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Sample records for riemann theta function

  1. On the Riemann theta function of a trigonal curve and solutions of the Boussinesq and KP equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, V. B.; Smirnov, A. O.

    1987-07-01

    Recently, considerable progress has been made in understanding the nature of the algebro-geometrical superposition principles for the solutions of nonlinear completely integrable evolution equations, and mainly for the equations related to hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces. Here we find such a superposition formula for particular real solutions of the KP and Boussinesq equations related to the nonhyperelliptic curve ω4 = (λ - E 1) (λ - E 2) (λ - E 3) (λ - E 4). It is shown that the associated Riemann theta function may be decomposed into a sum containing two terms, each term being the product of three one-dimensional theta functions. The space and time variables of the KP and Boussinesq equations enter into the arguments of these one-dimensional theta functions in a linear way.

  2. Riemann-Theta Boltzmann Machine arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Krefl, Daniel; Haghighat, Babak; Kahlen, Jens

    A general Boltzmann machine with continuous visible and discrete integer valued hidden states is introduced. Under mild assumptions about the connection matrices, the probability density function of the visible units can be solved for analytically, yielding a novel parametric density function involving a ratio of Riemann-Theta functions. The conditional expectation of a hidden state for given visible states can also be calculated analytically, yielding a derivative of the logarithmic Riemann-Theta function. The conditional expectation can be used as activation function in a feedforward neural network, thereby increasing the modelling capacity of the network. Both the Boltzmann machine and the derived feedforward neural network can be successfully trained via standard gradient- and non-gradient-based optimization techniques.

  3. Bethe Ansatz, Inverse Scattering Transform and Tropical Riemann Theta Function in a Periodic Soliton Cellular Automaton for A_n^{(1}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kuniba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study an integrable vertex model with a periodic boundary condition associated with U_q(A_n^{(1} at the crystallizing point q=0. It is an (n+1-state cellular automaton describing the factorized scattering of solitons. The dynamics originates in the commuting family of fusion transfer matrices and generalizes the ultradiscrete Toda/KP flow corresponding to the periodic box-ball system. Combining Bethe ansatz and crystal theory in quantum group, we develop an inverse scattering/spectral formalism and solve the initial value problem based on several conjectures. The action-angle variables are constructed representing the amplitudes and phases of solitons. By the direct and inverse scattering maps, separation of variables into solitons is achieved and nonlinear dynamics is transformed into a straight motion on a tropical analogue of the Jacobi variety. We decompose the level set into connected components under the commuting family of time evolutions and identify each of them with the set of integer points on a torus. The weight multiplicity formula derived from the q=0 Bethe equation acquires an elegant interpretation as the volume of the phase space expressed by the size and multiplicity of these tori. The dynamical period is determined as an explicit arithmetical function of the n-tuple of Young diagrams specifying the level set. The inverse map, i.e., tropical Jacobi inversion is expressed in terms of a tropical Riemann theta function associated with the Bethe ansatz data. As an application, time average of some local variable is calculated.

  4. Selfsimilarity of "Riemann's nondifferentiable function"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duistermaat, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    This is an expository article about the series f(x) = 1 X n=1 1 n 2 sin(n 2 x); which according to Weierstrass was presented by Riemann as an example of a continuous function without a derivative. An explanation is given of innitely many selfsimilarities of the graph, from which the known results

  5. Ramanujan's theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Shaun

    2017-01-01

    Theta functions were studied extensively by Ramanujan. This book provides a systematic development of Ramanujan’s results and extends them to a general theory. The author’s treatment of the subject is comprehensive, providing a detailed study of theta functions and modular forms for levels up to 12. Aimed at advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers, the organization, user-friendly presentation, and rich source of examples, lends this book to serve as a useful reference, a pedagogical tool, and a stimulus for further research. Topics, especially those discussed in the second half of the book, have been the subject of much recent research; many of which are appearing in book form for the first time. Further results are summarized in the numerous exercises at the end of each chapter.

  6. Gauss map on the theta divisor and Green's functions

    OpenAIRE

    de Jong, Robin

    2007-01-01

    In an earlier paper we constructed a Cartier divisor on the theta divisor of a principally polarised abelian variety whose support is precisely the ramification locus of the Gauss map. In this note we discuss a Green's function associated to this locus. For jacobians we relate this Green's function to the canonical Green's function of the corresponding Riemann surface.

  7. Exploring the Riemann zeta function 190 years from Riemann's birth

    CERN Document Server

    Nikeghbali, Ashkan; Rassias, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This book is concerned with the Riemann Zeta Function, its generalizations, and various applications to several scientific disciplines, including Analytic Number Theory, Harmonic Analysis, Complex Analysis and Probability Theory. Eminent experts in the field illustrate both old and new results towards the solution of long-standing problems and include key historical remarks. Offering a unified, self-contained treatment of broad and deep areas of research, this book will be an excellent tool for researchers and graduate students working in Mathematics, Mathematical Physics, Engineering and Cryptography.

  8. Ramanujan's mock theta functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michael; Ono, Ken; Rolen, Larry

    2013-04-09

    In his famous deathbed letter, Ramanujan introduced the notion of a mock theta function, and he offered some alleged examples. Recent work by Zwegers [Zwegers S (2001) Contemp Math 291:268-277 and Zwegers S (2002) PhD thesis (Univ of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] has elucidated the theory encompassing these examples. They are holomorphic parts of special harmonic weak Maass forms. Despite this understanding, little attention has been given to Ramanujan's original definition. Here, we prove that Ramanujan's examples do indeed satisfy his original definition.

  9. Bernoulli Numbers and the Riemann Zeta Function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 7. Bernoulli Numbers and the Riemann Zeta Function. B Sury. General Article Volume 8 Issue 7 July 2003 pp 54-62. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/008/07/0054-0062. Keywords.

  10. Theta vocabulary II. Multidimensional case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchev, S.; Zabrodin, A.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the Jacobi and Riemann identities of degree four for the multidimensional theta functions as well as the Weierstrass identities emerge as algebraic consequences of the fundamental multidimensional binary identities connecting the theta functions with Riemann matrices τ and 2 τ.

  11. A Mock Theta Function of Second Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the second-order mock theta function 5 (, which Hikami came across in his work on mathematical physics and quantum invariant of three manifold. We give their bilateral form, and show that it is the same as bilateral third-order mock theta function of Ramanujan. We also show that the mock theta function 5 ( outside the unit circle is a theta function and also write ℎ1( as a coefficient of 0 of a theta series. First writing ℎ1( as a coefficient of a theta function, we prove an identity for ℎ1(.

  12. On Ramanujan's definition of mock theta function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Robert C

    2013-05-07

    In his famous "deathbed" letter, Ramanujan "defined" the notion of a mock theta function and offered some examples of functions he believed satisfied his definition. Very recently, Griffin et al. established for the first time that Ramanujan's mock theta functions actually satisfy his own definition. On the other hand, Zwegers' 2002 doctoral thesis [Zwegers S (2002) Mock theta functions. PhD thesis (Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] showed that all of Ramanujan's examples are holomorphic parts of harmonic Maass forms. This has led to an alternate definition of a mock theta function. This paper shows that Ramanujan's definition of mock theta function is not equivalent to the modern definition.

  13. Algebraic geometry and theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Coble, Arthur B

    1929-01-01

    This book is the result of extending and deepening all questions from algebraic geometry that are connected to the central problem of this book: the determination of the tritangent planes of a space curve of order six and genus four, which the author treated in his Colloquium Lecture in 1928 at Amherst. The first two chapters recall fundamental ideas of algebraic geometry and theta functions in such fashion as will be most helpful in later applications. In order to clearly present the state of the central problem, the author first presents the better-known cases of genus two (Chapter III) and

  14. A Theta lift representation for the Kawazumi-Zhang and Faltings invariants of genus-two Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pioline, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The Kawazumi-Zhang invariant $\\varphi$ for compact genus-two Riemann surfaces was recently shown to be a eigenmode of the Laplacian on the Siegel upper half-plane, away from the separating degeneration divisor. Using this fact and the known behavior of $\\varphi$ in the non-separating degeneration limit, it is shown that $\\varphi$ is equal to the Theta lift of the unique (up to normalization) weak Jacobi form of weight $-2$. This identification provides the complete Fourier-Jacobi expansion of $\\varphi$ near the non-separating node, gives full control on the asymptotics of $\\varphi$ in the various degeneration limits, and provides a efficient numerical procedure to evaluate $\\varphi$ to arbitrary accuracy. It also reveals a mock-type holomorphic Siegel modular form of weight $-2$ underlying $\\varphi$. From the general relation between the Faltings invariant, the Kawazumi-Zhang invariant and the discriminant for hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces, a Theta lift representation for the Faltings invariant in genus two ...

  15. Discrete groups, Mumford curves and Theta functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Put, Marius van der

    1992-01-01

    A discrete group Γ given over some complete non archimedean valued field defines a curve X. The theta functions for Γ provide an analytic construction for the Jacobian variety of X. A theory of theta functions is developed with the help of currents on trees and graphs and the cohomology for Γ. In

  16. Theta function identities associated with Ramanujan's modular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E-mail: rupamb@tezu.ernet.in; nayan@tezu.ernet.in. MS received 10 June 2008; revised 23 March 2010. Abstract. We present alternative proofs of some of Ramanujan's theta function iden- tities associated with the modular equations of composite degree 15. Along the way we also find some new theta-function identities.

  17. Theta function identities associated with Ramanujan's modular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present alternative proofs of some of Ramanujan's theta function identities associated with the modular equations of composite degree 15. Along the way we also find some new theta-function identities. We also give simple proofs of his modular equations of degree 15.

  18. A functional equation for the Riemann Zeta fractional derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guariglia, Emanuel; Silvestrov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a functional equation for the fractional derivative of the Riemann ζ function is presented. The fractional derivative of ζ is computed by a generalization of the Grünwald-Letnikov fractional operator, which satisfies the generalized Leibniz rule. It is applied to the asymmetric functional equation of ζ in order to obtain the result sought. Moreover, further properties of this fractional derivative are proposed and discussed. At the request of both authors and with the approval of the proceedings editor, article 020146 titled, "A functional equation for the Riemann Zeta fractional derivative," is being retracted from the public record due to the fact that it is a duplication of article 020063 published in the same volume.

  19. On the Riemann zeta-function and analytic characteristic functions

    CERN Document Server

    Csizmazia, A P

    2005-01-01

    Set $f(s) :=1/(\\sin(\\pi s/4)q(1/2 + s))$ with $q(s) := \\pi^{-s/2} \\, 2 \\Gamma (1 + s/2)(s-1) \\zeta (s)$. The Riemann hypothesis, RH, and the simple zeros conjecture, SZC, together with conjectures advanced by the author are used to show that $f(s)$on each vertical strip $V_{4n}$ of $s$ with $4n < {\\rm Re} \\, (s) < 4(n+1)$ provides an analytic characteristic function, $(-1)^n \\cdot f(s) = \\int_R (dy) e^{sy} P_{4n} (y)$ with $P_{4n} (y)$ positive. The essential case with $n = 0$ implies RH. A formula is obtained for $P_{4n} (y)$, which for $y$ negative involves the critical zeros. An alternative formula is obtained for $P_{4n} (y)$, without relying on RH, SZC or other unproven conjectures. It does not involve the critical zeros. Analogous resultsfor the cases of the Dirichlet $L$-functions and the Ramanujan tau Dirichlet $L$-function are conjectured.

  20. Riemann zeta function from wave-packet dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mack, R.; Dahl, Jens Peder; Moya-Cessa, H.

    2010-01-01

    We show that the time evolution of a thermal phase state of an anharmonic oscillator with logarithmic energy spectrum is intimately connected to the generalized Riemann zeta function zeta(s, a). Indeed, the autocorrelation function at a time t is determined by zeta (sigma + i tau, a), where sigma...... is governed by the temperature of the thermal phase state and tau is proportional to t. We use the JWKB method to solve the inverse spectral problem for a general logarithmic energy spectrum; that is, we determine a family of potentials giving rise to such a spectrum. For large distances, all potentials...

  1. The Riemann zeta-function theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ivic, Aleksandar

    2003-01-01

    ""A thorough and easily accessible account.""-MathSciNet, Mathematical Reviews on the Web, American Mathematical Society. This extensive survey presents a comprehensive and coherent account of Riemann zeta-function theory and applications. Starting with elementary theory, it examines exponential integrals and exponential sums, the Voronoi summation formula, the approximate functional equation, the fourth power moment, the zero-free region, mean value estimates over short intervals, higher power moments, and omega results. Additional topics include zeros on the critical line, zero-density estim

  2. Indefinite theta series and generalized error functions

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Manschot, Jan; Pioline, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Theta series for lattices with indefinite signature $(n_+,n_-)$ arise in many areas of mathematics including representation theory and enumerative algebraic geometry. Their modular properties are well understood in the Lorentzian case ($n_+=1$), but have remained obscure when $n_+\\geq 2$. Using a higher-dimensional generalization of the usual (complementary) error function, discovered in an independent physics project, we construct the modular completion of a class of `conformal' holomorphic theta series ($n_+=2$). As an application, we determine the modular properties of a generalized Appell-Lerch sum attached to the lattice ${\\operatorname A}_2$, which arose in the study of rank 3 vector bundles on $\\mathbb{P}^2$. The extension of our method to $n_+>2$ is outlined.

  3. Riemann Integration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. Riemann Integration. Dilip P Patil. General Article Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 61-80 ... Keywords. Area; lower and upper sums; Riemann sums; integrable functions; definite integral; derivative; primitive; anti-derivative.

  4. On Equalities Involving Integrals of the Logarithm of the Riemann ς-Function with Exponential Weight Which Are Equivalent to the Riemann Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey K. Sekatskii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Integral equalities involving integrals of the logarithm of the Riemann ς-function with exponential weight functions are introduced, and it is shown that an infinite number of them are equivalent to the Riemann hypothesis. Some of these equalities are tested numerically. The possible contribution of the Riemann function zeroes nonlying on the critical line is rigorously estimated and shown to be extremely small, in particular, smaller than nine milliards of decimals for the maximal possible weight function exp(−2πt. We also show how certain Fourier transforms of the logarithm of the Riemann zeta-function taken along the real (demiaxis are expressible via elementary functions plus logarithm of the gamma-function and definite integrals thereof, as well as certain sums over trivial and nontrivial Riemann function zeroes.

  5. Superconformal algebras and mock theta functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Tohru [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hikami, Kazuhiro [Department of Mathematics, Naruto University of Education, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: eguchi@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: hikami@naruto-u.ac.jp

    2009-07-31

    It is known that characters of BPS representations of extended superconformal algebras do not have good modular properties due to extra singular vectors coming from the BPS condition. In order to improve their modular properties we apply the method of Zwegers which has recently been developed to analyze modular properties of mock theta functions. We consider the case of the N=4 superconformal algebra at general levels and obtain the decomposition of characters of BPS representations into a sum of simple Jacobi forms and an infinite series of non-BPS representations. We apply our method to study elliptic genera of hyper-Kaehler manifolds in higher dimensions. In particular, we determine the elliptic genera in the case of complex four dimensions of the Hilbert scheme of points on K3 surfaces K{sup [2]} and complex tori A{sup [[3

  6. On Ramanujan’s definition of mock theta function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    In his famous “deathbed” letter, Ramanujan “defined” the notion of a mock theta function and offered some examples of functions he believed satisfied his definition. Very recently, Griffin et al. established for the first time that Ramanujan’s mock theta functions actually satisfy his own definition. On the other hand, Zwegers’ 2002 doctoral thesis [Zwegers S (2002) Mock theta functions. PhD thesis (Univ Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands)] showed that all of Ramanujan’s examples are holomorphic parts of harmonic Maass forms. This has led to an alternate definition of a mock theta function. This paper shows that Ramanujan’s definition of mock theta function is not equivalent to the modern definition. PMID:23625007

  7. The role of Riemann generalized derivative in the study of qualitative properties of functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Radulescu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marshal Ash [3] introduced the concept of (sigma,tau differentiable functions and studied the Riemann generalized derivatives In this article we study the convexity and monotonicity of (sigma,tau differentiable functions, using results by Hincin, Humke and Laczkovich, and using the Riemann generalized derivative. We give conditions such that the classic properties of differentiable functions hold also for (sigma,tau differentiable functions.

  8. Minimal models on Riemann surfaces: The partition functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O. (Katholieke Univ. Nijmegen (Netherlands). Inst. voor Theoretische Fysica)

    1990-06-04

    The Coulomb gas representation of the A{sub n} series of c=1-6/(m(m+1)), m{ge}3, minimal models is extended to compact Riemann surfaces of genus g>1. An integral representation of the partition functions, for any m and g is obtained as the difference of two gaussian correlation functions of a background charge, (background charge on sphere) x (1-g), and screening charges integrated over the surface. The coupling constant x (compacitification radius){sup 2} of the gaussian expressions are, as on the torus, m(m+1), and m/(m+1). The partition functions obtained are modular invariant, have the correct conformal anomaly and - restricting the propagation of states to a single handle - one can verify explicitly the decoupling of the null states. On the other hand, they are given in terms of coupled surface integrals, and it remains to show how they degenerate consistently to those on lower-genus surfaces. In this work, this is clear only at the lattice level, where no screening charges appear. (orig.).

  9. Combinatorics of tenth-order mock theta functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    016-0305-4. Combinatorics of tenth-order mock theta functions. J K SAREEN and M RANA. ∗ ... 2010 Mathematics Subject Classifications. 11P81, 82 ..... [8] Fine N J, Basic hypergeometric series and applications, in: Mathematical Surveys and.

  10. Computational theories on the function of theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengyel, Máté; Huhn, Zsófia; Erdi, Péter

    2005-06-01

    Neural rhythms can be studied in terms of conditions for their generation, or in terms of their functional significance. The theta oscillation is a particularly prominent rhythm, reported to be present in many brain areas, and related to many important cognitive processes. The generating mechanisms of theta have extensively been studied and reviewed elsewhere; here we discuss ideas that have accumulated over the past decades on the computational roles it may subserve. Theories propose different aspects of theta oscillations as being relevant for their cognitive functions: limit cycle oscillations in neuronal firing rates, subthreshold membrane potential oscillations, periodic modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, and phase precession of hippocampal place cells. The relevant experimental data is briefly summarized in the light of these theories. Specific models proposing a function for theta in pattern recognition, memory, sequence learning and navigation are reviewed critically. Difficulties with testing and comparing alternative models are discussed, along with potentially important future research directions in the field.

  11. Quantum modular forms, mock modular forms, and partial theta functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Susanna

    Defined by Zagier in 2010, quantum modular forms have been the subject of an explosion of recent research. Many of these results are aimed at discovering examples of these functions, which are defined on the rational numbers and have "nice" modularity properties. Though the subject is in its early stages, numerous results (including Zagier's original examples) show these objects naturally arising from many areas of mathematics as limits of other modular-like functions. One such family of examples is due to Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades, who connected these new objects to partial theta functions (introduced by Rogers in 1917) and mock modular forms (about which there is a rich theory, whose origins date back to Ramanujan in 1920). In this thesis, we build off of the work of Folsom, Ono, and Rhoades by providing an infinite family of quantum modular forms of arbitrary positive half-integral weight. Further, this family of quantum modular forms "glues" mock modular forms to partial theta functions and is constructed from a so-called "universal" mock theta function by extending a method of Eichler and Zagier (originally defined for holomorphic Jacobi forms) into a non-holomorphic setting. In addition to the infinite family, we explore the weight 1/2 and 3/2 functions in more depth. For both of these weights, we are able to explicitly write down the quantum modular form, as well as the corresponding "errors to modularity," which can be shown to be Mordell integrals of specific theta functions and, as a consequence, are real-analytic functions. Finally, we turn our attention to the partial theta functions associated with these low weight examples. Berndt and Kim provide asymptotic expansions for a certain class of partial theta functions as q approaches 1 radially within the unit disk. Here, we extend this work to not only obtain asymptotic expansions for this class of functions as q approaches any root of unity, but also for a certain class of derivatives of these functions

  12. On Theta Functions and Dedekind’s function according to the changes in the value periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmet Yıldız

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It's a reality that there is a relationship between a sigma function of Weierstrass and a theta function. We know that an elliptic function can be set up using the theta functions just as it can be established with the help of sigma function of Weierstrass. In this study, we investigate relations between the Dedekind's -function and -theta function by the using characteristic values (mod2 for -function according to the pair , where complex numbers satisfying ? 0 . Also, we give the transformations among the theta functions according to the quarter periods and obtain a Jacobian style elliptic function by the help of a function we define.

  13. On Riemann sums and maximal functions in \\mathbb R^n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagulyan, Grigorii A.

    2009-04-01

    We investigate problems on a.e. convergence of Riemann sums \\displaystyle R_nf(x)=\\frac1n\\sum_{k=0}^{n-1}f\\biggl(x+\\frac kn\\biggr), \\qquad x\\in\\mathbb T, with the use of classical maximal functions in \\mathbb R^n. A theorem on the equivalence of Riemann and ordinary maximal functions is proved, which allows us to use techniques and results of the theory of differentiation of integrals in \\mathbb R^n in these problems. Using this method we prove that for a certain sequence \\{n_k\\} the Riemann sums R_{n_k}f(x) converge a.e. to f\\in L^p, p>1. Bibliography: 23 titles.

  14. On the comparison of trigonometric convolution operators with their discrete analogues for Riemann integrable functions

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    Nessel RJ

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This note is concerned with a comparison of the approximation-theoretical behaviour of trigonometric convolution processes and their discrete analogues. To be more specific, for continuous functions it is a well-known fact that under suitable conditions the relevant uniform errors are indeed equivalent, apart from constants. It is the purpose of this note to extend the matter to the frame of Riemann integrable functions. To establish the comparison for the corresponding Riemann errors, essential use is made of appropriate stability inequalities.

  15. Random matrix theory and discrete moments of the Riemann zeta function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, C P [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2003-03-28

    We calculate the discrete moments of the characteristic polynomial of a random unitary matrix, evaluated a small distance away from an eigenangle. Such results allow us to make conjectures about similar moments for the Riemann zeta function, and provide a uniform approach to understanding moments of the zeta function and its derivative.

  16. Combinatorics of tenth-order mock theta functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we provide the combinatorial interpretations of two tenth order mock theta functions which appeared in some identities given in Ramanujan's lost notebook ((1988) Narosa Publishing House, New Delhi). Author Affiliations. J K SAREEN M RANA. Dates. Manuscript received: 2 May 2014; Manuscript revised: 16 ...

  17. Riemann integral of a random function and the parabolic equation with a general stochastic measure

    OpenAIRE

    Radchenko, Vadym

    2012-01-01

    For stochastic parabolic equation driven by a general stochastic measure, the weak solution is obtained. The integral of a random function in the equation is considered as a limit in probability of Riemann integral sums. Basic properties of such integrals are studied in the paper.

  18. Donaldson-Witten theory and indefinite theta functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpas, Georgios; Manschot, Jan

    2017-11-01

    We consider partition functions with insertions of surface operators of topologically twisted N=2 , SU(2) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, or Donaldson-Witten theory for short, on a four-manifold. If the metric of the compact four-manifold has positive scalar curvature, Moore and Witten have shown that the partition function is completely determined by the integral over the Coulomb branch parameter a, while more generally the Coulomb branch integral captures the wall-crossing behavior of both Donaldson polynomials and Seiberg-Witten invariants. We show that after addition of a \\overlineQ -exact surface operator to the Moore-Witten integrand, the integrand can be written as a total derivative to the anti-holomorphic coordinate ā using Zwegers' indefinite theta functions. In this way, we reproduce Göttsche's expressions for Donaldson invariants of rational surfaces in terms of indefinite theta functions for any choice of metric.

  19. Vacuum stability, string density of states and the Riemann zeta function

    CERN Document Server

    Angelantonj, Carlo; Elitzur, Shmuel; Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    We study the distribution of graded degrees of freedom in classically stable oriented closed string vacua and use the Rankin-Selberg transform to link it to the finite one-loop vacuum energy. In particular, we find that the spectrum of physical excitations not only must enjoy asymptotic supersymmetry but actually, at very large mass, bosonic and fermionic states must follow a universal oscillating pattern, whose frequencies are related to the zeros of the Riemann zeta-function. Moreover, the convergence rate of the overall number of the graded degrees of freedom to the value of the vacuum energy is determined by the Riemann hypothesis. We discuss also attempts to obtain constraints in the case of tachyon-free open-string theories.

  20. Brandt matrices and theta series over global function fields

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chih-Yun; Wei, Fu-Tsun; Yu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to give a complete account of the Eichler-Brandt theory over function fields and the basis problem for Drinfeld type automorphic forms. Given arbitrary function field k together with a fixed place \\infty, the authors construct a family of theta series from the norm forms of "definite" quaternion algebras, and establish an explicit Hecke-module homomorphism from the Picard group of an associated definite Shimura curve to a space of Drinfeld type automorphic forms. The "compatibility" of these homomorphisms with different square-free levels is also examined. These Heck

  1. Riemann hypothesis is not correct

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, JinHua

    2014-01-01

    This paper use Nevanlinna's Second Main Theorem of the value distribution theory, we got an important conclusion by Riemann hypothesis. this conclusion contradicts the Theorem 8.12 in Titchmarsh's book "Theory of the Riemann Zeta-functions", therefore we prove that Riemann hypothesis is incorrect.

  2. Applications of Wirtinger Inequalities on the Distribution of Zeros of the Riemann Zeta-Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saker SamirH

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available On the hypothesis that the th moments of the Hardy -function are correctly predicted by random matrix theory and the moments of the derivative of are correctly predicted by the derivative of the characteristic polynomials of unitary matrices, we establish new large spaces between the zeros of the Riemann zeta-function by employing some Wirtinger-type inequalities. In particular, it is obtained that which means that consecutive nontrivial zeros often differ by at least 6.1392 times the average spacing.

  3. About the Uniform H\\"older Continuity of Generalized Riemann Function

    OpenAIRE

    Bastin, F.; Nicolay, S.; Simons, L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the uniform H\\"older continuity of the generalized Riemann function $R_{\\alpha,\\beta}$ (with $\\alpha>1$ and $\\beta>0$) defined by \\[ R_{\\alpha,\\beta}(x)=\\sum_{n=1}^{+\\infty}\\frac{\\sin(\\pi n^\\beta x)}{n^\\alpha},\\quad x\\in\\mathbb{R}, \\] using its continuous wavelet transform. In particular, we show that the exponent we find is optimal. We also analyse the behaviour of $R_{\\alpha,\\beta}$ as $\\beta$ tends to infinity.

  4. Fractional parts and their relations to the values of the Riemann zeta function

    KAUST Repository

    Alabdulmohsin, Ibrahim

    2017-09-06

    A well-known result, due to Dirichlet and later generalized by de la Vallée–Poussin, expresses a relationship between the sum of fractional parts and the Euler–Mascheroni constant. In this paper, we prove an asymptotic relationship between the summation of the products of fractional parts with powers of integers on the one hand, and the values of the Riemann zeta function, on the other hand. Dirichlet’s classical result falls as a particular case of this more general theorem.

  5. Bernhard Riemann

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    was at the height of his mathematical career, had a profound influence on Riemann. After four semesters at Berlin, Riemann returned to Gottingen, where the situation had improved. On an invitation from Gauss, Wilhelm Weber had returned to Gottingen, where he held outstanding lectures in physics accompanied with ...

  6. Path integrals and Voronin's theorem on the universality of the Riemann zeta function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Khalil M.; Khuri, N. N.; Ren, H. C.

    1991-10-01

    We present a new approach to the path integral in latticized quantum theories. Our method is based on Voronin's theorems on the universality of the Riemann zeta function. We obtain a formula for the partition function as a discrete sum over "paths" with each path labeled by an integer and given by a zeta function evaluated at a fixed set of points in the critical strip. These points are the image of the space-time lattice resulting from a simple linear mapping. A new measure appears in our sum, and its properties are extensively discussed and a method to calculate it is given. We carried out extensive checks of the method for Euclidean quantum mechanics, and compared the results with those obtained from well-established methods as well as exact results. The comparison confirms the validity of the zeta-function method and our calculation of the measure.

  7. Statistical mechanics of /2+1 gravity from Riemann zeta function and Alexander polynomial: exact results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, A. L.

    2001-05-01

    In the recent publication [J. Geom. Phys. 33 (2000) 23], we have demonstrated that dynamics of /2+1 gravity can be described in terms of train tracks. Train tracks were introduced by Thurston in connection with description of dynamics of surface automorphisms. In this work, we provide an example of utilization of general formalism developed earlier. The complete exact solution of the model problem describing equilibrium dynamics of train tracks on the punctured torus is obtained. Being guided by similarities between the dynamics of two-dimensional liquid crystals and /2+1 gravity the partition function for gravity is mapped into that for the Farey spin chain. The Farey spin chain partition function, fortunately, is known exactly and has been thoroughly investigated recently. Accordingly, the transition between the pseudo-Anosov and the periodic dynamic regime (in Thurston's terminology) in the case of gravity is being reinterpreted in terms of phase transitions in the Farey spin chain whose partition function is just the ratio of two Riemann zeta functions. The mapping into the spin chain is facilitated by recognition of a special role of the Alexander polynomial for knots/links in study of dynamics of self-homeomorphisms of surfaces. At the end of paper, using some facts from the theory of arithmetic hyperbolic 3-manifolds (initiated by Bianchi in 1892), we develop systematic extension of the obtained results to noncompact Riemann surfaces of higher genus. Some of the obtained results are also useful for /3+1 gravity. In particular, using the theorem of Margulis, we provide new reasons for the black hole existence in the Universe: black holes make our Universe arithmetic, i.e. the discrete Lie groups of motion are arithmetic.

  8. Integral and Series Representations of Riemann's Zeta Function and Dirichlet's Eta Function and a Medley of Related Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Milgram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contour integral representations of Riemann's Zeta function and Dirichlet's Eta (alternating Zeta function are presented and investigated. These representations flow naturally from methods developed in the 1800s, but somehow they do not appear in the standard reference summaries, textbooks, or literature. Using these representations as a basis, alternate derivations of known series and integral representations for the Zeta and Eta function are obtained on a unified basis that differs from the textbook approach, and results are developed that appear to be new.

  9. The explicit formulas and evaluations of Ramanujan's theta-function [psi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinhee; Lee, Yang; Paek, Dae Hyun

    2006-09-01

    We define two quotients of theta-function [psi] depending on two positive real parameters. We then show how they are connected with two parameters of Dedekind eta-function, theta-function [phi], and the Ramanujan-Weber class invariants. Explicit formulas for determining values of the theta-function [psi] are derived, and several examples will be given. In addition, we give some applications of these parameters for the famous Rogers-Ramanujan continued fraction R(q), Ramanujan's cubic continued fraction G(q), and the modular j-invariant.

  10. Some theorems on the explicit evaluation of Ramanujan's theta-functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayandeep Deka Baruah

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruce C. Berndt et al. and Soon-Yi Kang have proved many of Ramanujan's formulas for the explicit evaluation of the Rogers-Ramanujan continued fraction and theta-functions in terms of Weber-Ramanujan class invariants. In this note, we give alternative proofs of some of these identities of theta-functions recorded by Ramanujan in his notebooks and deduce some formulas for the explicit evaluation of his theta-functions in terms of Weber-Ramanujan class invariants.

  11. Bernhard Riemann

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. Bernhard Riemann. Renuka Ravindran. Article-in-a-Box Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 3-4. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/11/0003-0004. Author Affiliations.

  12. A Strong Kind of Riemann Integrability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Brian S.

    2012-01-01

    The usual definition of the Riemann integral as a limit of Riemann sums can be strengthened to demand more of the function to be integrated. This super-Riemann integrability has interesting properties and provides an easy proof of a simple change of variables formula and a novel characterization of derivatives. This theory offers teachers and…

  13. A Generalization of Riemann Sums

    OpenAIRE

    Kouba, Omran

    2014-01-01

    We generalize the property that Riemann sums of a continuous function corresponding to equidistant subdivision of an interval converge to the integral of that function, and we give some applications of this generalization.

  14. Protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-theta in Natural Killer (NK cell function and anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eAnel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The protein kinase C-theta (PKCtheta, which is essential for T cell function and survival, is also required for efficient anti-tumor immune surveillance. Natural killer (NK cells, which express PKCtheta, play a prominent role in this process, mainly by elimination of tumor cells with reduced or absent major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I expression. This justifies the increased interest of the use of activated NK cells in anti-tumor immunotherapy in the clinic. The in vivo development of MHC-I-deficient tumors is much favored in PKCtheta-/- mice compared with wild-type mice. Recent data offer some clues on the mechanism that could explain the important role of PKCtheta in NK cell-mediated anti-tumor immune surveillance: some studies show that PKCtheta is implicated in signal transduction and anti-tumoral activity of NK cells elicited by interleukin (IL-12 or IL-15, while others show that it is implicated in NK cell functional activation mediated by certain killer activating receptors (KAR. Alternatively, the possibility that PKCtheta is involved in NK cell degranulation is discussed, since recent data indicate that it is implicated in microtubule-organizing center (MTOC polarization to the immune synapse in CD4+ T cells. The implication of PKC isoforms in degranulation has been more extensively studied in CTL, and these studies will be also summarized.

  15. Asymmetric function of theta and gamma activity in syllable processing: an intra-cortical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eMorillon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-gamma (25-45 Hz and theta (4-8 Hz oscillations are proposed to underpin the integration of phonemic and syllabic information, respectively. How these two scales of analysis split functions across hemispheres is unclear. We analyzed cortical responses from an epileptic patient with a rare bilateral electrode implantation (stereotactic EEG in primary (A1/BA41 and A2/BA42 and association auditory cortices (BA22. Using time-frequency analyses, we confirmed the dominance of a 5-6 Hz theta activity in right and of a low-gamma (25-45 Hz activity in left primary auditory cortices (A1/A2, during both resting state and syllable processing. We further detected high-theta (7-8 Hz resting activity in left primary, but also associative auditory regions. In left BA22, its phase correlated with high-gamma induced power. Such a hierarchical relationship across theta and gamma frequency bands (theta/gamma phase-amplitude coupling could index the process by which the neural code shifts from stimulus feature- to phonological- encoding, and is associated with the transition from evoked to induced power responses. These data suggest that theta and gamma activity in right and left auditory cortices bear different functions. They support a scheme where slow parsing of the acoustic information dominates in right-hemisphere at a syllabic (5-6 Hz rate, and left auditory cortex exhibits a more complex cascade of oscillations, reflecting the possible extraction of transient acoustic cues at a fast (~25-45 Hz rate, subsequently integrated at a slower, e.g. syllabic one. Slow oscillations could functionally participate to speech processing by structuring gamma activity in left BA22, where abstract percepts emerge.

  16. The functional role of human right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta rhythm in environmental encoding during virtual spatial navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi; Cornwell, Brian R; Cheyne, Douglas; Johnson, Blake W

    2017-03-01

    Low frequency theta band oscillations (4-8 Hz) are thought to provide a timing mechanism for hippocampal place cell firing and to mediate the formation of spatial memory. In rodents, hippocampal theta has been shown to play an important role in encoding a new environment during spatial navigation, but a similar functional role of hippocampal theta in humans has not been firmly established. To investigate this question, we recorded healthy participants' brain responses with a 160-channel whole-head MEG system as they performed two training sets of a virtual Morris water maze task. Environment layouts (except for platform locations) of the two sets were kept constant to measure theta activity during spatial learning in new and familiar environments. In line with previous findings, left hippocampal/parahippocampal theta showed more activation navigating to a hidden platform relative to random swimming. Consistent with our hypothesis, right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta was stronger during the first training set compared to the second one. Notably, theta in this region during the first training set correlated with spatial navigation performance across individuals in both training sets. These results strongly argue for the functional importance of right hippocampal theta in initial encoding of configural properties of an environment during spatial navigation. Our findings provide important evidence that right hippocampal/parahippocampal theta activity is associated with environmental encoding in the human brain. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1347-1361, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Trans-theta logistics: a new family of population growth sigmoid functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozusko, F; Bourdeau, M

    2011-12-01

    Sigmoid functions have been applied in many areas to model self limited population growth. The most popular functions; General Logistic (GL), General von Bertalanffy (GV), and Gompertz (G), comprise a family of functions called Theta Logistic ([Formula: see text] L). Previously, we introduced a simple model of tumor cell population dynamics which provided a unifying foundation for these functions. In the model the total population (N) is divided into reproducing (P) and non-reproducing/quiescent (Q) sub-populations. The modes of the rate of change of ratio P/N was shown to produce GL, GV or G growth. We now generalize the population dynamics model and extend the possible modes of the P/N rate of change. We produce a new family of sigmoid growth functions, Trans-General Logistic (TGL), Trans-General von Bertalanffy (TGV) and Trans-Gompertz (TG)), which as a group we have named Trans-Theta Logistic (T [Formula: see text] L) since they exist when the [Formula: see text] L are translated from a two parameter into a three parameter phase space. Additionally, the model produces a new trigonometric based sigmoid (TS). The [Formula: see text] L sigmoids have an inflection point size fixed by a single parameter and an inflection age fixed by both of the defining parameters. T [Formula: see text] L and TS sigmoids have an inflection point size defined by two parameters in bounding relationships and inflection point age defined by three parameters (two bounded). While the Theta Logistic sigmoids provided flexibility in defining the inflection point size, the Trans-Theta Logistic sigmoids provide flexibility in defining the inflection point size and age. By matching the slopes at the inflection points we compare the range of values of inflection point age for T [Formula: see text] L versus [Formula: see text] L for model growth curves.

  18. Generalized Riemann derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Radulescu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Initiated by Marshall Ash in 1966, the study of generalized Riemann derivative draw significant attention of the mathematical community and numerous studies where carried out since then. One of the major areas that benefits from these developments is the numerical analysis, as the use of generalized Riemann derivatives leads to solving a wider class of problems that are not solvable with the classical tools. This article studies the generalized Riemann derivative and its properties and establishes relationships between Riemann generalized derivative and the classical one. The existence of classical derivative implies the existence of the Riemann generalized derivative, and we study conditions necessary for the generalized Riemann derivative to imply the existence of the classical derivative. Furthermore, we provide conditions on the generalized Riemann derivative that are sufficient for the existence of the classical derivative.

  19. Riemann Integration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of most functions are impossible to determine exactly (although they may be computed to any degree of accuracy desired by calcu- lating lower and upper sums). Nevertheless, the integral of many functions can be computed very easily. -74-----------------------------~~--------R-E-S-O-N-A-N-C-E-I-N-o-v-em--be-r--zo-o-6 ...

  20. Fractal supersymmetric QM, Geometric Probability and the Riemann Hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    The Riemann's hypothesis (RH) states that the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta-function are of the form $ s_n =1/2+i\\lambda_n $. Earlier work on the RH based on supersymmetric QM, whose potential was related to the Gauss-Jacobi theta series, allows to provide the proper framework to construct the well defined algorithm to compute the probability to find a zero (an infinity of zeros) in the critical line. Geometric probability theory furnishes the answer to the very difficult question whether the probability that the RH is true is indeed equal to unity or not. To test the validity of this geometric probabilistic framework to compute the probability if the RH is true, we apply it directly to the the hyperbolic sine function $ \\sinh (s) $ case which obeys a trivial analog of the RH (the HSRH). Its zeros are equally spaced in the imaginary axis $ s_n = 0 + i n \\pi $. The geometric probability to find a zero (and an infinity of zeros) in the imaginary axis is exactly unity. We proceed with a fractal supersymme...

  1. Deleting Items and Disturbing Mesh Theorems for Riemann Definite Integral and Their Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingwei; Liu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Based on the definition of Riemann definite integral,deleting items and disturbing mesh theorems on Riemann sums are given. After deleting some items or disturbing the mesh of partition, the limit of Riemann sums still converges to Riemann definite integral under specific conditions. These theorems can deal with a class of complicate limitation of sum and product of series of a function, and demonstrate that the geometric intuition of Riemann definite integral is more profound than ordinary t...

  2. The theta-syllable: a unit of speech information defined by cortical function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded eGhitza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent commentary (Oscillators and syllables: a cautionary note. Cummins, 2012 questions the validity of a class of speech perception models inspired by the possible role of neuronal oscillations in decoding speech (e.g., Ghitza 2011, Giraud & Poeppel 2012. In arguing against the approach, Cummins raises a cautionary flag from a phonetician’s point of view. Here we respond to his arguments from an auditory processing viewpoint, referring to a phenomenological model of Ghitza (2011 taken as a representative of the criticized approach. We shall conclude by proposing the theta-syllable as an information unit defined by cortical function – an alternative to the conventional, ambiguously defined syllable. In the large context, the resulting discussion debate should be viewed as a subtext of acoustic and auditory phonetics vs. articulatory and motor theories of speech reception.

  3. Riemann, topology, and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Monastyrsky, Michael I

    2008-01-01

    This significantly expanded second edition of Riemann, Topology, and Physics combines a fascinating account of the life and work of Bernhard Riemann with a lucid discussion of current interaction between topology and physics. The author, a distinguished mathematical physicist, takes into account his own research at the Riemann archives of Göttingen University and developments over the last decade that connect Riemann with numerous significant ideas and methods reflected throughout contemporary mathematics and physics. Special attention is paid in part one to results on the Riemann–Hilbert problem and, in part two, to discoveries in field theory and condensed matter such as the quantum Hall effect, quasicrystals, membranes with nontrivial topology, "fake" differential structures on 4-dimensional Euclidean space, new invariants of knots and more. In his relatively short lifetime, this great mathematician made outstanding contributions to nearly all branches of mathematics; today Riemann’s name appears prom...

  4. PKC-theta in regulatory and effector T-cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran eBrezar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teff or regulatory (Tregs T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ to the immunological synapse is instrumental for the formation of signalling complexes, that ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the immunological synapse where its formation induces altered signalling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance.This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs.

  5. Effects of Increase in Amplitude of Occipital Alpha & Theta Brain Waves on Global Functioning Level of Patients with GAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashi, Mohsen; Birashk, Behrooz; Taremian, Farhad; Asgarnejad, Ali Asghar; Momtazi, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The basic objective of this study is to investigate the effects of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude increase in occipital area on reducing the severity of symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder and to increase the global functioning level in patients with GAD. This study is a quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test with two groups. For this purpose, 28 patients who had been referred to Sohrawardi psychiatric and clinical psychology center in Zanjan were studied based on the interview with the psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and using clinical diagnostic criteria for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders text revision - the DSM-IV-TR Fourth Edition diagnosis of GAD, 14 subjects were studied in neurofeedback treatment group and 14 subjects in the waiting list group. Patients in both groups were evaluated at pre-test and post-test with General Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAFs). The treatment group received fifteen 30-minute alpha training sessions and fifteen 30-minute theta brain training sessions in occipital area by neurofeedback training (treatment group). This evaluation was performed according to the treatment protocol to increase the alpha and theta waves. And no intervention was done in the waiting list group. But due to ethical issues after the completion of the study all the subjects in the waiting list group were treated. The results showed that increase of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude in occipital area in people with GAD can increase the global functioning level and can reduce symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in a treatment group, but no such change was observed in the waiting list group. Increase of alpha and theta brain waves amplitude in occipital area can be useful in the treatment of people with GAD.

  6. Grid cell firing properties vary as a function of theta phase locking preferences in the rat medial entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehren Lee Newman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Theta rhythmic fluctuations in the hippocampal-entorhinal circuit are believed to reflect rapid transitions between modes of mnemonic processing. Specifically, activity at the trough and peak of CA1 pyramidal layer theta is thought to correspond to retrieval and encoding related processing, respectively. Spatially tuned ‘grid cells’ in layers II and III of the medial entorhinal cortex preferentially spike during the trough and peak phases of theta, respectively. Such differences suggest differential involvement of these layers to the processes of retrieval and encoding. It remains unknown, however, if the properties of grid cells that spike preferentially at the trough versus the peak of theta differ systematically. Such putative differences would offer insights into the differential processing that occurs during these two phases. The goal of the present work was to contrast these types of grid cells. We found that significant functional dissociations do exist: trough locked grid cells carried more spatial information, had a higher degree of head direction tuning, and were more likely to phase precess. Thus, grid cells that activate during the putative retrieval phase of theta (trough have a greater degree of location, orientation and temporal tuning specificity relative to grid cells that activate during the putative encoding phase (peak, potentially reflecting the influence of the retrieved content. Additionally, trough locked grid cells had a lower average firing rate, were more likely to burst, and were less phase locked to high-gamma (~80 Hz. Further analyses revealed they had different waveforms profiles and that systemic blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reduced the spatial tuning of both types, although these differences were only significant for the peak locked grid cells. These differences suggest that trough and peak locked grid cells are distinct populations of neurons.

  7. A theory of alpha/theta neurofeedback, creative performance enhancement, long distance functional connectivity and psychological integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzelier, John

    2009-02-01

    Professionally significant enhancement of music and dance performance and mood has followed training with an EEG-neurofeedback protocol which increases the ratio of theta to alpha waves using auditory feedback with eyes closed. While originally the protocol was designed to induce hypnogogia, a state historically associated with creativity, the outcome was psychological integration, while subsequent applications focusing on raising the theta-alpha ratio, reduced depression and anxiety in alcoholism and resolved post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD). In optimal performance studies we confirmed associations with creativity in musical performance, but effects also included technique and communication. We extended efficacy to dance and social anxiety. Diversity of outcome has a counterpart in wide ranging associations between theta oscillations and behaviour in cognitive and affective neuroscience: in animals with sensory-motor activity in exploration, effort, working memory, learning, retention and REM sleep; in man with meditative concentration, reduced anxiety and sympathetic autonomic activation, as well as task demands in virtual spatial navigation, focussed and sustained attention, working and recognition memory, and having implications for synaptic plasticity and long term potentiation. Neuroanatomical circuitry involves the ascending mescencephalic-cortical arousal system, and limbic circuits subserving cognitive as well as affective/motivational functions. Working memory and meditative bliss, representing cognitive and affective domains, respectively, involve coupling between frontal and posterior cortices, exemplify a role for theta and alpha waves in mediating the interaction between distal and widely distributed connections. It is posited that this mediation in part underpins the integrational attributes of alpha-theta training in optimal performance and psychotherapy, creative associations in hypnogogia, and enhancement of technical, communication and

  8. Improper Riemann integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Roussos, Ioannis Markos

    2013-01-01

    Improper Riemann Integrals is the first book to collect classical and modern material on the subject for undergraduate students. The book gives students the prerequisites and tools to understand the convergence, principal value, and evaluation of the improper/generalized Riemann integral. It also illustrates applications to science and engineering problems.The book contains the necessary background, theorems, and tools, along with two lists of the most important integrals and sums computed in the text. Numerous examples at various levels of difficulty illustrate the concepts and theorems. The

  9. 5. Enter Bernhard Riemann

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. Geometry Enter Bernhard Riemann. Kapil H Paranjape. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 33-40. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/06/0033-0040. Author Affiliations.

  10. Riemann and Theoretical Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. Riemann and Theoretical Physics. Joseph Samuel. General Article Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 56-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/11/0056-0060. Keywords.

  11. The Riemann Hypothesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. The Riemann Hypothesis. Renuka Ravindran. General Article Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 40-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/11/0040-0047 ...

  12. Riemann-Stieltjes Integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narita Keiko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the definitions and basic properties of Riemann-Stieltjes integral are formalized in Mizar [1]. In the first section, we showed the preliminary definition. We proved also some properties of finite sequences of real numbers. In Sec. 2, we defined variation. Using the definition, we also defined bounded variation and total variation, and proved theorems about related properties.

  13. Spectral analysis and the Riemann hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaud, Gilles

    2003-11-01

    The explicit formulas of Riemann and Guinand-Weil relate the set of prime numbers with the set of nontrivial zeros of the zeta function of Riemann. We recall Alain Connes' spectral interpretation of the critical zeros of the Riemann zeta function as eigenvalues of the absorption spectrum of an unbounded operator in a suitable Hilbert space. We then give a spectral interpretation of the zeros of the Dedekind zeta function of an algebraic number field K of degree n in an automorphic setting. If K is a complex quadratic field, the torical forms are the functions defined on the modular surface X, such that the sum of this function over the "Gauss set" of K is zero, and Eisenstein series provide such torical forms. In the case of a general number field, one can associate to K a maximal torus T of the general linear group G. The torical forms are the functions defined on the modular variety X associated to G, such that the integral over the subvariety induced by T is zero. Alternately, the torical forms are the functions which are orthogonal to orbital series on X. We show here that the Riemann hypothesis is equivalent to certain conditions bearing on spaces of torical forms, constructed from Eisenstein series, the torical wave packets. Furthermore, we define a Hilbert space and a self-adjoint operator on this space, whose spectrum equals the set of critical zeros of the Dedekind zeta function of K.

  14. The Riemann-Hurwitz formula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, F.

    2016-01-01

    Let ϕ : S → T be a surjective holomorphic map between compact Riemann surfaces. There is a formula relating the various invariants involved: the genus of S, the genus of T, the degree of ϕ and the amount of ramification. Riemann used this formula in case T has genus zero. Contemporaries referred to

  15. Functional role of delta and theta band oscillations for auditory feedback processing during vocal pitch motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Ibrahim, Nadine; Korzyukov, Oleg; Robin, Donald A; Larson, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    The answer to the question of how the brain incorporates sensory feedback and links it with motor function to achieve goal-directed movement during vocalization remains unclear. We investigated the mechanisms of voice pitch motor control by examining the spectro-temporal dynamics of EEG signals when non-musicians (NM), relative pitch (RP), and absolute pitch (AP) musicians maintained vocalizations of a vowel sound and received randomized ± 100 cents pitch-shift stimuli in their auditory feedback. We identified a phase-synchronized (evoked) fronto-central activation within the theta band (5-8 Hz) that temporally overlapped with compensatory vocal responses to pitch-shifted auditory feedback and was significantly stronger in RP and AP musicians compared with non-musicians. A second component involved a non-phase-synchronized (induced) frontal activation within the delta band (1-4 Hz) that emerged at approximately 1 s after the stimulus onset. The delta activation was significantly stronger in the NM compared with RP and AP groups and correlated with the pitch rebound error (PRE), indicating the degree to which subjects failed to re-adjust their voice pitch to baseline after the stimulus offset. We propose that the evoked theta is a neurophysiological marker of enhanced pitch processing in musicians and reflects mechanisms by which humans incorporate auditory feedback to control their voice pitch. We also suggest that the delta activation reflects adaptive neural processes by which vocal production errors are monitored and used to update the state of sensory-motor networks for driving subsequent vocal behaviors. This notion is corroborated by our findings showing that larger PREs were associated with greater delta band activity in the NM compared with RP and AP groups. These findings provide new insights into the neural mechanisms of auditory feedback processing for vocal pitch motor control.

  16. Functional role of delta and theta band oscillations for auditory feedback processing during vocal pitch motor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh eBehroozmand

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The answer to the question of how the brain incorporates sensory feedback and links it with motor function to achieve goal-directed movement during vocalization remains unclear. We investigated the mechanisms of voice pitch motor control by examining the spectro-temporal dynamics of EEG signals when non-musicians (NM, relative pitch (RP and absolute pitch (AP musicians maintained vocalizations of a vowel sound and received randomized ±100 cents pitch-shift stimuli in their auditory feedback. We identified a phase-synchronized (evoked fronto-central activation within the theta band (5-8 Hz that temporally overlapped with compensatory vocal responses to pitch-shifted auditory feedback and was significantly stronger in RP and AP musicians compared with non-musicians. A second component involved a non-phase-synchronized (induced frontal activation within the delta band (1-4 Hz that emerged at approximately 1 second after the stimulus onset. The delta activation was significantly stronger in the NM compared with RP and AP groups and correlated with the pitch rebound error (PRE, indicating the degree to which subjects failed to re-adjust their voice pitch to baseline after the stimulus offset. We propose that the evoked theta is a neurophysiological marker of enhanced pitch processing in musicians and reflects mechanisms by which humans incorporate auditory feedback to control their voice pitch. We also suggest that the delta activation reflects adaptive neural processes by which vocal production errors are monitored and used to update the state of sensory-motor networks for driving subsequent vocal behaviors. This notion is corroborated by our findings showing that larger PREs were associated with greater delta band activity in the NM compared with RP and AP groups. These findings provide new insights into the neural mechanisms of auditory feedback processing for vocal pitch motor control.

