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Sample records for rigid registration algorithm

  1. A Rigid Image Registration Based on the Nonsubsampled Contourlet Transform and Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasreddine Taleb

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is a fundamental task used in image processing to match two or more images taken at different times, from different sensors or from different viewpoints. The objective is to find in a huge search space of geometric transformations, an acceptable accurate solution in a reasonable time to provide better registered images. Exhaustive search is computationally expensive and the computational cost increases exponentially with the number of transformation parameters and the size of the data set. In this work, we present an efficient image registration algorithm that uses genetic algorithms within a multi-resolution framework based on the Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT. An adaptable genetic algorithm for registration is adopted in order to minimize the search space. This approach is used within a hybrid scheme applying the two techniques fitness sharing and elitism. Two NSCT based methods are proposed for registration. A comparative study is established between these methods and a wavelet based one. Because the NSCT is a shift-invariant multidirectional transform, the second method is adopted for its search speeding up property. Simulation results clearly show that both proposed techniques are really promising methods for image registration compared to the wavelet approach, while the second technique has led to the best performance results of all. Moreover, to demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods, these registration techniques have been successfully applied to register SPOT, IKONOS and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. The algorithm has been shown to work perfectly well for multi-temporal satellite images as well, even in the presence of noise.

  2. A rigid image registration based on the nonsubsampled contourlet transform and genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskine, Fatiha; Chikr El Mezouar, Miloud; Taleb, Nasreddine

    2010-01-01

    Image registration is a fundamental task used in image processing to match two or more images taken at different times, from different sensors or from different viewpoints. The objective is to find in a huge search space of geometric transformations, an acceptable accurate solution in a reasonable time to provide better registered images. Exhaustive search is computationally expensive and the computational cost increases exponentially with the number of transformation parameters and the size of the data set. In this work, we present an efficient image registration algorithm that uses genetic algorithms within a multi-resolution framework based on the Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT). An adaptable genetic algorithm for registration is adopted in order to minimize the search space. This approach is used within a hybrid scheme applying the two techniques fitness sharing and elitism. Two NSCT based methods are proposed for registration. A comparative study is established between these methods and a wavelet based one. Because the NSCT is a shift-invariant multidirectional transform, the second method is adopted for its search speeding up property. Simulation results clearly show that both proposed techniques are really promising methods for image registration compared to the wavelet approach, while the second technique has led to the best performance results of all. Moreover, to demonstrate the effectiveness of these methods, these registration techniques have been successfully applied to register SPOT, IKONOS and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. The algorithm has been shown to work perfectly well for multi-temporal satellite images as well, even in the presence of noise.

  3. Evaluating a method for automated rigid registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Vester-Christensen, Martin; Larsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    to point distance. T-test for common mean are used to determine the performance of the two methods (supported by a Wilcoxon signed rank test). The performance influence of sampling density, sampling quantity, and norms is analyzed using a similar method.......We evaluate a novel method for fully automated rigid registration of 2D manifolds in 3D space based on distance maps, the Gibbs sampler and Iterated Conditional Modes (ICM). The method is tested against the ICP considered as the gold standard for automated rigid registration. Furthermore...

  4. Non-rigid image registration using bone growth model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Gramkow, Claus; Kreiborg, Sven

    1997-01-01

    Non-rigid registration has traditionally used physical models like elasticity and fluids. These models are very seldom valid models of the difference between the registered images. This paper presents a non-rigid registration algorithm, which uses a model of bone growth as a model of the change...... between time sequence images of the human mandible. By being able to register the images, this paper at the same time contributes to the validation of the growth model, which is based on the currently available medical theories and knowledge...

  5. Constrained non-rigid registration for whole body image registration: method and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Peterson, Todd E.; Gore, John C.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2007-03-01

    3D intra- and inter-subject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include measurements and quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, deriving population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. A number of methods have been proposed to tackle this problem but few of them have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the vast majority of registration algorithms have been applied. To solve this problem, we have previously proposed an approach, which initializes an intensity-based non-rigid registration algorithm with a point based registration technique [1, 2]. In this paper, we introduce new constraints into our non-rigid registration algorithm to prevent the bones from being deformed inaccurately. Results we have obtained show that the new constrained algorithm leads to better registration results than the previous one.

  6. Optimized imaging using non-rigid registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Binev, Peter; Blom, Douglas A.; Dahmen, Wolfgang; Sharpley, Robert C.; Vogt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The extraordinary improvements of modern imaging devices offer access to data with unprecedented information content. However, widely used image processing methodologies fall far short of exploiting the full breadth of information offered by numerous types of scanning probe, optical, and electron microscopies. In many applications, it is necessary to keep measurement intensities below a desired threshold. We propose a methodology for extracting an increased level of information by processing a series of data sets suffering, in particular, from high degree of spatial uncertainty caused by complex multiscale motion during the acquisition process. An important role is played by a non-rigid pixel-wise registration method that can cope with low signal-to-noise ratios. This is accompanied by formulating objective quality measures which replace human intervention and visual inspection in the processing chain. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of siliceous zeolite material exhibits the above-mentioned obstructions and therefore serves as orientation and a test of our procedures. - Highlights: • Developed a new process for extracting more information from a series of STEM images. • An objective non-rigid registration process copes with distortions. • Images of zeolite Y show retrieval of all information available from the data set. • Quantitative measures of registration quality were implemented. • Applicable to any serially acquired data, e.g. STM, AFM, STXM, etc

  7. Assessment of rigid multi-modality image registration consistency using the multiple sub-volume registration (MSR) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, C; Heide, U A van der; Bol, G H; Lagendijk, J J W; Kotte, A N T J

    2005-01-01

    Registration of different imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, functional MRI (fMRI), positron (PET) and single photon (SPECT) emission tomography is used in many clinical applications. Determining the quality of any automatic registration procedure has been a challenging part because no gold standard is available to evaluate the registration. In this note we present a method, called the 'multiple sub-volume registration' (MSR) method, for assessing the consistency of a rigid registration. This is done by registering sub-images of one data set on the other data set, performing a crude non-rigid registration. By analysing the deviations (local deformations) of the sub-volume registrations from the full registration we get a measure of the consistency of the rigid registration. Registration of 15 data sets which include CT, MR and PET images for brain, head and neck, cervix, prostate and lung was performed utilizing a rigid body registration with normalized mutual information as the similarity measure. The resulting registrations were classified as good or bad by visual inspection. The resulting registrations were also classified using our MSR method. The results of our MSR method agree with the classification obtained from visual inspection for all cases (p < 0.02 based on ANOVA of the good and bad groups). The proposed method is independent of the registration algorithm and similarity measure. It can be used for multi-modality image data sets and different anatomic sites of the patient. (note)

  8. Non-rigid registration of tomographic images with Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Ar; Isoardi, Ra; Mato, G

    2007-01-01

    Spatial image registration of deformable body parts such as thorax and abdomen has important medical applications, but at the same time, it represents an important computational challenge. In this work we propose an automatic algorithm to perform non-rigid registration of tomographic images using a non-rigid model based on Fourier transforms. As a measure of similarity, we use the correlation coefficient, finding that the optimal order of the transformation is n = 3 (36 parameters). We apply this method to a digital phantom and to 7 pairs of patient images corresponding to clinical CT scans. The preliminary results indicate a fairly good agreement according to medical experts, with an average registration error of 2 mm for the case of clinical images. For 2D images (dimensions 512x512), the average running time for the algorithm is 15 seconds using a standard personal computer. Summarizing, we find that intra-modality registration of the abdomen can be achieved with acceptable accuracy for slight deformations and can be extended to 3D with a reasonable execution time

  9. Survey of Non-Rigid Registration Tools in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszei, András P; Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    We catalogue available software solutions for non-rigid image registration to support scientists in selecting suitable tools for specific medical registration purposes. Registration tools were identified using non-systematic search in Pubmed, Web of Science, IEEE Xplore® Digital Library, Google Scholar, and through references in identified sources (n = 22). Exclusions are due to unavailability or inappropriateness. The remaining (n = 18) tools were classified by (i) access and technology, (ii) interfaces and application, (iii) living community, (iv) supported file formats, and (v) types of registration methodologies emphasizing the similarity measures implemented. Out of the 18 tools, (i) 12 are open source, 8 are released under a permissive free license, which imposes the least restrictions on the use and further development of the tool, 8 provide graphical processing unit (GPU) support; (ii) 7 are built on software platforms, 5 were developed for brain image registration; (iii) 6 are under active development but only 3 have had their last update in 2015 or 2016; (iv) 16 support the Analyze format, while 7 file formats can be read with only one of the tools; and (v) 6 provide multiple registration methods and 6 provide landmark-based registration methods. Based on open source, licensing, GPU support, active community, several file formats, algorithms, and similarity measures, the tools Elastics and Plastimatch are chosen for the platform ITK and without platform requirements, respectively. Researchers in medical image analysis already have a large choice of registration tools freely available. However, the most recently published algorithms may not be included in the tools, yet.

  10. Robust non-rigid point set registration using student's-t mixture model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Zhou

    Full Text Available The Student's-t mixture model, which is heavily tailed and more robust than the Gaussian mixture model, has recently received great attention on image processing. In this paper, we propose a robust non-rigid point set registration algorithm using the Student's-t mixture model. Specifically, first, we consider the alignment of two point sets as a probability density estimation problem and treat one point set as Student's-t mixture model centroids. Then, we fit the Student's-t mixture model centroids to the other point set which is treated as data. Finally, we get the closed-form solutions of registration parameters, leading to a computationally efficient registration algorithm. The proposed algorithm is especially effective for addressing the non-rigid point set registration problem when significant amounts of noise and outliers are present. Moreover, less registration parameters have to be set manually for our algorithm compared to the popular coherent points drift (CPD algorithm. We have compared our algorithm with other state-of-the-art registration algorithms on both 2D and 3D data with noise and outliers, where our non-rigid registration algorithm showed accurate results and outperformed the other algorithms.

  11. Testing non-rigid registration of nuclear medicine data using synthetic derived SPECT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Non-rigid registration is needed to build atlas data to make statistical tests of significance of uptake in nuclear medicine (NM). Non-rigid registration is much more difficult than rigid registration to validate since some kind of matching function must be defined throughout the volume being registered, and no suitable gold standards exist. The aim here has been to assess non-rigid methods of registration and deformation for NM to NM and NM to MRI data. An additional aim has been to derive good synthetic SPECT images from other NM and MRI data to be used after as reference standards. Material and Methods: Phantom and patient test images have been acquired for both NM and MRI, which are then used to generate projections, where the characteristics of the images are modified to change both signal and noise properties. These derived images are different in character but perfectly registered with the original data, and can then be deformed in a known manner. The registration algorithm is then run backwards to re-register the modified deformed data with the original images. A technique has been developed to assess the vector fields of the original deformation to the reverse non-rigid registration field. Results: The main purpose of this paper is to describe a methodology for optimising algorithms, not to develop the algorithms themselves. Two different algorithms based on optic flow and thin plate spline interpolation have been intercompared and in particular the constraints imposed tested. Considerable differences in matching can be observed in different regions for example edge and centre of brain. Conclusions: Quadratic distance between known makers is a bad estimate to use to assess non-rigid registration. A robust statistic has been developed which can be used to optimise non-rigid algorithms based on the use of synthetic SPECT reference datasets. While the task being tested is simpler than the real clinical task, it is the first essential step in the

  12. Performance evaluation of 2D image registration algorithms with the numeric image registration and comparison platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerganov, G.; Kuvandjiev, V.; Dimitrova, I.; Mitev, K.; Kawrakow, I.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to present the capabilities of the NUMERICS web platform for evaluation of the performance of image registration algorithms. The NUMERICS platform is a web accessible tool which provides access to dedicated numerical algorithms for registration and comparison of medical images (http://numerics.phys.uni-sofia.bg). The platform allows comparison of noisy medical images by means of different types of image comparison algorithms, which are based on statistical tests for outliers. The platform also allows 2D image registration with different techniques like Elastic Thin-Plate Spline registration, registration based on rigid transformations, affine transformations, as well as non-rigid image registration based on Mobius transformations. In this work we demonstrate how the platform can be used as a tool for evaluation of the quality of the image registration process. We demonstrate performance evaluation of a deformable image registration technique based on Mobius transformations. The transformations are applied with appropriate cost functions like: Mutual information, Correlation coefficient, Sum of Squared Differences. The accent is on the results provided by the platform to the user and their interpretation in the context of the performance evaluation of 2D image registration. The NUMERICS image registration and image comparison platform provides detailed statistical information about submitted image registration jobs and can be used to perform quantitative evaluation of the performance of different image registration techniques. (authors)

  13. CT-3DRA registration for radiosurgery treatments: a comparison among rigid, affine and non rigid approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancanello, J.; Loeckx, D.; Francescon, P.; Calvedon, C.; Avanzo, M.; Cora, S.; Scalchi, P.; Cerveri, P.; Ferrigno, G.

    2004-01-01

    This work aims at comparing rigid, affine and Local Non Rigid (LNR) CT-3D Rotational Angiography (CT-3DRA) registrations based on mutual information. 10 cranial and 1 spinal cases have been registered by rigid and affine transformations; while LNR has been applied to the cases where residual deformation must be corrected. An example of CT-3DRA registration without regularization term and an example of LNR using the similarity criterion and the regularization term as well as 3D superposition of the 3DRA before and after the registration without the regularization term are presented. All the registrations performed by rigid transformation converged to an acceptable solution. The results about the robustness test in axial direction are reported. Conclusions: For cranial cases, affine transformation endowed with threshold-segmentation pre-processing can be considered the most favourable solution for almost all registrations; for some cases, LNR provides more accurate results. For the spinal case rigid transformation is the most suitable when immobilizing patient during examinations; in this case the increase of accuracy by using LNR registrations seems to be not significant

  14. Non-rigid registration by geometry-constrained diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Per Rønsholt; Nielsen, Mads

    1999-01-01

    Assume that only partial knowledge about a non-rigid registration is given so that certain point, curves, or surfaces in one 3D image map to certain points, curves, or surfaces in another 3D image. We are facing the aperture problem because along the curves and surfaces, point correspondences...

  15. Vision based tunnel inspection using non-rigid registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Amir; Ullah, Shan; Shahzad, Danish

    2015-04-01

    Growing numbers of long tunnels across the globe has increased the need for safety measurements and inspections of tunnels in these days. To avoid serious damages, tunnel inspection is highly recommended at regular intervals of time to find any deformations or cracks at the right time. While following the stringent safety and tunnel accessibility standards, conventional geodetic surveying using techniques of civil engineering and other manual and mechanical methods are time consuming and results in troublesome of routine life. An automatic tunnel inspection by image processing techniques using non rigid registration has been proposed. There are many other image processing methods used for image registration purposes. Most of the processes are operation of images in its spatial domain like finding edges and corners by Harris edge detection method. These methods are quite time consuming and fail for some or other reasons like for blurred or images with noise. Due to use of image features directly by these methods in the process, are known by the group, correlation by image features. The other method is featureless correlation, in which the images are converted into its frequency domain and then correlated with each other. The shift in spatial domain is the same as in frequency domain, but the processing is order faster than in spatial domain. In the proposed method modified normalized phase correlation has been used to find any shift between two images. As pre pre-processing the tunnel images i.e. reference and template are divided into small patches. All these relative patches are registered by the proposed modified normalized phase correlation. By the application of the proposed algorithm we get the pixel movement of the images. And then these pixels shifts are converted to measuring units like mm, cm etc. After the complete process if there is any shift in the tunnel at described points are located.

  16. Vertical dimensional stability and rigidity of occlusal registration materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Wu, Edis; Heckman, M Elizabeth; Alderman, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Dimensionally accurate occlusal registration records are essential for restorative dentistry; moreover, since records are not used immediately or may be used more than once, the registration material should exhibit accuracy over time (a concept known as dimensional stability). It has been speculated that materials with increased hardness or rigidity should produce more accurate registration records due to an increased resistance to distortion. This study compared the rigidity and associated dimensional accuracy of a recently marketed bisacrylic occlusal registration material and a vinyl polysiloxane (VPS). Maxillary and mandibular typodont arches were mounted on a plasterless articulator from which teeth No. 3, 13, and 15 had been removed to simulate edentulous spaces. After preparing teeth No. 2, 4, 12, and 14 as bridge abutments, the remaining teeth were equilibrated selectively to produce even anterior contact. Four digital photographs were taken to make vertical interarch measurements at four locations (teeth No. 3, 7, 10, and 14). Following initial photos (controls), 10 interocclusal records were made using each registration material, with material placed only in the segments in which teeth were prepared. The records were used for mounting the maxillary arch against the mandibular arch after 48, 72, and 120 hours. There were significant effects on vertical dimensional change related to arch location, material, and mounting time. Both materials demonstrated significantly larger posterior vertical openings than anterior vertical openings, while the bisacrylate produced a larger posterior opening than VPS at 48 and 72 hours and a larger anterior opening at all mounting times. There also was a significant difference in hardness/rigidity due to material and measurement time; at all measurement times, bisacrylate exhibited a significantly higher hardness number.

  17. On removing interpolation and resampling artifacts in rigid image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganj, Iman; Yeo, Boon Thye Thomas; Sabuncu, Mert R; Fischl, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    We show that image registration using conventional interpolation and summation approximations of continuous integrals can generally fail because of resampling artifacts. These artifacts negatively affect the accuracy of registration by producing local optima, altering the gradient, shifting the global optimum, and making rigid registration asymmetric. In this paper, after an extensive literature review, we demonstrate the causes of the artifacts by comparing inclusion and avoidance of resampling analytically. We show the sum-of-squared-differences cost function formulated as an integral to be more accurate compared with its traditional sum form in a simple case of image registration. We then discuss aliasing that occurs in rotation, which is due to the fact that an image represented in the Cartesian grid is sampled with different rates in different directions, and propose the use of oscillatory isotropic interpolation kernels, which allow better recovery of true global optima by overcoming this type of aliasing. Through our experiments on brain, fingerprint, and white noise images, we illustrate the superior performance of the integral registration cost function in both the Cartesian and spherical coordinates, and also validate the introduced radial interpolation kernel by demonstrating the improvement in registration.

  18. Non-rigid ultrasound image registration using generalized relaxation labeling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Seong, Yeong Kyeong; Park, MoonHo; Woo, Kyoung-Gu; Ku, Jeonghun; Park, Hee-Jun

    2013-03-01

    This research proposes a novel non-rigid registration method for ultrasound images. The most predominant anatomical features in medical images are tissue boundaries, which appear as edges. In ultrasound images, however, other features can be identified as well due to the specular reflections that appear as bright lines superimposed on the ideal edge location. In this work, an image's local phase information (via the frequency domain) is used to find the ideal edge location. The generalized relaxation labeling process is then formulated to align the feature points extracted from the ideal edge location. In this work, the original relaxation labeling method was generalized by taking n compatibility coefficient values to improve non-rigid registration performance. This contextual information combined with a relaxation labeling process is used to search for a correspondence. Then the transformation is calculated by the thin plate spline (TPS) model. These two processes are iterated until the optimal correspondence and transformation are found. We have tested our proposed method and the state-of-the-art algorithms with synthetic data and bladder ultrasound images of in vivo human subjects. Experiments show that the proposed method improves registration performance significantly, as compared to other state-of-the-art non-rigid registration algorithms.

  19. Evaluation of a New Motion-correction Algorithm Using On-rigid Registration in Respiratory-gated PET/CT Images of Liver Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagatsuma, Kei; Osawa, Tatsufumi; Yokokawa, Naoki; Miwa, Kenta; Oda, Keiichi; Kudo, Yoshiro; Unno, Yasushi; Ito, Kimiteru; Ishii, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of the Q.Freeze algorithm in PET/CT images of liver tumors. A body phantom and hot spheres representing liver tumors contained 5.3 and 21.2 kBq/mL of a solution containing 18 F radioactivity, respectively. The phantoms were moved in the superior-inferior direction at a motion displacement of 20 mm. Conventional respiratory-gated (RG) and Q.Freeze images were sorted into 6, 10, and 13 phase-groups. The SUV ave was calculated from the background of the body phantom, and the SUV max was determined from the hot spheres of the liver tumors. Three patients with four liver tumors were also clinically assessed by whole-body and RG PET. The RG and Q.Freeze images derived from the clinical study were also sorted into 6, 10 and 13 phase-groups. Liver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and SUV max were determined from the RG and Q.Freeze clinical images. The SUV ave of Q.Freeze images was the same as those derived from the body phantom using RG. The liver SNR improved with Q.Freeze, and the SUVs max was not overestimated when Q.Freeze was applied in both the phantom and clinical studies. Q.Freeze did not degrade the liver SNR and SUV max even though the phase number was larger. Q.Freeze delivered qualitative and quantitative motion correction than conventional RG imaging even in 10-phase groups.

  20. Inverse consistent non-rigid image registration based on robust point set matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Robust point matching (RPM) has been extensively used in non-rigid registration of images to robustly register two sets of image points. However, except for the location at control points, RPM cannot estimate the consistent correspondence between two images because RPM is a unidirectional image matching approach. Therefore, it is an important issue to make an improvement in image registration based on RPM. Methods In our work, a consistent image registration approach based on the point sets matching is proposed to incorporate the property of inverse consistency and improve registration accuracy. Instead of only estimating the forward transformation between the source point sets and the target point sets in state-of-the-art RPM algorithms, the forward and backward transformations between two point sets are estimated concurrently in our algorithm. The inverse consistency constraints are introduced to the cost function of RPM and the fuzzy correspondences between two point sets are estimated based on both the forward and backward transformations simultaneously. A modified consistent landmark thin-plate spline registration is discussed in detail to find the forward and backward transformations during the optimization of RPM. The similarity of image content is also incorporated into point matching in order to improve image matching. Results Synthetic data sets, medical images are employed to demonstrate and validate the performance of our approach. The inverse consistent errors of our algorithm are smaller than RPM. Especially, the topology of transformations is preserved well for our algorithm for the large deformation between point sets. Moreover, the distance errors of our algorithm are similar to that of RPM, and they maintain a downward trend as whole, which demonstrates the convergence of our algorithm. The registration errors for image registrations are evaluated also. Again, our algorithm achieves the lower registration errors in same iteration number

  1. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  2. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Kürklüoglu, Mustafa [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Lovejoy, John [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Yaniv, Ziv, E-mail: ZYaniv@childrensnational.org [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 and Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on

  3. GPU-based stochastic-gradient optimization for non-rigid medical image registration in time-critical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, M.; Al-Ars, Z.; Berendsen, Floris; Angelini, Elsa D.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2018-01-01

    Currently, non-rigid image registration algorithms are too computationally intensive to use in time-critical applications. Existing implementations that focus on speed typically address this by either parallelization on GPU-hardware, or by introducing methodically novel techniques into

  4. On combining algorithms for deformable image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muenzing, S.E.A.; Ginneken, van B.; Pluim, J.P.W.; Dawant, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a meta-algorithm for registration improvement by combining deformable image registrations (MetaReg). It is inspired by a well-established method from machine learning, the combination of classifiers. MetaReg consists of two main components: (1) A strategy for composing an improved

  5. Validation of non-rigid point-set registration methods using a porcine bladder pelvic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The problem of accurate dose accumulation in fractionated radiotherapy treatment for highly deformable organs, such as bladder, has garnered increasing interest over the past few years. However, more research is required in order to find a robust and efficient solution and to increase the accuracy over the current methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of utilizing non-rigid (affine or deformable) point-set registration in accumulating dose in bladder of different sizes and shapes. A pelvic phantom was built to house an ex vivo porcine bladder with fiducial landmarks adhered onto its surface. Four different volume fillings of the bladder were used (90, 180, 360 and 480 cc). The performance of MATLAB implementations of five different methods were compared, in aligning the bladder contour point-sets. The approaches evaluated were coherent point drift (CPD), gaussian mixture model, shape context, thin-plate spline robust point matching (TPS-RPM) and finite iterative closest point (ICP-finite). The evaluation metrics included registration runtime, target registration error (TRE), root-mean-square error (RMS) and Hausdorff distance (HD). The reference (source) dataset was alternated through all four points-sets, in order to study the effect of reference volume on the registration outcomes. While all deformable algorithms provided reasonable registration results, CPD provided the best TRE values (6.4 mm), and TPS-RPM yielded the best mean RMS and HD values (1.4 and 6.8 mm, respectively). ICP-finite was the fastest technique and TPS-RPM, the slowest.

  6. Validation of non-rigid point-set registration methods using a porcine bladder pelvic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The problem of accurate dose accumulation in fractionated radiotherapy treatment for highly deformable organs, such as bladder, has garnered increasing interest over the past few years. However, more research is required in order to find a robust and efficient solution and to increase the accuracy over the current methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of utilizing non-rigid (affine or deformable) point-set registration in accumulating dose in bladder of different sizes and shapes. A pelvic phantom was built to house an ex vivo porcine bladder with fiducial landmarks adhered onto its surface. Four different volume fillings of the bladder were used (90, 180, 360 and 480 cc). The performance of MATLAB implementations of five different methods were compared, in aligning the bladder contour point-sets. The approaches evaluated were coherent point drift (CPD), gaussian mixture model, shape context, thin-plate spline robust point matching (TPS-RPM) and finite iterative closest point (ICP-finite). The evaluation metrics included registration runtime, target registration error (TRE), root-mean-square error (RMS) and Hausdorff distance (HD). The reference (source) dataset was alternated through all four points-sets, in order to study the effect of reference volume on the registration outcomes. While all deformable algorithms provided reasonable registration results, CPD provided the best TRE values (6.4 mm), and TPS-RPM yielded the best mean RMS and HD values (1.4 and 6.8 mm, respectively). ICP-finite was the fastest technique and TPS-RPM, the slowest. (paper)

  7. Robust feature estimation by non-rigid hierarchical image registration and its application in disparity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Amir; Choudhry, Aadil Jaleel; Ullah, Shan

    2017-03-01

    Industries are moving towards automation in order to increase productivity and ensure quality. Variety of electronic and electromagnetic systems are being employed to assist human operator in fast and accurate quality inspection of products. Majority of these systems are equipped with cameras and rely on diverse image processing algorithms. Information is lost in 2D image, therefore acquiring accurate 3D data from 2D images is an open issue. FAST, SURF and SIFT are well-known spatial domain techniques for features extraction and henceforth image registration to find correspondence between images. The efficiency of these methods is measured in terms of the number of perfect matches found. A novel fast and robust technique for stereo-image processing is proposed. It is based on non-rigid registration using modified normalized phase correlation. The proposed method registers two images in hierarchical fashion using quad-tree structure. The registration process works through global to local level resulting in robust matches even in presence of blur and noise. The computed matches can further be utilized to determine disparity and depth for industrial product inspection. The same can be used in driver assistance systems. The preliminary tests on Middlebury dataset produced satisfactory results. The execution time for a 413 x 370 stereo-pair is 500ms approximately on a low cost DSP.

  8. Combinatorial and Algorithmic Rigidity: Beyond Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    44]. Theorems of Maxwell- Laman type were ob- tained in [9, 15, 43]. 2 3. Counting and Enumeration. As anticipated in the project, we relied on methods...decompositions. Graphs and Combinatorics, 25:219–238, 2009. [43] I. Streinu and L. Theran. Slider-pinning rigidity: a Maxwell- Laman -type theorem. Discrete and

  9. 3D Rigid Registration by Cylindrical Phase Correlation Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bican, Jakub; Flusser, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 10 (2009), s. 914-921 ISSN 0167-8655 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/1593 Grant - others:GAUK(CZ) 48908 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : 3D registration * correlation methods * Image registration Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 1.303, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/ZOI/bican-3d digit registration by cylindrical phase correlation method.pdf

  10. [Non-rigid medical image registration based on mutual information and thin-plate spline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guo-gang; Luo, Li-min

    2009-01-01

    To get precise and complete details, the contrast in different images is needed in medical diagnosis and computer assisted treatment. The image registration is the basis of contrast, but the regular rigid registration does not satisfy the clinic requirements. A non-rigid medical image registration method based on mutual information and thin-plate spline was present. Firstly, registering two images globally based on mutual information; secondly, dividing reference image and global-registered image into blocks and registering them; then getting the thin-plate spline transformation according to the shift of blocks' center; finally, applying the transformation to the global-registered image. The results show that the method is more precise than the global rigid registration based on mutual information and it reduces the complexity of getting control points and satisfy the clinic requirements better by getting control points of the thin-plate transformation automatically.

  11. 3D non-rigid surface-based MR-TRUS registration for image-guided prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Qiu, Wu; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Two dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy is the standard approach for definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, due to the lack of image contrast of prostate tumors needed to clearly visualize early-stage PCa, prostate biopsy often results in false negatives, requiring repeat biopsies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been considered to be a promising imaging modality for noninvasive identification of PCa, since it can provide a high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of early stage PCa. Our main objective is to develop and validate a registration method of 3D MR-TRUS images, allowing generation of volumetric 3D maps of targets identified in 3D MR images to be biopsied using 3D TRUS images. Our registration method first makes use of an initial rigid registration of 3D MR images to 3D TRUS images using 6 manually placed approximately corresponding landmarks in each image. Following the manual initialization, two prostate surfaces are segmented from 3D MR and TRUS images and then non-rigidly registered using a thin-plate spline (TPS) algorithm. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 4 patient images by measuring target registration error (TRE) of manually identified corresponding intrinsic fiducials (calcifications and/or cysts) in the prostates. Experimental results show that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of 2.05 mm, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm.

  12. Harmonic Auto-Regularization for Non Rigid Groupwise Registration in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Estebanez, S.; Royuela-del-Val, J.; Sevilla, T.; Revilla-Orodea, A.; Aja-Fernandez, S.; Alberola-Lopez, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for non rigid groupwise registration of cardiac magnetic resonance images by means of free-form deformations, imposing a prior harmonic deformation assumption. The procedure proposes a primal-dual framework for solving an equality constrained minimization problem, which allows an automatic estimate of the trade-off between image fidelity and the Laplacian smoothness terms for each iteration. The method has been applied to both a 4D extended cardio-torso phantom and to a set of voluntary patients. The accuracy of the method has been measured for the synthetic experiment as the difference in modulus between the estimated displacement field and the ground truth; as for the real data, we have calculated the Dice coefficient between the contour manual delineations provided by two cardiologists at end systolic phase and those provided by them at end diastolic phase and, consequently propagated by the registration algorithm to the systolic instant. The automatic procedure turns out to be competitive in motion compensation with other methods even though their parameters have been previously set for optimal performance in different scenarios. (Author)

  13. Sensitivity study of voxel-based PET image comparison to image registration algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Stephen, E-mail: syip@lroc.harvard.edu; Chen, Aileen B.; Berbeco, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Aerts, Hugo J. W. L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable registration is essential for voxel-based comparison of sequential positron emission tomography (PET) images for proper adaptation of treatment plan and treatment response assessment. The comparison may be sensitive to the method of deformable registration as the optimal algorithm is unknown. This study investigated the impact of registration algorithm choice on therapy response evaluation. Methods: Sixteen patients with 20 lung tumors underwent a pre- and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) and 4D FDG-PET scans before and after chemoradiotherapy. All CT images were coregistered using a rigid and ten deformable registration algorithms. The resulting transformations were then applied to the respective PET images. Moreover, the tumor region defined by a physician on the registered PET images was classified into progressor, stable-disease, and responder subvolumes. Particularly, voxels with standardized uptake value (SUV) decreases >30% were classified as responder, while voxels with SUV increases >30% were progressor. All other voxels were considered stable-disease. The agreement of the subvolumes resulting from difference registration algorithms was assessed by Dice similarity index (DSI). Coefficient of variation (CV) was computed to assess variability of DSI between individual tumors. Root mean square difference (RMS{sub rigid}) of the rigidly registered CT images was used to measure the degree of tumor deformation. RMS{sub rigid} and DSI were correlated by Spearman correlation coefficient (R) to investigate the effect of tumor deformation on DSI. Results: Median DSI{sub rigid} was found to be 72%, 66%, and 80%, for progressor, stable-disease, and responder, respectively. Median DSI{sub deformable} was 63%–84%, 65%–81%, and 82%–89%. Variability of DSI was substantial and similar for both rigid and deformable algorithms with CV > 10% for all subvolumes. Tumor deformation had moderate to significant impact on DSI for progressor

  14. The ANACONDA algorithm for deformable image registration in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weistrand, Ola; Svensson, Stina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to describe a versatile algorithm for deformable image registration with applications in radiotherapy and to validate it on thoracic 4DCT data as well as CT/cone beam CT (CBCT) data. Methods: ANAtomically CONstrained Deformation Algorithm (ANACONDA) combines image information (i.e., intensities) with anatomical information as provided by contoured image sets. The registration problem is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem and solved with an in-house developed solver, tailored to this problem. The objective function, which is minimized during optimization, is a linear combination of four nonlinear terms: 1. image similarity term; 2. grid regularization term, which aims at keeping the deformed image grid smooth and invertible; 3. a shape based regularization term which works to keep the deformation anatomically reasonable when regions of interest are present in the reference image; and 4. a penalty term which is added to the optimization problem when controlling structures are used, aimed at deforming the selected structure in the reference image to the corresponding structure in the target image. Results: To validate ANACONDA, the authors have used 16 publically available thoracic 4DCT data sets for which target registration errors from several algorithms have been reported in the literature. On average for the 16 data sets, the target registration error is 1.17 ± 0.87 mm, Dice similarity coefficient is 0.98 for the two lungs, and image similarity, measured by the correlation coefficient, is 0.95. The authors have also validated ANACONDA using two pelvic cases and one head and neck case with planning CT and daily acquired CBCT. Each image has been contoured by a physician (radiation oncologist) or experienced radiation therapist. The results are an improvement with respect to rigid registration. However, for the head and neck case, the sample set is too small to show statistical significance. Conclusions: ANACONDA

  15. Automatic motion correction for in vivo human skin optical coherence tomography angiography through combined rigid and nonrigid registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, David Wei; Deegan, Anthony J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-06-01

    When using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), the development of artifacts due to involuntary movements can severely compromise the visualization and subsequent quantitation of tissue microvasculatures. To correct such an occurrence, we propose a motion compensation method to eliminate artifacts from human skin OCTA by means of step-by-step rigid affine registration, rigid subpixel registration, and nonrigid B-spline registration. To accommodate this remedial process, OCTA is conducted using two matching all-depth volume scans. Affine transformation is first performed on the large vessels of the deep reticular dermis, and then the resulting affine parameters are applied to all-depth vasculatures with a further subpixel registration to refine the alignment between superficial smaller vessels. Finally, the coregistration of both volumes is carried out to result in the final artifact-free composite image via an algorithm based upon cubic B-spline free-form deformation. We demonstrate that the proposed method can provide a considerable improvement to the final en face OCTA images with substantial artifact removal. In addition, the correlation coefficients and peak signal-to-noise ratios of the corrected images are evaluated and compared with those of the original images, further validating the effectiveness of the proposed method. We expect that the proposed method can be useful in improving qualitative and quantitative assessment of the OCTA images of scanned tissue beds.

  16. Performance evaluation of grid-enabled registration algorithms using bronze-standards

    CERN Document Server

    Glatard, T; Montagnat, J

    2006-01-01

    Evaluating registration algorithms is difficult due to the lack of gold standard in most clinical procedures. The bronze standard is a real-data based statistical method providing an alternative registration reference through a computationally intensive image database registration procedure. We propose in this paper an efficient implementation of this method through a grid-interfaced workflow enactor enabling the concurrent processing of hundreds of image registrations in a couple of hours only. The performances of two different grid infrastructures were compared. We computed the accuracy of 4 different rigid registration algorithms on longitudinal MRI images of brain tumors. Results showed an average subvoxel accuracy of 0.4 mm and 0.15 degrees in rotation.

  17. Rigid registration of CT, MR and cryosection images using a GLCM framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Grimson, E.; Mosges, R.

    1997-01-01

    The majority of the available rigid registration measures are based on a 2-dimensional histogram of corresponding grey-values in the registered images. This paper shows that these features are similar to a family of texture measures based on grey level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). Features from...

  18. High performance deformable image registration algorithms for manycore processors

    CERN Document Server

    Shackleford, James; Sharp, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Manycore Processors develops highly data-parallel image registration algorithms suitable for use on modern multi-core architectures, including graphics processing units (GPUs). Focusing on deformable registration, we show how to develop data-parallel versions of the registration algorithm suitable for execution on the GPU. Image registration is the process of aligning two or more images into a common coordinate frame and is a fundamental step to be able to compare or fuse data obtained from different sensor measurements. E

  19. Non-rigid contour-to-pixel registration of photographic and quantitative light-induced fluorescence imaging of decalcified teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkels, Benjamin; Deserno, Thomas; Ehrlich, Eva E.; Fritz, Ulrike B.; Sirazitdinova, Ekaterina; Tatano, Rosalia

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) is widely used to assess the damage of a tooth due to decalcification. In digital photographs, decalcification appears as white spot lesions, i.e. white spots on the tooth surface. We propose a novel multimodal registration approach for the matching of digital photographs and QLF images of decalcified teeth. The registration is based on the idea of contour-to-pixel matching. Here, the curve, which represents the shape of the tooth, is extracted from the QLF image using a contour segmentation by binarization and morphological processing. This curve is aligned to the photo with a non-rigid variational registration approach. Thus, the registration problem is formulated as minimization problem with an objective function that consists of a data term and a regularizer for the deformation. To construct the data term, the photo is pointwise classified into tooth and non-tooth regions. Then, the signed distance function of the tooth region allows to measure the mismatch between curve and photo. As regularizer a higher order, linear elastic prior is used. The resulting minimization problem is solved numerically using bilinear Finite Elements for the spatial discretization and the Gauss-Newton algorithm. The evaluation is based on 150 image pairs, where an average of 5 teeth have been captured from 32 subjects. All registrations have been confirmed correctly by a dental expert. The contour-to-pixel methods can directly be used in 3D for surface-to-voxel tasks.

  20. 2D-3D rigid registration to compensate for prostate motion during 3D TRUS-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Fenster, Aaron; Cool, Derek W; Gardi, Lori; Romagnoli, Cesare; Samarabandu, Jagath; Ward, Aaron D

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systems have been developed to improve targeting accuracy during prostate biopsy. However, prostate motion during the procedure is a potential source of error that can cause target misalignments. The authors present an image-based registration technique to compensate for prostate motion by registering the live two-dimensional (2D) TRUS images acquired during the biopsy procedure to a preacquired 3D TRUS image. The registration must be performed both accurately and quickly in order to be useful during the clinical procedure. The authors implemented an intensity-based 2D-3D rigid registration algorithm optimizing the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) metric using Powell's method. The 2D TRUS images acquired during the procedure prior to biopsy gun firing were registered to the baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the procedure. The accuracy was measured by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified fiducials within the prostate; these fiducials were used for validation only and were not provided as inputs to the registration algorithm. They also evaluated the accuracy when the registrations were performed continuously throughout the biopsy by acquiring and registering live 2D TRUS images every second. This measured the improvement in accuracy resulting from performing the registration, continuously compensating for motion during the procedure. To further validate the method using a more challenging data set, registrations were performed using 3D TRUS images acquired by intentionally exerting different levels of ultrasound probe pressures in order to measure the performance of our algorithm when the prostate tissue was intentionally deformed. In this data set, biopsy scenarios were simulated by extracting 2D frames from the 3D TRUS images and registering them to the baseline 3D image. A graphics processing unit (GPU)-based implementation was used to improve the

  1. Hierarchical and successive approximate registration of the non-rigid medical image based on thin-plate splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinyan; Li, Li; Yang, Yunfeng

    2017-06-01

    The hierarchical and successive approximate registration method of non-rigid medical image based on the thin-plate splines is proposed in the paper. There are two major novelties in the proposed method. First, the hierarchical registration based on Wavelet transform is used. The approximate image of Wavelet transform is selected as the registered object. Second, the successive approximation registration method is used to accomplish the non-rigid medical images registration, i.e. the local regions of the couple images are registered roughly based on the thin-plate splines, then, the current rough registration result is selected as the object to be registered in the following registration procedure. Experiments show that the proposed method is effective in the registration process of the non-rigid medical images.

  2. Image Registration Algorithm Based on Parallax Constraint and Clustering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Dong, Min; Mu, Xiaomin; Wang, Song

    2018-01-01

    To resolve the problem of slow computation speed and low matching accuracy in image registration, a new image registration algorithm based on parallax constraint and clustering analysis is proposed. Firstly, Harris corner detection algorithm is used to extract the feature points of two images. Secondly, use Normalized Cross Correlation (NCC) function to perform the approximate matching of feature points, and the initial feature pair is obtained. Then, according to the parallax constraint condition, the initial feature pair is preprocessed by K-means clustering algorithm, which is used to remove the feature point pairs with obvious errors in the approximate matching process. Finally, adopt Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC) algorithm to optimize the feature points to obtain the final feature point matching result, and the fast and accurate image registration is realized. The experimental results show that the image registration algorithm proposed in this paper can improve the accuracy of the image matching while ensuring the real-time performance of the algorithm.

  3. Non-rigid CT/CBCT to CBCT registration for online external beam radiotherapy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, Cornel; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Kotte, Alexis N. T. J.; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Moonen, Chrit T. W.; Ries, Mario

    2018-01-01

    Image-guided external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) allows radiation dose deposition with a high degree of accuracy and precision. Guidance is usually achieved by estimating the displacements, via image registration, between cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and computed tomography (CT) images acquired at different stages of the therapy. The resulting displacements are then used to reposition the patient such that the location of the tumor at the time of treatment matches its position during planning. Moreover, ongoing research aims to use CBCT-CT image registration for online plan adaptation. However, CBCT images are usually acquired using a small number of x-ray projections and/or low beam intensities. This often leads to the images being subject to low contrast, low signal-to-noise ratio and artifacts, which ends-up hampering the image registration process. Previous studies addressed this by integrating additional image processing steps into the registration procedure. However, these steps are usually designed for particular image acquisition schemes, therefore limiting their use on a case-by-case basis. In the current study we address CT to CBCT and CBCT to CBCT registration by the means of the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. Contrary to previous approaches, EVolution does not require the integration of additional image processing steps in the registration scheme. Moreover, the algorithm requires a low number of input parameters, is easily parallelizable and provides an elastic deformation on a point-by-point basis. Results have shown that relative to a pure CT-based registration, the intrinsic artifacts present in typical CBCT images only have a sub-millimeter impact on the accuracy and precision of the estimated deformation. In addition, the algorithm has low computational requirements, which are compatible with online image-based guidance of EBRT treatments.

  4. COMPARISON OF VOLUMETRIC REGISTRATION ALGORITHMS FOR TENSOR-BASED MORPHOMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, Julio; Joshi, Anand A; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear registration of brain MRI scans is often used to quantify morphological differences associated with disease or genetic factors. Recently, surface-guided fully 3D volumetric registrations have been developed that combine intensity-guided volume registrations with cortical surface constraints. In this paper, we compare one such algorithm to two popular high-dimensional volumetric registration methods: large-deformation viscous fluid registration, formulated in a Riemannian framework, and the diffeomorphic "Demons" algorithm. We performed an objective morphometric comparison, by using a large MRI dataset from 340 young adult twin subjects to examine 3D patterns of correlations in anatomical volumes. Surface-constrained volume registration gave greater effect sizes for detecting morphometric associations near the cortex, while the other two approaches gave greater effects sizes subcortically. These findings suggest novel ways to combine the advantages of multiple methods in the future.

  5. Improving oncoplastic breast tumor bed localization for radiotherapy planning using image registration algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodzinski, Marek; Skalski, Andrzej; Ciepiela, Izabela; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Kedzierawski, Piotr; Gajda, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    Knowledge about tumor bed localization and its shape analysis is a crucial factor for preventing irradiation of healthy tissues during supportive radiotherapy and as a result, cancer recurrence. The localization process is especially hard for tumors placed nearby soft tissues, which undergo complex, nonrigid deformations. Among them, breast cancer can be considered as the most representative example. A natural approach to improving tumor bed localization is the use of image registration algorithms. However, this involves two unusual aspects which are not common in typical medical image registration: the real deformation field is discontinuous, and there is no direct correspondence between the cancer and its bed in the source and the target 3D images respectively. The tumor no longer exists during radiotherapy planning. Therefore, a traditional evaluation approach based on known, smooth deformations and target registration error are not directly applicable. In this work, we propose alternative artificial deformations which model the tumor bed creation process. We perform a comprehensive evaluation of the most commonly used deformable registration algorithms: B-Splines free form deformations (B-Splines FFD), different variants of the Demons and TV-L1 optical flow. The evaluation procedure includes quantitative assessment of the dedicated artificial deformations, target registration error calculation, 3D contour propagation and medical experts visual judgment. The results demonstrate that the currently, practically applied image registration (rigid registration and B-Splines FFD) are not able to correctly reconstruct discontinuous deformation fields. We show that the symmetric Demons provide the most accurate soft tissues alignment in terms of the ability to reconstruct the deformation field, target registration error and relative tumor volume change, while B-Splines FFD and TV-L1 optical flow are not an appropriate choice for the breast tumor bed localization problem

  6. A framework for automatic creation of gold-standard rigid 3D-2D registration datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Hennadii; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Špiclin, Žiga

    2017-02-01

    Advanced image-guided medical procedures incorporate 2D intra-interventional information into pre-interventional 3D image and plan of the procedure through 3D/2D image registration (32R). To enter clinical use, and even for publication purposes, novel and existing 32R methods have to be rigorously validated. The performance of a 32R method can be estimated by comparing it to an accurate reference or gold standard method (usually based on fiducial markers) on the same set of images (gold standard dataset). Objective validation and comparison of methods are possible only if evaluation methodology is standardized, and the gold standard  dataset is made publicly available. Currently, very few such datasets exist and only one contains images of multiple patients acquired during a procedure. To encourage the creation of gold standard 32R datasets, we propose an automatic framework. The framework is based on rigid registration of fiducial markers. The main novelty is spatial grouping of fiducial markers on the carrier device, which enables automatic marker localization and identification across the 3D and 2D images. The proposed framework was demonstrated on clinical angiograms of 20 patients. Rigid 32R computed by the framework was more accurate than that obtained manually, with the respective target registration error below 0.027 mm compared to 0.040 mm. The framework is applicable for gold standard setup on any rigid anatomy, provided that the acquired images contain spatially grouped fiducial markers. The gold standard datasets and software will be made publicly available.

  7. Improving supervised classification accuracy using non-rigid multimodal image registration: detecting prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelow, Jonathan; Viswanath, Satish; Monaco, James; Rosen, Mark; Tomaszewski, John; Feldman, Michael; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for the detection of cancer in medical images require precise labeling of training data. For magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) of the prostate, training labels define the spatial extent of prostate cancer (CaP); the most common source for these labels is expert segmentations. When ancillary data such as whole mount histology (WMH) sections, which provide the gold standard for cancer ground truth, are available, the manual labeling of CaP can be improved by referencing WMH. However, manual segmentation is error prone, time consuming and not reproducible. Therefore, we present the use of multimodal image registration to automatically and accurately transcribe CaP from histology onto MRI following alignment of the two modalities, in order to improve the quality of training data and hence classifier performance. We quantitatively demonstrate the superiority of this registration-based methodology by comparing its results to the manual CaP annotation of expert radiologists. Five supervised CAD classifiers were trained using the labels for CaP extent on MRI obtained by the expert and 4 different registration techniques. Two of the registration methods were affi;ne schemes; one based on maximization of mutual information (MI) and the other method that we previously developed, Combined Feature Ensemble Mutual Information (COFEMI), which incorporates high-order statistical features for robust multimodal registration. Two non-rigid schemes were obtained by succeeding the two affine registration methods with an elastic deformation step using thin-plate splines (TPS). In the absence of definitive ground truth for CaP extent on MRI, classifier accuracy was evaluated against 7 ground truth surrogates obtained by different combinations of the expert and registration segmentations. For 26 multimodal MRI-WMH image pairs, all four registration methods produced a higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve compared to that

  8. Non-rigid point set registration of curves: registration of the superficial vessel centerlines of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreiros, Filipe M. M.; Wang, Chunliang; Rossitti, Sandro; Smedby, Örjan

    2016-03-01

    In this study we present a non-rigid point set registration for 3D curves (composed by 3D set of points). The method was evaluated in the task of registration of 3D superficial vessels of the brain where it was used to match vessel centerline points. It consists of a combination of the Coherent Point Drift (CPD) and the Thin-Plate Spline (TPS) semilandmarks. The CPD is used to perform the initial matching of centerline 3D points, while the semilandmark method iteratively relaxes/slides the points. For the evaluation, a Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) dataset was used. Deformations were applied to the extracted vessels centerlines to simulate brain bulging and sinking, using a TPS deformation where a few control points were manipulated to obtain the desired transformation (T1). Once the correspondences are known, the corresponding points are used to define a new TPS deformation(T2). The errors are measured in the deformed space, by transforming the original points using T1 and T2 and measuring the distance between them. To simulate cases where the deformed vessel data is incomplete, parts of the reference vessels were cut and then deformed. Furthermore, anisotropic normally distributed noise was added. The results show that the error estimates (root mean square error and mean error) are below 1 mm, even in the presence of noise and incomplete data.

  9. Non-rigid registration of 3D ultrasound for neurosurgery using automatic feature detection and matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Inês; Toews, Matthew; Luo, Jie; Unadkat, Prashin; Essayed, Walid; George, Elizabeth; Teodoro, Pedro; Carvalho, Herculano; Martins, Jorge; Golland, Polina; Pieper, Steve; Frisken, Sarah; Golby, Alexandra; Wells, William

    2018-06-04

    The brain undergoes significant structural change over the course of neurosurgery, including highly nonlinear deformation and resection. It can be informative to recover the spatial mapping between structures identified in preoperative surgical planning and the intraoperative state of the brain. We present a novel feature-based method for achieving robust, fully automatic deformable registration of intraoperative neurosurgical ultrasound images. A sparse set of local image feature correspondences is first estimated between ultrasound image pairs, after which rigid, affine and thin-plate spline models are used to estimate dense mappings throughout the image. Correspondences are derived from 3D features, distinctive generic image patterns that are automatically extracted from 3D ultrasound images and characterized in terms of their geometry (i.e., location, scale, and orientation) and a descriptor of local image appearance. Feature correspondences between ultrasound images are achieved based on a nearest-neighbor descriptor matching and probabilistic voting model similar to the Hough transform. Experiments demonstrate our method on intraoperative ultrasound images acquired before and after opening of the dura mater, during resection and after resection in nine clinical cases. A total of 1620 automatically extracted 3D feature correspondences were manually validated by eleven experts and used to guide the registration. Then, using manually labeled corresponding landmarks in the pre- and post-resection ultrasound images, we show that our feature-based registration reduces the mean target registration error from an initial value of 3.3 to 1.5 mm. This result demonstrates that the 3D features promise to offer a robust and accurate solution for 3D ultrasound registration and to correct for brain shift in image-guided neurosurgery.

  10. Medical image registration by combining global and local information: a chain-type diffeomorphic demons algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaozheng; Yuan, Zhenming; Zhu, Junming; Xu, Dongrong

    2013-01-01

    The demons algorithm is a popular algorithm for non-rigid image registration because of its computational efficiency and simple implementation. The deformation forces of the classic demons algorithm were derived from image gradients by considering the deformation to decrease the intensity dissimilarity between images. However, the methods using the difference of image intensity for medical image registration are easily affected by image artifacts, such as image noise, non-uniform imaging and partial volume effects. The gradient magnitude image is constructed from the local information of an image, so the difference in a gradient magnitude image can be regarded as more reliable and robust for these artifacts. Then, registering medical images by considering the differences in both image intensity and gradient magnitude is a straightforward selection. In this paper, based on a diffeomorphic demons algorithm, we propose a chain-type diffeomorphic demons algorithm by combining the differences in both image intensity and gradient magnitude for medical image registration. Previous work had shown that the classic demons algorithm can be considered as an approximation of a second order gradient descent on the sum of the squared intensity differences. By optimizing the new dissimilarity criteria, we also present a set of new demons forces which were derived from the gradients of the image and gradient magnitude image. We show that, in controlled experiments, this advantage is confirmed, and yields a fast convergence. (paper)

  11. Non-rigid registration of breast surfaces using the laplace and diffusion equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Jao J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A semi-automated, non-rigid breast surface registration method is presented that involves solving the Laplace or diffusion equations over undeformed and deformed breast surfaces. The resulting potential energy fields and isocontours are used to establish surface correspondence. This novel surface-based method, which does not require intensity images, anatomical landmarks, or fiducials, is compared to a gold standard of thin-plate spline (TPS interpolation. Realistic finite element simulations of breast compression and further testing against a tissue-mimicking phantom demonstrate that this method is capable of registering surfaces experiencing 6 - 36 mm compression to within a mean error of 0.5 - 5.7 mm.

  12. High-performance GPU-based rendering for real-time, rigid 2D/3D-image registration and motion prediction in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerk, Jakob; Gendrin, Christelle; Weber, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Furtado, Hugo; Fabri, Daniella; Bloch, Christoph; Bergmann, Helmar; Gröller, Eduard; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    A common problem in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of lung cancer as well as other malignant diseases is the compensation of periodic and aperiodic motion during dose delivery. Modern systems for image-guided radiation oncology allow for the acquisition of cone-beam computed tomography data in the treatment room as well as the acquisition of planar radiographs during the treatment. A mid-term research goal is the compensation of tumor target volume motion by 2D/3D Registration. In 2D/3D registration, spatial information on organ location is derived by an iterative comparison of perspective volume renderings, so-called digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) from computed tomography volume data, and planar reference x-rays. Currently, this rendering process is very time consuming, and real-time registration, which should at least provide data on organ position in less than a second, has not come into existence. We present two GPU-based rendering algorithms which generate a DRR of 512×512 pixels size from a CT dataset of 53 MB size at a pace of almost 100 Hz. This rendering rate is feasible by applying a number of algorithmic simplifications which range from alternative volume-driven rendering approaches - namely so-called wobbled splatting - to sub-sampling of the DRR-image by means of specialized raycasting techniques. Furthermore, general purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming paradigms were consequently utilized. Rendering quality and performance as well as the influence on the quality and performance of the overall registration process were measured and analyzed in detail. The results show that both methods are competitive and pave the way for fast motion compensation by rigid and possibly even non-rigid 2D/3D registration and, beyond that, adaptive filtering of motion models in IGRT. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. High-performance GPU-based rendering for real-time, rigid 2D/3D-image registration and motion prediction in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerk, Jakob; Gendrin, Christelle; Weber, Christoph [Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Center of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering] [and others

    2012-07-01

    A common problem in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of lung cancer as well as other malignant diseases is the compensation of periodic and aperiodic motion during dose delivery. Modern systems for image-guided radiation oncology allow for the acquisition of cone-beam computed tomography data in the treatment room as well as the acquisition of planar radiographs during the treatment. A mid-term research goal is the compensation of tumor target volume motion by 2D/3D Registration. In 2D/3D registration, spatial information on organ location is derived by an iterative comparison of perspective volume renderings, so-called digitally rendered radiographs (DRR) from computed tomography volume data, and planar reference X-rays. Currently, this rendering process is very time consuming, and real-time registration, which should at least provide data on organ position in less than a second, has not come into existence. We present two GPU-based rendering algorithms which generate a DRR of 512 x 512 pixels size from a CT dataset of 53 MB size at a pace of almost 100 Hz. This rendering rate is feasible by applying a number of algorithmic simplifications which range from alternative volume-driven rendering approaches - namely so-called wobbled splatting - to sub-sampling of the DRR-image by means of specialized raycasting techniques. Furthermore, general purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming paradigms were consequently utilized. Rendering quality and performance as well as the influence on the quality and performance of the overall registration process were measured and analyzed in detail. The results show that both methods are competitive and pave the way for fast motion compensation by rigid and possibly even non-rigid 2D/3D registration and, beyond that, adaptive filtering of motion models in IGRT. (orig.)

  14. Topology preserving non-rigid image registration using time-varying elasticity model for MRI brain volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sahar; Khan, Muhammad Faisal

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new non-rigid image registration method that imposes a topology preservation constraint on the deformation. We propose to incorporate the time varying elasticity model into the deformable image matching procedure and constrain the Jacobian determinant of the transformation over the entire image domain. The motion of elastic bodies is governed by a hyperbolic partial differential equation, generally termed as elastodynamics wave equation, which we propose to use as a deformation model. We carried out clinical image registration experiments on 3D magnetic resonance brain scans from IBSR database. The results of the proposed registration approach in terms of Kappa index and relative overlap computed over the subcortical structures were compared against the existing topology preserving non-rigid image registration methods and non topology preserving variant of our proposed registration scheme. The Jacobian determinant maps obtained with our proposed registration method were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed. The results demonstrated that the proposed scheme provides good registration accuracy with smooth transformations, thereby guaranteeing the preservation of topology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Robust and Accurate Two-Step Auto-Labeling Conditional Iterative Closest Points (TACICP Algorithm for Three-Dimensional Multi-Modal Carotid Image Registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengkai Guo

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is among the leading causes of death and disability. Combining information from multi-modal vascular images is an effective and efficient way to diagnose and monitor atherosclerosis, in which image registration is a key technique. In this paper a feature-based registration algorithm, Two-step Auto-labeling Conditional Iterative Closed Points (TACICP algorithm, is proposed to align three-dimensional carotid image datasets from ultrasound (US and magnetic resonance (MR. Based on 2D segmented contours, a coarse-to-fine strategy is employed with two steps: rigid initialization step and non-rigid refinement step. Conditional Iterative Closest Points (CICP algorithm is given in rigid initialization step to obtain the robust rigid transformation and label configurations. Then the labels and CICP algorithm with non-rigid thin-plate-spline (TPS transformation model is introduced to solve non-rigid carotid deformation between different body positions. The results demonstrate that proposed TACICP algorithm has achieved an average registration error of less than 0.2mm with no failure case, which is superior to the state-of-the-art feature-based methods.

