging to the furo- and bymovirus groups and to an unclassified group are acquired in the in vivo manner and survive within the resting spores of their vector, O. brassicae, Polymyxa graminis, P. betae, and Spongospora subterranea. The viral coat protein has an essential role in in vitro transmission. With in vivo transmission a site in the coat protein-read through protein (CP-RT) of beet necrotic yellow vein furovirus determines vector transmissibility as does a site in a similar 98-kDa polyprotein of barley mild mosaic bymovirus. The mechanisms by which virions move (or are moved) into and out of the protoplasm of zoospores or of thalli needs study.

  8. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  9. Viruses: agents of coral disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, S K; Burchett, S G; Dale, A L; Davies, P; Davy, J E; Muncke, C; Hoegh-Guldberg, O; Wilson, W H

    2006-03-23

    The potential role of viruses in coral disease has only recently begun to receive attention. Here we describe our attempts to determine whether viruses are present in thermally stressed corals Pavona danai, Acropora formosa and Stylophora pistillata and zoanthids Zoanthus sp., and their zooxanthellae. Heat-shocked P. danai, A. formosa and Zoanthus sp. all produced numerous virus-like particles (VLPs) that were evident in the animal tissue, zooxanthellae and the surrounding seawater; VLPs were also seen around heat-shocked freshly isolated zooxanthellae (FIZ) from P. danai and S. pistillata. The most commonly seen VLPs were tail-less, hexagonal and about 40 to 50 nm in diameter, though a diverse range of other VLP morphotypes (e.g. rounded, rod-shaped, droplet-shaped, filamentous) were also present around corals. When VLPs around heat-shocked FIZ from S. pistillata were added to non-stressed FIZ from this coral, they resulted in cell lysis, suggesting that an infectious agent was present; however, analysis with transmission electron microscopy provided no clear evidence of viral infection. The release of diverse VLPs was again apparent when flow cytometry was used to enumerate release by heat-stressed A. formosa nubbins. Our data support the infection of reef corals by viruses, though we cannot yet determine the precise origin (i.e. coral, zooxanthellae and/or surface microbes) of the VLPs seen. Furthermore, genome sequence data are required to establish the presence of viruses unequivocally.

  10. Coping with Computer Viruses: General Discussion and Review of Symantec Anti-Virus for the Macintosh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primich, Tracy

    1992-01-01

    Discusses computer viruses that attack the Macintosh and describes Symantec AntiVirus for Macintosh (SAM), a commercial program designed to detect and eliminate viruses; sample screen displays are included. SAM is recommended for use in library settings as well as two public domain virus protection programs. (four references) (MES)

  11. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiridiou, M.; Borkent-Raven, B.; Hulshof, J.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection with hepatitis D can occur only as coinfection with HBV or superinfection of an existing HBV infection. Because of the bond between the two viruses, control

  12. Zika Virus and Complications: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do if they have been exposed to unprotected sex but do not wish to become pregnant because ... A's Zika virus and complications » Zika digital timeline Video Zika virus - Questions and answers (Q&A) Related ...

  13. Archaeal Viruses: Diversity, Replication, and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellas, Nikki; Snyder, Jamie C; Bolduc, Benjamin; Young, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    The Archaea-and their viruses-remain the most enigmatic of life's three domains. Once thought to inhabit only extreme environments, archaea are now known to inhabit diverse environments. Even though the first archaeal virus was described over 40 years ago, only 117 archaeal viruses have been discovered to date. Despite this small number, these viruses have painted a portrait of enormous morphological and genetic diversity. For example, research centered around the various steps of the archaeal virus life cycle has led to the discovery of unique mechanisms employed by archaeal viruses during replication, maturation, and virion release. In many instances, archaeal virus proteins display very low levels of sequence homology to other proteins listed in the public database, and therefore, structural characterization of these proteins has played an integral role in functional assignment. These structural studies have not only provided insights into structure-function relationships but have also identified links between viruses across all three domains of life.

  14. New Lineage of Lassa Virus, Togo, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Shannon L.M.; Strecker, Thomas; Cadar, Daniel; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Faber, Kelly; Patel, Ketan; Brown, Shelley M.; Davis, William G.; Klena, John D.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Noack, Bernd; Emmerich, Petra; Rieger, Toni; Wolff, Svenja; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Eickmann, Markus; Mengel, Jan Philipp; Schultze, Tilman; Hain, Torsten; Ampofo, William; Bonney, Kofi; Aryeequaye, Juliana Naa Dedei; Ribner, Bruce; Varkey, Jay B.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Lyon, G. Marshall; Kann, Gerrit; De Leuw, Philipp; Schuettfort, Gundolf; Stephan, Christoph; Wieland, Ulrike; Fries, Jochen W.U.; Kochanek, Matthias; Kraft, Colleen S.; Wolf, Timo; Nichol, Stuart T.; Becker, Stephan; Ströher, Ute

    2018-01-01

    We describe a strain of Lassa virus representing a putative new lineage that was isolated from a cluster of human infections with an epidemiologic link to Togo. This finding extends the known range of Lassa virus to Togo. PMID:29460758

  15. Zika Virus: Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Zika Virus Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies Language: English (US) ... Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Zika virus infection (Zika) during pregnancy can cause damage to ...