  17. DOES THE INFERIOR FRONTAL SULCUS PLAY A FUNCTIONAL ROLE IN DECEPTION? A NEURONAVIGATED THETA-BURST TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eVerschuere

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activated during deception paradigms. This led to the hypothesis that the inferior frontal region is the neural substrate critically involved in withholding the truth. Objective. We critically examine the functional necessity of the inferior frontal region in withholding the truth during deception. Method. We experimentally manipulated the neural activity level in right inferior frontal sulcus (IFS by means of neuronavigated continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS. Individual structural magnetic resonance brain images (MRI were used to allow precise stimulation in each participant. Twenty-six participants answered autobiographical questions truthfully or deceptively before and after sham and real cTBS. Results. Deception was reliably associated with more errors, longer and more variable response times than truth telling. Despite the potential role of IFS in deception as suggested by neuroimaging data, the cTBS-induced disruption of right IFS did not affect response times or error rates, when compared to sham stimulation. Conclusions. The present findings do not support the hypothesis that the right inferior frontal sulcus is critically involved in deception.

  18. Partial difference equations arising from the Cauchy-Riemann equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haruki

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider some functional equations arising from the Cauchy-Riemann equations, and certain related functional equations. First we propose a new functional equation (E.1 below, over a $2$-divisible Abelian group, which is a discrete version of the Cauchy-Riemann equations, and give the general solutions of (E.1. Next we study a functional equation which is equivalent to (E.1. Further we propose and solve partial difference-differential functional equations and nonsymmetric partial difference equations which are also arising from the Cauchy--Riemann equations. [ f(x+t,y- f(x-t,y = - i [f(x,y+t- f(x,y-t].    (E.1

  19. Differential downstream functions of protein kinase Ceta and -theta in EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, M S; Kang, B S; Luu, D; Wickham, J T; Sando, J J; Hahn, C S

    1998-10-16

    Sensitive EL4 mouse thymoma cells (s-EL4) respond to phorbol esters with growth inhibition, adherence to substrate, and production of cytokines including interleukin 2. Since these cells express several of the phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, the function of each isozyme remains unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that s-EL4 cells expressed substantially more PKCeta and PKCtheta than did EL4 cells resistant to phorbol esters (r-EL4). To examine potential roles for PKCeta and PKCtheta in EL4 cells, wild type and constitutively active versions of the isozymes were transiently expressed using a Sindbis virus system. Expression of constitutively active PKCeta, but not PKCtheta, in s- and r-EL4 cells altered cell morphology and cytoskeletal structure in a manner similar to that of phorbol ester treatment, suggesting a role for PKCeta in cytoskeletal organization. Prolonged treatment of s-EL4 cells with phorbol esters results in inhibition of cell cycling along with a decreased expression of most of the PKC isozymes, including PKCtheta. Introduction of virally expressed PKCtheta, but not PKCeta, overcame the inhibitory effects of the prolonged phorbol ester treatment on cell cycle progression, suggesting a possible involvement of PKCtheta in cell cycle regulation. These results support differential functions for PKCeta and PKCtheta in T cell activation.

  20. Traveling Theta Waves in the Human Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honghui

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal theta oscillation is strongly correlated with behaviors such as memory and spatial navigation, but we do not understand its specific functional role. One hint of theta's function came from the discovery in rodents that theta oscillations are traveling waves that allow parts of the hippocampus to simultaneously exhibit separate oscillatory phases. Because hippocampal theta oscillations in humans have different properties compared with rodents, we examined these signals directly using multielectrode recordings from neurosurgical patients. Our findings confirm that human hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, but also show that these oscillations appear at a broader range of frequencies compared with rodents. Human traveling waves showed a distinctive pattern of spatial propagation such that there is a consistent phase spread across the hippocampus regardless of the oscillations' frequency. This suggests that traveling theta oscillations are important functionally in humans because they coordinate phase coding throughout the hippocampus in a consistent manner. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time in humans that hippocampal theta oscillations are traveling waves, moving along the length of the hippocampus in a posterior–anterior direction. The existence of these traveling theta waves is important for understanding hippocampal neural coding because they cause neurons at separate positions in the hippocampus to experience different theta phases simultaneously. The theta phase that a neuron measures is a key factor in how that cell represents behavioral information. Therefore, the existence of traveling theta waves indicates that, to fully understand how a hippocampal neuron represents information, it is vital to also account for that cell's location in addition to conventional measures of neural activity. PMID:26354915

  1. Search for the exotic $\\Theta^+$ resonance in the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Samoylov, O; Autiero, D; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, M; Banner, M; Bassompierre, G; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A; Bunyatov, S; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, P W; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Challis, R; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R; Daniels, D; De Santo, A; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; Di Lella, L; Dignan, T; Do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, V; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, J M; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S; Godley, A; Gosset, J; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gössling, C; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hubbard, D; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C; Juget, F; Kent, N; Kirsanov, M; Klimov, O; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; La Rotonda, L; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Linssen, L; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Lyubushkin, V; Lévy, J M; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, M; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Méchain, X; Naumov, D; Nefedov, Yu; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nédélec, P; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, A; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rebuffi, L; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A; Touchard, A M; Tovey, S N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V; Vannucci, F; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P

    2007-01-01

    A search for exotic Theta baryon via Theta -> proton +Ks decay mode in the NOMAD muon neutrino DIS data is reported. The special background generation procedure was developed. The proton identification criteria are tuned to maximize the sensitivity to the Theta signal as a function of xF which allows to study the Theta production mechanism. We do not observe any evidence for the Theta state in the NOMAD data. We provide an upper limit on Theta production rate at 90% CL as 2.13 per 1000 of neutrino interactions.

  2. Extended Riemann-Liouville type fractional derivative operator with applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a class of new extended forms of the beta function, Gauss hypergeometric function and Appell-Lauricella hypergeometric functions by means of the modified Bessel function of the third kind. Some typical generating relations for these extended hypergeometric functions are obtained by defining the extension of the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative operator. Their connections with elementary functions and Fox’s H-function are also presented.

  3. Bernhard Riemann, a(rche)typical mathematical-physicist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizalde, Emilio

    2013-09-01

    The work of Bernhard Riemann is discussed under the perspective of present day mathematics and physics, and with a prospective view towards the future, too. Against the (unfortunately rather widespread) trend---which predominantly dominated national scientific societies in Europe during the last Century---of strictly classifying the work of scientists with the aim to constrain them to separated domains of knowledge, without any possible interaction among those and often even fighting against each other (and which, no doubt, was in part responsible for the decline of European in favor of American science), it will be here argued, using Riemann as a model, archetypical example, that good research transcends any classification. Its uses and applications arguably permeate all domains, subjects and disciplines one can possibly define, to the point that it can be considered to be universally useful. After providing a very concise review of the main publications of Bernhard Riemann on physical problems, some connections between Riemann's papers and contemporary physics will be considered: (i) the uses of Riemann's work on the zeta function for devising applications to the regularization of quantum field theories in curved space-time, in particular, of quantum vacuum fluctuations; (ii) the uses of the Riemann tensor in general relativity and in recent generalizations of this theory, which aim at understanding the presently observed acceleration of the universe expansion (the dark energy issue). Finally, it will be argued that mathematical physics, which was yet not long ago a model paradigm for interdisciplinary activity---and had a very important pioneering role in this sense---is now quickly being surpassed by the extraordinarily fruitful interconnections which seem to pop up from nothing every day and simultaneously involve several disciplines, in the classical sense, including genetics, combinatorics, nanoelectronics, biochemistry, medicine, and even ps

  4. De Riemann-hypothese: een miljoenenprobleem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, R.; van de Craats, J.

    2011-01-01

    De Riemann-hypothese is het belangrijkste open probleem van de wiskunde. Wie het oplost, wordt wereldberoemd en verdient bovendien de prijs van één miljoen dollar die er in het jaar 2000 voor is uitgeloofd. De Riemann-hypothese heeft te maken met de rij van de priemgetallen. Hoe liggen de

  5. Partitions of sets and the Riemann integral

    OpenAIRE

    Ungar, Š.

    2006-01-01

    We will discuss the definition of the Riemann integral using general partitions and give an elementary explication, without resorting to nets, generalized sequences and such, of what is meant by saying that "the Riemann integral is the limit of Darboux sums when the mesh of the partition approaches zero".

  6. Ice cream and orbifold Riemann-Roch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Anita; Reid, Miles; Zhou, Shengtian

    2013-06-01

    We give an orbifold Riemann-Roch formula in closed form for the Hilbert series of a quasismooth polarized n-fold (X,D), under the assumption that X is projectively Gorenstein with only isolated orbifold points. Our formula is a sum of parts each of which is integral and Gorenstein symmetric of the same canonical weight; the orbifold parts are called ice cream functions. This form of the Hilbert series is particularly useful for computer algebra, and we illustrate it on examples of {K3} surfaces and Calabi-Yau 3-folds. These results apply also with higher dimensional orbifold strata (see [1] and [2]), although the precise statements are considerably trickier. We expect to return to this in future publications.

  7. Sur un critère de Baez-Duarte pour l'hypothèse de Riemann

    OpenAIRE

    Balazard, Michel; de Roton, Anne

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Baez-Duarte reformulated the Riemann hypothesis as a statement about a Hilbert space distance, involving the integer dilations of the "fractional part" function. Under the assumption of the Riemann hypothesis, we improve on the currently known estimate for this distance.

  8. Riemann y los Números Primos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Sánchez Muñoz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available En el mes de noviembre de 1859, durante la presentación mensual de losinformes de la Academia de Berlín, el alemán Bernhard Riemann presentóun trabajo que cambiaría los designios futuros de la ciencia matemática. El tema central de su informe se centraba en los números primos, presentando el que hoy día, una vez demostrada la Conjetura de Poincaré, puede ser considerado el problema matemático abierto más importante. El presente artículo muestra en su tercera sección una traducción al castellano de dicho trabajo.

  9. Fractional Langevin equation and Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau Fa, Kwok

    2007-10-01

    In this present work we consider a fractional Langevin equation with Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivative which modifies the classical Newtonian force, nonlocal dissipative force, and long-time correlation. We investigate the first two moments, variances and position and velocity correlation functions of this system. We also compare them with the results obtained from the same fractional Langevin equation which uses the Caputo fractional derivative.

  10. Yangian Algebras and Classical Riemann Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Khoroshkin, S.; Lebedev, D.; Pakuliak, S.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate different Hopf algebras associated to Yang's solution of quantum Yang-Baxter equation. It is shown that for the precise definition of the algebra one needs the commutation relations for the deformed algebra of formal currents and the specialization of the Riemann problem for the currents. Two different Riemann problems are considered. They lead to the central extended Yangian double associated with ${sl}_2$ and to the degeneration of scaling limit of elliptic affine algebra. Un...

  11. Learning alters theta amplitude, theta-gamma coupling and neuronal synchronization in inferotemporal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol Alister U

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How oscillatory brain rhythms alone, or in combination, influence cortical information processing to support learning has yet to be fully established. Local field potential and multi-unit neuronal activity recordings were made from 64-electrode arrays in the inferotemporal cortex of conscious sheep during and after visual discrimination learning of face or object pairs. A neural network model has been developed to simulate and aid functional interpretation of learning-evoked changes. Results Following learning the amplitude of theta (4-8 Hz, but not gamma (30-70 Hz oscillations was increased, as was the ratio of theta to gamma. Over 75% of electrodes showed significant coupling between theta phase and gamma amplitude (theta-nested gamma. The strength of this coupling was also increased following learning and this was not simply a consequence of increased theta amplitude. Actual discrimination performance was significantly correlated with theta and theta-gamma coupling changes. Neuronal activity was phase-locked with theta but learning had no effect on firing rates or the magnitude or latencies of visual evoked potentials during stimuli. The neural network model developed showed that a combination of fast and slow inhibitory interneurons could generate theta-nested gamma. By increasing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor sensitivity in the model similar changes were produced as in inferotemporal cortex after learning. The model showed that these changes could potentiate the firing of downstream neurons by a temporal desynchronization of excitatory neuron output without increasing the firing frequencies of the latter. This desynchronization effect was confirmed in IT neuronal activity following learning and its magnitude was correlated with discrimination performance. Conclusions Face discrimination learning produces significant increases in both theta amplitude and the strength of theta-gamma coupling in the inferotemporal cortex

  12. On Hermite-Hadamard Type Inequalities for Riemann-Liouville Fractional Integrals via Two Kinds of Convexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain some Hermite-Hadamard type inequalities for products of two m-convex functions via Riemann-Liouville integrals. The analogous results for (α,m-convex functions are also established.

  13. Improvement of language functions in a chronic non-fluent post-stroke aphasic patient following bilateral sequential theta burst magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuksanović, Jasmina; Jelić, Milan B; Milanović, Sladjan D; Kačar, Katarina; Konstantinović, Ljubica; Filipović, Saša R

    2015-01-01

    In chronic non-fluent aphasia patients, inhibition of the intact right hemisphere (RH), by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or similar methods, can induce improvement in language functions. The supposed mechanism behind this improvement is a release of preserved left hemisphere (LH) language networks from RH transcallosal inhibition. Direct stimulation of the damaged LH can sometimes bring similar results too. Therefore, we developed a novel treatment approach that combined direct LH (Broca's area (BA)) stimulation, by intermittent theta burst stimulation (TBS), with homologue RH area's inhibition, by continuous TBS. We present the results of application of 15 daily sessions of the described treatment approach in a right-handed patient with chronic post-stroke non-fluent aphasia. The intervention appeared to improve several language functions, but most notably propositional speech, semantic fluency, short-term verbal memory, and verbal learning. Bilateral TBS modulation of activation of the language-related areas of both hemispheres seems to be a feasible and promising way to induce recovery in chronic aphasic patients. Due to potentially cumulative physiological effects of bilateral stimulation, the improvements may be even greater than following unilateral interventions.

  14. Functional neuroimaging of post-mortem tissue: lithium-pilocarpine seized rats express reduced brain mass and proportional reductions of left ventral cerebral theta spectral power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Rouleau

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural imaging tools can be used to identify neuropathology in post-mortem tissue whereas functional imaging tools including quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG are thought to be restricted for use in living subjects. We are not aware of any study which has used electrophysiological methods decades after death to infer pathology. We therefore attempted to discriminate between chemically preserved brains which had incurred electrical seizures and those that did not using functional imaging. Our data indicate that modified QEEG technology involving needle electrodes embedded within chemically fixed neural tissue can be used to discriminate pathology. Forty (n = 40 rat brains preserved in ethanol-formalin-acetic acid (EFA were probed by needle electrodes inserted into the dorsal and ventral components of the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Raw microvolt potentials were converted to spectral power densities within classical electroencephalographic frequency bands (1.5 Hz to 40 Hz. Brain mass differences were shown to scale with left hemispheric ventral theta-band spectral power densities in lithium-pilocarpine seized rats. This relationship was not observed in non-seized rats. A conspicuous absence of pathological indicators within dorsal regions as inferred by microvolt fluctuations was expected given the known localization of post-ictal damage in lithium-pilocarpine seized rats. Together, the data demonstrate that post-mortem neuroimaging is both possible and potentially useful as a means to identify neuropathology without structural imaging techniques or dissection.

  15. On the equivalence of two fundamental theta identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornwinder, T.H.

    2014-01-01

    Two fundamental theta identities, a three-term identity due to Weierstrass and a five-term identity due to Jacobi, both with products of four theta functions as terms, are shown to be equivalent. One half of the equivalence was already proved by R. J. Chapman in 1996. The history and usage of the

  16. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, Tino; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE) and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group) or the vertex (SHAM group). Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  17. Reversed Effects of Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation following Motor Training That Vary as a Function of Training-Induced Changes in Corticospinal Excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Stöckel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS has the potential to enhance corticospinal excitability (CSE and subsequent motor learning. However, the effects of iTBS following motor learning are unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of iTBS on CSE and performance following motor learning. Therefore twenty-four healthy participants practiced a ballistic motor task for a total of 150 movements. iTBS was subsequently applied to the trained motor cortex (STIM group or the vertex (SHAM group. Performance and CSE were assessed before motor learning and before and after iTBS. Training significantly increased performance and CSE in both groups. In STIM group participants, subsequent iTBS significantly reduced motor performance with smaller reductions in CSE. CSE changes as a result of motor learning were negatively correlated with both the CSE changes and performance changes as a result of iTBS. No significant effects of iTBS were found for SHAM group participants. We conclude that iTBS has the potential to degrade prior motor learning as a function of training-induced CSE changes. That means the expected LTP-like effects of iTBS are reversed following motor learning.

  18. Improvement of spasticity following intermittent theta burst stimulation in multiple sclerosis is associated with modulation of resting-state functional connectivity of the primary motor cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutière, Clémence; Rey, Caroline; Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Le Troter, Arnaud; Rico, Audrey; Crespy, Lydie; Achard, Sophie; Reuter, Françoise; Pariollaud, Fanelly; Wirsich, Jonathan; Asquinazi, Patrick; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Soulier, Elisabeth; Guye, Maxime; Pelletier, Jean; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Audoin, Bertrand

    2017-05-01

    Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) of the primary motor cortex improves transiently lower limbs spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the cerebral mechanisms underlying this effect have never been investigated. To assess whether modulation of spasticity induced by iTBS is underlined by functional reorganization of the primary motor cortices. A total of 17 patients with MS suffering from lower limbs spasticity were randomized to receive real iTBS or sham iTBS during the first half of a 5-week indoor rehabilitation programme. Spasticity was assessed using the Modified Ashworth Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale at baseline, after the stimulation session and at the end of the rehabilitation programme. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed at the three time points, and brain functional networks topology was analysed using graph-theoretical approach. At the end of stimulation, improvement of spasticity was greater in real iTBS group than in sham iTBS group ( p = 0.026). iTBS had a significant effect on the balance of the connectivity degree between the stimulated and the homologous primary motor cortex ( p = 0.005). Changes in inter-hemispheric balance were correlated with improvement of spasticity (rho = 0.56, p = 0.015). This longitudinal resting-state fMRI study evidences that functional reorganization of the primary motor cortices may underlie the effect of iTBS on spasticity in MS.

  19. Mapping the after-effects of theta burst stimulation on the human auditory cortex with functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Jamila; Zatorre, Robert J

    2012-09-12

    Auditory cortex pertains to the processing of sound, which is at the basis of speech or music-related processing. However, despite considerable recent progress, the functional properties and lateralization of the human auditory cortex are far from being fully understood. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that can transiently or lastingly modulate cortical excitability via the application of localized magnetic field pulses, and represents a unique method of exploring plasticity and connectivity. It has only recently begun to be applied to understand auditory cortical function. An important issue in using TMS is that the physiological consequences of the stimulation are difficult to establish. Although many TMS studies make the implicit assumption that the area targeted by the coil is the area affected, this need not be the case, particularly for complex cognitive functions which depend on interactions across many brain regions. One solution to this problem is to combine TMS with functional Magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The idea here is that fMRI will provide an index of changes in brain activity associated with TMS. Thus, fMRI would give an independent means of assessing which areas are affected by TMS and how they are modulated. In addition, fMRI allows the assessment of functional connectivity, which represents a measure of the temporal coupling between distant regions. It can thus be useful not only to measure the net activity modulation induced by TMS in given locations, but also the degree to which the network properties are affected by TMS, via any observed changes in functional connectivity. Different approaches exist to combine TMS and functional imaging according to the temporal order of the methods. Functional MRI can be applied before, during, after, or both before and after TMS. Recently, some studies interleaved TMS and fMRI in order to provide online mapping of the functional changes induced by TMS. However, this

  20. Henstock integral and Dini-Riemann theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Rao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In [5] an analogue of the classical Dini-Riemann theorem related to non-absolutely convergent series of real number is obtained for the Lebesgue improper integral. Here we are extending it to the case of the Henstock integral.

  1. Impact of Riemann's Work on Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. Impact of Riemann's Work on Physics. Joseph Samuel. Article-in-a-Box Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 5-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/11/0005-0005 ...

  2. The effects of continuous theta burst stimulation to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on executive function, food cravings, and snack food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Cassandra J; Hall, Peter A; Staines, William R

    2014-09-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that executive function (EF) strength is positively associated with dietary self-control. As such, the differential operation of the brain centers underlying EFs (i.e., dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]) may explain controlled aspects of dietary self-control. The present study was designed to examine the causal relationship between DLPFC function and two aspects of dietary self-control: visceral cravings and actual consumptive behaviors. The research was conducted using a within-participant design. A sample of 21 healthy female young adults aged 19 to 26 years (mean [M; standard deviation] = 21.10 [1.86] years) received both active and sham continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) to the left DLPFC. Before and after each session, subjective food cravings were assessed using the Food Craving Questionnaire-State. After each stimulation session, participants competed three measures of EF (Stroop, Go/No-Go, and Stop-Signal) and a bogus taste test. Participants reported larger increases in snack food cravings after active stimulation (M = 9.98% change, standard error [SE] = 0.45) than after sham stimulation (M = -3.46, SE = 0.39, p = .012) on the reinforcement anticipation dimension of Food Craving Questionnaire-State. Likewise, participants consumed significantly more snack foods after active stimulation (M = 70.62 grams, SE = 5.17) than after sham stimulation (M = 61.33, SE = 3.56, p = .006). Finally, performance on the Stroop task was reduced more after active (M = 71.56 milliseconds, SE = 25.18) than after sham stimulation (M = 20.16, SE = 13.32, p = .033); reduction in Stroop performance mediated the effect of active stimulation on increased appetitive food consumption. These results support the contention that EF strength, as modulated by DLPFC activity, is causally associated with effective dietary self-control.

  3. The Virasoro vertex algebra and factorization algebras on Riemann surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian

    2017-12-01

    This paper focuses on the connection of holomorphic two-dimensional factorization algebras and vertex algebras which has been made precise in the forthcoming book of Costello-Gwilliam. We provide a construction of the Virasoro vertex algebra starting from a local Lie algebra on the complex plane. Moreover, we discuss an extension of this factorization algebra to a factorization algebra on the category of Riemann surfaces. The factorization homology of this factorization algebra is computed as the correlation functions. We provide an example of how the Virasoro factorization algebra implements conformal symmetry of the beta-gamma system using the method of effective BV quantization.

  4. Essentially Small Riemann Sums Fungsi Terintegral Henstock-dunford Pada [A,b

    OpenAIRE

    Solikhin; Sumanto, Y.D; Khabibah, Siti

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study Henstock-Dunford integral on [a,b]. We discuss some properties of the integrable. We shall define essentially small Riemann sums (ESRS) and show that it is necessary and sufficient condition for function to be Henstock-Dunford integral on [a,b].

  5. Hippocampal theta (3-8Hz) activity during classical eyeblink conditioning in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokia, Miriam S; Penttonen, Markku; Korhonen, Tapani; Wikgren, Jan

    2008-07-01

    In 1978, Berry and Thompson showed that the amount of theta (3-8Hz) activity in the spontaneous hippocampal EEG predicted learning rate in subsequent eyeblink conditioning in rabbits. More recently, the absence of theta activity during the training trial has been shown to have a detrimental effect on learning rate. Here, we aimed to further explore the relationship between theta activity and classical eyeblink conditioning by determining how the relative power of hippocampal theta activity [theta/(theta+delta) ratio] changes during both unpaired control and paired training phases. We found that animals with a higher hippocampal theta ratio immediately before conditioning learned faster and also that in these animals the theta ratio was higher throughout both experimental phases. In fact, while the hippocampal theta ratio remained stable in the fast learners as a function of training, it decreased in the slow learners already during unpaired training. In addition, the presence of hippocampal theta activity enhanced the hippocampal model of the conditioned response (CR) and seemed to be beneficial for CR performance in terms of peak latency during conditioning, but did not have any effect when the animals showed asymptotic learning. Together with earlier findings, these results imply that the behavioral state in which hippocampal theta activity is absent is detrimental for learning, and that the behavioral state in which hippocampal theta activity dominates is beneficial for learning, at least before a well-learned state is achieved.

  6. Fractional diffusion equation with a generalized Riemann-Liouville time fractional derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandev, Trifce [Radiation Safety Directorate, Partizanski odredi 143, PO Box 22, 1020 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Metzler, Ralf [Department of Physics, Technical University of Munich, James Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany); Tomovski, Zivorad, E-mail: trifce.sandev@drs.gov.mk, E-mail: metz@ph.tum.de, E-mail: tomovski@pmf.ukim.mk [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Institute of Mathematics, Saints Cyril and Methodius University, 1000 Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of)

    2011-06-24

    In this paper, the solution of a fractional diffusion equation with a Hilfer-generalized Riemann-Liouville time fractional derivative is obtained in terms of Mittag-Leffler-type functions and Fox's H-function. The considered equation represents a quite general extension of the classical diffusion (heat conduction) equation. The methods of separation of variables, Laplace transform, and analysis of the Sturm-Liouville problem are used to solve the fractional diffusion equation defined in a bounded domain. By using the Fourier-Laplace transform method, it is shown that the fundamental solution of the fractional diffusion equation with a generalized Riemann-Liouville time fractional derivative defined in the infinite domain can be expressed via Fox's H-function. It is shown that the corresponding solutions of the diffusion equations with time fractional derivative in the Caputo and Riemann-Liouville sense are special cases of those diffusion equations with the Hilfer-generalized Riemann-Liouville time fractional derivative. The asymptotic behaviour of the solutions are found for large values of the spatial variable. The fractional moments of the fundamental solution of the fractional diffusion equation are obtained. The obtained results are relevant in the context of glass relaxation and aquifer problems.

  7. Riemann-Hilbert problem and the discrete Bessel kernel

    OpenAIRE

    Borodin, Alexei

    1999-01-01

    We use discrete analogs of Riemann-Hilbert problem's methods to derive the discrete Bessel kernel which describes the poissonized Plancherel measures for symmetric groups. To do this we define discrete analogs of a Riemann-Hilbert problem and of an integrable integral operator and show that computing the resolvent of a discrete integrable operator can be reduced to solving a corresponding discrete Riemann-Hilbert problem. We also give an example, explicitly solvable in terms of classical spec...

  8. Impairment of cognitive function and synaptic plasticity associated with alteration of information flow in theta and gamma oscillations in melamine-treated rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaxia Xu

    Full Text Available Changes of neural oscillations at a variety of physiological rhythms are effectively associated with cognitive performance. The present study investigated whether the directional indices of neural information flow (NIF could be used to symbolize the synaptic plasticity impairment in hippocampal CA3-CA1 network in a rat model of melamine. Male Wistar rats were employed while melamine was administered at a dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. Behavior was measured by the Morris water maze(MWMtest. Local field potentials (LFPs were recorded before long-term potentiation (LTP induction. Generalized partial directed coherence (gPDC and phase-amplitude coupling conditional mutual information (PAC_CMI were used to measure the unidirectional indices in both theta and low gamma oscillations (LG, ~ 30-50 Hz. Our results showed that melamine induced the cognition deficits consistent with the reduced LTP in CA1 area. Phase locking values (PLVs showed that the synchronization between CA3 and CA1 in both theta and LG rhythms was reduced by melamine. In both theta and LG rhythms, unidirectional indices were significantly decreased in melamine treated rats while a similar variation trend was observed in LTP reduction, implying that the effects of melamine on cognitive impairment were possibly mediated via profound alterations of NIF on CA3-CA1 pathway in hippocampus. The results suggested that LFPs activities at these rhythms were most likely involved in determining the alterations of information flow in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 network, which might be associated with the alteration of synaptic transmission to some extent.

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guillardia theta [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available illardia_theta_S.png Guillardia_theta_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+the...ta&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=60 ...

  10. Gaussian curvature on hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Let be a compact Riemann surface of genus g ≥ 1 , 1 , … , g be a basis of holomorphic 1-forms on and let H = ( h i j ) i , j = 1 g be a positive definite Hermitian matrix. It is well known that the metric defined as d s H 2 = ∑ i , j = 1 g h i j i ⊗ j ¯ is a K\\"a hler metric on of non-positive curvature. Let K H : C → R be ...

  11. Search for Theta+ at CLAS in gamma n ---> Theta+ K-.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.A. Baltzell; D.J. Tedeschi

    2006-06-01

    The existence of pentaquarks is being studied in recent experiments at Jefferson Lab. This analysis investigates the reaction gamma d --> Theta^+K^-(p) with the Theta^+ decaying to pK^0. Produced with a tagged photon beam of endpoint energy 3.6 GeV incident on a 24 cm liquid deuterium target, the pK^0_sK^-(p) final state is measured exclusively. With well defined strangeness and no neutral meson background, this channel is an important place to look for the Theta^+. However, it contains large contributions from hyperons produced via gamma n --> Y*K^0, and the effects of mesons are also present in the K^0K^- system. The current focus is on understanding these backgrounds.

  12. Early history of the Riemann Hypothesis in positive characteristic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, F.; Schappacher, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The classical Riemann Hypothesis RH is among the most prominent unsolved problems in modern mathematics. The development of Number Theory in the 19th century spawned an arithmetic theory of polynomials over finite fields in which an analogue of the Riemann Hypothesis suggested itself. We describe

  13. A Riemann problem with small viscosity and dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayyunnapara Thomas Joseph

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we prove existence of global solutions to a hyperbolic system in elastodynamics, with small viscosity and dispersion terms and derive estimates uniform in the viscosity-dispersion parameters. By passing to the limit, we prove the existence of solution the Riemann problem for the hyperbolic system with arbitrary Riemann data.

  14. Riemann curvature of a boosted spacetime geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Emmanuele; Esposito, Giampiero; Scudellaro, Paolo; Tramontano, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The ultrarelativistic boosting procedure had been applied in the literature to map the metric of Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime into a metric describing de Sitter spacetime plus a shock-wave singularity located on a null hypersurface. This paper evaluates the Riemann curvature tensor of the boosted Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric by means of numerical calculations, which make it possible to reach the ultrarelativistic regime gradually by letting the boost velocity approach the speed of light. Thus, for the first time in the literature, the singular limit of curvature, through Dirac’s δ distribution and its derivatives, is numerically evaluated for this class of spacetimes. Moreover, the analysis of the Kretschmann invariant and the geodesic equation shows that the spacetime possesses a “scalar curvature singularity” within a 3-sphere and it is possible to define what we here call “boosted horizon”, a sort of elastic wall where all particles are surprisingly pushed away, as numerical analysis demonstrates. This seems to suggest that such “boosted geometries” are ruled by a sort of “antigravity effect” since all geodesics seem to refuse to enter the “boosted horizon” and are “reflected” by it, even though their initial conditions are aimed at driving the particles toward the “boosted horizon” itself. Eventually, the equivalence with the coordinate shift method is invoked in order to demonstrate that all δ2 terms appearing in the Riemann curvature tensor give vanishing contribution in distributional sense.

  15. Theta variation and spatiotemporal scaling along the septotemporal axis of the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren L Long

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal theta has been related to locomotor speed, attention, anxiety, sensorimotor integration and memory among other emergent phenomena. One difficulty in understanding the function of theta is that the hippocampus (HPC modulates voluntary behavior at the same time that it processes sensory input. Both functions are correlated with characteristic changes in theta indices. The current review highlights a series of studies examining theta local field potential (LFP signals across the septotemporal or longitudinal axis of the HPC. While the theta signal is coherent throughout the entirety of the HPC, the amplitude, but not the frequency, of theta varies significantly across its three-dimensional expanse. We suggest that the theta signal offers a rich vein of information about how distributed neuronal ensembles support emergent function. Further, we speculate that emergent function across the long axis varies with respect to spatiotemporal scale. Thus, septal hippocampus processes details of the proximal spatiotemporal environment while more temporal aspects process larger spaces and wider time-scales. The degree to which emergent functions are supported by the synchronization of theta across the septotemporal axis is an open question. Our working model is that theta synchrony serves to bind ensembles representing varying resolutions of spatiotemporal information at interdependent septotemporal areas of the HPC. Such synchrony and cooperative interactions along the septotemporal axis likely support memory formation and subsequent consolidation and retrieval.

  16. Transformation optics with artificial Riemann sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Chen, Huanyang

    2013-11-01

    The two original versions of ‘invisibility’ cloaks (Leonhardt 2006 Science 312 1777-80 and Pendry et al 2006 Science 312 1780-2) show perfect cloaking but require unphysical singularities in material properties. A non-Euclidean version of cloaking (Leonhardt 2009 Science 323 110-12) was later presented to address these problems, using a very complicated non-Euclidean geometry. In this work, we combine the two original approaches to transformation optics into a more general concept: transformation optics with artificial Riemann sheets. Our method is straightforward and can be utilized to design new kinds of cloaks that can work not only in the realm of geometric optics but also using wave optics. The physics behind this design is similar to that of the conformal cloak for waves. The resonances in the interior region make the phase delay disappear and induce the cloaking effect. Numerical simulations confirm our theoretical results.

  17. From Riemann to differential geometry and relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, Athanase; Yamada, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the work of Bernhard Riemann and its impact on mathematics, philosophy and physics. It features contributions from a range of fields, historical expositions, and selected research articles that were motivated by Riemann’s ideas and demonstrate their timelessness. The editors are convinced of the tremendous value of going into Riemann’s work in depth, investigating his original ideas, integrating them into a broader perspective, and establishing ties with modern science and philosophy. Accordingly, the contributors to this volume are mathematicians, physicists, philosophers and historians of science. The book offers a unique resource for students and researchers in the fields of mathematics, physics and philosophy, historians of science, and more generally to a wide range of readers interested in the history of ideas.

  18. Particle tracks fitted on the Riemann sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Strandlie, A; Frühwirth, R; Lillekjendlie, B

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel method of fitting trajectories of charged particles in high-energy physics particle detectors. The method fits a circular arc to two-dimensional measurements by mapping the measurements onto the Riemann sphere and fitting a plane to the transformed coordinates of the measurements. In this way, the non- linear task of circle fitting, which in general requires the application of some iterative procedure, is turned into a linear problem which can be solved in a fast, direct and non-iterative manner. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach by stating results from two simulation experiments of tracks from the ATLAS Inner Detector Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT). The first experiment shows that with a significantly lower execution time, the accuracy of the estimated track parameters is virtually as good as the accuracy obtained by applying an optimal, non-linear least- squares procedure. The second experiment focuses on track parameter estimation in the presence of ambiguous measurements....

  19. Alpha Theta Meditation: Phenomenological, neurophysiologic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this investigation was to record a small group of participants' experiences of a single session of an alpha theta meditation with special reference to its influence on perceptions of mindfulness and mood. An integral approach, with mixed qualitative and quantitative methodology was adopted. Qualitative research ...

  20. Role of Riemann's and Goldbach's hypotheses in the behaviour of complex systems: Introduction to the concept of "Sciances"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Méhauté, A.; Tayurskii, D.

    2012-11-01

    The authors have already established a bi univocal correspondence between Riemann zeta functions and dynamic processes under the control of integro-differential operator of non-integer complex order. We recall that the Riemann zeta function can then be related to hyperbolic geodesics whose angles at the boundary are determined by the real part of the power laws that define the Riemann series. It is suggested that Riemann's conjecture can be reduced to a geometrical phase transition with a reduction of the parameter of order resulting from the combination of a pair symmetries associated with a quasi-self similarity of geodetics. The well-known relationship with the set of prime numbers must be considered as the result of the local existence of stationary 'state' in the dynamics. The work is focused on the 'non stationary' behaviour of Riemann zeta function. It is shown that the main characteristic of the dynamics of complex systems may be associated to a hybridizing between a pair of states and/or processes able to give a geometrical status to the concept of the time and equally to the concept of energy. It is based on the mirror properties of complementary zeta function. It is shown also that the set of prime numbers, which controls the transitions between 'states', is the simplest form of the complexity. This analysis suggests the existence of a mathematical relationship between Riemann's and Goldbach's hypothesis. Such relationship would be the base of an extension of the principles of the science for the analysis of the complexity. According to previous proposal we name this extension that enlarges the principles of the science : sciance with 'a'.

  1. The Grothendieck-Riemann-Roch theorem for group scheme actions

    OpenAIRE

    Koeck, B.

    1998-01-01

    Let G be a group or a group scheme. We establish formulas for the equivariant Euler characteristic of locally free G-modules on a projective G-scheme X: We prove an Adams- Riemann-Roch theorem and, under a certain continuity assumption for the push-forward map, a Grothendieck-Riemann- Roch theorem in (higher) equivariant algebraic K-theory. Furthermore, we present the following applications: The Adams-Riemann-Roch theorem specializes to an interchanging rule between Adams operations and induc...

  2. Frontal Midline Theta Oscillations during Working Memory Maintenance and Episodic Encoding and Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Liang-Tien; Ranganath, Charan

    2013-01-01

    Neural oscillations in the theta band (4-8 Hz) are prominent in the human electroencephalogram (EEG), and many recent electrophysiological studies in animals and humans have implicated scalp-recorded frontal midline theta (FMT) in working memory and episodic memory encoding and retrieval processes. However, the functional significance of theta oscillations in human memory processes remains largely unknown. Here, we review studies in human and animals examining how scalp-recorded FMT relates t...

  3. Quantum mechanical potentials related to the prime numbers and Riemann zeros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumayer, Dániel; van Zyl, Brandon P; Hutchinson, David A W

    2008-11-01

    Prime numbers are the building blocks of our arithmetic; however, their distribution still poses fundamental questions. Riemann showed that the distribution of primes could be given explicitly if one knew the distribution of the nontrivial zeros of the Riemann zeta(s) function. According to the Hilbert-Pólya conjecture, there exists a Hermitian operator of which the eigenvalues coincide with the real parts of the nontrivial zeros of zeta(s) . This idea has encouraged physicists to examine the properties of such possible operators, and they have found interesting connections between the distribution of zeros and the distribution of energy eigenvalues of quantum systems. We apply the Marchenko approach to construct potentials with energy eigenvalues equal to the prime numbers and to the zeros of the zeta(s) function. We demonstrate the multifractal nature of these potentials by measuring the Rényi dimension of their graphs. Our results offer hope for further analytical progress.

  4. A Modified Groundwater Flow Model Using the Space Time Riemann-Liouville Fractional Derivatives Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdon Atangana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of uncertainty in groundwater hydrology is of great importance as it is known to result in misleading output when neglected or not properly accounted for. In this paper we examine this effect in groundwater flow models. To achieve this, we first introduce the uncertainties functions u as function of time and space. The function u accounts for the lack of knowledge or variability of the geological formations in which flow occur (aquifer in time and space. We next make use of Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives that were introduced by Kobelev and Romano in 2000 and its approximation to modify the standard version of groundwater flow equation. Some properties of the modified Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative approximation are presented. The classical model for groundwater flow, in the case of density-independent flow in a uniform homogeneous aquifer is reformulated by replacing the classical derivative by the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives approximations. The modified equation is solved via the technique of green function and the variational iteration method.

  5. Scattering of vortices in Abelian Higgs models on compact Riemann surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Palvelev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abelian Higgs models on Riemann surfaces are natural analogues of the (2+1-dimensional Abelian Higgs model on the plane. The last model arises in theory of superconductivity. For this model the following result was previously obtained: if two vortices (zeros of the Higgs field move slowly, then after the head-on collision they scatter under the right angle, and if N vortices collide, then after the symmetric head-on collision they scatter on the angle π/N. In the critical case (when the parameter of the model is equal to 1 these results can be obtained with the help of so-called adiabatic principle. This principle allows to consider geodesics of so-called kinetic metric (metric that is given by kinetic energy functional on the moduli space of static solutions as approximations to dynamical solutions of the model with small kinetic energy. Recently, the adiabatic principle was rigorously justified in the (2+1-dimensional Abelian Higgs model on the plane in the critical case. Although the metric can not be written in explicit form, one can prove that required geodesics (describing the π/N scattering exist, using smoothness of the metric in coordinates that are given by symmetric functions on positions of vortices and symmetry properties of the kinetic metric. A local analogue of the result on π/N scattering in (2+1-dimensional Abelian Higgs model on the plane can be deduced only from smoothness property of the kinetic metric. One can suppose that this local version of the result on π/N scattering can be generalized to Abelian Higgs models on Riemann surfaces. It is proved in this paper that one can find geodesics of the kinetic metric that describe local π/N scattering after the symmetric collision in models on Riemann surfaces, using the fact that the kinetic metric is smooth in symmetric coordinates in the neihbourhood of a point of vortex collision. This smoothness property is established in the case of compact Riemann surfaces. With the

  6. On Riemann boundary value problems for null solutions of the two dimensional Helmholtz equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bory Reyes, Juan; Abreu Blaya, Ricardo; Rodríguez Dagnino, Ramón Martin; Kats, Boris Aleksandrovich

    2018-01-01

    The Riemann boundary value problem (RBVP to shorten notation) in the complex plane, for different classes of functions and curves, is still widely used in mathematical physics and engineering. For instance, in elasticity theory, hydro and aerodynamics, shell theory, quantum mechanics, theory of orthogonal polynomials, and so on. In this paper, we present an appropriate hyperholomorphic approach to the RBVP associated to the two dimensional Helmholtz equation in R^2 . Our analysis is based on a suitable operator calculus.

  7. Search for the exotic {theta}{sup +} resonance in the NOMAD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samoylov, O. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Naumov, D. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Univ. of Florence (Italy); INFN, Florence (Italy); Cavasinni, V. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); INFN, Pisa (IT)] (and others)

    2007-01-15

    A search for exotic {theta}{sup +} baryon via {theta}{sup +}{yields}p+K{sup 0} {sub S} decay mode in the NOMAD {nu}{sub {mu}}N data is reported. The special background generation procedure was developed. The proton identification criteria are tuned to maximize the sensitivity to the {theta}{sup +} signal as a function of x{sub F} which allows to study the {theta}{sup +} production mechanism. We do not observe any evidence for the {theta}{sup +} state in the NOMAD data. We provide an upper limit on {theta}{sup +} production rate at 90% CL as 2.13 x 10{sup -3} per neutrino interaction. (orig.)

  8. String operator formalism and functional integral in holomorphic representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losev, A.; Morozov, A.; Rosly, A.; Shatashvili, S.

    1989-01-05

    We discuss the relation between the functional integral over open Riemann surfaces and the operator formalism on closed Riemann surfaces. The states in the latter formalism arise in the holomorphic representation of the functional integral.

  9. Bernhard Riemann 1826-1866 Turning Points in the Conception of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Laugwitz, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    The name of Bernard Riemann is well known to mathematicians and physicists around the world. College students encounter the Riemann integral early in their studies. Real and complex function theories are founded on Riemann’s work. Einstein’s theory of gravitation would be unthinkable without Riemannian geometry. In number theory, Riemann’s famous conjecture stands as one of the classic challenges to the best mathematical minds and continues to stimulate deep mathematical research. The name is indelibly stamped on the literature of mathematics and physics. This book, originally written in German and presented here in an English-language translation, examines Riemann’s scientific work from a single unifying perspective. Laugwitz describes Riemann’s development of a conceptual approach to mathematics at a time when conventional algorithmic thinking dictated that formulas and figures, rigid constructs, and transformations of terms were the only legitimate means of studying mathematical objects. David Hi...

  10. swot: Super W Of Theta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupon, Jean; Leauthaud, Alexie; Kilbinger, Martin; Medezinski, Elinor

    2017-07-01

    SWOT (Super W Of Theta) computes two-point statistics for very large data sets, based on “divide and conquer” algorithms, mainly, but not limited to data storage in binary trees, approximation at large scale, parellelization (open MPI), and bootstrap and jackknife resampling methods “on the fly”. It currently supports projected and 3D galaxy auto and cross correlations, galaxy-galaxy lensing, and weighted histograms.

  11. Riemann zeros and periodic orbit quantization by harmonic inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Main, J; Wunner, G; Taylor, H S

    1997-01-01

    In formal analogy with Gutzwiller's semiclassical trace formula, the density of zeros of the Riemann zeta function zeta(z=1/2-iw) can be written as a non-convergent series rho(w)=-pi^{-1} sum_p sum_{m=1}^infty ln(p)p^{-m/2} cos(wm ln(p)) with p running over the prime numbers. We obtain zeros and poles of the zeta function by harmonic inversion of the time signal which is a Fourier transform of rho(w). More than 2500 zeros have been calculated to about 12 digit precision as eigenvalues of small matrices using the method of filter-diagonalization. Due to formal analogy of the zeta function with Gutzwiller's periodic orbit trace formula, the method can be applied to the latter to accurately calculate individual semiclassical eigenenergies and resonance poles for classically chaotic systems. The periodic orbit quantization is demonstrated on the three disk scattering system as a physical example.

  12. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM. We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function.

  13. Independent delta/theta rhythms in the human hippocampus and entorhinal cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mormann, F.; Osterhage, H.; Andrzejak, R.G.; Weber, B.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Fell, J.; Elger, C.E.; Lehnertz, K.

    2008-01-01

    Theta oscillations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) of mammals are involved in various functions such as spatial navigation, sensorimotor integration, and cognitive processing. While the theta rhythm was originally assumed to originate in the medial septum, more recent studies suggest autonomous

  14. Multidimensional Riemann problem with self-similar internal structure - part III - a multidimensional analogue of the HLLI Riemann solver for conservative hyperbolic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Nkonga, Boniface

    2017-10-01

    Just as the quality of a one-dimensional approximate Riemann solver is improved by the inclusion of internal sub-structure, the quality of a multidimensional Riemann solver is also similarly improved. Such multidimensional Riemann problems arise when multiple states come together at the vertex of a mesh. The interaction of the resulting one-dimensional Riemann problems gives rise to a strongly-interacting state. We wish to endow this strongly-interacting state with physically-motivated sub-structure. The fastest way of endowing such sub-structure consists of making a multidimensional extension of the HLLI Riemann solver for hyperbolic conservation laws. Presenting such a multidimensional analogue of the HLLI Riemann solver with linear sub-structure for use on structured meshes is the goal of this work. The multidimensional MuSIC Riemann solver documented here is universal in the sense that it can be applied to any hyperbolic conservation law. The multidimensional Riemann solver is made to be consistent with constraints that emerge naturally from the Galerkin projection of the self-similar states within the wave model. When the full eigenstructure in both directions is used in the present Riemann solver, it becomes a complete Riemann solver in a multidimensional sense. I.e., all the intermediate waves are represented in the multidimensional wave model. The work also presents, for the very first time, an important analysis of the dissipation characteristics of multidimensional Riemann solvers. The present Riemann solver results in the most efficient implementation of a multidimensional Riemann solver with sub-structure. Because it preserves stationary linearly degenerate waves, it might also help with well-balancing. Implementation-related details are presented in pointwise fashion for the one-dimensional HLLI Riemann solver as well as the multidimensional MuSIC Riemann solver.

  15. Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization Using Riemann Surface Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yalin; Lui, Lok Ming; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2011-01-01

    In medical imaging, parameterized 3-D surface models are useful for anatomical modeling and visualization, statistical comparisons of anatomy, and surface-based registration and signal processing. Here we introduce a parameterization method based on Riemann surface structure, which uses a special curvilinear net structure (conformal net) to partition the surface into a set of patches that can each be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable (their solutions tend to be smooth functions and the boundary conditions of the Dirichlet problem can be enforced). Conformal parameterization also helps transform partial differential equations (PDEs) that may be defined on 3-D brain surface manifolds to modified PDEs on a two-dimensional parameter domain. Since the Jacobian matrix of a conformal parameterization is diagonal, the modified PDE on the parameter domain is readily solved. To illustrate our techniques, we computed parameterizations for several types of anatomical surfaces in 3-D magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampi, and lateral ventricles. For surfaces that are topologically homeomorphic to each other and have similar geometrical structures, we show that the parameterization results are consistent and the subdivided surfaces can be matched to each other. Finally, we present an automatic sulcal landmark location algorithm by solving PDEs on cortical surfaces. The landmark detection results are used as constraints for building conformal maps between surfaces that also match explicitly defined landmarks. PMID:17679336

  16. Patterns of coupled theta activity in amygdala-hippocampal-prefrontal cortical circuits during fear extinction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lesting

    Full Text Available Signals related to fear memory and extinction are processed within brain pathways involving the lateral amygdala (LA for formation of aversive stimulus associations, the CA1 area of the hippocampus for context-dependent modulation of these associations, and the infralimbic region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC for extinction processes. While many studies have addressed the contribution of each of these modules individually, little is known about their interactions and how they function as an integrated system. Here we show, by combining multiple site local field potential (LFP and unit recordings in freely behaving mice in a fear conditioning paradigm, that theta oscillations may provide a means for temporally and functionally connecting these modules. Theta oscillations occurred with high specificity in the CA1-LA-mPFC network. Theta coupling increased between all areas during retrieval of conditioned fear, and declined during extinction learning. During extinction recall, theta coupling partly rebounded in LA-mPFC and CA1-mPFC, and remained at a low level in CA1-LA. Interfering with theta coupling through local electrical microstimulation in CA1-LA affected conditioned fear and extinction recall depending on theta phase. These results support the hypothesis that theta coupling provides a means for inter-areal coordination in conditioned behavioral responsiveness. More specifically, theta oscillations seem to contribute to a population code indicating conditioned stimuli during recall of fear memory before and after extinction.

  17. Hypnotic Induction is followed by State-like changes in the organization of EEG Functional Connectivity in the Theta and Beta Frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham eJamieson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs and 11 low susceptible (lows participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH, which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1–3.9Hz, theta (4–7.9Hz alpha (8–12.9Hz, beta1 (13–19.9Hz, beta2 (20–29.9Hz and gamma (30–45Hz. The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized hypnotic-state.

  18. Hypnotic induction is followed by state-like changes in the organization of EEG functional connectivity in the theta and beta frequency bands in high-hypnotically susceptible individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Graham A.; Burgess, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Altered state theories of hypnosis posit that a qualitatively distinct state of mental processing, which emerges in those with high hypnotic susceptibility following a hypnotic induction, enables the generation of anomalous experiences in response to specific hypnotic suggestions. If so then such a state should be observable as a discrete pattern of changes to functional connectivity (shared information) between brain regions following a hypnotic induction in high but not low hypnotically susceptible participants. Twenty-eight channel EEG was recorded from 12 high susceptible (highs) and 11 low susceptible (lows) participants with their eyes closed prior to and following a standard hypnotic induction. The EEG was used to provide a measure of functional connectivity using both coherence (COH) and the imaginary component of coherence (iCOH), which is insensitive to the effects of volume conduction. COH and iCOH were calculated between all electrode pairs for the frequency bands: delta (0.1–3.9 Hz), theta (4–7.9 Hz) alpha (8–12.9 Hz), beta1 (13–19.9 Hz), beta2 (20–29.9 Hz) and gamma (30–45 Hz). The results showed that there was an increase in theta iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition in highs but not lows with a large proportion of significant links being focused on a central-parietal hub. There was also a decrease in beta1 iCOH from the pre-hypnosis to hypnosis condition with a focus on a fronto-central and an occipital hub that was greater in high compared to low susceptibles. There were no significant differences for COH or for spectral band amplitude in any frequency band. The results are interpreted as indicating that the hypnotic induction elicited a qualitative change in the organization of specific control systems within the brain for high as compared to low susceptible participants. This change in the functional organization of neural networks is a plausible indicator of the much theorized “hypnotic-state.” PMID:25104928

  19. Movement-related theta rhythm in humans: coordinating self-directed hippocampal learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Kaplan

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is crucial for episodic or declarative memory and the theta rhythm has been implicated in mnemonic processing, but the functional contribution of theta to memory remains the subject of intense speculation. Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus might function as a network hub for volitional learning. In contrast to human experiments, electrophysiological recordings in the hippocampus of behaving rodents are dominated by theta oscillations reflecting volitional movement, which has been linked to spatial exploration and encoding. This literature makes the surprising cross-species prediction that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating exploratory movements in the service of self-directed learning. We examined the links between theta, spatial exploration, and memory encoding by designing an interactive human spatial navigation paradigm combined with multimodal neuroimaging. We used both non-invasive whole-head Magnetoencephalography (MEG to look at theta oscillations and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to look at brain regions associated with volitional movement and learning. We found that theta power increases during the self-initiation of virtual movement, additionally correlating with subsequent memory performance and environmental familiarity. Performance-related hippocampal theta increases were observed during a static pre-navigation retrieval phase, where planning for subsequent navigation occurred. Furthermore, periods of the task showing movement-related theta increases showed decreased fMRI activity in the parahippocampus and increased activity in the hippocampus and other brain regions that strikingly overlap with the previously observed volitional learning network (the reverse pattern was seen for stationary periods. These fMRI changes also correlated with participant's performance. Our findings suggest that the human hippocampal theta rhythm supports memory by coordinating

  20. Riemann-Hilbert approach to the time-dependent generalized sine kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlowski, K.K.