  16. Distortion Correction in Fetal EPI Using Non-Rigid Registration With a Laplacian Constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklisova-Murgasova, Maria; Lockwood Estrin, Georgia; Nunes, Rita G; Malik, Shaihan J; Rutherford, Mary A; Rueckert, Daniel; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2018-01-01

    Geometric distortion induced by the main B0 field disrupts the consistency of fetal echo planar imaging (EPI) data, on which diffusion and functional magnetic resonance imaging is based. In this paper, we present a novel data-driven method for simultaneous motion and distortion correction of fetal EPI. A motion-corrected and reconstructed T2 weighted single shot fast spin echo (ssFSE) volume is used as a model of undistorted fetal brain anatomy. Our algorithm interleaves two registration steps: estimation of fetal motion parameters by aligning EPI slices to the model; and deformable registration of EPI slices to slices simulated from the undistorted model to estimate the distortion field. The deformable registration is regularized by a physically inspired Laplacian constraint, to model distortion induced by a source-free background B0 field. Our experiments show that distortion correction significantly improves consistency of reconstructed EPI volumes with ssFSE volumes. In addition, the estimated distortion fields are consistent with fields calculated from acquired field maps, and the Laplacian constraint is essential for estimation of plausible distortion fields. The EPI volumes reconstructed from different scans of the same subject were more consistent when the proposed method was used in comparison with EPI volumes reconstructed from data distortion corrected using a separately acquired B0 field map.

  17. Computing homography with RANSAC algorithm: a novel method of registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian; Yan, Dayuan

    2005-02-01

    An AR (Augmented Reality) system can integrate computer-generated objects with the image sequences of real world scenes in either an off-line or a real-time way. Registration, or camera pose estimation, is one of the key techniques to determine its performance. The registration methods can be classified as model-based and move-matching. The former approach can accomplish relatively accurate registration results, but it requires the precise model of the scene, which is hard to be obtained. The latter approach carries out registration by computing the ego-motion of the camera. Because it does not require the prior-knowledge of the scene, its registration results sometimes turn out to be less accurate. When the model defined is as simple as a plane, a mixed method is introduced to take advantages of the virtues of the two methods mentioned above. Although unexpected objects often occlude this plane in an AR system, one can still try to detect corresponding points with a contract-expand method, while this will import erroneous correspondences. Computing homography with RANSAC algorithm is used to overcome such shortcomings. Using the robustly estimated homography resulted from RANSAC, the camera projective matrix can be recovered and thus registration is accomplished even when the markers are lost in the scene.

  18. Daily fraction dose recalculation based on rigid registration using Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Bosse

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To calculate the daily fraction dose for CBCT recalculations based on rigid registration and compare it to the planned CT doses.Methods: For this study, 30 patients that were previously treated (10 SBRT lung, 10 prostate and 10 abdomen were considered. The daily CBCT images were imported into the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Mosaic. Pinnacle was used to re-contour the regions of interest (ROI for the specific CBCT by copying the contours from the original CT plan, planned by the prescribing physician, onto each daily CBCT and then manually reshaping contours to match the ROIs. A new plan is then created with the re-contoured CBCT as primary image in order to calculate the daily dose delivered to each ROI. The DVH values are then exported into Excel and overlaid onto the original CT DVH to produce a graph.Results: For the SBRT lung patients, we found that there were small daily volume changes in the lungs, trachea and esophagus. For almost all regions of interest we found that the dose received each day was less than the predicted dose of the planned CT while the PTV dose was relatively the same each day. The results for the prostate patients were similar, showing slight differences in the DVH values for different days in the rectum and bladder but similar PTV.Conclusion: By comparing daily fraction dose between the re-contoured CBCT images and the original planned CT show that PTV coverage for both prostate and SBRT, it has been shown that for PTV coverage, a planned CT is adequate. However, there are differences between the dose for the organs surrounding the PTV. The dose difference is less than the planned in most instances.-----------------------Cite this article as: Bosse C, Tuohy R, Mavroidis P, Shi Z, Crownover R, Gutierrez A, Papanikolaou N, Stathakis S. Daily fraction dose recalculation based on rigid registration using Cone Beam CT. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020217. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.17

  19. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D., E-mail: gdhugo@vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, 23298 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm{sup 3}), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%;p < 0

  20. A block matching-based registration algorithm for localization of locally advanced lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Scott P.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To implement and evaluate a block matching-based registration (BMR) algorithm for locally advanced lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods: Small (1 cm 3 ), nonoverlapping image subvolumes (“blocks”) were automatically identified on the planning image to cover the tumor surface using a measure of the local intensity gradient. Blocks were independently and automatically registered to the on-treatment image using a rigid transform. To improve speed and robustness, registrations were performed iteratively from coarse to fine image resolution. At each resolution, all block displacements having a near-maximum similarity score were stored. From this list, a single displacement vector for each block was iteratively selected which maximized the consistency of displacement vectors across immediately neighboring blocks. These selected displacements were regularized using a median filter before proceeding to registrations at finer image resolutions. After evaluating all image resolutions, the global rigid transform of the on-treatment image was computed using a Procrustes analysis, providing the couch shift for patient setup correction. This algorithm was evaluated for 18 locally advanced lung cancer patients, each with 4–7 weekly on-treatment computed tomography scans having physician-delineated gross tumor volumes. Volume overlap (VO) and border displacement errors (BDE) were calculated relative to the nominal physician-identified targets to establish residual error after registration. Results: Implementation of multiresolution registration improved block matching accuracy by 39% compared to registration using only the full resolution images. By also considering multiple potential displacements per block, initial errors were reduced by 65%. Using the final implementation of the BMR algorithm, VO was significantly improved from 77% ± 21% (range: 0%–100%) in the initial bony alignment to 91% ± 8% (range: 56%–100%;p < 0.001). Left

  1. An efficient and robust algorithm for parallel groupwise registration of bone surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Vos, Frans M.; Grimbergen, Cornelis A.; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Streekstra, Geert J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a novel groupwise registration algorithm is proposed for the unbiased registration of a large number of densely sampled point clouds. The method fits an evolving mean shape to each of the example point clouds thereby minimizing the total deformation. The registration algorithm

  2. Template-based CTA to x-ray angio rigid registration of coronary arteries in frequency domain with automatic x-ray segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Timur; Unal, Gozde [Sabanci University, Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir [Computer Aided Medical Procedures (CAMP), Technical University of Munich, Garching, 85748 (Germany); Degertekin, Muzaffer [Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul 34752 (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: A key challenge for image guided coronary interventions is accurate and absolutely robust image registration bringing together preinterventional information extracted from a three-dimensional (3D) patient scan and live interventional image information. In this paper, the authors present a novel scheme for 3D to two-dimensional (2D) rigid registration of coronary arteries extracted from preoperative image scan (3D) and a single segmented intraoperative x-ray angio frame in frequency and spatial domains for real-time angiography interventions by C-arm fluoroscopy.Methods: Most existing rigid registration approaches require a close initialization due to the abundance of local minima and high complexity of search algorithms. The authors' method eliminates this requirement by transforming the projections into translation-invariant Fourier domain for estimating the 3D pose. For 3D rotation recovery, template Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR) as candidate poses of 3D vessels of segmented computed tomography angiography are produced by rotating the camera (image intensifier) around the DICOM angle values with a specific range as in C-arm setup. The authors have compared the 3D poses of template DRRs with the segmented x-ray after equalizing the scales in three domains, namely, Fourier magnitude, Fourier phase, and Fourier polar. The best rotation pose candidate was chosen by one of the highest similarity measures returned by the methods in these domains. It has been noted in literature that frequency domain methods are robust against noise and occlusion which was also validated by the authors' results. 3D translation of the volume was then recovered by distance-map based BFGS optimization well suited to convex structure of the authors' objective function without local minima due to distance maps. A novel automatic x-ray vessel segmentation was also performed in this study.Results: Final results were evaluated in 2D projection space for

  3. Template-based CTA to x-ray angio rigid registration of coronary arteries in frequency domain with automatic x-ray segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksoy, Timur; Unal, Gozde; Demirci, Stefanie; Navab, Nassir; Degertekin, Muzaffer

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A key challenge for image guided coronary interventions is accurate and absolutely robust image registration bringing together preinterventional information extracted from a three-dimensional (3D) patient scan and live interventional image information. In this paper, the authors present a novel scheme for 3D to two-dimensional (2D) rigid registration of coronary arteries extracted from preoperative image scan (3D) and a single segmented intraoperative x-ray angio frame in frequency and spatial domains for real-time angiography interventions by C-arm fluoroscopy.Methods: Most existing rigid registration approaches require a close initialization due to the abundance of local minima and high complexity of search algorithms. The authors' method eliminates this requirement by transforming the projections into translation-invariant Fourier domain for estimating the 3D pose. For 3D rotation recovery, template Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR) as candidate poses of 3D vessels of segmented computed tomography angiography are produced by rotating the camera (image intensifier) around the DICOM angle values with a specific range as in C-arm setup. The authors have compared the 3D poses of template DRRs with the segmented x-ray after equalizing the scales in three domains, namely, Fourier magnitude, Fourier phase, and Fourier polar. The best rotation pose candidate was chosen by one of the highest similarity measures returned by the methods in these domains. It has been noted in literature that frequency domain methods are robust against noise and occlusion which was also validated by the authors' results. 3D translation of the volume was then recovered by distance-map based BFGS optimization well suited to convex structure of the authors' objective function without local minima due to distance maps. A novel automatic x-ray vessel segmentation was also performed in this study.Results: Final results were evaluated in 2D projection space for patient data; and

  4. A conservative quaternion-based time integration algorithm for rigid body rotations with implicit constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Bjerre; Krenk, Steen

    2012-01-01

    A conservative time integration algorithm for rigid body rotations is presented in a purely algebraic form in terms of the four quaternions components and the four conjugate momentum variables via Hamilton’s equations. The introduction of an extended mass matrix leads to a symmetric set of eight...

  5. An algorithm for longitudinal registration of PET/CT images acquired during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Abramson, Richard G; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Chakravarthy, Anuradha Bapsi; Abramson, Vandana; Mayer, Ingrid; Farley, Jaime; Delbeke, Dominique; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-11-16

    By providing estimates of tumor glucose metabolism, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can potentially characterize the response of breast tumors to treatment. To assess therapy response, serial measurements of FDG-PET parameters (derived from static and/or dynamic images) can be obtained at different time points during the course of treatment. However, most studies track the changes in average parameter values obtained from the whole tumor, thereby discarding all spatial information manifested in tumor heterogeneity. Here, we propose a method whereby serially acquired FDG-PET breast data sets can be spatially co-registered to enable the spatial comparison of parameter maps at the voxel level. The goal is to optimally register normal tissues while simultaneously preventing tumor distortion. In order to accomplish this, we constructed a PET support device to enable PET/CT imaging of the breasts of ten patients in the prone position and applied a mutual information-based rigid body registration followed by a non-rigid registration. The non-rigid registration algorithm extended the adaptive bases algorithm (ABA) by incorporating a tumor volume-preserving constraint, which computed the Jacobian determinant over the tumor regions as outlined on the PET/CT images, into the cost function. We tested this approach on ten breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. By both qualitative and quantitative evaluation, our constrained algorithm yielded significantly less tumor distortion than the unconstrained algorithm: considering the tumor volume determined from standard uptake value maps, the post-registration median tumor volume changes, and the 25th and 75th quantiles were 3.42% (0%, 13.39%) and 16.93% (9.21%, 49.93%) for the constrained and unconstrained algorithms, respectively (p = 0.002), while the bending energy (a measure of the smoothness of the deformation) was 0.0015 (0.0005, 0.012) and 0.017 (0.005, 0

  6. Elastic Versus Rigid Image Registration in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Prostate Biopsy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venderink, Wulphert; de Rooij, Maarten; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Huisman, Henkjan J; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2016-07-29

    The main difference between the available magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion platforms for prostate biopsy is the method of image registration being either rigid or elastic. As elastic registration compensates for possible deformation caused by the introduction of an ultrasound probe for example, it is expected that it would perform better than rigid registration. The aim of this meta-analysis is to compare rigid with elastic registration by calculating the detection odds ratio (OR) for both subgroups. The detection OR is defined as the ratio of the odds of detecting clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) by MRI-TRUS fusion biopsy compared with systematic TRUS biopsy. Secondary objectives were the OR for any PCa and the OR after pooling both registration techniques. The electronic databases PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were systematically searched for relevant studies according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Statement. Studies comparing MRI-TRUS fusion and systematic TRUS-guided biopsies in the same patient were included. The quality assessment of included studies was performed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies version 2. Eleven papers describing elastic and 10 describing rigid registration were included. Meta-analysis showed an OR of csPCa for elastic and rigid registration of 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21-1.73, pimaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion systems which vary in their method of compensating for prostate deformation. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Behaviors study of image registration algorithms in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Lian; Hou Qing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Study the behaviors of image registration algorithms, and analyze the elements which influence the performance of image registrations. Methods: Pre-known corresponding coordinates were appointed for reference image and moving image, and then the influence of region of interest (ROI) selection, transformation function initial parameters and coupled parameter spaces on registration results were studied with a software platform developed in home. Results: Region of interest selection had a manifest influence on registration performance. An improperly chosen ROI resulted in a bad registration. Transformation function initial parameters selection based on pre-known information could improve the accuracy of image registration. Coupled parameter spaces would enhance the dependence of image registration algorithm on ROI selection. Conclusions: It is necessary for clinic IGRT to obtain a ROI selection strategy (depending on specific commercial software) correlated to tumor sites. Three suggestions for image registration technique developers are automatic selection of the initial parameters of transformation function based on pre-known information, developing specific image registration algorithm for specific image feature, and assembling real-time image registration algorithms according to tumor sites selected by software user. (authors)

  8. Rigid 3D-3D registration of TOF MRA integrating vessel segmentation for quantification of recurrence volumes after coiling cerebral aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saering, Dennis; Forkert, Nils Daniel; Fiehler, Jens; Ries, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    A fast and reproducible quantification of the recurrence volume of coiled aneurysms is required to enable a more timely evaluation of new coils. This paper presents two registration schemes for the semi-automatic quantification of aneurysm recurrence volumes based on baseline and follow-up 3D MRA TOF datasets. The quantification of shape changes requires a previous definition of corresponding structures in both datasets. For this, two different rigid registration methods have been developed and evaluated. Besides a state-of-the-art rigid registration method, a second approach integrating vessel segmentations is presented. After registration, the aneurysm recurrence volume can be calculated based on the difference image. The computed volumes were compared to manually extracted volumes. An evaluation based on 20 TOF MRA datasets (baseline and follow-up) of ten patients showed that both registration schemes are generally capable of providing sufficient registration results. Regarding the quantification of aneurysm recurrence volumes, the results suggest that the second segmentation-based registration method yields better results, while a reduction of the computation and interaction time is achieved at the same time. The proposed registration scheme incorporating vessel segmentation enables an improved quantification of recurrence volumes of coiled aneurysms with reduced computation and interaction time. (orig.)

  9. Effects of deformable registration algorithms on the creation of statistical maps for preoperative targeting in deep brain stimulation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; D'Haese, Pierre-Francois; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2014-03-01

    Deep brain stimulation, which is used to treat various neurological disorders, involves implanting a permanent electrode into precise targets deep in the brain. Accurate pre-operative localization of the targets on pre-operative MRI sequence is challenging as these are typically located in homogenous regions with poor contrast. Population-based statistical atlases can assist with this process. Such atlases are created by acquiring the location of efficacious regions from numerous subjects and projecting them onto a common reference image volume using some normalization method. In previous work, we presented results concluding that non-rigid registration provided the best result for such normalization. However, this process could be biased by the choice of the reference image and/or registration approach. In this paper, we have qualitatively and quantitatively compared the performance of six recognized deformable registration methods at normalizing such data in poor contrasted regions onto three different reference volumes using a unique set of data from 100 patients. We study various metrics designed to measure the centroid, spread, and shape of the normalized data. This study leads to a total of 1800 deformable registrations and results show that statistical atlases constructed using different deformable registration methods share comparable centroids and spreads with marginal differences in their shape. Among the six methods being studied, Diffeomorphic Demons produces the largest spreads and centroids that are the furthest apart from the others in general. Among the three atlases, one atlas consistently outperforms the other two with smaller spreads for each algorithm. However, none of the differences in the spreads were found to be statistically significant, across different algorithms or across different atlases.

  10. Two Phase Non-Rigid Multi-Modal Image Registration Using Weber Local Descriptor-Based Similarity Metrics and Normalized Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-rigid multi-modal image registration plays an important role in medical image processing and analysis. Existing image registration methods based on similarity metrics such as mutual information (MI and sum of squared differences (SSD cannot achieve either high registration accuracy or high registration efficiency. To address this problem, we propose a novel two phase non-rigid multi-modal image registration method by combining Weber local descriptor (WLD based similarity metrics with the normalized mutual information (NMI using the diffeomorphic free-form deformation (FFD model. The first phase aims at recovering the large deformation component using the WLD based non-local SSD (wldNSSD or weighted structural similarity (wldWSSIM. Based on the output of the former phase, the second phase is focused on getting accurate transformation parameters related to the small deformation using the NMI. Extensive experiments on T1, T2 and PD weighted MR images demonstrate that the proposed wldNSSD-NMI or wldWSSIM-NMI method outperforms the registration methods based on the NMI, the conditional mutual information (CMI, the SSD on entropy images (ESSD and the ESSD-NMI in terms of registration accuracy and computation efficiency.

  11. Numerical algorithm for rigid body position estimation using the quaternion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigic, Miodrag; Grahovac, Nenad

    2017-11-01

    This paper deals with rigid body attitude estimation on the basis of the data obtained from an inertial measurement unit mounted on the body. The aim of this work is to present the numerical algorithm, which can be easily applied to the wide class of problems concerning rigid body positioning, arising in aerospace and marine engineering, or in increasingly popular robotic systems and unmanned aerial vehicles. Following the considerations of kinematics of rigid bodies, the relations between accelerations of different points of the body are given. A rotation matrix is formed using the quaternion approach to avoid singularities. We present numerical procedures for determination of the absolute accelerations of the center of mass and of an arbitrary point of the body expressed in the inertial reference frame, as well as its attitude. An application of the algorithm to the example of a heavy symmetrical gyroscope is presented, where input data for the numerical procedure are obtained from the solution of differential equations of motion, instead of using sensor measurements.

  12. Robust surface registration using salient anatomical features for image-guided liver surgery: Algorithm and validation

    OpenAIRE

    Clements, Logan W.; Chapman, William C.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    A successful surface-based image-to-physical space registration in image-guided liver surgery (IGLS) is critical to provide reliable guidance information to surgeons and pertinent surface displacement data for use in deformation correction algorithms. The current protocol used to perform the image-to-physical space registration involves an initial pose estimation provided by a point based registration of anatomical landmarks identifiable in both the preoperative tomograms and the intraoperati...

  13. Fast fluid registration of medical images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Gramkow, Claus

    1996-01-01

    This paper offers a new fast algorithm for non-rigid viscous fluid registration of medical images that is at least an order of magnitude faster than the previous method by (Christensen et al., 1994). The core algorithm in the fluid registration method is based on a linear elastic deformation...

  14. Validation of TMJ osteoarthritis synthetic defect database via non-rigid registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, Beatriz; Pera, Juliette; Budin, Francois; Gomes, Liliane; Styner, Martin; Lucia, Cevidanes; Nguyen, Tung

    2015-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the jaw joint and the muscles controlling jaw movement. However, diagnosis and treatment of these conditions remain controversial. To date, there is no single sign, symptom, or test that can clearly diagnose early stages of osteoarthritis (OA). Instead, the diagnosis is based on a consideration of several factors, including radiological evaluation. The current radiological diagnosis scores of TMJ pathology are subject to misdiagnosis. We believe these scores are limited by the acquisition procedures, such as oblique cuts of the CT and head positioning errors, and can lead to incorrect diagnoses of flattening of the head of the condyle, formation of osteophytes, or condylar pitting. This study consists of creating and validating a methodological framework to simulate defects in CBCT scans of known location and size, in order to create synthetic TMJ OA database. User-generated defects were created using a non-rigid deformation protocol in CBCT. All segmentation evaluation, surface distances and linear distances from the user-generated to the simulated defects showed our methodological framework to be very precise and within a voxel (0.5 mm) of magnitude. A TMJ OA synthetic database will be created next, and evaluated by expert radiologists, and this will serve to evaluate how sensitive the current radiological diagnosis tools are.

  15. Study on Huizhou architecture of point cloud registration based on optimized ICP algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runmei; Wu, Yulu; Zhang, Guangbin; Zhou, Wei; Tao, Yuqian

    2018-03-01

    In view of the current point cloud registration software has high hardware requirements, heavy workload and moltiple interactive definition, the source of software with better processing effect is not open, a two--step registration method based on normal vector distribution feature and coarse feature based iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm is proposed in this paper. This method combines fast point feature histogram (FPFH) algorithm, define the adjacency region of point cloud and the calculation model of the distribution of normal vectors, setting up the local coordinate system for each key point, and obtaining the transformation matrix to finish rough registration, the rough registration results of two stations are accurately registered by using the ICP algorithm. Experimental results show that, compared with the traditional ICP algorithm, the method used in this paper has obvious time and precision advantages for large amount of point clouds.

  16. A batch Algorithm for Implicit Non-Rigid Shape and Motion Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartoli, Adrien; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2005-01-01

    The recovery of 3D shape and camera motion for non-rigid scenes from single-camera video footage is a very important problem in computer vision. The low-rank shape model consists in regarding the deformations as linear combinations of basis shapes. Most algorithms for reconstructing the parameters...... of this model along with camera motion are based on three main steps. Given point tracks and the rank, or equivalently the number of basis shapes, they factorize a measurement matrix containing all point tracks, from which the camera motion and basis shapes are extracted and refined in a bundle adjustment...

  17. A GLOBAL REGISTRATION ALGORITHM OF THE SINGLE-CLOSED RING MULTI-STATIONS POINT CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aimed at the global registration problem of the single-closed ring multi-stations point cloud, a formula in order to calculate the error of rotation matrix was constructed according to the definition of error. The global registration algorithm of multi-station point cloud was derived to minimize the error of rotation matrix. And fast-computing formulas of transformation matrix with whose implementation steps and simulation experiment scheme was given. Compared three different processing schemes of multi-station point cloud, the experimental results showed that the effectiveness of the new global registration method was verified, and it could effectively complete the global registration of point cloud.

  18. A semi-automated 2D/3D marker-based registration algorithm modelling prostate shrinkage during radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budiharto, Tom; Slagmolen, Pieter; Hermans, Jeroen; Maes, Frederik; Verstraete, Jan; Heuvel, Frank Van den; Depuydt, Tom; Oyen, Raymond; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Currently, most available patient alignment tools based on implanted markers use manual marker matching and rigid registration transformations to measure the needed translational shifts. To quantify the particular effect of prostate gland shrinkage, implanted gold markers were tracked during a course of radiotherapy including an isotropic scaling factor to model prostate shrinkage. Materials and methods: Eight patients with prostate cancer had gold markers implanted transrectally and seven were treated with (neo) adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy. After patient alignment to skin tattoos, orthogonal electronic portal images (EPIs) were taken. A semi-automated 2D/3D marker-based registration was performed to calculate the necessary couch shifts. The registration consists of a rigid transformation combined with an isotropic scaling to model prostate shrinkage. Results: The inclusion of an isotropic shrinkage model in the registration algorithm cancelled the corresponding increase in registration error. The mean scaling factor was 0.89 ± 0.09. For all but two patients, a decrease of the isotropic scaling factor during treatment was observed. However, there was almost no difference in the translation offset between the manual matching of the EPIs to the digitally reconstructed radiographs and the semi-automated 2D/3D registration. A decrease in the intermarker distance was found correlating with prostate shrinkage rather than with random marker migration. Conclusions: Inclusion of shrinkage in the registration process reduces registration errors during a course of radiotherapy. Nevertheless, this did not lead to a clinically significant change in the proposed table translations when compared to translations obtained with manual marker matching without a scaling correction

  19. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  20. On developing B-spline registration algorithms for multi-core processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shackleford, J A; Kandasamy, N; Sharp, G C

    2010-01-01

    Spline-based deformable registration methods are quite popular within the medical-imaging community due to their flexibility and robustness. However, they require a large amount of computing time to obtain adequate results. This paper makes two contributions towards accelerating B-spline-based registration. First, we propose a grid-alignment scheme and associated data structures that greatly reduce the complexity of the registration algorithm. Based on this grid-alignment scheme, we then develop highly data parallel designs for B-spline registration within the stream-processing model, suitable for implementation on multi-core processors such as graphics processing units (GPUs). Particular attention is focused on an optimal method for performing analytic gradient computations in a data parallel fashion. CPU and GPU versions are validated for execution time and registration quality. Performance results on large images show that our GPU algorithm achieves a speedup of 15 times over the single-threaded CPU implementation whereas our multi-core CPU algorithm achieves a speedup of 8 times over the single-threaded implementation. The CPU and GPU versions achieve near-identical registration quality in terms of RMS differences between the generated vector fields.

  1. Medical image registration algorithms assesment Bronze Standard application enactment on grids using the MOTEUR workflow engine

    CERN Document Server

    Glatard, T; Pennec, X

    2006-01-01

    Medical image registration is pre-processing needed for many medical image analysis procedures. A very large number of registration algorithms are available today, but their performance is often not known and very difficult to assess due to the lack of gold standard. The Bronze Standard algorithm is a very data and compute intensive statistical approach for quantifying registration algorithms accuracy. In this paper, we describe the Bronze Standard application and we discuss the need for grids to tackle such computations on medical image databases. We demonstrate MOTEUR, a service-based workflow engine optimized for dealing with data intensive applications. MOTEUR eases the enactment of the Bronze Standard and similar applications on the EGEE production grid infrastructure. It is a generic workflow engine, based on current standards and freely available, that can be used to instrument legacy application code at low cost.

  2. Registration of TLS and MLS Point Cloud Combining Genetic Algorithm with ICP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Large scene point cloud can be quickly acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS technology,which needs to be supplemented by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS point cloud because of limited field of view and occlusion.MLS and TLS point cloud are located in geodetic coordinate system and local coordinate system respectively.This paper proposes an automatic registration method combined genetic algorithm (GA and iterative closed point ICP to achieve a uniform coordinate reference frame.The local optimizer is utilized in ICP.The efficiency of ICP is higher than that of GA registration,but it depends on a initial solution.GA is a global optimizer,but it's inefficient.The combining strategy is that ICP is enabled to complete the registration when the GA tends to local search.The rough position measured by a built-in GPS of a terrestrial laser scanner is used in the GA registration to limit its optimizing search space.To improve the GA registration accuracy,a maximum registration model called normalized sum of matching scores (NSMS is presented.The results for measured data show that the NSMS model is effective,the root mean square error (RMSE of GA registration is 1~5 cm and the registration efficiency can be improved by about 50% combining GA with ICP.

  3. A SAR IMAGE REGISTRATION METHOD BASED ON SIFT ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the stability and rapidity of synthetic aperture radar (SAR images matching, an effective method was presented. Firstly, the adaptive smoothing filtering was employed for image denoising in image processing based on Wallis filtering to avoid the follow-up noise is amplified. Secondly, feature points were extracted by a simplified SIFT algorithm. Finally, the exact matching of the images was achieved with these points. Compared with the existing methods, it not only maintains the richness of features, but a-lso reduces the noise of the image. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve better matching effect.

  4. Non-rigid isometric ICP: A practical registration method for the analysis and compensation of form errors in production engineering

    KAUST Repository

    Sacharow, Alexei

    2011-12-01

    The unprecedented success of the iterative closest point (ICP) method for registration in geometry processing and related fields can be attributed to its efficiency, robustness, and wide spectrum of applications. Its use is however quite limited as soon as the objects to be registered arise from each other by a transformation significantly different from a Euclidean motion. We present a novel variant of ICP, tailored for the specific needs of production engineering, which registers a triangle mesh with a second surface model of arbitrary digital representation. Our method inherits most of ICP\\'s practical advantages but is capable of detecting medium-strength bendings i.e. isometric deformations. Initially, the algorithm assigns to all vertices in the source their closest point on the target mesh and then iteratively establishes isometry, a process which, very similar to ICP, requires intermediate re-projections. A NURBS-based technique for applying the resulting deformation to arbitrary instances of the source geometry, other than the very mesh used for correspondence estimation, is described before we present numerical results on synthetic and real data to underline the viability of our approach in comparison with others. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Joint Land Cover Mapping and Image Registration Algorithm Based on a Markov Random Field Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apisit Eiumnoh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, image registration of multi-modal and multi-temporal images is performed satisfactorily before land cover mapping. However, since multi-modal and multi-temporal images are likely to be obtained from different satellite platforms and/or acquired at different times, perfect alignment is very difficult to achieve. As a result, a proper land cover mapping algorithm must be able to correct registration errors as well as perform an accurate classification. In this paper, we propose a joint classification and registration technique based on a Markov random field (MRF model to simultaneously align two or more images and obtain a land cover map (LCM of the scene. The expectation maximization (EM algorithm is employed to solve the joint image classification and registration problem by iteratively estimating the map parameters and approximate posterior probabilities. Then, the maximum a posteriori (MAP criterion is used to produce an optimum land cover map. We conducted experiments on a set of four simulated images and one pair of remotely sensed images to investigate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Our results show that, with proper selection of a critical MRF parameter, the resulting LCMs derived from an unregistered image pair can achieve an accuracy that is as high as when images are perfectly aligned. Furthermore, the registration error can be greatly reduced.

  6. A high-accuracy image registration algorithm using phase-only correlation for dental radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koichi; Nikaido, Akira; Aoki, Takafumi; Kosuge, Eiko; Kawamata, Ryota; Kashima, Isamu

    2008-01-01

    Dental radiographs have been used for the accurate assessment and treatment of dental diseases. The nonlinear deformation between two dental radiographs may be observed, even if they are taken from the same oral regions of the subject. For an accurate diagnosis, the complete geometric registration between radiographs is required. This paper presents an efficient dental radiograph registration algorithm using Phase-Only Correlation (POC) function. The use of phase components in 2D (two-dimensional) discrete Fourier transforms of dental radiograph images makes possible to achieve highly robust image registration and recognition. Experimental evaluation using a dental radiograph database indicates that the proposed algorithm exhibits efficient recognition performance even for distorted radiographs. (author)

  7. Non-rigid registration of a 3D ultrasound and a MR image data set of the female pelvic floor using a biomechanical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rexilius Jan

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The visual combination of different modalities is essential for many medical imaging applications in the field of Computer-Assisted medical Diagnosis (CAD to enhance the clinical information content. Clinically, incontinence is a diagnosis with high clinical prevalence and morbidity rate. The search for a method to identify risk patients and to control the success of operations is still a challenging task. The conjunction of magnetic resonance (MR and 3D ultrasound (US image data sets could lead to a new clinical visual representation of the morphology as we show with corresponding data sets of the female anal canal with this paper. Methods We present a feasibility study for a non-rigid registration technique based on a biomechanical model for MR and US image data sets of the female anal canal as a base for a new innovative clinical visual representation. Results It is shown in this case study that the internal and external sphincter region could be registered elastically and the registration partially corrects the compression induced by the ultrasound transducer, so the MR data set showing the native anatomy is used as a frame for the US data set showing the same region with higher resolution but distorted by the transducer Conclusion The morphology is of special interest in the assessment of anal incontinence and the non-rigid registration of normal clinical MR and US image data sets is a new field of the adaptation of this method incorporating the advantages of both technologies.

  8. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  9. MOSHFIT: algorithms for occlusion-tolerant mean shape and rigid motion from 3D movement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchelson, Joel R

    2013-09-03

    This work addresses the use of 3D point data to measure rigid motions, in the presence of occlusion and without reference to a prior model of relative point locations. This is a problem where cluster-based measurement techniques are used (e.g. for measuring limb movements) and no static calibration trial is available. The same problem arises when performing the task known as roving capture, in which a mobile 3D movement analysis system is moved through a volume with static markers in unknown locations and the ego-motion of the system is required in order to understand biomechanical activity in the environment. To provide a solution for both of these applications, the new concept of a visibility graph is introduced, and is combined with a generalised procrustes method adapted from ones used by the biological shape statistics and computer graphics communities. Recent results on shape space manifolds are applied to show sufficient conditions for convergence to unique solution. Algorithm source code is available and referenced here. Processing speed and rate of convergence are demonstrated using simulated data. Positional and angular accuracy are shown to be equivalent to approaches which require full calibration, to within a small fraction of input resolution. Typical processing times for sub-micron convergence are found to be fractions of a second, so the method is suitable for workflows where there may be time pressure such as in sports science and clinical analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. SU-F-T-421: Dosimetry Change During Radiotherapy and Dosimetry Difference for Rigid and Deformed Registration in the Mid-Thoracic Esophageal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, C; Liu, T; Chen, J; Zhu, J; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to analyze dosimetry changes during radiotherapy for the mid-thoracic esophageal carcinoma, and investigate dosimetry difference between rigid and deformed registration. Methods: Twelve patients with primary middle thoracic esophageal carcinoma were selected randomly. Based on first CT scanning of each patient, plans-o were generated by experience physicists. After 20 fractions treatment, the corresponding plans-re were created with second CT scanning. And then, these two CT images were rigid and deformed registration respectively, and the dose was accumulated plan-o with plan-re. The dosimetry variation of these plans (plan-o: with 30 fractions, plan-rig: the accumulated dose with rigid registration and plan-def: the accumulated dose with deformed registration) were evaluated by paired T-test. Results: The V20 value of total lung were 32.68%, 30.3% and 29.71% for plan-o, plan-rig and plan-def respectively. The mean dose of total lung was 17.19 Gy, 16.67 Gy and 16.51 Gy for plan-o plan-rig and plan-def respectively. There were significant differences between plan-o and plan-rig or plan-def for both V20 and mean dose of total lung (with p= 0.003, p= 0.000 for V20 and p=0.008, p= 0.000 for mean dose respectively). There was no significant difference between plan-rig and plan-def (with p=0.118 for V20 and p=0.384 for mean dose). The max dose of spinal-cord was 41.95 Gy, 41.48 Gy and 41.4 Gy for plan-o, plan-rig and plan-def respectively. There were no significant differences for the max dose of spinal-cord between these plans. Conclusion: The target volume changes and anatomic position displacement of mid-thoracic esophageal carcinoma should not be neglected in clinics. These changes would cause overdose in normal tissue. Therefore, it is necessary to have another CT scanning and re-plan during the mid-thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiotherapy. And the dosimetry difference between rigid and deformed fusions was not found in this study.

  11. An enhanced block matching algorithm for fast elastic registration in adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malsch, U; Thieke, C; Huber, P E; Bendl, R

    2006-01-01

    Image registration has many medical applications in diagnosis, therapy planning and therapy. Especially for time-adaptive radiotherapy, an efficient and accurate elastic registration of images acquired for treatment planning, and at the time of the actual treatment, is highly desirable. Therefore, we developed a fully automatic and fast block matching algorithm which identifies a set of anatomical landmarks in a 3D CT dataset and relocates them in another CT dataset by maximization of local correlation coefficients in the frequency domain. To transform the complete dataset, a smooth interpolation between the landmarks is calculated by modified thin-plate splines with local impact. The concept of the algorithm allows separate processing of image discontinuities like temporally changing air cavities in the intestinal track or rectum. The result is a fully transformed 3D planning dataset (planning CT as well as delineations of tumour and organs at risk) to a verification CT, allowing evaluation and, if necessary, changes of the treatment plan based on the current patient anatomy without time-consuming manual re-contouring. Typically the total calculation time is less than 5 min, which allows the use of the registration tool between acquiring the verification images and delivering the dose fraction for online corrections. We present verifications of the algorithm for five different patient datasets with different tumour locations (prostate, paraspinal and head-and-neck) by comparing the results with manually selected landmarks, visual assessment and consistency testing. It turns out that the mean error of the registration is better than the voxel resolution (2 x 2 x 3 mm 3 ). In conclusion, we present an algorithm for fully automatic elastic image registration that is precise and fast enough for online corrections in an adaptive fractionated radiation treatment course

  12. A new technique for noise reduction at coronary CT angiography with multi-phase data-averaging and non-rigid image registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Nakamura, Yuko; Yamagami, Takuji; Date, Shuji; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao [Hiroshima University, Department of Radiology, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Kihara, Yasuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of a newly developed noise reduction technique at coronary CT angiography (CTA) that uses multi-phase data-averaging and non-rigid image registration. Sixty-five patients underwent coronary CTA with prospective ECG-triggering. The range of the phase window was set at 70-80 % of the R-R interval. First, three sets of consecutive volume data at 70 %, 75 % and 80 % of the R-R interval were prepared. Second, we applied non-rigid registration to align the 70 % and 80 % images to the 75 % image. Finally, we performed weighted averaging of the three images and generated a de-noised image. The image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the proximal coronary arteries between the conventional 75 % and the de-noised images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated the image quality using a 5-point scale (1, poor; 5, excellent). On de-noised images, mean image noise was significantly lower than on conventional 75 % images (18.3 HU ± 2.6 vs. 23.0 HU ± 3.3, P < 0.01) and the CNR was significantly higher (P < 0.01). The mean image quality score for conventional 75 % and de-noised images was 3.9 and 4.4, respectively (P < 0.01). Our method reduces image noise and improves image quality at coronary CTA. (orig.)

  13. Registration of terrestrial mobile laser data on 2D or 3D geographic database by use of a non-rigid ICP approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, F.; Vallet, B.; Paparoditis, N.; Papelard, J.-P.; David, N.

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a generic and efficient method to register terrestrial mobile data with imperfect location on a geographic database with better overall accuracy but less details. The registration method proposed in this paper is based on a semi-rigid point to plane ICP ("Iterative Closest Point"). The main applications of such registration is to improve existing geographic databases, particularly in terms of accuracy, level of detail and diversity of represented objects. Other applications include fine geometric modelling and fine façade texturing, object extraction such as trees, poles, road signs marks, facilities, vehicles, etc. The geopositionning system of mobile mapping systems is affected by GPS masks that are only partially corrected by an Inertial Navigation System (INS) which can cause an important drift. As this drift varies non-linearly, but slowly in time, it will be modelled by a translation defined as a piecewise linear function of time which variation over time will be minimized (rigidity term). For each iteration of the ICP, the drift is estimated in order to minimise the distance between laser points and planar model primitives (data attachment term). The method has been tested on real data (a scan of the city of Paris of 3.6 million laser points registered on a 3D model of approximately 71,400 triangles).

  14. Simulating Deformations of MR Brain Images for Validation of Atlas-based Segmentation and Registration Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Zhong; Shen, Dinggang; Karacali, Bilge; Stern, Joshua; Rottenberg, David; Davatzikos, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Simulated deformations and images can act as the gold standard for evaluating various template-based image segmentation and registration algorithms. Traditional deformable simulation methods, such as the use of analytic deformation fields or the displacement of landmarks followed by some form of interpolation, are often unable to construct rich (complex) and/or realistic deformations of anatomical organs. This paper presents new methods aiming to automatically simulate realistic inter- and in...

  15. Study on Low Illumination Simultaneous Polarization Image Registration Based on Improved SURF Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanjun; Yang, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Registration of simultaneous polarization images is the premise of subsequent image fusion operations. However, in the process of shooting all-weather, the polarized camera exposure time need to be kept unchanged, sometimes polarization images under low illumination conditions due to too dark result in SURF algorithm can not extract feature points, thus unable to complete the registration, therefore this paper proposes an improved SURF algorithm. Firstly, the luminance operator is used to improve overall brightness of low illumination image, and then create integral image, using Hession matrix to extract the points of interest to get the main direction of characteristic points, calculate Haar wavelet response in X and Y directions to get the SURF descriptor information, then use the RANSAC function to make precise matching, the function can eliminate wrong matching points and improve accuracy rate. And finally resume the brightness of the polarized image after registration, the effect of the polarized image is not affected. Results show that the improved SURF algorithm can be applied well under low illumination conditions.

  16. Effects of x-ray and CT image enhancements on the robustness and accuracy of a rigid 3D/2D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jinkoo; Yin Fangfang; Zhao Yang; Kim, Jae Ho

    2005-01-01

    A rigid body three-dimensional/two-dimensional (3D/2D) registration method has been implemented using mutual information, gradient ascent, and 3D texturemap-based digitally reconstructed radiographs. Nine combinations of commonly used x-ray and computed tomography (CT) image enhancement methods, including window leveling, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization, were examined to assess their effects on accuracy and robustness of the registration method. From a set of experiments using an anthropomorphic chest phantom, we were able to draw several conclusions. First, the CT and x-ray preprocessing combination with the widest attraction range was the one that linearly stretched the histograms onto the entire display range on both CT and x-ray images. The average attraction ranges of this combination were 71.3 mm and 61.3 deg in the translation and rotation dimensions, respectively, and the average errors were 0.12 deg and 0.47 mm. Second, the combination of the CT image with tissue and bone information and the x-ray images with adaptive histogram equalization also showed subvoxel accuracy, especially the best in the translation dimensions. However, its attraction ranges were the smallest among the examined combinations (on average 36 mm and 19 deg). Last the bone-only information on the CT image did not show convergency property to the correct registration

  17. Medical Image Registration and Surgery Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    This thesis explores the application of physical models in medical image registration and surgery simulation. The continuum models of elasticity and viscous fluids are described in detail, and this knowledge is used as a basis for most of the methods described here. Real-time deformable models......, and the use of selective matrix vector multiplication. Fluid medical image registration A new and faster algorithm for non-rigid registration using viscous fluid models is presented. This algorithm replaces the core part of the original algorithm with multi-resolution convolution using a new filter, which...... growth is also presented. Using medical knowledge about the growth processes of the mandibular bone, a registration algorithm for time sequence images of the mandible is developed. Since this registration algorithm models the actual development of the mandible, it is possible to simulate the development...

  18. SU-F-J-180: A Reference Data Set for Testing Two Dimension Registration Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dankwa, A; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To create and characterize a reference data set for testing image registration algorithms that transform portal image (PI) to digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). Methods: Anterior-posterior (AP) and Lateral (LAT) projection and DRR image pairs from nine cases representing four different anatomical sites (head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, and pelvis) were selected for this study. Five experts will perform manual registration by placing landmarks points (LMPs) on the DRR and finding their corresponding points on the PI using computer assisted manual point selection tool (CAMPST), a custom-made MATLAB software tool developed in house. The landmark selection process will be repeated on both the PI and the DRR in order to characterize inter- and -intra observer variations associated with the point selection process. Inter and an intra observer variation in LMPs was done using Bland-Altman (B&A) analysis and one-way analysis of variance. We set our limit such that the absolute value of the mean difference between the readings should not exceed 3mm. Later on in this project we will test different two dimension (2D) image registration algorithms and quantify the uncertainty associated with their registration. Results: Using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) there was no variations within the readers. When Bland-Altman analysis was used the variation within the readers was acceptable. The variation was higher in the PI compared to the DRR.ConclusionThe variation seen for the PI is because although the PI has a much better spatial resolution the poor resolution on the DRR makes it difficult to locate the actual corresponding anatomical feature on the PI. We hope this becomes more evident when all the readers complete the point selection. The reason for quantifying inter- and -intra observer variation tells us to what degree of accuracy a manual registration can be done. Research supported by William Beaumont Hospital Research Start Up Fund.

  19. SU-F-J-180: A Reference Data Set for Testing Two Dimension Registration Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dankwa, A; Castillo, E; Guerrero, T [William Beaumont Hospital, Rochester Hills, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To create and characterize a reference data set for testing image registration algorithms that transform portal image (PI) to digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). Methods: Anterior-posterior (AP) and Lateral (LAT) projection and DRR image pairs from nine cases representing four different anatomical sites (head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, and pelvis) were selected for this study. Five experts will perform manual registration by placing landmarks points (LMPs) on the DRR and finding their corresponding points on the PI using computer assisted manual point selection tool (CAMPST), a custom-made MATLAB software tool developed in house. The landmark selection process will be repeated on both the PI and the DRR in order to characterize inter- and -intra observer variations associated with the point selection process. Inter and an intra observer variation in LMPs was done using Bland-Altman (B&A) analysis and one-way analysis of variance. We set our limit such that the absolute value of the mean difference between the readings should not exceed 3mm. Later on in this project we will test different two dimension (2D) image registration algorithms and quantify the uncertainty associated with their registration. Results: Using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) there was no variations within the readers. When Bland-Altman analysis was used the variation within the readers was acceptable. The variation was higher in the PI compared to the DRR.ConclusionThe variation seen for the PI is because although the PI has a much better spatial resolution the poor resolution on the DRR makes it difficult to locate the actual corresponding anatomical feature on the PI. We hope this becomes more evident when all the readers complete the point selection. The reason for quantifying inter- and -intra observer variation tells us to what degree of accuracy a manual registration can be done. Research supported by William Beaumont Hospital Research Start Up Fund.

  20. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wognum, S.; Heethuis, S. E.; Rosario, T.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Bel, A.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations.

  1. An Orthogonal Learning Differential Evolution Algorithm for Remote Sensing Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an area-based method for remote sensing image registration. We use orthogonal learning differential evolution algorithm to optimize the similarity metric between the reference image and the target image. Many local and global methods have been used to achieve the optimal similarity metric in the last few years. Because remote sensing images are usually influenced by large distortions and high noise, local methods will fail in some cases. For this reason, global methods are often required. The orthogonal learning (OL strategy is efficient when searching in complex problem spaces. In addition, it can discover more useful information via orthogonal experimental design (OED. Differential evolution (DE is a heuristic algorithm. It has shown to be efficient in solving the remote sensing image registration problem. So orthogonal learning differential evolution algorithm (OLDE is efficient for many optimization problems. The OLDE method uses the OL strategy to guide the DE algorithm to discover more useful information. Experiments show that the OLDE method is more robust and efficient for registering remote sensing images.

  2. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of rigid and deformable motion correction algorithms using dual-energy CT images in view of application to CT perfusion measurements in abdominal organs affected by breathing motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skornitzke, S; Fritz, F; Klauss, M; Pahn, G; Hansen, J; Hirsch, J; Grenacher, L; Kauczor, H-U; Stiller, W

    2015-02-01

    To compare six different scenarios for correcting for breathing motion in abdominal dual-energy CT (DECT) perfusion measurements. Rigid [RRComm(80 kVp)] and non-rigid [NRComm(80 kVp)] registration of commercially available CT perfusion software, custom non-rigid registration [NRCustom(80 kVp], demons algorithm) and a control group [CG(80 kVp)] without motion correction were evaluated using 80 kVp images. Additionally, NRCustom was applied to dual-energy (DE)-blended [NRCustom(DE)] and virtual non-contrast [NRCustom(VNC)] images, yielding six evaluated scenarios. After motion correction, perfusion maps were calculated using a combined maximum slope/Patlak model. For qualitative evaluation, three blinded radiologists independently rated motion correction quality and resulting perfusion maps on a four-point scale (4 = best, 1 = worst). For quantitative evaluation, relative changes in metric values, R(2) and residuals of perfusion model fits were calculated. For motion-corrected images, mean ratings differed significantly [NRCustom(80 kVp) and NRCustom(DE), 3.3; NRComm(80 kVp), 3.1; NRCustom(VNC), 2.9; RRComm(80 kVp), 2.7; CG(80 kVp), 2.7; all p VNC), 22.8%; RRComm(80 kVp), 0.6%; CG(80 kVp), 0%]. Regarding perfusion maps, NRCustom(80 kVp) and NRCustom(DE) were rated highest [NRCustom(80 kVp), 3.1; NRCustom(DE), 3.0; NRComm(80 kVp), 2.8; NRCustom(VNC), 2.6; CG(80 kVp), 2.5; RRComm(80 kVp), 2.4] and had significantly higher R(2) and lower residuals. Correlation between qualitative and quantitative evaluation was low to moderate. Non-rigid motion correction improves spatial alignment of the target region and fit of CT perfusion models. Using DE-blended and DE-VNC images for deformable registration offers no significant improvement. Non-rigid algorithms improve the quality of abdominal CT perfusion measurements but do not benefit from DECT post processing.

  3. A Matlab user interface for the statistically assisted fluid registration algorithm and tensor-based morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes-Calderon, Fernando; Brun, Caroline; Sant, Nishita; Thompson, Paul; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Tensor-Based Morphometry (TBM) is an increasingly popular method for group analysis of brain MRI data. The main steps in the analysis consist of a nonlinear registration to align each individual scan to a common space, and a subsequent statistical analysis to determine morphometric differences, or difference in fiber structure between groups. Recently, we implemented the Statistically-Assisted Fluid Registration Algorithm or SAFIRA,1 which is designed for tracking morphometric differences among populations. To this end, SAFIRA allows the inclusion of statistical priors extracted from the populations being studied as regularizers in the registration. This flexibility and degree of sophistication limit the tool to expert use, even more so considering that SAFIRA was initially implemented in command line mode. Here, we introduce a new, intuitive, easy to use, Matlab-based graphical user interface for SAFIRA's multivariate TBM. The interface also generates different choices for the TBM statistics, including both the traditional univariate statistics on the Jacobian matrix, and comparison of the full deformation tensors.2 This software will be freely disseminated to the neuroimaging research community.

  4. Design of an Image Motion Compenstaion (IMC Algorithm for Image Registration of the Communication, Ocean, Meteorolotical Satellite (COMS-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taek Seo Jung

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Image Motion Compensation (IMC algorithm for the Korea's Communication, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS-1. An IMC algorithm is a priority component of image registration in Image Navigation and Registration (INR system to locate and register radiometric image data. Due to various perturbations, a satellite has orbit and attitude errors with respect to a reference motion. These errors cause depointing of the imager aiming direction, and in consequence cause image distortions. To correct the depointing of the imager aiming direction, a compensation algorithm is designed by adapting different equations from those used for the GOES satellites. The capability of the algorithm is compared with that of existing algorithm applied to the GOES's INR system. The algorithm developed in this paper improves pointing accuracy by 40%, and efficiently compensates the depointings of the imager aiming direction.

  5. Validation of an algorithm for the nonrigid registration of longitudinal breast MR images using realistic phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Dawant, Benoit M.; Welch, E. Brian; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Xu, Lei; Mayer, Ingrid; Kelley, Mark; Meszoely, Ingrid; Means-Powell, Julie; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors present a method to validate coregistration of breast magnetic resonance images obtained at multiple time points during the course of treatment. In performing sequential registration of breast images, the effects of patient repositioning, as well as possible changes in tumor shape and volume, must be considered. The authors accomplish this by extending the adaptive bases algorithm (ABA) to include a tumor-volume preserving constraint in the cost function. In this study, the authors evaluate this approach using a novel validation method that simulates not only the bulk deformation associated with breast MR images obtained at different time points, but also the reduction in tumor volume typically observed as a response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: For each of the six patients, high-resolution 3D contrast enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained before treatment, after one cycle of chemotherapy and at the conclusion of chemotherapy. To evaluate the effects of decreasing tumor size during the course of therapy, simulations were run in which the tumor in the original images was contracted by 25%, 50%, 75%, and 95%, respectively. The contracted area was then filled using texture from local healthy appearing tissue. Next, to simulate the post-treatment data, the simulated (i.e., contracted tumor) images were coregistered to the experimentally measured post-treatment images using a surface registration. By comparing the deformations generated by the constrained and unconstrained version of ABA, the authors assessed the accuracy of the registration algorithms. The authors also applied the two algorithms on experimental data to study the tumor volume changes, the value of the constraint, and the smoothness of transformations. Results: For the six patient data sets, the average voxel shift error (mean±standard deviation) for the ABA with constraint was 0.45±0.37, 0.97±0.83, 1.43±0.96, and 1.80±1.17 mm for the 25%, 50%, 75%, and 95

  6. TPS-HAMMER: improving HAMMER registration algorithm by soft correspondence matching and thin-plate splines based deformation interpolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guorong; Yap, Pew-Thian; Kim, Minjeong; Shen, Dinggang

    2010-02-01

    We present an improved MR brain image registration algorithm, called TPS-HAMMER, which is based on the concepts of attribute vectors and hierarchical landmark selection scheme proposed in the highly successful HAMMER registration algorithm. We demonstrate that TPS-HAMMER algorithm yields better registration accuracy, robustness, and speed over HAMMER owing to (1) the employment of soft correspondence matching and (2) the utilization of thin-plate splines (TPS) for sparse-to-dense deformation field generation. These two aspects can be integrated into a unified framework to refine the registration iteratively by alternating between soft correspondence matching and dense deformation field estimation. Compared with HAMMER, TPS-HAMMER affords several advantages: (1) unlike the Gaussian propagation mechanism employed in HAMMER, which can be slow and often leaves unreached blotches in the deformation field, the deformation interpolation in the non-landmark points can be obtained immediately with TPS in our algorithm; (2) the smoothness of deformation field is preserved due to the nice properties of TPS; (3) possible misalignments can be alleviated by allowing the matching of the landmarks with a number of possible candidate points and enforcing more exact matches in the final stages of the registration. Extensive experiments have been conducted, using the original HAMMER as a comparison baseline, to validate the merits of TPS-HAMMER. The results show that TPS-HAMMER yields significant improvement in both accuracy and speed, indicating high applicability for the clinical scenario. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anatomical accuracy of lesion localization. Retrospective interactive rigid image registration between 18F-FDG-PET and X-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noemayr, A.; Roemer, W.; Kuwert, T.; Hothorn, T.; Pfahlberg, A.; Hornegger, J.; Bautz, W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomical accuracy and reproducibility of retrospective interactive rigid image registration (RIR) between routinely archived X-ray computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography performed with 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in oncological patients. Methods: two observers registered PET and CT data obtained in 37 patients using a commercially available image fusion tool. RIR was performed separately for the thorax and the abdomen using physiological FDG uptake in several organs as a reference. One observer performed the procedure twice (01a and 01b), another person once (02). For 94 malignant lesions, clearly visible in CT and PET, the signed and absolute distances between their representation on PET and CT were measured in X-, Y-, and Z-direction with reference to a coordinate system centered in the CT representation of each lesion (X-, Y-, Z-distances). Results: the mean differences of the signed and absolute distances between 01a, 01b, and 02 did not exceed 3 mm in any dimension. The absolute X-, Y-, and Z-distances ranged between 0.57 ± 0.58 cm for 01a (X-direction) and 1.12 ± 1.28 cm for 02 (Z-direction). When averaging the absolute distances measured by 01a, 01b, and 02, the percentage of lesions misregistered by less than 1.5 cm was 91% for the X-, 88% for the Y-, and 77% for the Z-direction. The larger error of fusion determined for the remaining lesions was caused by non-rigid body transformations due to differences in breathing, arm position, or bowel movements between the two examinations. Mixed effects analysis of the signed and absolute X-, Y-, and Z-distances disclosed a significantly greater misalignment in the thorax than in the abdomen as well as axially than transaxially. Conclusion: the anatomical inaccuracy of RIR can be expected to be <1.5 cm for the majority of neoplastic foci. errors of alignment are bigger in the thorax and in Z-direction, due to non-rigid body transformations caused, e

  8. Medical image registration for analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Image registration techniques represent a rich family of image processing and analysis tools that aim to provide spatial correspondences across sets of medical images of similar and disparate anatomies and modalities. Image registration is a fundamental and usually the first step in medical image analysis and this paper presents a number of advanced techniques as well as demonstrates some of the advanced medical image analysis techniques they make possible. A number of both rigid and non-rigid medical image alignment algorithms of equivalent and merely consistent anatomical structures respectively are presented. The algorithms are compared in terms of their practical aims, inputs, computational complexity and level of operator (e.g. diagnostician) interaction. In particular, the focus of the methods discussion is placed on the applications and practical benefits of medical image registration. Results of medical image registration on a number of different imaging modalities and anatomies are presented demonstrating the accuracy and robustness of their application. Medical image registration is quickly becoming ubiquitous in medical imaging departments with the results of such algorithms increasingly used in complex medical image analysis and diagnostics. This paper aims to demonstrate at least part of the reason why

  9. Explicit symplectic integrators of molecular dynamics algorithms for rigid-body molecules in the canonical, isobaric-isothermal, and related ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G; Okamoto, Yuko

    2007-02-28

    The authors propose explicit symplectic integrators of molecular dynamics (MD) algorithms for rigid-body molecules in the canonical and isobaric-isothermal ensembles. They also present a symplectic algorithm in the constant normal pressure and lateral surface area ensemble and that combined with the Parrinello-Rahman algorithm. Employing the symplectic integrators for MD algorithms, there is a conserved quantity which is close to Hamiltonian. Therefore, they can perform a MD simulation more stably than by conventional nonsymplectic algorithms. They applied this algorithm to a TIP3P pure water system at 300 K and compared the time evolution of the Hamiltonian with those by the nonsymplectic algorithms. They found that the Hamiltonian was conserved well by the symplectic algorithm even for a time step of 4 fs. This time step is longer than typical values of 0.5-2 fs which are used by the conventional nonsymplectic algorithms.