  16. A Literature Review of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Anna R; Bloch, Evan M

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus is a mosquitoborne flavivirus that is the focus of an ongoing pandemic and public health emergency. Previously limited to sporadic cases in Africa and Asia, the emergence of Zika virus in Brazil in 2015 heralded rapid spread throughout the Americas. Although most Zika virus infections are characterized by subclinical or mild influenza-like illness, severe manifestations have been described, including Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults and microcephaly in babies born to infected mothers. Neither an effective treatment nor a vaccine is available for Zika virus; therefore, the public health response primarily focuses on preventing infection, particularly in pregnant women. Despite growing knowledge about this virus, questions remain regarding the virus's vectors and reservoirs, pathogenesis, genetic diversity, and potential synergistic effects of co-infection with other circulating viruses. These questions highlight the need for research to optimize surveillance, patient management, and public health intervention in the current Zika virus epidemic.

  17. General properties of grapevine viruses occurring in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Cseh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The past fifty years important advances have been made in the field of grapevine virus research, including characterization of pathogens and control measurements. Still the occurrence of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV, Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV, Tomato black ring virus (TBRV, Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV, Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV, Grapevine Bulgarian latent virus (GBLV, Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV, Grapevine leafroll- associated viruses (GLRaV1-4, Grapevine virus A (GVA, Grapevine virus B (GVB and Grapevine rupestris stem pitting- associated virus (GRSPaV have been reported in Hungary and characterized by conventional methods as woody indexing, herbaceous indexing and serological methods. Among grapevine viruses the Grapevine line pattern virus (GLPV seems to be uncial; because it was reported only in Hungary. Causal agents of several grapevine diseases, like enation, vein necrosis and vein mosaic remained undiscovered. These virus-like diseases occurred only sporadically, without economic importance.

  18. Bluetongue virus in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, J; Lorusso, A; Carmine, I; Di Gennaro, A; Portanti, O; Olivieri, S; Casaccia, C; Pisciella, M; Teodori, L; Sghaier, S; Savini, G

    2013-10-01

    Since 2000, several incursions of bluetongue virus (BTV) occurred in the Mediterranean Basin involving European and surrounding Countries. The Middle East represents one of the most important gateways for the access of BTV in Europe. Limited data on the BTV situation in this area are available. In this perspective, an epidemiological survey on the presence of BTV in Lebanon was conducted. Of the 181 serum samples tested, 97 (mean = 53.6%; 95% CI: 46.3-60.7) resulted positive when tested for the presence of BTV antibodies by c-ELISA, of these 42 (mean = 42%; 95% CI: 32.8-51.8) serum samples were from sheep and 55 (mean = 67.9%; 95% CI: 57.1-77.1) serum samples were from goats. Fourteen blood samples (14/110; mean = 12.7%; 95% CI: 7.8-20.3), 6 (6/66; mean = 9.1%; 95% CI: 4.4-18.5) from sheep and 8 (8/44; mean = 18.2%; 95% CI: 9.6-32.0) from goats, were positive by qRT-PCR. The results with serum-neutralization assay and typing performed by RT-PCR confirmed that six BTV serotypes are currently circulating in Lebanon, and these serotypes are as follows: 1, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24. This study is the first report that confirms the presence and circulation of BTV in Lebanon. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Yun

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the pr...

  20. Characteristics of Filoviridae: Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Brigitte; Kurth, Reinhard; Bukreyev, Alexander

    Filoviruses are enveloped, nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA viruses. The two species, Marburg and Ebola virus, are serologically, biochemically, and genetically distinct. Marburg virus was first isolated during an outbreak in Europe in 1967, and Ebola virus emerged in 1976 as the causative agent of two simultaneous outbreaks in southern Sudan and northern Zaire. Although the main route of infection is known to be person-to-person transmission by intimate contact, the natural reservoir for filoviruses still remains a mystery.

  1. Viruses, Vaccines and the Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; McQuillan, Julia; Spiegel, Amy N; Hill, Patricia Wonch; Smith, Rebecca; West, John; Wood, Charles

    Current research in virology is changing public conceptions about vaccines and infectious disease. The University of Nebraska State Museum collaborated with research virologists, science writers, artists and learning researchers to create public outreach materials about viruses and infectious disease. The project, funded by the National Institute of Health's SEPA program, developed comics, a book with Carl Zimmer, and other materials and programs. The project launched three kinds of learning research: 1) a survey of Nebraska adults on their opinions about vaccines and infectious disease; 2) a study comparing the mental models of viruses, vaccines and infection from virologists, teachers, and students; and 3) a controlled study 873 high school students randomly assigned to read either a comic or a text-based essay with the same virus information.

  2. Viruses & kidney disease: beyond HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Meryl; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-infected patients may acquire new viral co-infections; they may also experience the reactivation or worsening of existing viral infections, including active, smoldering, or latent infections. HIV-infected patients may be predisposed to these viral infections due to immunodeficiency or to risk factors common to HIV and other viruses. A number of these affect the kidney, either by direct infection or by deposition of immune complexes. In this review we discuss the renal manifestations and treatment of hepatitis C virus, BK virus, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and parvovirus B19 in patients with HIV disease. We also discuss an approach to the identification of new viral renal pathogens, using a viral gene chip to identify viral DNA or RNA. PMID:19013331

  3. Nipah virus transmission in a hamster model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmie de Wit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on epidemiological data, it is believed that human-to-human transmission plays an important role in Nipah virus outbreaks. No experimental data are currently available on the potential routes of human-to-human transmission of Nipah virus. In a first dose-finding experiment in Syrian hamsters, it was shown that Nipah virus was predominantly shed via the respiratory tract within nasal and oropharyngeal secretions. Although Nipah viral RNA was detected in urogenital and rectal swabs, no infectious virus was recovered from these samples, suggesting no viable virus was shed via these routes. In addition, hamsters inoculated with high doses shed significantly higher amounts of viable Nipah virus particles in comparison with hamsters infected with lower inoculum doses. Using the highest inoculum dose, three potential routes of Nipah virus transmission were investigated in the hamster model: transmission via fomites, transmission via direct contact and transmission via aerosols. It was demonstrated that Nipah virus is transmitted efficiently via direct contact and inefficiently via fomites, but not via aerosols. These findings are in line with epidemiological data which suggest that direct contact with nasal and oropharyngeal secretions of Nipah virus infected individuals resulted in greater risk of Nipah virus infection. The data provide new and much-needed insights into the modes and efficiency of Nipah virus transmission and have important public health implications with regards to the risk assessment and management of future Nipah virus outbreaks.