    2010-12-15

    We derive the leading asymptotic behavior and build a new series representation for the Fredholm determinant of integrable integral operators appearing in the representation of the time and distance dependent correlation functions of integrable models described by a six-vertex R-matrix. This series representation opens a systematic way for the computation of the long-time, long-distance asymptotic expansion for the correlation functions of the aforementioned integrable models away from their free fermion point. Our method builds on a Riemann-Hilbert based analysis. (orig.)

  1. Deforming super Riemann surfaces with gravitinos and super Schottky groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Playle, Sam [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Torino and INFN, Sezione di Torino,Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2016-12-12

    The (super) Schottky uniformization of compact (super) Riemann surfaces is briefly reviewed. Deformations of super Riemann surface by gravitinos and Beltrami parameters are recast in terms of super Schottky group cohomology. It is checked that the super Schottky group formula for the period matrix of a non-split surface matches its expression in terms of a gravitino and Beltrami parameter on a split surface. The relationship between (super) Schottky groups and the construction of surfaces by gluing pairs of punctures is discussed in an appendix.

  2. The stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces: Mumford's conjecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, I.; Weiss, Michael

    2007-01-01

    D. Mumford conjectured in "Towards an enumerative geometry of the moduli space of curves" that the rational cohomology of the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces is a polynomial algebra generated by certain classes $\\kappa_i$ of dimension $2i$. For the purpose of calculating rational cohomology......, one may replace the stable moduli space of Riemann surfaces by $B\\Gamma_{\\infty}$, where $\\Gamma_\\infty$ is the group of isotopy classes of automorphisms of a smooth oriented connected surface of ``large'' genus. Tillmann's theorem that the plus construction makes $B\\Gamma_{\\infty}$ into an infinite...

  3. Line operators from M-branes on compact Riemann surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amariti, Antonio [Physics Department, The City College of the CUNY, 160 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Orlando, Domenico [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Reffert, Susanne, E-mail: sreffert@itp.unibe.ch [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we determine the charge lattice of mutually local Wilson and 't Hooft line operators for class S theories living on M5-branes wrapped on compact Riemann surfaces. The main ingredients of our analysis are the fundamental group of the N-cover of the Riemann surface, and a quantum constraint on the six-dimensional theory. The latter plays a central role in excluding some of the possible lattices and imposing consistency conditions on the charges. This construction gives a geometric explanation for the mutual locality among the lines, fixing their charge lattice and the structure of the four-dimensional gauge group.

  4. The Modulation of Hippocampal Theta Rhythm by the Vestibular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Phillip; Zheng, Yiwen; Smith, Paul F

    2017-11-22

    The vestibular system is a sensory system that has evolved over millions of years to detect acceleration of the head, both rotational and translational, in three dimensions. One of its most important functions is to stabilize gaze during unexpected head movement; however, it is also important in the control of posture and autonomic reflexes. Theta rhythm is a 3-12 Hz oscillating EEG signal that is intimately linked to self-motion and is also known to be important in learning and memory. Many studies over the last two decades have shown that selective activation of the vestibular system, either using natural rotational or translational stimulation, or electrical stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system, can induce and modulate theta activity. Furthermore, inactivation of the vestibular system has been shown to significantly reduce theta in freely moving animals, which may be linked to its impairment of place cell function as well as spatial learning and memory. The pathways through which vestibular information modulate theta rhythm remain debatable. However, vestibular responses have been found in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) and activation of the vestibular system causes an increase in acetylcholine release into the hippocampus, probably from the medial septum. Therefore, a pathway from the vestibular nucleus complex and/or cerebellum to the PPTg, supramammillary nucleus, posterior hypothalamic nucleus and the septum, to the hippocampus, is likely. The modulation of theta by the vestibular system may have implications for vestibular effects on cognitive function and the contribution of vestibular impairment to the risk of dementia. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  5. Working memory performance correlates with prefrontal-hippocampal theta interactions but not with prefrontal neuron firing rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Hyman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Performance of memory tasks is impaired by lesions to either the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC or the hippocampus (HPC; although how these two areas contribute to successful performance is not well understood. mPFC unit activity is temporally affected by hippocampal theta oscillations, with almost half the mPFC population entrained to theta in behaving animals, pointing to theta interactions as the mechanism enabling collaborations between these two areas. mPFC neurons respond to sensory stimuli and responses in working memory tasks, though the function of these correlated firing rate changes remains unclear because similar responses are reported during mPFC dependent and independent tasks. Using a DNMS task we compared error trials vs. correct trials and found almost all mPFC cells fired at similar rates during both error and correct trials (92%, however theta-entrainment of mPFC neurons declined during error performance as only 17% of cells were theta-entrained (during correct trials 46% of the population was theta-entrained. Across the population, error and correct trials did not differ in firing rate, but theta-entrainment was impaired. Periods of theta-entrainment and firing rate changes appeared to be independent variables, and only theta-entrainment was correlated with successful performance, indicating mPFC-HPC theta range interactions are the key to successful DNMS performance.

  6. Frontal Theta Dynamics during Response Conflict in Long-Term Mindfulness Meditators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Gue Jo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness meditators often show greater efficiency in resolving response conflicts than non-meditators. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the improved behavioral efficiency are unclear. Here, we investigated frontal theta dynamics—a neural mechanism involved in cognitive control processes—in long-term mindfulness meditators. The dynamics of EEG theta oscillations (4–8 Hz recorded over the medial frontal cortex (MFC were examined in terms of their power (MFC theta power and their functional connectivity with other brain areas (the MFC-centered theta network. Using a flanker-type paradigm, EEG data were obtained from 22 long-term mindfulness meditators and compared to those from 23 matched controls without meditation experience. Meditators showed more efficient cognitive control after conflicts, evidenced by fewer error responses irrespective of response timing. Furthermore, meditators exhibited enhanced conflict modulations of the MFC-centered theta network shortly before the response, in particular for the functional connection between the MFC and the motor cortex. In contrast, MFC theta power was comparable between groups. These results suggest that the higher behavioral efficiency after conflicts in mindfulness meditators could be a function of increased engagement to control the motor system in association with the MFC-centered theta network.

  7. Off-shell D=5, N=2 Riemann squared supergravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Rosseel, Jan; Sezgin, Ergin

    2011-01-01

    We construct a new off-shell invariant in N = 2, D = 5 supergravity whose leading term is the square of the Riemann tensor. It contains a gravitational Chern-Simons term involving the vector field that belongs to the supergravity multiplet. The action is obtained by mapping the transformation rules

  8. Riemann Problem for a limiting system in elastodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Pal Choudhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the resolution of the Riemann problem for a 2x2 system in nonconservative form exhibiting parabolic degeneracy. The system can be perceived as the limiting equation (depending on a parameter tending to 0 of a 2x2 strictly hyperbolic, genuinely nonlinear, non-conservative system arising in context of a model in elastodynamics.

  9. Equidistribution rates, closed string amplitudes, and the Riemann hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cacciatori, S.L.; Cardella, M.

    2010-01-01

    We study asymptotic relations connecting unipotent averages of Sp(2g,Z) automorphic forms to their integrals over the moduli space of principally polarized abelian varieties. We obtain reformulations of the Riemann hypothesis as a class of problems concerning the computation of the equidistribution

  10. The Riemann Zeta Zeros from an Asymptotic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ken

    2015-01-01

    In 1859, on the occasion of being elected as a corresponding member of the Berlin Academy, Bernard Riemann (1826-66), a student of Carl Friedrich Gauss (1777-1855), presenteda lecture in which he presented a mathematics formula, derived from complex integration, which gave a precise count of the primes on the understanding that one of the terms in…

  11. From Bombieri's Mean Value Theorem to the Riemann Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Fu-Gao

    2008-01-01

    From Bombieri's mean value theorem one can deduce the prime number theorem being equivalent to the Riemann hypothesis and the least prime P(q) satisfying P(q)= O(q^2 [ln q]^32) in any arithmetic progressions with common difference q.

  12. Weyl transforms associated with the Riemann-Liouville operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Hamadi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For the Riemann-Liouville transform ℛα, α∈ℝ+, associated with singular partial differential operators, we define and study the Weyl transforms Wσ connected with ℛα, where σ is a symbol in Sm, m∈ℝ. We give criteria in terms of σ for boundedness and compactness of the transform Wσ.

  13. Colliding holes in Riemann surfaces and quantum cluster algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhov, Leonid; Mazzocco, Marta

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new type of surgery for non-compact Riemann surfaces that naturally appears when colliding two holes or two sides of the same hole in an orientable Riemann surface with boundary (and possibly orbifold points). As a result of this surgery, bordered cusps appear on the boundary components of the Riemann surface. In Poincaré uniformization, these bordered cusps correspond to ideal triangles in the fundamental domain. We introduce the notion of bordered cusped Teichmüller space and endow it with a Poisson structure, quantization of which is achieved with a canonical quantum ordering. We give a complete combinatorial description of the bordered cusped Teichmüller space by introducing the notion of maximal cusped lamination, a lamination consisting of geodesic arcs between bordered cusps and closed geodesics homotopic to the boundaries such that it triangulates the Riemann surface. We show that each bordered cusp carries a natural decoration, i.e. a choice of a horocycle, so that the lengths of the arcs in the maximal cusped lamination are defined as λ-lengths in Thurston–Penner terminology. We compute the Goldman bracket explicitly in terms of these λ-lengths and show that the groupoid of flip morphisms acts as a generalized cluster algebra mutation. From the physical point of view, our construction provides an explicit coordinatization of moduli spaces of open/closed string worldsheets and their quantization.

  14. Weyl and Riemann Liouville multifractional Ornstein Uhlenbeck processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper considers two new multifractional stochastic processes, namely the Weyl multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the Riemann-Liouville multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Basic properties of these processes such as locally self-similar property and Hausdorff dimension are studied. The relationship between the multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes and the corresponding multifractional Brownian motions is established.

  15. Euler characteristics, Fubini's theorem, and the Riemann-Hurwitz formula

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    We relate Fubini's theorem for Euler characteristics to Riemann-Hurwtiz formulae, and reprove a classical result of Iversen. The techniques used include algebraic geometry, complex geometry, and model theory. Possible applications to the study of wild ramification in finite characteristic are discussed.

  16. Optical implementation of Riemann sheets: an analogy to an electromagnetic 'wormhole'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Liu, Yichao; Bao, Fanglin; He, Sailing

    2017-05-15

    Inspired by the branch cut that can link two Riemann sheets in complex function theory, we utilize the branch cut to mimic an electromagnetic 'wormhole' linking two 2D 'parallel spaces' in a reference space. With the help of optical conformal mapping, we design a time-varying inhomogeneous medium that can effectively perform like an electromagnetic 'wormhole' in the real space. Based on this method, we can simulate the evolutionary process of an electromagnetic 'wormhole' and the wave propagation from one space to another in a laboratory environment. The proposed device may also be applied in light capture, light modulators, and absorption with directional dependence.

  17. Grüss type integral inequalities for generalized Riemann-Liouville k-fractional integrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Mubeen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Integral inequalities are considered to be important as they have many applications described by a number of researchers. Moreover, the theory of fractional calculus is used in solving differential, integral, and integro-differential equations and also in various other problems involving special functions. In this research article, we present the improved version of generalizations for a Grüss type integral inequality by taking a generalized Riemann-Liouville fractional integral in terms of a new parameter k > 0 $k>0$ . We contribute in the on going research by providing mathematical results that can be verified easily.

  18. Riemann surfaces of complex classical trajectories and tunnelling splitting in one-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hiromitsu; Mouchet, Amaury; Shudo, Akira

    2017-10-01

    The topology of complex classical paths is investigated to discuss quantum tunnelling splittings in one-dimensional systems. Here the Hamiltonian is assumed to be given as polynomial functions, so the fundamental group for the Riemann surface provides complete information on the topology of complex paths, which allows us to enumerate all the possible candidates contributing to the semiclassical sum formula for tunnelling splittings. This naturally leads to action relations among classically disjoined regions, revealing entirely non-local nature in the quantization condition. The importance of the proper treatment of Stokes phenomena is also discussed in Hamiltonians in the normal form.

  19. Regularity of mild solutions to fractional Cauchy problems with Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ning Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As an extension of the fact that a sectorial operator can determine an analytic semigroup, we first show that a sectorial operator can determine a real analytic alpha-order fractional resolvent which is defined in terms of Mittag-Leffler function and the curve integral. Then we give some properties of real analytic alpha-order fractional resolvent. Finally, based on these properties, we discuss the regularity of mild solution of a class of fractional abstract Cauchy problems with Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative.

  20. Teaching Integration: How Certain Instructional Moves May Undermine the Potential Conceptual Value of the Riemann Sum and the Riemann Integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven R.; Lim, YaeRi; Chandler, Katie R.

    2017-01-01

    Past research in calculus education has shown that Riemann sum-based conceptions of the definite integral, such as the multiplicatively based summation (MBS) conception, can have important value in interpreting and making sense of certain types of definite integral expressions. However, additional research has shown that students tend to not draw…

  1. Study on creep behavior of Grade 91 heat-resistant steel using theta projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Facai; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-10-01

    Creep behavior of Grade 91 heat-resistant steel used for steam cooler was characterized using the theta projection method. Creep tests were conducted at the temperature of 923K under the stress ranging from 100-150MPa. Based on the creep curve results, four theta parameters were established using a nonlinear least square fitting method. Four theta parameters showed a good linearity as a function of stress. The predicted curves coincided well with the experimental data and creep curves were also modeled to the low stress level of 60MPa.

  2. Hippocampal theta-band activity and trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokia, Miriam S; Penttonen, Markku; Korhonen, Tapani; Wikgren, Jan

    2009-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between hippocampal theta activity and trace eyeblink conditioning. Hippocampal electrophysiological local field potentials were recorded before, during, and after conditioning or explicitly unpaired training sessions in adult male New Zealand White rabbits. As expected, a high relative power of theta activity (theta ratio) in the hippocampus predicted faster acquisition of the conditioned response during trace conditioning but, contrary to previous results obtained using the delay paradigm, only in the initial stage of learning. The presentation of the conditioned stimulus overall elicited an increase in the hippocampal theta ratio. The theta ratio decreased in the unpaired group as a function of training, remained high throughout conditioning in the fast learners, and rapidly increased in the slow learners initially showing a low theta ratio. Our results indicate a reciprocal connection between the hippocampal oscillatory activity and associative learning. The hippocampal theta ratio seems to reflect changes and differences in the subjects' alertness and responsiveness to external stimuli, which affect the rate of learning and are, in turn, affected by both conditioning and unpaired training. Copyright (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Independent delta/theta rhythms in the human hippocampus and entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Mormann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Theta oscillations in the medial temporal lobe (MTL of mammals are involved in various functions such as spatial navigation, sensorimotor integration, and cognitive processing. While the theta rhythm was originally assumed to originate in the medial septum, more recent studies suggest autonomous theta generation in the MTL. Although coherence between entorhinal and hippocampal theta activity has been found to influence memory formation, it remains unclear whether these two structures can generate theta independently. In this study we analyzed intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG recordings from 22 patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis undergoing presurgical evaluation prior to resection of the epileptic focus. Using a wavelet-based, frequency-band-specific measure of phase synchronization, we quantified synchrony between 10 different recording sites along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampal formation in the non-epileptic brain hemisphere. We compared EEG synchrony between adjacent recording sites (i within the entorhinal cortex, (ii within the hippocampus, and (iii between the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. We observed a significant interregional gap in synchrony for the delta and theta band, indicating the existence of independent delta/theta rhythms in different subregions of the human MTL. The interaction of these rhythms could represent the temporal basis for the information processing required for mnemonic encoding and retrieval.

  4. Testing the effects of adolescent alcohol use on adult conflict-related theta dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jeremy; Malone, Stephen M; Iacono, William G

    2017-11-01

    Adolescent alcohol use (AAU) is associated with brain anomalies, but less is known about long-term neurocognitive effects. Despite theoretical models linking AAU to diminished cognitive control, empirical work testing this relationship with specific cognitive control neural correlates (e.g., prefrontal theta-band EEG dynamics) remains scarce. A longitudinal twin design was used to test the hypothesis that greater AAU is associated with reduced conflict-related EEG theta-band dynamics in adulthood, and to examine the genetic/environmental etiology of this association. In a large (N=718) population-based prospective twin sample, AAU was assessed at ages 11/14/17. Twins completed a flanker task at age 29 to elicit EEG theta-band medial frontal cortex (MFC) power and medial-dorsal prefrontal cortex (MFC-dPFC) connectivity. Two complementary analytic methods (cotwin control analysis; biometric modeling) were used to disentangle the genetic/shared environmental risk towards AAU from possible alcohol exposure effects on theta dynamics. AAU was negatively associated with adult cognitive control-related theta-band MFC power and MFC-dPFC functional connectivity. Genetic influences primarily underlie these associations. Findings provide strong evidence that genetic factors underlie the comorbidity between AAU and diminished cognitive control-related theta dynamics in adulthood. Conflict-related theta-band dynamics appear to be candidate brain-based endophenotypes/mechanisms for AAU. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Theta series, wall-crossing and quantum dilogarithm identities

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by mathematical structures which arise in string vacua and gauge theories with N=2 supersymmetry, we study the properties of certain generalized theta series which appear as Fourier coefficients of functions on a twisted torus. In Calabi-Yau string vacua, such theta series encode instanton corrections from $k$ Neveu-Schwarz five-branes. The theta series are determined by vector-valued wave-functions, and in this work we obtain the transformation of these wave-functions induced by Kontsevich-Soibelman symplectomorphisms. This effectively provides a quantum version of these transformations, where the quantization parameter is inversely proportional to the five-brane charge $k$. Consistency with wall-crossing implies a new five-term relation for Faddeev's quantum dilogarithm $\\Phi_b$ at $b=1$, which we prove. By allowing the torus to be non-commutative, we obtain a more general five-term relation valid for arbitrary $b$ and $k$, which may be relevant for the physics of five-branes at finite chemical po...

  6. Non-supersymmetric matrix strings from generalized Yang-Mills theory on arbitrary Riemann surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billó, M.; D'Adda, A.; Provero, P.

    2000-06-01

    We quantize pure 2d Yang-Mills theory on an arbitrary Riemann surface in the gauge where the field strength is diagonal. Twisted sectors originate, as in Matrix string theory, from permutations of the eigenvalues around homotopically non-trivial loops. These sectors, that must be discarded in the usual quantization due to divergences occurring when two eigenvalues coincide, can be consistently kept if one modifies the action by introducing a coupling of the field strength to the space-time curvature. This leads to a generalized Yang-Mills theory whose action reduces to the usual one in the limit of zero curvature. After integrating over the non-diagonal components of the gauge fields, the theory becomes a free string theory (sum over unbranched coverings) with a U (1) gauge theory on the world-sheet. This is shown to be equivalent to a lattice theory with a gauge group which is the semi-direct product of S N and U (1) N. By using well known results on the statistics of coverings, the partition function on arbitrary Riemann surfaces and the kernel functions on surfaces with boundaries are calculated. Extensions to include branch points and non-abelian groups on the world-sheet are briefly commented upon.

  7. Pseudo-periodic maps and degeneration of Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the book studies pseudo-periodic maps of a closed surface of genus greater than or equal to two. This class of homeomorphisms was originally introduced by J. Nielsen in 1944 as an extension of periodic maps. In this book, the conjugacy classes of the (chiral) pseudo-periodic mapping classes are completely classified, and Nielsen’s incomplete classification is corrected. The second part applies the results of the first part to the topology of degeneration of Riemann surfaces. It is shown that the set of topological types of all the singular fibers appearing in one-parameter holomorphic families of Riemann surfaces is in a bijective correspondence with the set of conjugacy classes of the pseudo-periodic maps of negative twists. The correspondence is given by the topological monodromy.

  8. The Riemann walk: A method for simulating complex actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocksch, Andreas

    1988-05-01

    A new method to simulate systems with complex actions is discussed. It is based on the stochastic evaluation of a certain density of states which explicitly depends on the “imaginary energy” but also has an implicit dependence on the parameters of the real part of the action. Since expectation values are obtained by approximating an integral by a Riemann sum, the method can be considered to be a hybrid between Monte Carlo and Riemann integration. Indeed, for the simple case of a complex coupling the method reduces to what is known as “stratified sampling”. In this letter the method is applied to the SU(3) spin model at finite chemical potential.

  9. Riesz Riemann-Liouville difference on discrete domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guo-Cheng; Baleanu, Dumitru; Xie, He-Ping

    2016-08-01

    A Riesz difference is defined by the use of the Riemann-Liouville differences on time scales. Then the definition is considered for discrete fractional modelling. A lattice fractional equation method is proposed among which the space variable is defined on discrete domains. Finite memory effects are introduced into the lattice system and the numerical formulae are given. Adomian decomposition method is adopted to solve the fractional partial difference equations numerically.

  10. Submaximal Riemann-Roch expected curves and symplectic packing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wioletta Syzdek

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We study Riemann-Roch expected curves on $mathbb{P}^1 imes mathbb{P}^1$ in the context of the Nagata-Biran conjecture. This conjecture predicts that for sufficiently large number of points multiple points Seshadri constants of an ample line bundle on algebraic surface are maximal. Biran gives an effective lower bound $N_0$. We construct examples verifying to the effect that the assertions of the Nagata-Biran conjecture can not hold for small number of points. We discuss cases where our construction fails. We observe also that there exists a strong relation between Riemann-Roch expected curves on $mathbb{P}^1 imes mathbb{P}^1$ and the symplectic packing problem. Biran relates the packing problem to the existence of solutions of certain Diophantine equations. We construct such solutions for any ample line bundle on $mathbb{P}^1 imes mathbb{P}^1$ and a relatively smallnumber of points. The solutions geometrically correspond to Riemann-Roch expected curves. Finally we discuss in how far the Biran number $N_0$ is optimal in the case of mathbb{P}^1 imes mathbb{P}^1. In fact we conjecture that it can be replaced by a lower number and we provide evidence justifying this conjecture.

  11. Hadamard model on the super Riemann surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuji, Matsumoto; Shozo, Uehara; Yukinori, Yasui

    1988-12-01

    A supersymmetrically extended version of the Hadamard model is investigated. Classical solutions are given, which imply that the system is chaotic. Quantization is performed in the path integral method. The quantized energy sum rule is shown to be a superanalog of the Selberg trace formula. The Selberg super zeta function is introduced and energy spectra associated with bosonic (fermionic) states are given by order 1 zero-points (poles) of the zeta function.

  12. The search for a Hamiltonian whose energy spectrum coincides with the Riemann zeta zeroes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschheim, Raymond; Perelman, Carlos Castro; Irwin, Klee

    Inspired by the Hilbert-Polya proposal to prove the Riemann Hypothesis we have studied the Schroedinger QM equation involving a highly nontrivial potential, and whose self-adjoint Hamiltonian operator has for its energy spectrum one which approaches the imaginary parts of the zeta zeroes only in the asymptotic (very large N) region. The ordinates λn are the positive imaginary parts of the nontrivial zeta zeroes in the critical line :sn = 1 2 + iλn. The latter results are consistent with the validity of the Bohr-Sommerfeld semi-classical quantization condition. It is shown how one may modify the parameters which define the potential, and fine tune its values, such that the energy spectrum of the (modified) Hamiltonian matches not only the first two zeroes but the other consecutive zeroes. The highly nontrivial functional form of the potential is found via the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization formula using the full-fledged Riemann-von Mangoldt counting formula (without any truncations) for the number N(E) of zeroes in the critical strip with imaginary part greater than 0 and less than or equal to E.

  13. Modeling of locally self-similar processes using multifractional Brownian motion of Riemann-Liouville type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Lim, S. C.

    2001-04-01

    Fractional Brownian motion (FBM) is widely used in the modeling of phenomena with power spectral density of power-law type. However, FBM has its limitation since it can only describe phenomena with monofractal structure or a uniform degree of irregularity characterized by the constant Holder exponent. For more realistic modeling, it is necessary to take into consideration the local variation of irregularity, with the Holder exponent allowed to vary with time (or space). One way to achieve such a generalization is to extend the standard FBM to multifractional Brownian motion (MBM) indexed by a Holder exponent that is a function of time. This paper proposes an alternative generalization to MBM based on the FBM defined by the Riemann-Liouville type of fractional integral. The local properties of the Riemann-Liouville MBM (RLMBM) are studied and they are found to be similar to that of the standard MBM. A numerical scheme to simulate the locally self-similar sample paths of the RLMBM for various types of time-varying Holder exponents is given. The local scaling exponents are estimated based on the local growth of the variance and the wavelet scalogram methods. Finally, an example of the possible applications of RLMBM in the modeling of multifractal time series is illustrated.

  14. Derivative-Based Trapezoid Rule for the Riemann-Stieltjes Integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The derivative-based trapezoid rule for the Riemann-Stieltjes integral is presented which uses 2 derivative values at the endpoints. This kind of quadrature rule obtains an increase of two orders of precision over the trapezoid rule for the Riemann-Stieltjes integral and the error term is investigated. At last, the rationality of the generalization of derivative-based trapezoid rule for Riemann-Stieltjes integral is demonstrated.

  15. SU(2) Flat Connection on Riemann Surface and Twisted Geometry with Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Muxin

    2016-01-01

    SU(2) flat connection on 2D Riemann surface is shown to relate to the generalized twisted geometry in 3D space with cosmological constant. Various flat connection quantities on Riemann surface are mapped to the geometrical quantities in discrete 3D space. We propose that the moduli space of SU(2) flat connections on Riemann surface generalizes the phase space of twisted geometry or Loop Quantum Gravity to include the cosmological constant.

  16. A sharp companion of Ostrowski's inequality for the Riemann-Stieltjes integral and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad W. Alomari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A sharp companion of Ostrowski's inequality for the Riemann-Stieltjes integral ∫ab f(tdu(t, where f is assumed to be of r-H-Hölder type on [a,b] and u is of bounded variation on [a,b], is proved. Applications to the approximation problem of the Riemann-Stieltjesintegral in terms of Riemann-Stieltjes sums are also pointed out.

  17. Altered theta oscillations in resting EEG of fibromyalgia syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, N; Chiu, Y; Nurmikko, T; Stancak, A

    2018-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain, sleep disturbance, fatigue and cognitive/affective symptoms. Functional imaging studies have revealed that FM and other chronic pain syndromes can affect resting brain activity. This study utilized electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to investigate the relative power of ongoing oscillatory activity in the resting brain. A 64-channel EEG was recorded at rest in 19 female FM patients and 18 healthy, age-matched, control subjects. The Manual Tender Point Scale (MTPS) examination was performed to quantify tonic pain and tenderness on the day of testing along with measures of mood, arousal and fatigue. Oscillations in delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequency bands were analysed using Standardised Low-Resolution Brain Electromagnetic Tomography to evaluate sources of spectral activity throughout the whole brain. FM patients exhibited greater pain, tiredness and tension on the day of testing relative to healthy control participants and augmented theta activity in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. No significant differences were seen in other frequency bands. Augmented frontal theta activity in FM patients significantly correlated with measures of tenderness and mean tiredness scores. The findings indicate that alterations to resting-state oscillatory activity may relate to ongoing tonic pain and fatigue in FM, and manifest in brain regions relevant for cognitive-attentional aspects of pain processing and endogenous pain inhibition. Enhanced low-frequency oscillations were previously seen in FM and other chronic pain syndromes, and may relate to pathophysiological mechanisms for ongoing pain such as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. Increased prefrontal theta activity may contribute to persistent pain in fibromyalgia or represent the outcome of prolonged symptoms. The findings point to the potential for therapeutic interventions aimed at normalizing neural oscillations

  18. Gaussian curvature on hyperelliptic Riemann surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The moduli space of curves of genus two, say M2, has interesting geometric properties. For example, when the Bergman metric is considered on a hyperelliptic curve, the study of extremal properties of the Laplacian in this metric on M2 is related to a smooth func- tional F on M2, which can be considered as a function on the ...

  19. Measuring Theta_13 at Daya Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Kwong [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-03-14

    We measured the neutrino mixing angle, theta13, presumably related to the preponderance of matter over antimatter in our universe with high precision. We determined theta13 by measuring the disappearance of neutrinos from a group of six nuclear reactors. The target, located inside a mountain at about 2 km from the reactors, is 80 tons of liquid scintillator doped with trace amount of Gadolinium to increase its neutron detection efficiency. The neutrino flux is measured by the inverse beta-decay reaction where the final-state particles are detected by the liquid scintillator. The measured value of theta13, based on data collected over 3 years, is large, around 8 degrees, rendering the measurement of the parameter related to matter-antimatter asymmetry in future long baseline neutrino experiments easier.

  20. Brain Responses to a 6-Hz Binaural Beat: Effects on General Theta Rhythm and Frontal Midline Theta Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirakittayakorn, Nantawachara; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2017-01-01

    A binaural beat is a beat phenomenon that is generated by the dichotic presentation of two almost equivalent pure tones but with slightly different frequencies. The brain responses to binaural beats remain controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate theta activity responses to a binaural beat by controlling factors affecting localization, including beat frequency, carrier tone frequency, exposure duration, and recording procedure. Exposure to a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone for 30 min was utilized in this study. Quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) was utilized as the recording modality. Twenty-eight participants were divided into experimental and control groups. Emotional states were evaluated by Brunel Mood Scale (BRMUS) before and after exposing to the stimulus. The results showed that theta activity was induced in the entire cortex within 10 min of exposure to the stimulus in the experimental group. Compared to the control group, theta activity was also induced at the frontal and parietal-central regions, which included the Fz position, and left hemisphere dominance was presented for other exposure durations. The pattern recorded for 10 min of exposure appeared to be brain functions of a meditative state. Moreover, tension factor of BRUMS was decreased in experimental group compared to control group which resembled the meditation effect. Thus, a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone was suggested as a stimulus for inducing a meditative state.

  1. Brain Responses to a 6-Hz Binaural Beat: Effects on General Theta Rhythm and Frontal Midline Theta Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantawachara Jirakittayakorn

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A binaural beat is a beat phenomenon that is generated by the dichotic presentation of two almost equivalent pure tones but with slightly different frequencies. The brain responses to binaural beats remain controversial; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate theta activity responses to a binaural beat by controlling factors affecting localization, including beat frequency, carrier tone frequency, exposure duration, and recording procedure. Exposure to a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone for 30 min was utilized in this study. Quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG was utilized as the recording modality. Twenty-eight participants were divided into experimental and control groups. Emotional states were evaluated by Brunel Mood Scale (BRMUS before and after exposing to the stimulus. The results showed that theta activity was induced in the entire cortex within 10 min of exposure to the stimulus in the experimental group. Compared to the control group, theta activity was also induced at the frontal and parietal-central regions, which included the Fz position, and left hemisphere dominance was presented for other exposure durations. The pattern recorded for 10 min of exposure appeared to be brain functions of a meditative state. Moreover, tension factor of BRUMS was decreased in experimental group compared to control group which resembled the meditation effect. Thus, a 6-Hz binaural beat on a 250 Hz carrier tone was suggested as a stimulus for inducing a meditative state.

  2. ACCIONES DE GRUPOS SOBRE EL ESPACIO DE RIEMANN-ROCH

    OpenAIRE

    VASQUEZ LATORRE, DANIELA

    2013-01-01

    Sea G un grupo finito de automorfismos de una curva proyectiva suave X, sobre el cuerpo de los números complejos, y D un divisor no especial de X invariante bajo la acción de G. En este trabajo estudiaremos el problema de descomposición de la representación natural del grupo G en el espacio de Riemann-Roch L(D), asociado al divisor D. Presentaremos fórmulas explícitas para la multiplicidad de cada factor irreducible, en términos de la multiplicidad de estos factores en la descompo...

  3. Norm-Euclidean Galois fields and the Generalized Riemann Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    McGown, Kevin J.

    2011-01-01

    Assuming the Generalized Riemann Hypothesis (GRH), we show that the norm-Euclidean Galois cubic fields are exactly those with discriminant $\\Delta=7^2,9^2,13^2,19^2,31^2,37^2,43^2,61^2,67^2,103^2,109^2,127^2,157^2$. A large part of the proof is in establishing the following more general result: Let $K$ be a Galois number field of odd prime degree $\\ell$ and conductor $f$. Assume the GRH for $\\zeta_K(s)$. If $38(\\ell-1)^2(\\log f)^6\\log\\log f

  4. A Riemann-Roch Theoremfor One-Dimensional Complex Groupoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Denis

    We consider a smooth groupoid of the form Σ⋊Γ, where Σ is a Riemann surface and Γ a discrete pseudogroup acting on Σ by local conformal diffeomorphisms. After defining a K-cycle on the crossed product C0(Σ)⋊Γ generalising the classical Dolbeault complex, we compute its Chern character in cyclic cohomology, using the index theorem of Connes and Moscovici. This involves in particular a generalisation of the Euler class constructed from the modular automorphism group of the von Neumann algebra L∞(Σ)⋊Γ.

  5. Integrable systems twistors, loop groups, and Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hitchin, NJ; Ward, RS

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is designed to give graduate students an understanding of integrable systems via the study of Riemann surfaces, loop groups, and twistors. The book has its origins in a series of lecture courses given by the authors, all of whom are internationally known mathematicians and renowned expositors. It is written in an accessible and informal style, and fills a gap in the existing literature. The introduction by Nigel Hitchin addresses the meaning of integrability: how do werecognize an integrable system? His own contribution then develops connections with algebraic geometry, and inclu

  6. Double Chooz and Reactor Theta13 Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    This is a contribution paper from the Double Chooz experiment to the special issue of NPB on neutrino oscillations. The physics and history of the reactor theta13 experiments, as well as Double Chooz experiment and its neutrino oscillation analyses are reviewed.

  7. Hippocampal theta frequency shifts and operant behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Kamp, A.

    1. 1. A shift of hippocampal dominant theta frequency to 6 c/sec has been demonstrated in the post-reward period in two dogs, which occurs consistently related in time to a well defined behavioural pattern in the course of an operant conditioning paradigm. 2. 2. The frequency shift was detected and

  8. Better than sleep: theta neurofeedback training accelerates memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Miriam; Rozengurt, Roman; Barnea, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Consistent empirical results showed that both night and day sleep enhanced memory consolidation. In this study we explore processes of consolidation of memory during awake hours. Since theta oscillations have been shown to play a central role in exchange of information, we hypothesized that elevated theta during awake hours will enhance memory consolidation. We used a neurofeedback protocol, to enhance the relative power of theta or beta oscillations. Participants trained on a tapping task, were divided into three groups: neurofeedback theta; neurofeedback beta; control. We found a significant improvement in performance in the theta group, relative to the beta and control groups, immediately after neurofeedback. Performance was further improved after night sleep in all groups, with a significant advantage favoring the theta group. Theta power during training was correlated with the level of improvement, indicating a clear relationship between memory consolidation, and theta neurofeedback. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analysis of matrix cracking and local delamination in (0/theta/-theta)s graphite epoxy laminates under tensile load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpekar, S. A.; O'Brien, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Three-dimensional element analyses of (0/theta/-theta)s graphite epoxy laminates, where theta = 15, 20, 25, 30, and 45 deg, subjected to axial tensile load, were performed. The interlaminar stresses in the theta/-theta interface were calculated with and without a matrix crack in the central -theta plies. The interlaminar normal stress changes from a small compressive stress when no matrix crack is present to a high tensile stress at the intersection of the matrix crack and the free edge. The analysis of local delamination from the -theta matrix crack indicates a high strain energy release rate and a localized Mode I component near the free edge, within one-ply distance from the matrix crack. To examine the stress state causing the matrix cracking, the maximum principal normal stress in a plane perpendicular to the fiber direction in the -theta ply was calculated in an uncracked laminate. The corresponding shear stress parallel to the fiber was also calculated. The principal normal stress at the laminate edge increased through the ply thickness and reached a very high tensile value at the theta/-theta interface indicating that the crack in the -theta ply may initiate at the theta/-theta interface.

  10. Solution to the Riemann problem for a five-equation model of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solution to the Riemann problem for a five-equation model of multiphase flows in non-conservative form. SAHADEB ... In this paper, we consider the Riemann problem for a five-equation, two-pressure (5E2P) model proposed by Ransom and Hicks for an isentropic compressible gas–liquid two-phase flows. The model is ...

  11. Exact Riemann solver for RMHD in the case of shocks only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E.A. van Odyck (Daniel)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper the quasi-1D relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic (RMHD) equations are numerically solved with a Lax-Friedrichs scheme. The RMHD shock relations are studied in detail. An ansatz is made to build an exact Riemann solver for RMHD. The results of the exact Riemann solver are

  12. A Two-dimensional HLLC Riemann Solver for Conservation Laws : Application to Euler and MHD Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Balsara, Dinshaw S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a genuinely two-dimensional HLLC Riemann solver. On logically rectangular meshes, it accepts four input states that come together at an edge and outputs the multi-dimensionally upwinded fluxes in both directions. This work builds on, and improves, our prior work on two-dimensional HLL Riemann solvers. The HLL Riemann solver presented here achieves its stabilization by introducing a constant state in the region of strong interaction, where four one-dimensional Riemann problems interact vigorously with one another. A robust version of the HLL Riemann solver is presented here along with a strategy for introducing sub-structure in the strongly-interacting state. Introducing sub-structure turns the two-dimensional HLL Riemann solver into a two-dimensional HLLC Riemann solver. The sub-structure that we introduce represents a contact discontinuity which can be oriented in any direction relative to the mesh. The Riemann solver presented here is general and can work with any system of conserva...

  13. Self-generated theta oscillations in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Romain; Jackson, Jesse; Williams, Sylvain

    2009-12-01

    Hippocampal theta rhythm is crucial for spatial memory and is thought to be generated by extrinsic inputs. In contrast, using a complete rat hippocampus in vitro, we found several intrinsic, atropine-resistant theta generators in CA1. These oscillators were organized along the septotemporal axis and arose independently from CA3. Our results suggest that CA1 theta rhythm can emerge from the coupling of multiple autonomous hippocampal theta oscillators.

  14. Dynamical stability of the alpha and theta phases of alumina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodziana, Zbigniew; Parlinski, K.

    2003-01-01

    Using density functional calculations the phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, and free energy of theta and alpha phases of alumina are investigated. The temperature dependence of the free energy indicates that entropy contributes to the destabilization of the alpha phase...... cations in alumina, and suggest that some other than entropic mechanism exists, which stabilizes transition aluminas up to 1400 K. The present calculations go beyond the ground state energy calculations [C. Wolverton and K.C. Hass, Phys. Rev. B 63, 24102 (2001)], and give an additional understanding...... of the stability of transition alumina at finite temperatures....

  15. Riemann surfaces and algebraic curves a first course in Hurwitz theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalieri, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    Hurwitz theory, the study of analytic functions among Riemann surfaces, is a classical field and active research area in algebraic geometry. The subject's interplay between algebra, geometry, topology and analysis is a beautiful example of the interconnectedness of mathematics. This book introduces students to this increasingly important field, covering key topics such as manifolds, monodromy representations and the Hurwitz potential. Designed for undergraduate study, this classroom-tested text includes over 100 exercises to provide motivation for the reader. Also included are short essays by guest writers on how they use Hurwitz theory in their work, which ranges from string theory to non-Archimedean geometry. Whether used in a course or as a self-contained reference for graduate students, this book will provide an exciting glimpse at mathematics beyond the standard university classes.

  16. Monotone method for Riemann-Liouville multi-order fractional differential systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Denton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop the monotone method for nonlinear multi-order \\(N\\-systems of Riemann-Liouville fractional differential equations. That is, a hybrid system of nonlinear equations of orders \\(q_i\\ where \\(0 \\lt q_i \\lt 1\\. In the development of this method we recall any needed existence results along with any necessary changes. Through the method's development we construct a generalized multi-order Mittag-Leffler function that fulfills exponential-like properties for multi-order systems. Further we prove a comparison result paramount for the discussion of fractional multi-order inequalities that utilizes lower and upper solutions of the system. The monotone method is then developed via the construction of sequences of linear systems based on the upper and lower solutions, and are used to approximate the solution of the original nonlinear multi-order system.

  17. Fractional Brownian motion and multifractional Brownian motion of Riemann-Liouville type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.

    2001-02-01

    The relationship between standard fractional Brownian motion (FBM) and FBM based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional integral (or RL-FBM) is clarified. The absence of stationary property in the increment process of RL-FBM is compensated by a weaker property of local stationarity, and the stationary property for the increments of the large-time asymptotic RL-FBM. Generalization of RL-FBM to the RL-multifractional Brownian motion (RL-MBM) can be carried out by replacing the constant Hölder exponent by a time-dependent function. RL-MBM is shown to satisfy a weaker scaling property known as the local asymptotic self-similarity. This local scaling property can be translated into the small-scale behaviour of the associated scalogram by using the wavelet transform.

  18. Two-Loop Scattering Amplitudes from the Riemann Sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Geyer, Yvonne; Monteiro, Ricardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The scattering equations give striking formulae for massless scattering amplitudes at tree level and, as shown recently, at one loop. The progress at loop level was based on ambitwistor string theory, which naturally yields the scattering equations. We proposed that, for ambitwistor strings, the standard loop expansion in terms of the genus of the worldsheet is equivalent to an expansion in terms of nodes of a Riemann sphere, with the nodes carrying the loop momenta. In this paper, we show how to obtain two-loop scattering equations with the correct factorization properties. We adapt genus-two integrands from the ambitwistor string to the nodal Riemann sphere and show that these yield correct answers, by matching standard results for the four-point two-loop amplitudes of maximal supergravity and super-Yang-Mills theory. In the Yang-Mills case, this requires the loop analogue of the Parke-Taylor factor carrying the colour dependence, which includes non-planar contributions.

  19. One-loop amplitudes on the Riemann sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Geyer, Yvonne; Monteiro, Ricardo; Tourkine, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The scattering equations provide a powerful framework for the study of scattering amplitudes in a variety of theories. Their derivation from ambitwistor string theory led to proposals for formulae at one loop on a torus for 10 dimensional supergravity, and we recently showed how these can be reduced to the Riemann sphere and checked in simple cases. We also proposed analogous formulae for other theories including maximal super-Yang-Mills theory and supergravity in other dimensions at one loop. We give further details of these results and extend them in two directions. Firstly, we propose new formulae for the one-loop integrands of Yang-Mills theory and gravity in the absence of supersymmetry. These follow from the identification of the states running in the loop as expressed in the ambitwistor-string correlator. Secondly, we give a systematic proof of the non-supersymmetric formulae using the worldsheet factorisation properties of the nodal Riemann sphere underlying the scattering equations at one loop. Our f...

  20. Age-related changes of frontal-midline theta is predictive of efficient memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, Z; Tóth, B; Boha, R; File, B; Molnár, M

    2014-07-25

    Frontal areas are thought to be the coordinators of working memory processes by controlling other brain areas reflected by oscillatory activities like frontal-midline theta (4-7 Hz). With aging substantial changes can be observed in the frontal brain areas, presumably leading to age-associated changes in cortical correlates of cognitive functioning. The present study aimed to test whether altered frontal-midline theta dynamics during working memory maintenance may underlie the capacity deficits observed in older adults. 33-channel EEG was recorded in young (18-26 years, N=20) and old (60-71 years, N=16) adults during the retention period of a visual delayed match-to-sample task, in which they had to maintain arrays of 3 or 5 colored squares. An additional visual odd-ball task was used to be able to measure the electrophysiological indices of sustained attentional processes. Old participants showed reduced frontal theta activity during both tasks compared to the young group. In the young memory maintenance-related frontal-midline theta activity was shown to be sensitive both to the increased memory demands and to efficient subsequent memory performance, whereas the old adults showed no such task-related difference in the frontal theta activity. The decrease of frontal-midline theta activity in the old group indicates that cerebral aging may alter the cortical circuitries of theta dynamics, thereby leading to age-associated decline of working memory maintenance function. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards quantized number theory: spectral operators and an asymmetric criterion for the Riemann hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Michel L

    2015-08-06

    This research expository article not only contains a survey of earlier work but also contains a main new result, which we first describe. Given c≥0, the spectral operator [Formula: see text] can be thought of intuitively as the operator which sends the geometry onto the spectrum of a fractal string of dimension not exceeding c. Rigorously, it turns out to coincide with a suitable quantization of the Riemann zeta function ζ=ζ(s): a=ζ(∂), where ∂=∂(c) is the infinitesimal shift of the real line acting on the weighted Hilbert space [Formula: see text]. In this paper, we establish a new asymmetric criterion for the Riemann hypothesis (RH), expressed in terms of the invertibility of the spectral operator for all values of the dimension parameter [Formula: see text] (i.e. for all c in the left half of the critical interval (0,1)). This corresponds (conditionally) to a mathematical (and perhaps also, physical) 'phase transition' occurring in the midfractal case when [Formula: see text]. Both the universality and the non-universality of ζ=ζ(s) in the right (resp., left) critical strip [Formula: see text] (resp., [Formula: see text]) play a key role in this context. These new results are presented here. We also briefly discuss earlier joint work on the complex dimensions of fractal strings, and we survey earlier related work of the author with Maier and with Herichi, respectively, in which were established symmetric criteria for the RH, expressed, respectively, in terms of a family of natural inverse spectral problems for fractal strings of Minkowski dimension D∈(0,1), with [Formula: see text], and of the quasi-invertibility of the family of spectral operators [Formula: see text] (with [Formula: see text]). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Self-regulation of frontal-midline theta facilitates memory updating and mental set shifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eEnriquez-Geppert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Frontal-midline (fm theta oscillations as measured via the electroencephalogram (EEG have been suggested as neural working language of executive functioning. Their power has been shown to increase when cognitive processing or task performance is enhanced. Thus, the question arises whether learning to increase fm-theta amplitudes would functionally impact the behavioral performance in tasks probing executive functions (EFs. Here, the effects of neurofeedback, a learning method to self-up-regulate fm-theta over frontal-midline electrodes, on the four most representative EFs, memory updating, set shifting, conflict monitoring, and motor inhibition are presented. Before beginning and after completing an individualized, eight-session gap-spaced neurofeedback intervention, the three-back, letter/number task-switching, Stroop, and stop-signal tasks were tested while measuring the EEG. Self-determined up-regulation of fm-theta and its putative role for executive functioning were compared to an active control group, the so-called pseudo-neurofeedback group. Task-related fm-theta activity after training differed significantly between groups. More importantly, though, after neurofeedback significantly enhanced behavioral performance was observed. The training group showed higher accuracy scores in the three-back task and reduced mixing and shifting costs in letter/number task-switching. However, this specific protocol type did not affect performance in tasks probing conflict monitoring and motor inhibition. Thus, our results suggest a modulation of proactive but not reactive mechanisms of cognitive control. In sum, the modulation of fm-theta via neurofeedback may serve as potent treatment approach for executive dysfunctions.

  3. Period Matrices of Real Riemann Surfaces and Fundamental Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Giavedoni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available For some positive integers g and n we consider a subgroup G_{g,n} of the 2g-dimensional modular group keeping invariant a certain locus W_{g,n} in the Siegel upper half plane of degree g. We address the problem of describing a fundamental domain for the modular action of the subgroup on W_{g,n}. Our motivation comes from geometry: g and n represent the genus and the number of ovals of a generic real Riemann surface of separated type; the locus W_{g,n} contains the corresponding period matrix computed with respect to some specific basis in the homology. In this paper we formulate a general procedure to solve the problem when g is even and n equals one. For g equal to two or four the explicit calculations are worked out in full detail.

  4. Berry's phase, chaos, and the deformations of Riemann surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévay, Péter

    1997-11-01

    Parametrized families of Landau Hamiltonians on compact Riemann surfaces corresponding to classically chaotic families of geodesic motion are investigated. The parameters describe deformations of such surfaces with genus g>=1. It is shown that the adiabatic curvature (responsible for Berry's phase) of the lowest Landau level for g>1 is the sum of two terms. The first term is proportional to the natural symplectic form on deformation space, and the second is a fluctuating term reflecting the chaos of the geodesic motion for g>1. For g=1 (integrable motion on the torus) we have no fluctuating term. We propose our result to be interpreted as a curvature analog of the well-known semiclassical trace formulas. Connections with the viscosity properties of quantum Hall fluids on such surfaces are also pointed out. An interesting possibility in this respect is the fractional quantization of certain components of the viscosity tensor of such fluids.

  5. Riemann-Roch Spaces and Linear Network Codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Johan P.

    a metric on the set of vector spaces and showed that a minimal distance decoder for this metric achieves correct decoding if the dimension of the intersection of the transmitted and received vector space is sufficiently large. The vector spaces in our construction have minimal distance bounded from below......We construct linear network codes utilizing algebraic curves over finite fields and certain associated Riemann-Roch spaces and present methods to obtain their parameters. In particular we treat the Hermitian curve and the curves associated with the Suzuki and Ree groups all having the maximal...... number of points for curves of their respective genera. Linear network coding transmits information in terms of a basis of a vector space and the information is received as a basis of a possibly altered vector space. Ralf Koetter and Frank R. Kschischang %\\cite{DBLP:journals/tit/KoetterK08} introduced...

  6. Polynomials, Riemann surfaces, and reconstructing missing-energy events

    CERN Document Server

    Gripaios, Ben; Webber, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing energies, momenta, and masses in collider events with missing energy, along with the complications introduced by combinatorial ambiguities and measurement errors. Typically, one reconstructs more than one value and we show how the wrong values may be correlated with the right ones. The problem has a natural formulation in terms of the theory of Riemann surfaces. We discuss examples including top quark decays in the Standard Model (relevant for top quark mass measurements and tests of spin correlation), cascade decays in models of new physics containing dark matter candidates, decays of third-generation leptoquarks in composite models of electroweak symmetry breaking, and Higgs boson decay into two tau leptons.

  7. Global synchronization in the theta band during mental imagery of navigation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Umeno, Katsumi; Hori, Etsuro; Takakura, Hiromasa; Urakawa, Susumu; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2009-09-01

    Visual mental imagery is critical for successfully navigating the environment, which in turn activates many cortical regions simultaneously. Theta oscillation is implicated in navigation and brain synchronization. In this study, EEG coherence was analyzed during 3 tasks: subjects (1) mentally simulated jogging along the walls of a gym and pressed a button when they imagined arriving at a corner (jogging imagery task), (2) thought of and memorized one digit after pressing a button 5 times and recalled the digits sequentially after pressing the button again (digit imagery task), and (3) pressed a button (button pressing task). The results indicated that theta-wave (4-8 Hz) power was significantly higher in the frontal and parietal regions during the digit and jogging imagery tasks. Coherence at the theta band showed almost no differences between the button pressing and digit imagery tasks. Coherence between the distant regions, especially between the frontal and parieto-occipital regions and between interhemispheric regions, was significantly higher during the jogging imagery task. Increase in theta power during the jogging imagery task reflects working memory load to manipulate internal information. Theta oscillation appears to play an important role in large-scale synchronization to form the functional neuronal networks required for mental navigation.