  10. Inter-patient image registration algorithms to disentangle regional dose bioeffects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Serena; Pacelli, Roberto; Cella, Laura; Palma, Giuseppe

    2018-03-20

    Radiation therapy (RT) technological advances call for a comprehensive reconsideration of the definition of dose features leading to radiation induced morbidity (RIM). In this context, the voxel-based approach (VBA) to dose distribution analysis in RT offers a radically new philosophy to evaluate local dose response patterns, as an alternative to dose-volume-histograms for identifying dose sensitive regions of normal tissue. The VBA relies on mapping patient dose distributions into a single reference case anatomy which serves as anchor for local dosimetric evaluations. The inter-patient elastic image registrations (EIRs) of the planning CTs provide the deformation fields necessary for the actual warp of dose distributions. In this study we assessed the impact of EIR on the VBA results in thoracic patients by identifying two state-of-the-art EIR algorithms (Demons and B-Spline). Our analysis demonstrated that both the EIR algorithms may be successfully used to highlight subregions with dose differences associated with RIM that substantially overlap. Furthermore, the inclusion for the first time of covariates within a dosimetric statistical model that faces the multiple comparison problem expands the potential of VBA, thus paving the way to a reliable voxel-based analysis of RIM in datasets with strong correlation of the outcome with non-dosimetric variables.

  11. A proposal of multi-objective function for submarine rigid pipelines route optimization via evolutionary algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, D.H.; Medeiros, A.R. [Subsea7, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Jacob, B.P.; Lima, B.S.L.P.; Albrecht, C.H. [Universidade Federaldo Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia

    2009-07-01

    This work presents studies regarding the determination of optimal pipeline routes for offshore applications. The assembly of an objective function is presented; this function can be later associated with Evolutionary Algorithm to implement a computational tool for the automatic determination of the most advantageous pipeline route for a given scenario. This tool may reduce computational overheads, avoid mistakes with route interpretation, and minimize costs with respect to submarine pipeline design and installation. The following aspects can be considered in the assembly of the objective function: Geophysical and geotechnical data obtained from the bathymetry and sonography; the influence of the installation method, total pipeline length and number of free spans to be mitigated along the routes as well as vessel time for both cases. Case studies are presented to illustrate the use of the proposed objective function, including a sensitivity analysis intended to identify the relative influence of selected parameters in the evaluation of different routes. (author)

  12. The influence of non-rigid anatomy and patient positioning on endoscopy-CT image registration in the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, W Scott; Yang, Jinzhong; Wendt, Richard; Beadle, Beth M; Rao, Arvind; Wang, Xin A; Court, Laurence E

    2017-08-01

    To assess the influence of non-rigid anatomy and differences in patient positioning between CT acquisition and endoscopic examination on endoscopy-CT image registration in the head and neck. Radiotherapy planning CTs and 31-35 daily treatment-room CTs were acquired for nineteen patients. Diagnostic CTs were acquired for thirteen of the patients. The surfaces of the airways were segmented on all scans and triangular meshes were created to render virtual endoscopic images with a calibrated pinhole model of an endoscope. The virtual images were used to take projective measurements throughout the meshes, with reference measurements defined as those taken on the planning CTs and test measurements defined as those taken on the daily or diagnostic CTs. The influence of non-rigid anatomy was quantified by 3D distance errors between reference and test measurements on the daily CTs, and the influence of patient positioning was quantified by 3D distance errors between reference and test measurements on the diagnostic CTs. The daily CT measurements were also used to investigate the influences of camera-to-surface distance, surface angle, and the interval of time between scans. Average errors in the daily CTs were 0.36 ± 0.61 cm in the nasal cavity, 0.58 ± 0.83 cm in the naso- and oropharynx, and 0.47 ± 0.73 cm in the hypopharynx and larynx. Average errors in the diagnostic CTs in those regions were 0.52 ± 0.69 cm, 0.65 ± 0.84 cm, and 0.69 ± 0.90 cm, respectively. All CTs had errors heavily skewed towards 0, albeit with large outliers. Large camera-to-surface distances were found to increase the errors, but the angle at which the camera viewed the surface had no effect. The errors in the Day 1 and Day 15 CTs were found to be significantly smaller than those in the Day 30 CTs (P projective measurement errors. In general, these errors are largest when the camera is in the superior pharynx, where it sees large distances and a lot of muscle motion. The

  13. Object-constrained meshless deformable algorithm for high speed 3D nonrigid registration between CT and CBCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ting; Kim, Sung; Goyal, Sharad; Jabbour, Salma; Zhou Jinghao; Rajagopal, Gunaretnum; Haffty, Bruce; Yue Ning

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: High-speed nonrigid registration between the planning CT and the treatment CBCT data is critical for real time image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) to improve the dose distribution and to reduce the toxicity to adjacent organs. The authors propose a new fully automatic 3D registration framework that integrates object-based global and seed constraints with the grayscale-based ''demons'' algorithm. Methods: Clinical objects were segmented on the planning CT images and were utilized as meshless deformable models during the nonrigid registration process. The meshless models reinforced a global constraint in addition to the grayscale difference between CT and CBCT in order to maintain the shape and the volume of geometrically complex 3D objects during the registration. To expedite the registration process, the framework was stratified into hierarchies, and the authors used a frequency domain formulation to diffuse the displacement between the reference and the target in each hierarchy. Also during the registration of pelvis images, they replaced the air region inside the rectum with estimated pixel values from the surrounding rectal wall and introduced an additional seed constraint to robustly track and match the seeds implanted into the prostate. The proposed registration framework and algorithm were evaluated on 15 real prostate cancer patients. For each patient, prostate gland, seminal vesicle, bladder, and rectum were first segmented by a radiation oncologist on planning CT images for radiotherapy planning purpose. The same radiation oncologist also manually delineated the tumor volumes and critical anatomical structures in the corresponding CBCT images acquired at treatment. These delineated structures on the CBCT were only used as the ground truth for the quantitative validation, while structures on the planning CT were used both as the input to the registration method and the ground truth in validation. By registering the planning CT to the CBCT, a

  14. Towards adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: validation of an in-house deformable registration algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, C.; McClelland, J.; Moinuddin, S.; Ricketts, K.; Modat, M.; Ourselin, S.; D'Souza, D.; Royle, G.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to validate an in-house deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm for adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients. We aim to use the registrations to estimate the "dose of the day" and assess the need to replan. NiftyReg is an open-source implementation of the B-splines deformable registration algorithm, developed in our institution. We registered a planning CT to a CBCT acquired midway through treatment for 5 HN patients that required replanning. We investigated 16 different parameter settings that previously showed promising results. To assess the registrations, structures delineated in the CT were warped and compared with contours manually drawn by the same clinical expert on the CBCT. This structure set contained vertebral bodies and soft tissue. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), overlap index (OI), centroid position and distance between structures' surfaces were calculated for every registration, and a set of parameters that produces good results for all datasets was found. We achieve a median value of 0.845 in DSC, 0.889 in OI, error smaller than 2 mm in centroid position and over 90% of the warped surface pixels are distanced less than 2 mm of the manually drawn ones. By using appropriate DIR parameters, we are able to register the planning geometry (pCT) to the daily geometry (CBCT).

  15. Use of the CT component of PET-CT to improve PET-MR registration: demonstration in soft-tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somer, Edward J; Benatar, Nigel A; O'Doherty, Michael J; Smith, Mike A; Marsden, Paul K

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated improvements to PET-MR image registration offered by PET-CT scanning. Ten subjects with suspected soft-tissue sarcomas were scanned with an in-line PET-CT and a clinical MR scanner. PET to CT, CT to MR and PET to MR image registrations were performed using a rigid-body external marker technique and rigid and non-rigid voxel-similarity algorithms. PET-MR registration was also performed using transformations derived from the registration of CT to MR. The external marker technique gave fiducial registration errors of 2.1 mm, 5.1 mm and 5.3 mm for PET-CT, PET-MR and CT-MR registration. Target registration errors were 3.9 mm, 9.0 mm and 9.3 mm, respectively. Voxel-based algorithms were evaluated by measuring the distance between corresponding fiducials after registration. Registration errors of 6.4 mm, 14.5 mm and 9.5 mm, respectively, for PET-CT, PET-MR and CT-MR were observed for rigid-body registration while non-rigid registration gave errors of 6.8 mm, 16.3 mm and 7.6 mm for the same modality combinations. The application of rigid and non-rigid CT to MR transformations to accompanying PET data gives significantly reduced PET-MR errors of 10.0 mm and 8.5 mm, respectively. Visual comparison by two independent observers confirmed the improvement over direct PET-MR registration. We conclude that PET-MR registration can be more accurately and reliably achieved using the hybrid technique described than through direct rigid-body registration of PET to MR

  16. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuyu; Shi, Yinghua; Wu, Shuyu; Xiao, Yang; Gu, Xuejun; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT) images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N) cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB), the vertebral foramen (VF), the parotid gland (PG) and the submandibular gland (SMG). It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  17. Comprehensive evaluation of ten deformable image registration algorithms for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head & neck radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    Full Text Available Deformable image registration (DIR is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART for propagating contours between planning computerized tomography (CT images and treatment CT/cone-beam CT (CBCT images to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR contour mapping, ten intensity-based DIR strategies, which were classified into four categories-optical flow-based, demons-based, level-set-based and spline-based-were tested on planning CT and fractional CBCT images acquired from twenty-one head & neck (H&N cancer patients who underwent 6~7-week intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Three similarity metrics, i.e., the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC, the percentage error (PE and the Hausdorff distance (HD, were employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician-delineated ground truths of four OARs, including the vertebra (VTB, the vertebral foramen (VF, the parotid gland (PG and the submandibular gland (SMG. It was found that the evaluated DIRs in this work did not necessarily outperform rigid registration. DIR performed better for bony structures than soft-tissue organs, and the DIR performance tended to vary for different ROIs with different degrees of deformation as the treatment proceeded. Generally, the optical flow-based DIR performed best, while the demons-based DIR usually ranked last except for a modified demons-based DISC used for CT-CBCT DIR. These experimental results suggest that the choice of a specific DIR algorithm depends on the image modality, anatomic site, magnitude of deformation and application. Therefore, careful examinations and modifications are required before accepting the auto-propagated contours, especially for automatic re-planning ART systems.

  18. Image registration with auto-mapped control volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreibmann, Eduard; Xing Lei

    2006-01-01

    Many image registration algorithms rely on the use of homologous control points on the two input image sets to be registered. In reality, the interactive identification of the control points on both images is tedious, difficult, and often a source of error. We propose a two-step algorithm to automatically identify homologous regions that are used as a priori information during the image registration procedure. First, a number of small control volumes having distinct anatomical features are identified on the model image in a somewhat arbitrary fashion. Instead of attempting to find their correspondences in the reference image through user interaction, in the proposed method, each of the control regions is mapped to the corresponding part of the reference image by using an automated image registration algorithm. A normalized cross-correlation (NCC) function or mutual information was used as the auto-mapping metric and a limited memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm (L-BFGS) was employed to optimize the function to find the optimal mapping. For rigid registration, the transformation parameters of the system are obtained by averaging that derived from the individual control volumes. In our deformable calculation, the mapped control volumes are treated as the nodes or control points with known positions on the two images. If the number of control volumes is not enough to cover the whole image to be registered, additional nodes are placed on the model image and then located on the reference image in a manner similar to the conventional BSpline deformable calculation. For deformable registration, the established correspondence by the auto-mapped control volumes provides valuable guidance for the registration calculation and greatly reduces the dimensionality of the problem. The performance of the two-step registrations was applied to three rigid registration cases (two PET-CT registrations and a brain MRI-CT registration) and one deformable registration of

  19. A Piecewise Monotone Subgradient Algorithm for Accurate L1 -TV Based Registration of Physical Slices With Discontinuities in Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan; Čapek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 5 (2013), s. 901-918 ISSN 0278-0062 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA02011193 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : convex optimization * image registration * subgradient algorithm * total variation Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.799, year: 2013

  20. IFACEwat: the interfacial water-implemented re-ranking algorithm to improve the discrimination of near native structures for protein rigid docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chinh; Nguyen, Thuy-Diem; Zheng, Jie; Kwoh, Chee-Keong

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein docking is an in silico method to predict the formation of protein complexes. Due to limited computational resources, the protein-protein docking approach has been developed under the assumption of rigid docking, in which one of the two protein partners remains rigid during the protein associations and water contribution is ignored or implicitly presented. Despite obtaining a number of acceptable complex predictions, it seems to-date that most initial rigid docking algorithms still find it difficult or even fail to discriminate successfully the correct predictions from the other incorrect or false positive ones. To improve the rigid docking results, re-ranking is one of the effective methods that help re-locate the correct predictions in top high ranks, discriminating them from the other incorrect ones. Our results showed that the IFACEwat increased both the numbers of the near-native structures and improved their ranks as compared to the initial rigid docking ZDOCK3.0.2. In fact, the IFACEwat achieved a success rate of 83.8% for Antigen/Antibody complexes, which is 10% better than ZDOCK3.0.2. As compared to another re-ranking technique ZRANK, the IFACEwat obtains success rates of 92.3% (8% better) and 90% (5% better) respectively for medium and difficult cases. When comparing with the latest published re-ranking method F2Dock, the IFACEwat performed equivalently well or even better for several Antigen/Antibody complexes. With the inclusion of interfacial water, the IFACEwat improves mostly results of the initial rigid docking, especially for Antigen/Antibody complexes. The improvement is achieved by explicitly taking into account the contribution of water during the protein interactions, which was ignored or not fully presented by the initial rigid docking and other re-ranking techniques. In addition, the IFACEwat maintains sufficient computational efficiency of the initial docking algorithm, yet improves the ranks as well as the number of the near

  1. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wognum, S; Heethuis, S E; Rosario, T; Hoogeman, M S; Bel, A

    2014-07-01

    The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations. Excised porcine bladders, exhibiting similar filling and voiding behavior as human bladders, provide such an environment. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial accuracy of different DIR algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with radiopaque fiducial markers applied to the outer surface, for a range of bladder volumes, using various accuracy metrics. Five excised porcine bladders with a grid of 30-40 radiopaque fiducial markers attached to the outer wall were suspended inside a water-filled phantom. The bladder was filled with a controlled amount of water with added contrast medium for a range of filling volumes (100-400 ml in steps of 50 ml) using a luer lock syringe, and CT scans were acquired at each filling volume. DIR was performed for each data set, with the 100 ml bladder as the reference image. Six intensity-based algorithms (optical flow or demons-based) implemented in theMATLAB platform DIRART, a b-spline algorithm implemented in the commercial software package VelocityAI, and a structure-based algorithm (Symmetric Thin Plate Spline Robust Point Matching) were validated, using adequate parameter settings according to values previously published. The resulting deformation vector field from each registration was applied to the contoured bladder structures and to the marker coordinates for spatial error calculation. The quality of the algorithms was assessed by comparing the different error metrics across the different algorithms, and by comparing the effect of deformation magnitude (bladder volume difference) per algorithm, using the Independent Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. The authors found good structure accuracy without dependency on

  2. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wognum, S.; Heethuis, S. E.; Bel, A.; Rosario, T.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations. Excised porcine bladders, exhibiting similar filling and voiding behavior as human bladders, provide such an environment. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial accuracy of different DIR algorithms on CT images ofex vivo porcine bladders with radiopaque fiducial markers applied to the outer surface, for a range of bladder volumes, using various accuracy metrics. Methods: Five excised porcine bladders with a grid of 30–40 radiopaque fiducial markers attached to the outer wall were suspended inside a water-filled phantom. The bladder was filled with a controlled amount of water with added contrast medium for a range of filling volumes (100–400 ml in steps of 50 ml) using a luer lock syringe, and CT scans were acquired at each filling volume. DIR was performed for each data set, with the 100 ml bladder as the reference image. Six intensity-based algorithms (optical flow or demons-based) implemented in theMATLAB platform DIRART, a b-spline algorithm implemented in the commercial software package VelocityAI, and a structure-based algorithm (Symmetric Thin Plate Spline Robust Point Matching) were validated, using adequate parameter settings according to values previously published. The resulting deformation vector field from each registration was applied to the contoured bladder structures and to the marker coordinates for spatial error calculation. The quality of the algorithms was assessed by comparing the different error metrics across the different algorithms, and by comparing the effect of deformation magnitude (bladder volume difference) per algorithm, using the Independent Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The authors found good structure

  3. Validation of deformable image registration algorithms on CT images of ex vivo porcine bladders with fiducial markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S., E-mail: s.wognum@gmail.com; Heethuis, S. E.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosario, T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The spatial accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is important in the implementation of image guided adaptive radiotherapy techniques for cancer in the pelvic region. Validation of algorithms is best performed on phantoms with fiducial markers undergoing controlled large deformations. Excised porcine bladders, exhibiting similar filling and voiding behavior as human bladders, provide such an environment. The aim of this study was to determine the spatial accuracy of different DIR algorithms on CT images ofex vivo porcine bladders with radiopaque fiducial markers applied to the outer surface, for a range of bladder volumes, using various accuracy metrics. Methods: Five excised porcine bladders with a grid of 30–40 radiopaque fiducial markers attached to the outer wall were suspended inside a water-filled phantom. The bladder was filled with a controlled amount of water with added contrast medium for a range of filling volumes (100–400 ml in steps of 50 ml) using a luer lock syringe, and CT scans were acquired at each filling volume. DIR was performed for each data set, with the 100 ml bladder as the reference image. Six intensity-based algorithms (optical flow or demons-based) implemented in theMATLAB platform DIRART, a b-spline algorithm implemented in the commercial software package VelocityAI, and a structure-based algorithm (Symmetric Thin Plate Spline Robust Point Matching) were validated, using adequate parameter settings according to values previously published. The resulting deformation vector field from each registration was applied to the contoured bladder structures and to the marker coordinates for spatial error calculation. The quality of the algorithms was assessed by comparing the different error metrics across the different algorithms, and by comparing the effect of deformation magnitude (bladder volume difference) per algorithm, using the Independent Samples Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The authors found good structure

  4. CT image registration in sinogram space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Li, Tianfang; Wink, Nicole; Xing, Lei

    2007-09-01

    Object displacement in a CT scan is generally reflected in CT projection data or sinogram. In this work, the direct relationship between object motion and the change of CT projection data (sinogram) is investigated and this knowledge is applied to create a novel algorithm for sinogram registration. Calculated and experimental results demonstrate that the registration technique works well for registering rigid 2D or 3D motion in parallel and fan beam samplings. Problem and solution for 3D sinogram-based registration of metallic fiducials are also addressed. Since the motion is registered before image reconstruction, the presented algorithm is particularly useful when registering images with metal or truncation artifacts. In addition, this algorithm is valuable for dealing with situations where only limited projection data are available, making it appealing for various applications in image guided radiation therapy.

  5. Evaluation of registration methods on thoracic CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, K.; van Ginneken, B.; Reinhardt, J.

    2011-01-01

    method and the evaluation is independent, using the same criteria for all participants. All results are published on the EMPIRE10 website (http://empire10.isi.uu.nl). The challenge remains ongoing and open to new participants. Full results from 24 algorithms have been published at the time of writing......EMPIRE10 (Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image REgistration 2010) is a public platform for fair and meaningful comparison of registration algorithms which are applied to a database of intra-patient thoracic CT image pairs. Evaluation of non-rigid registration techniques is a non trivial task....... This article details the organisation of the challenge, the data and evaluation methods and the outcome of the initial launch with 20 algorithms. The gain in knowledge and future work are discussed....

  6. CT image registration in sinogram space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Weihua; Li Tianfang; Wink, Nicole; Xing Lei

    2007-01-01

    Object displacement in a CT scan is generally reflected in CT projection data or sinogram. In this work, the direct relationship between object motion and the change of CT projection data (sinogram) is investigated and this knowledge is applied to create a novel algorithm for sinogram registration. Calculated and experimental results demonstrate that the registration technique works well for registering rigid 2D or 3D motion in parallel and fan beam samplings. Problem and solution for 3D sinogram-based registration of metallic fiducials are also addressed. Since the motion is registered before image reconstruction, the presented algorithm is particularly useful when registering images with metal or truncation artifacts. In addition, this algorithm is valuable for dealing with situations where only limited projection data are available, making it appealing for various applications in image guided radiation therapy

  7. SU-F-J-88: Comparison of Two Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for CT-To-CT Contour Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, A; Xu, H; Chen, S [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the contour propagation accuracy of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms in the Raystation treatment planning system – the “Hybrid” algorithm based on image intensities and anatomical information; and the “Biomechanical” algorithm based on linear anatomical elasticity and finite element modeling. Methods: Both DIR algorithms were used for CT-to-CT deformation for 20 lung radiation therapy patients that underwent treatment plan revisions. Deformation accuracy was evaluated using landmark tracking to measure the target registration error (TRE) and inverse consistency error (ICE). The deformed contours were also evaluated against physician drawn contours using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC). Contour propagation was qualitatively assessed using a visual quality score assigned by physicians, and a refinement quality score (0algorithms showed similar ICE (< 1.5 mm), but the hybrid DIR (TRE = 3.2 mm) performed better than the biomechanical DIR (TRE = 4.3 mm) with landmark tracking. Both algorithms had comparable DSC (DSC > 0.9 for lungs, > 0.85 for heart, > 0.8 for liver) and similar qualitative assessments (VQS < 0.35, RQS > 0.75 for lungs). When anatomical structures were used to control the deformation, the DSC improved more significantly for the biomechanical DIR compared to the hybrid DIR, while the VQS and RQS improved only for the controlling structures. However, while the inclusion of controlling structures improved the TRE for the hybrid DIR, it increased the TRE for the biomechanical DIR. Conclusion: The hybrid DIR was found to perform slightly better than the biomechanical DIR based on lower TRE while the DSC, VQS, and RQS studies yielded comparable results for both. The use of controlling structures showed considerable improvement in the hybrid DIR results and is recommended for clinical use in

  8. Evaluation of linear registration algorithms for brain SPECT and the errors due to hypoperfusion lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radau, Perry E.; Slomka, Piotr J.; Julin, Per; Svensson, Leif; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2001-01-01

    The semiquantitative analysis of perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images requires a reproducible, objective method. Automated spatial standardization (registration) of images is a prerequisite to this goal. A source of registration error is the presence of hypoperfusion defects, which was evaluated in this study with simulated lesions. The brain perfusion images measured by 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT from 21 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 35 control subjects were retrospectively analyzed. An automatic segmentation method was developed to remove external activity. Three registration methods, robust least squares, normalized mutual information (NMI), and count difference were implemented and the effects of simulated defects were compared. The tested registration methods required segmentation of the cerebrum from external activity, and the automatic and manual methods differed by a three-dimensional displacement of 1.4±1.1 mm. NMI registration proved to be least adversely effected by simulated defects with 3 mm average displacement caused by severe defects. The error in quantifying the patient-template parietal ratio due to misregistration was 2.0% for large defects (70% hypoperfusion) and 0.5% for smaller defects (85% hypoperfusion)

  9. Parallel O(log n) algorithms for open- and closed-chain rigid multibody systems based on a new mass matrix factorization technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, parallel O(log n) algorithms for computation of rigid multibody dynamics are developed. These parallel algorithms are derived by parallelization of new O(n) algorithms for the problem. The underlying feature of these O(n) algorithms is a drastically different strategy for decomposition of interbody force which leads to a new factorization of the mass matrix (M). Specifically, it is shown that a factorization of the inverse of the mass matrix in the form of the Schur Complement is derived as M(exp -1) = C - B(exp *)A(exp -1)B, wherein matrices C, A, and B are block tridiagonal matrices. The new O(n) algorithm is then derived as a recursive implementation of this factorization of M(exp -1). For the closed-chain systems, similar factorizations and O(n) algorithms for computation of Operational Space Mass Matrix lambda and its inverse lambda(exp -1) are also derived. It is shown that these O(n) algorithms are strictly parallel, that is, they are less efficient than other algorithms for serial computation of the problem. But, to our knowledge, they are the only known algorithms that can be parallelized and that lead to both time- and processor-optimal parallel algorithms for the problem, i.e., parallel O(log n) algorithms with O(n) processors. The developed parallel algorithms, in addition to their theoretical significance, are also practical from an implementation point of view due to their simple architectural requirements.

  10. Non-Rigid Contour-Based Registration of Cell Nuclei in 2-D Live Cell Microscopy Images Using a Dynamic Elasticity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dmitry V; Peterlik, Igor; Tektonidis, Marco; Rohr, Karl; Matula, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of the pure motion of subnuclear structures without influence of the cell nucleus motion and deformation is essential in live cell imaging. In this paper, we propose a 2-D contour-based image registration approach for compensation of nucleus motion and deformation in fluorescence microscopy time-lapse sequences. The proposed approach extends our previous approach, which uses a static elasticity model to register cell images. Compared with that scheme, the new approach employs a dynamic elasticity model for the forward simulation of nucleus motion and deformation based on the motion of its contours. The contour matching process is embedded as a constraint into the system of equations describing the elastic behavior of the nucleus. This results in better performance in terms of the registration accuracy. Our approach was successfully applied to real live cell microscopy image sequences of different types of cells including image data that was specifically designed and acquired for evaluation of cell image registration methods. An experimental comparison with the existing contour-based registration methods and an intensity-based registration method has been performed. We also studied the dependence of the results on the choice of method parameters.

  11. a Robust Registration Algorithm for Point Clouds from Uav Images for Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawabdeh, A.; Al-Gurrani, H.; Al-Durgham, K.; Detchev, I.; He, F.; El-Sheimy, N.; Habib, A.

    2016-06-01

    Landslides are among the major threats to urban landscape and manmade infrastructure. They often cause economic losses, property damages, and loss of lives. Temporal monitoring data of landslides from different epochs empowers the evaluation of landslide progression. Alignment of overlapping surfaces from two or more epochs is crucial for the proper analysis of landslide dynamics. The traditional methods for point-cloud-based landslide monitoring rely on using a variation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) registration procedure to align any reconstructed surfaces from different epochs to a common reference frame. However, sometimes the ICP-based registration can fail or may not provide sufficient accuracy. For example, point clouds from different epochs might fit to local minima due to lack of geometrical variability within the data. Also, manual interaction is required to exclude any non-stable areas from the registration process. In this paper, a robust image-based registration method is introduced for the simultaneous evaluation of all registration parameters. This includes the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs) of the camera and the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs) of the involved images from all available observation epochs via a bundle block adjustment with self-calibration. Next, a semi-global dense matching technique is implemented to generate dense 3D point clouds for each epoch using the images captured in a particular epoch separately. The normal distances between any two consecutive point clouds can then be readily computed, because the point clouds are already effectively co-registered. A low-cost DJI Phantom II Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was customised and used in this research for temporal data collection over an active soil creep area in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. The customisation included adding a GPS logger and a Large-Field-Of-View (LFOV) action camera which facilitated capturing high-resolution geo-tagged images in two epochs

  12. SU-F-J-88: Comparison of Two Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for CT-To-CT Contour Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, A; Xu, H; Chen, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the contour propagation accuracy of two deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms in the Raystation treatment planning system – the “Hybrid” algorithm based on image intensities and anatomical information; and the “Biomechanical” algorithm based on linear anatomical elasticity and finite element modeling. Methods: Both DIR algorithms were used for CT-to-CT deformation for 20 lung radiation therapy patients that underwent treatment plan revisions. Deformation accuracy was evaluated using landmark tracking to measure the target registration error (TRE) and inverse consistency error (ICE). The deformed contours were also evaluated against physician drawn contours using Dice similarity coefficients (DSC). Contour propagation was qualitatively assessed using a visual quality score assigned by physicians, and a refinement quality score (0 0.9 for lungs, > 0.85 for heart, > 0.8 for liver) and similar qualitative assessments (VQS 0.75 for lungs). When anatomical structures were used to control the deformation, the DSC improved more significantly for the biomechanical DIR compared to the hybrid DIR, while the VQS and RQS improved only for the controlling structures. However, while the inclusion of controlling structures improved the TRE for the hybrid DIR, it increased the TRE for the biomechanical DIR. Conclusion: The hybrid DIR was found to perform slightly better than the biomechanical DIR based on lower TRE while the DSC, VQS, and RQS studies yielded comparable results for both. The use of controlling structures showed considerable improvement in the hybrid DIR results and is recommended for clinical use in contour propagation.

  13. Feasibility of Multimodal Deformable Registration for Head and Neck Tumor Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortunati, Valerio, E-mail: v.fortunati@erasmusmc.nl [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Verhaart, René F. [Hyperthermia Unit, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Angeloni, Francesco [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Foundation SDN for Research and High Education in Nuclear Diagnostics, Naples (Italy); Lugt, Aad van der [Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Veenland, Jifke F. [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Paulides, Margarethus M. [Hyperthermia Unit, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Walsum, Theo van [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using deformable registration in clinical practice to fuse MR and CT images of the head and neck for treatment planning. Method and Materials: A state-of-the-art deformable registration algorithm was optimized, evaluated, and compared with rigid registration. The evaluation was based on manually annotated anatomic landmarks and regions of interest in both modalities. We also developed a multiparametric registration approach, which simultaneously aligns T1- and T2-weighted MR sequences to CT. This was evaluated and compared with single-parametric approaches. Results: Our results show that deformable registration yielded a better accuracy than rigid registration, without introducing unrealistic deformations. For deformable registration, an average landmark alignment of approximatively 1.7 mm was obtained. For all the regions of interest excluding the cerebellum and the parotids, deformable registration provided a median modified Hausdorff distance of approximatively 1 mm. Similar accuracies were obtained for the single-parameter and multiparameter approaches. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that deformable registration of head-and-neck CT and MR images is feasible, with overall a significanlty higher accuracy than for rigid registration.

  14. Feasibility of Multimodal Deformable Registration for Head and Neck Tumor Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortunati, Valerio; Verhaart, René F.; Angeloni, Francesco; Lugt, Aad van der; Niessen, Wiro J.; Veenland, Jifke F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; Walsum, Theo van

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using deformable registration in clinical practice to fuse MR and CT images of the head and neck for treatment planning. Method and Materials: A state-of-the-art deformable registration algorithm was optimized, evaluated, and compared with rigid registration. The evaluation was based on manually annotated anatomic landmarks and regions of interest in both modalities. We also developed a multiparametric registration approach, which simultaneously aligns T1- and T2-weighted MR sequences to CT. This was evaluated and compared with single-parametric approaches. Results: Our results show that deformable registration yielded a better accuracy than rigid registration, without introducing unrealistic deformations. For deformable registration, an average landmark alignment of approximatively 1.7 mm was obtained. For all the regions of interest excluding the cerebellum and the parotids, deformable registration provided a median modified Hausdorff distance of approximatively 1 mm. Similar accuracies were obtained for the single-parameter and multiparameter approaches. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that deformable registration of head-and-neck CT and MR images is feasible, with overall a significanlty higher accuracy than for rigid registration

  15. Mass preserving image registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents results the mass preserving image registration method in the Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image Registration 2010 (EMPIRE10) Challenge. The mass preserving image registration algorithm was applied to the 20 image pairs. Registration was evaluated using four different...

  16. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lourenço, Ana Mónica [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Acoustics and Ionizing Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Mouinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; McClelland, Jamie R. [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used to propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of

  17. A ROBUST REGISTRATION ALGORITHM FOR POINT CLOUDS FROM UAV IMAGES FOR CHANGE DETECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Rawabdeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are among the major threats to urban landscape and manmade infrastructure. They often cause economic losses, property damages, and loss of lives. Temporal monitoring data of landslides from different epochs empowers the evaluation of landslide progression. Alignment of overlapping surfaces from two or more epochs is crucial for the proper analysis of landslide dynamics. The traditional methods for point-cloud-based landslide monitoring rely on using a variation of the Iterative Closest Point (ICP registration procedure to align any reconstructed surfaces from different epochs to a common reference frame. However, sometimes the ICP-based registration can fail or may not provide sufficient accuracy. For example, point clouds from different epochs might fit to local minima due to lack of geometrical variability within the data. Also, manual interaction is required to exclude any non-stable areas from the registration process. In this paper, a robust image-based registration method is introduced for the simultaneous evaluation of all registration parameters. This includes the Interior Orientation Parameters (IOPs of the camera and the Exterior Orientation Parameters (EOPs of the involved images from all available observation epochs via a bundle block adjustment with self-calibration. Next, a semi-global dense matching technique is implemented to generate dense 3D point clouds for each epoch using the images captured in a particular epoch separately. The normal distances between any two consecutive point clouds can then be readily computed, because the point clouds are already effectively co-registered. A low-cost DJI Phantom II Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV was customised and used in this research for temporal data collection over an active soil creep area in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. The customisation included adding a GPS logger and a Large-Field-Of-View (LFOV action camera which facilitated capturing high-resolution geo-tagged images

  18. A Novel Technique for Prealignment in Multimodality Medical Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorithm was proposed to determine the rotational differences between two images based on orientation histogram matching accumulated from local orientation of each pixel without any feature extraction. Experimental results showed that it was effective to acquire the orientation angle between two unregistered images with advantages over the existed method based on edge-map in multimodalities. Applying the orientation detection into the registration of CT/MR, T1/T2 MRI, and monomadality images with respect to rigid and nonrigid deformation improved the chances of finding the global optimization of the registration and reduced the search space of optimization.

  19. A multi-institution evaluation of deformable image registration algorithms for automatic organ delineation in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kumar, Prashant; Oechsner, Markus; Richter, Anne; Song, Shiyu; Myers, Michael; Polat, Bülent; Bzdusek, Karl; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Cannon, Donald M; Brouwer, Charlotte L; Wittendorp, Paul WH; Dogan, Nesrin; Guckenberger, Matthias; Allaire, Stéphane; Mallya, Yogish

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive Radiotherapy aims to identify anatomical deviations during a radiotherapy course and modify the treatment plan to maintain treatment objectives. This requires regions of interest (ROIs) to be defined using the most recent imaging data. This study investigates the clinical utility of using deformable image registration (DIR) to automatically propagate ROIs. Target (GTV) and organ-at-risk (OAR) ROIs were non-rigidly propagated from a planning CT scan to a per-treatment CT scan for 22 patients. Propagated ROIs were quantitatively compared with expert physician-drawn ROIs on the per-treatment scan using Dice scores and mean slicewise Hausdorff distances, and center of mass distances for GTVs. The propagated ROIs were qualitatively examined by experts and scored based on their clinical utility. Good agreement between the DIR-propagated ROIs and expert-drawn ROIs was observed based on the metrics used. 94% of all ROIs generated using DIR were scored as being clinically useful, requiring minimal or no edits. However, 27% (12/44) of the GTVs required major edits. DIR was successfully used on 22 patients to propagate target and OAR structures for ART with good anatomical agreement for OARs. It is recommended that propagated target structures be thoroughly reviewed by the treating physician

  20. Real Time Surface Registration for PET Motion Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    to create point clouds representing parts of the patient's face. The movement is estimated by a rigid registration of the point clouds. The registration should be done using a robust algorithm that can handle partial overlap and ideally operate in real time. We present an optimized Iterative Closest Point......Head movement during high resolution Positron Emission Tomography brain studies causes blur and artifacts in the images. Therefore, attempts are being made to continuously monitor the pose of the head and correct for this movement. Specifically, our method uses a structured light scanner system...... algorithm that operates at 10 frames per second on partial human face surfaces. © 2011 Springer-Verlag....

  1. Convex Hull Aided Registration Method (CHARM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jingfan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Yitian; Ai, Danni; Liu, Yonghuai; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yongtian

    2017-09-01

    Non-rigid registration finds many applications such as photogrammetry, motion tracking, model retrieval, and object recognition. In this paper we propose a novel convex hull aided registration method (CHARM) to match two point sets subject to a non-rigid transformation. First, two convex hulls are extracted from the source and target respectively. Then, all points of the point sets are projected onto the reference plane through each triangular facet of the hulls. From these projections, invariant features are extracted and matched optimally. The matched feature point pairs are mapped back onto the triangular facets of the convex hulls to remove outliers that are outside any relevant triangular facet. The rigid transformation from the source to the target is robustly estimated by the random sample consensus (RANSAC) scheme through minimizing the distance between the matched feature point pairs. Finally, these feature points are utilized as the control points to achieve non-rigid deformation in the form of thin-plate spline of the entire source point set towards the target one. The experimental results based on both synthetic and real data show that the proposed algorithm outperforms several state-of-the-art ones with respect to sampling, rotational angle, and data noise. In addition, the proposed CHARM algorithm also shows higher computational efficiency compared to these methods.

  2. Image registration algorithm for high-voltage electric power live line working robot based on binocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengqi; Ren, Zhigang; Yang, Bo; An, Qinghao; Yu, Xiangru; Li, Jinping

    2017-12-01

    In the process of dismounting and assembling the drop switch for the high-voltage electric power live line working (EPL2W) robot, one of the key problems is the precision of positioning for manipulators, gripper and the bolts used to fix drop switch. To solve it, we study the binocular vision system theory of the robot and the characteristic of dismounting and assembling drop switch. We propose a coarse-to-fine image registration algorithm based on image correlation, which can improve the positioning precision of manipulators and bolt significantly. The algorithm performs the following three steps: firstly, the target points are marked respectively in the right and left visions, and then the system judges whether the target point in right vision can satisfy the lowest registration accuracy by using the similarity of target points' backgrounds in right and left visions, this is a typical coarse-to-fine strategy; secondly, the system calculates the epipolar line, and then the regional sequence existing matching points is generated according to neighborhood of epipolar line, the optimal matching image is confirmed by calculating the similarity between template image in left vision and the region in regional sequence according to correlation matching; finally, the precise coordinates of target points in right and left visions are calculated according to the optimal matching image. The experiment results indicate that the positioning accuracy of image coordinate is within 2 pixels, the positioning accuracy in the world coordinate system is within 3 mm, the positioning accuracy of binocular vision satisfies the requirement dismounting and assembling the drop switch.

  3. A Scheduling Algorithm for the Distributed Student Registration System in Transaction-Intensive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhao

    2011-01-01

    Distributed workflow technology has been widely used in modern education and e-business systems. Distributed web applications have shown cross-domain and cooperative characteristics to meet the need of current distributed workflow applications. In this paper, the author proposes a dynamic and adaptive scheduling algorithm PCSA (Pre-Calculated…

  4. SU-E-J-209: Verification of 3D Surface Registration Between Stereograms and CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, T; Gifford, K [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, B [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, M [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereography can provide a visualization of the skin surface for radiation therapy patients. The aim of this study was to verify the registration algorithm in a commercial image analysis software, 3dMDVultus, for the fusion of stereograms and CT images. Methods: CT and stereographic scans were acquired of a head phantom and a deformable phantom. CT images were imported in 3dMDVultus and the surface contours were generated by threshold segmentation. Stereograms were reconstructed in 3dMDVultus. The resulting surfaces were registered with Vultus algorithm and then exported to in-house registration software and compared with four algorithms: rigid, affine, non-rigid iterative closest point (ICP) and b-spline algorithm. RMS (root-mean-square residuals of the surface point distances) error between the registered CT and stereogram surfaces was calculated and analyzed. Results: For the head phantom, the maximum RMS error between registered CT surfaces to stereogram was 6.6 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 0.7 mm. For the deformable phantom, the maximum RMS error was 16.2 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 4.4 mm. Non-rigid ICP demonstrated the best registration accuracy, as the mean of RMS errors were both within 1 mm. Conclusion: The accuracy of registration algorithm in 3dMDVultus was verified and exceeded RMS of 2 mm for deformable cases. Non-rigid ICP and b-spline algorithms improve the registration accuracy for both phantoms, especially in deformable one. For those patients whose body habitus deforms during radiation therapy, more advanced nonrigid algorithms need to be used.

  5. Minimally invasive registration for computer-assisted orthopedic surgery: combining tracked ultrasound and bone surface points via the P-IMLOP algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Seth; Kang, Hyun Jae; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad; Kazanzides, Peter; Taylor, Russell

    2015-06-01

    We present a registration method for computer-assisted total hip replacement (THR) surgery, which we demonstrate to improve the state of the art by both reducing the invasiveness of current methods and increasing registration accuracy. A critical element of computer-guided procedures is the determination of the spatial correspondence between the patient and a computational model of patient anatomy. The current method for establishing this correspondence in robot-assisted THR is to register points intraoperatively sampled by a tracked pointer from the exposed proximal femur and, via auxiliary incisions, from the distal femur. In this paper, we demonstrate a noninvasive technique for sampling points on the distal femur using tracked B-mode ultrasound imaging and present a new algorithm for registering these data called Projected Iterative Most-Likely Oriented Point (P-IMLOP). Points and normal orientations of the distal bone surface are segmented from ultrasound images and registered to the patient model along with points sampled from the exposed proximal femur via a tracked pointer. The proposed approach is evaluated using a bone- and tissue-mimicking leg phantom constructed to enable accurate assessment of experimental registration accuracy with respect to a CT-image-based model of the phantom. These experiments demonstrate that localization of the femur shaft is greatly improved by tracked ultrasound. The experiments further demonstrate that, for ultrasound-based data, the P-IMLOP algorithm significantly improves registration accuracy compared to the standard ICP algorithm. Registration via tracked ultrasound and the P-IMLOP algorithm has high potential to reduce the invasiveness and improve the registration accuracy of computer-assisted orthopedic procedures.

  6. A novel Gravity-FREAK feature extraction and Gravity-KLT tracking registration algorithm based on iPhone MEMS mobile sensor in mobile environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhiling; Lin, Fan; Xiao, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Based on the traditional Fast Retina Keypoint (FREAK) feature description algorithm, this paper proposed a Gravity-FREAK feature description algorithm based on Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS) sensor to overcome the limited computing performance and memory resources of mobile devices and further improve the reality interaction experience of clients through digital information added to the real world by augmented reality technology. The algorithm takes the gravity projection vector corresponding to the feature point as its feature orientation, which saved the time of calculating the neighborhood gray gradient of each feature point, reduced the cost of calculation and improved the accuracy of feature extraction. In the case of registration method of matching and tracking natural features, the adaptive and generic corner detection based on the Gravity-FREAK matching purification algorithm was used to eliminate abnormal matches, and Gravity Kaneda-Lucas Tracking (KLT) algorithm based on MEMS sensor can be used for the tracking registration of the targets and robustness improvement of tracking registration algorithm under mobile environment.

  7. A novel Gravity-FREAK feature extraction and Gravity-KLT tracking registration algorithm based on iPhone MEMS mobile sensor in mobile environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Hong

    Full Text Available Based on the traditional Fast Retina Keypoint (FREAK feature description algorithm, this paper proposed a Gravity-FREAK feature description algorithm based on Micro-electromechanical Systems (MEMS sensor to overcome the limited computing performance and memory resources of mobile devices and further improve the reality interaction experience of clients through digital information added to the real world by augmented reality technology. The algorithm takes the gravity projection vector corresponding to the feature point as its feature orientation, which saved the time of calculating the neighborhood gray gradient of each feature point, reduced the cost of calculation and improved the accuracy of feature extraction. In the case of registration method of matching and tracking natural features, the adaptive and generic corner detection based on the Gravity-FREAK matching purification algorithm was used to eliminate abnormal matches, and Gravity Kaneda-Lucas Tracking (KLT algorithm based on MEMS sensor can be used for the tracking registration of the targets and robustness improvement of tracking registration algorithm under mobile environment.

  8. Algorithm for personal identification in distance learning system based on registration of keyboard rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, P. V.; Savinov, A. N.; Bazhenov, R. I.; Sivandaev, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    The article describes the method of identifying a person in distance learning systems based on a keyboard rhythm. An algorithm for the organization of access control is proposed, which implements authentication, identification and verification of a person using the keyboard rhythm. Authentication methods based on biometric personal parameters, including those based on the keyboard rhythm, due to the inexistence of biometric characteristics without a particular person, are able to provide an advanced accuracy and inability to refuse authorship and convenience for operators of automated systems, in comparison with other methods of conformity checking. Methods of permanent hidden keyboard monitoring allow detecting the substitution of a student and blocking the key system.

  9. An automatic MRI/SPECT registration algorithm using image intensity and anatomical feature as matching characters: application on the evaluation of Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.-D.; Huang, C.-H.; Weng, Y.-H.; Lin, K.-J.; Chen, C.-T.

    2007-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of dopamine transporters with 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 has recently been proposed to offer valuable information in assessing the functionality of dopaminergic systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and SPECT imaging are important in the noninvasive examination of dopamine concentration in vivo. Therefore, this investigation presents an automated MRI/SPECT image registration algorithm based on a new similarity metric. This similarity metric combines anatomical features that are characterized by specific binding, the mean count per voxel in putamens and caudate nuclei, and the distribution of image intensity that is characterized by normalized mutual information (NMI). A preprocess, a novel two-cluster SPECT normalization algorithm, is also presented for MRI/SPECT registration. Clinical MRI/SPECT data from 18 healthy subjects and 13 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are involved to validate the performance of the proposed algorithms. An appropriate color map, such as 'rainbow,' for image display enables the two-cluster SPECT normalization algorithm to provide clinically meaningful visual contrast. The proposed registration scheme reduces target registration error from >7 mm for conventional registration algorithm based on NMI to approximately 4 mm. The error in the specific/nonspecific 99m Tc-TRODAT-1 binding ratio, which is employed as a quantitative measure of TRODAT receptor binding, is also reduced from 0.45±0.22 to 0.08±0.06 among healthy subjects and from 0.28±0.18 to 0.12±0.09 among PD patients

  10. A Variational Approach to Video Registration with Subspace Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravi; Roussos, Anastasios; Agapito, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of non-rigid video registration, or the computation of optical flow from a reference frame to each of the subsequent images in a sequence, when the camera views deformable objects. We exploit the high correlation between 2D trajectories of different points on the same non-rigid surface by assuming that the displacement of any point throughout the sequence can be expressed in a compact way as a linear combination of a low-rank motion basis. This subspace constraint effectively acts as a trajectory regularization term leading to temporally consistent optical flow. We formulate it as a robust soft constraint within a variational framework by penalizing flow fields that lie outside the low-rank manifold. The resulting energy functional can be decoupled into the optimization of the brightness constancy and spatial regularization terms, leading to an efficient optimization scheme. Additionally, we propose a novel optimization scheme for the case of vector valued images, based on the dualization of the data term. This allows us to extend our approach to deal with colour images which results in significant improvements on the registration results. Finally, we provide a new benchmark dataset, based on motion capture data of a flag waving in the wind, with dense ground truth optical flow for evaluation of multi-frame optical flow algorithms for non-rigid surfaces. Our experiments show that our proposed approach outperforms state of the art optical flow and dense non-rigid registration algorithms.

  11. A real-time dynamic-MLC control algorithm for delivering IMRT to targets undergoing 2D rigid motion in the beam's eye view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Ryan; Berbeco, Ross; Nishioka, Seiko; Ishikawa, Masayori; Papiez, Lech

    2008-01-01

    An MLC control algorithm for delivering intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to targets that are undergoing two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view (BEV) is presented. The goal of this method is to deliver 3D-derived fluence maps over a moving patient anatomy. Target motion measured prior to delivery is first used to design a set of planned dynamic-MLC (DMLC) sliding-window leaf trajectories. During actual delivery, the algorithm relies on real-time feedback to compensate for target motion that does not agree with the motion measured during planning. The methodology is based on an existing one-dimensional (1D) algorithm that uses on-the-fly intensity calculations to appropriately adjust the DMLC leaf trajectories in real-time during exposure delivery [McMahon et al., Med. Phys. 34, 3211-3223 (2007)]. To extend the 1D algorithm's application to 2D target motion, a real-time leaf-pair shifting mechanism has been developed. Target motion that is orthogonal to leaf travel is tracked by appropriately shifting the positions of all MLC leaves. The performance of the tracking algorithm was tested for a single beam of a fractionated IMRT treatment, using a clinically derived intensity profile and a 2D target trajectory based on measured patient data. Comparisons were made between 2D tracking, 1D tracking, and no tracking. The impact of the tracking lag time and the frequency of real-time imaging were investigated. A study of the dependence of the algorithm's performance on the level of agreement between the motion measured during planning and delivery was also included. Results demonstrated that tracking both components of the 2D motion (i.e., parallel and orthogonal to leaf travel) results in delivered fluence profiles that are superior to those that track the component of motion that is parallel to leaf travel alone. Tracking lag time effects may lead to relatively large intensity delivery errors compared to the other sources of error investigated

  12. Solvent-assisted multistage nonequilibrium electron transfer in rigid supramolecular systems: Diabatic free energy surfaces and algorithms for numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feskov, Serguei V.; Ivanov, Anatoly I.

    2018-03-01

    An approach to the construction of diabatic free energy surfaces (FESs) for ultrafast electron transfer (ET) in a supramolecule with an arbitrary number of electron localization centers (redox sites) is developed, supposing that the reorganization energies for the charge transfers and shifts between all these centers are known. Dimensionality of the coordinate space required for the description of multistage ET in this supramolecular system is shown to be equal to N - 1, where N is the number of the molecular centers involved in the reaction. The proposed algorithm of FES construction employs metric properties of the coordinate space, namely, relation between the solvent reorganization energy and the distance between the two FES minima. In this space, the ET reaction coordinate zn n' associated with electron transfer between the nth and n'th centers is calculated through the projection to the direction, connecting the FES minima. The energy-gap reaction coordinates zn n' corresponding to different ET processes are not in general orthogonal so that ET between two molecular centers can create nonequilibrium distribution, not only along its own reaction coordinate but along other reaction coordinates too. This results in the influence of the preceding ET steps on the kinetics of the ensuing ET. It is important for the ensuing reaction to be ultrafast to proceed in parallel with relaxation along the ET reaction coordinates. Efficient algorithms for numerical simulation of multistage ET within the stochastic point-transition model are developed. The algorithms are based on the Brownian simulation technique with the recrossing-event detection procedure. The main advantages of the numerical method are (i) its computational complexity is linear with respect to the number of electronic states involved and (ii) calculations can be naturally parallelized up to the level of individual trajectories. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated for a model

  13. Voxel-based morphometric analysis in hypothyroidism using diffeomorphic anatomic registration via an exponentiated lie algebra algorithm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Modi, S; Bagga, D; Kaur, P; Shankar, L R; Khushu, S

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether brain morphological differences exist between adult hypothyroid subjects and age-matched controls using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) with diffeomorphic anatomic registration via an exponentiated lie algebra algorithm (DARTEL) approach. High-resolution structural magnetic resonance images were taken in ten healthy controls and ten hypothyroid subjects. The analysis was conducted using statistical parametric mapping. The VBM study revealed a reduction in grey matter volume in the left postcentral gyrus and cerebellum of hypothyroid subjects compared to controls. A significant reduction in white matter volume was also found in the cerebellum, right inferior and middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, right inferior occipital gyrus and right temporal gyrus of hypothyroid patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, no meaningful cluster for greater grey or white matter volume was obtained in hypothyroid subjects compared to controls. Our study is the first VBM study of hypothyroidism in an adult population and suggests that, compared to controls, this disorder is associated with differences in brain morphology in areas corresponding to known functional deficits in attention, language, motor speed, visuospatial processing and memory in hypothyroidism. © 2012 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  14. Co-registration of the BNCT treatment planning images for clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salli, Eero; Seppaelae, Tiina; Kankaanranta, Leena; Asikainen, Sami; Savolainen, Sauli; Koivunoro, Hanna

    2006-01-01

    We have co-registered MRI, CT and FBPA-PET images for BNCT in clinical practice. Co-registration improves the spatial accuracy of the treatment planning by enabling use of information from all the co-registered modalities. The multimodal co-registration has been implemented as a service product provided by the Imaging Center of Helsinki University Central Hospital to other departments. To increase the accuracy of co-registration and patient positioning in the head area BNCT, a patient-specific fixation mask suitable for PET, MRI and CT was developed. The goal of the fixation mask is to normalize the orientation of the patient's head and neck. Co-registration is performed at the image processing unit by using a rigid body model, mutual-information based algorithms and partly in-house developed software tools. The accuracy of co-registration is verified by comparing the locations of the external skin markers and anatomical landmarks in different modalities. After co-registration, the images are transformed and covered into a format required by the BNCT dose-planning software and set to the dose-planning unit of the hospital. So far co-registration has been done for 22 patients. The co-registration protocol has proved to be reliable and efficient. Some registration errors are seen on some patients in the neck area because the rigid-body model used in co-registration is not fully valid for the brain-neck entity. The registration accuracy in this area could likely be improved by implementing a co-registration procedure utilizing a partly non-rigid body model. (author)

  15. An efficient direct method for image registration of flat objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Dmitry; Tihonkih, Dmitrii; Makovetskii, Artyom; Voronin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    Image alignment of rigid surfaces is a rapidly developing area of research and has many practical applications. Alignment methods can be roughly divided into two types: feature-based methods and direct methods. Known SURF and SIFT algorithms are examples of the feature-based methods. Direct methods refer to those that exploit the pixel intensities without resorting to image features and image-based deformations are general direct method to align images of deformable objects in 3D space. Nevertheless, it is not good for the registration of images of 3D rigid objects since the underlying structure cannot be directly evaluated. In the article, we propose a model that is suitable for image alignment of rigid flat objects under various illumination models. The brightness consistency assumptions used for reconstruction of optimal geometrical transformation. Computer simulation results are provided to illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithm for computing of an accordance between pixels of two images.

  16. Increasing feasibility of the field-programmable gate array implementation of an iterative image registration using a kernel-warping algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An Hung; Guillemette, Thomas; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.; Garratt, Matthew A.

    2017-09-01

    Image registration is a fundamental image processing technique. It is used to spatially align two or more images that have been captured at different times, from different sensors, or from different viewpoints. There have been many algorithms proposed for this task. The most common of these being the well-known Lucas-Kanade (LK) and Horn-Schunck approaches. However, the main limitation of these approaches is the computational complexity required to implement the large number of iterations necessary for successful alignment of the images. Previously, a multi-pass image interpolation algorithm (MP-I2A) was developed to considerably reduce the number of iterations required for successful registration compared with the LK algorithm. This paper develops a kernel-warping algorithm (KWA), a modified version of the MP-I2A, which requires fewer iterations to successfully register two images and less memory space for the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation than the MP-I2A. These reductions increase feasibility of the implementation of the proposed algorithm on FPGAs with very limited memory space and other hardware resources. A two-FPGA system rather than single FPGA system is successfully developed to implement the KWA in order to compensate insufficiency of hardware resources supported by one FPGA, and increase parallel processing ability and scalability of the system.

  17. Canny edge-based deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Huang, Yihui; Mao, Weihua; Yuan, Baohong; Tang, Liping

    2017-02-07

    This work focuses on developing a 2D Canny edge-based deformable image registration (Canny DIR) algorithm to register in vivo white light images taken at various time points. This method uses a sparse interpolation deformation algorithm to sparsely register regions of the image with strong edge information. A stability criterion is enforced which removes regions of edges that do not deform in a smooth uniform manner. Using a synthetic mouse surface ground truth model, the accuracy of the Canny DIR algorithm was evaluated under axial rotation in the presence of deformation. The accuracy was also tested using fluorescent dye injections, which were then used for gamma analysis to establish a second ground truth. The results indicate that the Canny DIR algorithm performs better than rigid registration, intensity corrected Demons, and distinctive features for all evaluation matrices and ground truth scenarios. In conclusion Canny DIR performs well in the presence of the unique lighting and shading variations associated with white-light-based image registration.