  4. RNAi suppressors encoded by pathogenic human viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Walter; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing or RNAi interference (RNAi) serves as an innate antiviral mechanism in plants, fungi and animals. Human viruses, like plant viruses, encode suppressor proteins or RNAs that block or modulate the RNAi pathway. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which pathogenic human viruses

  5. Characterization of pseudorabies viruses produced in mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-28

    Feb 28, 2012 ... for influenza A and B viruses (Govorkova et al., 1996). In addition, the propagation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a porcine coronavirus had been unsuccessful until serial passage of the virus in Vero cells. (Hofmann and Wyler, 1988; Song et al., 2003). There- fore, this cell line is being widely ...

  6. Contact Mechanics of a Small Icosahedral Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Cheng; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Ma, Xiang; Schoot, Paul van der; Zandi, Roya; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Virus binding to a surface results at least locally, at the contact area, in stress and potential structural perturbation of the virus cage. Here we address the question of the role of substrate-induced deformation in the overall virus mechanical response to the adsorption event. This question may

  7. Emerging viruses in the genus Comovirus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrzik, Karel; Koloniuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2010), s. 290-292 ISSN 0920-8569 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Capsid proteins * plant virus * Radish mosaic virus * Turnip ringspot virus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.693, year: 2010

  8. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  9. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-10-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles.

  10. Influenza Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Engel, Gregory A.; Feeroz, M.M.; San, Sorn; Rompis, Aida; Lee, Benjamin P. Y.-H.; Shaw, Eric; Oh, Gunwha; Schillaci, Michael A.; Grant, Richard; Heidrich, John; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether nonhuman primates are infected with influenza viruses in nature, we conducted serologic and swab studies among macaques from several parts of the world. Our detection of influenza virus and antibodies to influenza virus raises questions about the role of nonhuman primates in the ecology of influenza. PMID:23017256

  11. Influenza B viruses : not to be discounted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Bodewes, Rogier; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; de Vries, Rory D

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to influenza A viruses, which have been investigated extensively, influenza B viruses have attracted relatively little attention. However, influenza B viruses are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population and full understanding of their biological and

  12. Chikungunya Virus: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya Virus: What you need to know Chikungunya (pronunciation: \\chik-en-gun-ye) is: ŠŠ A virus spread through Aedes species mosquito bites. Aedes mosquitoes also spread dengue and Zika viruses. ŠŠ A risk to anyone traveling to a region ...

  13. Engineering resistance against potato virus Y

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Potato virus Y is the type species of the potyvirus genus, the largest genus of the plant virus family Potyviridae. The virus causes serious problems in the cultivation of several Solanaceous crops and although certain poly- and monogenic resistances are available,

  14. Inhibition of Interferon Induction and Action by the Nairovirus Nairobi Sheep Disease Virus/Ganjam Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Holzer, Barbara; Bakshi, Siddharth; Bridgen, Anne; Baron, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The Nairoviruses are an important group of tick-borne viruses that includes pathogens of man (Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus) and livestock animals (Dugbe virus, Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV)). NSDV is found in large parts of East Africa and the Indian subcontinent (where it is known as Ganjam virus). We have investigated the ability of NSDV to antagonise the induction and actions of interferon. Both pathogenic and apathogenic isolates could actively inhibit the induction of type ...

  15. Characterization of Ebola Virus Entry by Using Pseudotyped Viruses: Identification of Receptor-Deficient Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Wool-Lewis, Rouven J.; Bates, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Studies analyzing Ebola virus replication have been severely hampered by the extreme pathogenicity of this virus. To permit analysis of the host range and function of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (Ebo-GP), we have developed a system for pseudotyping these glycoproteins into murine leukemia virus (MLV). This pseudotyped virus, MLV(Ebola), can be readily concentrated to titers which exceed 5 × 106 infectious units/ml and is effectively neutralized by antibodies specific for Ebo-GP. Analysis of ...

  16. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Rhabdoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Peter J; Blasdell, Kim R; Calisher, Charles H; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Kondo, Hideki; Kurath, Gael; Longdon, Ben; Stone, David M; Tesh, Robert B; Tordo, Noël; Vasilakis, Nikos; Whitfield, Anna E; Nbsp Ictv Report Consortium

    2018-04-01

    The family Rhabdoviridae comprises viruses with negative-sense (-) single-stranded RNA genomes of 10.8-16.1 kb. Virions are typically enveloped with bullet-shaped or bacilliform morphology but can also be non-enveloped filaments. Rhabdoviruses infect plants and animals including mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, as well as arthropods which serve as single hosts or act as biological vectors for transmission to animals or plants. Rhabdoviruses include important pathogens of humans, livestock, fish and agricultural crops. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of Rhabdoviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/rhabdoviridae.