  8. The Picard group of the moduli space of r-Spin Riemann surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    An r-Spin Riemann surface is a Riemann surface equipped with a choice of rth root of the (co)tangent bundle. We give a careful construction of the moduli space (orbifold) of r-Spin Riemann surfaces, and explain how to establish a Madsen–Weiss theorem for it. This allows us to prove the “Mumford...... conjecture” for these moduli spaces, but more interestingly allows us to compute their algebraic Picard groups (for g≥10, or g≥9 in the 2-Spin case). We give a complete description of these Picard groups, in terms of explicitly constructed line bundles....

  9. Seasonal variation of Sigma sub(Theta) with wind speed, direction and stability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    For an airport site near Visakhapatnam, India, and based on 10 years of data for the months of January, April, August and October, values of Sigma sub(Theta) are given as a function of wind speed, wind direction and Pasquill diffusion category...

  10. A randomized trial of Rapid Rhino Riemann and Telfa nasal packs following endoscopic sinus surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruise, A. S.; Amonoo-Kuofi, K.; Srouji, I.; Kanagalingam, J.; Georgalas, C.; Patel, N. N.; Badia, L.; Lund, V. J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare Telfa with the Rapid Rhino Riemann nasal pack for use following endoscopic sinus surgery. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, double-blind, paired trial. SETTING: Tertiary otolaryngology hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five adult patients undergoing bilateral endoscopic sinus

  11. Prime Obsession: Bernhard Riemann and the Greatest Unsolved Problem in Mathematics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Derbyshire, John

    2003-01-01

    .... Is the hypothesis true or false?Riemann's basic inquiry, the primary topic of his paper, concerned a straightforward but nevertheless important matter of arithmetic defining a precise formula to track and identify the occurrence...

  12. Existence and Nonexistence of Positive Solutions for Coupled Riemann-Liouville Fractional Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Henderson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the existence and nonexistence of positive solutions for a system of nonlinear Riemann-Liouville fractional differential equations with two parameters, subject to coupled integral boundary conditions.

  13. Grüss type integral inequalities for generalized Riemann-Liouville k-fractional integrals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mubeen, Shahid; Iqbal, Sana

    2016-01-01

    .... In this research article, we present the improved version of generalizations for a Grüss type integral inequality by taking a generalized Riemann-Liouville fractional integral in terms of a new parameter k > 0 $k>0...

  14. Nontrivial Solution of Fractional Differential System Involving Riemann-Stieltjes Integral Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge-Feng Yang

    2012-01-01

    differential system involving the Riemann-Stieltjes integral condition, by using the Leray-Schauder nonlinear alternative and the Banach contraction mapping principle, some sufficient conditions of the existence and uniqueness of a nontrivial solution of a system are obtained.

  15. Lower trait frontal theta activity in mindfulness meditators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guaraci Ken Tanaka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute and long-term effects of mindfulness meditation on theta-band activity are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate frontal theta differences between long- and short-term mindfulness practitioners before, during, and after mindfulness meditation. Twenty participants were recruited, of which 10 were experienced Buddhist meditators. Despite an acute increase in the theta activity during meditation in both the groups, the meditators showed lower trait frontal theta activity. Therefore, we suggested that this finding is a neural correlate of the expert practitioners’ ability to limit the processing of unnecessary information (e.g., discursive thought and increase the awareness of the essential content of the present experience. In conclusion, acute changes in the theta band throughout meditation did not appear to be a specific correlate of mindfulness but were rather related to the concentration properties of the meditation. Notwithstanding, lower frontal theta activity appeared to be a trait of mindfulness practices.

  16. Théorie $L^p$ pour l'équation de Cauchy-Riemann

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent-Thiébaut, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a systematic study of the Cauchy-Riemann operator in the $L^p$-setting in complex manifolds. We first consider $L^p_{loc}$-theory and then we develop an $L^p$ Andreotti-Grauert theory. Finally we consider Serre duality and its applications to the solvability of the Cauchy-Riemann equation with exact support in $L^p$-spaces.

  17. Th\\'eorie $L^p$ pour l'\\'equation de Cauchy-Riemann

    OpenAIRE

    Laurent-Thiébaut, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a systematic study of the Cauchy-Riemann operator in the $L^p$-setting in complex manifolds. We first consider $L^p_{loc}$-theory and then we develop an $L^p$ Andreotti-Grauert theory. Finally we consider Serre duality and its applications to the solvability of the Cauchy-Riemann equation with exact support in $L^p$-spaces.

  18. Bring's Curve: its Period Matrix and the Vector of Riemann Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Harry W.; Northover, Timothy P.

    2012-10-01

    Bring's curve is the genus 4 Riemann surface with automorphism group of maximal size, S5. Riera and Rodríguez have provided the most detailed study of the curve thus far via a hyperbolic model. We will recover and extend their results via an algebraic model based on a sextic curve given by both Hulek and Craig and implicit in work of Ramanujan. In particular we recover their period matrix; further, the vector of Riemann constants will be identified.

  19. Essay on Fractional Riemann-Liouville Integral Operator versus Mikusinski’s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the representation of the fractional Riemann-Liouville integral by using the Mikusinski operators. The Mikusinski operators discussed in the paper may yet provide a new view to describe and study the fractional Riemann-Liouville integral operator. The present result may be useful for applying the Mikusinski operational calculus to the study of fractional calculus in mathematics and to the theory of filters of fractional order in engineering.

  20. Theta oscillations are sensitive to both early and late conflict processing stages: effects of alcohol intoxication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacevic

    Full Text Available Prior neuroimaging evidence indicates that decision conflict activates medial and lateral prefrontal and parietal cortices. Theoretical accounts of cognitive control highlight anterior cingulate cortex (ACC as a central node in this network. However, a better understanding of the relative primacy and functional contributions of these areas to decision conflict requires insight into the neural dynamics of successive processing stages including conflict detection, response selection and execution. Moderate alcohol intoxication impairs cognitive control as it interferes with the ability to inhibit dominant, prepotent responses when they are no longer correct. To examine the effects of moderate intoxication on successive processing stages during cognitive control, spatio-temporal changes in total event-related theta power were measured during Stroop-induced conflict. Healthy social drinkers served as their own controls by participating in both alcohol (0.6 g/kg ethanol for men, 0.55 g/kg women and placebo conditions in a counterbalanced design. Anatomically-constrained magnetoencephalography (aMEG approach was applied to complex power spectra for theta (4-7 Hz frequencies. The principal generator of event-related theta power to conflict was estimated to ACC, with contributions from fronto-parietal areas. The ACC was uniquely sensitive to conflict during both early conflict detection, and later response selection and execution stages. Alcohol attenuated theta power to conflict across successive processing stages, suggesting that alcohol-induced deficits in cognitive control may result from theta suppression in the executive network. Slower RTs were associated with attenuated theta power estimated to ACC, indicating that alcohol impairs motor preparation and execution subserved by the ACC. In addition to their relevance for the currently prevailing accounts of cognitive control, our results suggest that alcohol-induced impairment of top-down strategic

  1. Epilepsy is related to theta band brain connectivity and network topology in brain tumor patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douw Linda

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both epilepsy patients and brain tumor patients show altered functional connectivity and less optimal brain network topology when compared to healthy controls, particularly in the theta band. Furthermore, the duration and characteristics of epilepsy may also influence functional interactions in brain networks. However, the specific features of connectivity and networks in tumor-related epilepsy have not been investigated yet. We hypothesize that epilepsy characteristics are related to (theta band connectivity and network architecture in operated glioma patients suffering from epileptic seizures. Included patients participated in a clinical study investigating the effect of levetiracetam monotherapy on seizure frequency in glioma patients, and were assessed at two time points: directly after neurosurgery (t1, and six months later (t2. At these time points, magnetoencephalography (MEG was recorded and information regarding clinical status and epilepsy history was collected. Functional connectivity was calculated in six frequency bands, as were a number of network measures such as normalized clustering coefficient and path length. Results At the two time points, MEG registrations were performed in respectively 17 and 12 patients. No changes in connectivity or network topology occurred over time. Increased theta band connectivity at t1 and t2 was related to a higher total number of seizures. Furthermore, higher number of seizures was related to a less optimal, more random brain network topology. Other factors were not significantly related to functional connectivity or network topology. Conclusions These results indicate that (pathologically increased theta band connectivity is related to a higher number of epileptic seizures in brain tumor patients, suggesting that theta band connectivity changes are a hallmark of tumor-related epilepsy. Furthermore, a more random brain network topology is related to greater vulnerability to

  2. Intrahemispheric theta rhythm desynchronization impairs working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseichuk, Ivan; Pabel, Stefanie Corinna; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in large-scale connectivity as one of the crucial factors in working memory. Correlative evidence has revealed the anatomical and electrophysiological players in the working memory network, but understanding of the effective role of their connectivity remains elusive. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study we aimed to identify the causal role of theta phase connectivity in visual-spatial working memory. The frontoparietal network was over- or de-synchronized in the anterior-posterior direction by multi-electrode, 6 Hz transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS). A decrease in memory performance and increase in reaction time was caused by frontoparietal intrahemispheric desynchronization. According to the diffusion drift model, this originated in a lower signal-to-noise ratio, known as the drift rate index, in the memory system. The EEG analysis revealed a corresponding decrease in phase connectivity between prefrontal and parietal areas after tACS-driven desynchronization. The over-synchronization did not result in any changes in either the behavioral or electrophysiological levels in healthy participants. Taken together, we demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating multi-site large-scale networks in humans, and the disruptive effect of frontoparietal desynchronization on theta phase connectivity and visual-spatial working memory.

  3. A Riemann-Hilbert Approach for the Novikov Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet de Monvel, Anne; Shepelsky, Dmitry; Zielinski, Lech

    2016-09-01

    We develop the inverse scattering transform method for the Novikov equation u_t-u_{txx}+4u^2u_x=3u u_xu_{xx}+u^2u_{xxx} considered on the line xin(-∞,∞) in the case of non-zero constant background. The approach is based on the analysis of an associated Riemann-Hilbert (RH) problem, which in this case is a 3× 3 matrix problem. The structure of this RH problem shares many common features with the case of the Degasperis-Procesi (DP) equation having quadratic nonlinear terms (see [Boutet de Monvel A., Shepelsky D., Nonlinearity 26 (2013), 2081-2107, arXiv:1107.5995]) and thus the Novikov equation can be viewed as a ''modified DP equation'', in analogy with the relationship between the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation. We present parametric formulas giving the solution of the Cauchy problem for the Novikov equation in terms of the solution of the RH problem and discuss the possibilities to use the developed formalism for further studying of the Novikov equation.

  4. Hippocampal theta oscillations are slower in humans than in rodents: implications for models of spatial navigation and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Joshua

    2014-02-05

    The theta oscillation is a neuroscience enigma. When a rat runs through an environment, large-amplitude theta oscillations (4-10 Hz) reliably appear in the hippocampus's electrical activity. The consistency of this pattern led to theta playing a central role in theories on the neural basis of mammalian spatial navigation and memory. However, in fact, hippocampal oscillations at 4-10 Hz are rare in humans and in some other species. This presents a challenge for theories proposing theta as an essential component of the mammalian brain, including models of place and grid cells. Here, I examine this issue by reviewing recent research on human hippocampal oscillations using direct brain recordings from neurosurgical patients. This work indicates that the human hippocampus does indeed exhibit rhythms that are functionally similar to theta oscillations found in rodents, but that these signals have a slower frequency of approximately 1-4 Hz. I argue that oscillatory models of navigation and memory derived from rodent data are relevant for humans, but that they should be modified to account for the slower frequency of the human theta rhythm.

  5. Simplifications of the Keiper/Li approach to the Riemann Hypothesis : Simplifications de l'approche de Keiper--Li à l'Hypothèse de Riemann

    OpenAIRE

    Voros, André

    2016-01-01

    The Keiper/Li constants {λ_n } n=1,2,... are asymptotically (n → ∞) sensitive to the Riemann Hypothesis, but highly elusive analytically and difficult to compute numerically. We present quite explicit variant sequences that stay within the abstract Keiper–Li frame, and appear simpler to analyze and compute.

  6. EEG Cortical Connectivity Analysis of Working Memory Reveals Topological Reorganization in Theta and Alpha Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiang Dai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have revealed various working memory (WM-related brain activities that originate from various cortical regions and oscillate at different frequencies. However, multi-frequency band analysis of the brain network in WM in the cortical space remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed a graph theoretical framework to characterize the topological properties of the brain functional network in the theta and alpha frequency bands during WM tasks. Twenty-eight subjects performed visual n-back tasks at two difficulty levels, i.e., 0-back (control task and 2-back (WM task. After preprocessing, Electroencephalogram (EEG signals were projected into the source space and 80 cortical brain regions were selected for further analysis. Subsequently, the theta- and alpha-band networks were constructed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficients between the power series (obtained by concatenating the power values of all epochs in each session of all pairs of brain regions. Graph theoretical approaches were then employed to estimate the topological properties of the brain networks at different WM tasks. We found higher functional integration in the theta band and lower functional segregation in the alpha band in the WM task compared with the control task. Moreover, compared to the 0-back task, altered regional centrality was revealed in the 2-back task in various brain regions that mainly resided in the frontal, temporal and occipital lobes, with distinct presentations in the theta and alpha bands. In addition, significant negative correlations were found between the reaction time with the average path length of the theta-band network and the local clustering of the alpha-band network, which demonstrates the potential for using the brain network metrics as biomarkers for predicting the task performance during WM tasks.

  7. Reversal of theta rhythm flow through intact hippocampal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jesse; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Goutagny, Romain; Bott, Jean-Bastien; Manseau, Frédéric; Kortleven, Christian; Bressler, Steven L; Williams, Sylvain

    2014-10-01

    Activity flow through the hippocampus is thought to arise exclusively from unidirectional excitatory synaptic signaling from CA3 to CA1 to the subiculum. Theta rhythms are important for hippocampal synchronization during episodic memory processing; thus, it is assumed that theta rhythms follow these excitatory feedforward circuits. To the contrary, we found that theta rhythms generated in the rat subiculum flowed backward to actively modulate spike timing and local network rhythms in CA1 and CA3. This reversed signaling involved GABAergic mechanisms. However, when hippocampal circuits were physically limited to a lamellar slab, CA3 outputs synchronized CA1 and the subiculum using excitatory mechanisms, as predicted by classic hippocampal models. Finally, analysis of in vivo recordings revealed that this reversed theta flow was most prominent during REM sleep. These data demonstrate that communication between CA3, CA1 and the subiculum is not exclusively unidirectional or excitatory and that reversed inhibitory theta signaling also contributes to intrahippocampal synchrony.

  8. Theta- and delta-band EEG network dynamics during a novelty oddball task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jeremy; Malone, Stephen M; Iacono, William G

    2017-11-01

    While the P3 component during target detection and novelty processing has been widely studied, less is known about its underlying network dynamics. A recent cognitive model suggests that frontal-parietal and frontal-temporal interregional connectivity are related to attention/action selection and target-related memory updating during the P3, respectively, but empirical work testing this model is lacking. Other work suggests the importance of theta- and delta-band connectivity between the medial frontal cortex and distributed cortical regions during attention, stimulus detection, and response selection processes, and similar dynamics may underlie P3-related network connectivity. The present study evaluated the functional connectivity elicited during a visual task, which combined oddball target and novelty stimuli, in a sample of 231 same-sex twins. It was hypothesized that both target and novel conditions would involve theta frontoparietal connectivity and medial frontal theta power, but that target stimuli would elicit the strongest frontotemporal connectivity. EEG time-frequency analysis revealed greater theta-band frontoparietal connectivity and medial frontal power during both target and novel conditions compared to standards, which may index conflict/uncertainty resolution processes. Theta-band frontotemporal connectivity was maximal during the target condition, potentially reflecting context updating or stimulus-response activation. Delta-band frontocentral-parietal connectivity was also strongest following targets, which may be sensitive to response-related demands. These results suggest the existence of functional networks related to P3 that are differentially engaged by target oddballs and novel distractors. Compared to simple P3 amplitude, network measures may provide a more nuanced view of the neural dynamics during target detection/novelty processing in normative and pathological populations. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. The life-cycle of Riemann-Silberstein electromagnetic vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, J. F.

    2017-11-01

    To study the singularities of a monochromatic electromagnetic wave field in free space, it is desirable to use a quantity that combines both the electric field E and the magnetic field B in equal measure. The Riemann-Silberstein (R-S) field is a way of doing this. It is based on the real physical E and B and one constructs from them the complex vector field {F}={E}+{{i}} {B}. Then, one constructs {F}\\cdot {F} and studies the optical vortices of this R-S complex scalar field. Unlike the better-known and much studied optical vortices of a monochromatic complex scalar field, which are stationary, these vortices are normally in continual motion; they oscillate at the optical frequency. We study their life cycle in the simplest model that is sufficiently generic, namely, fields generated by the interference of four randomly chosen plane elliptically polarised waves. The topological events in the life cycle do not repeat on a 3D space lattice in a stationary laboratory frame. In space-time, however, the R-S vortices are invariant under any Lorentz transformation, and because of this and the inherent time repetition there is a particular moving frame in space-time, reached by a Lorentz transformation, where there exists a repeating pattern of events in space. Its 4D unit cell constitutes, in effect, a description of the whole infinite pattern. Just because they are in constant motion, it is not surprising that the R-S vortex lines in the model make reconnections and appear as rings that either shrink to nothing or appear from nothing. However, these processes occur in groups of four, reflecting the fact that the unit cell is face-centred. What distinguishes the R-S field from the other complex scalar fields containing vortices is the existence of this face-centred repeating cell.

  10. Computational Solutions of Distributed Order Reaction-Diffusion Systems Associated with Riemann-Liouville Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram K. Saxena

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is in continuation of the authors research attempts to derive computational solutions of an unified reaction-diffusion equation of distributed order associated with Caputo derivatives as the time-derivative and Riesz-Feller derivative as space derivative. This article presents computational solutions of distributed order fractional reaction-diffusion equations associated with Riemann-Liouville derivatives of fractional orders as the time-derivatives and Riesz-Feller fractional derivatives as the space derivatives. The method followed in deriving the solution is that of joint Laplace and Fourier transforms. The solution is derived in a closed and computational form in terms of the familiar Mittag-Leffler function. It provides an elegant extension of results available in the literature. The results obtained are presented in the form of two theorems. Some results associated specifically with fractional Riesz derivatives are also derived as special cases of the most general result. It will be seen that in case of distributed order fractional reaction-diffusion, the solution comes in a compact and closed form in terms of a generalization of the Kampé de Fériet hypergeometric series in two variables. The convergence of the double series occurring in the solution is also given.

  11. Learning to learn: theta oscillations predict new learning, which enhances related learning and neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokia, Miriam S; Sisti, Helene M; Choksi, Monica R; Shors, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    Animals in the natural world continuously encounter learning experiences of varying degrees of novelty. New neurons in the hippocampus are especially responsive to learning associations between novel events and more cells survive if a novel and challenging task is learned. One might wonder whether new neurons would be rescued from death upon each new learning experience or whether there is an internal control system that limits the number of cells that are retained as a function of learning. In this experiment, it was hypothesized that learning a task that was similar in content to one already learned previously would not increase cell survival. We further hypothesized that in situations in which the cells are rescued hippocampal theta oscillations (3-12 Hz) would be involved and perhaps necessary for increasing cell survival. Both hypotheses were disproved. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on two similar hippocampus-dependent tasks, trace and very-long delay eyeblink conditioning, while recording hippocampal local-field potentials. Cells that were generated after training on the first task were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine and quantified after training on both tasks had ceased. Spontaneous theta activity predicted performance on the first task and the conditioned stimulus induced a theta-band response early in learning the first task. As expected, performance on the first task correlated with performance on the second task. However, theta activity did not increase during training on the second task, even though more cells were present in animals that had learned. Therefore, as long as learning occurs, relatively small changes in the environment are sufficient to increase the number of surviving neurons in the adult hippocampus and they can do so in the absence of an increase in theta activity. In conclusion, these data argue against an upper limit on the number of neurons that can be rescued from death by learning.

  12. Learning to learn: theta oscillations predict new learning, which enhances related learning and neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam S Nokia

    Full Text Available Animals in the natural world continuously encounter learning experiences of varying degrees of novelty. New neurons in the hippocampus are especially responsive to learning associations between novel events and more cells survive if a novel and challenging task is learned. One might wonder whether new neurons would be rescued from death upon each new learning experience or whether there is an internal control system that limits the number of cells that are retained as a function of learning. In this experiment, it was hypothesized that learning a task that was similar in content to one already learned previously would not increase cell survival. We further hypothesized that in situations in which the cells are rescued hippocampal theta oscillations (3-12 Hz would be involved and perhaps necessary for increasing cell survival. Both hypotheses were disproved. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on two similar hippocampus-dependent tasks, trace and very-long delay eyeblink conditioning, while recording hippocampal local-field potentials. Cells that were generated after training on the first task were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine and quantified after training on both tasks had ceased. Spontaneous theta activity predicted performance on the first task and the conditioned stimulus induced a theta-band response early in learning the first task. As expected, performance on the first task correlated with performance on the second task. However, theta activity did not increase during training on the second task, even though more cells were present in animals that had learned. Therefore, as long as learning occurs, relatively small changes in the environment are sufficient to increase the number of surviving neurons in the adult hippocampus and they can do so in the absence of an increase in theta activity. In conclusion, these data argue against an upper limit on the number of neurons that can be rescued from death by learning.

  13. Emotion regulation by cognitive reappraisal - the role of frontal theta oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Matthias; Hildebrandt, Maria; Ourina, Kristina; Leicht, Gregor; Mulert, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    The regulation of emotion by cognitive reappraisal has attracted a lot of attention over the last decade. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed a wide-spread network of multiple prefrontal and sub-cortical brain regions involved in the successful decrease of negative emotions. However, less is known about the temporal dynamics and the physiological mechanisms underlying these regulation processes. Synchronization of neural oscillations in specific frequency bands plays a key-role in the long-range interaction of different brain regions and oscillatory coupling in the theta frequency range was recently identified to play an important role in the interaction of prefrontal structures, the amygdala and the hippocampus in animal models. Accordingly, we investigated the role of prefrontal theta oscillations during the cognitive reappraisal of aversive pictures in humans. We hypothesized an increase in frontal theta oscillations during emotion regulation and a relationship between frontal theta power and the subjective success of emotion regulation. EEG from 30 healthy participants was recorded while they were asked to passively watch or reappraise the content of pictures with negative content. As expected, we found a significant increase in frequencies around 4Hz at electrode Fz during the regulation condition 'decrease' compared to the 'maintain' condition (p=.006) as well as for the regulation condition 'increase' compared to the 'maintain' condition (p=.017). Additionally, the strength of theta power was positively correlated with the regulation success as reported by the participants (r=0.463, pemotion regulation and a possible physiological mechanism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Existence of solutions for Riemann-Liouvillle type coupled systems of fractional integro-differential equations and boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Alsaedi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study a boundary value problem of coupled systems of nonlinear Riemann-Liouvillle fractional integro-differential equations supplemented with nonlocal Riemann-Liouvillle fractional integro-differential boundary conditions. Our results rely on some standard tools of the fixed point theory. An illustrative example is also discussed.

  15. Deficient Event-Related Theta Oscillations in Individuals at Risk for Alcoholism: A Study of Reward Processing and Impulsivity Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarajan, Chella; Pandey, Ashwini K; Chorlian, David B; Manz, Niklas; Stimus, Arthur T; Anokhin, Andrey P; Bauer, Lance O; Kuperman, Samuel; Kramer, John; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Schuckit, Marc A; Hesselbrock, Victor M; Porjesz, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    Individuals at high risk to develop alcoholism often manifest neurocognitive deficits as well as increased impulsivity. Event-related oscillations (EROs) have been used to effectively measure brain (dys)function during cognitive tasks in individuals with alcoholism and related disorders and in those at risk to develop these disorders. The current study examines ERO theta power during reward processing as well as impulsivity in adolescent and young adult subjects at high risk for alcoholism. EROs were recorded during a monetary gambling task (MGT) in 12-25 years old participants (N = 1821; males = 48%) from high risk alcoholic families (HR, N = 1534) and comparison low risk community families (LR, N = 287) from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Impulsivity scores and prevalence of externalizing diagnoses were also compared between LR and HR groups. HR offspring showed lower theta power and decreased current source density (CSD) activity than LR offspring during loss and gain conditions. Younger males had higher theta power than younger females in both groups, while the older HR females showed more theta power than older HR males. Younger subjects showed higher theta power than older subjects in each comparison. Differences in topography (i.e., frontalization) between groups were also observed. Further, HR subjects across gender had higher impulsivity scores and increased prevalence of externalizing disorders compared to LR subjects. As theta power during reward processing is found to be lower not only in alcoholics, but also in HR subjects, it is proposed that reduced reward-related theta power, in addition to impulsivity and externalizing features, may be related in a predisposition to develop alcoholism and related disorders.

  16. Methods for the computation of the multivalued Painlevé transcendents on their Riemann surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasondini, Marco; Fornberg, Bengt; Weideman, J. A. C.

    2017-09-01

    We extend the numerical pole field solver (Fornberg and Weideman (2011) [12]) to enable the computation of the multivalued Painlevé transcendents, which are the solutions to the third, fifth and sixth Painlevé equations, on their Riemann surfaces. We display, for the first time, solutions to these equations on multiple Riemann sheets. We also provide numerical evidence for the existence of solutions to the sixth Painlevé equation that have pole-free sectors, known as tronquée solutions.

  17. Bring's Curve: its Period Matrix and the Vector of Riemann Constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry W. Braden

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bring's curve is the genus 4 Riemann surface with automorphism group of maximal size, S_5. Riera and Rodríguez have provided the most detailed study of the curve thus far via a hyperbolic model. We will recover and extend their results via an algebraic model based on a sextic curve given by both Hulek and Craig and implicit in work of Ramanujan. In particular we recover their period matrix; further, the vector of Riemann constants will be identified.

  18. Black Women Leaders: The Case of Delta Sigma Theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canady, Hortense

    1985-01-01

    Describes the leadership role taken by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., in educational and economic development, international affairs, and physical and mental health since the organization's founding at Howard University in 1913. (GC)

  19. Hippocampal-Prefrontal Theta Oscillations Support Memory Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, Alexander R; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Szebényi, Szabolcs; Hanslmayr, Simon; Doeller, Christian F

    2016-02-22

    Integration of separate memories forms the basis of inferential reasoning--an essential cognitive process that enables complex behavior. Considerable evidence suggests that both hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) play a crucial role in memory integration. Although previous studies indicate that theta oscillations facilitate memory processes, the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying memory integration remain elusive. To bridge this gap, we recorded magnetoencephalography data while participants performed an inference task and employed novel source reconstruction techniques to estimate oscillatory signals from the hippocampus. We found that hippocampal theta power during encoding predicts subsequent memory integration. Moreover, we observed increased theta coherence between hippocampus and mPFC. Our results suggest that integrated memory representations arise through hippocampal theta oscillations, possibly reflecting dynamic switching between encoding and retrieval states, and facilitating communication with mPFC. These findings have important implications for our understanding of memory-based decision making and knowledge acquisition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. When things look wrong: theta activity in rule violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzur, Gabriel; Berger, Andrea

    2007-10-01

    A violation of a rule or expectation is known to evoke a phasic negative potential over the medial frontal cortex. This electrophysiological effect has been shown for incorrect mathematical equations and incongruent words at the end of sentences. The cognitive processes elicited in rule violation seem to involve violation of expectation, error detection, and conflict between competing cognitions. Consistent with the conceptual relation between rule violation and error/conflict detection, rule violation conditions should involve a power increase in the theta frequency band involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The present study verifies the connection between rule violation and theta activity using a wavelet analysis. Moreover, low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) source localization connects this theta activity to the ACC. Furthermore, the results show that theta activity is sensitive to the salience of the violation, that is, the degree of deviation of the conflicting/erroneous stimulus from the correct (expected) one.

  1. Theta and Gamma Oscillations during Encoding Predict Subsequent Recall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sederberg, Per B; Kahana, Michael J; Howard, Marc W; Donner, Elizabeth J; Madsen, Joseph R

    2003-01-01

    ... to 64 Hz as participants studied lists of common nouns. Significant increases in oscillatory power during encoding predicted subsequent recall, with this effect predominantly in the 4-8 Hz (theta) and 28-64 Hz (gamma) frequency bands...

  2. SMEX03 ThetaProbe Soil Moisture Data: Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes soil moisture data measured with Delta-T Devices’ ThetaProbe ML2 sensors for the Soil Moisture Experiment 2003 (SMEX03), conducted during June...

  3. Matter Mass Generation and Theta Vacuum: Dynamical Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2001-01-01

    This work proposes a stringent concept of matter mass generation and Theta vacuum in the context of local gauge theory for the strong force under the constraint of the flat universe. The matter mass is generated as the consequence of dynamical spontaneous symmetry breaking (DSSB) of gauge symmetry and discrete symmetries, which is motivated by the parameter Theta representing the surface term. Matter mass generation introduces the typical features of constituent particle mass, dual Meissner e...

  4. Using distraction to regulate emotion: insights from EEG theta dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusberg, Andero; Thiruchselvam, Ravi; Gross, James J

    2014-03-01

    Distraction is a powerful and widely-used emotion regulation strategy. Although distraction regulates emotion sooner than other cognitive strategies (Thiruchselvam, Blechert, Sheppes, Rydstrom, & Gross, 2011), it is not yet clear whether it is capable of blocking the earliest stages of emotion generation. To address this issue, we capitalized on the excellent temporal resolution of EEG by focusing on occipital theta dynamics which were associated with distinct stages of visual processing of emotional stimuli. Individually defined theta band dynamics were extracted from a previously published EEG dataset (Thiruchselvam et al., 2011) in which participants attended to unpleasant (and neutral) images or regulated emotion using distraction and reappraisal. Results revealed two peaks within early theta power increase, both of which were increased by emotional stimuli. Distraction did not affect theta power during an early peak (150-350 ms), but did successfully decrease activity in a second peak (350-550 ms). These results suggest that although distraction acts relatively early in the emotion-generative trajectory, it does not block fast detection of emotional significance. Given that theta dynamics were uncorrelated with Late Positive Potential activity, the present results also encourage researchers to add the occipital theta to the growing toolkit of EEG-based measures of emotion regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Generation of theta activity (RSA) in the cingulate cortex of the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.

    1982-01-01

    Unit activity recorded from the cingulate cortex during theta rhythm shows periodic trains of spikes which are phase-locked to the local theta field potential waves. These cortical theta units were also shown to be correlated with hippocampal theta units. These findings, along with the fact that

  6. Fourth-Order Compact Difference Schemes for the Riemann-Liouville and Riesz Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose two new compact difference schemes for numerical approximation of the Riemann-Liouville and Riesz derivatives, respectively. It is shown that these formulas have fourth-order convergence order by means of the Fourier transform method. Finally, some numerical examples are implemented to testify the efficiency of the numerical schemes and confirm the convergence orders.

  7. The Cauchy-Riemann equations: discretization by finite elements, fast solution, and a posteriori error estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will concentrate on the numerical solution of the Cauchy-Riemann equations. First we show that these equations bring together the nite element discretizations for the Laplace equation by standard nite elements on the one hand, and by mixed nite element methods on the other. As a

  8. Scattering analysis of asymmetric metamaterial resonators by the Riemann-Hilbert approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaminski, Piotr Marek; Ziolkowski, Richard W.; Arslanagic, Samel

    2016-01-01

    with an aperture. Exact analytical solution of the problem is derived; it is based on the n-series approach which is casted into the equivalent Riemann-Hilbert problem. The examined configuration leads to large enhancements of the radiated field and to steerable Huygens-like directivity patterns. Particularly...

  9. Riemann type algebraic structures and their differential-algebraic integrability analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prykarpatsky A.K.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential-algebraic approach to studying the Lax type integrability of generalized Riemann type equations is devised. The differentiations and the associated invariant differential ideals are analyzed in detail. The approach is also applied to studying the Lax type integrability of the well known Korteweg-de Vries dynamical system.

  10. Helmholtz, Riemann, and the Sirens: Sound, Color, and the "Problem of Space"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesic, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Emerging from music and the visual arts, questions about hearing and seeing deeply affected Hermann Helmholtz's and Bernhard Riemann's contributions to what became called the "problem of space [ Raumproblem]," which in turn influenced Albert Einstein's approach to general relativity. Helmholtz's physiological investigations measured the time dependence of nerve conduction and mapped the three-dimensional manifold of color sensation. His concurrent studies on hearing illuminated musical evidence through experiments with mechanical sirens that connect audible with visible phenomena, especially how the concept of frequency unifies motion, velocity, and pitch. Riemann's critique of Helmholtz's work on hearing led Helmholtz to respond and study Riemann's then-unpublished lecture on the foundations of geometry. During 1862-1870, Helmholtz applied his findings on the manifolds of hearing and seeing to the Raumproblem by supporting the quadratic distance relation Riemann had assumed as his fundamental hypothesis about geometrical space. Helmholtz also drew a "close analogy … in all essential relations between the musical scale and space." These intersecting studies of hearing and seeing thus led to reconsideration and generalization of the very concept of "space," which Einstein shaped into the general manifold of relativistic space-time.

  11. Bäcklund-Darboux Transformation for Non-Isospectral Canonical System and Riemann-Hilbert Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sakhnovich

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A GBDT version of the Bäcklund-Darboux transformation is constructed for a non-isospectral canonical system, which plays essential role in the theory of random matrix models. The corresponding Riemann-Hilbert problem is treated and some explicit formulas are obtained. A related inverse problem is formulated and solved.

  12. Interaction of a weak discontinuity with elementary waves of Riemann problema)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, R.; Sharma, V. D.

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of a weak discontinuity wave with the elementary waves of the Riemann problem for the one-dimensional Euler equations governing the flow of ideal polytropic gases, and investigate the effects of initial states, and the shock strength on the jumps in shock acceleration and the reflected and transmitted waves.

  13. Generalized Binomial Probability Distributions Attached to Landau Levels on the Riemann Sphere

    OpenAIRE

    Ghanmi, A.; Hafoud, A.; Mouayn, Z.

    2011-01-01

    A family of generalized binomial probability distributions attached to Landau levels on the Riemann sphere is introduced by constructing a kind of generalized coherent states. Their main statistical parameters are obtained explicitly. As an application, photon number statistics related to coherent states under consideration are discussed.

  14. The Great Gorilla Jump: An Introduction to Riemann Sums and Definite Integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealey, Vicki; Engelke, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The great gorilla jump is an activity designed to allow calculus students to construct an understanding of the structure of the Riemann sum and definite integral. The activity uses the ideas of position, velocity, and time to allow students to explore familiar ideas in a new way. Our research has shown that introducing the definite integral as…

  15. Nuclear effects and the NuTeV sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, K.S.; Zeller, G.P.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Avvakumov, S.; Barbaro, L. de; Barbaro, P. de; Bernstein, R.H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.; Drucker, R.B.; Fleming, B.T.; Frey, R.; Formaggio, J.A.; Goldman, J.; Goncharov, M.; Harris, D.A.; Johnson, R.A.; Kim, J.H.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Mason, D.; McDonald, J.; McNulty, C.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Radescu, V.; Romosan, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Schellman, H.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; Suwonjandee, N.; Tzanov, M.; Vakili, M.; Vaitaitis, A.; Yang, U.K.; Yu, J.; Zimmerman, E.D

    2002-11-01

    NuTeV measures sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} by comparing neutral and charged current cross-sections on a heavy nuclear target, and finds a value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup (on-shell)} = 0.2277 {+-} 0.0013(stat) {+-} 0.0009(syst), approximately 3{sigma} from the predicted value. We discuss the possibility that nuclear effects on parton distribution functions or cross-sections may be responsible for the discrepancy.

  16. Transient Global Amnesia Deteriorates the Network Efficiency of the Theta Band.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ho Park

    Full Text Available Acute perturbation of the hippocampus, one of the connector hubs in the brain, is a key step in the pathophysiological cascade of transient global amnesia (TGA. We tested the hypothesis that network efficiency, meaning the efficiency of information exchange over a network, is impaired during the acute stage of TGA. Graph theoretical analysis was applied to resting-state EEG data collected from 21 patients with TGA. The EEG data were obtained twice, once during the acute stage ( 2 months after symptom onset of TGA. Characteristic path lengths and clustering coefficients of functional networks constructed using phase-locking values were computed and normalized as a function of the degree in the delta, theta, alpha, beta 1, beta 2 and gamma frequency bands of the EEG. We investigated whether the normalized characteristic path length (nCPL and normalized clustering coefficients (nCC differed significantly between the acute and resolved stages of TGA at each frequency band using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. For networks where the nCPL or nCC differed significantly between the two stages, we also evaluated changes in the connections of the brain networks. During the acute stage of TGA, the nCPL of the theta band networks with mean degrees of 8, 8.5, 9 and 9.5 significantly increased (P < 0.05. During the acute stage, the lost edges for these networks were mostly found between the anterior (frontal and anterior temporal and posterior (parieto-occipital and posterior temporal brain regions, whereas newly developed edges were primarily found between the left and right frontotemporal regions. The nCC of the theta band with a mean degree of 5.5 significantly decreased during the acute stage (P < 0.05. Our results indicate that TGA deteriorates the network efficiency of the theta frequency band. This effect might be related to the desynchronization between the anterior and posterior brain areas.

  17. Cerebellar theta burst stimulation in stroke patients with ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnì, Sonia; Ponzo, Viviana; Caltagirone, Carlo; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for effective improvement of the symptoms of cerebellar stroke is still limited. Here, we investigated the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over the injured cerebellar hemisphere in six patients with posterior circulation stroke. We applied a two-week course of cerebellar intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS). Before and after the iTBS treatment, paired-pulse TMS methods were used to explore: i) the functional connectivity between the cerebellar hemisphere and the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), by means of the cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) protocol; and ii) the intracortical circuits in the contralateral M1, by means of the short intra-cortical inhibition (SICI) and intra-cortical facilitation (ICF) protocols. Patients were also evaluated using the Modified International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (MICARS). Cerebellar iTBS induced a decrease in CBI and an increase in ICF at an interstimulus interval of 15 msec. These neurophysiological changes were paralleled by a clinical improvement, shown by the MICARS posture and gait subscale scores. Cerebellar iTBS could be a promising tool to promote recovery of cerebellar stroke patients.

  18. Recognition memory and theta-gamma interactions in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimper, John B; Stefanescu, Roxana A; Manns, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Neuronal oscillations and cross-frequency interactions in the rat hippocampus relate in important ways to memory processes and serve as a model for studying oscillatory activity in cognition more broadly. We report here that hippocampal synchrony (CA3-CA1 coherence) increased markedly in the low gamma range as rats were exploring novel objects, particularly those for which the rat subsequently showed good memory. The gamma synchrony varied across phases of the theta rhythm such that coherence was highest at the falling slope and trough of the theta wave. Further, the shape of the theta wave was more asymmetric and elongated at the falling slope during exploration of objects for which the rat subsequently showed good memory as compared with objects for which the rat subsequently showed poor memory. The results showed a strong association between event-related gamma synchrony in rat hippocampus and memory encoding for novel objects. In addition, a novel potential mechanism of cross-frequency interactions was observed whereby dynamic alterations in the shape of theta wave related to memory in correspondence with the strength of gamma synchrony. These findings add to our understanding of how theta and gamma oscillations interact in the hippocampus in the service of memory. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The morphology of midcingulate cortex predicts frontal-midline theta neurofeedback success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eEnriquez-Geppert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Humans differ in their ability to learn how to control their own brain activity by neurofeedback. However, neural mechanisms underlying these inter-individual differences, which may determine training success and associated cognitive enhancement, are not well understood. Here, it is asked whether neurofeedback success of frontal-midline (fm theta, an oscillation related to higher cognitive functions, could be predicted by the morphology of brain structures known to be critically involved in fm-theta generation. Nineteen young, right-handed participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of T1-weighted brain images, and took part in an individualized, eight-session neurofeedback training in order to learn how to enhance activity in their fm-theta frequency band. Initial training success, measured at the second training session, was correlated with the final outcome measure. We found that the inferior, superior and middle frontal cortices were not associated with training success. However, volume of the midcingulate cortex as well as volume and concentration of the underlying white matter structures act as predictor variables for the general responsiveness to training. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical foundation for the ability to learn to control one’s own brain activity.

  20. Theta frequency background tunes transmission but not summation of spiking responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Parameshwaran

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurons are known to fire as a function of frequency and phase of spontaneous network rhythms, associated with the animal's behaviour. This dependence is believed to give rise to precise rate and temporal codes. However, it is not well understood how these periodic membrane potential fluctuations affect the integration of synaptic inputs. Here we used sinusoidal current injection to the soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the rat brain slice to simulate background oscillations in the physiologically relevant theta and gamma frequency range. We used a detailed compartmental model to show that somatic current injection gave comparable results to more physiological synaptically driven theta rhythms incorporating excitatory input in the dendrites, and inhibitory input near the soma. We systematically varied the phase of synaptic inputs with respect to this background, and recorded changes in response and summation properties of CA1 neurons using whole-cell patch recordings. The response of the cell was dependent on both the phase of synaptic inputs and frequency of the background input. The probability of the cell spiking for a given synaptic input was up to 40% greater during the depolarized phases between 30-135 degrees of theta frequency current injection. Summation gain on the other hand, was not affected either by the background frequency or the phasic afferent inputs. This flat summation gain, coupled with the enhanced spiking probability during depolarized phases of the theta cycle, resulted in enhanced transmission of summed inputs during the same phase window of 30-135 degrees. Overall, our study suggests that although oscillations provide windows of opportunity to selectively boost transmission and EPSP size, summation of synaptic inputs remains unaffected during membrane oscillations.

  1. Modification of the Riemann problem and the application for the boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyncl, Martin; Pelant, Jaroslav

    We work with the system of partial differential equations describing the non-stationary compressible turbulent fluid flow. It is a characteristic feature of the hyperbolic equations, that there is a possible raise of discontinuities in solutions, even in the case when the initial conditions are smooth. The fundamental problem in this area is the solution of the so-called Riemann problem for the split Euler equations. It is the elementary problem of the one-dimensional conservation laws with the given initial conditions (LIC - left-hand side, and RIC - right-hand side). The solution of this problem is required in many numerical methods dealing with the 2D/3D fluid flow. The exact (entropy weak) solution of this hyperbolical problem cannot be expressed in a closed form, and has to be computed by an iterative process (to given accuracy), therefore various approximations of this solution are being used. The complicated Riemann problem has to be further modified at the close vicinity of boundary, where the LIC is given, while the RIC is not known. Usually, this boundary problem is being linearized, or roughly approximated. The inaccuracies implied by these simplifications may be small, but these have a huge impact on the solution in the whole studied area, especially for the non-stationary flow. Using the thorough analysis of the Riemann problem we show, that the RIC for the local problem can be partially replaced by the suitable complementary conditions. We suggest such complementary conditions accordingly to the desired preference. This way it is possible to construct the boundary conditions by the preference of total values, by preference of pressure, velocity, mass flow, temperature. Further, using the suitable complementary conditions, it is possible to simulate the flow in the vicinity of the diffusible barrier. On the contrary to the initial-value Riemann problem, the solution of such modified problems can be written in the closed form for some cases. Moreover

  2. Hemoglobins in the genome of the cryptomonad Guillardia theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David R; Vinogradov, Serge N; Hoogewijs, David

    2014-05-08

    Cryptomonads, are a lineage of unicellular and mostly photosynthetic algae, that acquired their plastids through the "secondary" endosymbiosis of a red alga - and still retain the nuclear genome (nucleomorph) of the latter. We find that the genome of the cryptomonad Guillardia theta comprises genes coding for 13 globin domains, of which 6 occur within two large chimeric proteins. All the sequences adhere to the vertebrate 3/3 myoglobin fold. Although several globins have no introns, the remainder have atypical intron locations. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses suggest that the G. theta Hbs are related to the stramenopile and chlorophyte single domain globins.

  3. GRUNWALD-LETNIKOV, RIEMANN-LIOUVILLE VE CAPUTO KESİRSEL TÜREVLERİ ÜZERİNE

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZEN, Saime; ÖZTÜRK, İlhan

    2004-01-01

    Bu çalışmada Grünwald-Letnikov, Riemann-Liouville ve Caputo kesirsel türevleri üzerinde duruldu. Ayrıca GrünwaldLetnikov, Riemann-Liouville ve Caputo kesirsel türevlerinin birbiriyle olan ilişkilerini gösteren bazı özel örnekler bulundu

  4. Ship-induced solitary Riemann waves of depression in Venice Lagoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnell, Kevin E. [College of Marine and Environmental Sciences and Centre for Tropical Environmental and Sustainability Sciences, James Cook University, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Soomere, Tarmo, E-mail: soomere@cs.ioc.ee [Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Estonian Academy of Sciences, Kohtu 6, 10130 Tallinn (Estonia); Zaggia, Luca [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice (Italy); Rodin, Artem [Institute of Cybernetics at Tallinn University of Technology, Akadeemia tee 21, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Lorenzetti, Giuliano [Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venice (Italy); Rapaglia, John [Sacred Heart University Department of Biology, 5151 Park Avenue, Fairfield, CT 06825 (United States); Scarpa, Gian Marco [Università Ca' Foscari, Dorsoduro 3246, 30123 Venice (Italy)

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrate that ships of moderate size, sailing at low depth Froude numbers (0.37–0.5) in a navigation channel surrounded by shallow banks, produce depressions with depths up to 2.5 m. These depressions (Bernoulli wakes) propagate as long-living strongly nonlinear solitary Riemann waves of depression substantial distances into Venice Lagoon. They gradually become strongly asymmetric with the rear of the depression becoming extremely steep, similar to a bore. As they are dynamically similar, air pressure fluctuations moving over variable-depth coastal areas could generate meteorological tsunamis with a leading depression wave followed by a devastating bore-like feature. - Highlights: • Unprecedently deep long-living ship-induced waves of depression detected. • Such waves are generated in channels with side banks under low Froude numbers. • The propagation of these waves is replicated using Riemann waves. • Long-living waves of depression form bore-like features at rear slope.

  5. Classical Particle in Presence of Magnetic Field, Hyperbolic Lobachevsky and Spherical Riemann Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kudryashov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion of a classical particle in 3-dimensional Lobachevsky and Riemann spaces is studied in the presence of an external magnetic field which is analogous to a constant uniform magnetic field in Euclidean space. In both cases three integrals of motions are constructed and equations of motion are solved exactly in the special cylindrical coordinates on the base of the method of separation of variables. In Lobachevsky space there exist trajectories of two types, finite and infinite in radial variable, in Riemann space all motions are finite and periodical. The invariance of the uniform magnetic field in tensor description and gauge invariance of corresponding 4-potential description is demonstrated explicitly. The role of the symmetry is clarified in classification of all possible solutions, based on the geometric symmetry group, SO(3,1 and SO(4 respectively.

  6. Laplace transformations of hydrodynamic type systems in Riemann invariants periodic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Ferapontov, E V

    1997-01-01

    The conserved densities of hydrodynamic type system in Riemann invariants satisfy a system of linear second order partial differential equations. For linear systems of this type Darboux introduced Laplace transformations, generalising the classical transformations in the scalar case. It is demonstrated that Laplace transformations can be pulled back to the transformations of the corresponding hydrodynamic type systems. We discuss periodic Laplace sequences of with the emphasize on the simplest nontrivial case of period 2. For 3-component systems in Riemann invariants a complete description of closed quadruples is proposed. They turn to be related to a special quadratic reduction of the (2+1)-dimensional 3-wave system which can be reduced to a triple of pairwize commuting Monge-Ampere equations. In terms of the Lame and rotation coefficients Laplace transformations have a natural interpretation as the symmetries of the Dirac operator, associated with the (2+1)-dimensional n-wave system. The 2-component Laplace...

  7. Clifford and Riemann-Finsler structures in geometric mechanics and gravity selected works

    CERN Document Server

    Vacaru, S; Gaburov, E; Gonta, D

    2006-01-01

    The book contains a collection of works on Riemann-Cartan and metric-affine manifolds provided with nonlinear connection structure and on generalized Finsler-Lagrange and Cartan-Hamilton geometries and Clifford structures modelled on such manifolds. The choice of material presented has evolved from various applications in modern gravity and geometric mechanics and certain generalizations to noncommutative Riemann-Finsler geometry. The authors develop and use the method of anholonomic frames with associated nonlinear connection structure and apply it to a number of concrete problems: constructing of generic off-diagonal exact solutions, in general, with nontrivial torsion and nonmetricity, possessing noncommutative symmetries and describing black ellipsoid/torus configurations, locally anisotropic wormholes, gravitational solitons and warped factors and investigation of stability of such solutions; classification of Lagrange/ Finsler -- affine spaces; definition of nonholonomic Dirac operators and their applic...

  8. Statistical mechanics of Coulomb gases as quantum theory on Riemann surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulden, Tobias; Janas, Michael; Kamenev, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Statistical mechanics of 1D Coulomb gases may be mapped onto (in general) non-Hermitian quantum mechanics. We use this example to develop non-Hermitian instanton calculus. Treating momentum and coordinate as independent complex variables, constant energy manifolds are given by Riemann surfaces of genus g >= 1 . The actions along principal cycles on these surfaces obey an ODE in the moduli space of the Riemann surface known as the Picard-Fuchs equation. Solving the Picard-Fuchs equation yields semiclassical spectra as well as instanton effects such as width of Bloch bands (the latter determines energy barrier for charge transport). Both are shown to be in perfect agreement with numerical simulations. Applications include transport through biological ion channels as well as nanofluidics, e.g water filled nanotubes. The work was supported by NSF grant DMR1306734.

  9. An Exact, Compressible One-Dimensional Riemann Solver for General, Convex Equations of State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, James Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-05

    This note describes an algorithm with which to compute numerical solutions to the one- dimensional, Cartesian Riemann problem for compressible flow with general, convex equations of state. While high-level descriptions of this approach are to be found in the literature, this note contains most of the necessary details required to write software for this problem. This explanation corresponds to the approach used in the source code that evaluates solutions for the 1D, Cartesian Riemann problem with a JWL equation of state in the ExactPack package [16, 29]. Numerical examples are given with the proposed computational approach for a polytropic equation of state and for the JWL equation of state.

  10. Experimental Generation of Riemann Waves in Optics: A Route to Shock Wave Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Benjamin; Bongiovanni, Domenico; Kues, Michael; Hu, Yi; Chen, Zhigang; Trillo, Stefano; Dudley, John M; Wabnitz, Stefano; Morandotti, Roberto

    2016-08-12

    We report the first observation of Riemann (simple) waves, which play a crucial role for understanding the dynamics of any shock-bearing system. This was achieved by properly tailoring the phase of an ultrashort light pulse injected into a highly nonlinear fiber. Optical Riemann waves are found to evolve in excellent quantitative agreement with the remarkably simple inviscid Burgers equation, whose applicability in physical systems is often challenged by viscous or dissipative effects. Our method allows us to further demonstrate a viable novel route to efficiently control the shock formation by the proper shaping of a laser pulse phase. Our results pave the way towards the experimental study, in a convenient benchtop setup, of complex physical phenomena otherwise difficult to access.

  11. The unified Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative formulae

    OpenAIRE

    R. C. Soni; Deepika Singh

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we obtain two unified fractional derivative formulae. The first involves the product of two general class of polynomials and the multivariable $H$-function. The second fractional derivative formula also involves the product of two general class of polynomials and the multivariable $H$-function and has been obtained by the application of the first fractional derivative formula twice and it has two independent variables instead of one. The polynomials and the functions involved i...

  12. Codomains for the Cauchy-Riemann and Laplace operators in ℝ2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Edgar S. Moyo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A codomain for a nonzero constant-coefficient linear partial differential operator P(∂ with fundamental solution E is a space of distributions T for which it is possible to define the convolution E*T and thus solving the equation P(∂S=T. We identify codomains for the Cauchy-Riemann operator in ℝ2 and Laplace operator in ℝ2 . The convolution is understood in the sense of the S′-convolution.