  18. 3D full-field quantification of cell-induced large deformations in fibrillar biomaterials by combining non-rigid image registration with label-free second harmonic generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Bové, Hannelore; Sanen, Kathleen; Vaeyens, Marie-Mo; Steuwe, Christian; Roeffaers, Maarten; Ameloot, Marcel; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2017-08-01

    To advance our current understanding of cell-matrix mechanics and its importance for biomaterials development, advanced three-dimensional (3D) measurement techniques are necessary. Cell-induced deformations of the surrounding matrix are commonly derived from the displacement of embedded fiducial markers, as part of traction force microscopy (TFM) procedures. However, these fluorescent markers may alter the mechanical properties of the matrix or can be taken up by the embedded cells, and therefore influence cellular behavior and fate. In addition, the currently developed methods for calculating cell-induced deformations are generally limited to relatively small deformations, with displacement magnitudes and strains typically of the order of a few microns and less than 10% respectively. Yet, large, complex deformation fields can be expected from cells exerting tractions in fibrillar biomaterials, like collagen. To circumvent these hurdles, we present a technique for the 3D full-field quantification of large cell-generated deformations in collagen, without the need of fiducial markers. We applied non-rigid, Free Form Deformation (FFD)-based image registration to compute full-field displacements induced by MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts in a collagen type I hydrogel by solely relying on second harmonic generation (SHG) from the collagen fibrils. By executing comparative experiments, we show that comparable displacement fields can be derived from both fibrils and fluorescent beads. SHG-based fibril imaging can circumvent all described disadvantages of using fiducial markers. This approach allows measuring 3D full-field deformations under large displacement (of the order of 10 μm) and strain regimes (up to 40%). As such, it holds great promise for the study of large cell-induced deformations as an inherent component of cell-biomaterial interactions and cell-mediated biomaterial remodeling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fast and accurate registration of cranial CT images with A-mode ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, Lorenz; Schmieder, Kirsten; Engelhardt, Martin; Pasalic, Lamija; Radermacher, Klaus; Heger, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Within the CRANIO project, a navigation module based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) data was developed for Computer and Robot Assisted Neurosurgery. The approach followed for non-invasive user-interactive registration of cranial CT images with the physical operating space consists of surface-based registration following pre-registration based on anatomical landmarks. Surface-based registration relies on bone surface points digitized transcutaneously by means of an optically tracked A-mode ultrasound (US) probe. As probe alignment and thus bone surface point digitization may be time-consuming, we investigated how to obtain high registration accuracy despite inaccurate pre-registration and a limited number of digitized bone surface points. Furthermore, we aimed at efficient man-machine-interaction during the probe alignment process. Finally, we addressed the problem of registration plausibility estimation in our approach. We modified the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, presented by Besl and McKay and frequently used for surface-based registration, such that it can escape from local minima of the cost function to be iteratively minimized. The random-based ICP (R-ICP) we developed is less influenced by the quality of the pre-registration as it can escape from local minima close to the starting point for iterative optimization in the 6D domain of rigid transformations. The R-ICP is also better suited to approximate the global minimum as it can escape from local minima in the vicinity of the global minimum, too. Furthermore, we developed both CT-less and CT-based probe alignment tools along with appropriate man-machine strategies for a more time-efficient palpation process. To improve registration reliability, we developed a simple plausibility test based on data readily available after registration. In a cadaver study, where we evaluated the R-ICP algorithm, the probe alignment tools, and the plausibility test, the R-ICP algorithm consistently

  20. Successive approximation algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakami, Raiko; Hiroshima, Kyoichi; Nishino, Junji

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images. We have already proposed an automatic registration method based on the detection of local movements. When motion of the object is large, it is difficult to estimate the exact movement, and the cancellation of artifacts may therefore fail. The algorithm we propose here is based on a simple rigid model. We present the results of applying the proposed method to a series of experimental X-ray images, as well as the results of applying the algorithm as preprocessing for a registration method based on local movement. (author)

  1. 3D ultrasound-CT registration of the liver using combined landmark-intensity information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Thomas; Schlag, Peter M.; Papenberg, Nils; Heldmann, Stefan; Modersitzki, Jan; Fischer, Bernd; Lamecker, Hans

    2009-01-01

    An important issue in computer-assisted surgery of the liver is a fast and reliable transfer of preoperative resection plans to the intraoperative situation. One problem is to match the planning data, derived from preoperative CT or MR images, with 3D ultrasound images of the liver, acquired during surgery. As the liver deforms significantly in the intraoperative situation non-rigid registration is necessary. This is a particularly challenging task because pre- and intraoperative image data stem from different modalities and ultrasound images are generally very noisy. One way to overcome these problems is to incorporate prior knowledge into the registration process. We propose a method of combining anatomical landmark information with a fast non-parametric intensity registration approach. Mathematically, this leads to a constrained optimization problem. As distance measure we use the normalized gradient field which allows for multimodal image registration. A qualitative and quantitative validation on clinical liver data sets of three different patients has been performed. We used the distance of dense corresponding points on vessel center lines for quantitative validation. The combined landmark and intensity approach improves the mean and percentage of point distances above 3 mm compared to rigid and thin-plate spline registration based only on landmarks. The proposed algorithm offers the possibility to incorporate additional a priori knowledge - in terms of few landmarks - provided by a human expert into a non-rigid registration process. (orig.)

  2. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-07

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency.

  3. Automated landmark-guided deformable image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, Vasant; Chen, Susie; Gu, Xuejun; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Jing; Yordy, John; Nedzi, Lucien; Mao, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an automated landmark-guided deformable image registration (LDIR) algorithm between the planning CT and daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) with low image quality. This method uses an automated landmark generation algorithm in conjunction with a local small volume gradient matching search engine to map corresponding landmarks between the CBCT and the planning CT. The landmarks act as stabilizing control points in the following Demons deformable image registration. LDIR is implemented on graphics processing units (GPUs) for parallel computation to achieve ultra fast calculation. The accuracy of the LDIR algorithm has been evaluated on a synthetic case in the presence of different noise levels and data of six head and neck cancer patients. The results indicate that LDIR performed better than rigid registration, Demons, and intensity corrected Demons for all similarity metrics used. In conclusion, LDIR achieves high accuracy in the presence of multimodality intensity mismatch and CBCT noise contamination, while simultaneously preserving high computational efficiency. (paper)

  4. SU-C-BRA-07: Variability of Patient-Specific Motion Models Derived Using Different Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhou, S; Williams, C [Brigham and Women’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Ionascu, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Lewis, J [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the variability of patient-specific motion models derived from 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) images using different deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients. Methods: Motion models are derived by 1) applying DIR between each 4DCT image and a reference image, resulting in a set of displacement vector fields (DVFs), and 2) performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the DVFs, resulting in a motion model (a set of eigenvectors capturing the variations in the DVFs). Three DIR algorithms were used: 1) Demons, 2) Horn-Schunck, and 3) iterative optical flow. The motion models derived were compared using patient 4DCT scans. Results: Motion models were derived and the variations were evaluated according to three criteria: 1) the average root mean square (RMS) difference which measures the absolute difference between the components of the eigenvectors, 2) the dot product between the eigenvectors which measures the angular difference between the eigenvectors in space, and 3) the Euclidean Model Norm (EMN), which is calculated by summing the dot products of an eigenvector with the first three eigenvectors from the reference motion model in quadrature. EMN measures how well an eigenvector can be reconstructed using another motion model derived using a different DIR algorithm. Results showed that comparing to a reference motion model (derived using the Demons algorithm), the eigenvectors of the motion model derived using the iterative optical flow algorithm has smaller RMS, larger dot product, and larger EMN values than those of the motion model derived using Horn-Schunck algorithm. Conclusion: The study showed that motion models vary depending on which DIR algorithms were used to derive them. The choice of a DIR algorithm may affect the accuracy of the resulting model, and it is important to assess the suitability of the algorithm chosen for a particular application. This project was supported

  5. SU-C-BRA-07: Variability of Patient-Specific Motion Models Derived Using Different Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Lung Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhou, S; Williams, C; Ionascu, D; Lewis, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the variability of patient-specific motion models derived from 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) images using different deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients. Methods: Motion models are derived by 1) applying DIR between each 4DCT image and a reference image, resulting in a set of displacement vector fields (DVFs), and 2) performing principal component analysis (PCA) on the DVFs, resulting in a motion model (a set of eigenvectors capturing the variations in the DVFs). Three DIR algorithms were used: 1) Demons, 2) Horn-Schunck, and 3) iterative optical flow. The motion models derived were compared using patient 4DCT scans. Results: Motion models were derived and the variations were evaluated according to three criteria: 1) the average root mean square (RMS) difference which measures the absolute difference between the components of the eigenvectors, 2) the dot product between the eigenvectors which measures the angular difference between the eigenvectors in space, and 3) the Euclidean Model Norm (EMN), which is calculated by summing the dot products of an eigenvector with the first three eigenvectors from the reference motion model in quadrature. EMN measures how well an eigenvector can be reconstructed using another motion model derived using a different DIR algorithm. Results showed that comparing to a reference motion model (derived using the Demons algorithm), the eigenvectors of the motion model derived using the iterative optical flow algorithm has smaller RMS, larger dot product, and larger EMN values than those of the motion model derived using Horn-Schunck algorithm. Conclusion: The study showed that motion models vary depending on which DIR algorithms were used to derive them. The choice of a DIR algorithm may affect the accuracy of the resulting model, and it is important to assess the suitability of the algorithm chosen for a particular application. This project was supported

  6. Fast time-of-flight camera based surface registration for radiotherapy patient positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placht, Simon; Stancanello, Joseph; Schaller, Christian; Balda, Michael; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This work introduces a rigid registration framework for patient positioning in radiotherapy, based on real-time surface acquisition by a time-of-flight (ToF) camera. Dynamic properties of the system are also investigated for future gating/tracking strategies. Methods: A novel preregistration algorithm, based on translation and rotation-invariant features representing surface structures, was developed. Using these features, corresponding three-dimensional points were computed in order to determine initial registration parameters. These parameters became a robust input to an accelerated version of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm for the fine-tuning of the registration result. Distance calibration and Kalman filtering were used to compensate for ToF-camera dependent noise. Additionally, the advantage of using the feature based preregistration over an ''ICP only'' strategy was evaluated, as well as the robustness of the rigid-transformation-based method to deformation. Results: The proposed surface registration method was validated using phantom data. A mean target registration error (TRE) for translations and rotations of 1.62 ± 1.08 mm and 0.07 deg. ± 0.05 deg., respectively, was achieved. There was a temporal delay of about 65 ms in the registration output, which can be seen as negligible considering the dynamics of biological systems. Feature based preregistration allowed for accurate and robust registrations even at very large initial displacements. Deformations affected the accuracy of the results, necessitating particular care in cases of deformed surfaces. Conclusions: The proposed solution is able to solve surface registration problems with an accuracy suitable for radiotherapy cases where external surfaces offer primary or complementary information to patient positioning. The system shows promising dynamic properties for its use in gating/tracking applications. The overall system is competitive with commonly-used surface registration

  7. 3D registration of surfaces for change detection in medical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Elizabeth; van der Stelt, Paul F.; Dunn, Stanley M.

    1997-04-01

    Spatial registration of data sets is essential for quantifying changes that take place over time in cases where the position of a patient with respect to the sensor has been altered. Changes within the region of interest can be problematic for automatic methods of registration. This research addresses the problem of automatic 3D registration of surfaces derived from serial, single-modality images for the purpose of quantifying changes over time. The registration algorithm utilizes motion-invariant, curvature- based geometric properties to derive an approximation to an initial rigid transformation to align two image sets. Following the initial registration, changed portions of the surface are detected and excluded before refining the transformation parameters. The performance of the algorithm was tested using simulation experiments. To quantitatively assess the registration, random noise at various levels, known rigid motion transformations, and analytically-defined volume changes were applied to the initial surface data acquired from models of teeth. These simulation experiments demonstrated that the calculated transformation parameters were accurate to within 1.2 percent of the total applied rotation and 2.9 percent of the total applied translation, even at the highest applied noise levels and simulated wear values.

  8. Objective and expert-independent validation of retinal image registration algorithms by a projective imaging distortion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangyeol; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Cattin, Philippe C; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2010-08-01

    Fundus camera imaging of the retina is widely used to diagnose and manage ophthalmologic disorders including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Retinal images typically have a limited field of view, and multiple images can be joined together using an image registration technique to form a montage with a larger field of view. A variety of methods for retinal image registration have been proposed, but evaluating such methods objectively is difficult due to the lack of a reference standard for the true alignment of the individual images that make up the montage. A method of generating simulated retinal images by modeling the geometric distortions due to the eye geometry and the image acquisition process is described in this paper. We also present a validation process that can be used for any retinal image registration method by tracing through the distortion path and assessing the geometric misalignment in the coordinate system of the reference standard. The proposed method can be used to perform an accuracy evaluation over the whole image, so that distortion in the non-overlapping regions of the montage components can be easily assessed. We demonstrate the technique by generating test image sets with a variety of overlap conditions and compare the accuracy of several retinal image registration models. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, E S; Muren, L P; Sørensen, T S

    2012-01-01

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR)...

  10. Use of articulated registration for response assessment of individual metastatic bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Stephen; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Accurate skeleton registration is necessary to match corresponding metastatic bone lesions for response assessment over multiple scans. In articulated registration (ART), whole-body skeletons are registered by auto-segmenting individual bones, then rigidly aligning them. Performance and robustness of the ART in lesion matching were evaluated and compared to other commonly used registration techniques. Sixteen prostate cancer patients were treated either with molecular targeted therapy or chemotherapy. Ten out of the 16 patients underwent the double baseline whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans for test-retest (TRT) evaluation. Twelve of the 16 patients underwent pre- and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Skeletons at different time points were registered using ART, rigid, and deformable (DR) registration algorithms. The corresponding lesions were contoured and identified on successive PET images based on including the voxels with the standardized uptake value over 15. Each algorithm was evaluated for its ability to accurately align corresponding lesions via skeleton registration. A lesion matching score (MS) was measured for each lesion, which quantified the per cent overlap between the lesion's two corresponding contours. Three separate sensitivity studies were conducted to investigate the robustness of ART in matching: sensitivity of lesion matching to various contouring threshold levels, effects of imperfections in the bone auto-segmentation and sensitivity of mis-registration. The performance of ART (MS = 82% for both datasets, p ≪ 0.001) in lesion matching was significantly better than rigid (MS TRT  = 53%, MS Response  = 46%) and DR (MS TRT  = 46%, MS Response  = 45%) algorithms. Neither varying threshold levels for lesion contouring nor imperfect bone segmentation had significant (p∼0.10) impact on the ART matching performance as the MS remained unchanged. Despite the mis-registration reduced MS for ART, as low as 67% (p ≪ 0.001), the

  11. Efficient nonrigid registration using ranked order statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tennakoon, Ruwan B.; Bab-Hadiashar, Alireza; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2013-01-01

    of research. In this paper we propose a fast and accurate non-rigid registration method for intra-modality volumetric images. Our approach exploits the information provided by an order statistics based segmentation method, to find the important regions for registration and use an appropriate sampling scheme......Non-rigid image registration techniques are widely used in medical imaging applications. Due to high computational complexities of these techniques, finding appropriate registration method to both reduce the computation burden and increase the registration accuracy has become an intense area...... to target those areas and reduce the registration computation time. A unique advantage of the proposed method is its ability to identify the point of diminishing returns and stop the registration process. Our experiments on registration of real lung CT images, with expert annotated landmarks, show...

  12. A novel scheme for automatic nonrigid image registration using deformation invariant feature and geometric constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhipeng; Lei, Lin; Zhou, Shilin

    2015-10-01

    Automatic image registration is a vital yet challenging task, particularly for non-rigid deformation images which are more complicated and common in remote sensing images, such as distorted UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) images or scanning imaging images caused by flutter. Traditional non-rigid image registration methods are based on the correctly matched corresponding landmarks, which usually needs artificial markers. It is a rather challenging task to locate the accurate position of the points and get accurate homonymy point sets. In this paper, we proposed an automatic non-rigid image registration algorithm which mainly consists of three steps: To begin with, we introduce an automatic feature point extraction method based on non-linear scale space and uniform distribution strategy to extract the points which are uniform distributed along the edge of the image. Next, we propose a hybrid point matching algorithm using DaLI (Deformation and Light Invariant) descriptor and local affine invariant geometric constraint based on triangulation which is constructed by K-nearest neighbor algorithm. Based on the accurate homonymy point sets, the two images are registrated by the model of TPS (Thin Plate Spline). Our method is demonstrated by three deliberately designed experiments. The first two experiments are designed to evaluate the distribution of point set and the correctly matching rate on synthetic data and real data respectively. The last experiment is designed on the non-rigid deformation remote sensing images and the three experimental results demonstrate the accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared with other traditional methods.

  13. Improving case-based reasoning systems by combining k-nearest neighbour algorithm with logistic regression in the prediction of patients' registration on the renal transplant waiting list.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Campillo-Gimenez

    Full Text Available Case-based reasoning (CBR is an emerging decision making paradigm in medical research where new cases are solved relying on previously solved similar cases. Usually, a database of solved cases is provided, and every case is described through a set of attributes (inputs and a label (output. Extracting useful information from this database can help the CBR system providing more reliable results on the yet to be solved cases.We suggest a general framework where a CBR system, viz. K-Nearest Neighbour (K-NN algorithm, is combined with various information obtained from a Logistic Regression (LR model, in order to improve prediction of access to the transplant waiting list.LR is applied, on the case database, to assign weights to the attributes as well as the solved cases. Thus, five possible decision making systems based on K-NN and/or LR were identified: a standalone K-NN, a standalone LR and three soft K-NN algorithms that rely on the weights based on the results of the LR. The evaluation was performed under two conditions, either using predictive factors known to be related to registration, or using a combination of factors related and not related to registration.The results show that our suggested approach, where the K-NN algorithm relies on both weighted attributes and cases, can efficiently deal with non relevant attributes, whereas the four other approaches suffer from this kind of noisy setups. The robustness of this approach suggests interesting perspectives for medical problem solving tools using CBR methodology.

  14. Efficient Constrained Local Model Fitting for Non-Rigid Face Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Simon; Wang, Yang; Cox, Mark; Sridharan, Sridha; Cohn, Jeffery F

    2009-11-01

    Active appearance models (AAMs) have demonstrated great utility when being employed for non-rigid face alignment/tracking. The "simultaneous" algorithm for fitting an AAM achieves good non-rigid face registration performance, but has poor real time performance (2-3 fps). The "project-out" algorithm for fitting an AAM achieves faster than real time performance (> 200 fps) but suffers from poor generic alignment performance. In this paper we introduce an extension to a discriminative method for non-rigid face registration/tracking referred to as a constrained local model (CLM). Our proposed method is able to achieve superior performance to the "simultaneous" AAM algorithm along with real time fitting speeds (35 fps). We improve upon the canonical CLM formulation, to gain this performance, in a number of ways by employing: (i) linear SVMs as patch-experts, (ii) a simplified optimization criteria, and (iii) a composite rather than additive warp update step. Most notably, our simplified optimization criteria for fitting the CLM divides the problem of finding a single complex registration/warp displacement into that of finding N simple warp displacements. From these N simple warp displacements, a single complex warp displacement is estimated using a weighted least-squares constraint. Another major advantage of this simplified optimization lends from its ability to be parallelized, a step which we also theoretically explore in this paper. We refer to our approach for fitting the CLM as the "exhaustive local search" (ELS) algorithm. Experiments were conducted on the CMU Multi-PIE database.

  15. Intensity-based hierarchical elastic registration using approximating splines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serifovic-Trbalic, Amira; Demirovic, Damir; Cattin, Philippe C

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new hierarchical approach for elastic medical image registration using approximating splines. In order to obtain the dense deformation field, we employ Gaussian elastic body splines (GEBS) that incorporate anisotropic landmark errors and rotation information. Since the GEBS approach is based on a physical model in form of analytical solutions of the Navier equation, it can very well cope with the local as well as global deformations present in the images by varying the standard deviation of the Gaussian forces. The proposed GEBS approximating model is integrated into the elastic hierarchical image registration framework, which decomposes a nonrigid registration problem into numerous local rigid transformations. The approximating GEBS registration scheme incorporates anisotropic landmark errors as well as rotation information. The anisotropic landmark localization uncertainties can be estimated directly from the image data, and in this case, they represent the minimal stochastic localization error, i.e., the Cramér-Rao bound. The rotation information of each landmark obtained from the hierarchical procedure is transposed in an additional angular landmark, doubling the number of landmarks in the GEBS model. The modified hierarchical registration using the approximating GEBS model is applied to register 161 image pairs from a digital mammogram database. The obtained results are very encouraging, and the proposed approach significantly improved all registrations comparing the mean-square error in relation to approximating TPS with the rotation information. On artificially deformed breast images, the newly proposed method performed better than the state-of-the-art registration algorithm introduced by Rueckert et al. (IEEE Trans Med Imaging 18:712-721, 1999). The average error per breast tissue pixel was less than 2.23 pixels compared to 2.46 pixels for Rueckert's method. The proposed hierarchical elastic image registration approach incorporates the GEBS

  16. FPFH-based graph matching for 3D point cloud registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiapeng; Li, Chen; Tian, Lihua; Zhu, Jihua

    2018-04-01

    Correspondence detection is a vital step in point cloud registration and it can help getting a reliable initial alignment. In this paper, we put forward an advanced point feature-based graph matching algorithm to solve the initial alignment problem of rigid 3D point cloud registration with partial overlap. Specifically, Fast Point Feature Histograms are used to determine the initial possible correspondences firstly. Next, a new objective function is provided to make the graph matching more suitable for partially overlapping point cloud. The objective function is optimized by the simulated annealing algorithm for final group of correct correspondences. Finally, we present a novel set partitioning method which can transform the NP-hard optimization problem into a O(n3)-solvable one. Experiments on the Stanford and UWA public data sets indicates that our method can obtain better result in terms of both accuracy and time cost compared with other point cloud registration methods.

  17. Automatic Tracking Of Remote Sensing Precipitation Data Using Genetic Algorithm Image Registration Based Automatic Morphing: September 1999 Storm Floyd Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, L.; Vongsaard, J.; El-Ghazawi, T.; Weinman, J.; Yang, R.; Kafatos, M.

    U Due to the poor temporal sampling by satellites, data gaps exist in satellite derived time series of precipitation. This poses a challenge for assimilating rain- fall data into forecast models. To yield a continuous time series, the classic image processing technique of digital image morphing has been used. However, the digital morphing technique was applied manually and that is time consuming. In order to avoid human intervention in the process, an automatic procedure for image morphing is needed for real-time operations. For this purpose, Genetic Algorithm Based Image Registration Automatic Morphing (GRAM) model was developed and tested in this paper. Specifically, automatic morphing technique was integrated with Genetic Algo- rithm and Feature Based Image Metamorphosis technique to fill in data gaps between satellite coverage. The technique was tested using NOWRAD data which are gener- ated from the network of NEXRAD radars. Time series of NOWRAD data from storm Floyd that occurred at the US eastern region on September 16, 1999 for 00:00, 01:00, 02:00,03:00, and 04:00am were used. The GRAM technique was applied to data col- lected at 00:00 and 04:00am. These images were also manually morphed. Images at 01:00, 02:00 and 03:00am were interpolated from the GRAM and manual morphing and compared with the original NOWRAD rainrates. The results show that the GRAM technique outperforms manual morphing. The correlation coefficients between the im- ages generated using manual morphing are 0.905, 0.900, and 0.905 for the images at 01:00, 02:00,and 03:00 am, while the corresponding correlation coefficients are 0.946, 0.911, and 0.913, respectively, based on the GRAM technique. Index terms ­ Remote Sensing, Image Registration, Hydrology, Genetic Algorithm, Morphing, NEXRAD

  18. Nonrigid registration with tissue-dependent filtering of the deformation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staring, Marius; Klein, Stefan; Pluim, Josien P W

    2007-01-01

    In present-day medical practice it is often necessary to nonrigidly align image data. Current registration algorithms do not generally take the characteristics of tissue into account. Consequently, rigid tissue, such as bone, can be deformed elastically, growth of tumours may be concealed, and contrast-enhanced structures may be reduced in volume. We propose a method to locally adapt the deformation field at structures that must be kept rigid, using a tissue-dependent filtering technique. This adaptive filtering of the deformation field results in locally linear transformations without scaling or shearing. The degree of filtering is related to tissue stiffness: more filtering is applied at stiff tissue locations, less at parts of the image containing nonrigid tissue. The tissue-dependent filter is incorporated in a commonly used registration algorithm, using mutual information as a similarity measure and cubic B-splines to model the deformation field. The new registration algorithm is compared with this popular method. Evaluation of the proposed tissue-dependent filtering is performed on 3D computed tomography (CT) data of the thorax and on 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images. The results show that tissue-dependent filtering of the deformation field leads to improved registration results: tumour volumes and vessel widths are preserved rather than affected

  19. TU-AB-BRA-03: Atlas-Based Algorithms with Local Registration-Goodness Weighting for MRI-Driven Electron Density Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farjam, R; Tyagi, N [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Veeraraghavan, H; Apte, A; Zakian, K; Deasy, J [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Hunt, M [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop image-analysis algorithms to synthesize CT with accurate electron densities for MR-only radiotherapy of head & neck (H&N) and pelvis anatomies. Methods: CT and 3T-MRI (Philips, mDixon sequence) scans were randomly selected from a pool of H&N (n=11) and pelvis (n=12) anatomies to form an atlas. All MRIs were pre-processed to eliminate scanner and patient-induced intensity inhomogeneities and standardize their intensity histograms. CT and MRI for each patient were then co-registered to construct CT-MRI atlases. For more accurate CT-MR fusion, bone intensities in CT were suppressed to improve the similarity between CT and MRI. For a new patient, all CT-MRI atlases are deformed onto the new patients’ MRI initially. A newly-developed generalized registration error (GRE) metric was then calculated as a measure of local registration accuracy. The synthetic CT value at each point is a 1/GRE-weighted average of CTs from all CT-MR atlases. For evaluation, the mean absolute error (MAE) between the original and synthetic CT (generated in a leave-one-out scheme) was computed. The planning dose from the original and synthetic CT was also compared. Results: For H&N patients, MAE was 67±9, 114±22, and 116±9 HU over the entire-CT, air and bone regions, respectively. For pelvis anatomy, MAE was 47±5 and 146±14 for the entire and bone regions. In comparison with MIRADA medical, an FDA-approved registration tool, we found that our proposed registration strategy reduces MAE by ∼30% and ∼50% over the entire and bone regions, respectively. GRE-weighted strategy further lowers MAE by ∼15% to ∼40%. Our primary dose calculation also showed highly consistent results between the original and synthetic CT. Conclusion: We’ve developed a novel image-analysis technique to synthesize CT for H&N and pelvis anatomies. Our proposed image fusion strategy and GRE metric help generate more accurate synthetic CT using locally more similar atlases (Support: Philips

  20. TU-AB-BRA-03: Atlas-Based Algorithms with Local Registration-Goodness Weighting for MRI-Driven Electron Density Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farjam, R; Tyagi, N; Veeraraghavan, H; Apte, A; Zakian, K; Deasy, J; Hunt, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop image-analysis algorithms to synthesize CT with accurate electron densities for MR-only radiotherapy of head & neck (H&N) and pelvis anatomies. Methods: CT and 3T-MRI (Philips, mDixon sequence) scans were randomly selected from a pool of H&N (n=11) and pelvis (n=12) anatomies to form an atlas. All MRIs were pre-processed to eliminate scanner and patient-induced intensity inhomogeneities and standardize their intensity histograms. CT and MRI for each patient were then co-registered to construct CT-MRI atlases. For more accurate CT-MR fusion, bone intensities in CT were suppressed to improve the similarity between CT and MRI. For a new patient, all CT-MRI atlases are deformed onto the new patients’ MRI initially. A newly-developed generalized registration error (GRE) metric was then calculated as a measure of local registration accuracy. The synthetic CT value at each point is a 1/GRE-weighted average of CTs from all CT-MR atlases. For evaluation, the mean absolute error (MAE) between the original and synthetic CT (generated in a leave-one-out scheme) was computed. The planning dose from the original and synthetic CT was also compared. Results: For H&N patients, MAE was 67±9, 114±22, and 116±9 HU over the entire-CT, air and bone regions, respectively. For pelvis anatomy, MAE was 47±5 and 146±14 for the entire and bone regions. In comparison with MIRADA medical, an FDA-approved registration tool, we found that our proposed registration strategy reduces MAE by ∼30% and ∼50% over the entire and bone regions, respectively. GRE-weighted strategy further lowers MAE by ∼15% to ∼40%. Our primary dose calculation also showed highly consistent results between the original and synthetic CT. Conclusion: We’ve developed a novel image-analysis technique to synthesize CT for H&N and pelvis anatomies. Our proposed image fusion strategy and GRE metric help generate more accurate synthetic CT using locally more similar atlases (Support: Philips

  1. SU-E-J-109: Evaluation of Deformable Accumulated Parotid Doses Using Different Registration Algorithms in Adaptive Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, S [Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing, 100084 China (China); Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853 China (China); Liu, B [Image processing center, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 China (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Three deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms are utilized to perform deformable dose accumulation for head and neck tomotherapy treatment, and the differences of the accumulated doses are evaluated. Methods: Daily MVCT data for 10 patients with pathologically proven nasopharyngeal cancers were analyzed. The data were acquired using tomotherapy (TomoTherapy, Accuray) at the PLA General Hospital. The prescription dose to the primary target was 70Gy in 33 fractions.Three DIR methods (B-spline, Diffeomorphic Demons and MIMvista) were used to propagate parotid structures from planning CTs to the daily CTs and accumulate fractionated dose on the planning CTs. The mean accumulated doses of parotids were quantitatively compared and the uncertainties of the propagated parotid contours were evaluated using Dice similarity index (DSI). Results: The planned mean dose of the ipsilateral parotids (32.42±3.13Gy) was slightly higher than those of the contralateral parotids (31.38±3.19Gy)in 10 patients. The difference between the accumulated mean doses of the ipsilateral parotids in the B-spline, Demons and MIMvista deformation algorithms (36.40±5.78Gy, 34.08±6.72Gy and 33.72±2.63Gy ) were statistically significant (B-spline vs Demons, P<0.0001, B-spline vs MIMvista, p =0.002). And The difference between those of the contralateral parotids in the B-spline, Demons and MIMvista deformation algorithms (34.08±4.82Gy, 32.42±4.80Gy and 33.92±4.65Gy ) were also significant (B-spline vs Demons, p =0.009, B-spline vs MIMvista, p =0.074). For the DSI analysis, the scores of B-spline, Demons and MIMvista DIRs were 0.90, 0.89 and 0.76. Conclusion: Shrinkage of parotid volumes results in the dose increase to the parotid glands in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy. The accumulated doses of parotids show significant difference using the different DIR algorithms between kVCT and MVCT. Therefore, the volume-based criterion (i.e. DSI) as a quantitative evaluation of

  2. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    polynomial) division have been found in Vedic Mathematics which are dated much before Euclid's algorithm. A programming language Is used to describe an algorithm for execution on a computer. An algorithm expressed using a programming.

  3. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, E S; Muren, L P; Thor, M; Petersen, J B; Tanderup, K; Sørensen, T S; Noe, K Ø; Høyer, M; Bentzen, L

    2012-01-01

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR) to improve the accuracy of bladder dose assessment. For each of nine prostate cancer patients, the initial treatment plan was re-calculated on eight to nine repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. The planned bladder dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters were compared to corresponding parameters derived from DIR-based accumulations as well as DVH summation based on dose re-calculations. It was found that the deviations between the DIR-based accumulations and the planned treatment were substantial and ranged (−0.5–2.3) Gy and (−9.4–13.5) Gy for D 2% and D mean , respectively, whereas the deviations between DIR-based accumulations and DVH summation were small and well within 1 Gy. For the investigated treatment scenario, DIR-based bladder dose accumulation did not result in substantial improvement of dose estimation as compared to the straightforward DVH summation. Large variations were found in individual patients between the doses from the initial treatment plan and the accumulated bladder doses. Hence, the use of repeat imaging has a potential for improved accuracy in treatment dose reporting. (paper)

  4. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of rodent CT images from combined PET/CT studies to corresponding CT images of the Digimouse anatomical mouse model. The latter provides a pre-segmented atlas consisting of 21 anatomical regions suitable for automated quantitative analysis. Image registration is performed using a package based on the Insight Toolkit allowing the implementation of various image registration algorithms. The optimal parameters obtained for deformable registration were applied to simulated and experimental mouse PET/CT studies. The accuracy of the image registration procedure was assessed by segmenting mouse CT images into seven regions: brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, bladder, skeleton and the rest of the body. This was accomplished prior to image registration using a semi-automated algorithm. Each mouse segmentation was transformed using the parameters obtained during CT to CT image registration. The resulting segmentation was compared with the original Digimouse atlas to quantify image registration accuracy using established metrics such as the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. PET images were then transformed using the same technique and automated quantitative analysis of tracer uptake performed. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance show fair to excellent agreement and a mean registration mismatch distance of about 6 mm. The results demonstrate good quantification accuracy in most of the regions, especially the brain, but not in the bladder, as expected. Normalized mean activity estimates were preserved between the reference and automated quantification techniques with relative errors below 10 % in most of the organs considered. The proposed automated quantification technique is

  5. Automatic block-matching registration to improve lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott Patrick

    To improve relatively poor outcomes for locally-advanced lung cancer patients, many current efforts are dedicated to minimizing uncertainties in radiotherapy. This enables the isotoxic delivery of escalated tumor doses, leading to better local tumor control. The current dissertation specifically addresses inter-fractional uncertainties resulting from patient setup variability. An automatic block-matching registration (BMR) algorithm is implemented and evaluated for the purpose of directly localizing advanced-stage lung tumors during image-guided radiation therapy. In this algorithm, small image sub-volumes, termed "blocks", are automatically identified on the tumor surface in an initial planning computed tomography (CT) image. Each block is independently and automatically registered to daily images acquired immediately prior to each treatment fraction. To improve the accuracy and robustness of BMR, this algorithm incorporates multi-resolution pyramid registration, regularization with a median filter, and a new multiple-candidate-registrations technique. The result of block-matching is a sparse displacement vector field that models local tissue deformations near the tumor surface. The distribution of displacement vectors is aggregated to obtain the final tumor registration, corresponding to the treatment couch shift for patient setup correction. Compared to existing rigid and deformable registration algorithms, the final BMR algorithm significantly improves the overlap between target volumes from the planning CT and registered daily images. Furthermore, BMR results in the smallest treatment margins for the given study population. However, despite these improvements, large residual target localization errors were noted, indicating that purely rigid couch shifts cannot correct for all sources of inter-fractional variability. Further reductions in treatment uncertainties may require the combination of high-quality target localization and adaptive radiotherapy.

  6. Rigidity of Glasses and Macromolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, M. F.

    1998-03-01

    The simple yet powerful ideas of percolation theory have found their way into many different areas of research. In this talk we show how RIGIDITY PERCOLATION can be studied at a similar level of sophistication, using a powerful new program THE PEBBLE GAME (D. J. Jacobs and M. F. Thorpe, Phys. Rev. E) 53, 3682 (1996). that uses an integer algorithm. This program can analyse the rigidity of two and three dimensional networks containing more than one million bars and joints. We find the total number of floppy modes, and find the critical behavior as the network goes from floppy to rigid as more bars are added. We discuss the relevance of this work to network glasses, and how it relates to experiments that involve the mechanical properties like hardness and elasticity of covalent glassy networks like Ge_xAs_ySe_1-x-y and dicuss recent experiments that suggest that the rigidity transition may be first order (Xingwei Feng, W. J.Bresser and P. Boolchand, Phys. Rev. Lett 78), 4422 (1997).. This approach is also useful in macromolecules and proteins, where detailed information about the rigid domain structure can be obtained.

  7. SU-D-202-04: Validation of Deformable Image Registration Algorithms for Head and Neck Adaptive Radiotherapy in Routine Clinical Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L; Pi, Y; Chen, Z; Xu, X [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Wang, Z [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China); Shi, C [Saint Vincent Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Long, T; Luo, W; Wang, F [The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ROI contours and accumulated dose difference using different deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Eight H&N cancer patients were randomly selected from the affiliated hospital. During the treatment, patients were rescanned every week with ROIs well delineated by radiation oncologist on each weekly CT. New weekly treatment plans were also re-designed with consistent dose prescription on the rescanned CT and executed for one week on Siemens CT-on-rails accelerator. At the end, we got six weekly CT scans from CT1 to CT6 including six weekly treatment plans for each patient. The primary CT1 was set as the reference CT for DIR proceeding with the left five weekly CTs using ANACONDA and MORFEUS algorithms separately in RayStation and the external skin ROI was set to be the controlling ROI both. The entire calculated weekly dose were deformed and accumulated on corresponding reference CT1 according to the deformation vector field (DVFs) generated by the two different DIR algorithms respectively. Thus we got both the ANACONDA-based and MORFEUS-based accumulated total dose on CT1 for each patient. At the same time, we mapped the ROIs on CT1 to generate the corresponding ROIs on CT6 using ANACONDA and MORFEUS DIR algorithms. DICE coefficients between the DIR deformed and radiation oncologist delineated ROIs on CT6 were calculated. Results: For DIR accumulated dose, PTV D95 and Left-Eyeball Dmax show significant differences with 67.13 cGy and 109.29 cGy respectively (Table1). For DIR mapped ROIs, PTV, Spinal cord and Left-Optic nerve show difference with −0.025, −0.127 and −0.124 (Table2). Conclusion: Even two excellent DIR algorithms can give divergent results for ROI deformation and dose accumulation. As more and more TPS get DIR module integrated, there is an urgent need to realize the potential risk using DIR in clinical.

  8. Registration Service

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    Following a reorganization in Building 55, please note that the Registration Service is now organised as follows :  Ground floor: access cards (76903). 1st floor : registration of external firms’ personnel (76611 / 76622); car access stickers (76633); biometric registration (79710). Opening hours: 07-30 to 16-00 non-stop. GS-SEM Group General Infrastructure Services Department

  9. The algorithm to generate color point-cloud with the registration between panoramic image and laser point-cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Fanyang; Zhong, Ruofei

    2014-01-01

    Laser point cloud contains only intensity information and it is necessary for visual interpretation to obtain color information from other sensor. Cameras can provide texture, color, and other information of the corresponding object. Points with color information of corresponding pixels in digital images can be used to generate color point-cloud and is conducive to the visualization, classification and modeling of point-cloud. Different types of digital cameras are used in different Mobile Measurement Systems (MMS).the principles and processes for generating color point-cloud in different systems are not the same. The most prominent feature of the panoramic images is the field of 360 degrees view angle in the horizontal direction, to obtain the image information around the camera as much as possible. In this paper, we introduce a method to generate color point-cloud with panoramic image and laser point-cloud, and deduce the equation of the correspondence between points in panoramic images and laser point-clouds. The fusion of panoramic image and laser point-cloud is according to the collinear principle of three points (the center of the omnidirectional multi-camera system, the image point on the sphere, the object point). The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm and formulae in this paper are correct

  10. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to as 'divide-and-conquer'. Although there has been a large effort in realizing efficient algorithms, there are not many universally accepted algorithm design paradigms. In this article, we illustrate algorithm design techniques such as balancing, greedy strategy, dynamic programming strategy, and backtracking or traversal of ...

  11. Rigid Body Sampling and Individual Time Stepping for Rigid-Fluid Coupling of Fluid Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an efficient and simple rigid-fluid coupling scheme with scientific programming algorithms for particle-based fluid simulation and three-dimensional visualization. Our approach samples the surface of rigid bodies with boundary particles that interact with fluids. It contains two procedures, that is, surface sampling and sampling relaxation, which insures uniform distribution of particles with less iterations. Furthermore, we present a rigid-fluid coupling scheme integrating individual time stepping to rigid-fluid coupling, which gains an obvious speedup compared to previous method. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  12. Deformable image registration for cone-beam CT guided transoral robotic base-of-tongue surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaungamornrat, S; Liu, W P; Otake, Y; Uneri, A; Siewerdsen, J H; Taylor, R H; Wang, A S; Nithiananthan, S; Schafer, S; Tryggestad, E; Richmon, J; Sorger, J M

    2013-01-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) offers a minimally invasive approach to resection of base-of-tongue tumors. However, precise localization of the surgical target and adjacent critical structures can be challenged by the highly deformed intraoperative setup. We propose a deformable registration method using intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to accurately align preoperative CT or MR images with the intraoperative scene. The registration method combines a Gaussian mixture (GM) model followed by a variation of the Demons algorithm. First, following segmentation of the volume of interest (i.e. volume of the tongue extending to the hyoid), a GM model is applied to surface point clouds for rigid initialization (GM rigid) followed by nonrigid deformation (GM nonrigid). Second, the registration is refined using the Demons algorithm applied to distance map transforms of the (GM-registered) preoperative image and intraoperative CBCT. Performance was evaluated in repeat cadaver studies (25 image pairs) in terms of target registration error (TRE), entropy correlation coefficient (ECC) and normalized pointwise mutual information (NPMI). Retraction of the tongue in the TORS operative setup induced gross deformation >30 mm. The mean TRE following the GM rigid, GM nonrigid and Demons steps was 4.6, 2.1 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The respective ECC was 0.57, 0.70 and 0.73, and NPMI was 0.46, 0.57 and 0.60. Registration accuracy was best across the superior aspect of the tongue and in proximity to the hyoid (by virtue of GM registration of surface points on these structures). The Demons step refined registration primarily in deeper portions of the tongue further from the surface and hyoid bone. Since the method does not use image intensities directly, it is suitable to multi-modality registration of preoperative CT or MR with intraoperative CBCT. Extending the 3D image registration to the fusion of image and planning data in stereo-endoscopic video is anticipated to

  13. Locally orderless registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Sporring, Jon

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a unifying approach for calculating a wide range of popular, but seemingly very different, similarity measures. Our domain is the registration of n-dimensional images sampled on a regular grid, and our approach is well suited for gradient-based optimization algorithms. Our app...

  14. SU-E-J-94: Geometric and Dosimetric Evaluation of Deformation Image Registration Algorithms Using Virtual Phantoms Generated From Patients with Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z; Greskovich, J; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To generate virtual phantoms with clinically relevant deformation and use them to objectively evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients undergoing adaptive 3DCRT planning were selected. For each patient, a pair of planning CT (pCT) and replanning CT (rCT) were used as the basis for virtual phantom generation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTV, lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart) on pCT and rCT. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was used to deform pCT to generate a simulated replanning CT (srCT) that was closely matched to rCT. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten virtual phantoms. The images, ROIs, and doses were mapped from pCT to srCT using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.85 to 0.96 for Demons, from 0.86 to 0.97 for intensity-based, and from 0.76 to 0.95 for B-Spline. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.2 to 5.4 mm for Demons, from 2.3 to 6.8 mm for intensity-based, and from 2.4 to 11.4 mm for B-Spline. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.2 to 0.6 Gy for Demons, from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy for intensity-based, and from 0.5 to 1.5 Gy for B-Spline. Conclusion: Virtual phantoms were modeled after patients with lung cancer and were clinically relevant for adaptive radiotherapy treatment replanning. Virtual phantoms with known DVFs serve as references and can provide a fair comparison when evaluating different DIRs. Demons and intensity-based DIRs were shown to have smaller geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than B-Spline. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; J Greskovich: None; P Xia

  15. SU-E-J-115: Correlation of Displacement Vector Fields Calculated by Deformable Image Registration Algorithms with Motion Parameters of CT Images with Well-Defined Targets and Controlled-Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskowiak, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate correlation of displacement vector fields (DVF) calculated by deformable image registration algorithms with motion parameters in helical axial and cone-beam CT images with motion artifacts. Methods: A mobile thorax phantom with well-known targets with different sizes that were made from water-equivalent material and inserted in foam to simulate lung lesions. The thorax phantom was imaged with helical, axial and cone-beam CT. The phantom was moved with a cyclic motion with different motion amplitudes and frequencies along the superior-inferior direction. Different deformable image registration algorithms including demons, fast demons, Horn-Shunck and iterative-optical-flow from the DIRART software were used to deform CT images for the phantom with different motion patterns. The CT images of the mobile phantom were deformed to CT images of the stationary phantom. Results: The values of displacement vectors calculated by deformable image registration algorithm correlated strongly with motion amplitude where large displacement vectors were calculated for CT images with large motion amplitudes. For example, the maximal displacement vectors were nearly equal to the motion amplitudes (5mm, 10mm or 20mm) at interfaces between the mobile targets lung tissue, while the minimal displacement vectors were nearly equal to negative the motion amplitudes. The maximal and minimal displacement vectors matched with edges of the blurred targets along the Z-axis (motion-direction), while DVF’s were small in the other directions. This indicates that the blurred edges by phantom motion were shifted largely to match with the actual target edge. These shifts were nearly equal to the motion amplitude. Conclusions: The DVF from deformable-image registration algorithms correlated well with motion amplitude of well-defined mobile targets. This can be used to extract motion parameters such as amplitude. However, as motion amplitudes increased, image artifacts increased

  16. Solid Mesh Registration for Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for solid organ registration of pre-segmented data represented as tetrahedral meshes. Registration of the organ surface is driven by force terms based on a distance field representation of the source and reference shapes. Registration of internal morphology is achieved usi...

  17. Elastic models application for thorax image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa Prado, Lorena S; Diaz, E Andres Valdez; Romo, Raul

    2007-01-01

    This work consist of the implementation and evaluation of elastic alignment algorithms of biomedical images, which were taken at thorax level and simulated with the 4D NCAT digital phantom. Radial Basis Functions spatial transformations (RBF), a kind of spline, which allows carrying out not only global rigid deformations but also local elastic ones were applied, using a point-matching method. The applied functions were: Thin Plate Spline (TPS), Multiquadric (MQ) Gaussian and B-Spline, which were evaluated and compared by means of calculating the Target Registration Error and similarity measures between the registered images (the squared sum of intensity differences (SSD) and correlation coefficient (CC)). In order to value the user incurred error in the point-matching and segmentation tasks, two algorithms were also designed that calculate the Fiduciary Localization Error. TPS and MQ were demonstrated to have better performance than the others. It was proved RBF represent an adequate model for approximating the thorax deformable behaviour. Validation algorithms showed the user error was not significant

  18. 3D craniofacial registration using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yucong; Zhao, Junli; Deng, Qingqiong; Duan, Fuqing

    2017-01-01

    Craniofacial registration is used to establish the point-to-point correspondence in a unified coordinate system among human craniofacial models. It is the foundation of craniofacial reconstruction and other craniofacial statistical analysis research. In this paper, a non-rigid 3D craniofacial registration method using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection is proposed. First, the gradient descent optimization is utilized to improve a cylindrical surface fitting (CSF) for the reference craniofacial model. Second, the thin-plate spline transform (TPST) is applied to deform a target craniofacial model to the reference model. Finally, the cylindrical surface projection (CSP) is used to derive the point correspondence between the reference and deformed target models. To accelerate the procedure, the iterative closest point ICP algorithm is used to obtain a rough correspondence, which can provide a possible intersection area of the CSP. Finally, the inverse TPST is used to map the obtained corresponding points from the deformed target craniofacial model to the original model, and it can be realized directly by the correspondence between the original target model and the deformed target model. Three types of registration, namely, reflexive, involutive and transitive registration, are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed craniofacial registration algorithm. Comparison with the methods in the literature shows that the proposed method is more accurate.

  19. 3D craniofacial registration using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucong Chen

    Full Text Available Craniofacial registration is used to establish the point-to-point correspondence in a unified coordinate system among human craniofacial models. It is the foundation of craniofacial reconstruction and other craniofacial statistical analysis research. In this paper, a non-rigid 3D craniofacial registration method using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection is proposed. First, the gradient descent optimization is utilized to improve a cylindrical surface fitting (CSF for the reference craniofacial model. Second, the thin-plate spline transform (TPST is applied to deform a target craniofacial model to the reference model. Finally, the cylindrical surface projection (CSP is used to derive the point correspondence between the reference and deformed target models. To accelerate the procedure, the iterative closest point ICP algorithm is used to obtain a rough correspondence, which can provide a possible intersection area of the CSP. Finally, the inverse TPST is used to map the obtained corresponding points from the deformed target craniofacial model to the original model, and it can be realized directly by the correspondence between the original target model and the deformed target model. Three types of registration, namely, reflexive, involutive and transitive registration, are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed craniofacial registration algorithm. Comparison with the methods in the literature shows that the proposed method is more accurate.

  20. Fast time-of-flight camera based surface registration for radiotherapy patient positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placht, Simon; Stancanello, Joseph; Schaller, Christian; Balda, Michael; Angelopoulou, Elli

    2012-01-01

    This work introduces a rigid registration framework for patient positioning in radiotherapy, based on real-time surface acquisition by a time-of-flight (ToF) camera. Dynamic properties of the system are also investigated for future gating/tracking strategies. A novel preregistration algorithm, based on translation and rotation-invariant features representing surface structures, was developed. Using these features, corresponding three-dimensional points were computed in order to determine initial registration parameters. These parameters became a robust input to an accelerated version of the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm for the fine-tuning of the registration result. Distance calibration and Kalman filtering were used to compensate for ToF-camera dependent noise. Additionally, the advantage of using the feature based preregistration over an "ICP only" strategy was evaluated, as well as the robustness of the rigid-transformation-based method to deformation. The proposed surface registration method was validated using phantom data. A mean target registration error (TRE) for translations and rotations of 1.62 ± 1.08 mm and 0.07° ± 0.05°, respectively, was achieved. There was a temporal delay of about 65 ms in the registration output, which can be seen as negligible considering the dynamics of biological systems. Feature based preregistration allowed for accurate and robust registrations even at very large initial displacements. Deformations affected the accuracy of the results, necessitating particular care in cases of deformed surfaces. The proposed solution is able to solve surface registration problems with an accuracy suitable for radiotherapy cases where external surfaces offer primary or complementary information to patient positioning. The system shows promising dynamic properties for its use in gating/tracking applications. The overall system is competitive with commonly-used surface registration technologies. Its main benefit is the

  1. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ticians but also forms the foundation of computer science. Two ... with methods of developing algorithms for solving a variety of problems but ... applications of computers in science and engineer- ... numerical calculus are as important. We will ...

  2. Spherical Demons: Fast Surface Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, B.T. Thomas; Sabuncu, Mert; Vercauteren, Tom; Ayache, Nicholas; Fischl, Bruce; Golland, Polina

    2009-01-01

    We present the fast Spherical Demons algorithm for registering two spherical images. By exploiting spherical vector spline interpolation theory, we show that a large class of regularizers for the modified demons objective function can be efficiently implemented on the sphere using convolution. Based on the one parameter subgroups of diffeomorphisms, the resulting registration is diffeomorphic and fast – registration of two cortical mesh models with more than 100k nodes takes less than 5 minutes, comparable to the fastest surface registration algorithms. Moreover, the accuracy of our method compares favorably to the popular FreeSurfer registration algorithm. We validate the technique in two different settings: (1) parcellation in a set of in-vivo cortical surfaces and (2) Brodmann area localization in ex-vivo cortical surfaces. PMID:18979813

  3. Fast Rotation-Free Feature-Based Image Registration Using Improved N-SIFT and GMM-Based Parallel Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongdong; Yang, Feng; Yang, Caiyun; Leng, Chengcai; Cao, Jian; Wang, Yining; Tian, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Image registration is a key problem in a variety of applications, such as computer vision, medical image processing, pattern recognition, etc., while the application of registration is limited by time consumption and the accuracy in the case of large pose differences. Aimed at these two kinds of problems, we propose a fast rotation-free feature-based rigid registration method based on our proposed accelerated-NSIFT and GMM registration-based parallel optimization (PO-GMMREG). Our method is accelerated by using the GPU/CUDA programming and preserving only the location information without constructing the descriptor of each interest point, while its robustness to missing correspondences and outliers is improved by converting the interest point matching to Gaussian mixture model alignment. The accuracy in the case of large pose differences is settled by our proposed PO-GMMREG algorithm by constructing a set of initial transformations. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed algorithm can fast rigidly register 3-D medical images and is reliable for aligning 3-D scans even when they exhibit a poor initialization.

  4. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    algorithm design technique called 'divide-and-conquer'. One of ... Turtle graphics, September. 1996. 5. ... whole list named 'PO' is a pointer to the first element of the list; ..... Program for computing matrices X and Y and placing the result in C *).

  5. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    algorithm that it is implicitly understood that we know how to generate the next natural ..... Explicit comparisons are made in line (1) where maximum and minimum is ... It can be shown that the function T(n) = 3/2n -2 is the solution to the above ...

  6. Algorithms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    will become clear in the next article when we discuss a simple logo like programming language. ... Rod B may be used as an auxiliary store. The problem is to find an algorithm which performs this task. ... No disks are moved from A to Busing C as auxiliary rod. • move _disk (A, C);. (No + l)th disk is moved from A to C directly ...

  7. Dual Quaternion Variational Integrator for Rigid Body Dynamic Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jiafeng; Halse, Karl Henning

    2016-01-01

    In rigid body dynamic simulations, often the algorithm is required to deal with general situations where both reference point and inertia matrix are arbitrarily de- fined. We introduce a novel Lie group variational integrator using dual quaternion for simulating rigid body dynamics in all six degrees of freedom. Dual quaternion is used to represent rigid body kinematics and one-step Lie group method is used to derive dynamic equations. The combination of these two becomes the first Lie group ...

  8. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wognum, S; Bondar, L; Zolnay, A G; Chai, X; Hulshof, M C C M; Hoogeman, M S; Bel, A

    2013-02-01

    for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9-14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9-4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1-9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9-9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  9. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A.; Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S.

    2013-01-01

    parameters were determined for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. Results: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9–14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9–4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1–9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9–9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. Conclusions: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  10. Control over structure-specific flexibility improves anatomical accuracy for point-based deformable registration in bladder cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wognum, S.; Chai, X.; Hulshof, M. C. C. M.; Bel, A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Meiberdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bondar, L.; Zolnay, A. G.; Hoogeman, M. S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Erasmus Medical Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    parameters were determined for the weighted S-TPS-RPM. Results: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with optimal parameters significantly improved the anatomical accuracy as compared to S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder alone and reduced the range of the anatomical errors by half as compared with the simultaneous nonweighted S-TPS-RPM registration of the bladder and tumor structures. The weighted algorithm reduced the RDE range of lipiodol markers from 0.9-14 mm after rigid bone match to 0.9-4.0 mm, compared to a range of 1.1-9.1 mm with S-TPS-RPM of bladder alone and 0.9-9.4 mm for simultaneous nonweighted registration. All registration methods resulted in good geometric accuracy on the bladder; average error values were all below 1.2 mm. Conclusions: The weighted S-TPS-RPM registration algorithm with additional weight parameter allowed indirect control over structure-specific flexibility in multistructure registrations of bladder and bladder tumor, enabling anatomically coherent registrations. The availability of an anatomically validated deformable registration method opens up the horizon for improvements in IGART for bladder cancer.

  11. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

  12. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalvati, Farzad; Tizhoosh, Hamid R.; Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Rodrigues, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability

  13. Rigidity and symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Asia; Whiteley, Walter

    2014-01-01

    This book contains recent contributions to the fields of rigidity and symmetry with two primary focuses: to present the mathematically rigorous treatment of rigidity of structures, and to explore the interaction of geometry, algebra, and combinatorics. Overall, the book shows how researchers from diverse backgrounds explore connections among the various discrete structures with symmetry as the unifying theme.  Contributions present recent trends and advances in discrete geometry, particularly in the theory of polytopes. The rapid development of abstract polytope theory has resulted in a rich theory featuring an attractive interplay of methods and tools from discrete geometry, group theory, classical geometry, hyperbolic geometry and topology.  The volume will also be a valuable source as an introduction to the ideas of both combinatorial and geometric rigidity theory and its applications, incorporating the surprising impact of symmetry. It will appeal to students at both the advanced undergraduate and gradu...

  14. Birationally rigid varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhlikov, Aleksandr

    2013-01-01

    Birational rigidity is a striking and mysterious phenomenon in higher-dimensional algebraic geometry. It turns out that certain natural families of algebraic varieties (for example, three-dimensional quartics) belong to the same classification type as the projective space but have radically different birational geometric properties. In particular, they admit no non-trivial birational self-maps and cannot be fibred into rational varieties by a rational map. The origins of the theory of birational rigidity are in the work of Max Noether and Fano; however, it was only in 1970 that Iskovskikh and Manin proved birational superrigidity of quartic three-folds. This book gives a systematic exposition of, and a comprehensive introduction to, the theory of birational rigidity, presenting in a uniform way, ideas, techniques, and results that so far could only be found in journal papers. The recent rapid progress in birational geometry and the widening interaction with the neighboring areas generate the growing interest ...

  15. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenzler, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Grezdo, Jozef [Department of Radiotherapy, St Elisabeth Institute of Oncology, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogner, Joachim [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Birkfellner, Wolfgang [Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-04-21

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm{sup 3} tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm{sup 3} were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical

  16. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzler, Thomas; Grezdo, Jozef; Bogner, Joachim; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Georg, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm 3 tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm 3 were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical target

  17. The influence of the image registration method on the adaptive radiotherapy. A proof of the principle in a selected case of prostate IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenguer, Roberto; de la Vara, Victoria; Lopez-Honrubia, Veronica; Nuñez, Ana Teresa; Rivera, Miguel; Villas, Maria Victoria; Sabater, Sebastia

    2018-01-01

    To analyse the influence of the image registration method on the adaptive radiotherapy of an IMRT prostate treatment, and to compare the dose accumulation according to 3 different image registration methods with the planned dose. The IMRT prostate patient was CT imaged 3 times throughout his treatment. The prostate, PTV, rectum and bladder were segmented on each CT. A Rigid, a deformable (DIR) B-spline and a DIR with landmarks registration algorithms were employed. The difference between the accumulated doses and planned doses were evaluated by the gamma index. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance was used to evaluate the overlap between volumes, to quantify the quality of the registration. When comparing adaptive vs no adaptive RT, the gamma index calculation showed large differences depending on the image registration method (as much as 87.6% in the case of DIR B-spline). The quality of the registration was evaluated using an index such as the Dice coefficient. This showed that the best result was obtained with DIR with landmarks compared with the rest and it was always above 0.77, reported as a recommended minimum value for prostate studies in a multi-centre review. Apart from showing the importance of the application of an adaptive RT protocol in a particular treatment, this work shows that the election of the registration method is decisive in the result of the adaptive radiotherapy and dose accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion Maps for Multimodal Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Piella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal image registration is a difficult task, due to the significant intensity variations between the images. A common approach is to use sophisticated similarity measures, such as mutual information, that are robust to those intensity variations. However, these similarity measures are computationally expensive and, moreover, often fail to capture the geometry and the associated dynamics linked with the images. Another approach is the transformation of the images into a common space where modalities can be directly compared. Within this approach, we propose to register multimodal images by using diffusion maps to describe the geometric and spectral properties of the data. Through diffusion maps, the multimodal data is transformed into a new set of canonical coordinates that reflect its geometry uniformly across modalities, so that meaningful correspondences can be established between them. Images in this new representation can then be registered using a simple Euclidean distance as a similarity measure. Registration accuracy was evaluated on both real and simulated brain images with known ground-truth for both rigid and non-rigid registration. Results showed that the proposed approach achieved higher accuracy than the conventional approach using mutual information.