  17. Systematic analysis of protein identity between Zika virus and other arthropod-borne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Huber, Roland G; Bond, Peter J; Grad, Yonatan H; Camerini, David; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-07-01

    To analyse the proportions of protein identity between Zika virus and dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile and chikungunya viruses as well as polymorphism between different Zika virus strains. We used published protein sequences for the Zika virus and obtained protein sequences for the other viruses from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) protein database or the NCBI virus variation resource. We used BLASTP to find regions of identity between viruses. We quantified the identity between the Zika virus and each of the other viruses, as well as within-Zika virus polymorphism for all amino acid k -mers across the proteome, with k ranging from 6 to 100. We assessed accessibility of protein fragments by calculating the solvent accessible surface area for the envelope and nonstructural-1 (NS1) proteins. In total, we identified 294 Zika virus protein fragments with both low proportion of identity with other viruses and low levels of polymorphisms among Zika virus strains. The list includes protein fragments from all Zika virus proteins, except NS3. NS4A has the highest number (190 k -mers) of protein fragments on the list. We provide a candidate list of protein fragments that could be used when developing a sensitive and specific serological test to detect previous Zika virus infections.

  18. Virus isolation for diagnosing dengue virus infections in returning travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teichmann, D.; Göbels, K.; Niedrig, M.; Sim-Brandenburg, J.-W.; Làge-Stehr, J.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Dengue fever is recognized as one of the most frequent imported acute febrile illnesses affecting European tourists returning from the tropics. In order to assess the value of virus isolation for the diagnosis of dengue fever, 70 cases of dengue fever confirmed in German travelers during the period

  19. [Epidemiologic aspects of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, M; Konate, A; Minta, D; Sounko, A; Dembele, M; Toure, C S; Kalle, A; Traore, H H; Maiga, M Y

    2006-01-01

    In order to determinate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus among patients infected by the HIV, We realized a transverse survey case--control in hepato-gastro-enterological ward and serology unity of National Institute of Research in Public health (INRSP). Our sample was constituted with 100 patients HIV positive compared to 100 controls HIV negative. The viral markers research has been made by methods immuno-enzymatiqueses of ELISA 3rd generation. Tests permitted to get the following results: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBs Ag) was positive among 21% with patients HIV positive versus 23% among control (p = 0,732); Antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV ab) was present among 23% with patients HIV positive versus 0% among control (p <0,05). Female was predominant among co-infections patient, but without statistic link (p = 0,9 and p = 0,45); The co-infection HBV- HCV was significatively linked to age beyond 40 years (p = 0,0005). Co-infections with HIV infection and hepatitis virus are not rare and deserve to be investigated.

  20. Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of viral hepatitis and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during pregnancy is of great importance for health planners and program managers. However, few published data on viral hepatitis and HIV are available in Sudan especially during pregnancy. Objectives: The current study was ...

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in rural Kilimanjaro Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Oria village from March to June 2005 involving all individuals aged 15-44 years ...

  2. Citrus Tristeza Virus: An Increasing Trend in the Virus Occurrence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus tristeza clostervirus (CTV) is one of the most damaging fruit viruses playing havoc in citrus orchards around the world. Here, we report, an ELISA-based indexing of citrus trees over a period of eight years (2002 to 2010) in Northwest Pakistan, revealing that the incidence of CTV is increasing mainly with the distribution ...

  3. Loads on EPR containment after RPV failure at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, G.

    1995-01-01

    As regards the desgin of the EPR, the general strategy is to eliminate, the vessel failure at high pressure by preventive and mitigative measures. The design proposals involved trust in the reliability of dedicated devices (relief valves) for rapid depressurization. The aim is to attain a lower pressure level at the moment of vessel failure, so that the containment is capable to cope with the blowdown impact on the pit walls and the vessel supporting structures. Nevertheless, the potential of a high-pressure failure of the vessel must be kept in mind, whatever well thought-out and reliable preventive depressurization measures might be. Therefore, the reactor pressure blowdown has been studied in order to quantify the ultimate containment load, which might support future design requirements. The calculations were performed with the LWR transient analysis thermal-hydraulics computer code REALAP5/MOD3. In previous analyses, the nodalization of the problem was based on the geometrical conditions of a typical German 1300 MW(e) NPP. In the present analysis a new input model has been used, which was based on the EPR conditions. (orig./HP)

  4. The technology development for surveillance test of RPV materials 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Lee, Sam Lai; Kim, Byoung Chul; Choi, Sun Pil; Choi, Kwen Jai

    1998-12-01

    Irradiation-induced changes in mechanical properties and magnetic parameters were measured and compared to explore possible correlations for Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel surveillance specimens which were irradiated to a neutron fluence of 2.4 x 10 1 9n/cm 2 (E≥1.0 MeV) in a typical pressurized water reactor environment at about 288 deg C. For mechanical property parameters, microvickers hardness, tensile and Charpy impact test were performed and Barkhausen Noise(BN) amplitude, coercivity, maximum induction were measured for magnetic parameters, respectively. Results of mechanical property measurements showed an increase in yield and tensil strength, microvickers hardness 41J indexed RT NDT and a decrease in upper shelf energy irrespective of base and weld metals. In the case of magnetic measurements, it is found that magnetic remanence, BN amplitude, BN energy have dropped significantly but coercivity has increased rapidly after irradiation. For isothermally heat treated condition of irradiated specimen, BN energy has increased while Vickers microhardness has decreased. Results of BNE and Vickers microhardness are reversed to the results on irradiated condition. All these consistent changes in magnetic parameter and Vickers microhardness measurement, which are thought to be resulted from the interaction between irradiation-induced defects and dislocation, and magnetic domain, respectively, show a possibility that magnetic measurement may be used to the evaluation of material degradation and recovery due to neutron irradiation and heat treatment, respectively, if a relevant large database is prepared. (author). 49 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs

  5. Some aspects of RPV integrity of Ukrainian NPP's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaritsky, N.; Kovyrshin, V.; Zhukov, P.