  13. Monotone iterative technique for finite systems of nonlinear Riemann-Liouville fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Denton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparison results of the nonlinear scalar Riemann-Liouville fractional differential equation of order \\(q\\, \\(0 \\lt q \\leq 1\\, are presented without requiring Hölder continuity assumption. Monotone method is developed for finite systems of fractional differential equations of order \\(q\\, using coupled upper and lower solutions. Existence of minimal and maximal solutions of the nonlinear fractional differential system is proved.

  14. Topological sectors and measures on moduli space in quantum Yang-Mills on a Riemann surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Dana Stanley

    1996-03-01

    Previous path integral treatments of Yang-Mills on a Riemann surface automatically sum over principal fiber bundles of all possible topological types in computing quantum expectations. This paper extends the path integral formulation to treat separately each topological sector. The formulation is sufficiently explicit to calculate Wilson line expectations exactly. Further, it suggests two new measures on the moduli space of flat connections, one of which proves to agree with the small-volume limit of the Yang-Mills measure.

  15. Augmented Riemann solvers for the shallow water equations over variable topography with steady states and inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, David L.

    2008-03-01

    We present a class of augmented approximate Riemann solvers for the shallow water equations in the presence of a variable bottom surface. These belong to the class of simple approximate solvers that use a set of propagating jump discontinuities, or waves, to approximate the true Riemann solution. Typically, a simple solver for a system of m conservation laws uses m such discontinuities. We present a four wave solver for use with the the shallow water equations—a system of two equations in one dimension. The solver is based on a decomposition of an augmented solution vector—the depth, momentum as well as momentum flux and bottom surface. By decomposing these four variables into four waves the solver is endowed with several desirable properties simultaneously. This solver is well-balanced: it maintains a large class of steady states by the use of a properly defined steady state wave—a stationary jump discontinuity in the Riemann solution that acts as a source term. The form of this wave is introduced and described in detail. The solver also maintains depth non-negativity and extends naturally to Riemann problems with an initial dry state. These are important properties for applications with steady states and inundation, such as tsunami and flood modeling. Implementing the solver with LeVeque's wave propagation algorithm [R.J. LeVeque, Wave propagation algorithms for multi-dimensional hyperbolic systems, J. Comput. Phys. 131 (1997) 327-335] is also described. Several numerical simulations are shown, including a test problem for tsunami modeling.

  16. Working memory performance inversely predicts spontaneous delta and theta-band scaling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Matthew J; Wiltshire, Travis J; Niermeyer, Madison A; Butner, Jonathan E

    2016-04-15

    Electrophysiological studies have strongly implicated theta-band activity in human working memory processes. Concurrently, work on spontaneous, non-task-related oscillations has revealed the presence of long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs) within sub-bands of the ongoing EEG, and has begun to demonstrate their functional significance. However, few studies have yet assessed the relation of LRTCs (also called scaling relations) to individual differences in cognitive abilities. The present study addressed the intersection of these two literatures by investigating the relation of narrow-band EEG scaling relations to individual differences in working memory ability, with a particular focus on the theta band. Fifty-four healthy adults completed standardized assessments of working memory and separate recordings of their spontaneous, non-task-related EEG. Scaling relations were quantified in each of the five classical EEG frequency bands via the estimation of the Hurst exponent obtained from detrended fluctuation analysis. A multilevel modeling framework was used to characterize the relation of working memory performance to scaling relations as a function of general scalp location in Cartesian space. Overall, results indicated an inverse relationship between both delta and theta scaling relations and working memory ability, which was most prominent at posterior sensors, and was independent of either spatial or individual variability in band-specific power. These findings add to the growing literature demonstrating the relevance of neural LRTCs for understanding brain functioning, and support a construct- and state-dependent view of their functional implications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The noncommutative standard model. Construction beyond leading order in {theta} and collider phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alboteanu, A.M.

    2007-07-01

    Within this work we study the phenomenological consequences of a possible realization of QFT on noncommutative space-time. In the first part we performed a phenomenological analysis of the hadronic process pp {yields} Z{sub {gamma}} {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}{gamma} at the LHC and of electron-positron pair annihilation into a Z boson and a photon at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The noncommutative extension of the SM considered within this work relies on two building blocks: the Moyal-Weyl *-product of functions on ordinary space-time and the Seiberg-Witten maps. A consequence of the noncommutativity of space-time is the violation of rotational invariance with respect to the beam axis. This effect shows up in the azimuthal dependence of cross sections, which is absent in the SM as well as in other models beyond the SM. We have found this dependence to be best suited for deriving the sensitivity bounds on the noncommutative scale NC. By studying pp{yields}Z{sub {gamma}} {yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}{gamma} to first order in the noncommutative parameter {theta}, we show in the first part of this work that measurements at the LHC are sensitive to noncommutative effects only in certain cases, giving bounds on the noncommutative scale of {lambda}{sub NC} >or similar 1.2 TeV. By means of e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} Z{sub {gamma}} {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -}{gamma} to O({theta}) we have shown that ILC measurements are complementary to LHC measurements of the noncommutative parameters. In addition, the bounds on {lambda}{sub NC} derived from the ILC are significantly higher and reach {lambda}{sub NC} >or similar 6 TeV. In the second part of this work we expand the neutral current sector of the noncommutative SM to second order in {theta}. We found that, against the general expectation, the theory must be enlarged by additional parameters. The new parameters enter the theory as ambiguities of the Seiberg-Witten maps. The latter are not uniquely determined and differ by

  18. Wilson loops on Riemann surfaces, Liouville theory and covariantization of the conformal group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matone, Marco; Pasti, Paolo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei” and INFN,Università di Padova, Via Marzolo, 8-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-06-03

    The covariantization procedure is usually referred to the translation operator, that is the derivative. Here we introduce a general method to covariantize arbitrary differential operators, such as the ones defining the fundamental group of a given manifold. We focus on the differential operators representing the sl{sub 2}(ℝ) generators, which in turn, generate, by exponentiation, the two-dimensional conformal transformations. A key point of our construction is the recent result on the closed forms of the Baker-Campbell-Hausdorff formula. In particular, our covariantization receipt is quite general. This has a deep consequence since it means that the covariantization of the conformal group is always definite. Our covariantization receipt is quite general and apply in general situations, including AdS/CFT. Here we focus on the projective unitary representations of the fundamental group of a Riemann surface, which may include elliptic points and punctures, introduced in the framework of noncommutative Riemann surfaces. It turns out that the covariantized conformal operators are built in terms of Wilson loops around Poincaré geodesics, implying a deep relationship between gauge theories on Riemann surfaces and Liouville theory.

  19. Limit of Riemann Solutions to the Nonsymmetric System of Keyfitz-Kranzer Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The limit of Riemann solutions to the nonsymmetric system of Keyfitz-Kranzer type with a scaled pressure is considered for both polytropic gas and generalized Chaplygin gas. In the former case, the delta shock wave can be obtained as the limit of shock wave and contact discontinuity when u->u+ and the parameter ϵ tends to zero. The point is, the delta shock wave is not the one of transport equations, which is obviously different from cases of some other systems such as Euler equations or relativistic Euler equations. For the generalized Chaplygin gas, unlike the polytropic or isothermal gas, there exists a certain critical value ϵ2 depending only on the Riemann initial data, such that when ϵ drops to ϵ2, the delta shock wave appears as u->u+, which is actually a delta solution of the same system in one critical case. Then as ϵ becomes smaller and goes to zero at last, the delta shock wave solution is the exact one of transport equations. Furthermore, the vacuum states and contact discontinuities can be obtained as the limit of Riemann solutions when u-

  20. Conditional symmetries and Riemann invariants for inhomogeneous hydrodynamic-type systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundland, A M [Centre de Recherches Mathematiques, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, (QC) H3C 3J7 (Canada); Huard, B, E-mail: grundlan@crm.umontreal.c, E-mail: huard@dms.umontreal.c [Departement de mathematiques et de statistique, CP 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, (QC) H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2010-11-12

    A new approach to the solution of quasilinear nonelliptic first-order systems of inhomogeneous partial differential equations in many dimensions is presented. It is based on a version of the conditional symmetry and Riemann invariant methods. We discuss in detail the necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of rank-2 and rank-3 solutions expressible in terms of Riemann invariants. We perform the analysis using the Cayley-Hamilton theorem for a certain algebraic system associated with the initial system. The problem of finding such solutions has been reduced to expanding a set of trace conditions on wave vectors and their profiles which are expressible in terms of Riemann invariants. A couple of theorems useful for the construction of such solutions are given. These theoretical considerations are illustrated by the example of inhomogeneous equations of fluid dynamics which describe motion of an ideal fluid subjected to gravitational and Coriolis forces. Several new rank-2 solutions are obtained. Some physical interpretation of these results is given.

  1. Event-related theta power during lexical-semantic retrieval and decision conflict is modulated by alcohol intoxication: anatomically-constrained MEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija eMarinkovic

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Language processing is commonly characterized by an event-related increase in theta power (4-7 Hz in scalp EEG. Oscillatory brain dynamics underlying alcohol's effects on language are poorly understood despite impairments on verbal tasks. To investigate how moderate alcohol intoxication modulates event-related theta activity during visual word processing, healthy social drinkers (N=22, 11 females participated in both alcohol (0.6 g/kg ethanol for men, 0.55 g/kg for women and placebo conditions in a counterbalanced design. They performed a double-duty lexical decision task as they detected real words among nonwords. An additional requirement to respond to all words that also referred to animals induced response conflict. High density whole head MEG signals and midline scalp EEG data were decomposed for each trial with Morlet wavelets. Each person’s reconstructed cortical surface was used to constrain noise-normalized distributed minimum norm inverse solutions for theta frequencies. Alcohol intoxication increased reaction time and marginally affected accuracy. The overall spatiotemporal pattern is consistent with the left-lateralized fronto-temporal activation observed in language studies applying time domain analysis. Event-related theta power was sensitive to the two functions manipulated by the task. First, theta estimated to the left-lateralized fronto-temporal areas reflected lexical-semantic retrieval, indicating that this measure is well suited for investigating the neural basis of language functions. While alcohol attenuated theta power overall, it was particularly deleterious to semantic retrieval since it reduced theta to real words but not pseudowords. Second, a highly overlapping prefrontal network comprising lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex was sensitive to decision conflict and was also affected by intoxication, in agreement with previous studies indicating that executive functions are especially vulnerable to

  2. Evaluation of Alpha Theta training on neurophysiology, mood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this small scale study was to evaluate changes in consciousness, with special reference to neurophysiology, mood, mindfulness, health and spirituality, related to an alpha theta training programme of five sessions. There were 6 participants, 4 men and 2 women with mean age of 43 years and age range of 26 to ...

  3. Classical Conditioning of Hippocampal Theta Patterns in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    associated with changes in performance of learned tasks , 1,4,5, 8,9 there have been very few studies of neurona l plasticity of the hippocampus It self...rapid development of a conditioned hippocampal theta response to a visual sti mulus demonstrates tha t there is considerable neurona l plasticity in the

  4. A Low energy neutrino factory for large theta(13)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, Steve; Mena, Olga; /Fermilab /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Pascoli, Silvia; /Durham U., IPPP

    2007-01-01

    If the value of {theta}{sub 13} is within the reach of the upcoming generation of long-baseline experiments, T2K and NOvA, they show that a low-energy neutrino factory, with peak energy in the few GeV range, would provide a sensitive tool to explore CP-violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy. They consider baselines with typical length 1000-1500 km. The unique performance of the low energy neutrino factory is due to the rich neutrino oscillation pattern at energies between 1 and 4 GeV at baselines {Omicron}(1000) km. They perform both a semi-analytical study of the sensitivities and a numerical analysis to explore how well this setup can measure {theta}{sub 13}, CP-violation, and determine the type of mass hierarchy and the {theta}{sub 23} quadrant. A low energy neutrino factory provides a powerful tool to resolve ambiguities and make precise parameter determinations, for both large and fairly small values of the mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}.

  5. Athletes in a Slump: Neurophysiological Evidence from Frontal Theta Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingu Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the neurophysiological differences in athletes who suffer from a slump and other athletes who do not. Eighteen high school student athletes participated in this experiment. A subjective questionnaire was conducted to identify athletes in a slump (i.e., the slump group and not in a slump (i.e., the no-slump group. EEG data was recorded at 4 regions (left prefrontal, right prefrontal, left frontal, and right frontal. A two-way (2 groups x 4 regions ANOVA was performed on the dependent variable (i.e., frontal theta power. The findings of this study demonstrated that participants in the no-slump group showed higher frontal theta activity than their counterparts in the slump group. From the findings of this study, it is suggested that mental fatigue may cause low frontal theta activity in athletes who experience a slump. The present study makes an important contribution to the current literature by being the first to report that EEG theta power over frontal regions can be used as a marker of athletes suffering from a slump.

  6. Alpha- and theta-range cortical synchronization and corticomuscular coherence during joystick manipulation in a virtual navigation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Hori, Etsuro; Kuwayama, Naoya; Ono, Taketoshi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have reported that multiple brain regions are activated during spatial navigation, but it remains unclear how this activation is converted to motor commands for navigation. This study was aimed to investigate synchronization across different brain regions and between cortical areas and muscles during spatial navigation. This synchronization has been suggested to be essential for integrating activity in the multiple brain areas to support higher cognitive functions and for conversion of cortical activity to motor commands. In the present study, the subjects were required to sequentially trace ten checkpoints in a virtual town by manipulating a joystick and to perform this three times while electroencephalograms and electromyograms from the right arm were monitored. Time spent on the task in the third trial was significantly lesser than that in the first trial indicating an improvement in task performance. This repeated learning was associated with an increase in alpha power at the electrodes over the contralateral sensorimotor region and in theta power at the electrodes over the bilateral premotor and frontotemporal regions. Alpha- and theta-range corticocortical coherences between these regions and other brain areas were also increased in the third trial compared to the first trial. Furthermore, alpha- and theta-range corticomuscular coherence was significantly increased in the second and third trials compared to the first trial. These results suggest that alpha- and theta-range synchronous activity across multiple systems is essential for the integrated brain activity required in spatial navigation and for the conversion of this activity to motor commands.

  7. Oscillatory Brain States and Learning: Impact of Hippocampal Theta-Contingent Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthew A. Seager; Lynn D. Johnson; Elizabeth S. Chabot; Yukiko Asaka; Stephen D. Berry

    2002-01-01

    .... When studying rabbits in this paradigm, we observed a dramatic modification of learning rate by conducting training during episodes of either hippocampal theta or hippocampal non-theta activity...

  8. Hippocampal theta phase-contingent memory retrieval in delay and trace eyeblink conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Waselius, Tomi; Pöllänen, Eveliina; Wikgren, Jan; Penttonen, Markku; Nokia, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampal theta oscillations (3–12 Hz) play a prominent role in learning. It has been suggested that encoding and retrieval of memories are supported by different phases of the theta cycle. Our previous study on trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits suggests that the timing of the conditioned stimulus (CS) in relation to theta phase affects encoding but not retrieval of the memory trace. Here, we directly tested the effects of hippocampal theta phase on memory retrieval in two experiments ...

  9. Evidence that Clostridium perfringens theta-toxin induces colloid-osmotic lysis of erythrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, R. W.; Sims, P J; Tweten, R K

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens theta-toxin was shown to lyse target erythrocytes by a colloid-osmotic mechanism. Analysis showed the onset of lysis of erythrocytes by theta-toxin could be temporarily stabilized with 0.3 M sucrose. Flow cytometry analysis of the size distribution of theta-toxin-treated erythrocytes showed swelling of the erythrocytes prior to lysis.

  10. Multidimensional Riemann problem with self-similar internal structure. Part II - Application to hyperbolic conservation laws on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Multidimensional Riemann solvers that have internal sub-structure in the strongly-interacting state have been formulated recently (D.S. Balsara (2012, 2014) [5,16]). Any multidimensional Riemann solver operates at the grid vertices and takes as its input all the states from its surrounding elements. It yields as its output an approximation of the strongly interacting state, as well as the numerical fluxes. The multidimensional Riemann problem produces a self-similar strongly-interacting state which is the result of several one-dimensional Riemann problems interacting with each other. To compute this strongly interacting state and its higher order moments we propose the use of a Galerkin-type formulation to compute the strongly interacting state and its higher order moments in terms of similarity variables. The use of substructure in the Riemann problem reduces numerical dissipation and, therefore, allows a better preservation of flow structures, like contact and shear waves. In this second part of a series of papers we describe how this technique is extended to unstructured triangular meshes. All necessary details for a practical computer code implementation are discussed. In particular, we explicitly present all the issues related to computational geometry. Because these Riemann solvers are Multidimensional and have Self-similar strongly-Interacting states that are obtained by Consistency with the conservation law, we call them MuSIC Riemann solvers. (A video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers is available on http://www.elsevier.com/xml/linking-roles/text/html". The MuSIC framework is sufficiently general to handle general nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions. It can also accommodate all self-similar one-dimensional Riemann solvers and subsequently produces a multidimensional version of the same. In this paper we focus on unstructured triangular meshes. As examples of different systems of conservation laws we

  11. Prestimulus theta in the human hippocampus predicts subsequent recognition but not recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkow, Maxwell B; Burke, John F; Stein, Joel M; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Human theta (4-8 Hz) activity in the medial temporal lobe correlates with memory formation; however, the precise role that theta plays in the memory system remains elusive (Hanslmayr and Staudigl, ). Recently, prestimulus theta activity has been associated with successful memory formation, although its specific cognitive role remains unknown (e.g., Fell et al., 2011). In this report, we demonstrate that prestimulus theta in the hippocampus indexes encoding that supports old-new recognition memory but not recall. These findings suggest that human hippocampal prestimulus theta may preferentially participate in the encoding of item information, as opposed to associative information. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Simplified scaling model for the THETA-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, K. J.; Thomson, D. B.

    1982-02-01

    A simple ID scaling model for the fast THETA-pinch was developed and written as a code that would be flexible, inexpensive in computer time, and readily available for use with the Los Alamos explosive-driven high-magnetic-field program. The simplified model uses three successive separate stages: (1) a snowplow-like radial implosion, (2) an idealized resistive annihilation of reverse bias field, and (3) an adiabatic compression stage of a BETA = 1 plasma for which ideal pressure balance is assumed to hold. The code uses one adjustable fitting constant whose value was first determined by comparison with results from the Los Alamos Scylla III, Scyllacita, and Scylla IA THETA-pinches.

  13. Event-related theta synchronization predicts deficit in facial affect recognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csukly, Gábor; Stefanics, Gábor; Komlósi, Sarolta; Czigler, István; Czobor, Pál

    2014-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests that abnormalities in the synchronized oscillatory activity of neurons in schizophrenia may lead to impaired neural activation and temporal coding and thus lead to neurocognitive dysfunctions, such as deficits in facial affect recognition. To gain an insight into the neurobiological processes linked to facial affect recognition, we investigated both induced and evoked oscillatory activity by calculating the Event Related Spectral Perturbation (ERSP) and the Inter Trial Coherence (ITC) during facial affect recognition. Fearful and neutral faces as well as nonface patches were presented to 24 patients with schizophrenia and 24 matched healthy controls while EEG was recorded. The participants' task was to recognize facial expressions. Because previous findings with healthy controls showed that facial feature decoding was associated primarily with oscillatory activity in the theta band, we analyzed ERSP and ITC in this frequency band in the time interval of 140-200 ms, which corresponds to the N170 component. Event-related theta activity and phase-locking to facial expressions, but not to nonface patches, predicted emotion recognition performance in both controls and patients. Event-related changes in theta amplitude and phase-locking were found to be significantly weaker in patients compared with healthy controls, which is in line with previous investigations showing decreased neural synchronization in the low frequency bands in patients with schizophrenia. Neural synchrony is thought to underlie distributed information processing. Our results indicate a less effective functioning in the recognition process of facial features, which may contribute to a less effective social cognition in schizophrenia. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. EEG Theta and Mu Oscillations during Perception of Human and Robot Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu A. Urgen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Perception of others’ actions supports important social skills, such as communication, intention understanding, and empathy. Are mechanisms of action processing in human brain specifically tuned to process biological agents? Humanoid robots can perform recognizable actions, but can look and move differently from humans so they can be used as stimuli to address such questions. Here, we recorded EEG during the observation of human and robot actions. Sensorimotor mu (8-13 Hz rhythm has been linked to the motor simulation aspect of action processing (and to human mirror neuron system, MNS and frontal theta (4-8 Hz rhythm to semantic and memory-related aspects. We explored whether these measures exhibit selectivity for biological entities: for whether the motion and/or the visual appearance of the observed agent is biological. Participants watched videos of three agents performing the same actions. The first was a Human, and had biological motion and appearance. The other two were a state-of-the-art robot in two different appearances: Android, which had biological appearance but mechanical motion, and Robot, which had mechanical motion and appearance. Observation of all agents induced significant attenuation in the power of mu oscillations that was equivalent for all agents. Thus, mu suppression, considered an index of the activity of the MNS, did not appear to be selective for biological agents. Observation of the Robot resulted in greater frontal theta activity compared to the Android and the Human, whereas the latter two did not differ from each other. Frontal theta activity thus appears to be sensitive to visual appearance, suggesting artificial agents that are not sufficiently biological in appearance may result in greater memory processing demands for the observer. Studies combining robotics and neuroscience thus can allow us to explore functional properties of action processing on the one hand, and help inform the design of social robots on

  15. The role of REM theta activity in emotional memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Camilla Hutchison

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available While NREM sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of REM sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity – which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex – is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale PGO waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and the gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces observed in both wake and REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep acetylcholine levels – which are thought to reduce hippocampal afferent inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate recurrent activation within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus.

  16. Theta coordinated error-driven learning in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Ketz

    Full Text Available The learning mechanism in the hippocampus has almost universally been assumed to be Hebbian in nature, where individual neurons in an engram join together with synaptic weight increases to support facilitated recall of memories later. However, it is also widely known that Hebbian learning mechanisms impose significant capacity constraints, and are generally less computationally powerful than learning mechanisms that take advantage of error signals. We show that the differential phase relationships of hippocampal subfields within the overall theta rhythm enable a powerful form of error-driven learning, which results in significantly greater capacity, as shown in computer simulations. In one phase of the theta cycle, the bidirectional connectivity between CA1 and entorhinal cortex can be trained in an error-driven fashion to learn to effectively encode the cortical inputs in a compact and sparse form over CA1. In a subsequent portion of the theta cycle, the system attempts to recall an existing memory, via the pathway from entorhinal cortex to CA3 and CA1. Finally the full theta cycle completes when a strong target encoding representation of the current input is imposed onto the CA1 via direct projections from entorhinal cortex. The difference between this target encoding and the attempted recall of the same representation on CA1 constitutes an error signal that can drive the learning of CA3 to CA1 synapses. This CA3 to CA1 pathway is critical for enabling full reinstatement of recalled hippocampal memories out in cortex. Taken together, these new learning dynamics enable a much more robust, high-capacity model of hippocampal learning than was available previously under the classical Hebbian model.

  17. Impact of Prefrontal Theta Burst Stimulation on Clinical Neuropsychological Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Viejo-Sobera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Theta burst stimulation (TBS protocols hold high promise in neuropsychological rehabilitation. Nevertheless, their ability to either decrease (continuous, cTBS or increase (intermittent, iTBS cortical excitability in areas other than the primary motor cortex, and their consistency modulating human behaviors with clinically relevant tasks remain to be fully established. The behavioral effects of TBS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC are particularly interesting given its involvement in working memory (WM and executive functions (EF, often impaired following frontal brain damage. We aimed to explore the ability of cTBS and iTBS to modulate WM and EF in healthy individuals, assessed with clinical neuropsychological tests (Digits Backward, 3-back task, Stroop Test, and Tower of Hanoi. To this end, 36 participants were assessed using the four tests 1 week prior to stimulation and immediately following a single session of either cTBS, iTBS, or sham TBS, delivered to the left dlPFC. No significant differences were found across stimulation conditions in any of the clinical tasks. Nonetheless, in some of them, active stimulation induced significant pre/post performance modulations, which were not found for the sham condition. More specifically, sham stimulation yielded improvements in the 3-back task and the Color, Color-Word, and Interference Score of the Stroop Test, an effect likely caused by task practice. Both, iTBS and cTBS, produced improvements in Digits Backward and impairments in 3-back task accuracy. Moreover, iTBS increased Interference Score in the Stroop Test in spite of the improved word reading and impaired color naming, whereas cTBS decreased the time required to complete the Tower of Hanoi. Differing from TBS outcomes reported for cortico-spinal measures on the primary motor cortex, our analyses did not reveal any of the expected performance differences across stimulation protocols. However, if one considers independently

  18. Differential frontal theta activity during cognitive and motor tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kwangmin; Choi, Youngjin; Kim, Jingu; Kim, Yujin; Chio, Sungmook

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated psychophysiological differences between cognitive and motor tasks. Participants were 16 university students (male[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]10, female[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]6) aged between 24 to 31 years (mean[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]27.6 years, SD[Formula: see text][Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] years). They were instructed to perform cognitive and motor tasks while their brain activity was simultaneously recorded using electroencephalography (EEG). A 3(task)[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]8(area)[Formula: see text][Formula: see text][Formula: see text]4(bands) analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. The results showed that the cognitive task resulted in a significantly higher spectral power in the theta band at frontal electrodes than did the motor task. This suggests that the frontal lobe might be engaged in problem solving, resulting in increased theta activity. However, there were no differences in alpha and beta activity between the two tasks. The present study provides psychophysiological evidence for classifying cognitive and motor tasks, which has been a controversial issue for task classifications in motor learning research.

  19. Cosmological lepton asymmetry with a nonzero mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$

    CERN Document Server

    Castorina, Emanuele; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pastor, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    While the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is nowadays well measured by cosmological observations, the bounds on the lepton asymmetry in the form of neutrinos are still significantly weaker. We place limits on the relic neutrino asymmetries using some of the latest cosmological data, taking into account the effect of flavor oscillations. We present our results for two different values of the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13}, and show that for large \\theta_{13} the limits on the total neutrino asymmetry become more stringent, diluting even large initial flavor asymmetries. In particular, we find that the present bounds are still dominated by the limits coming from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, while the limits on the total neutrino mass from cosmological data are essentially independent of \\theta_{13}. Finally, we perform a forecast for COrE, taken as an example of a future CMB experiment, and find that it could improve the limits on the total lepton asymmetry approximately by up to a factor 5.

  20. Theta signal as the neural signature of social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofori, Irene; Moretti, Laura; Harquel, Sylvain; Posada, Andres; Deiana, Gianluca; Isnard, Jean; Mauguière, François; Sirigu, Angela

    2013-10-01

    The feeling of being excluded from a social interaction triggers social pain, a sensation as intense as actual physical pain. Little is known about the neurophysiological underpinnings of social pain. We addressed this issue using intracranial electroencephalography in 15 patients performing a ball game where inclusion and exclusion blocks were alternated. Time-frequency analyses showed an increase in power of theta-band oscillations during exclusion in the anterior insula (AI) and posterior insula, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC), and the fusiform "face area" (FFA). Interestingly, the AI showed an initial fast response to exclusion but the signal rapidly faded out. Activity in the sACC gradually increased and remained significant thereafter. This suggests that the AI may signal social pain by detecting emotional distress caused by the exclusion, whereas the sACC may be linked to the learning aspects of social pain. Theta activity in the FFA was time-locked to the observation of a player poised to exclude the participant, suggesting that the FFA encodes the social value of faces. Taken together, our findings suggest that theta activity represents the neural signature of social pain. The time course of this signal varies across regions important for processing emotional features linked to social information.

  1. Background-independent measurement of $\\theta_{13}$ in Double Chooz

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Y; Barriere, J C; Baussan, E; Bekman, I; Bergevin, M; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukov, L; Blucher, E; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chauveau, E; Chimenti, P; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Elnimr, M; Etenko, A; Fallot, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fernandes, S M; Fischer, V; Franco, D; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Grant, C; Haag, N; Hara, T; Haser, J; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Hourlier, A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L N; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Kawasaki, T; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; López-Casta\; LoSecco, J M; Lucht, S; Maeda, J; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Minotti, A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Nikitenko, Y; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Palomares, C; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Röhling, M; Roncin, R; Roth, S; Rybolt, B; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schilithz, A C; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Shaevitz, M H; Sharankova, R; Shimojima, S; Sibille, V; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Stokes, L F F; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Svoboda, R; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Thi, H H Trinh; Valdiviesso, G; Vassilopoulos, N; Veyssiere, C; Vivier, M; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Wurm, M; Yang, G; Yermia, F; Zimmer, V

    2014-01-01

    The oscillation results published by the Double Chooz collaboration in 2011 and 2012 rely on background models substantiated by reactor-on data. In this analysis, we present a background-model-independent measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by including 7.53 days of reactor-off data. A global fit of the observed neutrino rates for different reactor power conditions is performed, yielding a measurement of both $\\theta_{13}$ and the total background rate. The results on the mixing angle are improved significantly by including the reactor-off data in the fit, as it provides a direct measurement of the total background rate. This reactor rate modulation analysis considers antineutrino candidates with neutron captures on both Gd and H, whose combination yields $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})=$ 0.102 $\\pm$ 0.028(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.033(syst.). The results presented in this study are fully consistent with the ones already published by Double Chooz, achieving a competitive precision. They provide, for the first time, a de...

  2. Theta, mental flexibility, and post-traumatic stress disorder: connecting in the parietal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T Dunkley

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a mental health injury characterised by re-experiencing, avoidance, numbing and hyperarousal. Whilst the aetiology of the disorder is relatively well understood, there is debate about the prevalence of cognitive sequelae that manifest in PTSD. In particular, there are conflicting reports about deficits in executive function and mental flexibility. Even less is known about the neural changes that underlie such deficits. Here, we used magnetoencephalography to study differences in functional connectivity during a mental flexibility task in combat-related PTSD (all males, mean age = 37.4, n = 18 versus a military control (all males, mean age = 33.05, n = 19 group. We observed large-scale increases in theta connectivity in the PTSD group compared to controls. The PTSD group performance was compromised in the more attentionally-demanding task and this was characterised by 'late-stage' theta hyperconnectivity, concentrated in network connections involving right parietal cortex. Furthermore, we observed significant correlations with the connectivity strength in this region with a number of cognitive-behavioural outcomes, including measures of attention, depression and anxiety. These findings suggest atypical coordination of neural synchronisation in large scale networks contributes to deficits in mental flexibility for PTSD populations in timed, attentionally-demanding tasks, and this propensity toward network hyperconnectivity may play a more general role in the cognitive sequelae evident in this disorder.

  3. Supersymmetric version of a hydrodynamic system in Riemann invariants and its solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundland, A. M.; Hariton, A. J.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a supersymmetric extension of a system of hydrodynamic-type equations involving Riemann invariants is formulated in terms of a superspace and superfield formalism. The symmetry properties of both the classical and supersymmetric versions of this hydrodynamical model are analyzed through the use of group-theoretical methods applied to partial differential equations involving both bosonic and fermionic variables. More specifically, we compute the Lie superalgebras of both models and perform classifications of their respective subalgebras. A systematic use of the subalgebra structures allows us to construct several classes of invariant solutions, including traveling waves, centered waves, and solutions involving monomials, exponentials, and radicals.

  4. Every even number greater than 2 is the sum of two primes provided Riemann hypothesis holds

    OpenAIRE

    Sabihi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    We solve Goldbach's conjecture for all the evens greater than 2. This solution is based upon the proof of Sabihi's first and second conjectures (my own conjectures on Goldbach's one) and Riemann Hypothesis is supposed to be correct. Our essential method goes through compleax integral analysis. The first conjecture states that $L(N(k))-D(N(k))\\geq K(N(k),m)\\geq 2$ and $N(k)\\geq 120$, but since the proof can be exhaustive for special case $N(k)=n$, we therefore prove it in such a case. The seco...

  5. Analytical solution to the Riemann problem of 1D elastodynamics with general constitutive laws

    CERN Document Server

    Berjamin, H; Chiavassa, G; Favrie, N

    2016-01-01

    Under the hypothesis of small deformations, the equations of 1D elastodynamics write as a 2 x 2 hyperbolic system of conservation laws. Here, we study the Riemann problem for convex and nonconvex constitutive laws. In the convex case, the solution can include shock waves or rarefaction waves. In the nonconvex case, compound waves must also be considered. In both convex and nonconvex cases, a new existence criterion for the initial velocity jump is obtained. Also, admissibility regions are determined. Lastly, analytical solutions are completely detailed for various constitutive laws (hyperbola, tanh and polynomial), and reference test cases are proposed.

  6. Riemann method for the plane strain of a homogeneous porous plastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, S. E.; Lyamina, E. A.

    2015-03-01

    The system of static equations describing the stress state in a homogeneous porous plastic material obeying the pyramidal yield criterion is studied under plane strain conditions. It is shown that determining the curvature radii of the characteristics amounts to solving the telegraph equation. Thus, it is expedient to construct the net of characteristics by the Riemann method, which is widely used to solve boundary value problems in the classical theory of plasticity of incompressible materials. These solutions can directly be generalized to the considered porous material model.

  7. Meromorphic Matrix Trivializations of Factors of Automorphy over a Riemann Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, Joseph A.; Clancey, Kevin F.; Vinnikov, Victor

    2015-01-01

    It is a consequence of the Jacobi Inversion Theorem that a line bundle over a Riemann surface M of genus g has a meromorphic section having at most g poles, or equivalently, the divisor class of a divisor D over M contains a divisor having at most g poles (counting multiplicities). We explore various analogues of these ideas for vector bundles and associated matrix divisors over M. The most explicit results are for the genus 1 case. We also review and improve earlier results concerning the co...

  8. An iterative Riemann solver for systems of hyperbolic conservation law s, with application to hyperelastic solid mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Gregory H.

    2003-08-06

    In this paper we present a general iterative method for the solution of the Riemann problem for hyperbolic systems of PDEs. The method is based on the multiple shooting method for free boundary value problems. We demonstrate the method by solving one-dimensional Riemann problems for hyperelastic solid mechanics. Even for conditions representative of routine laboratory conditions and military ballistics, dramatic differences are seen between the exact and approximate Riemann solution. The greatest discrepancy arises from misallocation of energy between compressional and thermal modes by the approximate solver, resulting in nonphysical entropy and temperature estimates. Several pathological conditions arise in common practice, and modifications to the method to handle these are discussed. These include points where genuine nonlinearity is lost, degeneracies, and eigenvector deficiencies that occur upon melting.

  9. Modulation of induced frontocentral theta (Fm-theta) event-related (de-)synchronisation dynamics following mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenberg, P.L.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Depressive severity has been associated with attenuated neocortical frontal midline theta (Fm-theta) power/evoked activity. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) has shown to be a successful novel intervention for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), albeit precise working mechanisms remain

  10. Search for $\\Theta^+(1540)$ pentaquark in high statistics measurement of $\\gamma p \\to \\bar K^0 K^+ n$ at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Battaglieri; R. De Vita; V. Kubarovsky; L. Guo; G.S. Mutchler; P. Stoler; D.P. Weygand

    2005-10-01

    The exclusive reaction {gamma}p {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +}n was studied in the photon energy range between 1.6-3.8 GeV searching for evidence of the exotic baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540) {yields} nK{sup +}. The decay to nK{sup +} requires the assignment of strangeness S = +1 to any observed resonance. Data were collected with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 70 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark was found. Upper limits were set on the production cross section as function of center-of-mass angle and nK{sup +} mass. The 95% CL upper limit on the total cross section for a narrow resonance at 1540 MeV was found to be 0.8 nb.

  11. The neuronal mechanisms underlying improvement of impulsivity in ADHD by theta/beta neurofeedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluschke, Annet; Broschwitz, Felicia; Kohl, Simon; Roessner, Veit; Beste, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is increasingly recognized as an intervention to treat core symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the large number of studies having been carried out to evaluate its effectiveness, it is widely elusive what neuronal mechanisms related to the core symptoms of ADHD are modulated by neurofeedback. 19 children with ADHD undergoing 8 weeks of theta/beta neurofeedback and 17 waiting list controls performed a Go/Nogo task in a pre-post design. We used neurophysiological measures combining high-density EEG recording with source localization analyses using sLORETA. Compared to the waiting list ADHD control group, impulsive behaviour measured was reduced after neurofeedback treatment. The effects of neurofeedback were very specific for situations requiring inhibitory control over responses. The neurophysiological data shows that processes of perceptual gating, attentional selection and resource allocation processes were not affected by neurofeedback. Rather, neurofeedback effects seem to be based on the modulation of response inhibition processes in medial frontal cortices. The study shows that specific neuronal mechanisms underlying impulsivity are modulated by theta/beta neurofeedback in ADHD. The applied neurofeedback protocol could be particularly suitable to address inhibitory control. The study validates assumed functional neuroanatomical target regions of an established neurofeedback protocol on a neurophysiological level. PMID:27514985

  12. Learning curves of theta/beta neurofeedback in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Tieme W P; Bink, Marleen; Weeda, Wouter D; Geladé, Katleen; van Mourik, Rosa; Maras, Athanasios; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2017-05-01

    Neurofeedback is widely applied as non-pharmacological intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of ADHD, even though efficacy has not been unequivocally established. Neuronal changes during the neurofeedback intervention that resemble learning can provide crucial evidence for the feasibility and specificity of this intervention. A total of 38 children (aged between 7 and 13 years) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD, completed on average 29 sessions of theta (4-8 Hz)/beta (13-20 Hz) neurofeedback training. Dependent variables included training-related measures as well as theta and beta power during baseline and training runs for each session. Learning effects were analyzed both within and between sessions. To further specify findings, individual learning curves were explored and correlated with behavioral changes in ADHD symptoms. Over the course of the training, there was a linear increase in participants' mean training level, highest obtained training level and the number of earned credits (range b = 0.059, -0.750, p neurofeedback, although a lack of behavioral correlates may indicate insufficient transfer to daily functioning, or to confounding reinforcement of electromyographic activity. This trial is registered at the US National Institutes of Health (ClinicalTrials.gov, ref. no: NCT01363544); https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01363544 .

  13. Theta Brain Rhythms Index Perceptual Narrowing in Infant Speech Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis eBosseler

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants’ initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the worlds’ languages narrows—native discrimination increases while nonnative discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4-8Hz, reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech stimuli in two dimensions, stimulus frequency (frequent vs. infrequent and language (native vs. nonnative speech syllables and tested 6-month-old infants, 12-month-old infants, and adults. We hypothesized that 6-month-old infants would show increased relative theta power (RTP for frequent syllables, regardless of their status as native or nonnative syllables, reflecting young infants’ attention and cognitive effort in response to highly frequent stimuli (statistical learning. In adults, we hypothesized increased RTP for nonnative stimuli, regardless of their presentation frequency, reflecting increased cognitive effort for nonnative phonetic categories. The 12-month-old infants were expected to show a pattern in transition, but one more similar to adults than to 6-month-old infants. The MEG brain rhythm results supported these hypotheses. We suggest that perceptual narrowing in speech perception is governed by an implicit learning process. This learning process involves an implicit shift in attention from frequent events (infants to learned categories (adults. Theta brain oscillatory activity may provide an index of perceptual narrowing beyond speech, and would offer a test of whether the early speech learning process is governed by domain-general or domain-specific processes.

  14. Increased theta band EEG power in sickle cell disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Case M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Case,1 Sina Shirinpour,1 Huishi Zhang,1 Yvonne H Datta,2 Stephen C Nelson,3 Karim T Sadak,4 Kalpna Gupta,2 Bin He1,5 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, 3Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 4Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital, 5Institute for Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Objective: Pain is a major issue in the care of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD. The mechanisms behind pain and the best way to treat it are not well understood. We studied how electroencephalography (EEG is altered in SCD patients. Methods: We recruited 20 SCD patients and compared their resting state EEG to that of 14 healthy controls. EEG power was found across frequency bands using Welch’s method. Electrophysiological source imaging was assessed for each frequency band using the eLORETA algorithm. Results: SCD patients had increased theta power and decreased beta2 power compared to controls. Source localization revealed that areas of greater theta band activity were in areas related to pain processing. Imaging parameters were significantly correlated to emergency department visits, which indicate disease severity and chronic pain intensity. Conclusion: The present results support the pain mechanism referred to as thalamocortical dysrhythmia. This mechanism causes increased theta power in patients. Significance: Our findings show that EEG can be used to quantitatively evaluate differences between controls and SCD patients. Our results show the potential of EEG to differentiate between different levels of pain in an unbiased setting, where specific frequency bands could be used as biomarkers for chronic pain. Keywords: sickle cell disease, electroencephalography, chronic pain, electrophysiological source imaging, thalamocortical dysrhythmia

  15. Zeros of the alternating zeta function on the line R(s)=1

    OpenAIRE

    Sondow, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The alternating zeta function zeta*(s) = 1 - 2^{-s} + 3^{-s} - ... is related to the Riemann zeta function by the identity (1-2^{1-s})zeta(s) = zeta*(s). We deduce the vanishing of zeta*(s) at each nonreal zero of the factor 1-2^{1-s} without using the identity. Instead, we use a formula connecting the partial sums of the series for zeta*(s) to Riemann sums for the integral of x^{-s} from x=1 to x=2. We relate the proof to our earlier paper "The Riemann Hypothesis, simple zeros, and the asymp...

  16. Enhancing early consolidation of human episodic memory by theta EEG neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozengurt, Roman; Shtoots, Limor; Sheriff, Aviv; Sadka, Ofir; Levy, Daniel A

    2017-10-10

    Consolidation of newly formed memories is readily disrupted, but can it be enhanced? Given the prominent role of hippocampal theta oscillations in memory formation and retrieval, we hypothesized that upregulating theta power during early stages of consolidation might benefit memory stability and persistence. We used EEG neurofeedback to enable participants to selectively increase theta power in their EEG spectra following episodic memory encoding, while other participants engaged in low beta-focused neurofeedback or passively viewed a neutral nature movie. Free recall assessments immediately following the interventions, 24h later and 7d later all indicated benefit to memory of theta neurofeedback, relative to low beta neurofeedback or passive movie-viewing control conditions. The degree of benefit to memory was correlated with the extent of theta power modulation, but not with other spectral changes. Theta enhancement may provide optimal conditions for stabilization of new hippocampus-dependent memories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Is $n\\sin\\theta$ conserved along light path?

    CERN Document Server

    Noorbala, Mahdiyar

    2016-01-01

    Snell's law states that the quantity $n\\sin\\theta$ is unchanged in refraction of light passing from one medium to another. We inquire whether this is true in the general case where the speed of light varies continuously within a medium. It turns out to be an instructive exercise in application of Snell's law and Fermat's principle. It also provides good pedagogical problems in calculus of variations to deal with the subtleties of a variable domain of integration and inclusion of constraints. The final result of these exercises is that, contrary to an initial expectation, the answer to the question in the title is negative.

  18. Approximate Riemann solvers and flux vector splitting schemes for two-phase flow; Solveurs de Riemann approches et schemas de decentrement de flux pour les ecoulements diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toumi, I.; Kumbaro, A.; Paillere, H

    1999-07-01

    These course notes, presented at the 30. Von Karman Institute Lecture Series in Computational Fluid Dynamics, give a detailed and through review of upwind differencing methods for two-phase flow models. After recalling some fundamental aspects of two-phase flow modelling, from mixture model to two-fluid models, the mathematical properties of the general 6-equation model are analysed by examining the Eigen-structure of the system, and deriving conditions under which the model can be made hyperbolic. The following chapters are devoted to extensions of state-of-the-art upwind differencing schemes such as Roe's Approximate Riemann Solver or the Characteristic Flux Splitting method to two-phase flow. Non-trivial steps in the construction of such solvers include the linearization, the treatment of non-conservative terms and the construction of a Roe-type matrix on which the numerical dissipation of the schemes is based. Extension of the 1-D models to multi-dimensions in an unstructured finite volume formulation is also described; Finally, numerical results for a variety of test-cases are shown to illustrate the accuracy and robustness of the methods. (authors)

  19. Hippocampal theta phase-contingent memory retrieval in delay and trace eyeblink conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waselius, Tomi; Pöllänen, Eveliina; Wikgren, Jan; Penttonen, Markku; Nokia, Miriam S

    2018-01-30

    Hippocampal theta oscillations (3-12Hz) play a prominent role in learning. It has been suggested that encoding and retrieval of memories are supported by different phases of the theta cycle. Our previous study on trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits suggests that the timing of the conditioned stimulus (CS) in relation to theta phase affects encoding but not retrieval of the memory trace. Here, we directly tested the effects of hippocampal theta phase on memory retrieval in two experiments conducted on adult female New Zealand White rabbits. In Experiment 1, animals were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning followed by extinction, and memory retrieval was tested by presenting the CS at troughs and peaks of the theta cycle during different stages of learning. In Experiment 2, animals were trained in delay conditioning either contingent on a high level of theta or at a random neural state. Conditioning was then followed by extinction conducted either at a random state, contingent on theta trough or contingent on theta peak. Our current results indicate that the phase of theta at CS onset has no effect on the performance of the behavioral learned response at any stage of classical eyeblink conditioning or extinction. In addition, theta-contingent trial presentation does not improve learning during delay eyeblink conditioning. The results are consistent with our earlier findings and suggest that the theta phase alone is not sufficient to affect learning at the behavioral level. It seems that the retrieval of recently acquired memories and consequently performing a learned response is moderated by neural mechanisms other than hippocampal theta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hippocampal theta-band activity and trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Nokia, Miriam; Penttonen, Markku; Korhonen, Tapani; Wikgren, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between hippocampal theta activity and trace eyeblink conditioning. Hippocampal electrophysiological local field potentials were recorded before, during, and after conditioning or explicitly unpaired training sessions in adult male New Zealand White rabbits. As expected, a high relative power of theta activity (theta ratio) in the hippocampus predicted faster acquisition of the conditioned response during trace conditioning but, contrary to previous resul...

  1. Pentaquark {Theta}{sup +} production from the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} {Theta}{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Liu; C. M. Ko; V. Kubarovsky

    2004-02-01

    The cross section for {Theta}{sup +} production from the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} {Theta}{sup +}, which was observed in the CLAS experiment at the Jefferson National Laboratory, is evaluated in a hadronic model that includes couplings of {Theta}{sup +} to both KN and K*N. With their coupling constants determined from the empirical {pi} NN(1710) and {rho} NN(1710) coupling constants using the SU(3) symmetry, the cross section for this reaction has been evaluated by taking {Theta}{sup +} to have spin 1/2 and isospin 0 but either positive or negative parity. We find that the cross section is 10-15 nb if {Theta}{sup +} has positive parity as predicted by the chiral soliton model. The cross section is reduced by more than a factor of 10 if {Theta}{sup +} has negative parity as given by lattice QCD studies. For both parities, the differential distribution peaks at small negative four momentum transfer as expected from the dominating t-channel kaon-exchange diagram that involves only the coupling of {Theta}{sup +} to KN.

  2. Le critère de Li et l'hypothèse de Riemann pour la classe de Selberg

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omar, Sami; Mazhouda, Kamel

    2007-01-01

    ... so, we use the Weil Explicit Formula. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. Tous droits réservés. Keywords: Selberg class; Riemann hypothesis; Li’s criterion 1. Introduction et notations En 1997, ...

  3. AdS5 solutions from M5-branes on Riemann surface and D6-branes sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Ibrahima

    2015-09-01

    We describe the gravity duals of four-dimensional N=1 superconformal field theories obtained by wrapping M5-branes on a punctured Riemann surface. The internal geometry, normal to the AdS 5 factor, generically preserves two U(1)s, with generators ( J +, J -), that are fibered over the Riemann surface. The metric is governed by a single potential that satisfies a version of the Monge-Ampère equation. The spectrum of N=1 punctures is given by the set of supersymmetric sources of the potential that are localized on the Riemann surface and lead to regular metrics near a puncture. We use this system to study a class of punctures where the geometry near the sources corresponds to M-theory description of D6-branes. These carry a natural ( p, q) label associated to the circle dual to the killing vector pJ + + qJ - which shrinks near the source. In the generic case the world volume of the D6-branes is AdS 5 × S 2 and they locally preserve N=2 supersymmetry. When p = - q, the shrinking circle is dual to a flavor U(1). The metric in this case is non-degenerate only when there are co-dimension one sources obtained by smearing M5-branes that wrap the AdS 5 factor and the circle dual the superconformal R-symmetry. The D6-branes are extended along the AdS 5 and on cups that end on the co-dimension one branes. In the special case when the shrinking circle is dual to the R-symmetry, the D6-branes are extended along the AdS 5 and wrap an auxiliary Riemann surface with an arbitrary genus. When the Riemann surface is compact with constant curvature, the system is governed by a Monge-Ampère equation.

  4. When shock is shocked: Riemann problem dynamics at pulse ionization of a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshchenko, Igor; Znamenskaya, Irina; Koroteev, Dmitry; Kuli-zade, Tahir

    2017-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the gas flow discontinuities after pulse ionization of a half space in front of a flat shock wave moving in a channel. Pulse volumetric electric discharge initiated in the vicinity of the shock concentrates in front of the shock and heats the gas there. The heating is shown to be very rapid. We use the shadow imaging technique and a high speed camera to study the flow pattern evolution after the discharge. The pattern consists of two shocks separated by a contact surface. This structure corresponds to the classical Riemann problem formulation. Based on the observed pattern, we estimate the amount of discharge energy converted to heat during the discharge time: the rate of temperature increase is in the order of several degrees K per nanosecond.

  5. Riemann-Hilbert technique scattering analysis of metamaterial-based asymmetric 2D open resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Piotr M.; Ziolkowski, Richard W.; Arslanagić, Samel

    2017-12-01

    The scattering properties of metamaterial-based asymmetric two-dimensional open resonators excited by an electric line source are investigated analytically. The resonators are, in general, composed of two infinite and concentric cylindrical layers covered with an infinitely thin, perfect conducting shell that has an infinite axial aperture. The line source is oriented parallel to the cylinder axis. An exact analytical solution of this problem is derived. It is based on the dual-series approach and its transformation to the equivalent Riemann-Hilbert problem. Asymmetric metamaterial-based configurations are found to lead simultaneously to large enhancements of the radiated power and to highly steerable Huygens-like directivity patterns; properties not attainable with the corresponding structurally symmetric resonators. The presented open resonator designs are thus interesting candidates for many scientific and engineering applications where enhanced directional near- and far-field responses, tailored with beam shaping and steering capabilities, are highly desired.

  6. A Riemann-Hilbert problem for the shape of a body dissolving in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nick; Huang, Jinzi Mac; Ristroph, Leif; Applied Math Lab, Courant Institute Team

    2014-11-01

    As is familiar to anyone who has stirred sugar into coffee, fluid flow can enhance the dissolution of solid material. This effect plays an important role in contexts as varied as landscape formation and drug delivery within the body, but such processes are not well understood due to the interaction between evolving surfaces and flow. By performing experiments with hard-candy bodies dissolving in fast flowing water, we find that different initial geometries converge to the same final shape as they vanish. By modeling both the separated flow around the body and the molecular diffusion of material within the boundary layer, we obtain a Riemann-Hilbert problem for the terminal shape. The solution predicts a front surface of nearly constant curvature, in agreement with experimental measurements. Once formed, this geometry dissolves self-similarly in time and vanishes with a power-law predicted by the model.

  7. Differential Galois theory through Riemann-Hilbert correspondence an elementary introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Sauloy, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Differential Galois theory is an important, fast developing area which appears more and more in graduate courses since it mixes fundamental objects from many different areas of mathematics in a stimulating context. For a long time, the dominant approach, usually called Picard-Vessiot Theory, was purely algebraic. This approach has been extensively developed and is well covered in the literature. An alternative approach consists in tagging algebraic objects with transcendental information which enriches the understanding and brings not only new points of view but also new solutions. It is very powerful and can be applied in situations where the Picard-Vessiot approach is not easily extended. This book offers a hands-on transcendental approach to differential Galois theory, based on the Riemann-Hilbert correspondence. Along the way, it provides a smooth, down-to-earth introduction to algebraic geometry, category theory and tannakian duality. Since the book studies only complex analytic linear differential equat...