  19. How precise is manual CT-MRI registration for cranial radiotherapy planning?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.; South, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    Manual fusion is a readily available image registration technique that does not require matching algorithms. The operator performs rigid-body transformations interactively. The precision of Manual fusion (as implemented on the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system) was required for cranial CT-MR images used in radiotherapy planning for typical centrally located planning target volumes . Materials and Methods: A multi-stage Manual fusion procedure was developed which 11 observers followed to match the head contour, bones, soft tissues and contoured structures for 5 patient image-sets. Registration parameters were calculated by solving the transformation matrix following a consistent order of translations (T) and rotations (R). The mean position of centre of each planning target volumes averaged over all observers was used as the reference. The effect of mis registration on the planning target volumes co-ordinates and the volume increase resulting from application of a margin for registration uncertainty were calculated. Results: Mean intra- and inter-observer T/R SDs were 0.5 mm/ 0.4 d ig a nd 1.1 mm/ 1.0 d ig , respectively. Mean intra- and inter-observer registration error (3D distance of each planning target volumes centre from the mean position for all observers) was 0.7 ±0.3 mm (1 SD) and 1.6±0.7 mm respectively, the latter reducing to 1.4±0.6 mm excluding the 3 least experienced operators. A subsequent 2 mm margin for mis registration on average increased the planning target volume by 27%. Conclusion: Moderately trained operators produced clinically acceptable results while experienced operators improved the precision. Manual fusion still has an important role in the registration of cranial CT and MR images for radiotherapy planning especially for under-resourced centers

  20. Longitudinal, intermodality registration of quantitative breast PET and MRI data acquired before and during neoadjuvant chemotherapy: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atuegwu, Nkiruka C.; Williams, Jason M.; Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Abramson, Richard G.; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Abramson, Vandana G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors propose a method whereby serially acquired DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and FDG-PET breast data sets can be spatially and temporally coregistered to enable the comparison of changes in parameter maps at the voxel level. Methods: First, the authors aligned the PET and MR images at each time point rigidly and nonrigidly. To register the MR images longitudinally, the authors extended a nonrigid registration algorithm by including a tumor volume-preserving constraint in the cost function. After the PET images were aligned to the MR images at each time point, the authors then used the transformation obtained from the longitudinal registration of the MRI volumes to register the PET images longitudinally. The authors tested this approach on ten breast cancer patients by calculating a modified Dice similarity of tumor size between the PET and MR images as well as the bending energy and changes in the tumor volume after the application of the registration algorithm. Results: The median of the modified Dice in the registered PET and DCE-MRI data was 0.92. For the longitudinal registration, the median tumor volume change was −0.03% for the constrained algorithm, compared to −32.16% for the unconstrained registration algorithms (p = 8 × 10 −6 ). The medians of the bending energy were 0.0092 and 0.0001 for the unconstrained and constrained algorithms, respectively (p = 2.84 × 10 −7 ). Conclusions: The results indicate that the proposed method can accurately spatially align DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, and FDG-PET breast images acquired at different time points during therapy while preventing the tumor from being substantially distorted or compressed

  1. Automatic selective feature retention in patient specific elastic surface registration

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, GJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy with which a recent elastic surface registration algorithm deforms the complex geometry of a skull is examined. This algorithm is then coupled to a line based algorithm as is frequently used in patient specific feature registration...

  2. Identifying Floppy and Rigid Regions in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, D. J.; Thorpe, M. F.; Kuhn, L. A.

    1998-03-01

    In proteins it is possible to separate hard covalent forces involving bond lengths and bond angles from other weak forces. We model the microstructure of the protein as a generic bar-joint truss framework, where the hard covalent forces and strong hydrogen bonds are regarded as rigid bar constraints. We study the mechanical stability of proteins using FIRST (Floppy Inclusions and Rigid Substructure Topography) based on a recently developed combinatorial constraint counting algorithm (the 3D Pebble Game), which is a generalization of the 2D pebble game (D. J. Jacobs and M. F. Thorpe, ``Generic Rigidity: The Pebble Game'', Phys. Rev. Lett.) 75, 4051-4054 (1995) for the special class of bond-bending networks (D. J. Jacobs, "Generic Rigidity in Three Dimensional Bond-bending Networks", Preprint Aug (1997)). This approach is useful in identifying rigid motifs and flexible linkages in proteins, and thereby determines the essential degrees of freedom. We will show some preliminary results from the FIRST analysis on the myohemerythrin and lyozyme proteins.

  3. Robust inverse-consistent affine CT-MR registration in MRI-assisted and MRI-alone prostate radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivest-Hénault, David; Dowson, Nicholas; Greer, Peter B; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    CT-MR registration is a critical component of many radiation oncology protocols. In prostate external beam radiation therapy, it allows the propagation of MR-derived contours to reference CT images at the planning stage, and it enables dose mapping during dosimetry studies. The use of carefully registered CT-MR atlases allows the estimation of patient specific electron density maps from MRI scans, enabling MRI-alone radiation therapy planning and treatment adaptation. In all cases, the precision and accuracy achieved by registration influences the quality of the entire process. Most current registration algorithms do not robustly generalize and lack inverse-consistency, increasing the risk of human error and acting as a source of bias in studies where information is propagated in a particular direction, e.g. CT to MR or vice versa. In MRI-based treatment planning where both CT and MR scans serve as spatial references, inverse-consistency is critical, if under-acknowledged. A robust, inverse-consistent, rigid/affine registration algorithm that is well suited to CT-MR alignment in prostate radiation therapy is presented. The presented method is based on a robust block-matching optimization process that utilises a half-way space definition to maintain inverse-consistency. Inverse-consistency substantially reduces the influence of the order of input images, simplifying analysis, and increasing robustness. An open source implementation is available online at http://aehrc.github.io/Mirorr/. Experimental results on a challenging 35 CT-MR pelvis dataset demonstrate that the proposed method is more accurate than other popular registration packages and is at least as accurate as the state of the art, while being more robust and having an order of magnitude higher inverse-consistency than competing approaches. The presented results demonstrate that the proposed registration algorithm is readily applicable to prostate radiation therapy planning. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  4. Image Registration Using Redundant Wavelet Transforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Richard

    2001-01-01

    .... In our research, we present a fundamentally new wavelet-based registration algorithm utilizing redundant transforms and a masking process to suppress the adverse effects of noise and improve processing efficiency...

  5. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, D.V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Van Nieuwenhuizen, P. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). C.N. Yang Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2008-01-15

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  6. Re-Irradiation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Clinical Applicability of Deformable Image Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Woo, Joong Yeol; Kim, Jun Won; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the deformable image registration (DIR) method is clinically applicable to the safe delivery of re-irradiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between August 2010 and March 2012, 12 eligible HCC patients received re-irradiation using helical tomotherapy. The median total prescribed radiation doses at first irradiation and re-irradiation were 50 Gy (range, 36-60 Gy) and 50 Gy (range, 36-58.42 Gy), respectively. Most re-irradiation therapies (11 of 12) were administered to previously irradiated or marginal areas. Dose summation results were reproduced using DIR by rigid and deformable registration methods, and doses of organs-at-risk (OARs) were evaluated. Treatment outcomes were also assessed. Thirty-six dose summation indices were obtained for three OARs (bowel, duodenum, and stomach doses in each patient). There was no statistical difference between the two different types of DIR methods (rigid and deformable) in terms of calculated summation ΣD (0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc, and max) in each OAR. The median total mean remaining liver doses (M(RLD)) in rigid- and deformable-type registration were not statistically different for all cohorts (p=0.248), although a large difference in M(RLD) was observed when there was a significant difference in spatial liver volume change between radiation intervals. One duodenal ulcer perforation developed 20 months after re-irradiation. Although current dose summation algorithms and uncertainties do not warrant accurate dosimetric results, OARs-based DIR dose summation can be usefully utilized in the re-irradiation of HCC. Appropriate cohort selection, watchful interpretation, and selective use of DIR methods are crucial to enhance the radio-therapeutic ratio.

  7. ACIR: automatic cochlea image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dhamari, Ibraheem; Bauer, Sabine; Paulus, Dietrich; Lissek, Friedrich; Jacob, Roland

    2017-02-01

    Efficient Cochlear Implant (CI) surgery requires prior knowledge of the cochlea's size and its characteristics. This information helps to select suitable implants for different patients. To get these measurements, a segmentation method of cochlea medical images is needed. An important pre-processing step for good cochlea segmentation involves efficient image registration. The cochlea's small size and complex structure, in addition to the different resolutions and head positions during imaging, reveals a big challenge for the automated registration of the different image modalities. In this paper, an Automatic Cochlea Image Registration (ACIR) method for multi- modal human cochlea images is proposed. This method is based on using small areas that have clear structures from both input images instead of registering the complete image. It uses the Adaptive Stochastic Gradient Descent Optimizer (ASGD) and Mattes's Mutual Information metric (MMI) to estimate 3D rigid transform parameters. The use of state of the art medical image registration optimizers published over the last two years are studied and compared quantitatively using the standard Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). ACIR requires only 4.86 seconds on average to align cochlea images automatically and to put all the modalities in the same spatial locations without human interference. The source code is based on the tool elastix and is provided for free as a 3D Slicer plugin. Another contribution of this work is a proposed public cochlea standard dataset which can be downloaded for free from a public XNAT server.

  8. Topology-Preserving Rigid Transformation of 2D Digital Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Phuc; Passat, Nicolas; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Talbot, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    We provide conditions under which 2D digital images preserve their topological properties under rigid transformations. We consider the two most common digital topology models, namely dual adjacency and well-composedness. This paper leads to the proposal of optimal preprocessing strategies that ensure the topological invariance of images under arbitrary rigid transformations. These results and methods are proved to be valid for various kinds of images (binary, gray-level, label), thus providing generic and efficient tools, which can be used in particular in the context of image registration and warping.

  9. Geometry planning and image registration in magnetic particle imaging using bimodal fiducial markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, F.; Hofmann, M.; Them, K.; Knopp, T.; Jung, C.; Salamon, J.; Kaul, M. G.; Mummert, T.; Adam, G.; Ittrich, H.; Werner, R.; Säring, D.; Weber, O. M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a quantitative imaging modality that allows the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to be visualized. Compared to other imaging techniques like x-ray radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MPI only provides a signal from the administered tracer, but no additional morphological information, which complicates geometry planning and the interpretation of MP images. The purpose of the authors’ study was to develop bimodal fiducial markers that can be visualized by MPI and MRI in order to create MP–MR fusion images. Methods: A certain arrangement of three bimodal fiducial markers was developed and used in a combined MRI/MPI phantom and also during in vivo experiments in order to investigate its suitability for geometry planning and image fusion. An algorithm for automated marker extraction in both MR and MP images and rigid registration was established. Results: The developed bimodal fiducial markers can be visualized by MRI and MPI and allow for geometry planning as well as automated registration and fusion of MR–MP images. Conclusions: To date, exact positioning of the object to be imaged within the field of view (FOV) and the assignment of reconstructed MPI signals to corresponding morphological regions has been difficult. The developed bimodal fiducial markers and the automated image registration algorithm help to overcome these difficulties.

  10. Geometry planning and image registration in magnetic particle imaging using bimodal fiducial markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, F., E-mail: f.werner@uke.de; Hofmann, M.; Them, K.; Knopp, T. [Section for Biomedical Imaging, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg 20246, Germany and Institute for Biomedical Imaging, Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg 21073 (Germany); Jung, C.; Salamon, J.; Kaul, M. G.; Mummert, T.; Adam, G.; Ittrich, H. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg 20246 (Germany); Werner, R.; Säring, D. [Institute for Computational Neuroscience, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg 20246 (Germany); Weber, O. M. [Philips Medical Systems DMC GmbH, Hamburg 22335 (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a quantitative imaging modality that allows the distribution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to be visualized. Compared to other imaging techniques like x-ray radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MPI only provides a signal from the administered tracer, but no additional morphological information, which complicates geometry planning and the interpretation of MP images. The purpose of the authors’ study was to develop bimodal fiducial markers that can be visualized by MPI and MRI in order to create MP–MR fusion images. Methods: A certain arrangement of three bimodal fiducial markers was developed and used in a combined MRI/MPI phantom and also during in vivo experiments in order to investigate its suitability for geometry planning and image fusion. An algorithm for automated marker extraction in both MR and MP images and rigid registration was established. Results: The developed bimodal fiducial markers can be visualized by MRI and MPI and allow for geometry planning as well as automated registration and fusion of MR–MP images. Conclusions: To date, exact positioning of the object to be imaged within the field of view (FOV) and the assignment of reconstructed MPI signals to corresponding morphological regions has been difficult. The developed bimodal fiducial markers and the automated image registration algorithm help to overcome these difficulties.

  11. Speeding up Coarse Point Cloud Registration by Threshold-Independent Baysac Match Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Z.; Lindenbergh, R.; Pu, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for the automatic registration of terrestrial point clouds by match selection using an efficiently conditional sampling method -- threshold-independent BaySAC (BAYes SAmpling Consensus) and employs the error metric of average point-to-surface residual to reduce the random measurement error and then approach the real registration error. BaySAC and other basic sampling algorithms usually need to artificially determine a threshold by which inlier points are identified, which leads to a threshold-dependent verification process. Therefore, we applied the LMedS method to construct the cost function that is used to determine the optimum model to reduce the influence of human factors and improve the robustness of the model estimate. Point-to-point and point-to-surface error metrics are most commonly used. However, point-to-point error in general consists of at least two components, random measurement error and systematic error as a result of a remaining error in the found rigid body transformation. Thus we employ the measure of the average point-to-surface residual to evaluate the registration accuracy. The proposed approaches, together with a traditional RANSAC approach, are tested on four data sets acquired by three different scanners in terms of their computational efficiency and quality of the final registration. The registration results show the st.dev of the average point-to-surface residuals is reduced from 1.4 cm (plain RANSAC) to 0.5 cm (threshold-independent BaySAC). The results also show that, compared to the performance of RANSAC, our BaySAC strategies lead to less iterations and cheaper computational cost when the hypothesis set is contaminated with more outliers.

  12. SU-E-J-114: A Practical Hybrid Method for Improving the Quality of CT-CBCT Deformable Image Registration for Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C; Kumarasiri, A; Chetvertkov, M; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Siddiqui, F; Kim, J [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between CT and CBCT in H&N is challenging. In this study, we propose a practical hybrid method that uses not only the pixel intensities but also organ physical properties, structure volume of interest (VOI), and interactive local registrations. Methods: Five oropharyngeal cancer patients were selected retrospectively. For each patient, the planning CT was registered to the last fraction CBCT, where the anatomy difference was largest. A three step registration strategy was tested; Step1) DIR using pixel intensity only, Step2) DIR with additional use of structure VOI and rigidity penalty, and Step3) interactive local correction. For Step1, a public-domain open-source DIR algorithm was used (cubic B-spline, mutual information, steepest gradient optimization, and 4-level multi-resolution). For Step2, rigidity penalty was applied on bony anatomies and brain, and a structure VOI was used to handle the body truncation such as the shoulder cut-off on CBCT. Finally, in Step3, the registrations were reviewed on our in-house developed software and the erroneous areas were corrected via a local registration using level-set motion algorithm. Results: After Step1, there were considerable amount of registration errors in soft tissues and unrealistic stretching in the posterior to the neck and near the shoulder due to body truncation. The brain was also found deformed to a measurable extent near the superior border of CBCT. Such errors could be effectively removed by using a structure VOI and rigidity penalty. The rest of the local soft tissue error could be corrected using the interactive software tool. The estimated interactive correction time was approximately 5 minutes. Conclusion: The DIR using only the image pixel intensity was vulnerable to noise and body truncation. A corrective action was inevitable to achieve good quality of registrations. We found the proposed three-step hybrid method efficient and practical for CT

  13. SU-E-J-08: A Hybrid Three Dimensional Registration Framework for Image-Guided Accurate Radiotherapy System ARTS-IGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q; Pei, X; Cao, R; Hu, L; Wu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop a registration framework and method based on the software platform of ARTS-IGRT and implement in C++ based on ITK libraries to register CT images and CBCT images. ARTS-IGRT was a part of our self-developed accurate radiation planning system ARTS. Methods: Mutual information (MI) registration treated each voxel equally. Actually, different voxels even having same intensity should be treated differently in the registration procedure. According to their importance values calculated from self-information, a similarity measure was proposed which combined the spatial importance of a voxel with MI (S-MI). For lung registration, Firstly, a global alignment method was adopted to minimize the margin error and achieve the alignment of these two images on the whole. The result obtained at the low resolution level was then interpolated to become the initial conditions for the higher resolution computation. Secondly, a new similarity measurement S-MI was established to quantify how close the two input image volumes were to each other. Finally, Demons model was applied to compute the deformable map. Results: Registration tools were tested for head-neck and lung images and the average region was 128*128*49. The rigid registration took approximately 2 min and converged 10% faster than traditional MI algorithm, the accuracy reached 1mm for head-neck images. For lung images, the improved symmetric Demons registration process was completed in an average of 5 min using a 2.4GHz dual core CPU. Conclusion: A registration framework was developed to correct patient's setup according to register the planning CT volume data and the daily reconstructed 3D CBCT data. The experiments showed that the spatial MI algorithm can be adopted for head-neck images. The improved Demons deformable registration was more suitable to lung images, and rigid alignment should be applied before deformable registration to get more accurate result. Supported by

  14. FZUImageReg: A toolbox for medical image registration and dose fusion in cervical cancer radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinquan Gao

    Full Text Available The combination external-beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy is a standard form of treatment for patients with locally advanced uterine cervical cancer. Personalized radiotherapy in cervical cancer requires efficient and accurate dose planning and assessment across these types of treatment. To achieve radiation dose assessment, accurate mapping of the dose distribution from HDR-BT onto EBRT is extremely important. However, few systems can achieve robust dose fusion and determine the accumulated dose distribution during the entire course of treatment. We have therefore developed a toolbox (FZUImageReg, which is a user-friendly dose fusion system based on hybrid image registration for radiation dose assessment in cervical cancer radiotherapy. The main part of the software consists of a collection of medical image registration algorithms and a modular design with a user-friendly interface, which allows users to quickly configure, test, monitor, and compare different registration methods for a specific application. Owing to the large deformation, the direct application of conventional state-of-the-art image registration methods is not sufficient for the accurate alignment of EBRT and HDR-BT images. To solve this problem, a multi-phase non-rigid registration method using local landmark-based free-form deformation is proposed for locally large deformation between EBRT and HDR-BT images, followed by intensity-based free-form deformation. With the transformation, the software also provides a dose mapping function according to the deformation field. The total dose distribution during the entire course of treatment can then be presented. Experimental results clearly show that the proposed system can achieve accurate registration between EBRT and HDR-BT images and provide radiation dose warping and fusion results for dose assessment in cervical cancer radiotherapy in terms of high accuracy and efficiency.

  15. Registration of planar bioluminescence to magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images as a platform for the development of bioluminescence tomography reconstruction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bradley J; Klose, Alexander D; Le, Carl H; Longo, Valerie A; Dobrenkov, Konstantine; Vider, Jelena; Koutcher, Jason A; Blasberg, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    The procedures we propose make possible the mapping of two-dimensional (2-D) bioluminescence image (BLI) data onto a skin surface derived from a three-dimensional (3-D) anatomical modality [magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT)] dataset. This mapping allows anatomical information to be incorporated into bioluminescence tomography (BLT) reconstruction procedures and, when applied using sources visible to both optical and anatomical modalities, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of those reconstructions. Our procedures, based on immobilization of the animal and a priori determined fixed projective transforms, should be more robust and accurate than previously described efforts, which rely on a poorly constrained retrospectively determined warping of the 3-D anatomical information. Experiments conducted to measure the accuracy of the proposed registration procedure found it to have a mean error of 0.36+/-0.23 mm. Additional experiments highlight some of the confounds that are often overlooked in the BLT reconstruction process, and for two of these confounds, simple corrections are proposed.

  16. Accuracy of deformable image registration on magnetic resonance images in digital and physical phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Rachel B; Yang, Jinzhong; Ding, Yao; Jacobsen, Megan C; Fuller, Clifton D; Howell, Rebecca M; Li, Heng; Jason Stafford, R; Zhou, Shouhao; Court, Laurence E

    2017-10-01

    Accurate deformable image registration is necessary for longitudinal studies. The error associated with commercial systems has been evaluated using computed tomography (CT). Several in-house algorithms have been evaluated for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but there is still relatively little information about MRI deformable image registration. This work presents an evaluation of two deformable image registration systems, one commercial (Velocity) and one in-house (demons-based algorithm), with MRI using two different metrics to quantify the registration error. The registration error was analyzed with synthetic MR images. These images were generated from interpatient and intrapatient variation models trained on 28 patients. Four synthetic post-treatment images were generated for each of four synthetic pretreatment images, resulting in 16 image registrations for both the T1- and T2-weighted images. The synthetic post-treatment images were registered to their corresponding synthetic pretreatment image. The registration error was calculated between the known deformation vector field and the generated deformation vector field from the image registration system. The registration error was also analyzed using a porcine phantom with ten implanted 0.35-mm diameter gold markers. The markers were visible on CT but not MRI. CT, T1-weighted MR, and T2-weighted MR images were taken in four different positions. The markers were contoured on the CT images and rigidly registered to their corresponding MR images. The MR images were deformably registered and the distance between the projected marker location and true marker location was measured as the registration error. The synthetic images were evaluated only on Velocity. Root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.76 mm in the left-right (LR) direction, 0.76 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, and 0.69 mm in the superior-inferior (SI) direction were observed for the T1-weighted MR images. RMSEs of 1.1 mm in the LR

  17. Development and application of pulmonary structure-function registration methods: towards pulmonary image-guidance tools for improved airway targeted therapies and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fumin; Pike, Damien; Svenningsen, Sarah; Coxson, Harvey O.; Drozd, John J.; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2014-03-01

    Objectives: We aimed to develop a way to rapidly generate multi-modality (MRI-CT) pulmonary imaging structurefunction maps using novel non-rigid image registration methods. This objective is part of our overarching goal to provide an image processing pipeline to generate pulmonary structure-function maps and guide airway-targeted therapies. Methods: Anatomical 1H and functional 3He MRI were acquired in 5 healthy asymptomatic ex-smokers and 7 ex-smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at inspiration breath-hold. Thoracic CT was performed within ten minutes of MRI using the same breath-hold volume. Landmark-based affine registration methods previously validated for imaging of COPD, was based on corresponding fiducial markers located in both CT and 1H MRI coronal slices and compared with shape-based CT-MRI non-rigid registration. Shape-based CT-MRI registration was developed by first identifying the shapes of the lung cavities manually, and then registering the two shapes using affine and thin-plate spline algorithms. We compared registration accuracy using the fiducial localization error (FLE) and target registration error (TRE). Results: For landmark-based registration, the TRE was 8.4±5.3 mm for whole lung and 7.8±4.6 mm for the R and L lungs registered independently (p=0.4). For shape-based registration, the TRE was 8.0±4.6 mm for whole lung as compared to 6.9±4.4 mm for the R and L lung registered independently and this difference was significant (p=0.01). The difference for shape-based (6.9±4.4 mm) and landmark-based R and L lung registration (7.8±4.6 mm) was also significant (p=.04) Conclusion: Shape-based registration TRE was significantly improved compared to landmark-based registration when considering L and R lungs independently.

  18. Accelerating Neuroimage Registration through Parallel Computation of Similarity Metric.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Gang Luo

    Full Text Available Neuroimage registration is crucial for brain morphometric analysis and treatment efficacy evaluation. However, existing advanced registration algorithms such as FLIRT and ANTs are not efficient enough for clinical use. In this paper, a GPU implementation of FLIRT with the correlation ratio (CR as the similarity metric and a GPU accelerated correlation coefficient (CC calculation for the symmetric diffeomorphic registration of ANTs have been developed. The comparison with their corresponding original tools shows that our accelerated algorithms can greatly outperform the original algorithm in terms of computational efficiency. This paper demonstrates the great potential of applying these registration tools in clinical applications.

  19. Mapping of the prostate in endorectal coil-based MRI/MRSI and CT: A deformable registration and validation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, J.; Xing, L.; Hunjan, S.; Dumoulin, C.; Levin, J.; Lo, A.; Watkins, R.; Rohling, K.; Giaquinto, R.; Kim, D.; Spielman, D.; Daniel, B.

    2004-01-01

    The endorectal coil is being increasingly used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to obtain anatomic and metabolic images of the prostate with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In practice, however, the use of endorectal probe inevitably distorts the prostate and other soft tissue organs, making the analysis and the use of the acquired image data in treatment planning difficult. The purpose of this work is to develop a deformable image registration algorithm to map the MRI/MRSI information obtained using an endorectal probe onto CT images and to verify the accuracy of the registration by phantom and patient studies. A mapping procedure involved using a thin plate spline (TPS) transformation was implemented to establish voxel-to-voxel correspondence between a reference image and a floating image with deformation. An elastic phantom with a number of implanted fiducial markers was designed for the validation of the quality of the registration. Radiographic images of the phantom were obtained before and after a series of intentionally introduced distortions. After mapping the distorted phantom to the original one, the displacements of the implanted markers were measured with respect to their ideal positions and the mean error was calculated. In patient studies, CT images of three prostate patients were acquired, followed by 3 Tesla (3 T) MR images with a rigid endorectal coil. Registration quality was estimated by the centroid position displacement and image coincidence index (CI). Phantom and patient studies show that TPS-based registration has achieved significantly higher accuracy than the previously reported method based on a rigid-body transformation and scaling. The technique should be useful to map the MR spectroscopic dataset acquired with ER probe onto the treatment planning CT dataset to guide radiotherapy planning

  20. Comparison of numerical results between related shapes using a non-rigid mapping with statistical quantication of uncertainty

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jansen van Rensburg, Gerhardus J

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, numerical results obtained on different but related shapes are compared by using a non-rigid mapping. Non-rigid registration is employed to obtain mesh representations of different human skull geometries with the same mesh...

  1. A multicore based parallel image registration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Gong, Leiguang; Zhang, Hong; Nosher, John L; Foran, David J

    2009-01-01

    Image registration is a crucial step for many image-assisted clinical applications such as surgery planning and treatment evaluation. In this paper we proposed a landmark based nonlinear image registration algorithm for matching 2D image pairs. The algorithm was shown to be effective and robust under conditions of large deformations. In landmark based registration, the most important step is establishing the correspondence among the selected landmark points. This usually requires an extensive search which is often computationally expensive. We introduced a nonregular data partition algorithm using the K-means clustering algorithm to group the landmarks based on the number of available processing cores. The step optimizes the memory usage and data transfer. We have tested our method using IBM Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/B.E.) platform.

  2. Robust surface registration using N-points approximate congruent sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Jian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scans acquired by 3D sensors are typically represented in a local coordinate system. When multiple scans, taken from different locations, represent the same scene these must be registered to a common reference frame. We propose a fast and robust registration approach to automatically align two scans by finding two sets of N-points, that are approximately congruent under rigid transformation and leading to a good estimate of the transformation between their corresponding point clouds. Given two scans, our algorithm randomly searches for the best sets of congruent groups of points using a RANSAC-based approach. To successfully and reliably align two scans when there is only a small overlap, we improve the basic RANSAC random selection step by employing a weight function that approximates the probability of each pair of points in one scan to match one pair in the other. The search time to find pairs of congruent sets of N-points is greatly reduced by employing a fast search codebook based on both binary and multi-dimensional lookup tables. Moreover, we introduce a novel indicator of the overlapping region quality which is used to verify the estimated rigid transformation and to improve the alignment robustness. Our framework is general enough to incorporate and efficiently combine different point descriptors derived from geometric and texture-based feature points or scene geometrical characteristics. We also present a method to improve the matching effectiveness of texture feature descriptors by extracting them from an atlas of rectified images recovered from the scan reflectance image. Our algorithm is robust with respect to different sampling densities and also resilient to noise and outliers. We demonstrate its robustness and efficiency on several challenging scan datasets with varying degree of noise, outliers, extent of overlap, acquired from indoor and outdoor scenarios.

  3. Torsional Rigidity of Minimal Submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    We prove explicit upper bounds for the torsional rigidity of extrinsic domains of minimal submanifolds $P^m$ in ambient Riemannian manifolds $N^n$ with a pole $p$. The upper bounds are given in terms of the torsional rigidities of corresponding Schwarz symmetrizations of the domains in warped...

  4. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero, Ruben [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del I.P.N., Unidad Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 9, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Molgado, Alberto [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Zacatecas Zac. (Mexico); Rojas, Efrain, E-mail: cordero@esfm.ipn.mx, E-mail: amolgado@fisica.uaz.edu.mx, E-mail: efrojas@uv.mx [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Universidad Veracruzana, 91000 Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-03-21

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  5. Quantum charged rigid membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero, Ruben; Molgado, Alberto; Rojas, Efrain

    2011-01-01

    The early Dirac proposal to model the electron as a charged membrane is reviewed. A rigidity term, instead of the natural membrane tension, involving linearly the extrinsic curvature of the worldvolume swept out by the membrane is considered in the action modeling the bubble in the presence of an electromagnetic field. We set up this model as a genuine second-order derivative theory by considering a non-trivial boundary term which plays a relevant part in our formulation. The Lagrangian in question is linear in the bubble acceleration and by means of the Ostrogradski-Hamiltonian approach, we observed that the theory comprises the management of both first- and second-class constraints. We thus show that our second-order approach is robust allowing for a proper quantization. We found an effective quantum potential which permits us to compute bounded states for the system. We comment on the possibility of describing brane world universes by invoking this kind of second-order correction terms.

  6. GPU accelerated generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs for 2-D/3-D image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgham, Osama M; Laycock, Stephen D; Fisher, Mark H

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in programming languages for graphics processing units (GPUs) provide developers with a convenient way of implementing applications which can be executed on the CPU and GPU interchangeably. GPUs are becoming relatively cheap, powerful, and widely available hardware components, which can be used to perform intensive calculations. The last decade of hardware performance developments shows that GPU-based computation is progressing significantly faster than CPU-based computation, particularly if one considers the execution of highly parallelisable algorithms. Future predictions illustrate that this trend is likely to continue. In this paper, we introduce a way of accelerating 2-D/3-D image registration by developing a hybrid system which executes on the CPU and utilizes the GPU for parallelizing the generation of digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Based on the advancements of the GPU over the CPU, it is timely to exploit the benefits of many-core GPU technology by developing algorithms for DRR generation. Although some previous work has investigated the rendering of DRRs using the GPU, this paper investigates approximations which reduce the computational overhead while still maintaining a quality consistent with that needed for 2-D/3-D registration with sufficient accuracy to be clinically acceptable in certain applications of radiation oncology. Furthermore, by comparing implementations of 2-D/3-D registration on the CPU and GPU, we investigate current performance and propose an optimal framework for PC implementations addressing the rigid registration problem. Using this framework, we are able to render DRR images from a 256×256×133 CT volume in ~24 ms using an NVidia GeForce 8800 GTX and in ~2 ms using NVidia GeForce GTX 580. In addition to applications requiring fast automatic patient setup, these levels of performance suggest image-guided radiation therapy at video frame rates is technically feasible using relatively low cost PC

  7. Automated Registration of Multimodal Optic Disc Images: Clinical Assessment of Alignment Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Siene; Legg, Phil; Avadhanam, Venkat; Aye, Kyaw; Evans, Steffan H P; North, Rachel V; Marshall, Andrew D; Rosin, Paul; Morgan, James E

    2016-04-01

    To determine the accuracy of automated alignment algorithms for the registration of optic disc images obtained by 2 different modalities: fundus photography and scanning laser tomography. Images obtained with the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph II and paired photographic optic disc images of 135 eyes were analyzed. Three state-of-the-art automated registration techniques Regional Mutual Information, rigid Feature Neighbourhood Mutual Information (FNMI), and nonrigid FNMI (NRFNMI) were used to align these image pairs. Alignment of each composite picture was assessed on a 5-point grading scale: "Fail" (no alignment of vessels with no vessel contact), "Weak" (vessels have slight contact), "Good" (vessels with 50% contact), and "Excellent" (complete alignment). Custom software generated an image mosaic in which the modalities were interleaved as a series of alternate 5×5-pixel blocks. These were graded independently by 3 clinically experienced observers. A total of 810 image pairs were assessed. All 3 registration techniques achieved a score of "Good" or better in >95% of the image sets. NRFNMI had the highest percentage of "Excellent" (mean: 99.6%; range, 95.2% to 99.6%), followed by Regional Mutual Information (mean: 81.6%; range, 86.3% to 78.5%) and FNMI (mean: 73.1%; range, 85.2% to 54.4%). Automated registration of optic disc images by different modalities is a feasible option for clinical application. All 3 methods provided useful levels of alignment, but the NRFNMI technique consistently outperformed the others and is recommended as a practical approach to the automated registration of multimodal disc images.

  8. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  9. Correction of patient motion in cone-beam CT using 3D-2D registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Jacobson, M.; Stayman, J. W.; Ehtiati, T.; Weiss, C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is increasingly common in guidance of interventional procedures, but can be subject to artifacts arising from patient motion during fairly long (~5-60 s) scan times. We present a fiducial-free method to mitigate motion artifacts using 3D-2D image registration that simultaneously corrects residual errors in the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of geometric calibration. The 3D-2D registration process registers each projection to a prior 3D image by maximizing gradient orientation using the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer. The resulting rigid transforms are applied to the system projection matrices, and a 3D image is reconstructed via model-based iterative reconstruction. Phantom experiments were conducted using a Zeego robotic C-arm to image a head phantom undergoing 5-15 cm translations and 5-15° rotations. To further test the algorithm, clinical images were acquired with a CBCT head scanner in which long scan times were susceptible to significant patient motion. CBCT images were reconstructed using a penalized likelihood objective function. For phantom studies the structural similarity (SSIM) between motion-free and motion-corrected images was  >0.995, with significant improvement (p  values of uncorrected images. Additionally, motion-corrected images exhibited a point-spread function with full-width at half maximum comparable to that of the motion-free reference image. Qualitative comparison of the motion-corrupted and motion-corrected clinical images demonstrated a significant improvement in image quality after motion correction. This indicates that the 3D-2D registration method could provide a useful approach to motion artifact correction under assumptions of local rigidity, as in the head, pelvis, and extremities. The method is highly parallelizable, and the automatic correction of residual geometric calibration errors provides added benefit that could be valuable in routine use.

  10. Mao-Gilles Stabilization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Gilles

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Originally, the Mao-Gilles stabilization algorithm was designed to compensate the non-rigid deformations due to atmospheric turbulence. Given a sequence of frames affected by atmospheric turbulence, the algorithm uses a variational model combining optical flow and regularization to characterize the static observed scene. The optimization problem is solved by Bregman Iteration and the operator splitting method. The algorithm is simple, efficient, and can be easily generalized for different scenarios involving non-rigid deformations.

  11. SU-E-J-266: A Pitfall of a Deformable Image Registration in Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Y [The National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku, Tokyo (Japan); Tachibana, H [The National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Moriya, S [Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo (Japan); Sawant, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: For four-dimensional (4D) planning and adaptive radiotherapy, deformable image registration (DIR) is needed and the accuracy is essential. We evaluated the accuracy of one free-downloadable DIR software library package (NiftyReg) and one commercial DIR software (MIM) in lung SBRT cancer patients. Methods: A rigid and non-rigid registrations were implemented to our in-house software. The non-rigid registration algorithm of the NiftyReg and MIM was based on the free-form deformation. The accuracy of the two software was evaluated when contoured structures to peak-inhale and peak-exhale 4DCT image data sets were measured using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The evaluation was performed in 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: In our visual evaluation, the eighteen cases show good agreement between the deformed structures for the peak-inhale phase and the peak-exhale phase structures (more than 0.8 DSC value). In the evaluation of the DSC in-house software, averaged DSC values of GTV and lung, heart, spinal cord, stomach and body were 0.862 and 0.979, 0.932, 0.974, 0.860, 0.998, respectively. As the Resultof the registration using the MIM program in the two cases which had less than 0.7 DSC value when analyzed using the in-house software, the DSC value were improved to 0.8. The CT images in a case with low DSC value shows the tumor was surrounded by the structure with the similar CT values, which were the chest wall or the diaphragm. Conclusion: Not only a free-downloadable DIR software but also a commercial software may provide unexpected results and there is a possibility that the results would make us misjudge the treatment planning. Therefore, we recommend that a commissioning test of any DIR software should be performed before clinical use and we should understand the characteristics of the software.

  12. Planning, guidance, and quality assurance of pelvic screw placement using deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerres, J.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M.; Ramsay, B.; De Silva, T.; Ketcha, M.; Han, R.; Manbachi, A.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Osgood, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous pelvic screw placement is challenging due to narrow bone corridors surrounded by vulnerable structures and difficult visual interpretation of complex anatomical shapes in 2D x-ray projection images. To address these challenges, a system for planning, guidance, and quality assurance (QA) is presented, providing functionality analogous to surgical navigation, but based on robust 3D-2D image registration techniques using fluoroscopy images already acquired in routine workflow. Two novel aspects of the system are investigated: automatic planning of pelvic screw trajectories and the ability to account for deformation of surgical devices (K-wire deflection). Atlas-based registration is used to calculate a patient-specific plan of screw trajectories in preoperative CT. 3D-2D registration aligns the patient to CT within the projective geometry of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Deformable known-component registration (dKC-Reg) localizes the surgical device, and the combination of plan and device location is used to provide guidance and QA. A leave-one-out analysis evaluated the accuracy of automatic planning, and a cadaver experiment compared the accuracy of dKC-Reg to rigid approaches (e.g. optical tracking). Surgical plans conformed within the bone cortex by 3-4 mm for the narrowest corridor (superior pubic ramus) and  >5 mm for the widest corridor (tear drop). The dKC-Reg algorithm localized the K-wire tip within 1.1 mm and 1.4° and was consistently more accurate than rigid-body tracking (errors up to 9 mm). The system was shown to automatically compute reliable screw trajectories and accurately localize deformed surgical devices (K-wires). Such capability could improve guidance and QA in orthopaedic surgery, where workflow is impeded by manual planning, conventional tool trackers add complexity and cost, rigid tool assumptions are often inaccurate, and qualitative interpretation of complex anatomy from 2D projections is prone to trial

  13. SU-E-J-266: A Pitfall of a Deformable Image Registration in Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Y; Tachibana, H; Moriya, S; Sawant, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For four-dimensional (4D) planning and adaptive radiotherapy, deformable image registration (DIR) is needed and the accuracy is essential. We evaluated the accuracy of one free-downloadable DIR software library package (NiftyReg) and one commercial DIR software (MIM) in lung SBRT cancer patients. Methods: A rigid and non-rigid registrations were implemented to our in-house software. The non-rigid registration algorithm of the NiftyReg and MIM was based on the free-form deformation. The accuracy of the two software was evaluated when contoured structures to peak-inhale and peak-exhale 4DCT image data sets were measured using the dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The evaluation was performed in 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: In our visual evaluation, the eighteen cases show good agreement between the deformed structures for the peak-inhale phase and the peak-exhale phase structures (more than 0.8 DSC value). In the evaluation of the DSC in-house software, averaged DSC values of GTV and lung, heart, spinal cord, stomach and body were 0.862 and 0.979, 0.932, 0.974, 0.860, 0.998, respectively. As the Resultof the registration using the MIM program in the two cases which had less than 0.7 DSC value when analyzed using the in-house software, the DSC value were improved to 0.8. The CT images in a case with low DSC value shows the tumor was surrounded by the structure with the similar CT values, which were the chest wall or the diaphragm. Conclusion: Not only a free-downloadable DIR software but also a commercial software may provide unexpected results and there is a possibility that the results would make us misjudge the treatment planning. Therefore, we recommend that a commissioning test of any DIR software should be performed before clinical use and we should understand the characteristics of the software

  14. A fast alignment method for breast MRI follow-up studies using automated breast segmentation and current-prior registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Strehlow, Jan; Rühaak, Jan; Weiler, Florian; Diez, Yago; Gubern-Merida, Albert; Diekmann, Susanne; Laue, Hendrik; Hahn, Horst K.

    2015-03-01

    In breast cancer screening for high-risk women, follow-up magnetic resonance images (MRI) are acquired with a time interval ranging from several months up to a few years. Prior MRI studies may provide additional clinical value when examining the current one and thus have the potential to increase sensitivity and specificity of screening. To build a spatial correlation between suspicious findings in both current and prior studies, a reliable alignment method between follow-up studies is desirable. However, long time interval, different scanners and imaging protocols, and varying breast compression can result in a large deformation, which challenges the registration process. In this work, we present a fast and robust spatial alignment framework, which combines automated breast segmentation and current-prior registration techniques in a multi-level fashion. First, fully automatic breast segmentation is applied to extract the breast masks that are used to obtain an initial affine transform. Then, a non-rigid registration algorithm using normalized gradient fields as similarity measure together with curvature regularization is applied. A total of 29 subjects and 58 breast MR images were collected for performance assessment. To evaluate the global registration accuracy, the volume overlap and boundary surface distance metrics are calculated, resulting in an average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 0.96 and root mean square distance (RMSD) of 1.64 mm. In addition, to measure local registration accuracy, for each subject a radiologist annotated 10 pairs of markers in the current and prior studies representing corresponding anatomical locations. The average distance error of marker pairs dropped from 67.37 mm to 10.86 mm after applying registration.

  15. Large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping registration of reconstructed 3D histological section images and in vivo MR images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Ceritoglu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of neuroanatomical abnormalities in neuropsychiatric diseases is based largely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and post mortem histological analyses of the brain. Further advances in elucidating altered brain structure in these human conditions might emerge from combining MRI and histological methods. We propose a multistage method for registering 3D volumes reconstructed from histological sections to corresponding in vivo MRI volumes from the same subjects: (1 manual segmentation of white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF compartments in histological sections, (2 alignment of consecutive histological sections using 2D rigid transformation to construct a 3D histological image volume from the aligned sections, (3 registration of reconstructed 3D histological volumes to the corresponding 3D MRI volumes using 3D affine transformation, (4 intensity normalization of images via histogram matching and (5 registration of the volumes via intensity based Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric (LDDMM image matching algorithm. Here we demonstrate the utility of our method in the transfer of cytoarchitectonic information from histological sections to identify regions of interest in MRI scans of nine adult macaque brains for morphometric analyses. LDDMM improved the accuracy of the registration via decreased distances between GM/CSF surfaces after LDDMM (0.39±0.13 mm compared to distances after affine registration (0.76±0.41 mm. Similarly, WM/GM distances decreased to 0.28±0.16 mm after LDDMM compared to 0.54±0.39 mm after affine registration. The multistage registration method may find broad application for mapping histologically based information, e.g., receptor distributions, gene expression, onto MRI volumes.

  16. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F.; Zaidi, Habib

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of

  17. Comparison of three filters in the solution of the Navier-Stokes equation in registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus; Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1997-01-01

    he registration of images is an often encountered problem in e.g. medical imagi ng, satelite imaging, or stereo vision. In most applications a rigid deformation model does not suffce and complex deformations must be estimated. In medical registration Bajcsy et al. [1] have proposed the use...

  18. Interactive, multi-modality image registrations for combined MRI/MRSI-planned HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen Reed

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the steps and criteria involved in the series of image registrations used clinically during the planning and dose delivery of focal high dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy of the prostate. Material and methods: Three imaging modalities – Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI, and Computed Tomography (CT – were used at different steps during the process. MRSI is used for identification of dominant intraprosatic lesions (DIL. A series of rigid and nonrigid transformations were applied to the data to correct for endorectal-coil-induced deformations and for alignment with the planning CT. Mutual information was calculated as a morphing metric. An inverse planning optimization algorithm was applied to boost dose to the DIL while providing protection to the urethra, penile bulb, rectum, and bladder. Six prostate cancer patients were treated using this protocol. Results: The morphing algorithm successfully modeled the probe-induced prostatic distortion. Mutual information calculated between the morphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe showed a significant (p = 0.0071 increase to that calculated between the unmorphed images and images acquired without the endorectal probe. Both mutual information and visual inspection serve as effective diagnostics of image morphing. The entire procedure adds less than thirty minutes to the treatment planning. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the utility of image transformations and registrations to HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

  19. Shape-based diffeomorphic registration on hippocampal surfaces using Beltrami holomorphic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Lok Ming; Wong, Tsz Wai; Thompson, Paul; Chan, Tony; Gu, Xianfeng; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new algorithm to automatically register hippocampal (HP) surfaces with complete geometric matching, avoiding the need to manually label landmark features. A good registration depends on a reasonable choice of shape energy that measures the dissimilarity between surfaces. In our work, we first propose a complete shape index using the Beltrami coefficient and curvatures, which measures subtle local differences. The proposed shape energy is zero if and only if two shapes are identical up to a rigid motion. We then seek the best surface registration by minimizing the shape energy. We propose a simple representation of surface diffeomorphisms using Beltrami coefficients, which simplifies the optimization process. We then iteratively minimize the shape energy using the proposed Beltrami Holomorphic flow (BHF) method. Experimental results on 212 HP of normal and diseased (Alzheimer's disease) subjects show our proposed algorithm is effective in registering HP surfaces with complete geometric matching. The proposed shape energy can also capture local shape differences between HP for disease analysis.

  20. On flexible and rigid nouns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2010-01-01

    classes. Finally this article wants to claim that the distinction between rigid and flexible noun categories (a) adds a new dimension to current classifications of parts of speech systems, (b) correlates with certain grammatical phenomena (e.g. so-called number discord), and (c) helps to explain the parts......This article argues that in addition to the major flexible lexical categories in Hengeveld’s classification of parts of speech systems (Contentive, Non-Verb, Modifier), there are also flexible word classes within the rigid lexical category Noun (Set Noun, Sort Noun, General Noun). Members...... by the flexible item in the external world. I will then argue that flexible word classes constitute a proper category (i.e. they are not the result of a merger of some rigid word classes) in that members of flexible word categories display the same properties regarding category membership as members of rigid word...

  1. Optic disc boundary segmentation from diffeomorphic demons registration of monocular fundus image sequences versus 3D visualization of stereo fundus image pairs for automated early stage glaucoma assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Vijay; Hill, Jason; Mitra, Sunanda; Nutter, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Despite the current availability in resource-rich regions of advanced technologies in scanning and 3-D imaging in current ophthalmology practice, world-wide screening tests for early detection and progression of glaucoma still consist of a variety of simple tools, including fundus image-based parameters such as CDR (cup to disc diameter ratio) and CAR (cup to disc area ratio), especially in resource -poor regions. Reliable automated computation of the relevant parameters from fundus image sequences requires robust non-rigid registration and segmentation techniques. Recent research work demonstrated that proper non-rigid registration of multi-view monocular fundus image sequences could result in acceptable segmentation of cup boundaries for automated computation of CAR and CDR. This research work introduces a composite diffeomorphic demons registration algorithm for segmentation of cup boundaries from a sequence of monocular images and compares the resulting CAR and CDR values with those computed manually by experts and from 3-D visualization of stereo pairs. Our preliminary results show that the automated computation of CDR and CAR from composite diffeomorphic segmentation of monocular image sequences yield values comparable with those from the other two techniques and thus may provide global healthcare with a cost-effective yet accurate tool for management of glaucoma in its early stage.

  2. Nonrigid Image Registration for Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning With PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Dyker, Karen E.; Barber, David C.; Wood, Steven M.; Hanney, Michael B.; Tindale, Wendy B.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Head and neck radiotherapy planning with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) requires the images to be reliably registered with treatment planning CT. Acquiring PET/CT in treatment position is problematic, and in practice for some patients it may be beneficial to use diagnostic PET/CT for radiotherapy planning. Therefore, the aim of this study was first to quantify the image registration accuracy of PET/CT to radiotherapy CT and, second, to assess whether PET/CT acquired in diagnostic position can be registered to planning CT. Methods and Materials: Positron emission tomography/CT acquired in diagnostic and treatment position for five patients with head and neck cancer was registered to radiotherapy planning CT using both rigid and nonrigid image registration. The root mean squared error for each method was calculated from a set of anatomic landmarks marked by four independent observers. Results: Nonrigid and rigid registration errors for treatment position PET/CT to planning CT were 2.77 ± 0.80 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.001. Applying the nonrigid registration to diagnostic position PET/CT produced a more accurate match to the planning CT than rigid registration of treatment position PET/CT (3.20 ± 1.22 mm and 4.96 ± 2.38 mm, respectively, p = 0.012). Conclusions: Nonrigid registration provides a more accurate registration of head and neck PET/CT to treatment planning CT than rigid registration. In addition, nonrigid registration of PET/CT acquired with patients in a standardized, diagnostic position can provide images registered to planning CT with greater accuracy than a rigid registration of PET/CT images acquired in treatment position. This may allow greater flexibility in the timing of PET/CT for head and neck cancer patients due to undergo radiotherapy

  3. Mammogram CAD, hybrid registration and iconic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, A.; Cloppet, F.; Vincent, N.

    2013-03-01

    This paper aims to develop a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) based on a two-step methodology to register and analyze pairs of temporal mammograms. The concept of "medical file", including all the previous medical information on a patient, enables joint analysis of different acquisitions taken at different times, and the detection of significant modifications. The developed registration method aims to superimpose at best the different anatomical structures of the breast. The registration is designed in order to get rid of deformation undergone by the acquisition process while preserving those due to breast changes indicative of malignancy. In order to reach this goal, a referent image is computed from control points based on anatomical features that are extracted automatically. Then the second image of the couple is realigned on the referent image, using a coarse-to-fine approach according to expert knowledge that allows both rigid and non-rigid transforms. The joint analysis detects the evolution between two images representing the same scene. In order to achieve this, it is important to know the registration error limits in order to adapt the observation scale. The approach used in this paper is based on an image sparse representation. Decomposed in regular patterns, the images are analyzed under a new angle. The evolution detection problem has many practical applications, especially in medical images. The CAD is evaluated using recall and precision of differences in mammograms.

  4. Rigid multibody system dynamics with uncertain rigid bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batou, A., E-mail: anas.batou@univ-paris-est.fr; Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS (France)

    2012-03-15

    This paper is devoted to the construction of a probabilistic model of uncertain rigid bodies for multibody system dynamics. We first construct a stochastic model of an uncertain rigid body by replacing the mass, the center of mass, and the tensor of inertia by random variables. The prior probability distributions of the stochastic model are constructed using the maximum entropy principle under the constraints defined by the available information. The generators of independent realizations corresponding to the prior probability distribution of these random quantities are further developed. Then several uncertain rigid bodies can be linked to each other in order to calculate the random response of a multibody dynamical system. An application is proposed to illustrate the theoretical development.

  5. Global Registration of 3D LiDAR Point Clouds Based on Scene Features: Application to Structured Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sanchez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring 3D data with LiDAR systems involves scanning multiple scenes from different points of view. In actual systems, the ICP algorithm (Iterative Closest Point is commonly used to register the acquired point clouds together to form a unique one. However, this method faces local minima issues and often needs a coarse initial alignment to converge to the optimum. This paper develops a new method for registration adapted to indoor environments and based on structure priors of such scenes. Our method works without odometric data or physical targets. The rotation and translation of the rigid transformation are computed separately, using, respectively, the Gaussian image of the point clouds and a correlation of histograms. To evaluate our algorithm on challenging registration cases, two datasets were acquired and are available for comparison with other methods online. The evaluation of our algorithm on four datasets against six existing methods shows that the proposed method is more robust against sampling and scene complexity. Moreover, the time performances enable a real-time implementation.

  6. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS FOR THE CASE OF RIGID ROTATING KINEMATIC COUPLING WITH BIG CLEARANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Cristian GRIGORE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an algorithm based on [1] [2] are numerical simulations, achieving generalized coordinates of motion, positions, speeds of a rigid rotating kinematic coupling with big clearance in joint, case without friction

  7. A review of biomechanically informed breast image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipwell, John H; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Eiben, Björn; Hawkes, David J; Han, Lianghao

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiology encompasses the full range of imaging modalities from routine imaging via x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound (both two- and three-dimensional), to more recent technologies such as digital breast tomosynthesis, and dedicated breast imaging systems for positron emission mammography and ultrasound tomography. In addition new and experimental modalities, such as Photoacoustics, Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrical Impedance Tomography etc, are emerging. The breast is a highly deformable structure however, and this greatly complicates visual comparison of imaging modalities for the purposes of breast screening, cancer diagnosis (including image guided biopsy), tumour staging, treatment monitoring, surgical planning and simulation of the effects of surgery and wound healing etc. Due primarily to the challenges posed by these gross, non-rigid deformations, development of automated methods which enable registration, and hence fusion, of information within and across breast imaging modalities, and between the images and the physical space of the breast during interventions, remains an active research field which has yet to translate suitable methods into clinical practice. This review describes current research in the field of breast biomechanical modelling and identifies relevant publications where the resulting models have been incorporated into breast image registration and simulation algorithms. Despite these developments there remain a number of issues that limit clinical application of biomechanical modelling. These include the accuracy of constitutive modelling, implementation of representative boundary conditions, failure to meet clinically acceptable levels of computational cost, challenges associated with automating patient-specific model generation (i.e. robust image segmentation and mesh generation) and the complexity of applying biomechanical modelling methods in routine clinical practice. (topical review)

  8. Three dimensional image alignment, registration and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treves, S.T.; Mitchell, K.D.; Habboush, I.H.

    1998-01-01

    Combined assessment of three dimensional anatomical and functional images (SPECT, PET, MRI, CT) is useful to determine the nature and extent of lesions in many parts of the body. Physicians principally rely on their spatial sense of mentally re-orient and overlap images obtained with different imaging modalities. Objective methods that enable easy and intuitive image registration can help the physician arrive at more optimal diagnoses and better treatment decisions. This review describes a simple, intuitive and robust image registration approach developed in our laboratory. It differs from most other registration techniques in that it allows the user to incorporate all of the available information within the images in the registration process. This method takes full advantage of the ability of knowledgeable operators to achieve image registration and fusion using an intuitive interactive visual approach. It can register images accurately and quickly without the use of elaborate mathematical modeling or optimization techniques. The method provides the operator with tools to manipulate images in three dimensions, including visual feedback techniques to assess the accuracy of registration (grids, overlays, masks, and fusion of images in different colors). Its application is not limited to brain imaging and can be applied to images from any region in the body. The overall effect is a registration algorithm that is easy to implement and can achieve accuracy on the order of one pixel

  9. SU-C-18A-02: Image-Based Camera Tracking: Towards Registration of Endoscopic Video to CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingram, S; Rao, A; Wendt, R; Castillo, R; Court, L; Yang, J; Beadle, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Endoscopic examinations are routinely performed on head and neck and esophageal cancer patients. However, these images are underutilized for radiation therapy because there is currently no way to register them to a CT of the patient. The purpose of this work is to develop a method to track the motion of an endoscope within a structure using images from standard clinical equipment. This method will be incorporated into a broader endoscopy/CT registration framework. Methods: We developed a software algorithm to track the motion of an endoscope within an arbitrary structure. We computed frame-to-frame rotation and translation of the camera by tracking surface points across the video sequence and utilizing two-camera epipolar geometry. The resulting 3D camera path was used to recover the surrounding structure via triangulation methods. We tested this algorithm on a rigid cylindrical phantom with a pattern spray-painted on the inside. We did not constrain the motion of the endoscope while recording, and we did not constrain our measurements using the known structure of the phantom. Results: Our software algorithm can successfully track the general motion of the endoscope as it moves through the phantom. However, our preliminary data do not show a high degree of accuracy in the triangulation of 3D point locations. More rigorous data will be presented at the annual meeting. Conclusion: Image-based camera tracking is a promising method for endoscopy/CT image registration, and it requires only standard clinical equipment. It is one of two major components needed to achieve endoscopy/CT registration, the second of which is tying the camera path to absolute patient geometry. In addition to this second component, future work will focus on validating our camera tracking algorithm in the presence of clinical imaging features such as patient motion, erratic camera motion, and dynamic scene illumination

  10. An evaluation of canonical forms for non-rigid 3D shape retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Pickup, David; Liu, Juncheng; Sun, Xianfang; Rosin, Paul L.; Martin, Ralph R.; Cheng, Zhiquan; Lian, Zhouhui; Nie, Sipin; Jin, Longcun; Shamai, Gil; Sahillioğlu, Yusuf; Kavan, Ladislav

    2018-01-01

    Canonical forms attempt to factor out a non-rigid shape’s pose, giving a pose-neutral shape. This opens up the\\ud possibility of using methods originally designed for rigid shape retrieval for the task of non-rigid shape retrieval.\\ud We extend our recent benchmark for testing canonical form algorithms. Our new benchmark is used to evaluate a\\ud greater number of state-of-the-art canonical forms, on five recent non-rigid retrieval datasets, within two different\\ud retrieval frameworks. A tota...