    1998-01-01

    The operating organisations in Ukraine implement the main IAEA recommendations concerned with NPP operational safety. Sufficient substantiation of the measures for improvement of WWER-1000 NPPs safety and reliability is provided. General information (chemical compositions and mechanical properties of reactor pressure vessel materials) is already collected on all Ukrainian WWER-1000 NPPs and transferred to International database on Pressure Vessel materials

  6. Development of advanced low alloy steel for nuclear RPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. C.; Shin, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, B. J. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    Low carbon low alloy steels are used in nuclear power plants as pressure vessel, steam generator, etc. Nuclear pressure vessel material requires good combination of strength/ toughness, good weldability and high resistance to neutron irradiation and corrosion fatigue. For SA508III steels, most widely used in the production of nuclear power plant, attaining toughness is more difficult than strength. When taking into account the loss of toughness due to neutron irradiation, attaining as low transition temperature as possible prior to operation is a critical task in the production of nuclear pressure vessels. In the present study, we investigated detrimental microstructural features of SA508III steels to toughness, then alloy design directions to achieve improved mechanical properties were devised. The next step of alloy design was determined based on phase equilibrium thermodynamics and obtained results. Low carbon low alloy steels having low transition temperatures with enough strength and hardenability were developed. Microstructure and mechanical properties of HAZ of SA508III steels and alloy designed steels were investigated. 22 refs., 147 figs., 38 tabs. (Author)

  7. Oskarshamn 1 RPV: cleaning it out before venturing in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svantesson, I.; Ingemansson, K.-E.; Ericsson, J.-O.; Bjerler, J.

    1994-01-01

    An opportunity to carry out nondestructive testing of the bottom dome of the Oskarshamn 1 BWR vessel arose when all the reactor internals had to be removed to replace cracked feedwater risers. This necessitated decontamination of the lower part of the vessel, the four main recirculation loops, the residual heat removal system and the reactor water clean-up system. A decontamination factor of between 100 and 1000 was achieved, making the vessel accessible for manual inspection and repair work. The decontamination process, using the Siemens KWU CORD method, is outlined. (UK)

  8. RPV Assessment of Remote Missile Site Intrusion Alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    meter j fuselage, servos, battery, alternator. 14. Pitot tube and plumbing - Centrol model no. C-5255. 15. Engine CD ignition unit - KBG model 10308...1.29 Alternator with Coupling 6.22 Magnetometer and Mount .30 +26V Lead Acid Battery Pack 5.81 Pitot Tube .15 Subrudder .43 Regulator .28 94.15 Empty...Conent, Major Henry , USAF. Training Division, 1550 Aircrew Training Test Wing, Military Airlift Command, Kirtland AFB NM. Telephone interview. 29 June

  9. High-flying Mini-Sniffer RPV - Mars bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Mini-Sniffer is a small unmanned survey aircraft developed by NASA to conduct turbulence and atmospheric pollution measurements from ground level to an altitude of 90,000 ft. Carrying a 25-lb air sampling apparatus, the Mini-Sniffer typically cruises for one hour at 70,000 ft before being remotely piloted back to earth. A hydrazine monopropellant engine powers the craft, while a PCM telemetering system and a radar transponder provide control functions. Development of a high-performance low-Reynolds-number airfoil could make the research craft suitable for a low-altitude terrain-following mission on Mars.

  10. Inspection and repair of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohmann, W.; Poetz, F.; Nicolai, M.

    1996-01-01

    The past 10 years of operation of light water reactors were characterized by intensive inspection- and repair work on vital components. For boiling water reactors (BWR) it was typical to totally replace the piping system and for pressurized water reactors (PWR) it was the step to complete steam generator (SG) replacement - besides the development of increasingly diligent inspection and repair methods for SG tubes. It can be expected that in the 10 years to come the development of inspection- and repair methods will be aimed mainly at the core internals of BWR's as well as PWR's. Our prediction is that before the end of this decade a first complete replacement of these components will be performed. Already to date a broad range of techniques are available which enable the utilities to carry out inspections and repair of components of core internals in a relatively short time and acceptable expenses. Using examples such as Fuel Alignment Pin Inspection and Replacement, Baffle Former Bolt Inspection and Replacement, Core Barrel Former Bolt Inspection which are typical for PWR's we will in the following describe the existing methods, their development and - last but not least - their successful utilization. What is going to happen in the future? Ageing of the operating plants will continue, thus requesting the plant operators as well as the service companies to work on advanced technologies to fulfill the needs of the industry. (author)

  11. Heat transfer between relocated materials and the RPV lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kohriyama, T. [INSS, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Questions about the coolability of a continuous mass of relocated corium were raised during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) Post-accident examinations indicate that nearly half of the material that relocated to the vessel lower head during the TMI-2 accident formed a cohesive or ''continuous'' layer. TMI-2 VIP results and other evidence suggest that conduction through this continuous layer of solidified corium materials was assisted by other cooling mechanisms. Because increased knowledge about in-vessel coolability of corium materials may assist reactor designers in demonstrating that their concepts are passively safe, there is international interest in this topic. However, data are needed to identify what cooling mechanism(s) occurred and to develop a validated model for predicting this cooling. Corium cooling models significantly impact predictions for subsequent accident progression, such as the estimated time and mode of vessel failure. Hence, improved cooling models will provide a much needed, missing component of severe accident analyses. This paper provides a critical review of research investigating the coolability of corium relocating to a water-filled lower head. Where possible, existing models and data for predicting cooling are quantitatively compared; and governing relationships are identified. Key phenomena that should be incorporated into models for predicting this heat transfer are discussed, and deficiencies in current models and available data for predicting cooling are noted. Recommendations for improving these models and for obtaining data to validate these models are also provided. (author)

  12. Heat transfer between relocated materials and the RPV lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Knudson, D.L.; Kohriyama, T.