  8. Riemann sum method for non-line-of-sight ultraviolet communication in noncoplanar geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peng; Zhou, Xianli; Song, Fei; Zhao, Taifei; Li, Yunhong

    2017-12-01

    The non-line-of-sight ultraviolet (UV) communication relies on the scattering common volume, however, it is difficult to carry out the triple integral operation of the scattering common volume. Based on UV single-scattering propagation theory and the spherical coordinate, we propose to use the Riemann sum method (RSM) to analyze the link path loss (PL) of UV communication system in noncoplanar geometries, and carried out related simulations. In addition, an outdoor testbed using UV light-emitting diode was set up to provide support for the validity of the RSM. When the elevation angles of the transmitter or the receiver are small, using RSM, the channel PL and temporal response of UV communication systems can be effectively and efficiently calculated. It is useful in UV embedded system design.

  9. Cálculo de series armónicas de Riemann con exponente par

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Morales Paredes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La llamada función Zeta de Riemann fue introducida por Euler mediante la definición , que se trata de una serie convergente en la que z es un número complejo con parte real mayor que uno. El presente trabajo va encaminado a presentar una fórmula recurrente para el cálculo de series . Es conocido que Euler desarrolló este mismo caso particular, trabajando con los ceros de la función zeta [3], nosotros realizamos dicho cálculo utilizando la función cot z e inducción matemática. Para la comprensión de este escrito, es necesario que el lector tenga algunas nociones de variable compleja, como son: función analítica, expansión en serie de Taylor, series de Laurent, entre otros [1], [2].

  10. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M D Tofazzal Hossain

    Full Text Available The glutathione transferase (GST superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  11. Establishing the Thematic Structure and Investigating the most Prominent Theta Roles Used in Sindhi Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahid Ali Veesar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the thematic structure of the Sindhi verbs to find theta roles in the Sindhi language. The study tries to answer the research questions; “What are the thematic structures of Sindhi verbs?” and “What are the prominent theta roles in the Sindhi language?” It examines the argument/thematic structure of Sindhi verbs and also finds the theta roles assigned by the Sindhi verbs to their arguments along with the most prominent theta roles used in the Sindhi language. The data come from the two interviews taken from two young native Sindhi speakers, which consist of 2 hours conversation having 1,669 sentences in natural spoken version of the Sindhi language. Towards the end, it has been found that the Sindhi language has certain theta roles which are assigned by the verbs to their arguments in sentences. Each verb phrase in our data is thus examined and studied in detail in terms of Argument/Thematic structure in order to find theta roles in Sindhi language. Thus, in this regard, each verb phrase (in a sentence has been examined with the help of Carnie’s theoretical framework (Thematic Relation and Theta Roles: 2006 in order to find the prominent theta roles in the Sindhi language. The data have been examined and analysed on the basis of the Carnie’s theoretical framework. The study finds that the Sindhi language has all (09 theta roles which have been proposed by Carnie (2006. It has been found that six prominent theta roles out of nine are used prominently in Sindhi. The six prominent theta roles in Sindhi language are: agent, theme, beneficiary, recipient, locative and goal.

  12. Increased Entorhinal–Prefrontal Theta Synchronization Parallels Decreased Entorhinal–Hippocampal Theta Synchronization during Learning and Consolidation of Associative Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori; Maal-Bared, Geith; Morrissey, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Memories are thought to be encoded as a distributed representation in the neocortex. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been shown to support the expression of memories that initially depend on the hippocampus (HPC), yet the mechanisms by which the HPC and mPFC access the distributed representations in the neocortex are unknown. By measuring phase synchronization of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, we found that learning initiated changes in neuronal communication of the HPC and mPFC with the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), an area that is connected with many other neocortical regions. LFPs were recorded simultaneously from the three brain regions while rats formed an association between an auditory stimulus (CS) and eyelid stimulation (US) in a trace eyeblink conditioning paradigm, as well as during retention 1 month following learning. Over the course of learning, theta oscillations in the LEC and mPFC became strongly synchronized following presentation of the CS on trials in which rats exhibited a conditioned response (CR), and this strengthened synchronization was also observed during remote retention. In contrast, CS-evoked theta synchronization between the LEC and HPC decreased with learning. Our results suggest that communication between the LEC and mPFC are strengthened with learning whereas the communication between the LEC and HPC are concomitantly weakened, suggesting that enhanced LEC–mPFC communication may be a neuronal correlate for theoretically proposed neocortical reorganization accompanying encoding and consolidation of a memory. PMID:22319482

  13. Vacuum stability, string density of states and the Riemann zeta function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelantonj, C.; Cardella, M.; Elitzur, S.; Rabinovici, E.

    2011-01-01

    We study the distribution of graded degrees of freedom in classically stable oriented closed string vacua and use the Rankin-Selberg transform to link it to the finite one-loop vacuum energy. In particular, we find that the spectrum of physical excitations not only must enjoy asymptotic

  14. ON THE THETA OPERATOR FOR MODULAR FORMS MODULO PRIME POWERS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Imin; Kiming, Ian

    2016-01-01

    We consider the classical theta operator θ on modular forms modulo pm and level N prime to p, where p is a prime greater than three. Our main result is that θ mod pm will map forms of weight k to forms of weight k+2+2pm−1(p−1) and that this weight is optimal in certain cases when m is at least two....... Thus, the natural expectation that θ mod pm should map to weight k+2+pm−1(p−1) is shown to be false. The primary motivation for this study is that application of the θ operator on eigenforms mod pm corresponds to twisting the attached Galois representations with the cyclotomic character. Our...... construction of the θ-operator mod pm gives an explicit weight bound on the twist of a modular mod pm Galois representation by the cyclotomic character....

  15. Utility of intracerebral theta burst electrical stimulation to attenuate interhemispheric inhibition and to promote motor recovery after cortical injury in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Melissa D; Boddington, Laura J; Igelström, Kajsa M; Gray, Jason P; Shemmell, Jon; Tseng, Kuei Y; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Reynolds, John N J

    2014-11-01

    Following a cerebral cortex injury such as stroke, excessive inhibition around the core of the injury is thought to reduce the potential for new motor learning. In part, this may be caused by an imbalance of interhemispheric inhibition (IHI); therefore, treatments that relieve the inhibitory drive from the healthy hemisphere to the peri-lesional area may enhance motor recovery. Theta burst stimulation delivered by transcranial magnetic stimulation has been tested as a means of normalizing IHI, but clinical results have been variable. Here we use a new rat model of synaptic IHI to demonstrate that electrical intracranial theta burst stimulation causes long-lasting changes in motor cortex excitability. Further, we show that contralateral intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) blocks IHI via a mechanism involving cannabinoid receptors. Finally, we show that contralesional iTBS applied during recovery from cortical injury in rats improves the recovery of motor function. These findings suggest that theta burst stimulation delivered through implanted electrodes may be a promising avenue to explore for augmenting rehabilitation from brain injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fractional Hunter-Saxton equation involving partial operators with bi-order in Riemann-Liouville and Liouville-Caputo sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Atangana, Abdon

    2017-02-01

    In this work the fractional Hunter-Saxton equation applied in the study of diffusion of nematic liquid crystals was done involving partial operators with two fractional orders, α and β, via Atangana-Riemann and Atangana-Caputo with bi-order and via Riemann-Liouville, Caputo-Fabrizio-Riemann and Atangana-Baleanu-Riemann for the space domain. The mathematical equation underpinning this physical phenomenon was solved numerically using an iterative scheme where the numerical approximations for second order were developed. The new approach with two fractional orders is able to consider media with two different layers, scales and properties. The generalization of this equation exhibit different cases of anomalous behavior and the numerical solutions obtained describes the propagation of waves in a nematic liquid cristal.

  17. Reduction in LFP cross-frequency coupling between theta and gamma rhythms associated with impaired STP and LTP in a rat model of brain ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao eZhang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling (CFC in hippocampus was reported to reflect memory process. In this study, we measured the CFC of hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs in a two-vessel occlusion (2VO rat model, combined with both amplitude and phase properties and associated with short and long-term plasticity indicating the memory function. Male Wistar rats were used and a 2VO model was established. STP and LTP were recorded in hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway after LFPs were collected in both CA3 and CA1. Based on the data of relative power spectra and phase synchronization, it suggested that both the amplitude and phase coupling of either theta or gamma rhythm were involved in modulating the neural network in 2VO rats. In order to determine whether the CFC was also implicated in neural impairment in 2VO rats, the coupling of CA3 theta–CA1 gamma was measured by both phase-phase coupling (n:m phase synchronization and phase-amplitude coupling. The attenuated CFC strength in 2VO rats implied the impaired neural communication in the coordination of theta-gamma entraining process. Moreover, compared with modulation index (MI a novel algorithm named cross frequency conditional mutual information (CF-CMI, was developed to focus on the coupling between theta phase and the phase of gamma amplitude. The results suggest that the reduced CFC strength probably attributed to the disruption of the phase of CA1 gamma envelop. In conclusion, it implied that the phase coupling and CFC of hippocampal theta and gamma played an important role in supporting functions of neural network. Furthermore, synaptic plasticity on CA3-CA1 pathway was reduced in line with the decreased CFC strength from CA3 to CA1. It partly supported our hypothesis that directional CFC indicator might probably be used as a measure of synaptic plasticity.

  18. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  19. Geometrías no-euclidianas: Friedrich Gauss, 1777-1855, Juan Bolyai, 1802-1860; Nikolai Lobachebskky, 1793-1856; Bernhard Riemann, 1826-1856

    OpenAIRE

    Tejada Jiménez, Débora María

    2003-01-01

    Relatamos aquí una de las piezas más emocionantes de la Historia de las Matemáticas: El descubrimiento de las Geometrías No-Euclidianas. Los actores principales, Gauss, Solyai, Lobachebsky y Riemann jugaron su papel sin ser conscientes de su importancia. Solamente después de la muerte de Riemann la comunidad matemática entendió su legado.

  20. Une approche hilbertienne de l'hypothèse de Riemann généralisée

    OpenAIRE

    de Roton, Anne

    2006-01-01

    En généralisant le théorème de Beurling et Nyman à la classe de Selberg, nous avons reformulé l'hypothèse de Riemann généralisée en terme d'un problème d'approximation. Nous poursuivons ici ce travail de généralisation par l'étude d'une distance liée à ce problème. Nous donnons dans cet article une minoration de cette distance, ce qui constitue une extension du travail de Burnol et de Báez-Duarte, Balazard, Landreau et Saias, travail qui concernait la fonction zeta de Riemann et que nous éten...

  1. Finite volume approximation of two phase-fluid flows based on an approximate Roe-Type Riemann solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainsaulieu, L. [C.E.R.M.I.C.S., E.N.P.C., Noisy-le-Grand (France)]|[Centre de Mathematiques Appliquees, Palaiseau (France)

    1995-10-01

    We introduce an approximate Roe type Riemann solver for the numerical simulation of two-phase fluid flows composed of liquid droplets suspended in gas. We compute a Roe linearization of some well-conditioned approximate Rankine-Hugoniot relations in nonconservation form. The computed solutions are found to be in good agreement with the exact solution in one dimension slab geometry. We extend this solver to two-dimensional geometries using a fininte volume formulation. 24 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Formulation of dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction for perfect crystals in the Laue case using the Riemann surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical theory for perfect crystals in the Laue case was reformulated using the Riemann surface, as used in complex analysis. In the two-beam approximation, each branch of the dispersion surface is specified by one sheet of the Riemann surface. The characteristic features of the dispersion surface are analytically revealed using four parameters, which are the real and imaginary parts of two quantities specifying the degree of departure from the exact Bragg condition and the reflection strength. By representing these parameters on complex planes, these characteristics can be graphically depicted on the Riemann surface. In the conventional case, the absorption is small and the real part of the reflection strength is large, so the formulation is the same as the traditional analysis. However, when the real part of the reflection strength is small or zero, the two branches of the dispersion surface cross, and the dispersion relationship becomes similar to that of the Bragg case. This is because the geometrical relationships among the parameters are similar in both cases. The present analytical method is generally applicable, irrespective of the magnitudes of the parameters. Furthermore, the present method analytically revealed many characteristic features of the dispersion surface and will be quite instructive for further numerical calculations of rocking curves.

  3. Search for the Theta+ pentaquark in the reactions gammap-->[overline K]0K+n and gammap-->[overline K]0K0p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffaella De Vita; Marco Battaglieri; V. Kubarovsky; Nathan Baltzell; Matthew Bellis; John Goett; Lei Guo; Gordon Mutchler; Paul Stoler; Maurizio Ungaro; Dennis Weygand; Moscov Amaryan; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Marco Anghinolfi; Gegham Asryan; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Harutyun Avakian; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; Vitaly Baturin; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Sergey Boyarinov; Sylvain Bouchigny; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; Sharon Careccia; Daniel Carman; Shifeng Chen; Eric Clinton; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; Volker Crede; John Cummings; D. Dale; Raffaella De Vita; Enzo De Sanctis; Pavel Degtiarenko; Alexandre Deur; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; Lamiaa Elfassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Herbert Funsten; Marianna Gabrielyan; Liping Gan; Michel Garcon; Ashot Gasparian; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; Oleksandr Glamazdin; John Goetz; Evgueni Golovatch; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Nevzat Guler; Harutyun Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Kenneth Hicks; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; D. Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jean Laget; Jorn Langheinrich; Dave Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Ji Li; K. Livingston; Haiyun Lu; Marion MacCormick; Nikolai Markov; Bryan McKinnon; Bernhard Mecking; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Marco Mirazita; R. Miskimen; Vasiliy Mochalov; Viktor Mokeev; Ludyvine Morand; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; Itaru Nakagawa; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Silvia Niccolai; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; Kijun Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Patrizia Rossi; Franck Sabatie; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Samuel Stepanyan; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Igor Strakovski; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; David Tedeschi; Aram Teymurazyan; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2006-11-16

    The exclusive reactions {gamma}p {yields} {bar K}{sup 0} K{sup +} n and {gamma}p {yields} {bar K}{sup 0} K{sup 0} p have been studied in the photon energy range 1.6--3.8 GeV, searching for evidence of the exotic baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540) in the decays {Theta}{sup +} {yields} nK{sup +} and {Theta}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup 0}. Data were collected with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The integrated luminosity was about 70 pb{sup -1}. The reactions have been isolated by detecting the K{sup +} and proton directly, the neutral kaon via its decay to K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and the neutron or neutral kaon via the missing mass technique. The mass and width of known hyperons such as {Sigma}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sup -} and {Lambda}(1116) were used as a check of the mass determination accuracy and experimental resolution. Approximately 100,000 {Lambda}*(1520)'s and 150,000 {phi}'s were observed in the {bar K}{sup 0} K{sup +} n and {bar K}{sup 0} K{sup 0} p final state respectively. No evidence for the {Theta}{sup +} pentaquark was found in the nK{sup +} or pK{sub S} invariant mass spectra. Upper limits were set on the production cross section of the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {Theta}{sup +} {bar K}{sup 0} as functions of center-of-mass angle, nK{sup +} and pK{sub S} masses. Combining the results of the two reactions, the 95% C.L. upper limit on the total cross section for a resonance peaked at 1540 MeV was found to be 0.7 nb. Within most of the available theoretical models, this corresponds to an upper limit on the {Theta}{sup +} width, {Gamma}{sub {Theta}{sup +}}, ranging between 0.01 and 7 MeV.

  4. Theta Burst Stimulation of the Precuneus Modulates Resting State Connectivity in the Left Temporal Pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Matteo; Mastropasqua, Chiara; Bonnì, Sonia; Ponzo, Viviana; Cercignani, Mara; Conforto, Silvia; Koch, Giacomo; Bozzali, Marco

    2017-05-01

    It has been shown that continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) over the precuneus acts on specific memory retrieval abilities. In order to study the neural mechanisms beyond these findings, we combined cTBS and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our experimental protocol involved stimulation and sham conditions on a group of healthy subjects, and each condition included a baseline and two follow-up acquisitions (5 and 15 min after baseline) after cTBS. We analysed brain functional connectivity by means of graph theoretical measures, with a specific focus on the network modular structure. Our results showed that cTBS of the precuneus selectively affects the left temporal pole, decreasing its functional connectivity in the first follow-up. Moreover, we observed a significant increase in the size of the module of the precuneus in the second follow-up. Such effects were absent in the sham condition. We observed here a modulation of functional connectivity as a result of inhibitory stimulation over the precuneus. Such a modulation first acts indirectly on the temporal area and then extends the connectivity of the precuneus itself by a feed-back mechanism. Our current findings extend our previous behavioural observations and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the stimulation of the precuneus.

  5. Hippocampal strata theta oscillations change their frequency and coupling during spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, J Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E; Olvera-Cortés, María E

    2016-11-19

    The theta rhythm is necessary for hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. It has been proposed that each hippocampal stratum can generate a current theta dipole. Therefore, considering that each hippocampal circuit (CA1, CA3, and Dentate Gyrus (DG)) contributes differently to distinct aspects of a spatial memory, the theta oscillations on each stratum and their couplings may exhibit oscillatory dynamics associated with different stages of learning. To test this hypothesis, the theta oscillations from five hippocampal strata were recorded in the rat during different stages of learning in a Morris maze. The peak power, the relative power (RP) and the coherence between hippocampal strata were analyzed. The early acquisition stage of the Morris task was characterized by the predominance of slow frequency theta activity and high coupling between specific hippocampal strata at slow frequencies. However, on the last training day, the theta oscillations were faster in all hippocampal strata, with tighter coupling at fast frequencies between the CA3 pyramidal stratum and other strata. Our results suggest that modifications to the theta frequency and its coupling can be a means by which the hippocampus differentially operates during acquisition and retrieval states. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photoproduction of the \\Theta^+ resonance on the nucleon in a Regge model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Kwee; M. Guidal; M. Polyakov; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2005-09-15

    We estimate the reaction mechanisms for the photoproduction of the {Theta}{sup +}(1540) resonance on the nucleon, through K and K* Regge exchanges. We compare the size of the cross sections for the {gamma}n {yields} K{sup -} {Theta}{sup +} and {gamma}p {yields} {bar K}{sup 0} {Theta}{sup +} reactions, and investigate their sensitivity to the spin-parity assignments J{sup P} = (1/2){sup {+-}}, (3/2){sup {+-}} for the {Theta}{sup +} resonance. The model allows to estimate the cross sections corresponding with a given upper bound on the width of the {Theta}{sup +}. Within this model, the cross sections on the neutron are found to be around a factor 5 larger than the ones on the proton, due to the presence of charged K exchange for the reaction on a neutron target. Furthermore, the photon asymmetry is found to display a pronounced sensitivity to the parity of the {Theta}{sup +}, making it a very promising observable to help determining the quantum numbers of the {Theta}{sup +} resonance.

  7. SEMANTIC ANALYSIS OF THETA ROLES OF VERBS IN THE MAH MERI LANGUAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisarah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Mah Meri language, one of the severely endangered languages of Malaysia, is facing the threat of extinction. In order to save valuable information of this language, this paper focuses on one of its aspects, the Theta Roles in relation to the verbs. Using Radford’s (1997 & 2009 theory of Theta Roles, this study analyzes and explores the verb phrase of Mah Meri. The main objective of this study is to establish the Theta Roles in relation to verbs in the Mah Meri language. In order to fully understand the verb structures, the morphological entities of affixes such as prefixes and suffixes are studied. Moreover, the word order of the sentential constructions are also analyzed according to active and passive forms. These are done in tandem with analyzing the pronouns in relation to the placement of verbs in a Mah Meri sentential construction. It is found that Theta Roles are present in the data except for the Theta Role Recipient. However, this is not due to the lack of the Theta Role of Recipient in the Mah Meri language; rather it is due to the limitation of the scope in this study as data is analyzed based on the interviews only. On the other hand, the Theta Role of Agent is clearly evident in the Mah Meri language.

  8. Resting-state EEG theta activity and risk learning: sensitivity to reward or punishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massar, Stijn A A; Kenemans, J Leon; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-03-01

    Increased theta (4-7 Hz)-beta (13-30 Hz) power ratio in resting state electroencephalography (EEG) has been associated with risky disadvantageous decision making and with impaired reinforcement learning. However, the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making remain unclear. The first aim of the present study was to replicate the earlier found relationship and examine the specific contributions of theta and beta power in risky decision making using the Iowa Gambling Task. The second aim of the study was to examine whether the relation were associated with differences in reward or punishment sensitivity. We replicated the earlier found relationship by showing a positive association between theta/beta ratio and risky decision making. This correlation was mainly driven by theta oscillations. Furthermore, theta power correlated with reward motivated learning, but not with punishment learning. The present results replicate and extend earlier findings by providing novel insights into the relation between thetabeta ratios and risky decision making. Specifically, findings show that resting-state theta activity is correlated with reinforcement learning, and that this association may be explained by differences in reward sensitivity. © 2013.

  9. Hippocampal Non-Theta-Contingent Eyeblink Classical Conditioning: A Model System for Neurobiological Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchese, Joseph J.; Berry, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Typical information processing is thought to depend on the integrity of neurobiological oscillations that may underlie coordination and timing of cells and assemblies within and between structures. The 3–7 Hz bandwidth of hippocampal theta rhythm is associated with cognitive processes essential to learning and depends on the integrity of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic forebrain systems. Since several significant psychiatric disorders appear to result from dysfunction of medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurochemical systems, preclinical studies on animal models may be an important step in defining and treating such syndromes. Many studies have shown that the amount of hippocampal theta in the rabbit strongly predicts the acquisition rate of classical eyeblink conditioning and that impairment of this system substantially slows the rate of learning and attainment of asymptotic performance. Our lab has developed a brain–computer interface that makes eyeblink training trials contingent upon the explicit presence or absence of hippocampal theta. The behavioral benefit of theta-contingent training has been demonstrated in both delay and trace forms of the paradigm with a two- to fourfold increase in learning speed over non-theta states. The non-theta behavioral impairment is accompanied by disruption of the amplitude and synchrony of hippocampal local field potentials, multiple-unit excitation, and single-unit response patterns dependent on theta state. Our findings indicate a significant electrophysiological and behavioral impact of the pretrial state of the hippocampus that suggests an important role for this MTL system in associative learning and a significant deleterious impact in the absence of theta. Here, we focus on the impairments in the non-theta state, integrate them into current models of psychiatric disorders, and suggest how improvement in our understanding of neurobiological oscillations is critical for theories and treatment of psychiatric

  10. Novel space alters theta and gamma synchrony across the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    stephanie c penley

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal theta (6-10 Hz and gamma (25-50 Hz and 65-100 Hz local field potentials reflect the dynamic synchronization of inputs impinging upon hippocampal neurons. Novel experience is known to engage hippocampal physiology and promote successful encoding. Does novelty synchronize or desynchronize theta and/or gamma frequency inputs across the septotemporal (long axis of the hippocampus? The present study tested the hypothesis that a novel spatial environment would alter theta power and coherence across the long axis. We compared theta and gamma local field potential signals at individual (power and millimeter distant electrode pairs (coherence within the dentate gyrus (DG and CA1 region while rats navigated a runway 1 in a familiar environment, 2 with a modified path in the same environment and 3 in a novel space. Locomotion in novel space was related to increases in theta and gamma power at most CA1 and DG sites. The increase in theta and gamma power was concurrent with an increase in theta and gamma coherence across the long axis of CA1; however, there was a significant decrease in theta coherence across the long axis of the DG. These findings illustrate significant shifts in the synchrony of entorhinal, CA3 and/or neuromodulatory afferents conveying novel spatial information to the dendritic fields of CA1 and DG targets across the long axis of the hippocampus. This shift suggests that the entire theta/gamma-related input to the CA1 network, and likely output, receives and conveys a more coherent message in response to novel sensory experience. Such may contribute to the successful encoding of novel sensory experience.

  11. The Riemann Geometry of Space and Gravitational Waves With The Spin $s=1$

    CERN Document Server

    Dolginov, Arkady Z

    2014-01-01

    It is taken into account that not the Ricci tensor ${R_{il}}$ (Einstein equation), but the Riemann tensor ${R_{iklm}}$ provides the most general description of the space geometry. If ${{R_{il}}=0}$ (the space empty with matter, but it can be occupied by gravitational waves) then ${{R_{iklm}}={C_{iklm}}} $ . The tensor ${C_{iklm}}$ is the Weyl tensor, which disappears by conversion:${{R_{il}}={g^{km}}{R_{iklm}}}$ and we lose all information about the space structure, which is described by ${C_{iklm}}$ .The symmetry of ${R_{il}}$ provides the existents of gravitational waves with the spin s=2. We show that ${C_{iklm}}$ describes gravitational waves with s=1. Such gravitational waves can be created in inhomogeneous media, where the selected directions are determined by derivates of the energy-momentum tensor ${T^m}_{i,k}$ of matter. It is taken into account that gravitation is described not only by the metric tensor $g^{ik} = (1/2)(\\gamma^i \\gamma^k + \\gamma^k \\gamma^i)$, but also by the anti-symmetric tensor $\\...

  12. On foundational thinking in fundamental physics, from Riemann to Einstein to Heisenberg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnitsky, Arkady

    2012-03-01

    This paper considers the nature of foundational thinking in fundamental physics, most especially in quantum mechanics. By "fundamental physics" I mean those areas of experimental and theoretical physics that deal with the ultimate constitution of nature, for example, as defined by the so-called elementary particles in the case of quantum physics. By "foundational thinking" I mean thinking that concerns fundamental physics itself. First, I argue, following Riemann, that our foundational thinking is based on hypotheses that we form and test. Second, I argue that foundational thinking in physics is defined by concepts, and that in modern physics foundational concepts always contains physical, mathematical, and philosophical components. Third, finally, I argue that the relationships between these components and, hence, our foundational thinking, are different in quantum mechanics than they are in classical physics and relativity. In these theories mathematics describes, by way of idealized models, physical reality, and predictions made by them are derived from these descriptions. By contrast, in quantum mechanics, mathematics only serves to predict the outcome of quantum experiments in the absence of any description, however idealized, of quantum objects and their behavior. At least such is the case in certain interpretations of quantum mechanics, which follow and develop Heisenberg's approach in his paper introducing quantum mechanics, as does, for example, Bohr's interpretation, known as complementarity.

  13. Multi-Regge kinematics and the moduli space of Riemann spheres with marked points

    CERN Document Server

    Del Duca, Vittorio; Drummond, James; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Marzucca, Robin; Papathanasiou, Georgios; Verbeek, Bram

    2016-08-25

    We show that scattering amplitudes in planar N = 4 Super Yang-Mills in multi-Regge kinematics can naturally be expressed in terms of single-valued iterated integrals on the moduli space of Riemann spheres with marked points. As a consequence, scattering amplitudes in this limit can be expressed as convolutions that can easily be computed using Stokes' theorem. We apply this framework to MHV amplitudes to leading-logarithmic accuracy (LLA), and we prove that at L loops all MHV amplitudes are determined by amplitudes with up to L + 4 external legs. We also investigate non-MHV amplitudes, and we show that they can be obtained by convoluting the MHV results with a certain helicity flip kernel. We classify all leading singularities that appear at LLA in the Regge limit for arbitrary helicity configurations and any number of external legs. Finally, we use our new framework to obtain explicit analytic results at LLA for all MHV amplitudes up to five loops and all non-MHV amplitudes with up to eight external legs and...

  14. Reduced theta connectivity during set-shifting in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam McLeod Doesburg

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a characterized by deficits in social cognition and executive function. An area of particular difficulty for children with ASD is cognitive flexibility, such as the ability to shift between attentional or response sets. The biological basis of such deficits remains poorly understood, although atypical development of structural and functional brain connectivity have been reported in ASD, suggesting that disruptions of normal patterns of inter-regional communication may contribute to cognitive problems in this group. The present MEG study measured inter-regional phase synchronization while children with ASD and typically developing matched controls (6-14 years of age performed a set-shifting task. Reduced theta-band phase synchronization was observed in children with ASD during extradimensional set-shifting. This reduction in task-dependent inter-regional connectivity encompassed numerous areas including multiple frontal lobe regions, and indicates that problems with communication among brain areas may contribute to difficulties with executive function in ASD.

  15. Modulation of EEG Theta Band Signal Complexity by Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Lee, Eun-Jeong

    The primary goal of this study was to investigate the impact of monochord (MC) sounds, a type of archaic sounds used in music therapy, on the neural complexity of EEG signals obtained from patients undergoing chemotherapy. The secondary goal was to compare the EEG signal complexity values for monochords with those for progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), an alternative therapy for relaxation. Forty cancer patients were randomly allocated to one of the two relaxation groups, MC and PMR, over a period of six months; continuous EEG signals were recorded during the first and last sessions. EEG signals were analyzed by applying signal mode complexity, a measure of complexity of neuronal oscillations. Across sessions, both groups showed a modulation of complexity of beta-2 band (20-29Hz) at midfrontal regions, but only MC group showed a modulation of complexity of theta band (3.5-7.5Hz) at posterior regions. Therefore, the neuronal complexity patterns showed different changes in EEG frequency band specific complexity resulting in two different types of interventions. Moreover, the different neural responses to listening to monochords and PMR were observed after regular relaxation interventions over a short time span.

  16. Geometric Calibration of Full Spherical Panoramic Ricoh-Theta Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghayari, S.; Saadatseresht, M.; Omidalizarandi, M.; Neumann, I.

    2017-05-01

    A novel calibration process of RICOH-THETA, full-view fisheye camera, is proposed which has numerous applications as a low cost sensor in different disciplines such as photogrammetry, robotic and machine vision and so on. Ricoh Company developed this camera in 2014 that consists of two lenses and is able to capture the whole surrounding environment in one shot. In this research, each lens is calibrated separately and interior/relative orientation parameters (IOPs and ROPs) of the camera are determined on the basis of designed calibration network on the central and side images captured by the aforementioned lenses. Accordingly, designed calibration network is considered as a free distortion grid and applied to the measured control points in the image space as correction terms by means of bilinear interpolation. By performing corresponding corrections, image coordinates are transformed to the unit sphere as an intermediate space between object space and image space in the form of spherical coordinates. Afterwards, IOPs and EOPs of each lens are determined separately through statistical bundle adjustment procedure based on collinearity condition equations. Subsequently, ROPs of two lenses is computed from both EOPs. Our experiments show that by applying 3*3 free distortion grid, image measurements residuals diminish from 1.5 to 0.25 degrees on aforementioned unit sphere.

  17. Developmental differences in beta and theta power during sentence processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Schneider

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although very young children process ongoing language quickly and effortlessly, research indicates that they continue to improve and mature in their language skills through adolescence. This prolonged development may be related to differing engagement of semantic and syntactic processes. This study used event related potentials and time frequency analysis of EEG to identify developmental differences in neural engagement as children (ages 10–12 and adults performed an auditory verb agreement grammaticality judgment task. Adults and children revealed very few differences in comprehending grammatically correct sentences. When identifying grammatical errors, however, adults displayed widely distributed beta and theta power decreases that were significantly less pronounced in children. Adults also demonstrated a significant P600 effect, while children exhibited an apparent N400 effect. Thus, when identifying subtle grammatical errors in real time, adults display greater neural activation that is traditionally associated with syntactic processing whereas children exhibit greater activity more commonly associated with semantic processing. These findings support previous claims that the cognitive and neural underpinnings of syntactic processing are still developing in adolescence, and add to them by more clearly identifying developmental changes in the neural oscillations underlying grammatical processing.

  18. Continuous theta-burst stimulation modulates tactile synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporal order judgement (TOJ) is the ability to detect the order of occurrence of two sequentially delivered stimuli. Previous research has shown that TOJ in the presence of synchronized periodic conditioning stimuli impairs TOJ performance, and this phenomenon is suggested to be mediated by GABAergic interneurons that cause perceptual binding across the two skin sites. Application of continuous theta-burst repetitive TMS (cTBS) over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) alters temporal and spatial tactile perception. The purpose of this study was to examine TOJ perception in the presence and absence of synchronized periodic conditioning stimuli before and after cTBS applied over left-hemisphere SI. A TOJ task was administered on the right index and middle finger (D2 and D3) in two separate sessions in the presence and absence of conditioning stimuli (a background low amplitude sinusoidal vibration). Results CTBS reduced the impact of the conditioning stimuli on TOJ performance for up to 18 minutes following stimulation while sham cTBS did not affect TOJ performance. In contrast, the TOJ task performed in the absence of synchronized conditioning stimulation was unaltered following cTBS. Conclusion We conclude that cTBS suppresses inhibitory networks in SI that mediate perceptual binding during TOJ synchronization. CTBS offers one method to suppress cortical excitability in the cortex and potentially benefit clinical populations with altered inhibitory cortical circuits. Additionally, TOJ measures with conditioning stimuli may provide an avenue to assess sensory processing in neurologically impaired patient populations. PMID:23968301

  19. Bilateral Theta-Burst TMS to Influence Global Gestalt Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzinger, Bernd; Huberle, Elisabeth; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects – a deficit termed simultanagnosia – greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right) or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres. PMID:23110106

  20. Bilateral theta-burst TMS to influence global gestalt perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Ritzinger

    Full Text Available While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects - a deficit termed simultanagnosia - greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ. The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres.

  1. Bilateral theta-burst TMS to influence global gestalt perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzinger, Bernd; Huberle, Elisabeth; Karnath, Hans-Otto

    2012-01-01

    While early and higher visual areas along the ventral visual pathway in the inferotemporal cortex are critical for the recognition of individual objects, the neural representation of human perception of complex global visual scenes remains under debate. Stroke patients with a selective deficit in the perception of a complex global Gestalt with intact recognition of individual objects - a deficit termed simultanagnosia - greatly helped to study this question. Interestingly, simultanagnosia typically results from bilateral lesions of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The present study aimed to verify the relevance of this area for human global Gestalt perception. We applied continuous theta-burst TMS either unilaterally (left or right) or bilateral simultaneously over TPJ. Healthy subjects were presented with hierarchically organized visual stimuli that allowed parametrical degrading of the object at the global level. Identification of the global Gestalt was significantly modulated only for the bilateral TPJ stimulation condition. Our results strengthen the view that global Gestalt perception in the human brain involves TPJ and is co-dependent on both hemispheres.

  2. Effects of nicotine stimulation on spikes, theta frequency oscillations, and spike-theta oscillation relationship in rat medial septum diagonal band Broca slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dong; Peng, Ce; Ou-yang, Gao-xiang; Henderson, Zainab; Li, Xiao-li; Lu, Cheng-biao

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Spiking activities and neuronal network oscillations in the theta frequency range have been found in many cortical areas during information processing. The aim of this study is to determine whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) mediate neuronal network activity in rat medial septum diagonal band Broca (MSDB) slices. Methods: Extracellular field potentials were recorded in the slices using an Axoprobe 1A amplifier. Data analysis was performed off-line. Spike sorting and local field potential (LFP) analyses were performed using Spike2 software. The role of spiking activity in the generation of LFP oscillations in the slices was determined by analyzing the phase-time relationship between the spikes and LFP oscillations. Circular statistic analysis based on the Rayleigh test was used to determine the significance of phase relationships between the spikes and LFP oscillations. The timing relationship was examined by quantifying the spike-field coherence (SFC). Results: Application of nicotine (250 nmol/L) induced prominent LFP oscillations in the theta frequency band and both small- and large-amplitude population spiking activity in the slices. These spikes were phase-locked to theta oscillations at specific phases. The Rayleigh test showed a statistically significant relationship in phase-locking between the spikes and theta oscillations. Larger changes in the SFC were observed for large-amplitude spikes, indicating an accurate timing relationship between this type of spike and LFP oscillations. The nicotine-induced spiking activity (large-amplitude population spikes) was suppressed by the nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (0.3 μmol/L). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that large-amplitude spikes are phase-locked to theta oscillations and have a high spike-timing accuracy, which are likely a main contributor to the theta oscillations generated in MSDB during nicotine receptor activation. PMID:23474704

  3. Algebraic functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bliss, Gilbert Ames

    1933-01-01

    This book, immediately striking for its conciseness, is one of the most remarkable works ever produced on the subject of algebraic functions and their integrals. The distinguishing feature of the book is its third chapter, on rational functions, which gives an extremely brief and clear account of the theory of divisors.... A very readable account is given of the topology of Riemann surfaces and of the general properties of abelian integrals. Abel's theorem is presented, with some simple applications. The inversion problem is studied for the cases of genus zero and genus unity. The chapter on t

  4. Early alterations in hippocampal circuitry and theta rhythm generation in a mouse model of prenatal infection: implications for schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Ducharme

    Full Text Available Post-mortem studies suggest that GABAergic neurotransmission is impaired in schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear if these changes occur early during development and how they impact overall network activity. To investigate this, we used a mouse model of prenatal infection with the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (poly I:C, a model based on epidemiological evidence that an immune challenge during pregnancy increases the prevalence of schizophrenia in the offspring. We found that prenatal infection reduced the density of parvalbumin- but not somatostatin-positive interneurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and strongly reduced the strength of inhibition early during postnatal development. Furthermore, using an intact hippocampal preparation in vitro, we found reduced theta oscillation generated in the CA1 area. Taken together, these results suggest that redistribution in excitatory and inhibitory transmission locally in the CA1 is associated with a significant alteration in network function. Furthermore, given the role of theta rhythm in memory, our results demonstrate how a risk factor for schizophrenia can affect network function early in development that could contribute to cognitive deficits observed later in the disease.

  5. Early alterations in hippocampal circuitry and theta rhythm generation in a mouse model of prenatal infection: implications for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Guillaume; Lowe, Germaine C; Goutagny, Romain; Williams, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Post-mortem studies suggest that GABAergic neurotransmission is impaired in schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear if these changes occur early during development and how they impact overall network activity. To investigate this, we used a mouse model of prenatal infection with the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (poly I:C), a model based on epidemiological evidence that an immune challenge during pregnancy increases the prevalence of schizophrenia in the offspring. We found that prenatal infection reduced the density of parvalbumin- but not somatostatin-positive interneurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and strongly reduced the strength of inhibition early during postnatal development. Furthermore, using an intact hippocampal preparation in vitro, we found reduced theta oscillation generated in the CA1 area. Taken together, these results suggest that redistribution in excitatory and inhibitory transmission locally in the CA1 is associated with a significant alteration in network function. Furthermore, given the role of theta rhythm in memory, our results demonstrate how a risk factor for schizophrenia can affect network function early in development that could contribute to cognitive deficits observed later in the disease.

  6. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Sigma-Theta

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sigma-Theta (Potential Density Anomaly) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  7. Thalamic theta phase alignment predicts human memory formation and anterior thalamic cross-frequency coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rugg, Michael D; Knight, Robert T; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2015-05-20

    Previously we reported electrophysiological evidence for a role for the anterior thalamic nucleus (ATN) in human memory formation (Sweeney-Reed et al., 2014). Theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling (CFC) predicted successful memory formation, with the involvement of gamma oscillations suggesting memory-relevant local processing in the ATN. The importance of the theta frequency range in memory processing is well-established, and phase alignment of oscillations is considered to be necessary for synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that theta phase alignment in the ATN would be necessary for memory encoding. Further analysis of the electrophysiological data reveal that phase alignment in the theta rhythm was greater during successful compared with unsuccessful encoding, and that this alignment was correlated with the CFC. These findings support an active processing role for the ATN during memory formation.

  8. Independent Measurement of Theta13 via Neutron Capture on Hydrogen at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Beriguete, W; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Butorov, I; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chasman, C; Chen, H; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, X; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Draeger, E; Du, X F; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Fu, J Y; Ge, L Q; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Gornushkin, Y A; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Han, G H; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Hinrichs, P; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E; Huang, H; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiang, H J; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lai, W C; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, A; Leung, J K C; Lewis, C A; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S K; Lin, Y C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S S; Liu, Y B; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Luk, K -B; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; McDonald, K T; McFarlane, M C; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Kebwaro, J Monari; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Nemchenok, I; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Y,; Tam, H; Tang, X; Themann, H; Tsang, K V; Tsang, R H M; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, L S; Wang, L Y; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Webber, D M; Wei, H Y; Wei, Y D; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xia, X; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C C; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Yeh, Y S; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, J Y; Yu, Z Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, B; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, F H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Q; Zhang, S H; Zhang, Y C; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, Z Y; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    A new measurement of the $\\theta_{13}$ mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GW$_{th}$ reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.083\\pm0.018$ in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.089\\pm0.008$ as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  9. Validation Study of CODES Dragonfly Network Model with Theta Cray XC System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarak, Misbah [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ross, Robert B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This technical report describes the experiments performed to validate the MPI performance measurements reported by the CODES dragonfly network simulation with the Theta Cray XC system at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF).

  10. Network mechanisms of theta related neuronal activity in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losonczy, Attila; Zemelman, Boris V; Vaziri, Alipasha; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2010-08-01

    Although hippocampal theta oscillations represent a prime example of temporal coding in the mammalian brain, little is known about the specific biophysical mechanisms. Intracellular recordings support a particular abstract oscillatory interference model of hippocampal theta activity, the soma-dendrite interference model. To gain insight into the cellular and circuit level mechanisms of theta activity, we implemented a similar form of interference using the actual hippocampal network in mice in vitro. We found that pairing increasing levels of phasic dendritic excitation with phasic stimulation of perisomatic projecting inhibitory interneurons induced a somatic polarization and action potential timing profile that reproduced most common features. Alterations in the temporal profile of inhibition were required to fully capture all features. These data suggest that theta-related place cell activity is generated through an interaction between a phasic dendritic excitation and a phasic perisomatic shunting inhibition delivered by interneurons, a subset of which undergo activity-dependent presynaptic modulation.

  11. A Precision Measurement of sin$^{2}\\theta$$_{w}$ from Semileptonic Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wotschack, Jorg

    1987-01-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring the electroweak mixing parameter sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$, of the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg theory $^{1}$ as precisely as possible: first, its value may be predicted by models of Grand Unification;$^{2}$ second, precise measurements of sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$ from different processes would test the validity of electroweak radiative corrections. $^{3,$}$. Different methods have been used to determine sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$, over a large range of $Q^{2}$ values. FIGURE 1 gives a compilation of sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$ with remarkable agreement between the results. At present, it is most precisely determined in semileptonic neutrino-nucleon scattering from the ratio of neutral current (NC) to charged current (CC) cross and in proton-antiproton collisions from the W boson mass. $^{10,11}$.

  12. Note on generalized Mittag-Leffler function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rachana; Salehbhai, I A; Shukla, A K

    2016-01-01

    The present paper deals with the study of a generalized Mittag-Leffler function and associated fractional operator. The operator has been discussed in the space of Lebesgue measurable functions. The composition with Riemann-Liouville fractional integration operator has been obtained.

  13. Differentiating neutrino models on the basis of $\\theta_{13}$ and lepton flavor violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, Carl H.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-03-01

    The authors show how models of neutrino masses and mixings can be differentiated on the basis of their predictions for {theta}{sub 13} and lepton flavor violation in radiative charged lepton decays and {mu} - e conversion. They illustrate the lepton flavor violation results for five predictive SO(10) SUSY GUT models and point out the relative importance of their heavy right-handed neutrino mass spectra and {theta}{sub 13} predictions.

  14. The electric dipole moment of the nucleon from simulations at imaginary vacuum angle theta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, S. [RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton (United States)]|[Tsukuba Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences; Horsley, R.; Zanotti, J. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Izubuchi, T. [RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton (United States)]|[Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Nakamura, Y.; Pleiter, D.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division. Dept. of Mathematical Sciences

    2008-07-15

    We compute the electric dipole moment of proton and neutron from lattice QCD simulations with N{sub f}=2 flavors of dynamical quarks at imaginary vacuum angle {theta}. The calculation proceeds via the CP odd form factor F{sub 3}. A novel feature of our calculation is that we use partially twisted boundary conditions to extract F{sub 3} at zero momentum transfer. As a byproduct, we test the QCD vacuum at nonvanishing {theta}. (orig.)

  15. Theta activity in local field potential of the ventral tegmental area in sleeping and waking rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzeł-Gryglewska, Jolanta; Matulewicz, Paweł; Jurkowlaniec, Edyta

    2014-05-15

    Hippocampal theta rhythm appears in two vigilance states: active waking and paradoxical sleep. The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is active in sleep and waking and is connected to the hippocampus. We assessed the relationship between local field potential (LFP) of the VTA and sleep-waking stages in freely moving rats. Electrical activity of the VTA was divided into: quiet waking (W), waking with theta (WT), slow wave sleep (SWS) and paradoxical sleep (PS), depending on the hippocampal signal and the animal's behavior. We analyzed total power in the VTA signal and we also extracted peak power (Pmax) and corresponding frequency (Fmax) in theta and delta bands from both the VTA and hippocampal recording. In the VTA the 6-9 Hz band had the highest power during PS, and the ratio of the 6-9 to 3-6 Hz power was highest during both PS and WT, which accentuated Pmax of this particular theta sub-band. During W, a very slight increase (or plateau) in signal power was seen in theta range. Pmax and Fmax of theta were higher in PS than in both WT and W, and these parameters did not differ between W and WT. During WT and PS, Fmax in the 6-9 Hz band was greatly correlated between the VTA and hippocampus signal. We also detected high cross-correlation in power spectra between the hippocampus and the VTA (for delta and theta, during WT and PS). The results suggest that the VTA may belong to the broad network involved in theta rhythm induction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Working memory-related frontal theta activity is decreased under acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Matti; Rohde-Liebenau, Lea; Grimm, Simone; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-05-01

    Acute stress impairs prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and has detrimental effects on working memory (WM) performance. Converging evidence from electrophysiological studies suggests a close link between WM processes and frontal theta (FT) activity (4-8 Hz). However, the effect of stress on WM-related FT activity has not been investigated yet. To shed light on this topic we acquired EEG data from 31 healthy male subjects who underwent a stressful and a neutral control condition. In both conditions, they performed an n-back WM task at two different difficulty levels. Our results showed that WM-related FT activity was decreased under stress. Behaviorally, we found performance impairments under stress in the difficult task condition that were related to FT decreases. Increased cortisol levels indicated a successful moderate stress induction. These findings indicate that FT is a potential neurobiological marker for intact PFC functioning during WM and further supports the recently made assumption that FT acts in the PFC to optimize performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Social exclusion modulates event-related frontal theta and tracks ostracism distress in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noordt, Stefon J R; White, Lars O; Wu, Jia; Mayes, Linda C; Crowley, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Social exclusion is a potent elicitor of distress. Previous studies have shown that medial frontal theta oscillations are modulated by the experience of social exclusion. Using the Cyberball paradigm, we examined event-related dynamics of theta power in the EEG at medial frontal sites while children aged 8-12 years were exposed to conditions of fair play and social exclusion. Using an event-related design, we found that medial frontal theta oscillations (4-8Hz) increase during both early (i.e., 200-400ms) and late (i.e., 400-800ms) processing of rejection events during social exclusion relative to perceptually identical "not my turn" events during inclusion. Importantly, we show that only for the later time window (400-800ms) slow-wave theta power tracks self-reported ostracism distress. Specifically, greater theta power at medial frontal sites to "rejection" events predicted higher levels of ostracism distress. Alpha and beta oscillations for rejection events were unrelated to ostracism distress at either 200-400ms or 400-800ms time windows. Our findings extend previous studies by showing that medial frontal theta oscillations for rejection events are a neural signature of social exclusion, linked to experienced distress in middle childhood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Riemann solvers for multi-component gas mixtures with temperature dependent heat capacities; Solveurs de riemann pour des melanges de gaz parfaits avec capacites calorifiques dependant de la temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beccantini, A

    2001-07-01

    This thesis represents a contribution to the development of upwind splitting schemes for the Euler equations for ideal gaseous mixtures and their investigation in computing multidimensional flows in irregular geometries. In the preliminary part we develop and investigate the parameterization of the shock and rarefaction curves in the phase space. Then, we apply them to perform some field-by-field decompositions of the Riemann problem: the entropy-respecting one, the one which supposes that genuinely-non-linear (GNL) waves are both shocks (shock-shock one) and the one which supposes that GNL waves are both rarefactions (rarefaction-rarefaction one). We emphasize that their analysis is fundamental in Riemann solvers developing: the simpler the field-by-field decomposition, the simpler the Riemann solver based on it. As the specific heat capacities of the gases depend on the temperature, the shock-shock field-by-field decomposition is the easiest to perform. Then, in the second part of the thesis, we develop an upwind splitting scheme based on such decomposition. Afterwards, we investigate its robustness, precision and CPU-time consumption, with respect to some of the most popular upwind splitting schemes for polytropic/non-polytropic ideal gases. 1-D test-cases show that this scheme is both precise (exact capturing of stationary shock and stationary contact) and robust in dealing with strong shock and rarefaction waves. Multidimensional test-cases show that it suffers from some of the typical deficiencies which affect the upwind splitting schemes capable of exact capturing stationary contact discontinuities i.e the developing of non-physical instabilities in computing strong shock waves. In the final part, we use the high-order multidimensional solver here developed to compute fully-developed detonation flows. (author)

  19. THETA-Rhythm Makes the World Go Round: Dissociative Effects of TMS Theta Versus Alpha Entrainment of Right pTPJ on Embodied Perspective Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding-Williams, Gerard; Wang, Hongfang; Kessler, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Being able to imagine another person's experience and perspective of the world is a crucial human ability and recent reports suggest that humans "embody" another's viewpoint by mentally rotating their own body representation into the other's orientation. Our recent Magnetoencephalography (MEG) data further confirmed this notion of embodied perspective transformations and pinpointed the right posterior temporo-parietal junction (pTPJ) as the crucial hub in a distributed network oscillating at theta frequency (3-7 Hz). In a subsequent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment we interfered with right pTPJ processing and observed a modulation of the embodied aspects of perspective transformations. While these results corroborated the role of right pTPJ, the notion of theta oscillations being the crucial neural code remained a correlational observation based on our MEG data. In the current study we therefore set out to confirm the importance of theta oscillations directly by means of TMS entrainment. We compared entrainment of right pTPJ at 6 Hz vs. 10 Hz and confirmed that only 6 Hz entrainment facilitated embodied perspective transformations (at 160° angular disparity) while 10 Hz slowed it down. The reverse was true at low angular disparity (60° between egocentric and target perspective) where a perspective transformation was not strictly necessary. Our results further corroborate right pTPJ involvement in embodied perspective transformations and highlight theta oscillations as a crucial neural code.

  20. Upsilon NU: Our chapter in Sigma Theta Tau Internacional Upsilon NU: nuestro capítulo en Sigma Theta Tau International

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GARZÓN ALARCÓN NELLY

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available ALa Sociedad de Honor de Enfermería, Sigma Theta Tau Internacional, es una organización que nace y vive para desarrollar el conocimiento y la ciencia de enfermería como fundamentos del liderazgo y la búsqueda de la excelencia en el cuidado de la persona, la familia y la comunidad.