  11. A Framework for the Objective Assessment of Registration Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pizzorni Ferrarese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Validation and accuracy assessment are the main bottlenecks preventing the adoption of image processing algorithms in the clinical practice. In the classical approach, a posteriori analysis is performed through objective metrics. In this work, a different approach based on Petri nets is proposed. The basic idea consists in predicting the accuracy of a given pipeline based on the identification and characterization of the sources of inaccuracy. The concept is demonstrated on a case study: intrasubject rigid and affine registration of magnetic resonance images. Both synthetic and real data are considered. While synthetic data allow the benchmarking of the performance with respect to the ground truth, real data enable to assess the robustness of the methodology in real contexts as well as to determine the suitability of the use of synthetic data in the training phase. Results revealed a higher correlation and a lower dispersion among the metrics for simulated data, while the opposite trend was observed for pathologic ones. Results show that the proposed model not only provides a good prediction performance but also leads to the optimization of the end-to-end chain in terms of accuracy and robustness, setting the ground for its generalization to different and more complex scenarios.

  12. Real-time non-rigid target tracking for ultrasound-guided clinical interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachiu, C.; Ries, M.; Ramaekers, P.; Guey, J.-L.; Moonen, C. T. W.; de Senneville, B. Denis

    2017-10-01

    Biological motion is a problem for non- or mini-invasive interventions when conducted in mobile/deformable organs due to the targeted pathology moving/deforming with the organ. This may lead to high miss rates and/or incomplete treatment of the pathology. Therefore, real-time tracking of the target anatomy during the intervention would be beneficial for such applications. Since the aforementioned interventions are often conducted under B-mode ultrasound (US) guidance, target tracking can be achieved via image registration, by comparing the acquired US images to a separate image established as positional reference. However, such US images are intrinsically altered by speckle noise, introducing incoherent gray-level intensity variations. This may prove problematic for existing intensity-based registration methods. In the current study we address US-based target tracking by employing the recently proposed EVolution registration algorithm. The method is, by construction, robust to transient gray-level intensities. Instead of directly matching image intensities, EVolution aligns similar contrast patterns in the images. Moreover, the displacement is computed by evaluating a matching criterion for image sub-regions rather than on a point-by-point basis, which typically provides more robust motion estimates. However, unlike similar previously published approaches, which assume rigid displacements in the image sub-regions, the EVolution algorithm integrates the matching criterion in a global functional, allowing the estimation of an elastic dense deformation. The approach was validated for soft tissue tracking under free-breathing conditions on the abdomen of seven healthy volunteers. Contact echography was performed on all volunteers, while three of the volunteers also underwent standoff echography. Each of the two modalities is predominantly specific to a particular type of non- or mini-invasive clinical intervention. The method demonstrated on average an accuracy of

  13. Improving alignment in Tract-based spatial statistics: evaluation and optimization of image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Marius; Vernooij, Meike W; Klein, Stefan; Ikram, M Arfan; Vos, Frans M; Smith, Stephen M; Niessen, Wiro J; Andersson, Jesper L R

    2013-08-01

    Anatomical alignment in neuroimaging studies is of such importance that considerable effort is put into improving the registration used to establish spatial correspondence. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) is a popular method for comparing diffusion characteristics across subjects. TBSS establishes spatial correspondence using a combination of nonlinear registration and a "skeleton projection" that may break topological consistency of the transformed brain images. We therefore investigated feasibility of replacing the two-stage registration-projection procedure in TBSS with a single, regularized, high-dimensional registration. To optimize registration parameters and to evaluate registration performance in diffusion MRI, we designed an evaluation framework that uses native space probabilistic tractography for 23 white matter tracts, and quantifies tract similarity across subjects in standard space. We optimized parameters for two registration algorithms on two diffusion datasets of different quality. We investigated reproducibility of the evaluation framework, and of the optimized registration algorithms. Next, we compared registration performance of the regularized registration methods and TBSS. Finally, feasibility and effect of incorporating the improved registration in TBSS were evaluated in an example study. The evaluation framework was highly reproducible for both algorithms (R(2) 0.993; 0.931). The optimal registration parameters depended on the quality of the dataset in a graded and predictable manner. At optimal parameters, both algorithms outperformed the registration of TBSS, showing feasibility of adopting such approaches in TBSS. This was further confirmed in the example experiment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in 68Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: 68 Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration. Conclusions

  15. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  16. Automated Registration Of Images From Multiple Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignot, Eric J. M.; Kwok, Ronald; Curlander, John C.; Pang, Shirley S. N.

    1994-01-01

    Images of terrain scanned in common by multiple Earth-orbiting remote sensors registered automatically with each other and, where possible, on geographic coordinate grid. Simulated image of terrain viewed by sensor computed from ancillary data, viewing geometry, and mathematical model of physics of imaging. In proposed registration algorithm, simulated and actual sensor images matched by area-correlation technique.

  17. Rigidly foldable origami gadgets and tessellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas A.; Lang, Robert J.; Magleby, Spencer P.; Howell, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Rigidly foldable origami allows for motion where all deflection occurs at the crease lines and facilitates the application of origami in materials other than paper. In this paper, we use a recently discovered method for determining rigid foldability to identify existing flat-foldable rigidly foldable tessellations, which are also categorized. We introduce rigidly foldable origami gadgets which may be used to modify existing tessellations or to create new tessellations. Several modified and new rigidly foldable tessellations are presented. PMID:26473037

  18. Registration of Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Tedd, Bernhard

    2017-07-01

    Space objects are subject to registration in order to allocate "jurisdiction and control" over those objects in the sovereign-free environment of outer space. This approach is similar to the registration of ships in view of the high sea and for aircrafts with respect to the international airspace. Registration is one of the basic principles of space law, starting with UN General Assembly Resolution 1721 B (XVI) of December 20, 1961, followed by Resolution 1962 (XVIII) of December 13, 1963, then formulated in Article VIII of the Outer Space Treaty of 1967 and as specified in the Registration Convention of 1975. Registration of space objects can be seen today as a principle of customary international law, relevant for each spacefaring state. Registration is divided into a national and an international level. The State Party establishes a national registry for its space objects, and those registrations have to be communicated via diplomatic channel to the UN Register of space objects. This UN Register is handled by the UN Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) and is an open source of information for space objects worldwide. Registration is linked to the so-called launching state of the relevant space object. There might be more than one launching state for the specific launch event, but only one state actor can register a specific space object. The state of registry gains "jurisdiction and control" over the space object and therefore no double registration is permissible. Based on the established UN Space Law, registration practice was subject to some adaptions due to technical developments and legal challenges. After the privatization of the major international satellite organizations, a number of non-registrations had to be faced. The state actors reacted with the UN Registration Practice Resolution of 2007 as elaborated in the Legal Subcommittee of UNCOPUOS, the Committee for the Peaceful Use of Outer Space. In this context an UNOOSA Registration Information

  19. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  20. TU-B-19A-01: Image Registration II: TG132-Quality Assurance for Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, K; Mutic, S

    2014-01-01

    AAPM Task Group 132 was charged with a review of the current approaches and solutions for image registration in radiotherapy and to provide recommendations for quality assurance and quality control of these clinical processes. As the results of image registration are always used as the input of another process for planning or delivery, it is important for the user to understand and document the uncertainty associate with the algorithm in general and the Result of a specific registration. The recommendations of this task group, which at the time of abstract submission are currently being reviewed by the AAPM, include the following components. The user should understand the basic image registration techniques and methods of visualizing image fusion. The disclosure of basic components of the image registration by commercial vendors is critical in this respect. The physicists should perform end-to-end tests of imaging, registration, and planning/treatment systems if image registration is performed on a stand-alone system. A comprehensive commissioning process should be performed and documented by the physicist prior to clinical use of the system. As documentation is important to the safe implementation of this process, a request and report system should be integrated into the clinical workflow. Finally, a patient specific QA practice should be established for efficient evaluation of image registration results. The implementation of these recommendations will be described and illustrated during this educational session. Learning Objectives: Highlight the importance of understanding the image registration techniques used in their clinic. Describe the end-to-end tests needed for stand-alone registration systems. Illustrate a comprehensive commissioning program using both phantom data and clinical images. Describe a request and report system to ensure communication and documentation. Demonstrate an clinically-efficient patient QA practice for efficient evaluation of image

  1. Complexity and accuracy of image registration methods in SPECT-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L S; Duzenli, C; Moiseenko, V [Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Tang, L; Hamarneh, G [Computing Science, Simon Fraser University, 9400 TASC1, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Gill, B [Medical Physics, Vancouver Cancer Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Celler, A; Shcherbinin, S [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 828 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada); Fua, T F; Thompson, A; Sheehan, F [Radiation Oncology, Vancouver Cancer Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Liu, M [Radiation Oncology, Fraser Valley Cancer Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 13750 9th Ave, Surrey, BC, V3V 1Z2 (Canada)], E-mail: lyin@bccancer.bc.ca

    2010-01-07

    The use of functional imaging in radiotherapy treatment (RT) planning requires accurate co-registration of functional imaging scans to CT scans. We evaluated six methods of image registration for use in SPECT-guided radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods varied in complexity from 3D affine transform based on control points to diffeomorphic demons and level set non-rigid registration. Ten lung cancer patients underwent perfusion SPECT-scans prior to their radiotherapy. CT images from a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner were registered to a planning CT, and then the same transformation was applied to the SPECT images. According to registration evaluation measures computed based on the intensity difference between the registered CT images or based on target registration error, non-rigid registrations provided a higher degree of accuracy than rigid methods. However, due to the irregularities in some of the obtained deformation fields, warping the SPECT using these fields may result in unacceptable changes to the SPECT intensity distribution that would preclude use in RT planning. Moreover, the differences between intensity histograms in the original and registered SPECT image sets were the largest for diffeomorphic demons and level set methods. In conclusion, the use of intensity-based validation measures alone is not sufficient for SPECT/CT registration for RTTP. It was also found that the proper evaluation of image registration requires the use of several accuracy metrics.

  2. 4D ultrasound and 3D MRI registration of beating heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlambang, N.; Matsumiya, K.; Masamune, K.; Dohi, T.; Liao, H.; Tsukihara, H.; Takamoto, S.

    2007-01-01

    To realize intra-cardiac surgery without cardio-pulmonary bypass, a medical imaging technique with both high image quality and data acquisition rate that is fast enough to follow heart beat movements is required. In this research, we proposed a method that utilized the image quality of MRI and the speed of ultrasound. We developed a 4D image reconstruction method using image registration of 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images. The registration method consists of rigid registration between 3D MRI and 3D ultrasound with the same heart beat phase, and non-rigid registration between 3D ultrasound images from different heart beat phases. Non-rigid registration was performed with B-spline based registration using variable spring model. In phantom experiment using balloon phantom, registration accuracy was less than 2 mm for total heart volume variation range of 10%. We applied our registration method on 3D MRI and 4D ultrasound images of a volunteer's beating heart data and confirmed through visual observation that heart beat pattern was well reproduced. (orig.)

  3. Skull registration for prone patient position using tracked ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Grace; Ungi, Tamas; Baum, Zachary; Lasso, Andras; Kronreif, Gernot; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-03-01

    PURPOSE: Tracked navigation has become prevalent in neurosurgery. Problems with registration of a patient and a preoperative image arise when the patient is in a prone position. Surfaces accessible to optical tracking on the back of the head are unreliable for registration. We investigated the accuracy of surface-based registration using points accessible through tracked ultrasound. Using ultrasound allows access to bone surfaces that are not available through optical tracking. Tracked ultrasound could eliminate the need to work (i) under the table for registration and (ii) adjust the tracker between surgery and registration. In addition, tracked ultrasound could provide a non-invasive method in comparison to an alternative method of registration involving screw implantation. METHODS: A phantom study was performed to test the feasibility of tracked ultrasound for registration. An initial registration was performed to partially align the pre-operative computer tomography data and skull phantom. The initial registration was performed by an anatomical landmark registration. Surface points accessible by tracked ultrasound were collected and used to perform an Iterative Closest Point Algorithm. RESULTS: When the surface registration was compared to a ground truth landmark registration, the average TRE was found to be 1.6+/-0.1mm and the average distance of points off the skull surface was 0.6+/-0.1mm. CONCLUSION: The use of tracked ultrasound is feasible for registration of patients in prone position and eliminates the need to perform registration under the table. The translational component of error found was minimal. Therefore, the amount of TRE in registration is due to a rotational component of error.

  4. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Rob H.; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A.; Foran, Bernadette H.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Wild, Jim M.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p < 0.001) and mean landmark error 0.75 ± 0.24 cm versus 1.25 ± 0.60 cm (p = 0.002). Image registration is significantly improved by using an imaging protocol that enables both 3He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  5. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE-PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ˜6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE-PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE-PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation.

  6. Rigidity-tuning conductive elastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Wanliang; Diller, Stuart; Tutcuoglu, Abbas; Majidi, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a conductive propylene-based elastomer (cPBE) that rapidly and reversibly changes its mechanical rigidity when powered with electrical current. The elastomer is rigid in its natural state, with an elastic (Young’s) modulus of 175.5 MPa, and softens when electrically activated. By embedding the cPBE in an electrically insulating sheet of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), we create a cPBE–PDMS composite that can reversibly change its tensile modulus between 37 and 1.5 MPa. The rigidity change takes ∼6 s and is initiated when a 100 V voltage drop is applied across the two ends of the cPBE film. This magnitude of change in elastic rigidity is similar to that observed in natural skeletal muscle and catch connective tissue. We characterize the tunable load-bearing capability of the cPBE–PDMS composite with a motorized tensile test and deadweight experiment. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to control the routing of internal forces by embedding several cPBE–PDMS ‘active tendons’ into a soft robotic pneumatic bending actuator. Selectively activating the artificial tendons controls the neutral axis and direction of bending during inflation. (paper)

  7. Rigid Body Energy Minimization on Manifolds for Molecular Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Hanieh; Beglov, Dmitri; Paschalidis, Ioannis Ch; Vajda, Sandor; Vakili, Pirooz; Kozakov, Dima

    2012-11-13

    Virtually all docking methods include some local continuous minimization of an energy/scoring function in order to remove steric clashes and obtain more reliable energy values. In this paper, we describe an efficient rigid-body optimization algorithm that, compared to the most widely used algorithms, converges approximately an order of magnitude faster to conformations with equal or slightly lower energy. The space of rigid body transformations is a nonlinear manifold, namely, a space which locally resembles a Euclidean space. We use a canonical parametrization of the manifold, called the exponential parametrization, to map the Euclidean tangent space of the manifold onto the manifold itself. Thus, we locally transform the rigid body optimization to an optimization over a Euclidean space where basic optimization algorithms are applicable. Compared to commonly used methods, this formulation substantially reduces the dimension of the search space. As a result, it requires far fewer costly function and gradient evaluations and leads to a more efficient algorithm. We have selected the LBFGS quasi-Newton method for local optimization since it uses only gradient information to obtain second order information about the energy function and avoids the far more costly direct Hessian evaluations. Two applications, one in protein-protein docking, and the other in protein-small molecular interactions, as part of macromolecular docking protocols are presented. The code is available to the community under open source license, and with minimal effort can be incorporated into any molecular modeling package.

  8. Robust linear registration of CT images using random regression forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konukoglu, Ender; Criminisi, Antonio; Pathak, Sayan; Robertson, Duncan; White, Steve; Haynor, David; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    Global linear registration is a necessary first step for many different tasks in medical image analysis. Comparing longitudinal studies1, cross-modality fusion2, and many other applications depend heavily on the success of the automatic registration. The robustness and efficiency of this step is crucial as it affects all subsequent operations. Most common techniques cast the linear registration problem as the minimization of a global energy function based on the image intensities. Although these algorithms have proved useful, their robustness in fully automated scenarios is still an open question. In fact, the optimization step often gets caught in local minima yielding unsatisfactory results. Recent algorithms constrain the space of registration parameters by exploiting implicit or explicit organ segmentations, thus increasing robustness4,5. In this work we propose a novel robust algorithm for automatic global linear image registration. Our method uses random regression forests to estimate posterior probability distributions for the locations of anatomical structures - represented as axis aligned bounding boxes6. These posterior distributions are later integrated in a global linear registration algorithm. The biggest advantage of our algorithm is that it does not require pre-defined segmentations or regions. Yet it yields robust registration results. We compare the robustness of our algorithm with that of the state of the art Elastix toolbox7. Validation is performed via 1464 pair-wise registrations in a database of very diverse 3D CT images. We show that our method decreases the "failure" rate of the global linear registration from 12.5% (Elastix) to only 1.9%.

  9. SU-E-J-91: Biomechanical Deformable Image Registration of Longitudinal Lung CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazoulat, G; Owen, D; Matuszak, M; Balter, J; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spatial correlation of lung tissue across longitudinal images, as the patient responds to treatment, is a critical step in adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this work is to expand a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm (Morfeus) to achieve accurate registration in the presence of significant anatomical changes. Methods: Four lung cancer patients previously treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy that exhibited notable tumor shrinkage during treatment were retrospectively evaluated. Exhale breathhold CT scans were obtained at treatment planning (PCT) and following three weeks (W3CT) of treatment. For each patient, the PCT was registered to the W3CT using Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm, consisting of boundary conditions on the lungs and incorporating a sliding interface between the lung and chest wall. To model the complex response of the lung, an extension to Morfeus has been developed: (i) The vessel tree was segmented by thresholding a vesselness image based on the Hessian matrix’s eigenvalues and the centerline was extracted; (ii) A 3D shape context method was used to find correspondences between the trees of the two images; (ii) Correspondences were used as additional boundary conditions (Morfeus+vBC). An expert independently identified corresponding landmarks well distributed in the lung to compute Target Registration Errors (TRE). Results: The TRE within 15mm of the tumor boundaries (on average 11 landmarks) is: 6.1±1.8, 4.6±1.1 and 3.8±2.3 mm after rigid registration, Morfeus and Morfeus+vBC, respectively. The TRE in the rest of the lung (on average 13 landmarks) is: 6.4±3.9, 4.7±2.2 and 3.6±1.9 mm, which is on the order of the 2mm isotropic dose grid vector (3.5mm). Conclusion: The addition of boundary conditions on the vessels improved the accuracy in modeling the response of the lung and tumor over the course of radiotherapy. Minimizing and modeling these

  10. Evaluation of whole-body MR to CT deformable image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Gutierrez, D.; Baskin, A.; Ay, M. R.; Ahmadian, A.; Alam, N. Riahi; Loevblad, K. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality image registration plays a crucial role in various clinical and research applications. The aim of this study is to present an optimized MR to CT whole-body deformable image registration algorithm and its validation using clinical studies. A 3D intermodality registration technique based

  11. Evaluation of registration methods on thoracic CT : the EMPIRE10 challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murphy, K.; Ginneken, van B.; Reinhardt, J.M.; Kabus, S.; Ding, K.; Deng, Xiang; Cao, K.; Du, K.; Christensen, G.E.; Garcia, V.; Vercauteren, T.; Ayache, N.; Commowick, O.; Malandain, G.; Glocker, B.; Paragios, N.; Navab, N.; Gorbunova, V.; Sporring, J.; Bruijne, de M.; Han, Xiao; Heinrich, M.P.; Schnabel, J.A.; Jenkinson, M.; Lorenz, C.; Modat, M.; McClelland, J.R.; Ourselin, S.; Muenzing, S.E.A.; Viergever, M.A.; Nigris, De D.; Collins, D.L.; Arbel, T.; Peroni, M.; Li, R.; Sharp, G.; Schmidt-Richberg, A.; Ehrhardt, J.; Werner, R.; Smeets, D.; Loeckx, D.; Song, G.; Tustison, N.; Avants, B.; Gee, J.C.; Staring, M.; Klein, S.; Stoel, B.C.; Urschler, M.; Werlberger, M.; Vandemeulebroucke, J.; Rit, S.; Sarrut, D.; Pluim, J.P.W.

    2011-01-01

    EMPIRE10 (Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image REgistration 2010) is a public platform for fair and meaningful comparison of registration algorithms which are applied to a database of intrapatient thoracic CT image pairs. Evaluation of nonrigid registration techniques is a nontrivial task. This

  12. Population based ranking of frameless CT-MRI registration methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opposits, Gabor; Kis, Sandor A.; Tron, Lajos; Emri, Miklos [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Berenyi, Ervin [Debrecen Univ. (Hungary). Dept. of Biomedical Laboratory and Imaging Science; Takacs, Endre [Rotating Gamma Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary); Dobai, Jozsef G.; Bognar, Laszlo [Debrecen Univ., Medical Center (Hungary). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Szuecs, Bernadett [ScanoMed Ltd., Debrecen (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    Clinical practice often requires simultaneous information obtained by two different imaging modalities. Registration algorithms are commonly used for this purpose. Automated procedures are very helpful in cases when the same kind of registration has to be performed on images of a high number of subjects. Radiotherapists would prefer to use the best automated method to assist therapy planning, however there are not accepted procedures for ranking the different registration algorithms. We were interested in developing a method to measure the population level performance of CT-MRI registration algorithms by a parameter of values in the [0,1] interval. Pairs of CT and MRI images were collected from 1051 subjects. Results of an automated registration were corrected manually until a radiologist and a neurosurgeon expert both accepted the result as good. This way 1051 registered MRI images were produced by the same pair of experts to be used as gold standards for the evaluation of the performance of other registration algorithms. Pearson correlation coefficient, mutual information, normalized mutual information, Kullback-Leibler divergence, L{sub 1} norm and square L{sub 2} norm (dis)similarity measures were tested for sensitivity to indicate the extent of (dis)similarity of a pair of individual mismatched images. The square Hellinger distance proved suitable to grade the performance of registration algorithms at population level providing the developers with a valuable tool to rank algorithms. The developed procedure provides an objective method to find the registration algorithm performing the best on the population level out of newly constructed or available preselected ones.

  13. Locally orderless registration code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows.......This is code for the TPAMI paper "Locally Orderless Registration". The code requires intel threadding building blocks installed and is provided for 64 bit on mac, linux and windows....

  14. [Algorithm for the automated processing of rheosignals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinets, G S

    1988-01-01

    Algorithm for rheosignals recognition for a microprocessing device with a representation apparatus and with automated and manual cursor control was examined. The algorithm permits to automate rheosignals registrating and processing taking into account their changeability.

  15. Registration of deformed multimodality medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshfeghi, M.; Naidich, D.

    1989-01-01

    The registration and combination of images from different modalities have several potential applications, such as functional and anatomic studies, 3D radiation treatment planning, surgical planning, and retrospective studies. Image registration algorithms should correct for any local deformations caused by respiration, heart beat, imaging device distortions, and so forth. This paper reports on an elastic matching technique for registering deformed multimodality images. Correspondences between contours in the two images are used to stretch the deformed image toward its goal image. This process is repeated a number of times, with decreasing image stiffness. As the iterations continue, the stretched image better approximates its goal image

  16. Extracting a Purely Non-rigid Deformation Field of a Single Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and the stent graft. The problem definition of deformable registration of images covering the entire abdominal region, however, is highly ill-posed. We present a new method for extracting the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. Our non-rigid registration procedure then only computes local non-rigid deformation and leaves out all remaining global rigid transformations. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  17. Targeted 2D/3D registration using ray normalization and a hybrid optimizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Joyoni; Napel, Sandy

    2006-01-01

    X-ray images are often used to guide minimally invasive procedures in interventional radiology. The use of a preoperatively obtained 3D volume can enhance the visualization needed for guiding catheters and other surgical devices. However, for intraoperative usefulness, the 3D dataset needs to be registered to the 2D x-ray images of the patient. We investigated the effect of targeting subvolumes of interest in the 3D datasets and registering the projections with C-arm x-ray images. We developed an intensity-based 2D/3D rigid-body registration using a Monte Carlo-based hybrid algorithm as the optimizer, using a single view for registration. Pattern intensity (PI) and mutual information (MI) were two metrics tested. We used normalization of the rays to address the problems due to truncation in 3D necessary for targeting. We tested the algorithm on a C-arm x-ray image of a pig's head and a 3D dataset reconstructed from multiple views of the C-arm. PI and MI were comparable in performance. For two subvolumes starting with a set of initial poses from +/-15 mm in x, from +/-3 mm (random), in y and z and +/-4 deg in the three angles, the robustness was 94% for PI and 91% for MI, with accuracy of 2.4 mm (PI) and 2.6 mm (MI), using the hybrid algorithm. The hybrid optimizer, when compared with a standard Powell's direction set method, increased the robustness from 59% (Powell) to 94% (hybrid). Another set of 50 random initial conditions from [+/-20] mm in x,y,z and [+/-10] deg in the three angles, yielded robustness of 84% (hybrid) versus 38% (Powell) using PI as metric, with accuracies 2.1 mm (hybrid) versus 2.0 mm (Powell)

  18. Dynamic Non-Rigid Objects Reconstruction with a Single RGB-D Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the 3D reconstruction problem for dynamic non-rigid objects with a single RGB-D sensor. It is a challenging task as we consider the almost inevitable accumulation error issue in some previous sequential fusion methods and also the possible failure of surface tracking in a long sequence. Therefore, we propose a global non-rigid registration framework and tackle the drifting problem via an explicit loop closure. Our novel scheme starts with a fusion step to get multiple partial scans from the input sequence, followed by a pairwise non-rigid registration and loop detection step to obtain correspondences between neighboring partial pieces and those pieces that form a loop. Then, we perform a global registration procedure to align all those pieces together into a consistent canonical space as guided by those matches that we have established. Finally, our proposed model-update step helps fixing potential misalignments that still exist after the global registration. Both geometric and appearance constraints are enforced during our alignment; therefore, we are able to get the recovered model with accurate geometry as well as high fidelity color maps for the mesh. Experiments on both synthetic and various real datasets have demonstrated the capability of our approach to reconstruct complete and watertight deformable objects.

  19. On flexible and rigid nouns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Studies in Language 32-3 (2008), 727-752. Special issue: Parts of Speech: Descriptive tools, theoretical constructs Jan Rijkhoff - On flexible and rigid nouns This article argues that in addition to the flexible lexical categories in Hengeveld’s classification of parts-of-speech systems (Contentive......, Non-Verb, Modifier), there are also flexible word classes within the rigid lexical category Noun (Set Noun, Sort Noun, General Noun). Members of flexible word classes are characterized by their vague semantics, which in the case of nouns means that values for the semantic features Shape...... and Homogeneity are either left undetermined or they are specified in such a way that they do not quite match the properties of the kind of entity denoted by the flexible item in the external world. I will then argue that flexible word classes constitute a proper category (i.e. they are not the result of a merger...

  20. Elasticity of Relativistic Rigid Bodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2013-10-01

    In the classical Twin Paradox, according to the Special Theory of Relativity, when the traveling twin blasts off from the Earth to a relative velocity v =√{/3 } 2 c with respect to the Earth, his measuring stick and other physical objects in the direction of relative motion shrink to half their lengths. How is that possible in the real physical world to have let's say a rigid rocket shrinking to half and then later elongated back to normal as an elastic material when it stops? What is the explanation for the traveler's measuring stick and other physical objects, in effect, return to the same length to their original length in the Stay-At-Home, but there is no record of their having shrunk? If it's a rigid (not elastic) object, how can it shrink and then elongate back to normal? It might get broken in such situation.

  1. Functionally rigid bistable [2]rotaxanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sune; Leung, Ken C-F; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    defines an unambiguous distance of 1.5 nm over which the ring moves between the MPTTF and NP units. The degenerate NP/NP [2]rotaxane was used to investigate the shuttling barrier by dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopy for the movement of the CBPQT4+ ring across the new rigid spacer. It is evident from...... better control over the position of the ring component in the ground state but also for control over the location of the CBPQT4+ ring during solution-state switching experiments, triggered either chemically (1H NMR) or electrochemically (cyclic voltammetry). In this instance, the use of the rigid spacer......Two-station [2]rotaxanes in the shape of a degenerate naphthalene (NP) shuttle and a nondegenerate monopyrrolotetrathiafulvalene (MPTTF)/NP redox-controllable switch have been synthesized and characterized in solution. Their dumbbell-shaped components are composed of polyether chains interrupted...

  2. Rigid body dynamics of mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, Hubert

    2003-01-01

    The second volume of Rigid Body Dynamics of Mechanisms covers applications via a systematic method for deriving model equations of planar and spatial mechanisms. The necessary theoretical foundations have been laid in the first volume that introduces the theoretical mechanical aspects of mechatronic systems. Here the focus is on the application of the modeling methodology to various examples of rigid-body mechanisms, simple planar ones as well as more challenging spatial problems. A rich variety of joint models, active constraints, plus active and passive force elements is treated. The book is intended for self-study by working engineers and students concerned with the control of mechanical systems, i.e. robotics, mechatronics, vehicles, and machine tools. The examples included are a likely source from which to choose models for university lectures.

  3. Associative memory through rigid origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms such as Miura Ori have proven useful in diverse contexts since they have only one degree of freedom that is easily controlled. We combine the theory of rigid origami and associative memory in frustrated neural networks to create structures that can ``learn'' multiple generic folding mechanisms and yet can be robustly controlled. We show that such rigid origami structures can ``recall'' a specific learned mechanism when induced by a physical impulse that only need resemble the desired mechanism (i.e. robust recall through association). Such associative memory in matter, seen before in self-assembly, arises due to a balance between local promiscuity (i.e., many local degrees of freedom) and global frustration which minimizes interference between different learned behaviors. Origami with associative memory can lead to a new class of deployable structures and kinetic architectures with multiple context-dependent behaviors.

  4. Rigidity spectrum of Forbush decrease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakibara, S.; Munakata, K.; Nagashima, K.

    1985-01-01

    Using data from neutron monitors and muon telescopes at surface and underground stations, the average rigidity spectrum of Forbush decreases (Fds) during the period of 1978-1982 were obtained. Thirty eight Ed-events are classified into two groups, Hard Fd and Soft FD according to size of Fd at the Sakashita station. It is found that a spectral form of a fractional-power type (P to the-gamma sub 1 (P+P sub c) to the -gamma sub2) is more suitable than that of a power-exponential type or of a power type with an upper limiting rigidity. The best fitted spectrum of the fractional-power type is expressed by gamma sub1 = 0.37, gamma sub2 = 0.89 and P subc = 10 GV for Hard Fd and gamma sub1 = 0.77, gamma sub2 = 1.02 and P sub c - 14GV for Soft Fd

  5. Signature of Thermal Rigidity Percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    To explore the role that temperature and percolation of rigidity play in determining the macroscopic properties, we propose a model that adds translational degrees of freedom to the spins of the well known Ising hamiltonian. In particular, the Ising model illustrate the longstanding idea that the growth of correlations on approach to a critical point could be describable in terms of the percolation of some sort of p hysical cluster . For certain parameters of this model we observe two well defined peaks of C V , that suggest the existence of two kinds of p hysical percolation , namely connectivity and rigidity percolation. Thermal fluctuations give rise to two different kinds of elementary excitations, i.e. droplets and configuron, as suggested by Angell in the framework of a bond lattice model approach. The later is reflected in the fluctuations of redundant constraints that gives stability to the structure and correlate with the order parameter

  6. Simple shape space for 3D face registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košir, Andrej; Perkon, Igor; Bracun, Drago; Tasic, Jurij; Mozina, Janez

    2009-09-01

    Three dimensional (3D) face recognition is a topic getting increasing interest in biometric applications. In our research framework we developed a laser scanner that provides 3D cloud information and texture data. In a user scenario with cooperative subjects with indoor light conditions, we address three problems of 3D face biometrics: the face registration, the formulation of a shape space together with a special designed gradient algorithm and the impact of initial approximation to the convergence of a registration algorithm. By defining the face registration as a problem of aligning a 3D data cloud with a predefined reference template, we solve the registration problem with a second order gradient algorithm working on a shape space designed for reducing the computational complexity of the method.

  7. Torsional rigidity, isospectrality and quantum graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colladay, Don; McDonald, Patrick; Kaganovskiy, Leon

    2017-01-01

    We study torsional rigidity for graph and quantum graph analogs of well-known pairs of isospectral non-isometric planar domains. We prove that such isospectral pairs are distinguished by torsional rigidity. (paper)

  8. Information from the Registration Service

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    Please note that the Registration Service (Bldg 55-1st floor) will be exceptionally open during the annual end of year closure from 10:00 to 12:00 on the following days: 22, 23, 26, 27,28, 29 et 30 December 2011 and 2,3, et 4 January 2012. All the activities related to the Registration Service will be operational: registration for contractors’ personnel; registrations for professional visits; access cards; car stickers; biometric registration. The Registration Service

  9. Automatic intra-modality brain image registration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, J.M.; Ardekani, B.A.; Braun, M.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Registration of 3D images of brain of the same or different subjects has potential importance in clinical diagnosis, treatment planning and neurological research. The broad aim of our work is to produce an automatic and robust intra-modality, brain image registration algorithm for intra-subject and inter-subject studies. Our algorithm is composed of two stages. Initial alignment is achieved by finding the values of nine transformation parameters (representing translation, rotation and scale) that minimise the nonoverlapping regions of the head. This is achieved by minimisation of the sum of the exclusive OR of two binary head images, produced using the head extraction procedure described by Ardekani et al. (J Comput Assist Tomogr, 19:613-623, 1995). The initial alignment successfully determines the scale parameters and gross translation and rotation parameters. Fine alignment uses an objective function described for inter-modality registration in Ardekani et al. (ibid.). The algorithm segments one of the images to be aligned into a set of connected components using K-means clustering. Registration is achieved by minimising the K-means variance of the segmentation induced in the other image. Similarity of images of the same modality makes the method attractive for intra-modality registration. A 3D MR image, with voxel dimensions, 2x2x6 mm, was misaligned. The registered image shows visually accurate registration. The average displacement of a pixel from its correct location was measured to be 3.3 mm. The algorithm was tested on intra-subject MR images and was found to produce good qualitative results. Using the data available, the algorithm produced promising qualitative results in intra-subject registration. Further work is necessary in its application to intersubject registration, due to large variability in brain structure between subjects. Clinical evaluation of the algorithm for selected applications is required

  10. Rigidity of monodromies for Appell's hypergeometric functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshishige Haraoka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For monodromy representations of holonomic systems, the rigidity can be defined. We examine the rigidity of the monodromy representations for Appell's hypergeometric functions, and get the representations explicitly. The results show how the topology of the singular locus and the spectral types of the local monodromies work for the study of the rigidity.

  11. Multimodality Registration without a Dedicated Multimodality Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Beattie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality scanners that allow the acquisition of both functional and structural image sets on a single system have recently become available for animal research use. Although the resultant registered functional/structural image sets can greatly enhance the interpretability of the functional data, the cost of multimodality systems can be prohibitive, and they are often limited to two modalities, which generally do not include magnetic resonance imaging. Using a thin plastic wrap to immobilize and fix a mouse or other small animal atop a removable bed, we are able to calculate registrations between all combinations of four different small animal imaging scanners (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and computed tomography [CT] at our disposal, effectively equivalent to a quadruple-modality scanner. A comparison of serially acquired CT images, with intervening acquisitions on other scanners, demonstrates the ability of the proposed procedures to maintain the rigidity of an anesthetized mouse during transport between scanners. Movement of the bony structures of the mouse was estimated to be 0.62 mm. Soft tissue movement was predominantly the result of the filling (or emptying of the urinary bladder and thus largely constrained to this region. Phantom studies estimate the registration errors for all registration types to be less than 0.5 mm. Functional images using tracers targeted to known structures verify the accuracy of the functional to structural registrations. The procedures are easy to perform and produce robust and accurate results that rival those of dedicated multimodality scanners, but with more flexible registration combinations and while avoiding the expense and redundancy of multimodality systems.

  12. Reconstructing rotations and rigid body motions from exact point correspondences through reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontijne, D.; Dorst, L.; Dorst, L.; Lasenby, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new algorithm to reconstruct a rigid body motion from point correspondences. The algorithm works by constructing a series of reflections which align the points with their correspondences one by one. This is naturally and efficiently implemented in the conformal model of geometric

  13. Consistency of parametric registration in serial MRI studies of brain tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Andreas; Buzug, Thorsten M.; Schnabel, Julia A.; Crum, William R.; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien; Hawkes, David J.; Camara-Rey, Oscar; Palm, Christoph; Caseiras, Gisele Brasil; Jaeger, H.R.

    2008-01-01

    The consistency of parametric registration in multi-temporal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies was evaluated. Serial MRI scans of adult patients with a brain tumor (glioma) were aligned by parametric registration. The performance of low-order spatial alignment (6/9/12 degrees of freedom) of different 3D serial MR-weighted images is evaluated. A registration protocol for the alignment of all images to one reference coordinate system at baseline is presented. Registration results were evaluated for both, multimodal intra-timepoint and mono-modal multi-temporal registration. The latter case might present a challenge to automatic intensity-based registration algorithms due to ill-defined correspondences. The performance of our algorithm was assessed by testing the inverse registration consistency. Four different similarity measures were evaluated to assess consistency. Careful visual inspection suggests that images are well aligned, but their consistency may be imperfect. Sub-voxel inconsistency within the brain was found for allsimilarity measures used for parametric multi-temporal registration. T1-weighted images were most reliable for establishing spatial correspondence between different timepoints. The parametric registration algorithm is feasible for use in this application. The sub-voxel resolution mean displacement error of registration transformations demonstrates that the algorithm converges to an almost identical solution for forward and reverse registration. (orig.)

  14. A Comparison of FFD-based Nonrigid Registration and AAMs Applied to Myocardial Perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2006-01-01

    -form deformations (FFDs). AAMs are known to be much faster than nonrigid registration algorithms. On the other hand nonrigid registration algorithms are independent of a training set as required to build an AAM. To obtain a further comparison of the two methods, they are both applied to automatically register multi...

  15. JALFHCC - Patient Registration Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center (JALFHCC) Patient Registration Service supports the operation of the first VA/Navy Federal Health Care Center...

  16. Visitor Registration System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Visitor Registration System (VRS) streamlines visitor check-in and check-out process for expediting visitors into USAID. The system captures visitor information...

  17. Pesticide Registration Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — PRISM provides an integrated, web portal for all pesticide related data, communications, registrations and transactions for OPP and its stakeholders, partners and...

  18. Registration of the cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, F.; Campos, X.

    2002-01-01

    A database for the registration of the cancer was designed in ambient access, of the Microsoft Office, to take the registrations at national level. With this database the statistics will be obtained about the incidence of the cancer in the population, evaluation of the sanitary services of prevention, diagnose and treatment of the illness, etc. The used codes are according to the listings of code of the Ministry of Health (MINSA) and OPS

  19. Geometry, rigidity, and group actions

    CERN Document Server

    Farb, Benson; Zimmer, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The study of group actions is more than a hundred years old but remains to this day a vibrant and widely studied topic in a variety of mathematic fields. A central development in the last fifty years is the phenomenon of rigidity, whereby one can classify actions of certain groups, such as lattices in semi-simple Lie groups. This provides a way to classify all possible symmetries of important spaces and all spaces admitting given symmetries. Paradigmatic results can be found in the seminal work of George Mostow, Gergory Margulis, and Robert J. Zimmer, among others.The p

  20. Incorporation of a laser range scanner into image-guided liver surgery: Surface acquisition, registration, and tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, David M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Chapman, William C.; Terawaki, Hiromi; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    As image guided surgical procedures become increasingly diverse, there will be more scenarios where point-based fiducials cannot be accurately localized for registration and rigid body assumptions no longer hold. As a result, procedures will rely more frequently on anatomical surfaces for the basis of image alignment and will require intraoperative geometric data to measure and compensate for tissue deformation in the organ. In this paper we outline methods for which a laser range scanner may be used to accomplish these tasks intraoperatively. A laser range scanner based on the optical principle of triangulation acquires a dense set of three-dimensional point data in a very rapid, noncontact fashion. Phantom studies were performed to test the ability to link range scan data with traditional modes of image-guided surgery data through localization, registration, and tracking in physical space. The experiments demonstrate that the scanner is capable of localizing point-based fiducials to within 0.2 mm and capable of achieving point and surface based registrations with target registration error of less than 2.0 mm. Tracking points in physical space with the range scanning system yields an error of 1.4±0.8 mm. Surface deformation studies were performed with the range scanner in order to determine if this device was capable of acquiring enough information for compensation algorithms. In the surface deformation studies, the range scanner was able to detect changes in surface shape due to deformation comparable to those detected by tomographic image studies. Use of the range scanner has been approved for clinical trials, and an initial intraoperative range scan experiment is presented. In all of these studies, the primary source of error in range scan data is deterministically related to the position and orientation of the surface within the scanner's field of view. However, this systematic error can be corrected, allowing the range scanner to provide a rapid, robust

  1. Calculating ensemble averaged descriptions of protein rigidity without sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C González

    Full Text Available Previous works have demonstrated that protein rigidity is related to thermodynamic stability, especially under conditions that favor formation of native structure. Mechanical network rigidity properties of a single conformation are efficiently calculated using the integer body-bar Pebble Game (PG algorithm. However, thermodynamic properties require averaging over many samples from the ensemble of accessible conformations to accurately account for fluctuations in network topology. We have developed a mean field Virtual Pebble Game (VPG that represents the ensemble of networks by a single effective network. That is, all possible number of distance constraints (or bars that can form between a pair of rigid bodies is replaced by the average number. The resulting effective network is viewed as having weighted edges, where the weight of an edge quantifies its capacity to absorb degrees of freedom. The VPG is interpreted as a flow problem on this effective network, which eliminates the need to sample. Across a nonredundant dataset of 272 protein structures, we apply the VPG to proteins for the first time. Our results show numerically and visually that the rigidity characterizations of the VPG accurately reflect the ensemble averaged [Formula: see text] properties. This result positions the VPG as an efficient alternative to understand the mechanical role that chemical interactions play in maintaining protein stability.

  2. Calculating ensemble averaged descriptions of protein rigidity without sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Luis C; Wang, Hui; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Previous works have demonstrated that protein rigidity is related to thermodynamic stability, especially under conditions that favor formation of native structure. Mechanical network rigidity properties of a single conformation are efficiently calculated using the integer body-bar Pebble Game (PG) algorithm. However, thermodynamic properties require averaging over many samples from the ensemble of accessible conformations to accurately account for fluctuations in network topology. We have developed a mean field Virtual Pebble Game (VPG) that represents the ensemble of networks by a single effective network. That is, all possible number of distance constraints (or bars) that can form between a pair of rigid bodies is replaced by the average number. The resulting effective network is viewed as having weighted edges, where the weight of an edge quantifies its capacity to absorb degrees of freedom. The VPG is interpreted as a flow problem on this effective network, which eliminates the need to sample. Across a nonredundant dataset of 272 protein structures, we apply the VPG to proteins for the first time. Our results show numerically and visually that the rigidity characterizations of the VPG accurately reflect the ensemble averaged [Formula: see text] properties. This result positions the VPG as an efficient alternative to understand the mechanical role that chemical interactions play in maintaining protein stability.

  3. Semiautomated Multimodal Breast Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curtis

    2012-01-01

    However, due to the highly deformable nature of breast tissues, comparison of 3D and 2D modalities is a challenge. To enable this comparison, a registration technique was developed to map features from 2D mammograms to locations in the 3D image space. This technique was developed and tested using magnetic resonance (MR images as a reference 3D modality, as MR breast imaging is an established technique in clinical practice. The algorithm was validated using a numerical phantom then successfully tested on twenty-four image pairs. Dice's coefficient was used to measure the external goodness of fit, resulting in an excellent overall average of 0.94. Internal agreement was evaluated by examining internal features in consultation with a radiologist, and subjective assessment concludes that reasonable alignment was achieved.

  4. [Multimodal medical image registration using cubic spline interpolation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanlie; Tian, Lianfang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Lifei; Ye, Guangchun; Mao, Zongyuan

    2007-12-01

    Based on the characteristic of the PET-CT multimodal image series, a novel image registration and fusion method is proposed, in which the cubic spline interpolation method is applied to realize the interpolation of PET-CT image series, then registration is carried out by using mutual information algorithm and finally the improved principal component analysis method is used for the fusion of PET-CT multimodal images to enhance the visual effect of PET image, thus satisfied registration and fusion results are obtained. The cubic spline interpolation method is used for reconstruction to restore the missed information between image slices, which can compensate for the shortage of previous registration methods, improve the accuracy of the registration, and make the fused multimodal images more similar to the real image. Finally, the cubic spline interpolation method has been successfully applied in developing 3D-CRT (3D Conformal Radiation Therapy) system.

  5. Validation of MRI to TRUS registration for high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Eric; Boudam, Karim; Pinter, Csaba; Kadoury, Samuel; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ménard, Cynthia

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate an open-source module for MRI to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) registration to support tumor-targeted prostate brachytherapy. In this study, 15 patients with prostate cancer lesions visible on multiparametric MRI were selected for the validation. T2-weighted images with 1-mm isotropic voxel size and diffusion weighted images were acquired on a 1.5T Siemens imager. Three-dimensional (3D) TRUS images with 0.5-mm slice thickness were acquired. The investigated registration module was incorporated in the open-source 3D Slicer platform, which can compute rigid and deformable transformations. An extension of 3D Slicer, SlicerRT, allows import of and export to DICOM-RT formats. For validation, similarity indices, prostate volumes, and centroid positions were determined in addition to registration errors for common 3D points identified by an experienced radiation oncologist. The average time to compute the registration was 35 ± 3 s. For the rigid and deformable registration, respectively, Dice similarity coefficients were 0.87 ± 0.05 and 0.93 ± 0.01 while the 95% Hausdorff distances were 4.2 ± 1.0 and 2.2 ± 0.3 mm. MRI volumes obtained after the rigid and deformable registration were not statistically different (p > 0.05) from reference TRUS volumes. For the rigid and deformable registration, respectively, 3D distance errors between reference and registered centroid positions were 2.1 ± 1.0 and 0.4 ± 0.1 mm while registration errors between common points were 3.5 ± 3.2 and 2.3 ± 1.1 mm. Deformable registration was found significantly better (p < 0.05) than rigid registration for all parameters. An open-source MRI to TRUS registration platform was validated for integration in the brachytherapy workflow. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An image acquisition and registration strategy for the fusion of hyperpolarized helium-3 MRI and x-ray CT images of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ireland, Rob H; Woodhouse, Neil; Hoggard, Nigel; Swinscoe, James A; Foran, Bernadette H; Hatton, Matthew Q; Wild, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this ethics committee approved prospective study was to evaluate an image acquisition and registration protocol for hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He-MRI) and x-ray computed tomography. Nine patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) gave written informed consent to undergo a free-breathing CT, an inspiration breath-hold CT and a 3D ventilation 3 He-MRI in CT position using an elliptical birdcage radiofrequency (RF) body coil. 3 He-MRI to CT image fusion was performed using a rigid registration algorithm which was assessed by two observers using anatomical landmarks and a percentage volume overlap coefficient. Registration of 3 He-MRI to breath-hold CT was more accurate than to free-breathing CT; overlap 82.9 ± 4.2% versus 59.8 ± 9.0% (p 3 He-MRI and CT to be acquired with similar breath holds and body position through the use of a birdcage 3 He-MRI body RF coil and an inspiration breath-hold CT. Fusion of 3 He-MRI to CT may be useful for the assessment of patients with lung diseases.

  7. Position tracking of moving liver lesion based on real-time registration between 2D ultrasound and 3D preoperative images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weon, Chijun; Hyun Nam, Woo; Lee, Duhgoon; Ra, Jong Beom; Lee, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Registration between 2D ultrasound (US) and 3D preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) (or computed tomography, CT) images has been studied recently for US-guided intervention. However, the existing techniques have some limits, either in the registration speed or the performance. The purpose of this work is to develop a real-time and fully automatic registration system between two intermodal images of the liver, and subsequently an indirect lesion positioning/tracking algorithm based on the registration result, for image-guided interventions. Methods: The proposed position tracking system consists of three stages. In the preoperative stage, the authors acquire several 3D preoperative MR (or CT) images at different respiratory phases. Based on the transformations obtained from nonrigid registration of the acquired 3D images, they then generate a 4D preoperative image along the respiratory phase. In the intraoperative preparatory stage, they properly attach a 3D US transducer to the patient’s body and fix its pose using a holding mechanism. They then acquire a couple of respiratory-controlled 3D US images. Via the rigid registration of these US images to the 3D preoperative images in the 4D image, the pose information of the fixed-pose 3D US transducer is determined with respect to the preoperative image coordinates. As feature(s) to use for the rigid registration, they may choose either internal liver vessels or the inferior vena cava. Since the latter is especially useful in patients with a diffuse liver disease, the authors newly propose using it. In the intraoperative real-time stage, they acquire 2D US images in real-time from the fixed-pose transducer. For each US image, they select candidates for its corresponding 2D preoperative slice from the 4D preoperative MR (or CT) image, based on the predetermined pose information of the transducer. The correct corresponding image is then found among those candidates via real-time 2D registration based on a

  8. Significantly reducing registration time in IGRT using graphics processing units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    respiration phases in a free breathing volunteer and 41 anatomical landmark points in each image series. The registration method used is a multi-resolution GPU implementation of the 3D Horn and Schunck algorithm. It is based on the CUDA framework from Nvidia. Results On an Intel Core 2 CPU at 2.4GHz each...... registration took 30 minutes. On an Nvidia Geforce 8800GTX GPU in the same machine this registration took 37 seconds, making the GPU version 48.7 times faster. The nine image series of different respiration phases were registered to the same reference image (full inhale). Accuracy was evaluated on landmark...

  9. Registration accuracy and quality of real-life images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yen Hsu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A common registration problem for the application of consumer device is to align all the acquired image sequences into a complete scene. Image alignment requires a registration algorithm that will compensate as much as possible for geometric variability among images. However, images captured views from a real scene usually produce different distortions. Some are derived from the optic characteristics of image sensors, and others are caused by the specific scenes and objects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An image registration algorithm considering the perspective projection is proposed for the application of consumer devices in this study. It exploits a multiresolution wavelet-based method to extract significant features. An analytic differential approach is then proposed to achieve fast convergence of point matching. Finally, the registration accuracy is further refined to obtain subpixel precision by a feature-based modified Levenberg-Marquardt method. Due to its feature-based and nonlinear characteristic, it converges considerably faster than most other methods. In addition, vignette compensation and color difference adjustment are also performed to further improve the quality of registration results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by testing the synthetic and real images acquired by a hand-held digital still camera and in comparison with two registration techniques in terms of the squared sum of intensity differences (SSD and correlation coefficient (CC. The results indicate that the proposed method is promising in registration accuracy and quality, which are statistically significantly better than other two approaches.

  10. List-mode-based reconstruction for respiratory motion correction in PET using non-rigid body transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamare, F; Carbayo, M J Ledesma; Cresson, T; Kontaxakis, G; Santos, A; Rest, C Cheze Le; Reader, A J; Visvikis, D

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory motion in emission tomography leads to reduced image quality. Developed correction methodology has been concentrating on the use of respiratory synchronized acquisitions leading to gated frames. Such frames, however, are of low signal-to-noise ratio as a result of containing reduced statistics. In this work, we describe the implementation of an elastic transformation within a list-mode-based reconstruction for the correction of respiratory motion over the thorax, allowing the use of all data available throughout a respiratory motion average acquisition. The developed algorithm was evaluated using datasets of the NCAT phantom generated at different points throughout the respiratory cycle. List-mode-data-based PET-simulated frames were subsequently produced by combining the NCAT datasets with Monte Carlo simulation. A non-rigid registration algorithm based on B-spline basis functions was employed to derive transformation parameters accounting for the respiratory motion using the NCAT dynamic CT images. The displacement matrices derived were subsequently applied during the image reconstruction of the original emission list mode data. Two different implementations for the incorporation of the elastic transformations within the one-pass list mode EM (OPL-EM) algorithm were developed and evaluated. The corrected images were compared with those produced using an affine transformation of list mode data prior to reconstruction, as well as with uncorrected respiratory motion average images. Results demonstrate that although both correction techniques considered lead to significant improvements in accounting for respiratory motion artefacts in the lung fields, the elastic-transformation-based correction leads to a more uniform improvement across the lungs for different lesion sizes and locations

  11. Mao-Gilles Stabilization Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Originally, the Mao-Gilles stabilization algorithm was designed to compensate the non-rigid deformations due to atmospheric turbulence. Given a sequence of frames affected by atmospheric turbulence, the algorithm uses a variational model combining optical flow and regularization to characterize the static observed scene. The optimization problem is solved by Bregman Iteration and the operator splitting method. The algorithm is simple, efficient, and can be easily generalized for different sce...

  12. Nonrigid synthetic aperture radar and optical image coregistration by combining local rigid transformations using a Kohonen network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Mehdi; Behrad, Alireza

    2017-10-01

    This study proposes a new algorithm for nonrigid coregistration of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical images. The proposed algorithm employs point features extracted by the binary robust invariant scalable keypoints algorithm and a new method called weighted bidirectional matching for initial correspondence. To refine false matches, we assume that the transformation between SAR and optical images is locally rigid. This property is used to refine false matches by assigning scores to matched pairs and clustering local rigid transformations using a two-layer Kohonen network. Finally, the thin plate spline algorithm and mutual information are used for nonrigid coregistration of SAR and optical images.

  13. Multimodality image registration with software: state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slomka, Piotr J. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, AIM Program/Department of Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Baum, Richard P. [Center for PET, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Multimodality image integration of functional and anatomical data can be performed by means of dedicated hybrid imaging systems or by software image co-registration techniques. Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) systems have found wide acceptance in oncological imaging, while software registration techniques have a significant role in patient-specific, cost-effective, and radiation dose-effective application of integrated imaging. Software techniques allow accurate (2-3 mm) rigid image registration of brain PET with CT and MRI. Nonlinear techniques are used in whole-body image registration, and recent developments allow for significantly accelerated computing times. Nonlinear software registration of PET with CT or MRI is required for multimodality radiation planning. Difficulties remain in the validation of nonlinear registration of soft tissue organs. The utilization of software-based multimodality image integration in a clinical environment is sometimes hindered by the lack of appropriate picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) infrastructure needed to efficiently and automatically integrate all available images into one common database. In cardiology applications, multimodality PET/single photon emission computed tomography and coronary CT angiography imaging is typically not required unless the results of one of the tests are equivocal. Software image registration is likely to be used in a complementary fashion with hybrid PET/CT or PET/magnetic resonance imaging systems. Software registration of stand-alone scans ''paved the way'' for the clinical application of hybrid scanners, demonstrating practical benefits of image integration before the hybrid dual-modality devices were available. (orig.)

  14. Multimodality image registration with software: state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slomka, Piotr J.; Baum, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality image integration of functional and anatomical data can be performed by means of dedicated hybrid imaging systems or by software image co-registration techniques. Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) systems have found wide acceptance in oncological imaging, while software registration techniques have a significant role in patient-specific, cost-effective, and radiation dose-effective application of integrated imaging. Software techniques allow accurate (2-3 mm) rigid image registration of brain PET with CT and MRI. Nonlinear techniques are used in whole-body image registration, and recent developments allow for significantly accelerated computing times. Nonlinear software registration of PET with CT or MRI is required for multimodality radiation planning. Difficulties remain in the validation of nonlinear registration of soft tissue organs. The utilization of software-based multimodality image integration in a clinical environment is sometimes hindered by the lack of appropriate picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) infrastructure needed to efficiently and automatically integrate all available images into one common database. In cardiology applications, multimodality PET/single photon emission computed tomography and coronary CT angiography imaging is typically not required unless the results of one of the tests are equivocal. Software image registration is likely to be used in a complementary fashion with hybrid PET/CT or PET/magnetic resonance imaging systems. Software registration of stand-alone scans ''paved the way'' for the clinical application of hybrid scanners, demonstrating practical benefits of image integration before the hybrid dual-modality devices were available. (orig.)

  15. An Optimized Spline-Based Registration of a 3D CT to a Set of C-Arm Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an algorithm for the rigid-body registration of a CT volume to a set of C-arm images. The algorithm uses a gradient-based iterative minimization of a least-squares measure of dissimilarity between the C-arm images and projections of the CT volume. To compute projections, we use a novel method for fast integration of the volume along rays. To improve robustness and speed, we take advantage of a coarse-to-fine processing of the volume/image pyramids. To compute the projections of the volume, the gradient of the dissimilarity measure, and the multiresolution data pyramids, we use a continuous image/volume model based on cubic B-splines, which ensures a high interpolation accuracy and a gradient of the dissimilarity measure that is well defined everywhere. We show the performance of our algorithm on a human spine phantom, where the true alignment is determined using a set of fiducial markers.