    2001-01-01

    Questions about the coolability of a continuous mass of relocated corium were raised during the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) Post-accident examinations indicate that nearly half of the material that relocated to the vessel lower head during the TMI-2 accident formed a cohesive or ''continuous'' layer. TMI-2 VIP results and other evidence suggest that conduction through this continuous layer of solidified corium materials was assisted by other cooling mechanisms. Because increased knowledge about in-vessel coolability of corium materials may assist reactor designers in demonstrating that their concepts are passively safe, there is international interest in this topic. However, data are needed to identify what cooling mechanism(s) occurred and to develop a validated model for predicting this cooling. Corium cooling models significantly impact predictions for subsequent accident progression, such as the estimated time and mode of vessel failure. Hence, improved cooling models will provide a much needed, missing component of severe accident analyses. This paper provides a critical review of research investigating the coolability of corium relocating to a water-filled lower head. Where possible, existing models and data for predicting cooling are quantitatively compared; and governing relationships are identified. Key phenomena that should be incorporated into models for predicting this heat transfer are discussed, and deficiencies in current models and available data for predicting cooling are noted. Recommendations for improving these models and for obtaining data to validate these models are also provided. (author)

  13. Use of enzyme immunoassays in disease diagnosis, with particular reference to rinderpest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The wider principles of the use of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in diagnosis are illustrated. The development of an antirinderpest antibody assay is explained in order to demonstrate the relative ease with which the test can be set up and used in various countries. The various stages of the test can be standardized in central laboratories; for example, antigen (inactivated) can be prepared and passively attached to microplates. Purchasing and titration of conjugates and selection of negative control sera could also be done centrally. Thus 'kits' for the initiation of diagnosis could be rapidly made available. When assays have been used in specific countries to study antibody populations in large numbers of animals, it may be found necessary to modify the above procedures; for example, different negative sera may be necessary, reflecting the mean (and distribution) of the country. Relatively simple standardization steps to titrate antigen, conjugates and sera would allow assays to be set up in individual countries with no need for outside standardization. However, it may be useful to obtain sero-negative and sero-positive standards from an outside source which could be used on a worldwide basis for interlaboratory standardization. The provision of washing solution, blocking buffers, plates, pipettes and readers is the only requisite for the versatility of ELISA to be fully realized in the study of many disease agents. (author)

  14. Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 - Novel virus at the edge of myco- and plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabáková, Lenka; Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2017-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a new RNA mycovirus in the KY isolate of Phomopsis longicolla Hobbs 1985 and its protoplasts subcultures p5, p9, and ME711 was discovered. The virus, provisionally named Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 (PlRV1), was localized in mitochondria and was determined to have a genome 2822 nucleotides long. A single open reading frame could be translated in silico by both standard and mitochondrial genetic codes into a product featuring conservative domains for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The RdRp of PlRV1 has no counterpart among mycoviruses, but it is about 30% identical with the RdRp of plant ourmiaviruses. Recently, new mycoviruses related to plant ourmiaviruses and forming one clade with PlRV1 have been discovered. This separate clade could represent the crucial link between plant and fungal viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  16. Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Viruses as Novel Nanoplatforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldahl, Kristine Buch

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on earth, and with an estimated 1031 virus-like particles in the biosphere, viruses are virtually everywhere. Traditionally, the study of viruses has focused on their roles as infectious agents. However, over the last decades with the development...... presents an in depth investigation of the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus SMV. Decisive steps in the viral life-cycle are studied with focus on the early stages of infection. TEM observations suggest that SMV1 virions enter into host cells via a fusion entry mechanism, involving three distinct stages...

  17. A new looming of Zika virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirav R. Soni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a member of the virus family Flaviviridae and the genus Flavivirus, transmitted by daytime-active Aedes mosquitoes, such as A. aegypti. ZIKV will continue to spread and it will be difficult to determine how the virus will spread over time. Sign and symptoms of ZIKAVD (Zika virus disease were conjunctivitis (red eyes, back pain, birth defect-abnormal brain development known as microcephaly and it is diagnosed through PCR (polymerase chain reaction and virus isolation from blood samples.

  18. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  19. Zika virus en seksuele transmissie.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, J W; Brandwagt, D A H; Timen, A; van der Eijk, A A; Vennema, H; Te Wierik, M J M

    2017-01-01

    - More evidence has become available concerning the sexual transmission of Zika virus and viral shedding in semen, which has led to the expansion of international guidelines for prevention of sexual transmission; Dutch guidelines have not been altered.- Internationally, the use of condoms during sex

  20. Nucleoside Inhibitors of Zika Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eyer, L.; Nencka, Radim; Huvarová, I.; Palus, Martin; Alves, M. J.; Gould, E. A.; De Clercq, E.; Růžek, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, č. 5 (2016), s. 707-711 ISSN 0022-1899 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Zika virus * flavivirus * nucleoside analogue * antiviral * therapy Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EE - Microbiology, Virology (BC-A) Impact factor: 6.273, year: 2016

  1. ICTV virus taxonomy profile: Baculoviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Baculoviridae is a family of large viruses with circular dsDNA genomes ranging from 80 to 180 kbp. Virions consist of enveloped rod-shaped nucleocapsids and are embedded in distinctive occlusion bodies measuring 0.15 to 15 µm. The occlusion bodies consist of a matrix composed of a single viral...