  1. Frontal theta and alpha power and coherence changes are modulated by semantic complexity in Go/NoGo tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Matthew R; Ferree, Thomas C; Maguire, Mandy J; Moore, Patricia; Spence, Jeffrey; Tillman, Gail D; Hart, John; Kraut, Michael A

    2010-12-01

    To study the interactions between semantic processing and motor response inhibition, we recorded scalp EEG as subjects performed a series of Go/NoGo response inhibition tasks whose response criteria depended on different levels of semantic processing. Three different tasks were used. The first required the subject to make a Go/NoGo decision based on pictures of one particular car or one particular dog. The second used pictures of different types of cars and of dogs, and the final task used stimuli that ranged across multiple types of objects and animals. We found that the theta-band EEG power recorded during the NoGo response was attenuated as a function of semantic complexity while the peak latency was delayed in only the most complex category task. Further, frontal alpha-band desynchronization was strongest for the simplest task and remained close to baseline for the other tasks. Finally, there was significant theta-band coherence between the frontal pole and pre-SMA for the NoGo conditions across tasks, which was not found in the Go trials. These findings provide information about how more rostral frontal regions interact with the pre-SMA during response inhibition across different stimuli and task demands: specifically, level of processing affects latency, difficulty affects amplitude, and coherence is affected by whether the decision is Go or NoGo. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Alterations in hippocampal network oscillations and theta-gamma coupling arise before Aβ overproduction in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Romain; Gu, Ning; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Jackson, Jesse; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Quirion, Rémi; Krantic, Slavica; Williams, Sylvain

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by memory impairments. Brain oscillatory activity is critical for cognitive function and is altered in AD patients. Recent evidence suggests that accumulation of soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) induces reorganization of hippocampal networks. However, whether fine changes in network activity might be present at very early stages, before Aβ overproduction, remains to be determined. We therefore assessed whether theta and gamma oscillations and their cross-frequency coupling, which are known to be essential for normal memory function, were precociously altered in the hippocampus. Electrophysiological field potential recordings were performed using complete hippocampal preparations in vitro from young transgenic CRND8 mice, a transgenic mouse model of AD. Our results indicate that a significant proportion of 1-month-old TgCRND8 mice showed robust alterations of theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling in the principal output region of the hippocampus, the subiculum. In addition we showed that, compared to controls, these mice expressed negligible levels of Aβ. Finally, these network alterations were not due to genetic factors as 15-day-old animals did not exhibit theta-gamma coupling alterations. Thus, initial alterations in hippocampal network activity arise before Aβ accumulation and may represent an early biomarker for AD. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Propofol, Sevoflurane, and Ketamine Induce a Reversible Increase in Delta-Gamma and Theta-Gamma Phase-Amplitude Coupling in Frontal Cortex of Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Pal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies from human and non-human species have demonstrated a breakdown of functional corticocortical connectivity during general anesthesia induced by anesthetics with diverse molecular, neurophysiological, and pharmacological profiles. Recent studies have demonstrated that changes in long-range neural communication, and by corollary, functional connectivity, might be influenced by cross-frequency coupling (CFC between the phase of slow oscillations and the amplitude of local fast oscillations. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC between slow oscillations and alpha rhythm during general anesthesia reveal distinct patterns depending on the anesthetic. In this study, we analyzed the effect of three clinically used anesthetics (propofol: n = 6, sevoflurane: n = 10, and ketamine: n = 8 with distinct molecular mechanisms on changes in PAC in the frontal cortex of rat. The loss of righting reflex was used as a surrogate for unconsciousness. PAC was calculated using the modulation index (MI algorithm between delta (1–4 Hz, theta (4–10 Hz, low gamma (25–55 Hz, and high gamma (65–125 Hz bands. A linear mixed model with fixed effects was used for statistical comparisons between waking, anesthetized, and post-anesthesia recovery epochs. All three anesthetics increased the coupling between delta and low gamma (p < 0.0001 as well as between theta and low gamma (p < 0.0001 oscillations, which returned to baseline waking levels during the post-anesthetic recovery period. In addition, a reversible reduction in high gamma power (p < 0.0001 was a consistent change during anesthesia induced by all three agents. The changes in delta-high gamma and theta-high gamma PAC as well as power spectral changes in delta, theta, and low gamma bandwidths did not show a uniform response across the three anesthetics. These results encourage the study of alternative PAC patterns as drug-invariant markers of general anesthesia in humans.

  4. On a Nonlocal Ostrovsky-Whitham Type Dynamical System, Its Riemann Type Inhomogeneous Regularizations and Their Integrability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Golenia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-wave perturbations in a relaxing medium, governed by a special reduction of the Ostrovsky evolution equation, and later derived by Whitham, are studied using the gradient-holonomic integrability algorithm. The bi-Hamiltonicity and complete integrability of the corresponding dynamical system is stated and an infinite hierarchy of commuting to each other conservation laws of dispersive type are found. The well defined regularization of the model is constructed and its Lax type integrability is discussed. A generalized hydrodynamical Riemann type system is considered, infinite hierarchies of conservation laws, related compatible Poisson structures and a Lax type representation for the special case N=3 are constructed.

  5. An Extension of the Athena++ Code Framework for GRMHD Based on Advanced Riemann Solvers and Staggered-mesh Constrained Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher J.; Stone, James M.; Gammie, Charles F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) code integrated into the Athena++ framework. Improving upon the techniques used in most GRMHD codes, ours allows the use of advanced, less diffusive Riemann solvers, in particular HLLC and HLLD. We also employ a staggered-mesh constrained transport algorithm suited for curvilinear coordinate systems in order to maintain the divergence-free constraint of the magnetic field. Our code is designed to work with arbitrary stationary spacetimes in one, two, or three dimensions, and we demonstrate its reliability through a number of tests. We also report on its promising performance and scalability.

  6. Fast estimation from above of the maximum wave speed in the Riemann problem for the Euler equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermond, Jean-Luc; Popov, Bojan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the construction of a fast algorithm for computing the maximum speed of propagation in the Riemann solution for the Euler system of gas dynamics with the co-volume equation of state. The novelty in the algorithm is that it stops when a guaranteed upper bound for the maximum speed is reached with a prescribed accuracy. The convergence rate of the algorithm is cubic and the bound is guaranteed for gasses with the co-volume equation of state and the heat capacity ratio γ in the range (1 , 5 / 3 ].

  7. The effects of theta-burst stimulation on sleep and vigilance in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensen, Armand; Gorban, Corina; Niklaus, Marcel; Kuske, Eva; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become a popular tool to modulate neuronal networks and associated brain functions in both clinical and basic research. Yet few studies have examined the potential effects of cortical stimulation on general levels of vigilance. In this exploratory study, we used theta-burst protocols, both continuous (cTBS) and intermittent (iTBS) patterns, to examine whether inhibition or excitation of the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) was able to induce reliable and acute changes to vigilance measures, compared to the left dorso-lateral associative visual cortex (dlAVC) as a control site in line with previous work. Partially sleep restricted participants underwent four separate sessions in a single day, in a between subjects design for TBS stimulation type and within subjects for locaton, each consisting of maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT), a sleep latency test, and a psychomotor vigilance task (PVT). TBS significantly affected measures of sleep consolidation, namely latency to sleep stage 2 and sleep efficiency, but had no effects on sleep drive or psychomotor vigilance levels for either TBS type or location. Contrary to our initial hypothesis of the dlAVC as a control site, stimulation to this region resulted in the largest differential effects between stimulation types. Moreover, the effect of TBS was found to be consistent throughout the day. These data may provide the basis for further investigation into therapeutic applications of TBS in sleep disorders. PMID:24971057

  8. The effects of theta-burst stimulation on vigilance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armand eMensen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has become a popular tool to modulate neuronal networks and associated brain functions in both clinical and basic research. Yet few studies have examined the potential effects of cortical stimulation on general levels of vigilance. In this exploratory study, we used theta-burst protocols, both continuous (cTBS and intermittent (iTBS patterns, to examine whether inhibition or excitation of the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC was able to induce reliable and acute changes to vigilance measures, compared to the left dorso-lateral associative visual cortex (dlAVC as a control site in line with previous work. Partially sleep restricted participants underwent four separate sessions in a single day, in a between subjects design for TBS stimulation type and within subjects for locaton, each consisting of maintenance of wakefulness test, a sleep latency test, and a psychomotor vigilance task. TBS significantly affected measures of sleep consolidation, namely latency to sleep stage 2 and sleep efficiency, but had no effects on sleep drive or psychomotor vigilance levels for either TBS type or location. Contrary to our initial hypothesis of the dlAVC as a control site, stimulation to this region resulted in the largest differential effects between stimulation types. Moreover, the effect of TBS was found to be consistent throughout the day. These data may provide the basis for further investigation into therapeutic applications of TBS in sleep disorders.

  9. On the zeros of the OEIS A191257 zeta function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calingasan, Recto Rex M.; Policarpio, Alexander Vincent B.

    2017-11-01

    In his 1859 paper, G. F. B. Riemann extended the domain of the zeta function from the set of real numbers to the set of complex numbers, and conjectured that the function's zeros lie on the vertical line whose real part is ½. We shall use this analogy to introduce another type of zeta function and the properties of its zeros.

  10. [The spatial synchronization and power of the alpha and theta rhythm after action of signals Go/NoGo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostandov, É A; Cheremushkin, E A

    2014-01-01

    At adult healthy subjects (n = 35) in pause between the target (facial expression) and triggering stimuli showed the conditioning signals of Go/NoGo defining significants of triggering stimulus. The low-frequency alpha rhythm reacts to stimuli Go/NoGo in the left hemisphere more strongly. The coherence of low-frequency alpha potentials on 5-7 second after positive and negative conditioning (Go/NoGo) stimuli increases. Just before the triggering stimulus irrespective of their sign, confirms situation that development of a differentiation demands not less functional activity, than positive conditional reaction. Modulation of cortical activity is connected generally with the talamo-cortical system of selective attention. The coherence a theta rhythm increases after action of positive conditioning signal in the medial cortical areas. It is linked with the function of emotional memory.

  11. The Experimental Status of $\\theta_{13}$ from the Point of View of the Electron (Anti-) Neutrino Disappearance Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Leitner, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    A non zero, surprisingly large value of the third mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ has been measured in reactor neutrino experiments. Currently the most precise measurement of $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13}$ has been performed by the Daya Bay experiment $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}=0.089\\pm 0.010({\\rm stat.})\\pm0.005({\\rm syst.})$ (7.7 $\\sigma$ significance of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13} > 0$),the RENO experiment has measured the value $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.113 \\pm 0.013(\\rm stat.) \\pm 0.019(\\rm syst.)$ (4.9 $\\sigma$ significance) and the Double Chooz experiment $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.109 \\pm 0.030(\\rm stat.) \\pm 0.025(\\rm syst.)$ (2.9 $\\sigma$ significance). These results are extremely important for future searches of violation of combined CP parity in lepton sector of the Standard model.

  12. Median raphe stimulation-induced motor inhibition concurrent with suppression of type 1 and type 2 hippocampal theta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, Brian H; Bland, Cheryl E; MacIver, M Bruce

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological effects produced by electrical stimulation of posterior hypothalamic (PH) or median raphe (MR) nuclei, independently and during combined stimulation of both PH and MR. These three stimulation conditions were applied during spontaneous behavior in an open field and during PH stimulation-induced wheel running, while simultaneously recording hippocampal (HPC) field activity. An additional objective was to determine the effects of MR stimulation on Type 1 movement related theta and Type 2 sensory processing related theta. To achieve the latter, when behavioral studies were completed we studied the same rats under urethane anesthesia and then during urethane anesthesia with the addition of atropine sulfate (ATSO4). Here we demonstrated that electrical stimulation of a localized region of the MR nucleus resulted in a profound inhibition of both spontaneously occurring theta related motor behaviors and the theta related motor behaviors induced by electrical stimulation of the PH nucleus. Furthermore, this motor inhibition occurred concurrently with strong suppression of hippocampal theta field oscillations in the freely moving rat, a condition where the theta recorded is Type 2 sensory processing theta occurring coincidently with Type 1 movement related theta (Bland, 1986). Our results indicate that motor inhibition resulted from stimulation of neurons located in the mid central region of the MR, while stimulation in adjacent regions produced variable responses, including movements and theta activity. The present study provided evidence that the pharmacological basis of the suppression of Type 2 sensory processing HPC theta was cholinergic. However, MR inhibition of PH-induced wheel running was not affected by cholinergic blockade, which blocks Type 2 theta, indicating that MR stimulation-induced motor inhibition also requires the suppression of Type 1 theta. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reward Expectancy Strengthens CA1 Theta and Beta Band Synchronization and Hippocampal-Ventral Striatal Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, Carien S; Meijer, Guido T; Lankelma, Jan V; Vinck, Martin A; Jackson, Jadin C; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2016-10-12

    The use of information from the hippocampal memory system in motivated behavior depends on its communication with the ventral striatum. When an animal encounters cues that signal subsequent reward, its reward expectancy is raised. It is unknown, however, how this process affects hippocampal dynamics and their influence on target structures, such as ventral striatum. We show that, in rats, reward-predictive cues result in enhanced hippocampal theta and beta band rhythmic activity during subsequent action, compared with uncued goal-directed navigation. The beta band component, also labeled theta's harmonic, involves selective hippocampal CA1 cell groups showing frequency doubling of firing periodicity relative to theta rhythmicity and it partitions the theta cycle into segments showing clear versus poor spike timing organization. We found that theta phase precession occurred over a wider range than previously reported. This was apparent from spikes emitted near the peak of the theta cycle exhibiting large "phase precessing jumps" relative to spikes in foregoing cycles. Neither this phenomenon nor the regular manifestation of theta phase precession was affected by reward expectancy. Ventral striatal neuronal firing phase-locked not only to hippocampal theta, but also to beta band activity. Both hippocampus and ventral striatum showed increased synchronization between neuronal firing and local field potential activity during cued compared with uncued goal approaches. These results suggest that cue-triggered reward expectancy intensifies hippocampal output to target structures, such as the ventral striatum, by which the hippocampus may gain prioritized access to systems modulating motivated behaviors. Here we show that temporally discrete cues raising reward expectancy enhance both theta and beta band activity in the hippocampus once goal-directed navigation has been initiated. These rhythmic activities are associated with increased synchronization of neuronal firing

  14. The effects of alpha/theta neurofeedback on personality and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Joshua; Varney, Carolyn; Parkinson, Lesley A; Gruzelier, John H

    2005-05-01

    Alpha/theta neurofeedback has been shown to be successful both in treating addictions and in enhancing artistry in music students. How its effects are mediated are not yet clear. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that alpha/theta neurofeedback works inter alia by normalising extreme personality and raising feelings of well being. 12 participants with high scores for Withdrawal (as measured by the PSQ) were given either alpha/theta neurofeedback or mock feedback and their personality and mood were assessed. Withdrawal scores on the PSQ-80 were not found to change in either group but significant effects were found for the Profile Of Mood States (POMS), with real feedback producing higher overall scores than mock feedback (P = 0.056). Real feedback caused participants to feel significantly more energetic (P < 0.01) than did mock feedback. Sessions of real feedback made participants feel more composed (P < 0.01), agreeable (P < 0.01), elevated (P < 0.01) and confident (P < 0.05), whilst sessions of mock feedback made participants feel more tired (P < 0.05), yet composed (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that, whilst 9 sessions of alpha/theta neurofeedback was insufficient to change personality, improvements in mood may provide a partial explanation for the efficacy of alpha/theta neurofeedback.

  15. Patterns of Theta Activity in Limbic Anxiety Circuit Preceding Exploratory Behavior in Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R Jacinto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theta oscillations within the hippocampus-amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (HPC-AMY-mPFC(PrL circuit have been consistently implicated in the regulation of anxiety behaviors, including risk-assessment. To study if theta activity during risk-assessment was correlated with exploratory behavior in an approach/avoidance paradigm we recorded simultaneous local field potentials from this circuit in rats exploring the elevated-plus maze (EPM. Opposing patterns of power variations in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC, basolateral amygdala (BLA and prelimbic (PrL mPFC, but not in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC, during exploratory risk-assessment of the open arms preceded further exploration of the open arms or retreat back to the safer closed arms. The same patterns of theta power variations in the HPC-BLA-mPFC(PrL circuit were also displayed by animals submitted to chronic unpredictable stress protocol known to induce an anxious state. Diverging patterns of vHPC-mPFC(PrL theta coherence were also significantly correlated with forthcoming approach or avoidance behavior in the conflict situation in both controls and stressed animals; interestingly, vHPC-BLA and BLA-mPFC(PrL theta coherence correlated with future behavior only in stressed animals, underlying the pivotal role of the amygdala on the stress response.

  16. Estimates by bootstrap interval for time series forecasts obtained by theta model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, are developed an experimental computer program in Matlab language version 7.1 from the univariate method for time series forecasting called Theta, and implementation of resampling technique known as computer intensive "bootstrap" to estimate the prediction for the point forecast obtained by this method by confidence interval. To solve this problem built up an algorithm that uses Monte Carlo simulation to obtain the interval estimation for forecasts. The Theta model presented in this work was very efficient in M3 Makridakis competition, where tested 3003 series. It is based on the concept of modifying the local curvature of the time series obtained by a coefficient theta (Θ. In it's simplest approach the time series is decomposed into two lines theta representing terms of long term and short term. The prediction is made by combining the forecast obtained by fitting lines obtained with the theta decomposition. The results of Mape's error obtained for the estimates confirm the favorable results to the method of M3 competition being a good alternative for time series forecast.

  17. Hippocampal theta modulation of neocortical spike times and gamma rhythm: a biophysical model study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eelke Spaak

    Full Text Available The hippocampal theta and neocortical gamma rhythms are two prominent examples of oscillatory neuronal activity. The hippocampus has often been hypothesized to influence neocortical networks by its theta rhythm, and, recently, evidence for such a direct influence has been found. We examined a possible mechanism for this influence by means of a biophysical model study using conductance-based model neurons. We found, in agreement with previous studies, that networks of fast-spiking GABA-ergic interneurons, coupled with shunting inhibition, synchronize their spike activity at a gamma frequency and are able to impose this rhythm on a network of pyramidal cells to which they are coupled. When our model was supplied with hippocampal theta-modulated input fibres, the theta rhythm biased the spike timings of both the fast-spiking and pyramidal cells. Furthermore, both the amplitude and frequency of local field potential gamma oscillations were influenced by the phase of the theta rhythm. We show that the fast-spiking cells, not pyramidal cells, are essential for this latter phenomenon, thus highlighting their crucial role in the interplay between hippocampus and neocortex.

  18. Novelty-induced correlation between visual neurons and the hippocampal theta rhythm in sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedemonte, Marisa; Gambini, Juan P; Velluti, Ricardo A

    2005-11-16

    Various rhythms have been shown to affect sensory processing such as the waking-sleep cycle and the hippocampal theta waves. Changes in the firing of visual lateral geniculate nucleus neurons have been reported to be dependent on the animal's behavioral state. The lateral geniculate extracellular neuronal firing and hippocampal field activity were recorded in chronically implanted animals to analyze the relationship during quiet wakefulness and sleep associated with stimulation shifts that may introduce novelty. During wakefulness, a change in light flash stimulation pattern (stimuli frequency shift, stimuli on and off) caused an increment in the theta band power in 100% of the cases and a phase-locking of the spikes in 53% of the recorded neurons. During slow wave sleep, there were no consistent changes in the theta power notwithstanding 13% of the neurons exhibited phase-locking, i.e., novelty may induce changes in the temporal correlation of visual neuronal activity with the hippocampal theta rhythm in sleep. The present results suggest that visual processing in slow wave sleep exists, while auditory information and learning were reported during slow wave sleep in animals and newborn humans. The changes in the theta power as well as in the neuronal phase-locking amount indicate that in slow wave sleep, the ability of the hippocampus to detect/process novelty, although present, may be decreased. This is consistent with the noticeable decrease in awareness of the environment during sleep.

  19. Thirring model partition functions and harmonic differentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, D. Z.; Pilch, K.

    1988-10-01

    The partition function of the Thirring model on a Riemann surface is calculated using the representation of the model as a fermion interacting with an auxiliary vector potential. The Hodge decomposition of the potential is used and the integral over the harmonic forms is shown to reproduce exactly the soliton sum in the bosonic version of the theory.

  20. La notion husserlienne de multiplicité : au-delà de Cantor et Riemann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ierna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available En raison du rôle changeant qu’il joue dans les différents ouvrages de Husserl, le concept de Mannigfaltigkeit afait l’objet de nombreuses interprétations. La présence de ce terme a notamment induit en erreur plusieurs commentateurs, qui ont cru en déterminer l’origine dans les années de Halle, à l’époque où Husserl, ami et collègue de Cantor, rédigeait la Philosophie de l’arithmétique. Mais force est de constater qu’à cette époque Husserl s’était déjà ouvertement éloigné de la définition cantorienne de Mannigfaltigkeit en s’approchant plutôt de Riemann, comme le montrent les nombreuses études et leçons qui lui sont consacrées. La Mannigfaltigkeitslehre de Husserl semble donc plus proche de la topologie que de la théorie des ensembles de Cantor. Ainsi, dans les Prolégomènes, Husserl introduit l’idée d’une Mannigfaltigkeitslehre pure en tant qu’entreprise méta-théorique dont le but est d’étudier les relations entre théories, à savoir la manière par laquelle une théorie est dérivée ou fondée à partir d’une autre. Dès lors, lorsque Husserl affirme que le meilleur exemple d’une telle théorie pure des multiplicités se trouve dans les mathématiques, cela risque donc de prêter à confusion. En effet, la théorie pure des théories ne saurait être simplement identifiée aux mathématiques qui relèvent de la topologie, mais considérée en tant que mathesis universalis. Bien qu’une telle position ne fût sans doute pas entièrement claire en 1900-01, Husserl ne tardera pas à relier explicitement théorie des multiplicités et mathesis universalis.En ce sens, la mathesis universalis, théorie des théories en général, est une discipline formelle, apriori et analytique qui a pour but l’analyse des catégories sémantiques suprêmes et des catégories d’objets qui leur sont corrélées. Dans cet article j’essayerai de comprendre le développement de la notion de

  1. Independent control of gamma and theta activity by distinct interneuron networks in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Izumi; Herb, Jan T; Kollo, Mihaly; Boyden, Edward S; Schaefer, Andreas T

    2014-09-01

    Circuits in the brain possess the ability to orchestrate activities on different timescales, but the manner in which distinct circuits interact to sculpt diverse rhythms remains unresolved. The olfactory bulb is a classic example of a place in which slow theta and fast gamma rhythms coexist. Furthermore, inhibitory interneurons that are generally implicated in rhythm generation are segregated into distinct layers, neatly separating local and global motifs. We combined intracellular recordings in vivo with circuit-specific optogenetic interference to examine the contribution of inhibition to rhythmic activity in the mouse olfactory bulb. We found that the two inhibitory circuits controlled rhythms on distinct timescales: local, glomerular networks coordinated theta activity, regulating baseline and odor-evoked inhibition, whereas granule cells orchestrated gamma synchrony and spike timing. Notably, granule cells did not contribute to baseline rhythms or sniff-coupled odor-evoked inhibition. Thus, activities on theta and gamma timescales are controlled by separate, dissociable inhibitory networks in the olfactory bulb.

  2. Theta power decreases in preparation for voluntary isometric contractions performed with maximal subjective effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, T; Sust, M; Beyer, L; Hansen, E; Rost, R; Schmalz, T

    1995-07-07

    In order to find EEG parameters that can be attributed to movements performed with maximal subjective effort, EEG recordings and force measurements were realized in connection with isometric contractions (IMC). IMC were performed with submaximal and maximal subjective effort. Mean spectral power density within the theta band was found as an indicator for maximal subjective effort. The theta power across the parieto-occipital area decreases from rest through movements performed with submaximal force to movements performed with maximal effort. It is argued that this theta decrease possibly reflects a down-regulation of the posterior attention system in order to minimize the influences of external stimuli during the preparation for voluntary IMC performed with maximal subjective effort.

  3. First Measurement of \\theta_13 from Delayed Neutron Capture on Hydrogen in the Double Chooz Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Y; Anjos, J C dos; Barriere, J C; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bezerra, T J C; Bezrukhov, L; Blucher, E; Bowden, N S; Buck, C; Busenitz, J; Cabrera, A; Caden, E; Camilleri, L; Carr, R; Cerrada, M; Chang, P -J; Chimenti, P; Classen, T; Collin, A P; Conover, E; Conrad, J M; Crespo-Anadón, J I; Crum, K; Cucoanes, A; Damon, E; Dawson, J V; Dazeley, S; Dietrich, D; Djurcic, Z; Dracos, M; Durand, V; Ebert, J; Efremenko, Y; Elnimr, M; Erickson, A; Etenko, A; Fallot, M; Fechner, M; von Feilitzsch, F; Felde, J; Fernandes, S M; Fischer, V; Franco, D; Franke, A J; Franke, M; Furuta, H; Gama, R; Gil-Botella, I; Giot, L; Göger-Neff, M; Gonzalez, L F G; Goodenough, L; Goodman, M C; Goon, J TM; Greiner, D; Haag, N; Habib, S; Hagner, C; Hara, T; Hartmann, F X; Haser, J; Hatzikoutelis, A; Hayakawa, T; Hofmann, M; Horton-Smith, G A; Hourlier, A; Ishitsuka, M; Jochum, J; Jollet, C; Jones, C L; Kaether, F; Kalousis, L N; Kamyshkov, Y; Kaplan, D M; Kawasaki, T; Keefer, G; Kemp, E; de Kerret, H; Konno, T; Kryn, D; Kuze, M; Lachenmaier, T; Lane, C E; Langbrandtner, C; Lasserre, T; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Lima, H P; Lindner, M; López-Castaño, J M; LoSecco, J M; Lubsandorzhiev, B K; Lucht, S; McKee, D; Maeda, J; Maesano, C N; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Martino, J; Matsubara, T; Mention, G; Meregaglia, A; Meyer, M; Miletic, T; Milincic, R; Miyata, H; Mueller, Th A; Nagasaka, Y; Nakajima, K; Novella, P; Obolensky, M; Oberauer, L; Onillon, A; Osborn, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Palomares, C; Pepe, I M; Perasso, S; Perrin, P; Pfahler, P; Porta, A; Potzel, W; Pronost, G; Reichenbacher, J; Reinhold, B; Remoto, A; Röhling, M; Roncin, R; Roth, S; Rybolt, B; Sakamoto, Y; Santorelli, R; Sato, F; Schönert, S; Schoppmann, S; Schwetz, T; Shaevitz, M H; Shimojima, S; Shrestha, D; Sida, J-L; Sinev, V; Skorokhvatov, M; Smith, E; Spitz, J; Stahl, A; Stancu, I; Stokes, L F F; Strait, M; Stüken, A; Suekane, F; Sukhotin, S; Sumiyoshi, T; Sun, Y; Svoboda, R; Terao, K; Tonazzo, A; Toups, M; Thi, H H Trinh; Valdiviesso, G; Veyssiere, C; Wagner, S; Watanabe, H; White, B; Wiebusch, C; Winslow, L; Worcester, M; Wurm, M; Yermia, F; Zimmer, V

    2013-01-01

    The Double Chooz experiment has determined the value of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$ from an analysis of inverse beta decay interactions with neutron capture on hydrogen. This analysis uses a three times larger fiducial volume than the standard Double Chooz assessment, which is restricted to a region doped with gadolinium (Gd), yielding an exposure of 113.1 GW-ton-years. The data sample used in this analysis is distinct from that of the Gd analysis, and the systematic uncertainties are also largely independent, with some exceptions, such as the reactor neutrino flux prediction. A combined rate- and energy-dependent fit finds $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13}=0.097\\pm 0.034(stat.) \\pm 0.034 (syst.)$, excluding the no-oscillation hypothesis at 2.0 \\sigma. This result is consistent with previous measurements of $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13}$.

  4. Altered neurophysiologic response to intermittent theta burst stimulation in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Steve W; Gilbert, Donald L

    2012-07-01

    The motor system in Tourette syndrome has been found to be abnormal in previous fine-motor and neurophysiologic studies. This novel pilot study uses repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as a method to characterize the neurophysiology of the motor system in Tourette syndrome. We investigated the modulation of cortical excitability in adult Tourette syndrome patients by measuring motor-evoked potential amplitudes before and after applying intermittent theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation. Motor-evoked potential amplitude changes over 1 and 10 minutes after intermittent theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation were greater in 11 healthy controls than 10 adult patients with Tourette syndrome (P = 0.004). This altered neurophysiologic response to intermittent theta burst stimulation may contribute to the understanding of motor cortical mechanisms in Tourette syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Episodic sequence memory is supported by a theta-gamma phase code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Andrew C; Poeppel, David; Ezzyat, Youssef; Davachi, Lila

    2016-10-01

    The meaning we derive from our experiences is not a simple static extraction of the elements but is largely based on the order in which those elements occur. Models propose that sequence encoding is supported by interactions between high- and low-frequency oscillations, such that elements within an experience are represented by neural cell assemblies firing at higher frequencies (gamma) and sequential order is encoded by the specific timing of firing with respect to a lower frequency oscillation (theta). During episodic sequence memory formation in humans, we provide evidence that items in different sequence positions exhibit greater gamma power along distinct phases of a theta oscillation. Furthermore, this segregation is related to successful temporal order memory. Our results provide compelling evidence that memory for order, a core component of an episodic memory, capitalizes on the ubiquitous physiological mechanism of theta-gamma phase-amplitude coupling.

  6. A Data-Driven Approach to Responder Subgroup Identification after Paired Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonio Heidegger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modulation of cortical excitability by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is used for investigating human brain functions. A common observation is the high variability of long-term depression (LTD-like changes in human (motor cortex excitability. This study aimed at analyzing the response subgroup distribution after paired continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS as a basis for subject selection.Methods: The effects of paired cTBS using 80% active motor threshold (AMT in 31 healthy volunteers were assessed at the primary motor cortex (M1 corresponding to the representation of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI muscle of the left hand, before and up to 50 min after plasticity induction. The changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs were analyzed using machine-learning derived methods implemented as Gaussian mixture modeling (GMM and computed ABC analysis.Results: The probability density distribution of the MEP changes from baseline was tri-modal, showing a clear separation at 80.9%. Subjects displaying at least this degree of LTD-like changes were n = 6 responders. By contrast, n = 7 subjects displayed a paradox response with increase in MEP. Reassessment using ABC analysis as alternative approach led to the same n = 6 subjects as a distinct category.Conclusion: Depressive effects of paired cTBS using 80% AMT endure at least 50 min, however, only in a small subgroup of healthy subjects. Hence, plasticity induction by paired cTBS might not reflect a general mechanism in human motor cortex excitability. A mathematically supported criterion is proposed to select responders for enrolment in assessments of human brain functional networks using virtual brain lesions.

  7. A Data-Driven Approach to Responder Subgroup Identification after Paired Continuous Theta Burst Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Tonio; Hansen-Goos, Onno; Batlaeva, Olga; Annak, Onur; Ziemann, Ulf; Lötsch, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Background: Modulation of cortical excitability by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used for investigating human brain functions. A common observation is the high variability of long-term depression (LTD)-like changes in human (motor) cortex excitability. This study aimed at analyzing the response subgroup distribution after paired continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) as a basis for subject selection. Methods: The effects of paired cTBS using 80% active motor threshold (AMT) in 31 healthy volunteers were assessed at the primary motor cortex (M1) corresponding to the representation of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the left hand, before and up to 50 min after plasticity induction. The changes in motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were analyzed using machine-learning derived methods implemented as Gaussian mixture modeling (GMM) and computed ABC analysis. Results: The probability density distribution of the MEP changes from baseline was tri-modal, showing a clear separation at 80.9%. Subjects displaying at least this degree of LTD-like changes were n = 6 responders. By contrast, n = 7 subjects displayed a paradox response with increase in MEP. Reassessment using ABC analysis as alternative approach led to the same n = 6 subjects as a distinct category. Conclusion: Depressive effects of paired cTBS using 80% AMT endure at least 50 min, however, only in a small subgroup of healthy subjects. Hence, plasticity induction by paired cTBS might not reflect a general mechanism in human motor cortex excitability. A mathematically supported criterion is proposed to select responders for enrolment in assessments of human brain functional networks using virtual brain lesions.

  8. Characterizing the roles of alpha and theta oscillations in multisensory attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arielle S; Payne, Lisa; Sekuler, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Cortical alpha oscillations (8-13Hz) appear to play a role in suppressing distractions when just one sensory modality is being attended, but do they also contribute when attention is distributed over multiple sensory modalities? For an answer, we examined cortical oscillations in human subjects who were dividing attention between auditory and visual sequences. In Experiment 1, subjects performed an oddball task with auditory, visual, or simultaneous audiovisual sequences in separate blocks, while the electroencephalogram was recorded using high-density scalp electrodes. Alpha oscillations were present continuously over posterior regions while subjects were attending to auditory sequences. This supports the idea that the brain suppresses processing of visual input in order to advantage auditory processing. During a divided-attention audiovisual condition, an oddball (a rare, unusual stimulus) occurred in either the auditory or the visual domain, requiring that attention be divided between the two modalities. Fronto-central theta band (4-7Hz) activity was strongest in this audiovisual condition, when subjects monitored auditory and visual sequences simultaneously. Theta oscillations have been associated with both attention and with short-term memory. Experiment 2 sought to distinguish these possible roles of fronto-central theta activity during multisensory divided attention. Using a modified version of the oddball task from Experiment 1, Experiment 2 showed that differences in theta power among conditions were independent of short-term memory load. Ruling out theta's association with short-term memory, we conclude that fronto-central theta activity is likely a marker of multisensory divided attention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Search for the pentaquark candidate $\\Theta^+$(1540) in the hyperon beam experiment WA89

    CERN Document Server

    Adamovich, M I; Baranov, S P; Barberis, D; Beck, M; Bérat, C; Beusch, W; Boss, M; Brons, S; Brückner, W; Buénerd, M; Busch, C; Büscher, C; Charignon, F; Chauvin, J; Chudakov, E A; Dersch, U; Dropmann, F; Engelfried, J; Faller, F; Fournier, A; Gerassimov, S G; Godbersen, M; Grafström, P; Haller, T; Heidrich, M; Hubbard, E; Hurst, R B; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Keller, N; Martens, K; Martin, P; Masciocchi, S; Michaels, R; Müller, U; Neeb, H; Newbold, D; Newsom, C; Paul, S; Pochodzalla, J; Potashnikova, I; Povh, B; Ransome, R; Ren, Z; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Rosner, G; Rossi, L; Rudolph, H; Scheel, C; Schmitt, L; Siebert,H W; Simon, A; Smith, V J; Thilmann, O; Trombini, A; Vesin, E; Volkemer, B; Vorwalter, K; Walcher, T; Wälder, G; Werding, R; Wittmann, E; Zavertyaev, M V

    2005-01-01

    We report on a high-statistics search for the \\t1540 resonance in $\\Sigma^-$-nucleus collisions at 340 \\gevc1 . No evidence for this resonance was found in our data sample which contains 13 millions $K^0_s \\to \\pi^+\\pi^- $ decays above background. For the decay channel $\\Theta^+ \\to K^0_s p$ and the kinematic range $x_F>$ 0.05 we find the production cross section to be $BR(\\Theta^+ \\to K^0_s p)\\cdot \\sigma_0 <$ 1.8 $\\mu$b per nucleon at 99% CL.

  10. Theta-associated high-frequency oscillations (110–160 Hz) in the hippocampus and neocortex

    OpenAIRE

    Tort, Adriano B. L.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Souza, Bryan C.; Draguhn, Andreas; Brankacˇk, Jurij

    2013-01-01

    TORT, A. B. L. ; SCHEFFER-TEIXEIRA, R ; Souza, B.C. ; DRAGUHN, A. ; BRANKACK, J. . Theta-associated high-frequency oscillations (110-160 Hz) in the hippocampus and neocortex. Progress in Neurobiology , v. 100, p. 1-14, 2013. We review recent evidence for a novel type of fast cortical oscillatory activity that occurs circumscribed between 110 and 160 Hz, which we refer to as high-frequency oscillations (HFOs). HFOs characteristically occur modulated by theta phase in the hippocampus a...

  11. Transient loss of plasma from a theta pinch having an initially reversed magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of the transient loss of plasma from a 25-cm-long theta pinch initially containing a reversed trapped magnetic field are presented. The plasma, amenable to MHD analyses, was a doubly ionized helium plasma characterized by an ion density N/sub i/ = 2 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and an ion temperature T/sub i/ = 15 eV at midcoil and by N/sub i/ = 0.5 x 10/sup 16/ cm/sup -3/ and T/sub i/ = 6 eV at a position 2.5 cm beyond the end of the theta coil.

  12. Anisothecium staphylinum (Whitehouse) Sipman, Rubers & Riemann comb. nov. found in Belgium, Denmark and the Netherlands, with a remark on its costal anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipman, H.; Rubers, W.V.; Riemann, B.

    1972-01-01

    Dicranella staphylina Whitehouse, a species recently described from Great Britain, is now recorded from Belgium, Denmark and The Netherlands. A new combination, Anisothecium staphylinum (Whitehouse) Sipman, Rubers & Riemann, is proposed. A study of the costal anatomy revealed that A. staphylinum in

  13. Divergence-free MHD on unstructured meshes using high order finite volume schemes based on multidimensional Riemann solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Several advances have been reported in the recent literature on divergence-free finite volume schemes for Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Almost all of these advances are restricted to structured meshes. To retain full geometric versatility, however, it is also very important to make analogous advances in divergence-free schemes for MHD on unstructured meshes. Such schemes utilize a staggered Yee-type mesh, where all hydrodynamic quantities (mass, momentum and energy density) are cell-centered, while the magnetic fields are face-centered and the electric fields, which are so useful for the time update of the magnetic field, are centered at the edges. Three important advances are brought together in this paper in order to make it possible to have high order accurate finite volume schemes for the MHD equations on unstructured meshes. First, it is shown that a divergence-free WENO reconstruction of the magnetic field can be developed for unstructured meshes in two and three space dimensions using a classical cell-centered WENO algorithm, without the need to do a WENO reconstruction for the magnetic field on the faces. This is achieved via a novel constrained L2-projection operator that is used in each time step as a postprocessor of the cell-centered WENO reconstruction so that the magnetic field becomes locally and globally divergence free. Second, it is shown that recently-developed genuinely multidimensional Riemann solvers (called MuSIC Riemann solvers) can be used on unstructured meshes to obtain a multidimensionally upwinded representation of the electric field at each edge. Third, the above two innovations work well together with a high order accurate one-step ADER time stepping strategy, which requires the divergence-free nonlinear WENO reconstruction procedure to be carried out only once per time step. The resulting divergence-free ADER-WENO schemes with MuSIC Riemann solvers give us an efficient and easily-implemented strategy for divergence-free MHD on

  14. Protein kinase C theta is required for efficient induction of IL-10-secreting T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Bronwen R.

    2017-01-01

    Secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) by CD4+ T cells is an essential immunoregulatory mechanism. The work presented here assesses the role of the signaling molecule protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) in the induction of IL-10 expression in CD4+ T cells. Using wildtype and PKCθ-deficient Tg4 T cell receptor transgenic mice, we implemented a well-described protocol of repeated doses of myelin basic protein (MBP)Ac1-9[4Y] antigen to induce Tr1-like IL-10+ T cells. We find that PKCθ is required for the efficient induction of IL-10 following antigen administration. Both serum concentrations of IL-10 and the proportion of IL-10+ T cells were reduced in PKCθ-deficient mice relative to wildtype mice following [4Y] treatment. We further characterized the T cells of [4Y] treated PKCθ-deficient Tg4 mice and found reduced expression of the transcription factors cMaf, Nfil3 and FoxP3 and the surface receptors PD-1 and Tim3, all of which have been associated with the differentiation or function of IL-10+ T cells. Finally, we demonstrated that, unlike [4Y] treated wildtype Tg4 T cells, cells from PKCθ-deficient mice were unable to suppress the priming of naïve T cells in vitro and in vivo. In summary, we present data demonstrating a role for PKCθ in the induction of suppressive, IL-10-secreting T cells induced in TCR-transgenic mice following chronic antigen administration. This should be considered when contemplating PKCθ as a suitable drug target for inducing immune suppression and graft tolerance. PMID:28158245

  15. Effects of Theta Burst Stimulation on Suprahyoid Motor Cortex Excitability in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tuo; Jiang, Lisheng; Dou, Zulin; Wu, Cheng; Liu, Feng; Xu, Guangqing; Lan, Yue

    Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) and intermittent TBS (iTBS) are powerful patterns of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), with substantial potential for motor function rehabilitation post-stroke. However, TBS of suprahyoid motor cortex excitability has not been investigated. This study investigated TBS effects on suprahyoid motor cortex excitability and its potential mechanisms in healthy subjects. Thirty-five healthy subjects (23 females; mean age = 21.66 ± 1.66 years) completed three TBS protocols on separate days, separated by at least one week. A stereotaxic neuronavigation system facilitated accurate TMS positioning. Left and right suprahyoid motor evoked potentials (SMEP) were recorded using single-pulse TMS from the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex before stimulation (baseline) and 0, 15, and 30 min after stimulation. The SMEP latency and amplitude were analyzed via repeated measures analysis of variance. cTBS suppressed ipsilateral suprahyoid motor cortex excitability and activated the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex. iTBS facilitated ipsilateral suprahyoid motor cortex excitability; however, it did not affect the contralateral excitability. iTBS eliminated the inhibitory effect caused by cTBS applied to the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex. TBS had no significant effect on the latencies of bilateral SMEP. TBS effects on suprahyoid motor cortex excitability lasted a minimum of 30 min. TBS effectively regulates suprahyoid motor cortex excitability. Suppression of excitability in one hemisphere leads to further activation of the corresponding contralateral motor cortex. iTBS reverses the inhibitory effect induced by cTBS of the contralateral suprahyoid motor cortex. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Solution of the Riemann problem for polarization waves in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, S. K.; Kamchatnov, A. M.; Congy, T.; Pavloff, N.

    2017-12-01

    We provide a classification of the possible flows of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates evolving from initially discontinuous profiles. We consider the situation where the dynamics can be reduced to the consideration of a single polarization mode (also denoted as "magnetic excitation") obeying a system of equations equivalent to the Landau-Lifshitz equation for an easy-plane ferromagnet. We present the full set of one-phase periodic solutions. The corresponding Whitham modulation equations are obtained together with formulas connecting their solutions with the Riemann invariants of the modulation equations. The problem is not genuinely nonlinear, and this results in a non-single-valued mapping of the solutions of the Whitham equations with physical wave patterns as well as the appearance of interesting elements—contact dispersive shock waves—that are absent in more standard, genuinely nonlinear situations. Our analytic results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  17. Measuring $\\theta_{13}$ via Muon Neutrino to Electron Neutrino Oscillations in the MINOS Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Ruth B. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Pembroke College

    2011-01-01

    One of the primary goals in neutrino physics at the present moment is to make a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameter $\\theta_{13}$. This parameter, in addition to being unknown, could potentially allow for the introduction of CP violation into the lepton sector. The MINOS long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment has the ability to make a measurement of this parameter, by looking for the oscillation of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos between a Near and Far Detector over a distance of 735 km. This thesis discusses the development of an analysis framework to search for this oscillation mode. Two major improvements to pre-existing analysis techniques have been implemented by the author. First, a novel particle ID technique based on strip topology, known as the Library Event Matching (LEM) method, is optimized for use in MINOS. Second, a multiple bin likelihood method is developed to fit the data. These two improvements, when combined, increase MINOS' sensitivity to $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})$ by 27\\% over previous analyses. This thesis sees a small excess over background in the Far Detector. A Frequentist interpretation of the data rules out $\\theta_{13}=0$ at 91\\%. A Bayesian interpretation of the data is also presented, placing the most stringent upper boundary on the oscillation parameter to date, at $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})<0.09(0.015)$ for the Normal (Inverted) Hierarchy and $\\delta_{CP}=0$.

  18. Theta waves in children's waking electroencephalogram resemble local aspects of sleep during wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattinger, Sara; Kurth, Salome; Ringli, Maya; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2017-09-11

    Vyazovskiy and colleagues found in rats' multi-unit recordings brief periods of silence (off-states) in local populations of cortical neurons during wakefulness which closely resembled the characteristic off-states during sleep. These off-states became more global and frequent with increasing sleep pressure and were associated with the well-known increase of theta activity under sleep deprivation in the surface EEG. Moreover, the occurrence of such off-states was related to impaired performance. While these animal experiments were based on intracranial recordings, we aimed to explore whether the human surface EEG may also provide evidence for such a local sleep-like intrusion during wakefulness. Thus, we analysed high-density wake EEG recordings during an auditory attention task in the morning and evening in 12 children. We found that, theta waves became more widespread in the evening and the occurrence of widespread theta waves was associated with slower reaction times in the attention task. These results indicate that widespread theta events measured on the scalp might be markers of local sleep in humans. Moreover, such markers of local sleep, seem to be related to the well described performance decline under high sleep pressure.

  19. Lack of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 Selectively Modulates Theta Rhythm and Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holscher, Christian; Schmid, Susanne; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Sansig, Gilles; van der Putten, Herman; Plappert, Claudia F.

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are known to play a role in synaptic plasticity and learning. We have previously shown that mGluR7 deletion in mice produces a selective working memory (WM) impairment, while other types of memory such as reference memory remain unaffected. Since WM has been associated with Theta activity (6-12 Hz) in…

  20. EEG theta and gamma responses to semantic violations in online sentence processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hald, L.A.; Bastiaansen, M.C.M.; Hagoort, P.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the nature of the oscillatory dynamics in the EEG of subjects reading sentences that contain a semantic violation. More specifically, we examine whether increases in theta (approximate to 3-7 Hz) and gamma (around 40 Hz) band power occur in response to sentences that were either

  1. The effects of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahor, Anja; Jaušovec, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to explore the influence of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on resting brain activity and on measures of fluid intelligence. Theta tACS was applied to the left parietal and left frontal brain areas of healthy participants after which resting electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded. Following sham/active stimulation, the participants solved two tests of fluid intelligence while their EEG was recorded. The results showed that active theta tACS affected spectral power in theta and alpha frequency bands. In addition, active theta tACS improved performance on tests of fluid intelligence. This influence was more pronounced in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left parietal area than in the group of participants that received stimulation to the left frontal area. Left parietal tACS increased performance on the difficult test items of both tests (RAPM and PF&C) whereas left frontal tACS increased performance only on the easy test items of one test (RAPM). The observed behavioral tACS influences were also accompanied by changes in neuroelectric activity. The behavioral and neuroelectric data tentatively support the P-FIT neurobiological model of intelligence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Sudarshan Kriya (meditation) on gamma, alpha, and theta rhythm during working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Sushil; Sharma, Greeshma; Mittal, Alok Prakash; Jha, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on analyzing the effects of Sudarshan Kriya yoga (SKY) on brain signals during a working memory (WM) task. To envision the significant effects of SKY on WM capacity (WMC), we chose a control group for contriving a cogent comparison that could be corroborated using statistical tests. A total of 25 subjects were taken in the study, of which 10 were allotted to a control group and 15 to an experimental group. Electroencephalograph was taken during a WM task, which was an automated operation span test before and after SKY with 90 days intervals. No SKY was given to the control group. t-test and one-way ANOVA were applied. SKY promoted the efficient use of energy and power spectral density (PSD) for different brain rhythms in the desired locations as depicted by the gamma (F8 channel), alpha, and theta 2 (F7 and FC5) bands. It was found that gamma PSD reduced for both phases of memory in the experimental group. Alpha energy increased during the retrieval phase in the experimental group after SKY. Theta 1 rhythm was not affected by SKY, but theta 2 had shown left hemispheric activation. Theta rhythm was associated with memory consolidation. SKY had shown minimized energy losses while performing the task. SKY can improve WMC by changing the brain rhythms such that energy is utilized efficiently in performing the task.

  3. Event-related alpha and theta responses in a visuo-spatial working memory task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, Marcel C. M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Groot, Paul F. C.; de Geus, Eco J. C.

    2002-01-01

    To explore the reactivity of the theta and alpha rhythms during visuo-spatial working memory. One hundred and seventy-four subjects performed a delayed response task. They had to remember the spatial location of a target stimulus on a computer screen for a 1 or a 4s retention interval. The target

  4. Event-related alpha and theta responses in a visuo-spatial working memory task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, M.C.M.; Posthuma, D.; Groot, P.F.C.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the reactivity of the theta and alpha rhythms during visuo-spatial working memory. Methods: One hundred and seventy-four subjects performed a delayed response task. They had to remember the spatial location of a target stimulus on a computer screen for a 1 or a 4s retention

  5. White paper report on using nuclear reactors to search for a value of theta13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, K.; Anjos, J.C.; Ayres, D.; Beacom, J.; Bediaga, I.; de Bellefon, A.; Berger, B.E.; Bilenky, S.; Blucher, E.; Bolton, T.; Buck, C.; Bugg, W.; Busenitz, J.; Choubey, S.; Conrad, J.; Cribier, M.; Dadoun, O.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Decowski, M.; de Gouvea, Andre; Demutrh, D.; Dessages-Ardellier, F.; Efremenko, Y.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Finley, D.; Formaggio, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Garbini, M.; Giusti, P.; Goger-Neff, M.; Goodman, M.; Gray, F.; Grieb, C.; Grudzinski, J.J.; Guarino, V.J.; Hartmann, F.; Hagner, C.; Heeger, K.M.; Hofmann, W.; Horton-Smith, G.; Huber, P.; Inzhechik, L.; Jochum, J.; Jostlein, H.; Kadel, R.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Kaplan, D.; Kasper, P.; de Kerret, H.; Kersten, J.; Klein, J.; Knopfle, K.T.; Kopeikin, V.; Kozlov, Yu.; Kryn, D.; Kuchler, V.; Kuze, M.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laughton, C.; Lendvai, C.; Li, J.; Lindner, M.; Link, J.; Longo, M.; Lu, Y.S.; Luk, K.B.; Ma, Y.Q.; Martemyanov, V.P.; Mauger, C.; Manghetti, H.; McKeown, R.; Mention, G.; Meyer, J.P.; Mikaelyan, L.; Minakata, H.; Naples, D.; Nunokawa, H.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Parke, S.; Petcov, S.T.; Peres, O.L.G.; Potzel, W.; Pilcher, J.; Plunkett, R.; Raffelt, G.; Rapidis, P.; Reyna, D.; Roe, B.; Rolinec, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Sartorelli, G.; Schonert, S.; Schwertz, T.; Selvi, M.; Shaevitz, M.; Shellard, R.; Shrock, R.; Sidwell, R.; Sims, J.; Sinev, V.; Stanton, N.; Stancu, I.; Stefanski, R.; Seukane, F.; Sugiyama, H.; Sukhotin, S.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Svoboda, R.; Talaga, R.; Tamura, N.; Tanimoto, M.; Thron, J.; von Toerne, E.; Vignaud, D.; Wagner, C.; Wang, Y.F.; Wang, Z.; Winter, W.; Wong, H.; Yakushev, E.; Yang, C.G.; Yasuda, O.

    2004-02-26

    There has been superb progress in understanding the neutrino sector of elementary particle physics in the past few years. It is now widely recognized that the possibility exists for a rich program of measuring CP violation and matter effects in future accelerator {nu} experiments, which has led to intense efforts to consider new programs at neutrino superbeams, off-axis detectors, neutrino factories and beta beams. However, the possibility of measuring CP violation can be fulfilled only if the value of the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} is such that sin{sup 2} (2{theta}{sub 13}) greater than or equal to on the order of 0.01. The authors of this white paper are an International Working Group of physicists who believe that a timely new experiment at a nuclear reactor sensitive to the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13} in this range has a great opportunity for an exciting discovery, a non-zero value to {theta}{sub 13}. This would be a compelling next step of this program. We are studying possible new reactor experiments at a variety of sites around the world, and we have collaborated to prepare this document to advocate this idea and describe some of the issues that are involved.

  6. Updated BBN bounds on the cosmological lepton asymmetry for non-zero {theta}{sub 13}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, Gianpiero [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Miele, Gennaro [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Pastor, Sergio, E-mail: pastor@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, Ed. Institutos de Investigacion, Apdo. correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Pisanti, Ofelia [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sarikas, Srdjan [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Werner-Heisenberg-Institut, Foehringer Ring 6, 80802 Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-02-14

    We discuss the bounds on the cosmological lepton number from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), in light of recent evidences for a large value of the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 13}{>=}0.01 at 2{sigma}. The largest asymmetries for electron and {mu}, {tau} neutrinos compatible with {sup 4}He and {sup 2}H primordial yields are computed versus the neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angles. The flavour oscillation dynamics is traced till the beginning of BBN and neutrino distributions after decoupling are numerically computed. The latter contains in general, non-thermal distortion due to the onset of flavour oscillations driven by solar squared mass difference in the temperature range where neutrino scatterings become inefficient to enforce thermodynamical equilibrium. Depending on the value of {theta}{sub 13}, this translates into a larger value for the effective number of neutrinos, N{sub eff}. Upper bounds on this parameter are discussed for both neutrino mass hierarchies. Values for N{sub eff} which are large enough to be detectable by the Planck experiment are found only for the (presently disfavoured) range sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 13}{<=}0.01.