  16. Three-dimensional measurement of small inner surface profiles using feature-based 3-D panoramic registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yuanzheng; Seibel, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid development in the performance of sophisticated optical components, digital image sensors, and computer abilities along with decreasing costs has enabled three-dimensional (3-D) optical measurement to replace more traditional methods in manufacturing and quality control. The advantages of 3-D optical measurement, such as noncontact, high accuracy, rapid operation, and the ability for automation, are extremely valuable for inline manufacturing. However, most of the current optical approaches are eligible for exterior instead of internal surfaces of machined parts. A 3-D optical measurement approach is proposed based on machine vision for the 3-D profile measurement of tiny complex internal surfaces, such as internally threaded holes. To capture the full topographic extent (peak to valley) of threads, a side-view commercial rigid scope is used to collect images at known camera positions and orientations. A 3-D point cloud is generated with multiview stereo vision using linear motion of the test piece, which is repeated by a rotation to form additional point clouds. Registration of these point clouds into a complete reconstruction uses a proposed automated feature-based 3-D registration algorithm. The resulting 3-D reconstruction is compared with x-ray computed tomography to validate the feasibility of our proposed method for future robotically driven industrial 3-D inspection.

  17. Biomedical Image Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Biomedical Image Registration, WBIR 2018, held in Leiden, The Netherlands, in June 2018. The 11 full and poster papers included in this volume were carefully reviewed and selected from 17 submitted papers. The pap...

  18. Registration of Plant Varieties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Registration of two Sorghum Hybrids, ESH-1 and ESH-2. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L) Moench) is an indigenous crop to Ethiopia and staple for many millions of people in most parts of Africa. The crop is one of the most important cereals grown in arid and semi arid areas where others often fail to survive. In Eastern Africa ...

  19. Determination of Weight Suspension Rigidity in the Transport-Erector Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zverev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to determine weight suspension rigidity in aggregates designed to perform technological transport-erector operations at the miscellaneous launch complexes.We consider the weight suspension comprising the following distinctive structural components: the executive weight-lowering mechanism, polyspast mechanism, rope, traverse, and rods. A created structural dynamic model of suspension allowed us to define weight suspension rigidity. Within the framework of design analysis of a dynamic model we determined the rigidity of its structural units, i.e. traverse, rope, and polyspast.Known analytical relationships were used to calculate the rope rigidity. To determine rigidity of polyspast and traverse have been created special models based on the finite element method. For each model deformation in the specific points under the test load have been defined. Data obtained were used to determine trigidity of traverses and polyspast, and also rigidity of suspension in total. The rigidity models of polispast mechanism and traverse have been developed and calculated using the software complex "Zenit-95".As the research results, the paper presents a dynamic model of the weight suspension of the transport-erector aggregate, the finite element models of the polispast mechanism and traverse, an algorithm for determining the weight suspension rigidity and relevant analytical relationships.Independent calculation of weight suspension rigidity enables us to simplify further dynamic calculation of the aggregate-weight system because it allows attaining a simpler model of the aggregate-weight system that uses the weight suspension model as an element of equivalent rigidity. Despite this simplification the model allows us to determine correctly weight movement parameters and overloads in the aggregate-weight system in the process of technical operations.

  20. Comparison of manual vs. automated multimodality (CT-MRI) image registration for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Abhirup; Santiago, Roberto J.; Smith, Ryan; Kassaee, Alireza

    2005-01-01

    Computed tomgoraphy-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) registrations are routinely used for target-volume delineation of brain tumors. We clinically use 2 software packages based on manual operation and 1 automated package with 2 different algorithms: chamfer matching using bony structures, and mutual information using intensity patterns. In all registration algorithms, a minimum of 3 pairs of identical anatomical and preferably noncoplanar landmarks is used on each of the 2 image sets. In manual registration, the program registers these points and links the image sets using a 3-dimensional (3D) transformation. In automated registration, the 3 landmarks are used as an initial starting point and further processing is done to complete the registration. Using our registration packages, registration of CT and MRI was performed on 10 patients. We scored the results of each registration set based on the amount of time spent, the accuracy reported by the software, and a final evaluation. We evaluated each software program by measuring the residual error between 'matched' points on the right and left globes and the posterior fossa for fused image slices. In general, manual registration showed higher misalignment between corresponding points compared to automated registration using intensity matching. This error had no directional dependence and was, most of the time, larger for a larger structure in both registration techniques. Automated algorithm based on intensity matching also gave the best results in terms of registration accuracy, irrespective of whether or not the initial landmarks were chosen carefully, when compared to that done using bone matching algorithm. Intensity-matching algorithm required the least amount of user-time and provided better accuracy

  1. Topological orders in rigid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, X.G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors study a new kind of ordering topological order in rigid states (the states with no local gapless excitations). This paper concentrates on characterization of the different topological orders. As an example the authors discuss in detail chiral spin states of 2+1 dimensional spin systems. Chiral spin states are described by the topological Chern-Simons theories in the continuum limit. The authors show that the topological orders can be characterized by a non-Abelian gauge structure over the moduli space which parametrizes a family of the model Hamiltonians supporting topologically ordered ground states. In 2 + 1 dimensions, the non-Abelian gauge structure determines possible fractional statistics of the quasi-particle excitations over the topologically ordered ground states. The dynamics of the low lying global excitations is shown to be independent of random spatial dependent perturbations. The ground state degeneracy and the non-Abelian gauge structures discussed in this paper are very robust, even against those perturbations that break translation symmetry. The authors also discuss the symmetry properties of the degenerate ground states of chiral spin states. The authors find that some degenerate ground states of chiral spin states on torus carry non-trivial quantum numbers of the 90 degrees rotation

  2. The hidden KPI registration accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorrosh, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Determining the registration accuracy rate is fundamental to improving revenue cycle key performance indicators. A registration quality assurance (QA) process allows errors to be corrected before bills are sent and helps registrars learn from their mistakes. Tools are available to help patient access staff who perform registration QA manually.

  3. Parallel Processing and Bio-inspired Computing for Biomedical Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Ioan Bejinariu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Image Registration (IR is an optimization problem computing optimal parameters of a geometric transform used to overlay one or more source images to a given model by maximizing a similarity measure. In this paper the use of bio-inspired optimization algorithms in image registration is analyzed. Results obtained by means of three different algorithms are compared: Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm (BFOA, Genetic Algorithm (GA and Clonal Selection Algorithm (CSA. Depending on the images type, the registration may be: area based, which is slow but more precise, and features based, which is faster. In this paper a feature based approach based on the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT is proposed. Finally, results obtained using sequential and parallel implementations on multi-core systems for area based and features based image registration are compared.

  4. Crack identification for rigid pavements using unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaddin Ersoz, Ahmet; Pekcan, Onur; Teke, Turker

    2017-09-01

    Pavement condition assessment is an essential piece of modern pavement management systems as rehabilitation strategies are planned based upon its outcomes. For proper evaluation of existing pavements, they must be continuously and effectively monitored using practical means. Conventionally, truck-based pavement monitoring systems have been in-use in assessing the remaining life of in-service pavements. Although such systems produce accurate results, their use can be expensive and data processing can be time consuming, which make them infeasible considering the demand for quick pavement evaluation. To overcome such problems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be used as an alternative as they are relatively cheaper and easier-to-use. In this study, we propose a UAV based pavement crack identification system for monitoring rigid pavements’ existing conditions. The system consists of recently introduced image processing algorithms used together with conventional machine learning techniques, both of which are used to perform detection of cracks on rigid pavements’ surface and their classification. Through image processing, the distinct features of labelled crack bodies are first obtained from the UAV based images and then used for training of a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model. The performance of the developed SVM model was assessed with a field study performed along a rigid pavement exposed to low traffic and serious temperature changes. Available cracks were classified using the UAV based system and obtained results indicate it ensures a good alternative solution for pavement monitoring applications.

  5. Selecting registration schemes in case of interstitial lung disease follow-up in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlachopoulos, Georgios; Korfiatis, Panayiotis; Skiadopoulos, Spyros; Kazantzi, Alexandra; Kalogeropoulou, Christina; Pratikakis, Ioannis; Costaridou, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Primary goal of this study is to select optimal registration schemes in the framework of interstitial lung disease (ILD) follow-up analysis in CT. Methods: A set of 128 multiresolution schemes composed of multiresolution nonrigid and combinations of rigid and nonrigid registration schemes are evaluated, utilizing ten artificially warped ILD follow-up volumes, originating from ten clinical volumetric CT scans of ILD affected patients, to select candidate optimal schemes. Specifically, all combinations of four transformation models (three rigid: rigid, similarity, affine and one nonrigid: third order B-spline), four cost functions (sum-of-square distances, normalized correlation coefficient, mutual information, and normalized mutual information), four gradient descent optimizers (standard, regular step, adaptive stochastic, and finite difference), and two types of pyramids (recursive and Gaussian-smoothing) were considered. The selection process involves two stages. The first stage involves identification of schemes with deformation field singularities, according to the determinant of the Jacobian matrix. In the second stage, evaluation methodology is based on distance between corresponding landmark points in both normal lung parenchyma (NLP) and ILD affected regions. Statistical analysis was performed in order to select near optimal registration schemes per evaluation metric. Performance of the candidate registration schemes was verified on a case sample of ten clinical follow-up CT scans to obtain the selected registration schemes. Results: By considering near optimal schemes common to all ranking lists, 16 out of 128 registration schemes were initially selected. These schemes obtained submillimeter registration accuracies in terms of average distance errors 0.18 ± 0.01 mm for NLP and 0.20 ± 0.01 mm for ILD, in case of artificially generated follow-up data. Registration accuracy in terms of average distance error in clinical follow-up data was in the

  6. Selecting registration schemes in case of interstitial lung disease follow-up in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlachopoulos, Georgios; Korfiatis, Panayiotis; Skiadopoulos, Spyros; Kazantzi, Alexandra [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine,University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece); Kalogeropoulou, Christina [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece); Pratikakis, Ioannis [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi 67100 (Greece); Costaridou, Lena, E-mail: costarid@upatras.gr [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras 26504 (Greece)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Primary goal of this study is to select optimal registration schemes in the framework of interstitial lung disease (ILD) follow-up analysis in CT. Methods: A set of 128 multiresolution schemes composed of multiresolution nonrigid and combinations of rigid and nonrigid registration schemes are evaluated, utilizing ten artificially warped ILD follow-up volumes, originating from ten clinical volumetric CT scans of ILD affected patients, to select candidate optimal schemes. Specifically, all combinations of four transformation models (three rigid: rigid, similarity, affine and one nonrigid: third order B-spline), four cost functions (sum-of-square distances, normalized correlation coefficient, mutual information, and normalized mutual information), four gradient descent optimizers (standard, regular step, adaptive stochastic, and finite difference), and two types of pyramids (recursive and Gaussian-smoothing) were considered. The selection process involves two stages. The first stage involves identification of schemes with deformation field singularities, according to the determinant of the Jacobian matrix. In the second stage, evaluation methodology is based on distance between corresponding landmark points in both normal lung parenchyma (NLP) and ILD affected regions. Statistical analysis was performed in order to select near optimal registration schemes per evaluation metric. Performance of the candidate registration schemes was verified on a case sample of ten clinical follow-up CT scans to obtain the selected registration schemes. Results: By considering near optimal schemes common to all ranking lists, 16 out of 128 registration schemes were initially selected. These schemes obtained submillimeter registration accuracies in terms of average distance errors 0.18 ± 0.01 mm for NLP and 0.20 ± 0.01 mm for ILD, in case of artificially generated follow-up data. Registration accuracy in terms of average distance error in clinical follow-up data was in the

  7. Deformable image registration in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Jong; Kim, Si Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The number of imaging data sets has significantly increased during radiation treatment after introducing a diverse range of advanced techniques into the field of radiation oncology. As a consequence, there have been many studies proposing meaningful applications of imaging data set use. These applications commonly require a method to align the data sets at a reference. Deformable image registration (DIR) is a process which satisfies this requirement by locally registering image data sets into a reference image set. DIR identifies the spatial correspondence in order to minimize the differences between two or among multiple sets of images. This article describes clinical applications, validation, and algorithms of DIR techniques. Applications of DIR in radiation treatment include dose accumulation, mathematical modeling, automatic segmentation, and functional imaging. Validation methods discussed are based on anatomical landmarks, physical phantoms, digital phantoms, and per application purpose. DIR algorithms are also briefly reviewed with respect to two algorithmic components: similarity index and deformation models.

  8. Registration of acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Cathrine; Mehnert, Frank; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The validity of the registration of patients in stroke-specific registries has seldom been investigated, nor compared with administrative hospital discharge registries. The objective of this study was to examine the validity of the registration of patients in a stroke-specific registry...... (The Danish Stroke Registry [DSR]) and a hospital discharge registry (The Danish National Patient Registry [DNRP]). METHODS: Assuming that all patients with stroke were registered in either the DSR, DNRP or both, we first identified a sample of 75 patients registered with stroke in 2009; 25 patients...... in the DSR, 25 patients in the DNRP, and 25 patients registered in both data sources. Using the medical record as a gold standard, we then estimated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of a stroke diagnosis in the DSR and the DNRP. Secondly, we reviewed 160 medical records for all potential stroke...

  9. Image registration with uncertainty analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Katherine M [Cedar Crest, NM

    2011-03-22

    In an image registration method, edges are detected in a first image and a second image. A percentage of edge pixels in a subset of the second image that are also edges in the first image shifted by a translation is calculated. A best registration point is calculated based on a maximum percentage of edges matched. In a predefined search region, all registration points other than the best registration point are identified that are not significantly worse than the best registration point according to a predetermined statistical criterion.

  10. The role of image registration in brain mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, A.W.; Thompson, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Image registration is a key step in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. It provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another, and is a prerequisite for all imaging applications that compare datasets across subjects, imaging modalities, or across time. Registration algorithms also enable the pooling and comparison of experimental findings across laboratories, the construction of population-based brain atlases, and the creation of systems to detect group patterns in structural and functional imaging data. We review the major types of registration approaches used in brain imaging today. We focus on their conceptual basis, the underlying mathematics, and their strengths and weaknesses in different contexts. We describe the major goals of registration, including data fusion, quantification of change, automated image segmentation and labeling, shape measurement, and pathology detection. We indicate that registration algorithms have great potential when used in conjunction with a digital brain atlas, which acts as a reference system in which brain images can be compared for statistical analysis. The resulting armory of registration approaches is fundamental to medical image analysis, and in a brain mapping context provides a means to elucidate clinical, demographic, or functional trends in the anatomy or physiology of the brain. PMID:19890483

  11. 3-D brain image registration using optimal morphological processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loncaric, S.; Dhawan, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) registration of Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Positron Emission Tomographic (PET) images of the brain is important for analysis of the human brain and its diseases. A procedure for optimization of (3-D) morphological structuring elements, based on a genetic algorithm, is presented in the paper. The registration of the MR and PET images is done by means of a registration procedure in two major phases. In the first phase, the Iterative Principal Axis Transform (IPAR) is used for initial registration. In the second phase, the optimal shape description method based on the Morphological Signature Transform (MST) is used for final registration. The morphological processing is used to improve the accuracy of the basic IPAR method. The brain ventricle is used as a landmark for MST registration. A near-optimal structuring element obtained by means of a genetic algorithm is used in MST to describe the shape of the ventricle. The method has been tested on the set of brain images demonstrating the feasibility of approach. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs

  12. Optimization strategies for ultrasound volume registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, Umer Zeeshan; Prager, Richard W; Gee, Andrew H; Treece, Graham M

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers registration of 3D ultrasound volumes acquired in multiple views for display in a single image volume. One way to acquire 3D data is to use a mechanically swept 3D probe. However, the usefulness of these probes is restricted by their limited field of view. This problem can be overcome by attaching a six-degree-of-freedom (DOF) position sensor to the probe, and displaying the information from multiple sweeps in their proper positions. However, an external six-DOF position sensor can be an inconvenience in a clinical setting. The objective of this paper is to propose a hybrid strategy that replaces the sensor with a combination of three-DOF image registration and an unobtrusive inertial sensor for measuring orientation. We examine a range of optimization algorithms and similarity measures for registration and compare them in in vitro and in vivo experiments. We register based on multiple reslice images rather than a whole voxel array. In this paper, we use a large number of reslices for improved reliability at the expense of computational speed. We have found that the Levenberg–Marquardt method is very fast but is not guaranteed to give the correct solution all the time. We conclude that normalized mutual information used in the Nelder–Mead simplex algorithm is potentially suitable for the registration task with an average execution time of around 5 min, in the majority of cases, with two restarts in a C++ implementation on a 3.0 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo CPU machine

  13. Remote Sensing Image Registration Using Multiple Image Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing image registration plays an important role in military and civilian fields, such as natural disaster damage assessment, military damage assessment and ground targets identification, etc. However, due to the ground relief variations and imaging viewpoint changes, non-rigid geometric distortion occurs between remote sensing images with different viewpoint, which further increases the difficulty of remote sensing image registration. To address the problem, we propose a multi-viewpoint remote sensing image registration method which contains the following contributions. (i A multiple features based finite mixture model is constructed for dealing with different types of image features. (ii Three features are combined and substituted into the mixture model to form a feature complementation, i.e., the Euclidean distance and shape context are used to measure the similarity of geometric structure, and the SIFT (scale-invariant feature transform distance which is endowed with the intensity information is used to measure the scale space extrema. (iii To prevent the ill-posed problem, a geometric constraint term is introduced into the L2E-based energy function for better behaving the non-rigid transformation. We evaluated the performances of the proposed method by three series of remote sensing images obtained from the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV and Google Earth, and compared with five state-of-the-art methods where our method shows the best alignments in most cases.

  14. Automatic 3D MR image registration and its evaluation for precise monitoring of knee joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yuanzhi; Jin Quan; Guo Changyong; Ding Xiaohua; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tamura, Shinichi

    2011-01-01

    We describe a technique for the registration of three dimensional (3D) knee femur surface points from MR image data sets; it is a technique that can track local cartilage thickness changes over time. In the first coarse registration step, we use the direction vectors of the volume given by the cloud of points of the MR image to correct for different knee joint positions and orientations in the MR scanner. In the second fine registration step, we propose a global search algorithm that simultaneously determines the optimal transformation parameters and point correspondences through searching a six dimensional space of Euclidean motion vectors (translation and rotation). The present algorithm is grounded on a mathematical theory- Lipschitz optimization. Compared with the other three registration approaches (iterative closest point (ICP), EM-ICP, and genetic algorithms), the proposed method achieved the highest registration accuracy on both animal and clinical data. (author)

  15. Patient-Specific Biomechanical Model as Whole-Body CT Image Registration Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mao; Miller, Karol; Joldes, Grand Roman; Doyle, Barry; Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Kikinis, Ron; Wittek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration is important for cancer diagnosis, therapy planning and treatment. Such registration requires accounting for large differences between source and target images caused by deformations of soft organs/tissues and articulated motion of skeletal structures. The registration algorithms relying solely on image processing methods exhibit deficiencies in accounting for such deformations and motion. We propose to predict the deformations and moveme...

  16. Validation of co-registration of clinical lung ventilation and perfusion SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.H.; O'Keeffe, D.S.; Barnden, L.R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This talk will present results from a recent validation study of coregistration of computed tomography ventilation and perfusion (SPECT V/Q) images. The coregistration algorithm was incorporated in Qonsub, a program to coregister, normalise and subtract the SPECT (V/Q) images. Ventilation and perfusion image data were acquired from 23 patients undergoing a routine clinical SPECT V/Q study. The only change to normal patient management was the placement of three Tc 9 9 m filled fiducial markers adhered to the skin on the patient's torso. To quantify coregistration accuracy, image data were modified (within software) to remove the markers and Qonsub determined a parameter set of six values fully describing the six degree rigid transformation. The accuracy with which the six parameters coregister the images was then quantified by applying the same transformation parameters to the ventilation markers and determining how well they locate to the perfusion marker positions. Results show that for 65% of patients surveyed co-registration accuracy was to within I pixel, 30% were co-registered with an accuracy between 1 and 2 pixels and 5% were co-registered with an accuracy of between 2 and 3 pixels. Because patient placement between scans resulted in a misregistration of at most five pixels, a more rigorous test of the algorithm was required. Ethics approval had not been sought to intentionally misregister patient images, so the algorithm had to be further tested by synthetically misregistering the images. For these images Qonsub generally co-registered with the same accuracy as the original image. (author)

  17. A new robust markerless method for automatic image-to-patient registration in image-guided neurosurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinlong; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Manning

    2017-12-01

    Compared with the traditional point-based registration in the image-guided neurosurgery system, surface-based registration is preferable because it does not use fiducial markers before image scanning and does not require image acquisition dedicated for navigation purposes. However, most existing surface-based registration methods must include a manual step for coarse registration, which increases the registration time and elicits some inconvenience and uncertainty. A new automatic surface-based registration method is proposed, which applies 3D surface feature description and matching algorithm to obtain point correspondences for coarse registration and uses the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm in the last step to obtain an image-to-patient registration. Both phantom and clinical data were used to execute automatic registrations and target registration error (TRE) calculated to verify the practicality and robustness of the proposed method. In phantom experiments, the registration accuracy was stable across different downsampling resolutions (18-26 mm) and different support radii (2-6 mm). In clinical experiments, the mean TREs of two patients by registering full head surfaces were 1.30 mm and 1.85 mm. This study introduced a new robust automatic surface-based registration method based on 3D feature matching. The method achieved sufficient registration accuracy with different real-world surface regions in phantom and clinical experiments.

  18. Fast free-form deformable registration via calculus of variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli; Olivera, Gustavo H; Ruchala, Kenneth J; Mackie, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automatic, fast and accurate deformable registration technique. This technique deals with free-form deformation. It minimizes an energy functional that combines both similarity and smoothness measures. By using calculus of variations, the minimization problem was represented as a set of nonlinear elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs). A Gauss-Seidel finite difference scheme is used to iteratively solve the PDE. The registration is refined by a multi-resolution approach. The whole process is fully automatic. It takes less than 3 min to register two three-dimensional (3D) image sets of size 256 x 256 x 61 using a single 933 MHz personal computer. Extensive experiments are presented. These experiments include simulations, phantom studies and clinical image studies. Experimental results show that our model and algorithm are suited for registration of temporal images of a deformable body. The registration of inspiration and expiration phases of the lung images shows that the method is able to deal with large deformations. When applied to the daily CT images of a prostate patient, the results show that registration based on iterative refinement of displacement field is appropriate to describe the local deformations in the prostate and the rectum. Similarity measures improved significantly after the registration. The target application of this paper is for radiotherapy treatment planning and evaluation that incorporates internal organ deformation throughout the course of radiation therapy. The registration method could also be equally applied in diagnostic radiology

  19. Coarse Point Cloud Registration by Egi Matching of Voxel Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhu; Lindenbergh, Roderik; Shen, Yueqian; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Laser scanning samples the surface geometry of objects efficiently and records versatile information as point clouds. However, often more scans are required to fully cover a scene. Therefore, a registration step is required that transforms the different scans into a common coordinate system. The registration of point clouds is usually conducted in two steps, i.e. coarse registration followed by fine registration. In this study an automatic marker-free coarse registration method for pair-wise scans is presented. First the two input point clouds are re-sampled as voxels and dimensionality features of the voxels are determined by principal component analysis (PCA). Then voxel cells with the same dimensionality are clustered. Next, the Extended Gaussian Image (EGI) descriptor of those voxel clusters are constructed using significant eigenvectors of each voxel in the cluster. Correspondences between clusters in source and target data are obtained according to the similarity between their EGI descriptors. The random sampling consensus (RANSAC) algorithm is employed to remove outlying correspondences until a coarse alignment is obtained. If necessary, a fine registration is performed in a final step. This new method is illustrated on scan data sampling two indoor scenarios. The results of the tests are evaluated by computing the point to point distance between the two input point clouds. The presented two tests resulted in mean distances of 7.6 mm and 9.5 mm respectively, which are adequate for fine registration.

  20. elastix: a toolbox for intensity-based medical image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Stefan; Staring, Marius; Murphy, Keelin; Viergever, Max A; Pluim, Josien P W

    2010-01-01

    Medical image registration is an important task in medical image processing. It refers to the process of aligning data sets, possibly from different modalities (e.g., magnetic resonance and computed tomography), different time points (e.g., follow-up scans), and/or different subjects (in case of population studies). A large number of methods for image registration are described in the literature. Unfortunately, there is not one method that works for all applications. We have therefore developed elastix, a publicly available computer program for intensity-based medical image registration. The software consists of a collection of algorithms that are commonly used to solve medical image registration problems. The modular design of elastix allows the user to quickly configure, test, and compare different registration methods for a specific application. The command-line interface enables automated processing of large numbers of data sets, by means of scripting. The usage of elastix for comparing different registration methods is illustrated with three example experiments, in which individual components of the registration method are varied.

  1. A virtual pebble game to ensemble average graph rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Luis C; Wang, Hui; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    The body-bar Pebble Game (PG) algorithm is commonly used to calculate network rigidity properties in proteins and polymeric materials. To account for fluctuating interactions such as hydrogen bonds, an ensemble of constraint topologies are sampled, and average network properties are obtained by averaging PG characterizations. At a simpler level of sophistication, Maxwell constraint counting (MCC) provides a rigorous lower bound for the number of internal degrees of freedom (DOF) within a body-bar network, and it is commonly employed to test if a molecular structure is globally under-constrained or over-constrained. MCC is a mean field approximation (MFA) that ignores spatial fluctuations of distance constraints by replacing the actual molecular structure by an effective medium that has distance constraints globally distributed with perfect uniform density. The Virtual Pebble Game (VPG) algorithm is a MFA that retains spatial inhomogeneity in the density of constraints on all length scales. Network fluctuations due to distance constraints that may be present or absent based on binary random dynamic variables are suppressed by replacing all possible constraint topology realizations with the probabilities that distance constraints are present. The VPG algorithm is isomorphic to the PG algorithm, where integers for counting "pebbles" placed on vertices or edges in the PG map to real numbers representing the probability to find a pebble. In the VPG, edges are assigned pebble capacities, and pebble movements become a continuous flow of probability within the network. Comparisons between the VPG and average PG results over a test set of proteins and disordered lattices demonstrate the VPG quantitatively estimates the ensemble average PG results well. The VPG performs about 20% faster than one PG, and it provides a pragmatic alternative to averaging PG rigidity characteristics over an ensemble of constraint topologies. The utility of the VPG falls in between the most

  2. Free surface flow of a suspension of rigid particles in a non-Newtonian fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svec, Oldrich; Skocek, Jan; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A numerical framework capable of predicting the free surface flow of a suspension of rigid particles in a non-Newtonian fluid is described. The framework is a combination of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flow, the mass tracking algorithm for free surface representation, the immersed...

  3. Force-controlled robotic assembly processes of rigid and flexible objects methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalyan, Ibrahim Fahad Jasim

    2016-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive and integrated approaches for rigid and flexible object assembly. It presents comparison studies with the available force-guided robotic processes and covers contact-state modeling, scheme control strategies, and position searching algorithms. Further, it includes experimental validations for different assembly situations, including those for the assembly of industrial parts taken from the automotive industry. .

  4. Robust and Accurate Algorithm for Wearable Stereoscopic Augmented Reality with Three Indistinguishable Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cutolo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the context of surgical navigation systems based on augmented reality (AR, the key challenge is to ensure the highest degree of realism in merging computer-generated elements with live views of the surgical scene. This paper presents an algorithm suited for wearable stereoscopic augmented reality video see-through systems for use in a clinical scenario. A video-based tracking solution is proposed that relies on stereo localization of three monochromatic markers rigidly constrained to the scene. A PnP-based optimization step is introduced to refine separately the pose of the two cameras. Video-based tracking methods using monochromatic markers are robust to non-controllable and/or inconsistent lighting conditions. The two-stage camera pose estimation algorithm provides sub-pixel registration accuracy. From a technological and an ergonomic standpoint, the proposed approach represents an effective solution to the implementation of wearable AR-based surgical navigation systems wherever rigid anatomies are involved.

  5. Automated robust registration of grossly misregistered whole-slide images with varying stains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litjens, G.; Safferling, K.; Grabe, N.

    2016-03-01

    Cancer diagnosis and pharmaceutical research increasingly depend on the accurate quantification of cancer biomarkers. Identification of biomarkers is usually performed through immunohistochemical staining of cancer sections on glass slides. However, combination of multiple biomarkers from a wide variety of immunohistochemically stained slides is a tedious process in traditional histopathology due to the switching of glass slides and re-identification of regions of interest by pathologists. Digital pathology now allows us to apply image registration algorithms to digitized whole-slides to align the differing immunohistochemical stains automatically. However, registration algorithms need to be robust to changes in color due to differing stains and severe changes in tissue content between slides. In this work we developed a robust registration methodology to allow for fast coarse alignment of multiple immunohistochemical stains to the base hematyoxylin and eosin stained image. We applied HSD color model conversion to obtain a less stain color dependent representation of the whole-slide images. Subsequently, optical density thresholding and connected component analysis were used to identify the relevant regions for registration. Template matching using normalized mutual information was applied to provide initial translation and rotation parameters, after which a cost function-driven affine registration was performed. The algorithm was validated using 40 slides from 10 prostate cancer patients, with landmark registration error as a metric. Median landmark registration error was around 180 microns, which indicates performance is adequate for practical application. None of the registrations failed, indicating the robustness of the algorithm.

  6. Semi-automatic construction of reference standards for evaluation of image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murphy, K.; Ginneken, van B.; Klein, S.; Staring, M.; Hoop, de B.J.; Viergever, M.A.; Pluim, J.P.W.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of image registration algorithms is a difficult and under-addressed issue due to the lack of a reference standard in most registration problems. In this work a method is presented whereby detailed reference standard data may be constructed in an efficient semi-automatic

  7. Verification and Validation of a Fingerprint Image Registration Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for reliable identification and authentication is driving the increased use of biometric devices and systems. Verification and validation techniques applicable to these systems are rather immature and ad hoc, yet the consequences of the wide deployment of biometric systems could be significant. In this paper we discuss an approach towards validation and reliability estimation of a fingerprint registration software. Our validation approach includes the following three steps: (a the validation of the source code with respect to the system requirements specification; (b the validation of the optimization algorithm, which is in the core of the registration system; and (c the automation of testing. Since the optimization algorithm is heuristic in nature, mathematical analysis and test results are used to estimate the reliability and perform failure analysis of the image registration module.

  8. Analysis of Switched-Rigid Floating Oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar R. Marur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In explicit finite element simulations, a technique called deformable-to-rigid (D2R switching is used routinely to reduce the computation time. Using the D2R option, the deformable parts in the model can be switched to rigid and reverted back to deformable when needed during the analysis. The time of activation of D2R however influences the overall dynamics of the system being analyzed. In this paper, a theoretical basis for the selection of time of rigid switching based on system energy is established. A floating oscillator problem is investigated for this purpose and closed-form analytical expressions are derived for different phases in rigid switching. The analytical expressions are validated by comparing the theoretical results with numerical computations.

  9. Rigid pricing and rationally inattentive consumer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Filip

    158 B, July (2015), s. 656-678 ISSN 0022-0531 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : rational inattention * imperfect information * nominal rigidity Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.097, year: 2015

  10. Rigid pricing and rationally inattentive consumer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Filip

    158 B, July (2015), s. 656-678 ISSN 0022-0531 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : rational inattention * imperfect information * nominal rigidity Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.097, year: 2015

  11. Soft soils reinforced by rigid vertical inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia-Victoria NEAGOE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement of soft soils by rigid vertical inclusions is an increasingly used technique over the last few years. The system consists of rigid or semi-rigid vertical inclusions and a granular platform for the loads transfer from the structure to the inclusions. This technique aims to reduce the differential settlements both at ground level as below the structure. Reinforcement by rigid inclusions is mainly used for foundation works for large commercial and industrial platforms, storage tanks, wastewater treatment plants, wind farms, bridges, roads, railway embankments. The subject is one of interest as it proves the recently concerns at international level in research and design; however, most studies deal more with the static behavior and less with the dynamic one.

  12. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...... on four groups of data: 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with small difference in lung volume; 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with large difference in lung volume; 16 pairs of expiratory and inspiratory CT scans; and 5 pairs of images extracted at end exhale and end...

  13. Flexible and rigid cystoscopy in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Jason R; Waterman, Bradley J; Jarrard, David F; Hedican, Sean P; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the tolerability of rigid versus flexible cystoscopy in men. Similar studies, however, have not been performed in women. We sought to determine whether office-based flexible cystoscopy was better tolerated than rigid cystoscopy in women. Following full IRB approval, women were prospectively randomized in a single-blind manner. Patients were randomized to flexible or rigid cystoscopy and draped in the lithotomy position to maintain blinding of the study. Questionnaires evaluated discomfort before, during, and after cystoscopy. Thirty-six women were randomized to flexible (18) or rigid (18) cystoscopy. Indications were surveillance (16), hematuria (15), recurrent UTIs (2), voiding dysfunction (1), and other (2). All questionnaires were returned by 31/36 women. Using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS), median discomfort during the procedure for flexible and rigid cystoscopy were 1.4 and 1.8, respectively, in patients perceiving pain. Median recalled pain 1 week later was similar at 0.8 and 1.15, respectively. None of these differences were statistically significant. Flexible and rigid cystoscopy are well tolerated in women. Discomfort during and after the procedure is minimal in both groups. Urologists should perform either procedure in women based on their preference and skill level.

  14. A combined alignment and registration scheme of psoriasis lesion |images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maletti, Gabriela Mariel; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2003-01-01

    A two-stage registration scheme of psoriasis lesion patterns is proposed. In the first stage, global rotation and translation effects of assumed equally scaled psoriasis lesion patterns are removed. In the second stage, only local translation effects are removed. In both stages a novel algorithm...

  15. Summer Camp Registrations 2018

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    Registration for the CERN SA Summer camp, for children from 4 to 6 years old, is now open. The general conditions are available on the EVE and School website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch For further questions, please contact us by email at  Summer.Camp@cern.ch An inscription per week is proposed, for 450.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open on weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. This year the theme will be Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.

  16. The Household Registration System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Although longitudinal experimental community health research is crucial to testing hypotheses about the demographic impact of health technologies, longitudinal demographic research field stations are rare, owing to the complexity and high cost of developing requisite computer software systems. This paper describes the Household Registration System (HRS, a software package that has been used for the rapid development of eleven surveillance systems in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Features of the HRS automate software generation for a family of surveillance applications, obviating the need for new and complex computer software systems for each new longitudinal demographic study.

  17. Registration Summer Camp 2016

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Reminder: registration for the CERN Staff Association Summer Camp is now open for children from 4 to 6 years old.   More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. The summer camp is open to all children. The proposed cost is 480.-CHF/week, lunch included. The camp will be open weeks 27, 28, 29 and 30, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For further questions, you are welcome to contact us by email at Summer.Camp@cern.ch. CERN Staff Association

  18. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models—Flexibility and rigidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Kelin; Opron, Kristopher; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The emerging complexity of large macromolecules has led to challenges in their full scale theoretical description and computer simulation. Multiscale multiphysics and multidomain models have been introduced to reduce the number of degrees of freedom while maintaining modeling accuracy and achieving computational efficiency. A total energy functional is constructed to put energies for polar and nonpolar solvation, chemical potential, fluid flow, molecular mechanics, and elastic dynamics on an equal footing. The variational principle is utilized to derive coupled governing equations for the above mentioned multiphysical descriptions. Among these governing equations is the Poisson-Boltzmann equation which describes continuum electrostatics with atomic charges. The present work introduces the theory of continuum elasticity with atomic rigidity (CEWAR). The essence of CEWAR is to formulate the shear modulus as a continuous function of atomic rigidity. As a result, the dynamics complexity of a macromolecular system is separated from its static complexity so that the more time-consuming dynamics is handled with continuum elasticity theory, while the less time-consuming static analysis is pursued with atomic approaches. We propose a simple method, flexibility-rigidity index (FRI), to analyze macromolecular flexibility and rigidity in atomic detail. The construction of FRI relies on the fundamental assumption that protein functions, such as flexibility, rigidity, and energy, are entirely determined by the structure of the protein and its environment, although the structure is in turn determined by all the interactions. As such, the FRI measures the topological connectivity of protein atoms or residues and characterizes the geometric compactness of the protein structure. As a consequence, the FRI does not resort to the interaction Hamiltonian and bypasses matrix diagonalization, which underpins most other flexibility analysis methods. FRI's computational complexity is of O

  19. Myocardial strain assessment by cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using non-rigid registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsadok, Yossi; Friedman, Zvi; Haluska, Brian A; Hoffmann, Rainer; Adam, Dan

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a novel post-processing method for assessment of longitudinal mid-myocardial strain in standard cine cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging sequences. Cine CMR imaging and tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) were performed in 15 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and 15 healthy volunteers served as control group. A second group of 37 post-AMI patients underwent both cine CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) CMR exams. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) was performed in 36 of these patients. Cine CMR, TMRI and STE were analyzed to obtain longitudinal strain. LGE-CMR datasets were analyzed to evaluate scar extent. Comparison of peak systolic strain (PSS) measured from CMR and TMRI yielded a strong correlation (r=0.86, pcine CMR data. The method was found to be highly correlated with strain measurements obtained by TMRI and STE. This tool allows accurate discrimination between different transmurality states of myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Correction for non-rigid movement artefacts in calcium imaging using local-global optical flow and PCA-based templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, A.; Fordsmann, J.; Lauritzen, M.

    2017-01-01

    correction of calcium timelapse imaging data is accurate, can represent non-rigid image distortions, robust to noisy data and allows for fast registration of large videos. The implementation is open-source and is programmed in Python, which provides for easy access and merging into downstream image...

  1. Dimensional Metrology of Non-rigid Parts Without Specialized Inspection Fixtures =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Vahid

    Quality control is an important factor for manufacturing companies looking to prosper in an era of globalization, market pressures and technological advances. Functionality and product quality cannot be guaranteed without this important aspect. Manufactured parts have deviations from their nominal (CAD) shape caused by the manufacturing process. Thus, geometric inspection is a very important element in the quality control of mechanical parts. We will focus here on the geometric inspection of non-rigid (flexible) parts which are widely used in the aeronautic and automotive industries. Non-rigid parts can have different forms in a free-state condition compared with their nominal models due to residual stress and gravity loads. To solve this problem, dedicated inspection fixtures are generally used in industry to compensate for the displacement of such parts for simulating the use state in order to perform geometric inspections. These fixtures and the installation and inspection processes are expensive and time-consuming. Our aim in this thesis is therefore to develop an inspection method which eliminates the need for specialized fixtures. This is done by acquiring a point cloud from the part in a free-state condition using a contactless measuring device such as optical scanning and comparing it with the CAD model for the deviation identification. Using a non-rigid registration method and finite element analysis, we numerically inspect the profile of a non-rigid part. To do so, a simulated displacement is performed using an improved definition of displacement boundary conditions for simulating unfixed parts. In addition, we propose a numerical method for dimensional metrology of non-rigid parts in a free-state condition based on the arc length measurement by calculating the geodesic distance using the Fast Marching Method (FMM). In this thesis, we apply our developed methods on industrial non-rigid parts with free-form surfaces simulated with different types of

  2. Multimodal Registration of gated cardiac PET, CT and MR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baty, X.

    2007-07-01

    The research described in this manuscript deals with the multimodal registration of cardiac images from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Position Emission Tomography (PET) and Computerized Tomography (CT). All these modalities are gated to the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and provide information to evaluate cardiac function, and to diagnose and to follow-up cardiovascular pathologies. PET imaging allows the evaluation of ventricular function and MRI is a gold standard for the study of the left ventricular function. The goal of our registration process is to merge functional (from PET) and anatomical images (from CT and MRI). Our process is adapted to the modalities used and is divided in two steps: (i) a global rigid 3-dimensional model-based ICP (Iterative Closest Point) registration between CT and MR data and (ii) an iconic 2-dimensional registration based on Free Form Deformations and Mutual Information. This last step presents an original contribution by using a composite image of CT (which presents epicardic contours) and PET (where endocardic contours are partially visible) data to make mutual information more accurate in representing the similarity with the MR data. To speed up the whole process, we also present a transformation initialization scheme using displacement field obtained form MR data only. The obtained results have been evaluated by experts. (author)

  3. Evaluation of multi-modality CT-MRI-SPECT registration tools for radiotherapy treatment planning purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchini, S.; Alfonso, R.; Castillo, J.; Coca, M.; Torres, L.

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative and quantitative comparison of registration CT-CT, CT-MR and CT-SPECT performed by the different software and algorithms studies is presented. Only two studied software were full DICOM RT compatible while accepting DICOM images in any layout. Quantitative results of fiducial displacement errors were calculated for all software and available registration methods. The presented methodology demonstrated being effective for assessing the quality of studied image registration tools in the radiotherapy planning context, provided the images are free of significant geometric deformation. When implementing this methodology in real patients, the use of immobilization devices, such as thermoplastic masks, is recommended for enhanced quality of image registration. (Author)

  4. Image Segmentation, Registration, Compression, and Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadegar, Jacob; Wei, Hai; Yadegar, Joseph; Ray, Nilanjan; Zabuawala, Sakina

    2011-01-01

    A novel computational framework was developed of a 2D affine invariant matching exploiting a parameter space. Named as affine invariant parameter space (AIPS), the technique can be applied to many image-processing and computer-vision problems, including image registration, template matching, and object tracking from image sequence. The AIPS is formed by the parameters in an affine combination of a set of feature points in the image plane. In cases where the entire image can be assumed to have undergone a single affine transformation, the new AIPS match metric and matching framework becomes very effective (compared with the state-of-the-art methods at the time of this reporting). No knowledge about scaling or any other transformation parameters need to be known a priori to apply the AIPS framework. An automated suite of software tools has been created to provide accurate image segmentation (for data cleaning) and high-quality 2D image and 3D surface registration (for fusing multi-resolution terrain, image, and map data). These tools are capable of supporting existing GIS toolkits already in the marketplace, and will also be usable in a stand-alone fashion. The toolkit applies novel algorithmic approaches for image segmentation, feature extraction, and registration of 2D imagery and 3D surface data, which supports first-pass, batched, fully automatic feature extraction (for segmentation), and registration. A hierarchical and adaptive approach is taken for achieving automatic feature extraction, segmentation, and registration. Surface registration is the process of aligning two (or more) data sets to a common coordinate system, during which the transformation between their different coordinate systems is determined. Also developed here are a novel, volumetric surface modeling and compression technique that provide both quality-guaranteed mesh surface approximations and compaction of the model sizes by efficiently coding the geometry and connectivity

  5. Authentications of Myanmar National Registration Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myint Myint Sein

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The automatic identification system of Myanmar national registration card (NRC holder is presented in this paper. The proposed system can be handled the identification by the extracted low quality face image and fingerprint image from Myanmar NRC. Both of the facial recognition and fingerprint recognition system are developed for Myanmar citizenship confirmation. Age invariant face recognition algorithm is performed based on combination of DiaPCA (Diagonal principal Component Analysis and KNN (Kth nearest neighbor classifier approaches. An algorithm of the fingerprint recognition is proposed for recognition of the poor quality fingerprint image with fabric background.  Several experiments have been done for confirming the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  6. Automated image registration for FDOPA PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang-Ping Lin; Sung-Cheng Huang, Dan-Chu Yu; Melega, W.; Barrio, J.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, various image registration methods are investigated for their suitability for registration of L-6-[18F]-fluoro-DOPA (FDOPA) PET images. Five different optimization criteria including sum of absolute difference (SAD), mean square difference (MSD), cross-correlation coefficient (CC), standard deviation of pixel ratio (SDPR), and stochastic sign change (SSC) were implemented and Powell's algorithm was used to optimize the criteria. The optimization criteria were calculated either unidirectionally (i.e. only evaluating the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2) or bidirectionally (i.e. averaging the criteria for comparing the resliced image 1 with the original image 2 and those for the sliced image 2 with the original image 1). Monkey FDOPA images taken at various known orientations were used to evaluate the accuracy of different methods. A set of human FDOPA dynamic images was used to investigate the ability of the methods for correcting subject movement. It was found that a large improvement in performance resulted when bidirectional rather than unidirectional criteria were used. Overall, the SAD, MSD and SDPR methods were found to be comparable in performance and were suitable for registering FDOPA images. The MSD method gave more adequate results for frame-to-frame image registration for correcting subject movement during a dynamic FDOPA study. The utility of the registration method is further demonstrated by registering FDOPA images in monkeys before and after amphetamine injection to reveal more clearly the changes in spatial distribution of FDOPA due to the drug intervention. (author)

  7. [Accurate 3D free-form registration between fan-beam CT and cone-beam CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yueqiang; Xu, Hongbing; Li, Baosheng; Li, Hongsheng; Yang, Fujun

    2012-06-01

    Because the X-ray scatters, the CT numbers in cone-beam CT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. This, therefore, results in registration error when the intensity-based registration algorithm is used to register planning fan-beam CT and cone-beam CT. In order to reduce the registration error, we have developed an accurate gradient-based registration algorithm. The gradient-based deformable registration problem is described as a minimization of energy functional. Through the calculus of variations and Gauss-Seidel finite difference method, we derived the iterative formula of the deformable registration. The algorithm was implemented by GPU through OpenCL framework, with which the registration time was greatly reduced. Our experimental results showed that the proposed gradient-based registration algorithm could register more accurately the clinical cone-beam CT and fan-beam CT images compared with the intensity-based algorithm. The GPU-accelerated algorithm meets the real-time requirement in the online adaptive radiotherapy.

  8. 32 CFR 1615.1 - Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... registration card or other method of registration prescribed by the Director of Selective Service by a person... the records (master computer file) of the Selective Service System. Registration is completed when... Director include completing a Selective Service Registration Card at a classified Post Office, registration...

  9. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina, E-mail: catarina.veiga.11@ucl.ac.uk; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary [Radiation Physics Group, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Moinuddin, Syed [Department of Radiotherapy, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom); D’Souza, Derek [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London NW1 2PG (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  10. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for "dose of the day" calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Catarina; McClelland, Jamie; Moinuddin, Syed; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; D'Souza, Derek; Royle, Gary

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the "dose of the day" received by a head and neck patient. NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for "dose of the day" calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on a replan CT. The DD is smaller

  11. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Feasibility study on using CT-to-CBCT deformable registration for “dose of the day” calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Catarina; Lourenço, Ana; Ricketts, Kate; Annkah, James; Royle, Gary; McClelland, Jamie; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; Moinuddin, Syed; D’Souza, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the appropriateness of using computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam CT (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) for the application of calculating the “dose of the day” received by a head and neck patient. Methods: NiftyReg is an open-source registration package implemented in our institution. The affine registration uses a Block Matching-based approach, while the deformable registration is a GPU implementation of the popular B-spline Free Form Deformation algorithm. Two independent tests were performed to assess the suitability of our registrations methodology for “dose of the day” calculations in a deformed CT. A geometric evaluation was performed to assess the ability of the DIR method to map identical structures between the CT and CBCT datasets. Features delineated in the planning CT were warped and compared with features manually drawn on the CBCT. The authors computed the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transformation, and centre of mass distance between features. A dosimetric evaluation was performed to evaluate the clinical significance of the registrations errors in the application proposed and to identify the limitations of the approximations used. Dose calculations for the same intensity-modulated radiation therapy plan on the deformed CT and replan CT were compared. Dose distributions were compared in terms of dose differences (DD), gamma analysis, target coverage, and dose volume histograms (DVHs). Doses calculated in a rigidly aligned CT and directly in an extended CBCT were also evaluated. Results: A mean value of 0.850 in DSC was achieved in overlap between manually delineated and warped features, with the distance between surfaces being less than 2 mm on over 90% of the pixels. Deformable registration was clearly superior to rigid registration in mapping identical structures between the two datasets. The dose recalculated in the deformed CT is a good match to the dose calculated on

  12. Computational Analysis of Distance Operators for the Iterative Closest Point Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higinio Mora

    Full Text Available The Iterative Closest Point (ICP algorithm is currently one of the most popular methods for rigid registration so that it has become the standard in the Robotics and Computer Vision communities. Many applications take advantage of it to align 2D/3D surfaces due to its popularity and simplicity. Nevertheless, some of its phases present a high computational cost thus rendering impossible some of its applications. In this work, it is proposed an efficient approach for the matching phase of the Iterative Closest Point algorithm. This stage is the main bottleneck of that method so that any efficiency improvement has a great positive impact on the performance of the algorithm. The proposal consists in using low computational cost point-to-point distance metrics instead of classic Euclidean one. The candidates analysed are the Chebyshev and Manhattan distance metrics due to their simpler formulation. The experiments carried out have validated the performance, robustness and quality of the proposal. Different experimental cases and configurations have been set up including a heterogeneous set of 3D figures, several scenarios with partial data and random noise. The results prove that an average speed up of 14% can be obtained while preserving the convergence properties of the algorithm and the quality of the final results.

  13. Nonrigid Registration of Prostate Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Hao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion and deformation are common in prostate diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI during acquisition. These misalignments lead to errors in estimating an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map fitted with DWI. To address this problem, we propose an image registration algorithm to align the prostate DWI and improve ADC map. First, we apply affine transformation to DWI to correct intraslice motions. Then, nonrigid registration based on free-form deformation (FFD is used to compensate for intraimage deformations. To evaluate the influence of the proposed algorithm on ADC values, we perform statistical experiments in three schemes: no processing of the DWI, with the affine transform approach, and with FFD. The experimental results show that our proposed algorithm can correct the misalignment of prostate DWI and decrease the artifacts of ROI in the ADC maps. These ADC maps thus obtain sharper contours of lesions, which are helpful for improving the diagnosis and clinical staging of prostate cancer.

  14. Quantum mechanics of a generalised rigid body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Sutherland, Dave

    2016-01-01

    We consider the quantum version of Arnold’s generalisation of a rigid body in classical mechanics. Thus, we quantise the motion on an arbitrary Lie group manifold of a particle whose classical trajectories correspond to the geodesics of any one-sided-invariant metric. We show how the derivation of the spectrum of energy eigenstates can be simplified by making use of automorphisms of the Lie algebra and (for groups of type I) by methods of harmonic analysis. We show how the method can be extended to cosets, generalising the linear rigid rotor. As examples, we consider all connected and simply connected Lie groups up to dimension 3. This includes the universal cover of the archetypical rigid body, along with a number of new exactly solvable models. We also discuss a possible application to the topical problem of quantising a perfect fluid. (paper)

  15. Durable bistable auxetics made of rigid solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiao; Liu, Lu; Rafsanjani, Ahmad; Pasini, Damiano

    2018-02-01

    Bistable Auxetic Metamaterials (BAMs) are a class of monolithic perforated periodic structures with negative Poisson's ratio. Under tension, a BAM can expand and reach a second state of equilibrium through a globally large shape transformation that is ensured by the flexibility of its elastomeric base material. However, if made from a rigid polymer, or metal, BAM ceases to function due to the inevitable rupture of its ligaments. The goal of this work is to extend the unique functionality of the original kirigami architecture of BAM to a rigid solid base material. We use experiments and numerical simulations to assess performance, bistability and durability of rigid BAMs at 10,000 cycles. Geometric maps are presented to elucidate the role of the main descriptors of BAM architecture. The proposed design enables the realization of BAM from a large palette of materials, including elastic-perfectly plastic materials and potentially brittle materials.

  16. Deformable image registration for image guided prostate radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassetta, Roberto; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Leandro, Kleber; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Goncalves, Vinicius; Sakuraba, Roberto; Fattori, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present a CT to CBCT deformable registration method based on the ITK library. An algorithm was developed in order to explore the soft tissue information of the CT-CBCT images to perform deformable image registration (DIR), making efforts to overcome the poor signal-to-noise ratio and HU calibration issues that limits CBCT use for treatment planning purposes. Warped CT images and contours were generated and their impact in adaptive radiotherapy was evaluated by DVH analysis for photon and proton treatments. Considerable discrepancies, related to the treatment planning dose distribution, might be found due to changes in patient’s anatomy. (author)

  17. Robust image registration for multiple exposure high dynamic range image synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Susu

    2011-03-01

    Image registration is an important preprocessing technique in high dynamic range (HDR) image synthesis. This paper proposed a robust image registration method for aligning a group of low dynamic range images (LDR) that are captured with different exposure times. Illumination change and photometric distortion between two images would result in inaccurate registration. We propose to transform intensity image data into phase congruency to eliminate the effect of the changes in image brightness and use phase cross correlation in the Fourier transform domain to perform image registration. Considering the presence of non-overlapped regions due to photometric distortion, evolutionary programming is applied to search for the accurate translation parameters so that the accuracy of registration is able to be achieved at a hundredth of a pixel level. The proposed algorithm works well for under and over-exposed image registration. It has been applied to align LDR images for synthesizing high quality HDR images..

  18. Comparison of Rigid and Adaptive Methods of Propagating Gross Tumor Volume Through Respiratory Phases of Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography Image Data Set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezhil, Muthuveni; Choi, Bum; Starkschall, George; Bucci, M. Kara; Vedam, Sastry; Balter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To compare three different methods of propagating the gross tumor volume (GTV) through the respiratory phases that constitute a four-dimensional computed tomography image data set. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography data sets of 20 patients who had undergone definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy to the lung were acquired. The GTV regions of interest (ROIs) were manually delineated on each phase of the four-dimensional computed tomography data set. The ROI from the end-expiration phase was propagated to the remaining nine phases of respiration using the following three techniques: (1) rigid-image registration using in-house software, (2) rigid image registration using research software from a commercial radiotherapy planning system vendor, and (3) rigid-image registration followed by deformable adaptation originally intended for organ-at-risk delineation using the same software. The internal GTVs generated from the various propagation methods were compared with the manual internal GTV using the normalized Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) index. Results: The normalized DSC index of 1.01 ± 0.06 (SD) for rigid propagation using the in-house software program was identical to the normalized DSC index of 1.01 ± 0.06 for rigid propagation achieved with the vendor's research software. Adaptive propagation yielded poorer results, with a normalized DSC index of 0.89 ± 0.10 (paired t test, p <0.001). Conclusion: Propagation of the GTV ROIs through the respiratory phases using rigid- body registration is an acceptable method within a 1-mm margin of uncertainty. The adaptive organ-at-risk propagation method was not applicable to propagating GTV ROIs, resulting in an unacceptable reduction of the volume and distortion of the ROIs

  19. Effect of rigid inclusions on sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahaman, M.N.; De Jonghe, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    The predictions of recent theoretical studies on the effect of inert, rigid inclusions on the sintering of ceramic powder matrices are examined and compared with experimental data. The densification of glass matrix composites with inclusion volume fractions of ≤0.15 can be adequately explained by Scherer's theory for viscous sintering with rigid inclusions. Inclusions cause a vast reduction in the densification rates of polycrystalline matrix composites even at low inclusion volume fractions. Models put forward to explain the sintering of polycrystalline matrix composites are discussed

  20. Type number and rigidity of fibred surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markov, P E

    2001-01-01

    Infinitesimal l-th order bendings, 1≤l≤∞, of higher-dimensional surfaces are considered in higher-dimensional flat spaces (for l=∞ an infinitesimal bending is assumed to be an analytic bending). In terms of the Allendoerfer type number, criteria are established for the (r,l)-rigidity (in the terminology of Sabitov) of such surfaces. In particular, an (r,l)-infinitesimal analogue is proved of the classical theorem of Allendoerfer on the unbendability of surfaces with type number ≥3 and the class of (r,l)-rigid fibred surfaces is distinguished

  1. Rigid origami vertices: conditions and forcing sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Abel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop an intrinsic necessary and sufficient condition for single-vertex origami crease patterns to be able to fold rigidly.  We classify such patterns in the case where the creases are pre-assigned to be mountains and valleys as well as in the unassigned case.  We also illustrate the utility of this result by applying it to the new concept of minimal forcing sets for rigid origami models, which are the smallest collection of creases that, when folded, will force all the other creases to fold in a prescribed way.

  2. S-HAMMER: hierarchical attribute-guided, symmetric diffeomorphic registration for MR brain images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guorong; Kim, Minjeong; Wang, Qian; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-03-01

    Deformable registration has been widely used in neuroscience studies for spatial normalization of brain images onto the standard space. Because of possible large anatomical differences across different individual brains, registration performance could be limited when trying to estimate a single directed deformation pathway, i.e., either from template to subject or from subject to template. Symmetric image registration, however, offers an effective way to simultaneously deform template and subject images toward each other until they meet at the middle point. Although some intensity-based registration algorithms have nicely incorporated this concept of symmetric deformation, the pointwise intensity matching between two images may not necessarily imply the matching of correct anatomical correspondences. Based on HAMMER registration algorithm (Shen and Davatzikos, [2002]: IEEE Trans Med Imaging 21:1421-1439), we integrate the strategies of hierarchical attribute matching and symmetric diffeomorphic deformation to build a new symmetric-diffeomorphic HAMMER registration algorithm, called as S-HAMMER. The performance of S-HAMMER has been extensively compared with 14 state-of-the-art nonrigid registration algorithms evaluated in (Klein et al., [2009]: NeuroImage 46:786-802) by using real brain images in LPBA40, IBSR18, CUMC12, and MGH10 datasets. In addition, the registration performance of S-HAMMER, by comparison with other methods, is also demonstrated on both elderly MR brain images (>70 years old) and the simulated brain images with ground-truth deformation fields. In all experiments, our proposed method achieves the best registration performance over all other registration methods, indicating the high applicability of our method in future neuroscience and clinical applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the... web page that goes directly to “Product Registration.” (b) Purpose statement. The registration page... registration page. The Web site registration page shall request only the consumer's name, address, telephone...