  2. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Pleolipoviridae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bamford, D.H.; Pietila, M.K.; Roine, E.; Atanasova, N.S.; Dienstbier, Ana; Oksanen, H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 12 (2017), s. 2916-2917 ISSN 0022-1317 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Pleolipoviridae * taxonomy * Halorubrum pleomorphic virus 1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2016

  3. A Case of Ebola Virus

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-01

    Dr. Adam MacNeil, an epidemiologist at CDC, discusses Ebola virus.  Created: 10/1/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 10/1/2012.

  4. Threat from Emerging Vectorborne Viruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-09

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the commentary by CDC author Ronald Rosenberg, Threat from Emerging Vectorborne Viruses.  Created: 6/9/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/9/2016.

  5. Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-30

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the EID perspective Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses.  Created: 5/30/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/2/2014.

  6. Hepatitis A Virus in Transplants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-17

    Dr. Monique Foster, a CDC epidemiologist, discusses an unusual case of hepatitis A virus in a transplant patient.  Created: 5/17/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/17/2017.

  7. West Nile Virus Neuroinvasive Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological features of West Nile Virus (WNV disease among children (<18 years of age reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1999 through 2007 were analyzed and compared with those of adult WNV neuroinvasive disease (WNND, in a study at CDC&P, Fort Collins, CO.

  8. Recombination in hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier; Bracho, María Alma

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a Flavivirus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of about 9,600 nucleotides. It is a major cause of liver disease, infecting almost 200 million people all over the world. Similarly to most RNA viruses, HCV displays very high levels of genetic diversity which have been used to differentiate six major genotypes and about 80 subtypes. Although the different genotypes and subtypes share basic biological and pathogenic features they differ in clinical outcomes, response to treatment and epidemiology. The first HCV recombinant strain, in which different genome segments derived from parentals of different genotypes, was described in St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2002. Since then, there have been only a few more than a dozen reports including descriptions of HCV recombinants at all levels: between genotypes, between subtypes of the same genotype and even between strains of the same subtype. Here, we review the literature considering the reasons underlying the difficulties for unequivocally establishing recombination in this virus along with the analytical methods necessary to do it. Finally, we analyze the potential consequences, especially in clinical practice, of HCV recombination in light of the coming new therapeutic approaches against this virus.

  9. Control of feline leukaemia virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Weijer (Kees); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractFeline leukaemia virus (FeLV) usually occurs in its natural species, the domestic cat. FeLV is also important to human individuals as a comparative model, as it may cause a variety of diseases, some malignant and some benign, such as immunosuppression, which bears a resemblance to AIDS

  10. Molecular phylogeny of Duvenhage virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis H. Nel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Duvenhage virus (DUVV constitutes one of the 11 species in the Lyssavirus genus and causes fatal rabies encephalitis. The virus is associated with insectivorous bat species and three human cases have been reported, all of which were linked to contact with bats. Few of these isolates have been studied and thus little is known about the phylogeny and epidemiology of this lyssavirus. Until 2007, when an isolate was made from the East African country of Kenya, all isolations of this virus had been from southern Africa. This discovery led to many questions regarding the spread and diversity of this lyssavirus. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the DUVV isolates constitute two different lineages, in which the southern African isolates group together to form one lineage and the more recent isolate from Kenya constitutes a new, second lineage. We found that the new isolate has a genetic variation that has not yet been seen for DUVV. Not only is our lack of knowledge regarding the geographical distribution of this uniquely African virus emphasised, but we have also demonstrated the potential diversity within this genotype.

  11. Oncolytic viruses as anticancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman eWoller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has shown impressive results in preclinical studies and first promising therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials as well. Since viruses are known for a long time as excellent vaccination agents, oncolytic viruses are now designed as novel anticancer agents combining the aspect of lysis-dependent cytoreductive activity with concomitant induction of antitumoral immune responses. Antitumoral immune activation by oncolytic virus infection of tumor tissue comprises both, immediate effects of innate immunity and also adaptive responses for long lasting antitumoral activity which is regarded as the most prominent challenge in clinical oncology. To date, the complex effects of a viral tumor infection on the tumor microenvironment and the consequences for the tumor-infiltrating immune cell compartment are poorly understood. However, there is more and more evidence that a tumor infection by an oncolytic virus opens up a number of options for further immunomodulating interventions such as systemic chemotherapy, generic immunostimulating strategies, dendritic cell-based vaccines, and antigenic libraries to further support clinical efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.

  12. Tetraspanin Assemblies in Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise Florin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tetraspanins (Tspans are a family of four-span transmembrane proteins, known as plasma membrane “master organizers.” They form Tspan-enriched microdomains (TEMs or TERMs through lateral association with one another and other membrane proteins. If multiple microdomains associate with each other, larger platforms can form. For infection, viruses interact with multiple cell surface components, including receptors, activating proteases, and signaling molecules. It appears that Tspans, such as CD151, CD82, CD81, CD63, CD9, Tspan9, and Tspan7, coordinate these associations by concentrating the interacting partners into Tspan platforms. In addition to mediating viral attachment and entry, these platforms may also be involved in intracellular trafficking of internalized viruses and assist in defining virus assembly and exit sites. In conclusion, Tspans play a role in viral infection at different stages of the virus replication cycle. The present review highlights recently published data on this topic, with a focus on events at the plasma membrane. In light of these findings, we propose a model for how Tspan interactions may organize cofactors for viral infection into distinct molecular platforms.

  13. Genital herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M S

    1979-09-01

    In recent years, a great increase in interest in genital herpes has been stimulated partly by the rising prevalence of this disease and partly by observations suggesting that genital herpes is a cause of cervical cancer. The clinical pictures produced by genital herpes simplex virus infections are similar in men and women. In contrast to recurrent attacks, initial episodes of infection are generally more extensive, last longer, and are more often associated with regional lymphadenopathy and systemic symptoms. Genital herpes in pregnancy may pose a serious threat to the newborn infant. Although the data suggesting genital herpes simplex virus infection is a cause of cervical cancer are quite extensive, the evidence is largely circumstantial. In spite of these more serious aspects of genital herpes simplex virus infection, episodes of genital herpes are almost always self-limited and benign. Frequent recurrences pose the major therapeutic and management problem. At present, there is no satisfactory treatment for recurrent genital herpes simplex virus in fection. Many of the suggested therapies, although some sound very promising, are potentially dangerous and should be used only under carefully controlled conditions.

  14. Mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosien, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the isolation and characterization of a number of mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus, a plant virus with a coat protein dependent genome, is described. Thermo-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected since, at least theoretically, ts mutations can be present in all virus coded functions. It was found that a high percentage of spontaneous mutants, isolated because of their aberrant symptoms, were ts. The majority of these isolates could grow at the non-permissive temperature in the presence of a single wild type (wt) component. To increase the mutation rate virus preparations were treated with several mutagens. After nitrous acid treatment or irradiation with ultraviolet light, an increase in the level of mutations was observed. UV irradiation was preferred since it did not require large amounts of purified viral components. During the preliminary characterization of potential ts mutants the author also obtained one structural and several symptom mutants which were analysed further (chapter 7, 8 and 9). The properties of the ts mutants are described in chapter 3-7. (Auth.)

  15. ICTV virus taxonomy profile: Pneumoviridae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.K. Rima (Bert); Collins, P. (Peter); Easton, A. (Andrew); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); Kurath, G. (Gael); Lamb, R.A. (Robert A.); Lee, B. (Benhur); A. Maisner (Andrea); P.A. Rota (Paul); Wang, L. (Linfa); Lefkowitz, E.J. (Elliot J.); Davison, A.J. (Andrew J.); Simmonds, P. (Peter); Sabanadzovic, S. (Sead); Smith, D.B. (Donald B.); Orton, R.J. (Richard J.); Siddell, S.G. (Stuart G.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe family Pneumoviridae comprises large enveloped negative-sense RNA viruses. This taxon was formerly a subfamily within the Paramyxoviridae, but was reclassified in 2016 as a family with two genera, Orthopneumovirus and Metapneumovirus. Pneumoviruses infect a range of mammalian

  16. Chikungunya VIrUS infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of 107 cases of serologically proven chikungunya (CHIK) virus infection was undertaken. All respondents 'had contracted the. 'disease at least 3 years previously; 87,9% had fully .recovered, 3,7% experienced only occasional stiff- ness or mild discomfort, 2,8% had persistent resi- dual joint stiffness but ...

  17. How infectious is SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. How infectious is SARS virus. Influenza: 1 patient infects ten people. SARS: 1 patient infects 2-4 people. Incubation period 10 days. Are there `silent´ cases ? Is quarantine enough ? How will it behave if and when it returns ?

  18. Viruses involved in chickpea stunt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horn, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    Chickpea stunt is the most important virus disease of chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L). This disease is characterized by leaf chlorosis or leaf reddening (depending on the chickpea cultivar), plant stunting, internode shortening, reduction in size of

  19. Diversity of large DNA viruses of invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Trevor; Bergoin, Max; van Oers, Monique M

    2017-07-01

    In this review we provide an overview of the diversity of large DNA viruses known to be pathogenic for invertebrates. We present their taxonomical classification and describe the evolutionary relationships among various groups of invertebrate-infecting viruses. We also indicate the relationships of the invertebrate viruses to viruses infecting mammals or other vertebrates. The shared characteristics of the viruses within the various families are described, including the structure of the virus particle, genome properties, and gene expression strategies. Finally, we explain the transmission and mode of infection of the most important viruses in these families and indicate, which orders of invertebrates are susceptible to these pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Literature Review of Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus is a mosquitoborne flavivirus that is the focus of an ongoing pandemic and public health emergency. Previously limited to sporadic cases in Africa and Asia, the emergence of Zika virus in Brazil in 2015 heralded rapid spread throughout the Americas. Although most Zika virus infections are characterized by subclinical or mild influenza-like illness, severe manifestations have been described, including Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults and microcephaly in babies born to infected mothers. Neither an effective treatment nor a vaccine is available for Zika virus; therefore, the public health response primarily focuses on preventing infection, particularly in pregnant women. Despite growing knowledge about this virus, questions remain regarding the virus’s vectors and reservoirs, pathogenesis, genetic diversity, and potential synergistic effects of co-infection with other circulating viruses. These questions highlight the need for research to optimize surveillance, patient management, and public health intervention in the current Zika virus epidemic. PMID:27070380