  4. 21 CFR 1301.36 - Suspension or revocation of registration; suspension of registration pending final order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension or revocation of registration; suspension of registration pending final order; extension of registration pending final order. 1301.36... registration pending final order; extension of registration pending final order. (a) For any registration...

  5. Dynamics of parallel robots from rigid bodies to flexible elements

    CERN Document Server

    Briot, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    This book starts with a short recapitulation on basic concepts, common to any types of robots (serial, tree structure, parallel, etc.), that are also necessary for computation of the dynamic models of parallel robots. Then, as dynamics requires the use of geometry and kinematics, the general equations of geometric and kinematic models of parallel robots are given. After, it is explained that parallel robot dynamic models can be obtained by decomposing the real robot into two virtual systems: a tree-structure robot (equivalent to the robot legs for which all joints would be actuated) plus a free body corresponding to the platform. Thus, the dynamics of rigid tree-structure robots is analyzed and algorithms to obtain their dynamic models in the most compact form are given. The dynamic model of the real rigid parallel robot is obtained by closing the loops through the use of the Lagrange multipliers. The problem of the dynamic model degeneracy near singularities is treated and optimal trajectory planning for cro...

  6. Iterative CT reconstruction with correction for known rigid motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan [Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Kim, Jung-Ha; Fulton, Roger [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Westmead Hospital, Sydney (Australia). Medical Physics

    2011-07-01

    In PET/CT brain imaging, correction for motion may be needed, in particular for children and psychiatric patients. Motion is more likely to occur in the lengthy PET measurement, but also during the short CT acquisition patient motion is possible. Rigid motion of the head can be measured independently from the PET/CT system with optical devices. In this paper, we propose a method and some preliminary simulation results for iterative CT reconstruction with correction for known rigid motion. We implemented an iterative algorithm for fully 3D reconstruction from helical CT scans. The motion of the head is incorporated in the system matrix as a view-dependent motion of the CT-system. The first simulation results indicate that some motion patterns may produce loss of essential data. This loss precludes exact reconstruction and results in artifacts in the reconstruction, even when motion is taken into account. However, by reducing the pitch during acquisition, the same motion pattern no longer caused artifacts in the motion corrected image. (orig.)

  7. Free-form image registration of human cochlear μCT data using skeleton similarity as anatomical prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Fagertun, Jens; Vera, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of the anatomical variability of the human cochlear is important for the design and function of Cochlear Implants. Proper non-rigid alignment of high-resolution cochlear μCT data is a challenge for the typical cubic B-spline registration model. In this paper we study one way ...

  8. LSAH: a fast and efficient local surface feature for point cloud registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rongrong; Zhu, Feng; Wu, Qingxiao; Kong, Yanzi

    2018-04-01

    Point cloud registration is a fundamental task in high level three dimensional applications. Noise, uneven point density and varying point cloud resolutions are the three main challenges for point cloud registration. In this paper, we design a robust and compact local surface descriptor called Local Surface Angles Histogram (LSAH) and propose an effectively coarse to fine algorithm for point cloud registration. The LSAH descriptor is formed by concatenating five normalized sub-histograms into one histogram. The five sub-histograms are created by accumulating a different type of angle from a local surface patch respectively. The experimental results show that our LSAH is more robust to uneven point density and point cloud resolutions than four state-of-the-art local descriptors in terms of feature matching. Moreover, we tested our LSAH based coarse to fine algorithm for point cloud registration. The experimental results demonstrate that our algorithm is robust and efficient as well.

  9. Comparison and Implementation of a Rigid and a Flexible Multibody Planetary Gearbox Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Felix; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    We propose algorithms for developing (1) a rigid (constrained) and (2) a flexible planetary gearbox model. The two methods are compared against each other and advantages/disadvantages of each method are discussed. The rigid model (1) has gear tooth reaction forces expressed by Lagrange multipliers...... between one and two gear teeth in mesh. The final results are from modelling the planetary gearbox in a 500 kW wind turbine which we also described in Jørgensen et al. (2013)........ The flexible approach (2) is being compared with the gear tooth forces from the rigid approach, first without damping and second the influence of damping is examined. Variable stiffness as a function of base circle arc length is implemented in the flexible approach such that it handles the realistic switch...

  10. Damageable contact between an elastic body and a rigid foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, M.; Fernández, J. R.; Silva, A.

    2009-02-01

    In this work, the contact problem between an elastic body and a rigid obstacle is studied, including the development of material damage which results from internal compression or tension. The variational problem is formulated as a first-kind variational inequality for the displacements coupled with a parabolic partial differential equation for the damage field. The existence of a unique local weak solution is stated. Then, a fully discrete scheme is introduced using the finite element method to approximate the spatial variable and an Euler scheme to discretize the time derivatives. Error estimates are derived on the approximate solutions, from which the linear convergence of the algorithm is deduced under suitable regularity conditions. Finally, three two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the accuracy and the behaviour of the scheme.

  11. Efficient nonlinear registration of 3D images using high order co-ordinate transfer functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D C

    1999-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in image registration for a variety of medical imaging applications. Image registration is achieved through the use of a co-ordinate transfer function (CTF) which maps voxels in one image to voxels in the other image, including in the general case changes in mapped voxel intensity. If images of the same subject are to be registered the co-ordinate transfer function needs to implement a spatial transformation consisting of a displacement and a rigid rotation. In order to achieve registration a common approach is to choose a suitable quality-of-registration measure and devise a method for the efficient generation of the parameters of the CTF which minimize this measure. For registration of images from different subjects more complex transforms are required. In general function minimization is too slow to allow the use of CTFs with more than a small number of parameters. However, provided the images are from the same modality and the CTF can be expanded in terms of an appropriate set of basis functions this paper will show how relatively complex CTFs can be used for registration. The use of increasingly complex CTFs to minimize the within group standard deviation of a set of normal single photon emission tomography brain images is used to demonstrate the improved registration of images from different subjects using CTFs of increasing complexity.

  12. Geometric integrators for stochastic rigid body dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Tretyakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-05

    Geometric integrators play an important role in simulating dynamical systems on long time intervals with high accuracy. We will illustrate geometric integration ideas within the stochastic context, mostly on examples of stochastic thermostats for rigid body dynamics. The talk will be mainly based on joint recent work with Rusland Davidchak and Tom Ouldridge.

  13. Birationally rigid varieties. I. Fano varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pukhlikov, A V

    2007-01-01

    The theory of birational rigidity of rationally connected varieties generalises the classical rationality problem. This paper gives a survey of the current state of this theory and traces its history from Noether's theorem and the Lueroth problem to the latest results on the birational superrigidity of higher-dimensional Fano varieties. The main components of the method of maximal singularities are considered.

  14. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  15. Geometric integrators for stochastic rigid body dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Tretyakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Geometric integrators play an important role in simulating dynamical systems on long time intervals with high accuracy. We will illustrate geometric integration ideas within the stochastic context, mostly on examples of stochastic thermostats for rigid body dynamics. The talk will be mainly based on joint recent work with Rusland Davidchak and Tom Ouldridge.

  16. Rigidity Sensing Explained by Active Matter Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Marcq, Philippe; Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Prost, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of traction forces exerted by living animal cells on their environment is a monotonically increasing and approximately sigmoidal function of the stiffness of the external medium. We rationalize this observation using active matter theory, and propose that adaptation to substrate rigidity results from an interplay between passive elasticity and active contractility.

  17. About deformation and rigidity in relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, Bartolome

    2007-01-01

    The notion of deformation involves that of rigidity. In relativity, starting from Born's early definition of rigidity, some other ones have been proposed, offering more or less interesting aspects but also accompanied of undesired or even pathological properties. In order to clarify the origin of these difficulties presented by the notion of rigidity in relativity, we analyze with some detail significant aspects of the unambiguous classical, Newtonian, notion. In particular, the relative character of its kinetic definition is pointed out, allowing to predict and to understand the limitations imposed by Herglotz-Noether theorem. Also, its equivalent dynamic definition is obtained and, in contrast, its absolute character is shown. But in spite of this absolute character, the dynamic definition is shown to be not extensible to relativity. The metric deformation of Minkowski space by the presence of a gravitational field is interpreted as a universal deformation, and it is shown that, under natural conditions, only a simple deformation law is possible, relating locally, but in an one-to-one way, gravitational fields and gauge classes of two-forms. We argue that fields of unit vectors associated to the internal gauge class of two-forms of every space-time (and, in particular, of Minkowski space-time) are the relativistic analogues of the classical accelerated observers, i.e. of the classical rigid motions. Some other consequences of the universal law of gravitational deformation are commented

  18. Rigid pricing and rationally inattentive consumer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, Filip

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2010), s. 1-40 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : rational inattention * nominal rigidity Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp409.pdf

  19. Cracking of open traffic rigid pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niken Chatarina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done by observing the growth of real structure cracking in Natar, Lampung, Indonesia compared to C. Niken’s et al research and literature study. The rigid pavement was done with open traffic system. There are two main crack types on Natar rigid pavement: cracks cross the road, and cracks spreads on rigid pavement surface. The observation of cracks was analyzed by analyzing material, casting, curing, loading and shrinkage mechanism. The relationship between these analysis and shrinkage mechanism was studied in concrete micro structure. Open traffic make hydration process occur under vibration; therefore, fresh concrete was compressed and tensioned alternately since beginning. High temperature together with compression, cement dissociation, the growth of Ca2+ at very early age leads abnormal swelling. No prevention from outside water movement leads hydration process occur with limited water which caused spreads fine cracks. Limited water improves shrinkage and plastic phase becomes shorter; therefore, rigid pavement can’t accommodate the abnormal swelling and shrinking alternately and creates the spread of cracks. Discontinuing casting the concrete makes both mix under different condition, the first is shrink and the second is swell and creates weak line on the border; so, the cracks appear as cracks across the road.

  20. Image Registration: A Necessary Evil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James; McLachlan, Blair; Hermstad, Dexter; Trosin, Jeff; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Registration of test and reference images is a key component of nearly all PSP data reduction techniques. This is done to ensure that a test image pixel viewing a particular point on the model is ratioed by the reference image pixel which views the same point. Typically registration is needed to account for model motion due to differing airloads when the wind-off and wind-on images are taken. Registration is also necessary when two cameras are used for simultaneous acquisition of data from a dual-frequency paint. This presentation will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of several different image registration techniques. In order to do so, it is necessary to propose both an accuracy requirement for image registration and a means for measuring the accuracy of a particular technique. High contrast regions in the unregistered images are most sensitive to registration errors, and it is proposed that these regions be used to establish the error limits for registration. Once this is done, the actual registration error can be determined by locating corresponding points on the test and reference images, and determining how well a particular registration technique matches them. An example of this procedure is shown for three transforms used to register images of a semispan model. Thirty control points were located on the model. A subset of the points were used to determine the coefficients of each registration transform, and the error with which each transform aligned the remaining points was determined. The results indicate the general superiority of a third-order polynomial over other candidate transforms, as well as showing how registration accuracy varies with number of control points. Finally, it is proposed that image registration may eventually be done away with completely. As more accurate image resection techniques and more detailed model surface grids become available, it will be possible to map raw image data onto the model surface accurately. Intensity

  1. Pro Forma Registration of Companies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses the view taken by Community law on companies' pro forma registration in another EU or EEA country. Community law recognises pro forma registration under company law, i.e. a brass plate is sufficient, whereas it does not recognise pro forma registration under tax law, i.......e. a brass plate is not sufficient. The article provides reasons for the differential treatment of the two contexts and clarifies the difference on the basis of the Hubbard criterion, in which it was ruled that the effectiveness of Community law cannot vary according to the various branches of national law....

  2. Computer Registration Becoming Mandatory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Following the decision by the CERN Management Board (see Weekly Bulletin 38/2003), registration of all computers connected to CERN's network will be enforced and only registered computers will be allowed network access. The implementation has started with the IT buildings, continues with building 40 and the Prevessin site (as of Tuesday 4th November 2003), and will cover the whole of CERN before the end of this year. We therefore recommend strongly that you register all your computers in CERN's network database (Ethernet and wire-less cards) as soon as possible without waiting for the access restriction to take force. This will allow you accessing the network without interruption and help IT service providers to contact you in case of problems (security problems, viruses, etc.) • Users WITH a CERN computing account register at: http://cern.ch/register/ (CERN Intranet page) • Visitors WITHOUT a CERN computing account (e.g. short term visitors) register at: http://cern.ch/registerVisitorComp...

  3. Computer Registration Becoming Mandatory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Following the decision by the CERN Management Board (see Weekly Bulletin 38/2003), registration of all computers connected to CERN's network will be enforced and only registered computers will be allowed network access. The implementation has started with the IT buildings, continues with building 40 and the Prevessin site (as of Tuesday 4th November 2003), and will cover the whole of CERN before the end of this year. We therefore recommend strongly that you register all your computers in CERN's network database including all network access cards (Ethernet AND wireless) as soon as possible without waiting for the access restriction to take force. This will allow you accessing the network without interruption and help IT service providers to contact you in case of problems (e.g. security problems, viruses, etc.) Users WITH a CERN computing account register at: http://cern.ch/register/ (CERN Intranet page) Visitors WITHOUT a CERN computing account (e.g. short term visitors) register at: http://cern.ch/regis...

  4. Rigid Spine Syndrome among Children in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Koul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rigidity of the spine is common in adults but is rarely observed in children. The aim of this study was to report on rigid spine syndrome (RSS among children in Oman. Methods: Data on children diagnosed with RSS were collected consecutively at presentation between 1996 and 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A diagnosis of RSS was based on the patient’s history, clinical examination, biochemical investigations, electrophysiological findings, neuro-imaging and muscle biopsy. Atrophy of the paraspinal muscles, particularly the erector spinae, was the diagnostic feature; this was noted using magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Children with disease onset in the paraspinal muscles were labelled as having primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy. Secondary RSS was classified as RSS due to the late involvement of other muscle diseases. Results: Over the 18-year period, 12 children were included in the study, with a maleto- female ratio of 9:3. A total of 10 children were found to have primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy syndrome while two had secondary RSS. Onset of the disease ranged from birth to 18 months of age. A family history was noted, with two siblings from one family and three siblings from another (n = 5. On examination, children with primary RSS had typical features of severe spine rigidity at onset, with the rest of the neurological examination being normal. Conclusion: RSS is a rare disease with only 12 reported cases found at SQUH during the study period. Cases of primary RSS should be differentiated from the secondary type.

  5. Duality based optical flow algorithms with applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakêt, Lars Lau

    We consider the popular TV-L1 optical flow formulation, and the so-called duality based algorithm for minimizing the TV-L1 energy. The original formulation is extended to allow for vector valued images, and minimization results are given. In addition we consider different definitions of total...... variation regularization, and related formulations of the optical flow problem that may be used with a duality based algorithm. We present a highly optimized algorithmic setup to estimate optical flows, and give five novel applications. The first application is registration of medical images, where X......-ray images of different hands, taken using different imaging devices are registered using a TV-L1 optical flow algorithm. We propose to regularize the input images, using sparsity enhancing regularization of the image gradient to improve registration results. The second application is registration of 2D...

  6. The two-body problem of a pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Vereshchagin, M.; Gózdziewski, K.

    2012-01-01

    n this paper we consider the two-body problem of a spherical pseudo-rigid body and a rigid sphere. Due to the rotational and "re-labelling" symmetries, the system is shown to possess conservation of angular momentum and circulation. We follow a reduction procedure similar to that undertaken...... in the study of the two-body problem of a rigid body and a sphere so that the computed reduced non-canonical Hamiltonian takes a similar form. We then consider relative equilibria and show that the notions of locally central and planar equilibria coincide. Finally, we show that Riemann's theorem on pseudo......-rigid bodies has an extension to this system for planar relative equilibria....

  7. Improving Intensity-Based Lung CT Registration Accuracy Utilizing Vascular Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate pulmonary image registration is a challenging problem when the lungs have a deformation with large distance. In this work, we present a nonrigid volumetric registration algorithm to track lung motion between a pair of intrasubject CT images acquired at different inflation levels and introduce a new vesselness similarity cost that improves intensity-only registration. Volumetric CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. The performance of four intensity-only registration algorithms was compared with and without adding the vesselness similarity cost function. Matching accuracy was evaluated using landmarks, vessel tree, and fissure planes. The Jacobian determinant of the transformation was used to reveal the deformation pattern of local parenchymal tissue. The average matching error for intensity-only registration methods was on the order of 1 mm at landmarks and 1.5 mm on fissure planes. After adding the vesselness preserving cost function, the landmark and fissure positioning errors decreased approximately by 25% and 30%, respectively. The vesselness cost function effectively helped improve the registration accuracy in regions near thoracic cage and near the diaphragm for all the intensity-only registration algorithms tested and also helped produce more consistent and more reliable patterns of regional tissue deformation.

  8. Drug Establishments Current Registration Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Establishments Current Registration Site (DECRS) is a database of current information submitted by drug firms to register establishments (facilities) which...

  9. Individual Pesticides in Registration Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    You can used the Chemical Search database to search pesticides by chemical name and find their registration review dockets, along with Work Plans, risk assessments, interim and final decisions, tolerance rules, and cancellation actions.

  10. From Wage Rigidities to Labour Market Rigidities: A Turning-Point in Explaining Equilibrium Unemployment?

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Guerrazzi; Nicola Meccheri

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a critical discussion of the concept of labour market rigidity relevant to explaining unemployment. Starting from Keynes’s own view, we discuss how the concept of labour market flexibility has changed over time, involving nominal or real wage flexibility, contract flexibility or labour market institution flexibility. We also provide a critical assessment of the factors that lead the search framework highlighting labour market rigidities (frictions) to challenge the more wide...

  11. PARALLEL AND ADAPTIVE UNIFORM-DISTRIBUTED REGISTRATION METHOD FOR CHANG’E-1 LUNAR REMOTE SENSED IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Ning

    2012-08-01

    To resolve the above-mentioned registration difficulties, a parallel and adaptive uniform-distributed registration method for CE-1 lunar remote sensed imagery is proposed in this paper. Based on 6 pairs of randomly selected images, both the standard SIFT algorithm and the parallel and adaptive uniform-distributed registration method were executed, the versatility and effectiveness were assessed. The experimental results indicate that: by applying the parallel and adaptive uniform-distributed registration method, the efficiency of CE-1 lunar remote sensed imagery registration were increased dramatically. Therefore, the proposed method in the paper could acquire uniform-distributed registration results more effectively, the registration difficulties including difficult to obtain results, time-consuming, non-uniform distribution could be successfully solved.

  12. A first step toward uncovering the truth about weight tuning in deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirpinia, Kleopatra; Bosman, Peter A. N.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    Deformable image registration is currently predominantly solved by optimizing a weighted linear combination of objectives. Successfully tuning the weights associated with these objectives is not trivial, leading to trial-and-error approaches. Such an approach assumes an intuitive interplay between weights, optimization objectives, and target registration errors. However, it is not known whether this always holds for existing registration methods. To investigate the interplay between weights, optimization objectives, and registration errors, we employ multi-objective optimization. Here, objectives of interest are optimized simultaneously, causing a set of multiple optimal solutions to exist, called the optimal Pareto front. Our medical application is in breast cancer and includes the challenging prone-supine registration problem. In total, we studied the interplay in three different ways. First, we ran many random linear combinations of objectives using the well-known registration software elastix. Second, since the optimization algorithms used in registration are typically of a local-search nature, final solutions may not always form a Pareto front. We therefore employed a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that finds weights that correspond to registration outcomes that do form a Pareto front. Third, we examined how the interplay differs if a true multi-objective (i.e., weight-free) image registration method is used. Results indicate that a trial-and-error weight-adaptation approach can be successful for the easy prone to prone breast image registration case, due to the absence of many local optima. With increasing problem difficulty the use of more advanced approaches can be of value in finding and selecting the optimal registration outcomes.

  13. Multisensor data fusion algorithm development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yocky, D.A.; Chadwick, M.D.; Goudy, S.P.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents a two-year LDRD research effort into multisensor data fusion. We approached the problem by addressing the available types of data, preprocessing that data, and developing fusion algorithms using that data. The report reflects these three distinct areas. First, the possible data sets for fusion are identified. Second, automated registration techniques for imagery data are analyzed. Third, two fusion techniques are presented. The first fusion algorithm is based on the two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform. Using test images, the wavelet algorithm is compared against intensity modulation and intensity-hue-saturation image fusion algorithms that are available in commercial software. The wavelet approach outperforms the other two fusion techniques by preserving spectral/spatial information more precisely. The wavelet fusion algorithm was also applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper and SPOT panchromatic imagery data. The second algorithm is based on a linear-regression technique. We analyzed the technique using the same Landsat and SPOT data.

  14. Alternative face models for 3D face registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Albert Ali; Alyüz, Neşe; Akarun, Lale

    2007-01-01

    3D has become an important modality for face biometrics. The accuracy of a 3D face recognition system depends on a correct registration that aligns the facial surfaces and makes a comparison possible. The best results obtained so far use a one-to-all registration approach, which means each new facial surface is registered to all faces in the gallery, at a great computational cost. We explore the approach of registering the new facial surface to an average face model (AFM), which automatically establishes correspondence to the pre-registered gallery faces. Going one step further, we propose that using a couple of well-selected AFMs can trade-off computation time with accuracy. Drawing on cognitive justifications, we propose to employ category-specific alternative average face models for registration, which is shown to increase the accuracy of the subsequent recognition. We inspect thin-plate spline (TPS) and iterative closest point (ICP) based registration schemes under realistic assumptions on manual or automatic landmark detection prior to registration. We evaluate several approaches for the coarse initialization of ICP. We propose a new algorithm for constructing an AFM, and show that it works better than a recent approach. Finally, we perform simulations with multiple AFMs that correspond to different clusters in the face shape space and compare these with gender and morphology based groupings. We report our results on the FRGC 3D face database.

  15. Surface-to-surface registration using level sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Erbou, Søren G.; Vester-Christensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a general approach for surface-to-surface registration (S2SR) with the Euclidean metric using signed distance maps. In addition, the method is symmetric such that the registration of a shape A to a shape B is identical to the registration of the shape B to the shape A. The S2SR...... problem can be approximated by the image registration (IR) problem of the signed distance maps (SDMs) of the surfaces confined to some narrow band. By shrinking the narrow bands around the zero level sets the solution to the IR problem converges towards the S2SR problem. It is our hypothesis...... that this approach is more robust and less prone to fall into local minima than ordinary surface-to-surface registration. The IR problem is solved using the inverse compositional algorithm. In this paper, a set of 40 pelvic bones of Duroc pigs are registered to each other w.r.t. the Euclidean transformation...

  16. Multi-modal image registration: matching MRI with histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alic, Lejla; Haeck, Joost C.; Klein, Stefan; Bol, Karin; van Tiel, Sandra T.; Wielopolski, Piotr A.; Bijster, Magda; Niessen, Wiro J.; Bernsen, Monique; Veenland, Jifke F.; de Jong, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Spatial correspondence between histology and multi sequence MRI can provide information about the capabilities of non-invasive imaging to characterize cancerous tissue. However, shrinkage and deformation occurring during the excision of the tumor and the histological processing complicate the co registration of MR images with histological sections. This work proposes a methodology to establish a detailed 3D relation between histology sections and in vivo MRI tumor data. The key features of the methodology are a very dense histological sampling (up to 100 histology slices per tumor), mutual information based non-rigid B-spline registration, the utilization of the whole 3D data sets, and the exploitation of an intermediate ex vivo MRI. In this proof of concept paper, the methodology was applied to one tumor. We found that, after registration, the visual alignment of tumor borders and internal structures was fairly accurate. Utilizing the intermediate ex vivo MRI, it was possible to account for changes caused by the excision of the tumor: we observed a tumor expansion of 20%. Also the effects of fixation, dehydration and histological sectioning could be determined: 26% shrinkage of the tumor was found. The annotation of viable tissue, performed in histology and transformed to the in vivo MRI, matched clearly with high intensity regions in MRI. With this methodology, histological annotation can be directly related to the corresponding in vivo MRI. This is a vital step for the evaluation of the feasibility of multi-spectral MRI to depict histological groundtruth.

  17. 3D Registration of mpMRI for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Focal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orczyk, Clément; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Mikheev, Artem; Villers, Arnauld; Bernaudin, Myriam; Taneja, Samir S; Valable, Samuel; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to assess a novel method of three-dimensional (3D) co-registration of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations performed before and after prostate cancer focal therapy. We developed a software platform for automatic 3D deformable co-registration of prostate MRI at different time points and applied this method to 10 patients who underwent focal ablative therapy. MRI examinations were performed preoperatively, as well as 1 week and 6 months post treatment. Rigid registration served as reference for assessing co-registration accuracy and precision. Segmentation of preoperative and postoperative prostate revealed a significant postoperative volume decrease of the gland that averaged 6.49 cc (P = .017). Applying deformable transformation based on mutual information from 120 pairs of MRI slices, we refined by 2.9 mm (max. 6.25 mm) the alignment of the ablation zone, segmented from contrast-enhanced images on the 1-week postoperative examination, to the 6-month postoperative T2-weighted images. This represented a 500% improvement over the rigid approach (P = .001), corrected by volume. The dissimilarity by Dice index of the mapped ablation zone using deformable transformation vs rigid control was significantly (P = .04) higher at the ablation site than in the whole gland. Our findings illustrate our method's ability to correct for deformation at the ablation site. The preliminary analysis suggests that deformable transformation computed from mutual information of preoperative and follow-up MRI is accurate in co-registration of MRI examinations performed before and after focal therapy. The ability to localize the previously ablated tissue in 3D space may improve targeting for image-guided follow-up biopsy within focal therapy protocols. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Financial Constraints and Nominal Price Rigidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menno, Dominik Francesco; Balleer, Almut; Hristov, Nikolay

    This paper investigates how financial market imperfections and the frequency of price adjustment interact. Based on new firm-level evidence for Germany, we document that financially constrained firms adjust prices more often than their unconstrained counterparts, both upwards and downwards. We show...... that these empirical patterns are consistent with a partial equilibrium menu-cost model with a working capital constraint. We then use the model to show how the presence of financial frictions changes profits and the price distribution of firms compared to a model without financial frictions. Our results suggest...... that tighter financial constraints are associated with higher nominal rigidities, higher prices and lower output. Moreover, in response to aggregate shocks, aggregate price rigidity moves substantially, the response of inflation is dampened, while output reacts more in the presence of financial frictions...

  19. Rigidity of the magic pentagram game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev, Amir; Miller, Carl A.

    2018-01-01

    A game is rigid if a near-optimal score guarantees, under the sole assumption of the validity of quantum mechanics, that the players are using an approximately unique quantum strategy. Rigidity has a vital role in quantum cryptography as it permits a strictly classical user to trust behavior in the quantum realm. This property can be traced back as far as 1998 (Mayers and Yao) and has been proved for multiple classes of games. In this paper we prove ridigity for the magic pentagram game, a simple binary constraint satisfaction game involving two players, five clauses and ten variables. We show that all near-optimal strategies for the pentagram game are approximately equivalent to a unique strategy involving real Pauli measurements on three maximally-entangled qubit pairs.

  20. Rigidity of the magic pentagram game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalev, Amir; Miller, Carl A

    2018-01-01

    A game is rigid if a near-optimal score guarantees, under the sole assumption of the validity of quantum mechanics, that the players are using an approximately unique quantum strategy. Rigidity has a vital role in quantum cryptography as it permits a strictly classical user to trust behavior in the quantum realm. This property can be traced back as far as 1998 (Mayers and Yao) and has been proved for multiple classes of games. In this paper we prove ridigity for the magic pentagram game, a simple binary constraint satisfaction game involving two players, five clauses and ten variables. We show that all near-optimal strategies for the pentagram game are approximately equivalent to a unique strategy involving real Pauli measurements on three maximally-entangled qubit pairs.

  1. Rigid cohomology over Laurent series fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lazda, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors develop a new theory of p-adic cohomology for varieties over Laurent series fields in positive characteristic, based on Berthelot's theory of rigid cohomology. Many major fundamental properties of these cohomology groups are proven, such as finite dimensionality and cohomological descent, as well as interpretations in terms of Monsky-Washnitzer cohomology and Le Stum's overconvergent site. Applications of this new theory to arithmetic questions, such as l-independence and the weight monodromy conjecture, are also discussed. The construction of these cohomology groups, analogous to the Galois representations associated to varieties over local fields in mixed characteristic, fills a major gap in the study of arithmetic cohomology theories over function fields. By extending the scope of existing methods, the results presented here also serve as a first step towards a more general theory of p-adic cohomology over non-perfect ground fields. Rigid Cohomology over Laurent Series Fields...

  2. Deformable Image Registration with Inclusion of Autodetected Homologous Tissue Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingsong Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel deformable registration algorithm is proposed in the application of radiation therapy. The algorithm starts with autodetection of a number of points with distinct tissue features. The feature points are then matched by using the scale invariance features transform (SIFT method. The associated feature point pairs are served as landmarks for the subsequent thin plate spline (TPS interpolation. Several registration experiments using both digital phantom and clinical data demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method. For the 3D phantom case, markers with error less than 2 mm are over 85% of total test markers, and it takes only 2-3 minutes for 3D feature points association. The proposed method provides a clinically practical solution and should be valuable for various image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT applications.

  3. A NEW IMAGE REGISTRATION METHOD FOR GREY IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nie Xuan; Zhao Rongchun; Jiang Zetao

    2004-01-01

    The proposed algorithm relies on a group of new formulas for calculating tangent slope so as to address angle feature of edge curves of image. It can utilize tangent angle features to estimate automatically and fully the rotation parameters of geometric transform and enable rough matching of images with huge rotation difference. After angle compensation, it can search for matching point sets by correlation criterion, then calculate parameters of affine transform, enable higher-precision emendation of rotation and transferring. Finally, it fulfills precise matching for images with relax-tense iteration method. Compared with the registration approach based on wavelet direction-angle features, the matching algorithm with tangent feature of image edge is more robust and realizes precise registration of various images. Furthermore, it is also helpful in graphics matching.

  4. A Remote Registration Based on MIDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIN, Xin

    2017-04-01

    We often need for software registration to protect the interests of the software developers. This article narrated one kind of software long-distance registration technology. The registration method is: place the registration information in a database table, after the procedure starts in check table registration information, if it has registered then the procedure may the normal operation; Otherwise, the customer must input the sequence number and registers through the network on the long-distance server. If it registers successfully, then records the registration information in the database table. This remote registration method can protect the rights of software developers.

  5. Cortical surface registration using spherical thin-plate spline with sulcal lines and mean curvature as features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Park, Jun-Sung; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Na, Duk L; Lee, Jong-Min

    2012-04-30

    Analysis of cortical patterns requires accurate cortical surface registration. Many researchers map the cortical surface onto a unit sphere and perform registration of two images defined on the unit sphere. Here we have developed a novel registration framework for the cortical surface based on spherical thin-plate splines. Small-scale composition of spherical thin-plate splines was used as the geometric interpolant to avoid folding in the geometric transform. Using an automatic algorithm based on anisotropic skeletons, we extracted seven sulcal lines, which we then incorporated as landmark information. Mean curvature was chosen as an additional feature for matching between spherical maps. We employed a two-term cost function to encourage matching of both sulcal lines and the mean curvature between the spherical maps. Application of our registration framework to fifty pairwise registrations of T1-weighted MRI scans resulted in improved registration accuracy, which was computed from sulcal lines. Our registration approach was tested as an additional procedure to improve an existing surface registration algorithm. Our registration framework maintained an accurate registration over the sulcal lines while significantly increasing the cross-correlation of mean curvature between the spherical maps being registered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Image/patient registration from (partial) projection data by the Fourier phase matching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiguo Lu; You, J.

    1999-01-01

    A technique for 2D or 3D image/patient registration, PFPM (projection based Fourier phase matching method), is proposed. This technique provides image/patient registration directly from sequential tomographic projection data. The method can also deal with image files by generating 2D Radon transforms slice by slice. The registration in projection space is done by calculating a Fourier invariant (FI) descriptor for each one-dimensional projection datum, and then registering the FI descriptor by the Fourier phase matching (FPM) method. The algorithm has been tested on both synthetic and experimental data. When dealing with translated, rotated and uniformly scaled 2D image registration, the performance of the PFPM method is comparable to that of the IFPM (image based Fourier phase matching) method in robustness, efficiency, insensitivity to the offset between images, and registration time. The advantages of the former are that subpixel resolution is feasible, and it is more insensitive to image noise due to the averaging effect of the projection acquisition. Furthermore, the PFPM method offers the ability to generalize to 3D image/patient registration and to register partial projection data. By applying patient registration directly from tomographic projection data, image reconstruction is not needed in the therapy set-up verification, thus reducing computational time and artefacts. In addition, real time registration is feasible. Registration from partial projection data meets the geometry and dose requirements in many application cases and makes dynamic set-up verification possible in tomotherapy. (author)

  7. Do Tumors in the Lung Deform During Normal Respiration? An Image Registration Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jianzhou; Lei Peng; Shekhar, Raj; Li Huiling; Suntharalingam, Mohan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether lung tumors may be described adequately using a rigid body assumption or whether they deform during normal respiration. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with early stage non-small-cell lung cancer underwent four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) simulation. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the 4D CT images. Image registration was performed in the vicinity of the GTV. The volume of interest for registration was the GTV and minimal volume of surrounding non-GTV tissue. Three types of registration were performed: translation only, translation + rotation, and deformable. The GTV contour from end-inhale was mapped to end-exhale using the registration-derived transformation field. The results were evaluated using three metrics: overlap index (OI), root-mean-squared distance (RMS), and Hausdorff distance (HD). Results: After translation only image registration, on average OI increased by 21.3%, RMS and HD reduced by 1.2 mm and 2.0 mm, respectively. The succeeding increases in OI after translation + rotation and deformable registration were 1.1% and 1.4% respectively. The succeeding reductions in RMS were 0.1 mm and 0.2 mm respectively. No reduction in HD was observed after translation + rotation and deformable image registration compared with translation only registration. The difference in the results from the three registration scenarios was independent of GTV size and motion amplitude. Conclusions: The primary effect of normal respiration on lung tumors was the translation of tumors. Rotation and deformation of lung tumors was determined to be minimal.

  8. Modeling the Flexural Rigidity of Rod Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeri, Mohammad; Knox, Barry E.; Ahmadi, Aphrodite

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrate eyes, the rod photoreceptor has a modified cilium with an extended cylindrical structure specialized for phototransduction called the outer segment (OS). The OS has numerous stacked membrane disks and can bend or break when subjected to mechanical forces. The OS exhibits axial structural variation, with extended bands composed of a few hundred membrane disks whose thickness is diurnally modulated. Using high-resolution confocal microscopy, we have observed OS flexing and disruption in live transgenic Xenopus rods. Based on the experimental observations, we introduce a coarse-grained model of OS mechanical rigidity using elasticity theory, representing the axial OS banding explicitly via a spring-bead model. We calculate a bending stiffness of ∼105 nN⋅μm2, which is seven orders-of-magnitude larger than that of typical cilia and flagella. This bending stiffness has a quadratic relation to OS radius, so that thinner OS have lower fragility. Furthermore, we find that increasing the spatial frequency of axial OS banding decreases OS rigidity, reducing its fragility. Moreover, the model predicts a tendency for OS to break in bands with higher spring number density, analogous to the experimental observation that transgenic rods tended to break preferentially in bands of high fluorescence. We discuss how pathological alterations of disk membrane properties by mutant proteins may lead to increased OS rigidity and thus increased breakage, ultimately contributing to retinal degeneration. PMID:23442852

  9. Blast wave interaction with a rigid surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josey, T.; Whitehouse, D.R.; Ripley, R.C.; Dionne, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    A simple model used to investigate blast wave interactions with a rigid surface is presented. The model uses a constant volume energy source analogue to predict pressure histories at gauges located directly above the charge. A series of two-dimensional axi-symmetric CFD calculations were performed, varying the height of the charge relative to the ground. Pressure histories, along with isopycnic plots are presented to evaluate the effects of placing a charge in close proximity to a rigid surface. When a charge is placed near a solid surface the pressure histories experienced at gauges above the charge indicate the presence of two distinct pressure peaks. The first peak is caused by the primary shock and the second peak is a result of the wave reflections from the rigid surface. As the distance from the charge to the wall is increased the magnitude of the second pressure peak is reduced, provided that the distance between the charge and the gauge is maintained constant. The simple model presented is able to capture significant, predictable flow features. (author)

  10. Lateral rigidity of cracked concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, A.; Chesi, C.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical results are discussed on the lateral rigidity of reinforced concrete structures with a given crack distribution. They have been favourably checked with experimental results for cylindrical shells under the effect of a thermal gradient producing vertical cracking or vertical plus horizontal cracking. The main effects characterizing the concrete behaviour are: (1) The shear transfer across a crack; (2) The shear transfer degradation after cyclic loading; (3) The tension stiffening provided by the concrete between crack and crack, in the normal stress transfer; (4) The temperature effect on the elastic moduli of concrete, when cracks are of thermal origin. Only the 1st effect is discussed on an experimental basis. Two broad cathegories of reinforced concrete structures have been investigated in this respect: shear walls of buildings and cylindrical containment structures. The main conclusions so far reached are: (1) Vertical cracks are unlikely to decrease the lateral rigidity to less than 80% of the original one, and to less than 90% when they do not involve the entire thickness of the wall; (2) The appearence of horizontal cracks can reduce the lateral rigidity by some 30% or more; (3) A noticeable but not yet evaluated influence is shown by cyclic loading. (orig.)

  11. Stresses in Circular Plates with Rigid Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikanov, N. L.; Koryagin, S. I.; Sharkov, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Calculations of residual stress fields are carried out by numerical and static methods, using the flat cross-section hypothesis. The failure of metal when exposed to residual stresses is, in most cases, brittle. The presence in the engineering structures of rigid elements often leads to the crack initiation and structure failure. This is due to the fact that rigid elements under the influence of external stresses are stress concentrators. In addition, if these elements are fixed by welding, the residual welding stresses can lead to an increase in stress concentration and, ultimately, to failure. The development of design schemes for such structures is a very urgent task for complex technical systems. To determine the stresses in a circular plate with a welded circular rigid insert under the influence of an external load, one can use the solution of the plane stress problem for annular plates in polar coordinates. The polar coordinates of the points are the polar radius and the polar angle, and the stress state is determined by normal radial stresses, tangential and shearing stresses. The use of the above mentioned design schemes, formulas, will allow more accurate determination of residual stresses in annular welded structures. This will help to establish the most likely directions of failure and take measures at the stages of designing, manufacturing and repairing engineering structures to prevent these failures. However, it must be taken into account that the external load, the presence of insulation can lead to a change in the residual stress field.

  12. Non-Invasive Ocular Rigidity Measurement: A Differential Tonometry Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios T. Detorakis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Taking into account the fact that Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT geometrically deforms the corneal apex and displaces volume from the anterior segment whereas Dynamic Contour Tonometry (DCT does not, we aimed at developing an algorithm for the calculation of ocular rigidity (OR based on the differences in pressure and volume between deformed and non-deformed status according to the general Friedenwald principle of differential tonometry. Methods: To avoid deviations of GAT IOP from true IOP in eyes with corneas different from the “calibration cornea” we applied the previously described Orssengo-Pye algorithm to calculate an error coefficient “C/B”. To test the feasibility of the proposed model, we calculated the OR coefficient (r in 17 cataract surgery candidates (9 males and 8 females. Results: The calculated r according to our model (mean ± SD, range was 0.0174 ± 0.010 (0.0123–0.022 mmHg/μL. A negative statistically significant correlation between axial length and r was detected whereas correlations between r and other biometric parameters examined were statistically not significant. Conclusions: The proposed method may prove a valid non-invasive tool for the measurement method of OR, which could help in introducing OR in the decision-making of the routine clinical practice.

  13. Surface registration technique for close-range mapping applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Ayman F.; Cheng, Rita W. T.

    2006-08-01

    Close-range mapping applications such as cultural heritage restoration, virtual reality modeling for the entertainment industry, and anatomical feature recognition for medical activities require 3D data that is usually acquired by high resolution close-range laser scanners. Since these datasets are typically captured from different viewpoints and/or at different times, accurate registration is a crucial procedure for 3D modeling of mapped objects. Several registration techniques are available that work directly with the raw laser points or with extracted features from the point cloud. Some examples include the commonly known Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm and a recently proposed technique based on matching spin-images. This research focuses on developing a surface matching algorithm that is based on the Modified Iterated Hough Transform (MIHT) and ICP to register 3D data. The proposed algorithm works directly with the raw 3D laser points and does not assume point-to-point correspondence between two laser scans. The algorithm can simultaneously establish correspondence between two surfaces and estimates the transformation parameters relating them. Experiment with two partially overlapping laser scans of a small object is performed with the proposed algorithm and shows successful registration. A high quality of fit between the two scans is achieved and improvement is found when compared to the results obtained using the spin-image technique. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm for registering 3D laser scanning data in close-range mapping applications to help with the generation of complete 3D models.

  14. Algorithming the Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Martina; Uprichard, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Imagine sailing across the ocean. The sun is shining, vastness all around you. And suddenly [BOOM] you’ve hit an invisible wall. Welcome to the Truman Show! Ever since Eli Pariser published his thoughts on a potential filter bubble, this movie scenario seems to have become reality, just with slight...... changes: it’s not the ocean, it’s the internet we’re talking about, and it’s not a TV show producer, but algorithms that constitute a sort of invisible wall. Building on this assumption, most research is trying to ‘tame the algorithmic tiger’. While this is a valuable and often inspiring approach, we...

  15. Improved image registration by sparse patch-based deformation estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjeong; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Qian; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-15

    Despite intensive efforts for decades, deformable image registration is still a challenging problem due to the potential large anatomical differences across individual images, which limits the registration performance. Fortunately, this issue could be alleviated if a good initial deformation can be provided for the two images under registration, which are often termed as the moving subject and the fixed template, respectively. In this work, we present a novel patch-based initial deformation prediction framework for improving the performance of existing registration algorithms. Our main idea is to estimate the initial deformation between subject and template in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. We argue that two image patches should follow the same deformation toward the template image if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. To this end, our framework consists of two stages, i.e., the training stage and the application stage. In the training stage, we register all training images to the pre-selected template, such that the deformation of each training image with respect to the template is known. In the application stage, we apply the following four steps to efficiently calculate the initial deformation field for the new test subject: (1) We pick a small number of key points in the distinctive regions of the test subject; (2) for each key point, we extract a local patch and form a coupled appearance-deformation dictionary from training images where each dictionary atom consists of the image intensity patch as well as their respective local deformations; (3) a small set of training image patches in the coupled dictionary are selected to represent the image patch of each subject key point by sparse representation. Then, we can predict the initial deformation for each subject key point by propagating the pre-estimated deformations on the selected training patches with the same sparse representation coefficients; and (4) we

  16. 49 CFR 587.18 - Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) DEFORMABLE BARRIERS Offset Deformable Barrier § 587.18 Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. (a) The fixed rigid barrier has a mass of not... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dimensions of fixed rigid barrier. 587.18 Section...

  17. Spatially weighted mutual information image registration for image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Samuel B.; Rhee, Frank C.; Monroe, James I.; Sohn, Jason W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new metric for image registration that incorporates the (sub)pixelwise differential importance along spatial location and to demonstrate its application for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: It is well known that rigid-body image registration with mutual information is dependent on the size and location of the image subset on which the alignment analysis is based [the designated region of interest (ROI)]. Therefore, careful review and manual adjustments of the resulting registration are frequently necessary. Although there were some investigations of weighted mutual information (WMI), these efforts could not apply the differential importance to a particular spatial location since WMI only applies the weight to the joint histogram space. The authors developed the spatially weighted mutual information (SWMI) metric by incorporating an adaptable weight function with spatial localization into mutual information. SWMI enables the user to apply the selected transform to medically ''important'' areas such as tumors and critical structures, so SWMI is neither dominated by, nor neglects the neighboring structures. Since SWMI can be utilized with any weight function form, the authors presented two examples of weight functions for IGRT application: A Gaussian-shaped weight function (GW) applied to a user-defined location and a structures-of-interest (SOI) based weight function. An image registration example using a synthesized 2D image is presented to illustrate the efficacy of SWMI. The convergence and feasibility of the registration method as applied to clinical imaging is illustrated by fusing a prostate treatment planning CT with a clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) image set acquired for patient alignment. Forty-one trials are run to test the speed of convergence. The authors also applied SWMI registration using two types of weight functions to two head and neck cases and a prostate case with clinically acquired CBCT/MVCT image sets. The

  18. Spatially weighted mutual information image registration for image guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Samuel B; Rhee, Frank C; Monroe, James I; Sohn, Jason W

    2010-09-01

    To develop a new metric for image registration that incorporates the (sub)pixelwise differential importance along spatial location and to demonstrate its application for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). It is well known that rigid-body image registration with mutual information is dependent on the size and location of the image subset on which the alignment analysis is based [the designated region of interest (ROI)]. Therefore, careful review and manual adjustments of the resulting registration are frequently necessary. Although there were some investigations of weighted mutual information (WMI), these efforts could not apply the differential importance to a particular spatial location since WMI only applies the weight to the joint histogram space. The authors developed the spatially weighted mutual information (SWMI) metric by incorporating an adaptable weight function with spatial localization into mutual information. SWMI enables the user to apply the selected transform to medically "important" areas such as tumors and critical structures, so SWMI is neither dominated by, nor neglects the neighboring structures. Since SWMI can be utilized with any weight function form, the authors presented two examples of weight functions for IGRT application: A Gaussian-shaped weight function (GW) applied to a user-defined location and a structures-of-interest (SOI) based weight function. An image registration example using a synthesized 2D image is presented to illustrate the efficacy of SWMI. The convergence and feasibility of the registration method as applied to clinical imaging is illustrated by fusing a prostate treatment planning CT with a clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) image set acquired for patient alignment. Forty-one trials are run to test the speed of convergence. The authors also applied SWMI registration using two types of weight functions to two head and neck cases and a prostate case with clinically acquired CBCT/ MVCT image sets. The SWMI registration with

  19. Feasibility of a novel deformable image registration technique to facilitate classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique for the integration of multimodality imaging, image guided treatment, and response monitoring. Methods and Materials: A multiorgan deformable image registration technique based on finite element modeling (FEM) and surface projection alignment of selected regions of interest with biomechanical material and interface models has been developed. FEM also provides an inherent method for direct tracking specified regions through treatment and follow-up. Results: The technique was demonstrated on 5 liver cancer patients. Differences of up to 1 cm of motion were seen between the diaphragm and the tumor center of mass after deformable image registration of exhale and inhale CT scans. Spatial differences of 5 mm or more were observed for up to 86% of the surface of the defined tumor after deformable image registration of the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images. Up to 6.8 mm of motion was observed for the tumor after deformable image registration of the CT and cone-beam CT scan after rigid registration of the liver. Deformable registration of the CT to the follow-up CT allowed a more accurate assessment of tumor response. Conclusions: This biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique incorporates classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue using one methodology

  20. Optimizing disk registration algorithms for nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekin, Thomas C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Gammer, Christoph [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Jahnstrasse 12, Leoben, Austria 8700 (Austria); Ciston, Jim [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Ophus, Colin, E-mail: cophus@gmail.com [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Scanning nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping is a technique by which the positions of diffracted disks sampled at the nanoscale over a crystalline sample can be used to reconstruct a strain map over a large area. However, it is important that the disk positions are measured accurately, as their positions relative to a reference are directly used to calculate strain. In this study, we compare several correlation methods using both simulated and experimental data in order to directly probe susceptibility to measurement error due to non-uniform diffracted disk illumination structure. We found that prefiltering the diffraction patterns with a Sobel filter before performing cross correlation or performing a square-root magnitude weighted phase correlation returned the best results when inner disk structure was present. We have tested these methods both on simulated datasets, and experimental data from unstrained silicon as well as a twin grain boundary in 304 stainless steel.

  1. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J-H; Kyme, A; Fulton, R; Nuyts, J; Kuncic, Z

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data. (paper)

  2. Method of automatic image registration of three-dimensional range of archaeological restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, O.; Perez, M.; Morales, N.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an automatic registration system for reconstruction of various positions of a large object based on a static structured light pattern. The system combines the technology of stereo vision, structured light pattern, the positioning system of the vision sensor and an algorithm that simplifies the process of finding correspondence for the modeling of large objects. A new structured light pattern based on Kautz sequence is proposed, using this pattern as static implement a proposed new registration method. (Author)

  3. Accelerated Deformable Registration of Repetitive MRI during Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Karsten Østergaard; Tanderup, Kari; Kiritsis, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Tumour regression and organ deformations during radiotherapy (RT) of cervical cancer represent major challenges regarding accurate conformation and calculation of dose when using image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. Deformable registration algorithms are able to handle organ deformations, which can...... be useful with advanced tools such as auto segmentation of organs and dynamic adaptation of radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to accelerate and validate deformable registration in MRI-based image-guided radiotherapy of cervical cancer.    ...

  4. Wavelet Compressed PCA Models for Real-Time Image Registration in Augmented Reality Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Cooper; Kent Wise; John Cooper; Makarand Deo

    2015-01-01

    The use of augmented reality (AR) has shown great promise in enhancing medical training and diagnostics via interactive simulations. This paper presents a novel method to perform accurate and inexpensive image registration (IR) utilizing a pre-constructed database of reference objects in conjunction with a principal component analysis (PCA) model. In addition, a wavelet compression algorithm is utilized to enhance the speed of the registration process. The proposed method is used to perform r...

  5. Language proficiency and nursing registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    This discussion paper focuses on English proficiency standards for nursing registration in Australia, how Australia has dealt with the issue of language proficiency, and the factors which have led to the establishment of the current language standards. Also, this paper will provide a comparison of the two language tests that are currently accepted in Australia (OET and IELTS), including the appropriateness of these tests and the minimum standards used. The paper will also examine the use of educational background as an indicator of language proficiency. Finally, communication-based complaints in the post-registration environment will be explored, and some discussion will be provided about why pre-registration measures might have failed to prevent such problematic situations from occurring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of flock coating on bending rigidity of woven fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, O.; Kesimci, M. O.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of our efforts that focused on the effect of the flock coating on the bending rigidity of woven fabrics. For this objective, a laboratory scale flocking unit is designed and flocked samples of controlled flock density are produced. Bending rigidity of the samples with different flock densities are measured on both flocked and unflocked sides. It is shown that the bending rigidity depends on both flock density and whether the side to be measured is flocked or not. Adhesive layer thickness on the bending rigidity is shown to be dramatic. And at higher basis weights, flock density gets less effective on bending rigidity.

  7. Understanding geological processes: Visualization of rigid and non-rigid transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, T. F.; Atit, K.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Resnick, I.; Tikoff, B.

    2012-12-01

    Visualizations are used in the geological sciences to support reasoning about structures and events. Research in cognitive sciences offers insights into the range of skills of different users, and ultimately how visualizations might support different users. To understand the range of skills needed to reason about earth processes we have developed a program of research that is grounded in the geosciences' careful description of the spatial and spatiotemporal patterns associated with earth processes. In particular, we are pursuing a research program that identifies specific spatial skills and investigates whether and how they are related to each other. For this study, we focus on a specific question: Is there an important distinction in the geosciences between rigid and non-rigid deformation? To study a general spatial thinking skill we employed displays with non-geological objects that had been altered by rigid change (rotation), and two types of non-rigid change ("brittle" (or discontinuous) and "ductile" (or continuous) deformation). Disciplinary scientists (geosciences and chemistry faculty), and novices (non-science faculty and undergraduate psychology students) answered questions that required them to visualize the appearance of the object before the change. In one study, geologists and chemists were found to be superior to non-science faculty in reasoning about rigid rotations (e.g., what an object would look like from a different perspective). Geologists were superior to chemists in reasoning about brittle deformations (e.g., what an object looked like before it was broken - here the object was a word cut into many fragments displaced in different directions). This finding is consistent with two hypotheses: 1) Experts are good at visualizing the types of changes required for their domain; and 2) Visualization of rigid and non-rigid changes are not the same skill. An additional important finding is that there was a broad range of skill in both rigid and non-rigid

  8. Neural network-based feature point descriptors for registration of optical and SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulkhanov, Dmitry; Konovalenko, Ivan; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Savchik, Alexey; Shvets, Evgeny; Sidorchuk, Dmitry

    2018-04-01

    Registration of images of different nature is an important technique used in image fusion, change detection, efficient information representation and other problems of computer vision. Solving this task using feature-based approaches is usually more complex than registration of several optical images because traditional feature descriptors (SIFT, SURF, etc.) perform poorly when images have different nature. In this paper we consider the problem of registration of SAR and optical images. We train neural network to build feature point descriptors and use RANSAC algorithm to align found matches. Experimental results are presented that confirm the method's effectiveness.

  9. INVITED REVIEW--IMAGE REGISTRATION IN VETERINARY RADIATION ONCOLOGY: INDICATIONS, IMPLICATIONS, AND FUTURE ADVANCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yang; Lawrence, Jessica; Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Forrest, Lisa; Mclaren, Duncan B; McLaughlin, Stephen; Argyle, David J; Nailon, William H

    2016-01-01

    The field of veterinary radiation therapy (RT) has gained substantial momentum in recent decades with significant advances in conformal treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), and intensity-modulated (IMRT) techniques. At the root of these advancements lie improvements in tumor imaging, image alignment (registration), target volume delineation, and identification of critical structures. Image registration has been widely used to combine information from multimodality images such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve the accuracy of radiation delivery and reliably identify tumor-bearing areas. Many different techniques have been applied in image registration. This review provides an overview of medical image registration in RT and its applications in veterinary oncology. A summary of the most commonly used approaches in human and veterinary medicine is presented along with their current use in IGRT and adaptive radiation therapy (ART). It is important to realize that registration does not guarantee that target volumes, such as the gross tumor volume (GTV), are correctly identified on the image being registered, as limitations unique to registration algorithms exist. Research involving novel registration frameworks for automatic segmentation of tumor volumes is ongoing and comparative oncology programs offer a unique opportunity to test the efficacy of proposed algorithms. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  10. Registration of eye reflection and scene images using an aspherical eye model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Atsushi; Nitschke, Christian; Nishida, Toyoaki

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces an image registration algorithm between an eye reflection and a scene image. Although there are currently a large number of image registration algorithms, this task remains difficult due to nonlinear distortions at the eye surface and large amounts of noise, such as iris texture, eyelids, eyelashes, and their shadows. To overcome this issue, we developed an image registration method combining an aspherical eye model that simulates nonlinear distortions considering eye geometry and a two-step iterative registration strategy that obtains dense correspondence of the feature points to achieve accurate image registrations for the entire image region. We obtained a database of eye reflection and scene images featuring four subjects in indoor and outdoor scenes and compared the registration performance with different asphericity conditions. Results showed that the proposed approach can perform accurate registration with an average accuracy of 1.05 deg by using the aspherical cornea model. This work is relevant for eye image analysis in general, enabling novel applications and scenarios.

  11. Numerical methods for image registration

    CERN Document Server

    Modersitzki, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Based on the author's lecture notes and research, this well-illustrated and comprehensive text is one of the first to provide an introduction to image registration with particular emphasis on numerical methods in medical imaging. Ideal for researchers in industry and academia, it is also a suitable study guide for graduate mathematicians, computer scientists, engineers, medical physicists, and radiologists.Image registration is utilised whenever information obtained from different viewpoints needs to be combined or compared and unwanted distortion needs to be eliminated. For example, CCTV imag

  12. Comparison of carina-based versus bony anatomy-based registration for setup verification in esophageal cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiels, Mélanie; Jin, Peng; van Gurp, Christianne H; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Alderliesten, Tanja; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the feasibility and geometric accuracy of carina-based registration for CBCT-guided setup verification in esophageal cancer IGRT, compared with current practice bony anatomy-based registration. Included were 24 esophageal cancer patients with 65 implanted fiducial markers, visible on planning CTs and follow-up CBCTs. All available CBCT scans (n = 236) were rigidly registered to the planning CT with respect to the bony anatomy and the carina. Target coverage was visually inspected and marker position variation was quantified relative to both registration approaches; the variation of systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) was estimated. Automatic carina-based registration was feasible in 94.9% of the CBCT scans, with an adequate target coverage in 91.1% compared to 100% after bony anatomy-based registration. Overall, Σ (σ) in the LR/CC/AP direction was 2.9(2.4)/4.1(2.4)/2.2(1.8) mm using the bony anatomy registration compared to 3.3(3.0)/3.6(2.6)/3.9(3.1) mm for the carina. Mid-thoracic placed markers showed a non-significant but smaller Σ in CC and AP direction when using the carina-based registration. Compared with a bony anatomy-based registration, carina-based registration for esophageal cancer IGRT results in inadequate target coverage in 8.9% of cases. Furthermore, large Σ and σ, requiring larger anisotropic margins, were seen after carina-based registration. Only for tumors entirely confined to the mid-thoracic region the carina-based registration might be slightly favorable.

  13. A rigid porous filter and filtration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

  14. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Mechanics of Materials

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for diffe