  7. Spatial Reference Memory is Associated with Modulation of Theta-Gamma Coupling in the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Jean-Bastien; Muller, Marc-Antoine; Jackson, Jesse; Aubert, Julien; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Mathis, Chantal; Goutagny, Romain

    2016-09-01

    Spatial reference memory in rodents represents a unique opportunity to study brain mechanisms responsible for encoding, storage and retrieval of a memory. Even though its reliance on hippocampal networks has long been established, the precise computations performed by different hippocampal subfields during spatial learning are still not clear. To study the evolution of electrophysiological activity in the CA1-dentate gyrus axis of the dorsal hippocampus over an iterative spatial learning paradigm, we recorded local field potentials in behaving mice using a newly designed appetitive version of the Barnes maze. We first showed that theta and gamma oscillations as well as theta-gamma coupling are differentially modulated in particular hippocampal subfields during the task. In addition, we show that dentate gyrus networks, but not CA1 networks, exhibit a transient learning-dependent increase in theta-gamma coupling specifically at the vicinity of the target area in the maze. In contrast to previous immediate early-gene studies, our results point to a long-lasting involvement of dentate networks in navigational memory in the Barnes maze. Based on these findings, we propose that theta-gamma coupling might represent a mechanism by which hippocampal areas compute relevant information. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Effective pathfinding for four-wheeled robot based on combining Theta* and hybrid A* algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віталій Геннадійович Михалько

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effective pathfinding algorithm based on Theta* and Hybrid A* algorithms was developed for four-wheeled robot. Pseudocode for algorithm was showed and explained. Algorithm and simulator for four-wheeled robot were implemented using Java programming language. Algorithm was tested on U-obstacles, complex maps and for parking problem

  9. Enhanced Constraints on theta13 from A Three-Flavor Oscillation Analysis of Reactor Antineutrinos at KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The KamLAND Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O' Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Decowski, M. P.

    2010-09-24

    We present new constraints on the neutrino oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2}, {theta}{sub 12}, and {theta}{sub 13} from a three-flavor analysis of solar and KamLAND data. The KamLAND data set includes data acquired following a radiopurity upgrade and amounts to a total exposure of 3.49 x 10{sup 32} target-proton-year. Under the assumption of CPT invariance, a two-flavor analysis ({theta}{sub 13} = 0) of the KamLAND and solar data yields the best-fit values tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub 12} = 0.444{sub -0.030}{sup +0.036} and {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.50{sub -0.20}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5} eV{sup 2}; a three-flavor analysis with {theta}{sub 13} as a free parameter yields the best-fit values tan{sup 2} {theta}{sub 12} = 0.452{sub -0.033}{sup +0.035}, {Delta}m{sub 21}{sup 2} = 7.50{sub -0.20}{sup +0.19} x 10{sup -5}eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} = 0.020{sub -0.016}{sup +0.016}. This {theta}{sub 13} interval is consistent with other recent work combining the CHOOZ, atmospheric and long-baseline accelerator experiments. We also present a new global {theta}{sub 13} analysis, incorporating the CHOOZ, atmospheric and accelerator data, which indicates sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 13} = 0.017{sub -0.009}{sup +0.010}, a nonzero value at the 93% C.L. This finding will be further tested by upcoming accelerator and reactor experiments.

  10. Canonical quantization of nonlinear sigma models with a theta term and applications to symmetry-protected topological phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Matthew F.; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2017-08-01

    We canonically quantize O (D +2 ) nonlinear sigma models (NLSMs) with a theta term on arbitrary smooth, closed, connected, oriented D -dimensional spatial manifolds M , with the goal of proving the suitability of these models for describing symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases of bosons in D spatial dimensions. We show that in the disordered phase of the NLSM, and when the coefficient θ of the theta term is an integer multiple of 2 π , the theory on M has a unique ground state and a finite energy gap to all excitations. We also construct the ground state wave functional of the NLSM in this parameter regime, and we show that it is independent of the metric on M and given by the exponential of a Wess-Zumino term for the NLSM field, in agreement with previous results on flat space. Our results show that the NLSM in the disordered phase and at θ =2 π k , k ∈Z , has a symmetry-preserving ground state but no topological order (i.e., no topology-dependent ground state degeneracy), making it an ideal model for describing SPT phases of bosons. Thus, our work places previous results on SPT phases derived using NLSMs on solid theoretical ground. To canonically quantize the NLSM on M , we use Dirac's method for the quantization of systems with second class constraints, suitably modified to account for the curvature of space. In a series of four Appendixes, we provide the technical background needed to follow the discussion in the main sections of the paper.

  11. High-learners present larger mid-frontal theta power and connectivity in response to incorrect performance feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Nolte, Guido; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2013-01-30

    A crucial aspect of cognitive control and learning is the ability to integrate feedback, that is, to evaluate action outcomes and their deviations from the intended goals and to adjust behavior accordingly. However, how high-learners differ from low-learners in relation to feedback processing has not been characterized. Further, little is known about the underlying brain connectivity patterns during feedback processing. This study aimed to fill these gaps by analyzing electrical brain responses from healthy adult human participants while they performed a time estimation task with correct and incorrect feedback. As compared with low-learners, high-learners presented larger mid-frontal theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations and lower sensorimotor beta (17-24 Hz) oscillations in response to incorrect feedback. Further, high-learners showed larger theta connectivity from left central, associated with motor activity, to mid-frontal, associated with performance monitoring, immediately after feedback (0-0.3 s), followed by (from 0.3 to 0.6 s after feedback) a flux from mid-frontal to prefrontal, associated with executive functioning. We suggest that these results reflect two cognitive processes related to successful feedback processing: first, the obtained feedback is compared with the expected one, and second, the feedback history is updated based on this information. Our results also indicate that high- and low-learners differ not only on how they react to incorrect feedback, but also in relation to how their distant brain areas interact while processing both correct and incorrect feedback. This study demonstrates the neural underpinnings of individual differences in goal-directed adaptive behavior.

  12. THETA AND ALPHA EEG FREQUENCY INTERPLAY IN SUBJECTS WITH MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT: EVIDENCE FROM EEG, MRI AND SPECT BRAIN MODIFICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Vito Moretti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: reduction of regional cerebral perfusion in hippocampus as well as temporo-parietal and medial temporal cortex atrophy are associated to mild cognitive impairment (MCI due to Alzheimer disease (AD. Methods: 74 adult subjects with MCI underwent clinical and neuropsychological evaluation, electroencephalogram (EEG recording and high resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Among the patients, a subset of 27 subjects underwent also perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and hippocampal atrophy evaluation. Alpha3/alpha2 power ratio as well as cortical thickness was computed for each subject. Three MCI groups were detected according to increasing tertile values of alpha3/alpha2 power ratio and difference of cortical thickness among the groups estimated. Results: higher alpha3/alpha2 power ratio group had wider cortical thinning than other groups, mapped to the Supramarginal and Precuneus bilaterally. Subjects with higher alpha3/alpha2 frequency power ratio showed a constant trend to a lower perfusion than lower alpha3/alpha2 group. Moreover, this group correlates with both a bigger hippocampal atrophy and an increase of theta frequency power.Conclusion: Higher EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio was associated with temporo-parietal cortical thinning, hippocampal atrophy and reduction of regional cerebral perfusion in medial temporal cortex. In this group an increase of theta frequency power was detected inMCI subjects. The combination of higher EEG alpha3/alpha2 power ratio, cortical thickness measure and regional cerebral perfusion reveals a complex interplay between EEG cerebral rhythms, structural and functional brain modifications.

  13. Stress affects theta activity in limbic networks and impairs novelty-induced exploration and familiarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eJacinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to a novel environment triggers the response of several brain areas that regulate emotional behaviors. Here, we studied theta oscillations within the hippocampus (HPC-amygdala (AMY-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC network in exploration of a novel environment and subsequent familiarization through repeated exposures to that same environment; in addition, we assessed how concomitant stress exposure could disrupt this activity and impair both behavioral processes. Local field potentials were simultaneously recorded from dorsal and ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC respectively, basolateral amygdala (BLA and mPFC in freely behaving rats while they were exposed to a novel environment, then repeatedly re-exposed over the course of 3 weeks to that same environment and, finally, on re-exposure to a novel unfamiliar environment. A longitudinal analysis of theta activity within this circuit revealed a reduction of vHPC and BLA theta power and vHPC-BLA theta coherence through familiarization which was correlated with a return to normal exploratory behavior in control rats. In contrast, a persistent over-activation of the same brain regions was observed in stressed rats that displayed impairments in novel exploration and familiarization processes. Importantly, we show that stress also affected intra-hippocampal synchrony and heightened the coherence between vHPC and BLA. In summary, we demonstrate that modulatory theta activity in the aforementioned circuit, namely in the vHPC and BLA, is correlated with the expression of anxiety in novelty-induced exploration and familiarization in both normal and pathological conditions.

  14. Fractional derivative of the Hurwitz ζ-function and chaotic decay to zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cattani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the fractional order derivative of a Dirichlet series, Hurwitz zeta function and Riemann zeta function is explicitly computed using the Caputo fractional derivative in the Ortigueira sense. It is observed that the obtained results are a natural generalization of the integer order derivative. Some interesting properties of the fractional derivative of the Riemann zeta function are also investigated to show that there is a chaotic decay to zero (in the Gaussian plane and a promising expression as a complex power series.

  15. Value-distribution of L-functions

    CERN Document Server

    Steuding, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    These notes present recent results in the value-distribution theory of L-functions with emphasis on the phenomenon of universality. In 1975, Voronin proved that any non-vanishing analytic function can be approximated uniformly by certain shifts of the Riemann zeta-function in the critical strip. This spectacular universality property has a strong impact on the zero-distribution: Riemann’s hypothesis is true if and only if the Riemann zeta-function can approximate itself uniformly (in the sense of Voronin). Meanwhile universality is proved for a large zoo of Dirichlet series, and it is conjectured that all reasonable L-functions are universal. In these notes we prove universality for polynomial Euler products. Our approach follows mainly Bagchi's probabilistic method. We further discuss related topics as, e.g., almost periodicity, density estimates, Nevanlinna theory, and functional independence.

  16. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex generates pre-stimulus theta coherence desynchronization: A schema instantiation hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Asaf; Moscovitch, Morris

    2017-02-01

    The ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has long been implicated in monitoring of memory veracity, and more recently also in memory schema functions. In our model of strategic retrieval the two are related. We have proposed that the vmPFC has two schema-dependent functions: (i) to establish context-relevant templates against which the output of memory systems can be compared; (ii) to mediate automatic decision monitoring processes to ensure that only those responses that meet the criterion are enacted. Electroencephalogram (EEG) data were used to provide evidence that vmPFC supports both functions, and that schema instantiation informs monitoring. Participants viewed pictures of acquaintances, along with those of famous and nonfamous people, and were asked to respond positively only to pictures of individuals they had met (personal familiarity). The Self serves as a super-ordinate cognitive schema, facilitating accurate endorsement of acquaintances and exclusion of non-personal but familiar faces. For the present report we focused on pre-cue tonic oscillatory activity. Controls demonstrated theta coherence desynchronization between medial prefrontal areas, inferotemporal and lateral temporal cortices. These oscillatory coherence patterns were significantly reduced in patients with vmPFC damage, especially in those with clinical histories of spontaneous confabulation. Importantly, these pre-stimulus cortico-cortical desynchronizations predicted post-cue automatic memory activation, as indexed by a familiarity modulation of the face-sensitive posterior cortical N170. Pre-cue desynchronization also predicted early post-cue frontal positive modulation (P230) and response accuracy. The data are consistent with a schema instantiation model that suggests the vmPFC biases posterior neocortical long-term memory representations that enhance automatic memory cue processing and informs frontally-mediated rapid memory monitoring (P230). Damage to these structures can lead

  17. Regularity of Functions on the Reduced Quaternion Field in Clifford Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We define a new hypercomplex structure of ℝ3 and a regular function with values in that structure. From the properties of regular functions, we research the exponential function on the reduced quaternion field and represent the corresponding Cauchy-Riemann equations in hypercomplex structures of ℝ3.

  18. Algebro-Geometric Solutions for a Discrete Integrable Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengshuang Tao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the assistance of a Lie algebra whose element is a matrix, we introduce a discrete spectral problem. By means of discrete zero curvature equation, we obtain a discrete integrable hierarchy. According to decomposition of the discrete systems, the new differential-difference integrable systems with two-potential functions are derived. By constructing the Abel-Jacobi coordinates to straighten the continuous and discrete flows, the Riemann theta functions are proposed. Based on the Riemann theta functions, the algebro-geometric solutions for the discrete integrable systems are obtained.

  19. Computational study of hippocampal-septal theta rhythm changes due to β-amyloid-altered ionic channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zou

    Full Text Available Electroencephagraphy (EEG of many dementia patients has been characterized by an increase in low frequency field potential oscillations. One of the characteristics of early stage Alzheimer's disease (AD is an increase in theta band power (4-7 Hz. However, the mechanism(s underlying the changes in theta oscillations are still unclear. To address this issue, we investigate the theta band power changes associated with β-Amyloid (Aβ peptide (one of the main markers of AD using a computational model, and by mediating the toxicity of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We use an established biophysical hippocampal CA1-medial septum network model to evaluate four ionic channels in pyramidal neurons, which were demonstrated to be affected by Aβ. They are the L-type Ca²⁺ channel, delayed rectifying K⁺ channel, A-type fast-inactivating K⁺ channel and large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channel. Our simulation results demonstrate that only the Aβ inhibited A-type fast-inactivating K⁺ channel can induce an increase in hippocampo-septal theta band power, while the other channels do not affect theta rhythm. We further deduce that this increased theta band power is due to enhanced synchrony of the pyramidal neurons. Our research may elucidate potential biomarkers and therapeutics for AD. Further investigation will be helpful for better understanding of AD-induced theta rhythm abnormalities and associated cognitive deficits.

  20. Why don't you like me? Midfrontal theta power in response to unexpected peer rejection feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, M J W; Dekkers, L M S; Westenberg, P M; van der Veen, F M; van der Molen, M W

    2017-02-01

    Social connectedness theory posits that the brain processes social rejection as a threat to survival. Recent electrophysiological evidence suggests that midfrontal theta (4-8Hz) oscillations in the EEG provide a window on the processing of social rejection. Here we examined midfrontal theta dynamics (power and inter-trial phase synchrony) during the processing of social evaluative feedback. We employed the Social Judgment paradigm in which 56 undergraduate women (mean age=19.67 years) were asked to communicate their expectancies about being liked vs. disliked by unknown peers. Expectancies were followed by feedback indicating social acceptance vs. rejection. Results revealed a significant increase in EEG theta power to unexpected social rejection feedback. This EEG theta response could be source-localized to brain regions typically reported during activation of the saliency network (i.e., dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, insula, inferior frontal gyrus, frontal pole, and the supplementary motor area). Theta phase dynamics mimicked the behavior of the time-domain averaged feedback-related negativity (FRN) by showing stronger phase synchrony for feedback that was unexpected vs. expected. Theta phase, however, differed from the FRN by also displaying stronger phase synchrony in response to rejection vs. acceptance feedback. Together, this study highlights distinct roles for midfrontal theta power and phase synchrony in response to social evaluative feedback. Our findings contribute to the literature by showing that midfrontal theta oscillatory power is sensitive to social rejection but only when peer rejection is unexpected, and this theta response is governed by a widely distributed neural network implicated in saliency detection and conflict monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Theta band activity in response to emotional expressions and its relationship with gamma band activity as revealed by MEG and advanced beamformer source imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian eLuo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal oscillations in the theta and gamma bands have been shown to be important for cognition. Here we examined the temporal and spatial relationship between the two frequency bands in emotional processing using Magnetoencephalography and an advanced dynamic beamformer source imaging method called Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry. We found that areas including the amygdala, visual and frontal cortex showed significant event-related synchronization (ERS in both bands, suggesting a functional association of neuronal oscillations in the same areas in the two bands. However, while the temporal profile in both bands was similar in the amygdala, the peak in gamma band power was much earlier within both visual and frontal areas. Our results do not support a traditional view that the localizations of lower and higher frequencies are spatially distinct. Instead, they suggest that in emotional processing, neuronal oscillations in the gamma and theta bands may reflect, at least in visual and frontal cortex either different but related functional processes or, perhaps more probably, different computational components of the same functional process.

  2. Protein kinase C theta is dispensable for suppression mediated by CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Siegmund

    Full Text Available The activation of conventional T cells upon T cell receptor stimulation critically depends on protein kinase C theta (PKCθ. However, its role in regulatory T (Treg cell function has yet to be fully elucidated. Using siRNA or the potent and PKC family-selective pharmacological inhibitor AEB071, we could show that murine Treg-mediated suppression in vitro is independent of PKCθ function. Likewise, Treg cells of PKCθ-deficient mice were fully functional, showing a similar suppressive activity as wild-type CD25+CD4+ T cells in an in vitro suppression assay. Furthermore, in vitro-differentiated wild-type and PKCθ-deficient iTreg cells showed comparable Foxp3 expression as well as suppressive activity. However, we observed a reduced percentage of Foxp3+CD25+ CD4+ T cells in the lymphatic organs of PKCθ-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that while PKCθ is involved in Treg cell differentiation in vivo, it is dispensable for Treg-mediated suppression.

  3. Network based statistical analysis detects changes induced by continuous theta-burst stimulation on brain activity at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropasqua, Chiara; Bozzali, Marco; Ponzo, Viviana; Giulietti, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Cercignani, Mara; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    We combined continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) and resting state (RS)-fMRI approaches to investigate changes in functional connectivity (FC) induced by right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)-cTBS at rest in a group of healthy subjects. Seed-based fMRI analysis revealed a specific pattern of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and several brain regions: based on these results, we defined a 29-node network to assess changes in each network connection before and after, respectively, DLPFC-cTBS and sham sessions. A decrease of correlation between the right prefrontal cortex and right parietal cortex (Brodmann areas 46 and 40, respectively) was detected after cTBS, while no significant result was found when analyzing sham-session data. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates within-subject changes in FC induced by cTBS applied on prefrontal area. The possibility to induce selective changes in a specific region without interfering with functionally correlated area could have several implications for the study of functional properties of the brain, and for the emerging therapeutic strategies based on transcranial stimulation.

  4. The \\theta_{13} and \\delta_{CP} sensitivities of the SPL-Frejus project revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Campagne, Jean Eric; Campagne, Jean Eric; Cazes, Antoine

    2004-01-01

    An optimization of the CERN SPL beam line has been performed guided by the sensitivities to the \\theta_{13} mixing angle and to the \\delta_{CP} Dirac CP violating phase. A UNO-like 440 ktons water Cerenkov detector located at 130 km from the target in a new foreseen Frejus laboratory has been used as a generic detector. Concerning the \\delta_{CP} independent \\theta_{13} sensitivity, a gain of about 20% may be reached using a 3.5 GeV proton beam with a 40 m long, 2 m radius decay tunnel compared to the up to now considered 2.2 GeV beam energy and 20 m long, 1 m radius decay tunnel. This may motivate new machine developments to upgrade the nominal SPL proton beam energy.

  5. High-Field Nb3Sn Cos-theta Dipole with Stress Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novitski, Igor [Fermilab; Carmichael, Justin [Fermilab; Kashikhin, Vadim V. [Fermilab; Zlobin, Alexander V. [Fermilab

    2017-01-01

    Cost-effective superconducting dipole magnets with operating fields up to 16 T are being considered for the LHC en-ergy upgrade (HE-LHC) and a Future Circular Collider (FCC). To demonstrate feasibility of 15 T accelerator quality dipole mag-nets, FNAL as a part of the US-MDP is developing a single-aper-ture Nb3Sn dipole demonstrator based on a 4-layer graded cos-theta coil with 60 mm aperture and cold iron yoke. In parallel, to explore the limit of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet technology, op-timize magnet design and performance parameters, and reduce magnet cost, magnet design studies are also being performed to push the nominal bore field to 16 T in a 60-mm aperture cos-theta dipole. Results of these studies are reported and discussed in this paper.

  6. New measurement of $\\theta_{13}$ via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J H; Cheng, J -H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Guo, Z; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, J K C; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y -C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, J J; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Lv, Z; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Mitchell, I; Mooney, M; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Pan, H -R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Konstantin, T; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C -H; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, Z Y; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y F; Zhao, Y B; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    This article reports an improved independent measurement of neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Electron antineutrinos were identified by inverse $\\beta$-decays with the emitted neutron captured by hydrogen, yielding a data-set with principally distinct uncertainties from that with neutrons captured by gadolinium. With the final two of eight antineutrino detectors installed, this study used 621 days of data including the previously reported 217-day data set with six detectors. The dominant statistical uncertainty was reduced by 49%. Intensive studies of the cosmogenic muon-induced $^9$Li and fast neutron backgrounds and the neutron-capture energy selection efficiency, resulted in a reduction of the systematic uncertainty by 26%. The deficit in the detected number of antineutrinos at the far detectors relative to the expected number based on the near detectors yielded $\\sin^22\\theta_{13} = 0.071 \\pm 0.011$ in the three-neutrino-oscillation framework. The combination...

  7. Indirect robust control of agile missile via Theta-D technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An agile missile with tail fins and pulse thrusters has continuous and discontinuous control inputs. This brings certain difficulty to the autopilot design and stability analysis. Indirect robust control via Theta-D technique is employed to handle this problem. An acceleration tracking system is formulated based on the nonlinear dynamics of agile missile. Considering the dynamics of actuators, there is an error between actual input and computed input. A robust control problem is formed by treating the error as input uncertainty. The robust control is equivalent to a nonlinear quadratic optimal control of the nominal system with a modified performance index including uncertainty bound. Theta-D technique is applied to solve the nonlinear optimal control problem to obtain the final control law. Numerical results show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed strategy.

  8. Theta and High-Frequency Activity Mark Spontaneous Recall of Episodic Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John F.; Sharan, Ashwini D.; Sperling, Michael R.; Ramayya, Ashwin G.; Evans, James J.; Healey, M. Karl; Beck, Erin N.; Davis, Kathryn A.; Lucas, Timothy H.

    2014-01-01

    Humans possess the remarkable ability to search their memory, allowing specific past episodes to be re-experienced spontaneously. Here, we administered a free recall test to 114 neurosurgical patients and used intracranial theta and high-frequency activity (HFA) to identify the spatiotemporal pattern of neural activity underlying spontaneous episodic retrieval. We found that retrieval evolved in three electrophysiological stages composed of: (1) early theta oscillations in the right temporal cortex, (2) increased HFA in the left hemisphere including the medial temporal lobe (MTL), left inferior frontal gyrus, as well as the ventrolateral temporal cortex, and (3) motor/language activation during vocalization of the retrieved item. Of these responses, increased HFA in the left MTL predicted recall performance. These results suggest that spontaneous recall of verbal episodic memories involves a spatiotemporal pattern of spectral changes across the brain; however, high-frequency activity in the left MTL represents a final common pathway of episodic retrieval. PMID:25143616

  9. Search for the Theta+ pentaquark in the gamma d -> Lambda n K+ reaction measured with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvia Niccolai; Marco Mirazita; Patrizia Rossi; Nathan Baltzell; Daniel Carman; Kenneth Hicks; Bryan McKinnon; Tsutomu Mibe; Stepan Stepanyan; David Tedeschi; Gary Adams; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Sergio Pereira; Marco Anghinolfi; Gegham Asryan; Harutyun AVAKIAN; H. Bagdasaryan; Nathan Baillie; Jacques Ball; V. Batourine; Marco Battaglieri; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Ivan Bedlinski; Ivan Bedlinskiy; Mehmet Bektasoglu; Matthew Bellis; Nawal Benmouna; Barry Berman; Angela Biselli; Sergey Boyarinov; Sylvain Bouchigny; Robert Bradford; Derek Branford; William Briscoe; William Brooks; Stephen Bueltmann; Volker Burkert; Cornel Butuceanu; John Calarco; S.L. Careccia; Bryan Carnahan; Shifeng Chen; Philip Cole; Patrick Collins; Philip Coltharp; Donald Crabb; Hall Crannell; V. Crede; John Cummings; Natalya Dashyan; Pavel Degtiarenko; Rita De Masi; Airton Deppman; Enzo De Sanctis; Alexandre Deur; Raffaella De Vita; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Chaden Djalali; Gail Dodge; Joseph Donnelly; David Doughty; Michael Dugger; Oleksandr Dzyubak; Hovanes Egiyan; Kim Egiyan; L. El Fassi; Latifa Elouadrhiri; Paul Eugenio; Gleb Fedotov; Gerald Feldman; Herbert Funsten; Michel Garcon; Gagik Gavalian; Gerard Gilfoyle; Kevin Giovanetti; Francois-Xavier Girod; John Goetz; Atilla Gonenc; Christopher Gordon; Ralf Gothe; Keith Griffioen; Michel Guidal; Nevzat Guler; Lei Guo; Vardan Gyurjyan; Cynthia Hadjidakis; Kawtar Hafidi; Hayk Hakobyan; Rafael Hakobyan; John Hardie; F. Hersman; Ishaq Hleiqawi; Maurik Holtrop; Charles Hyde-Wright; Yordanka Ilieva; David Ireland; Boris Ishkhanov; Eugeny Isupov; Mark Ito; David Jenkins; Hyon-Suk Jo; Kyungseon Joo; Henry Juengst; James Kellie; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Andreas Klein; Franz Klein; Alexei Klimenko; Mikhail Kossov; Laird Kramer; V. Kubarovsky; Joachim Kuhn; Sebastian Kuhn; Sergey Kuleshov; Jeff Lachniet; Jorn Langheinrich; David Lawrence; Tsung-shung Lee; Kenneth Livingston; H. Lu; Marion MacCormick; Nikolai Markov; Bernhard Mecking; Jonathan Mellor; Joseph Melone; Mac Mestayer; Curtis Meyer; Konstantin Mikhaylov; Ralph Minehart; Rory Miskimen; Viktor Mokeev; Ludyvine Morand; Steven Morrow; Maryam Moteabbed; Gordon Mutchler; Pawel Nadel-Turonski; James Napolitano; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Gabriel Niculescu; Maria-Ioana Niculescu; Bogdan Niczyporuk; Megh Niroula; Rustam Niyazov; Mina Nozar; Jorge De Olivei Echeimberg; Mikhail Osipenko; Alexander Ostrovidov; K. Park; Evgueni Pasyuk; Craig Paterson; Joshua Pierce; Nikolay Pivnyuk; Dinko Pocanic; Oleg Pogorelko; Sergey Pozdnyakov; Barry Preedom; John Price; Yelena Prok; Dan Protopopescu; Brian Raue; Gregory Riccardi; Giovanni Ricco; Marco Ripani; Barry Ritchie; Federico Ronchetti; Guenther Rosner; Franck Sabatie; Carlos Salgado; Joseph Santoro; Vladimir Sapunenko; Reinhard Schumacher; Vladimir Serov; Youri Sharabian; Nikolay Shvedunov; Elton Smith; Lee Smith; Daniel Sober; Aleksey Stavinskiy; Stepan Stepanyan; Burnham Stokes; Paul Stoler; Igor Strakovski; Steffen Strauch; Mauro Taiuti; Ulrike Thoma; Avtandil Tkabladze; Svyatoslav Tkachenko; Luminita Todor; Clarisse Tur; Maurizio Ungaro; Michael Vineyard; Alexander Vlassov; Daniel Watts; Lawrence Weinstein; Dennis Weygand; M. Williams; Elliott Wolin; Michael Wood; Amrit Yegneswaran; Lorenzo Zana; Jixie Zhang; Bo Zhao; Zhiwen Zhao

    2006-04-26

    For the first time, the reaction gamma d -> Lambda n K+ has been analyzed in order to search for the exotic pentaquark baryon Theta+(1540). The data were taken at Jefferson Lab, using the Hall-B tagged-photon beam of energy between 0.8 and 3.6 GeV and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). No statistically significant structures were observed in the nK+ invariant mass distribution. The upper limit on the gamma d -> Lambda Theta+ integrated cross section has been calculated and found to be between 5 and 25 nb, depending on the production model assumed. The upper limit on the differential cross section is also reported.

  10. The breakdown of Japanese passives and theta-role assignment principle by Broca's aphasics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higawara, H

    1993-10-01

    Syntactic comprehension of various types of passive sentences by Japanese Broca's aphasic patients was investigated. Based on their performance on the so-called "possessive passive" and "indirect passive," we exemplified that the comprehension abilities of Broca's aphasics and agrammatic Broca's aphasics point to a distinction between the gapped and gapless passive, as is proposed in Kubo (1990). We proposed a new structural account of syntactic disorders in Japanese, based on the assumption that the Head parameter, the directionality parameter of theta-assignment, and the distinction between the internal argument and external argument are retained in the grammar of Broca's aphasics. We then demonstrated that Broca's aphasics interpret sentences by the argument structure of a predicate and by the canonical direction of the theta-assignment. It was also shown that the proposed principle can account for the Broca's aphasics' performance on other types of constructions and that it has many consequences for the language-universal account of syntactic deficits.

  11. Persistent hyperdopaminergia decreases the peak frequency of hippocampal theta oscillations during quiet waking and REM sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kafui Dzirasa

    Full Text Available Long-term changes in dopaminergic signaling are thought to underlie the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric disorders. Several conditions are associated with cognitive deficits such as disturbances in attention processes and learning and memory, suggesting that persistent changes in dopaminergic signaling may alter neural mechanisms underlying these processes. Dopamine transporter knockout (DAT-KO mice exhibit a persistent five-fold increase in extracellular dopamine levels. Here, we demonstrate that DAT-KO mice display lower hippocampal theta oscillation frequencies during baseline periods of waking and rapid-eye movement sleep. These altered theta oscillations are not reversed via treatment with the antidopaminergic agent haloperidol. Thus, we propose that persistent hyperdopaminergia, together with secondary alterations in other neuromodulatory systems, results in lower frequency activity in neural systems responsible for various cognitive processes.

  12. Une approche séquentielle de l'hypothèse de Riemann généralisée

    OpenAIRE

    de Roton, Anne

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Une généralisation du théorème de Beurling et Nyman établit que l'hypothèse de Riemann pour une fonction F de la classe de selberg est équivalente à l'appartenance de la fonction indicatrice de l'intervalle ]0,1[ à l'adhérence d'un sous-espace de fonctions B dans l'espace L^2(R+). Dans cet article, nous étendons aux fonctions F de la classe de Selberg un résultat de Baez-Duarte en donnant une construction d'une suite de B qui, sous l'hypothèse de Riemann pour la foncti...

  13. African swine fever virus blocks the host cell antiviral inflammatory response through a direct inhibition of PKC-theta-mediated p300 transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Aitor G; Sánchez, Elena G; Sabina, Prado; Fresno, Manuel; Revilla, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    During a viral infection, reprogramming of the host cell gene expression pattern is required to establish an adequate antiviral response. The transcriptional coactivators p300 and CREB binding protein (CBP) play a central role in this regulation by promoting the assembly of transcription enhancer complexes to specific promoters of immune and proinflammatory genes. Here we show that the protein A238L encoded by African swine fever virus counteracts the host cell inflammatory response through the control of p300 transactivation during the viral infection. We demonstrate that A238L inhibits the expression of the inflammatory regulators cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by preventing the recruitment of p300 to the enhanceosomes formed on their promoters. Furthermore, we report that A238L inhibits p300 activity during the viral infection and that its amino-terminal transactivation domain is essential in the A238L-mediated inhibition of the inflammatory response. Importantly, we found that the residue serine 384 of p300 is required for the viral protein to accomplish its inhibitory function and that ectopically expressed PKC-theta completely reverts this inhibition, thus indicating that this signaling pathway is disrupted by A238L during the viral infection. Furthermore, we show here that A238L does not affect PKC-theta enzymatic activity, but the molecular mechanism of this viral inhibition relies on the lack of interaction between PKC-theta and p300. These findings shed new light on how viruses alter the host cell antiviral gene expression pattern through the blockade of the p300 activity, which represents a new and sophisticated viral mechanism to evade the inflammatory and immune defense responses.

  14. Learning curves of theta/beta neurofeedback in children with ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, T.W.P.; Bink, M.; Weeda, W.D.; Gelade, K.; Mourik, van, Y.; Maras, A.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurofeedback is widely applied as non-pharmacological intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of ADHD, even though efficacy has not been unequivocally established. Neuronal changes during the neurofeedback intervention that resemble learning can provide crucial evidence for the feasibility and specificity of this intervention. A total of 38 children (aged between 7 and 13?years) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD, completed on average 29 sessions of theta (4?8?Hz)/beta (13?20?Hz) neurofeedba...

  15. EEG theta and Mu oscillations during perception of human and robot actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgen, Burcu A.; Plank, Markus; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Poizner, Howard; Saygin, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    The perception of others’ actions supports important skills such as communication, intention understanding, and empathy. Are mechanisms of action processing in the human brain specifically tuned to process biological agents? Humanoid robots can perform recognizable actions, but can look and move differently from humans, and as such, can be used in experiments to address such questions. Here, we recorded EEG as participants viewed actions performed by three agents. In the Human condition, the agent had biological appearance and motion. The other two conditions featured a state-of-the-art robot in two different appearances: Android, which had biological appearance but mechanical motion, and Robot, which had mechanical appearance and motion. We explored whether sensorimotor mu (8–13 Hz) and frontal theta (4–8 Hz) activity exhibited selectivity for biological entities, in particular for whether the visual appearance and/or the motion of the observed agent was biological. Sensorimotor mu suppression has been linked to the motor simulation aspect of action processing (and the human mirror neuron system, MNS), and frontal theta to semantic and memory-related aspects. For all three agents, action observation induced significant attenuation in the power of mu oscillations, with no difference between agents. Thus, mu suppression, considered an index of MNS activity, does not appear to be selective for biological agents. Observation of the Robot resulted in greater frontal theta activity compared to the Android and the Human, whereas the latter two did not differ from each other. Frontal theta thus appears to be sensitive to visual appearance, suggesting agents that are not sufficiently biological in appearance may result in greater memory processing demands for the observer. Studies combining robotics and neuroscience such as this one can allow us to explore neural basis of action processing on the one hand, and inform the design of social robots on the other. PMID

  16. Resting-state theta band connectivity and graph analysis in generalized social anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqi Xing

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Theta-dependent interconnectivity was associated with state anxiety in gSAD and an increase in information processing efficiency in gSAD (compared to controls. Results may represent enhanced baseline self-focused attention, which is consistent with cognitive models of gSAD and fMRI studies implicating emotion dysregulation and disturbances in task negative networks (e.g., default mode network in gSAD.

  17. Frontal Midline Theta Reflects Anxiety and Cognitive Control: Meta-Analytic Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Cavanagh, James F.; Shackman, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from imaging and anatomical studies suggests that the midcingulate cortex (MCC) is a dynamic hub lying at the interface of affect and cognition. In particular, this neural system appears to integrate information about conflict and punishment in order to optimize behavior in the face of action-outcome uncertainty. In a series of meta-analyses, we show how recent human electrophysiological research provides compelling evidence that frontal-midline theta signals reflecting MCC activity ...

  18. Unruh Effect Revisited: Poincare {theta}-Vacua as Coherent States of Conformal Zero Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calixto, M [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Ciencias, Campus de Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Perez-Romero, E; Aldaya, V, E-mail: calixto@ugr.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), Apartado Postal 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain)

    2011-09-22

    We report on a group-theoretical revision of the Unruh effect based on the conformal group SO (4, 2), which has been developed by the authors and collaborators. Special Conformal Transformations (SCT) are interpreted as transitions to relativistic uniformly accelerated frames. Poincare invariant {theta}-vacua (which turn out to be coherent states of conformal zero modes) are destabilized by SCT and radiate as a black body.

  19. Theta and Alpha Alterations in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment in Semantic Go/NoGo Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lydia T; Mudar, Raksha A; Chiang, Hsueh-Sheng; Schneider, Julie M; Maguire, Mandy J; Kraut, Michael A; Hart, John

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that cognitive control processes are impaired in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI); however the nature of these alterations needs further examination. The current study examined differences in electroencephalographic theta and alpha power related to cognitive control processes involving response execution and response inhibition in 22 individuals with aMCI and 22 age-, sex-, and education-matched cognitively normal controls. Two Go/NoGo tasks involving semantic categorization were used. In the basic categorization task, Go/NoGo responses were made based on exemplars of a single car (Go) and a single dog (NoGo). In the superordinate categorization task, responses were made based on multiple exemplars of objects (Go) and animals (NoGo). Behavioral data showed that the aMCI group had more false alarms during the NoGo trials compared to controls. The EEG data revealed between group differences related to response type in theta (4-7 Hz) and low-frequency alpha (8-10 Hz) power. In particular, the aMCI group differed from controls in theta power during the NoGo trials at frontal and parietal electrodes, and in low-frequency alpha power during Go trials at parietal electrodes. These results suggest that alterations in theta power converge with behavioral deterioration in response inhibition, whereas alterations in low-frequency alpha power appear to precede behavioral changes in response execution. Both behavioral and electrophysiological correlates combined provide a more comprehensive characterization of cognitive control deficits in aMCI.

  20. Theta and Alpha Alterations in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment in Semantic Go/NoGo Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia T. Nguyen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that cognitive control processes are impaired in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI; however the nature of these alterations needs further examination. The current study examined differences in electroencephalographic theta and alpha power related to cognitive control processes involving response execution and response inhibition in 22 individuals with aMCI and 22 age-, sex-, and education-matched cognitively normal controls. Two Go/NoGo tasks involving semantic categorization were used. In the basic categorization task, Go/NoGo responses were made based on exemplars of a single car (Go and a single dog (NoGo. In the superordinate categorization task, responses were made based on multiple exemplars of objects (Go and animals (NoGo. Behavioral data showed that the aMCI group had more false alarms during the NoGo trials compared to controls. The EEG data revealed between group differences related to response type in theta (4–7 Hz and low-frequency alpha (8–10 Hz power. In particular, the aMCI group differed from controls in theta power during the NoGo trials at frontal and parietal electrodes, and in low-frequency alpha power during Go trials at parietal electrodes. These results suggest that alterations in theta power converge with behavioral deterioration in response inhibition, whereas alterations in low-frequency alpha power appear to precede behavioral changes in response execution. Both behavioral and electrophysiological correlates combined provide a more comprehensive characterization of cognitive control deficits in aMCI.

  1. Behavioral oscillation in priming: competing perceptual predictions conveyed in alternating theta-band rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Chen, Lin; Luo, Huan

    2015-02-11

    The brain constantly creates perceptual predictions about forthcoming stimuli to guide perception efficiently. Abundant studies have demonstrated that perceptual predictions modulate sensory activities depending on whether the actual inputs are consistent with one particular prediction. In real-life contexts, however, multiple and even conflicting predictions might concurrently exist to be tested, requiring a multiprediction coordination process. It remains largely unknown how multiple hypotheses are conveyed and harmonized to guide moment-by-moment perception. Based on recent findings revealing that multiple locations are sampled alternatively in various phase of attentional rhythms, we hypothesize that this oscillation-based temporal organization mechanism may also underlie the multiprediction coordination process. To address the issue, we used well established priming paradigms in combination with a time-resolved behavioral approach to investigate the fine temporal dynamics of the multiprediction harmonization course in human subjects. We first replicate classical priming effects in slowly developing trends of priming time courses. Second, after removing the typical priming patterns, we reveal a new theta-band (∼4 Hz) oscillatory component in the priming behavioral data regardless of whether the prime was masked. Third, we show that these theta-band priming oscillations triggered by congruent and incongruent primes are in an out-of-phase relationship. These findings suggest that perceptual predictions return to low-sensory areas not continuously but recurrently in a theta-band rhythm (every 200-300 ms) and that multiple predictions are dynamically coordinated in time by being conveyed in different phases of the theta-band oscillations to achieve dissociated but temporally organized neural representations. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352830-08$15.00/0.

  2. Is the hippocampal theta rhythm related to cognition in a non-locomotor place recognition task?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kelemen, Edo; Morón, I.; Fenton, André Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2005), s. 472-479 ISSN 1050-9631 Grant - others:5th Framework Development Program(XE) QLG3-CT-1999-00192; McDonnell Foundation(US) 98-38-CNS-QUA.05; Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnologia(ES) BS02002-01215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : theta rhythm * cognition * place recognition Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2005

  3. Von Neumann stability analysis of globally divergence-free RKDG schemes for the induction equation using multidimensional Riemann solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Käppeli, Roger

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we focus on the numerical solution of the induction equation using Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin (RKDG)-like schemes that are globally divergence-free. The induction equation plays a role in numerical MHD and other systems like it. It ensures that the magnetic field evolves in a divergence-free fashion; and that same property is shared by the numerical schemes presented here. The algorithms presented here are based on a novel DG-like method as it applies to the magnetic field components in the faces of a mesh. (I.e., this is not a conventional DG algorithm for conservation laws.) The other two novel building blocks of the method include divergence-free reconstruction of the magnetic field and multidimensional Riemann solvers; both of which have been developed in recent years by the first author. Since the method is linear, a von Neumann stability analysis is carried out in two-dimensions to understand its stability properties. The von Neumann stability analysis that we develop in this paper relies on transcribing from a modal to a nodal DG formulation in order to develop discrete evolutionary equations for the nodal values. These are then coupled to a suitable Runge-Kutta timestepping strategy so that one can analyze the stability of the entire scheme which is suitably high order in space and time. We show that our scheme permits CFL numbers that are comparable to those of traditional RKDG schemes. We also analyze the wave propagation characteristics of the method and show that with increasing order of accuracy the wave propagation becomes more isotropic and free of dissipation for a larger range of long wavelength modes. This makes a strong case for investing in higher order methods. We also use the von Neumann stability analysis to show that the divergence-free reconstruction and multidimensional Riemann solvers are essential algorithmic ingredients of a globally divergence-free RKDG-like scheme. Numerical accuracy analyses of the RKDG

  4. Neurofeedback for children with ADHD: a comparison of SCP and Theta/Beta protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leins, Ulrike; Goth, Gabriella; Hinterberger, Thilo; Klinger, Christoph; Rumpf, Nicola; Strehl, Ute

    2007-06-01

    Behavioral and cognitive improvements in children with ADHD have been consistently reported after neurofeedback-treatment. However, neurofeedback has not been commonly accepted as a treatment for ADHD. This study addresses previous methodological shortcomings while comparing a neurofeedback-training of Theta-Beta frequencies and training of slow cortical potentials (SCPs). The study aimed at answering (a) whether patients were able to demonstrate learning of cortical self-regulation, (b) if treatment leads to an improvement in cognition and behavior and (c) if the two experimental groups differ in cognitive and behavioral outcome variables. SCP participants were trained to produce positive and negative SCP-shifts while the Theta/Beta participants were trained to suppress Theta (4-8 Hz) while increasing Beta (12-20 Hz). Participants were blind to group assignment. Assessment included potentially confounding variables. Each group was comprised of 19 children with ADHD (aged 8-13 years). The treatment procedure consisted of three phases of 10 sessions each. Both groups were able to intentionally regulate cortical activity and improved in attention and IQ. Parents and teachers reported significant behavioral and cognitive improvements. Clinical effects for both groups remained stable six months after treatment. Groups did not differ in behavioural or cognitive outcome.

  5. Enhanced theta synchronization correlates with the successful retrieval of trace fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yujin; An, Bobae; Choi, Sukwoo

    2016-11-25

    Mechanisms underlying delay fear conditioning in which conditioned stimuli (CS) are paired and co-terminated with unconditioned stimuli (US), have been extensively characterized, thus expanding knowledge concerning learning and memory. However, trace fear conditioning in which CS and US are separated by trace interval periods, has received much less attention though it involves cognitive processes including timing and working memories. Various brain regions including the hippocampus are known to play an important role in memory acquisition and/or retrieval of trace fear conditioning. However, neural correlates, which are specific for the discrete steps in trace fear conditioning, have not been characterized thoroughly. Here, we investigated the network activities between the dorsal and ventral hippocampi at different stages of memory processing after trace fear conditioning. When fear memory was retrieved successfully, theta synchronization between the two regions was enhanced relative to preconditioning levels. The enhancement in theta synchronization was observed only during the trace interval period but not during CS presentation or after the trace interval period. Thus, the enhanced theta synchronization between the dorsal and ventral hippocampi may underlie a cognitive process associated with the trace interval period when fear memory is retrieved successfully. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Joule Heating and Thermal Denaturation of Proteins in Nano-ESI Theta Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feifei; Matt, Sarah M.; Bu, Jiexun; Rehrauer, Owen G.; Ben-Amotz, Dor; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-osmotically induced Joule heating in theta tips and its effect on protein denaturation were investigated. Myoglobin, equine cytochrome c, bovine cytochrome c, and carbonic anhydrase II solutions were subjected to electro-osmosis in a theta tip and all of the proteins were denatured during the process. The extent of protein denaturation was found to increase with the applied square wave voltage and electrolyte concentration. The solution temperature at the end of a theta tip was measured directly by Raman spectroscopy and shown to increase with the square wave voltage, thereby demonstrating the effect of Joule heating through an independent method. The electro-osmosis of a solution comprised of myoglobin, bovine cytochrome c, and ubiquitin demonstrated that the magnitude of Joule heating that causes protein denaturation is positively correlated with protein melting temperature. This allows for a quick determination of a protein's relative thermal stability. This work establishes a fast, novel method for protein conformation manipulation prior to MS analysis and provides a temperature-controllable platform for the study of processes that take place in solution with direct coupling to mass spectrometry. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Theta-Gamma Coding Meets Communication-through-Coherence: Neuronal Oscillatory Multiplexing Theories Reconciled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLelland, Douglas; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-10-01

    Several theories have been advanced to explain how cross-frequency coupling, the interaction of neuronal oscillations at different frequencies, could enable item multiplexing in neural systems. The communication-through-coherence theory proposes that phase-matching of gamma oscillations between areas enables selective processing of a single item at a time, and a later refinement of the theory includes a theta-frequency oscillation that provides a periodic reset of the system. Alternatively, the theta-gamma neural code theory proposes that a sequence of items is processed, one per gamma cycle, and that this sequence is repeated or updated across theta cycles. In short, both theories serve to segregate representations via the temporal domain, but differ on the number of objects concurrently represented. In this study, we set out to test whether each of these theories is actually physiologically plausible, by implementing them within a single model inspired by physiological data. Using a spiking network model of visual processing, we show that each of these theories is physiologically plausible and computationally useful. Both theories were implemented within a single network architecture, with two areas connected in a feedforward manner, and gamma oscillations generated by feedback inhibition within areas. Simply increasing the amplitude of global inhibition in the lower area, equivalent to an increase in the spatial scope of the gamma oscillation, yielded a switch from one mode to the other. Thus, these different processing modes may co-exist in the brain, enabling dynamic switching between exploratory and selective modes of attention.

  8. Deqi Induction by HT7 Acupuncture Alters Theta and Alpha Band Coherence in Human Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go-Eun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary study is to investigate the changes in phase synchronization in the theta and alpha bands before and during the performance of classical acupuncture on the Sinmun (HT7. The electroencephalogram (EEG signals from nine healthy young subjects were recorded before and during acupuncture in the “closed-eye” state. The EEG signals were acquired from 19 surface scalp electrodes (FP1, FP2, F7, F3, Fz F4, F8, T3, C3, Cz, C4, T4, T5, P3, Pz, P4, T6, O1, and O2. Needles were inserted into the HT7 bilaterally and were then manipulated to induce deqi and retained for 15 minutes. Phase synchronization was measured by phase coherence. In the theta band, coherence significantly increased between the temporal (T5, T6 and occipital areas (O1, O2 during the acupuncture stimulation. In the alpha band, coherence significantly increased between the left temporal area (T5 and other areas (frontal, parietal, and occipital. Phase coherence in the theta and alpha bands tended to increase during the retention of the acupuncture needles after deqi. Therefore, it can be concluded that acupuncture stimulation with deqi is clinically effective via the central nervous system (CNS.

  9. Mood congruent tuning of reward expectation in positive mood: evidence from FRN and theta modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Katharina; Pourtois, Gilles

    2017-05-01

    Positive mood broadens attention and builds additional mental resources. However, its effect on performance monitoring and reward prediction errors remain unclear. To examine this issue, we used a standard mood induction procedure (based on guided imagery) and asked 45 participants to complete a gambling task suited to study reward prediction errors by means of the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and mid-frontal theta band power. Results showed a larger FRN for negative feedback as well as a lack of reward expectation modulation for positive feedback at the theta level with positive mood, relative to a neutral mood condition. A control analysis showed that this latter result could not be explained by the mere superposition of the event-related brain potential component on the theta oscillations. Moreover, these neurophysiological effects were evidenced in the absence of impairments at the behavioral level or increase in autonomic arousal with positive mood, suggesting that this mood state reliably altered brain mechanisms of reward prediction errors during performance monitoring. We interpret these new results as reflecting a genuine mood congruency effect, whereby reward is anticipated as the default outcome with positive mood and therefore processed as unsurprising (even when it is unlikely), while negative feedback is perceived as unexpected. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Using theta and alpha band power to assess cognitive workload in multitasking environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Sébastien; Matton, Nadine; Paubel, Pierre-V; Raufaste, Éric; El-Yagoubi, Radouane

    2017-10-07

    Cognitive workload is of central importance in the fields of human factors and ergonomics. A reliable measurement of cognitive workload could allow for improvements in human machine interface designs and increase safety in several domains. At present, numerous studies have used electroencephalography (EEG) to assess cognitive workload, reporting the rise in cognitive workload to be associated with increases in theta band power and decreases in alpha band power. However, results have been inconsistent with some failing to reach the required level of significance. We hypothesized that the lack of consistency could be related to individual differences in task performance and/or to the small sample sizes in most EEG studies. In the present study we used EEG to assess the increase in cognitive workload occurring in a multitasking environment while taking into account differences in performance. Twenty participants completed a task commonly used in airline pilot recruitment, which included an increasing number of concurrent sub-tasks to be processed from one to four. Subjective ratings, performances scores, pupil size and EEG signals were recorded. Results showed that increases in EEG alpha and theta band power reflected increases in the involvement of cognitive resources for the completion of one to three subtasks in a multitasking environment. These values reached a ceiling when performances dropped. Consistent differences in levels of alpha and theta band power were associated to levels of task performance: highest performance was related to lowest band power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential effects of ongoing EEG beta and theta power on memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Sebastian; Schneider, Signe Luisa; Rose, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Recently, elevated ongoing pre-stimulus beta power (13-17 Hz) at encoding has been associated with subsequent memory formation for visual stimulus material. It is unclear whether this activity is merely specific to visual processing or whether it reflects a state facilitating general memory formation, independent of stimulus modality. To answer that question, the present study investigated the relationship between neural pre-stimulus oscillations and verbal memory formation in different sensory modalities. For that purpose, a within-subject design was employed to explore differences between successful and failed memory formation in the visual and auditory modality. Furthermore, associative memory was addressed by presenting the stimuli in combination with background images. Results revealed that similar EEG activity in the low beta frequency range (13-17 Hz) is associated with subsequent memory success, independent of stimulus modality. Elevated power prior to stimulus onset differentiated successful from failed memory formation. In contrast, differential effects between modalities were found in the theta band (3-7 Hz), with an increased oscillatory activity before the onset of later remembered visually presented words. In addition, pre-stimulus theta power dissociated between successful and failed encoding of associated context, independent of the stimulus modality of the item itself. We therefore suggest that increased ongoing low beta activity reflects a memory promoting state, which is likely to be moderated by modality-independent attentional or inhibitory processes, whereas high ongoing theta power is suggested as an indicator of the enhanced binding of incoming interlinked information.

  12. Differential effects of ongoing EEG beta and theta power on memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Scholz

    Full Text Available Recently, elevated ongoing pre-stimulus beta power (13-17 Hz at encoding has been associated with subsequent memory formation for visual stimulus material. It is unclear whether this activity is merely specific to visual processing or whether it reflects a state facilitating general memory formation, independent of stimulus modality. To answer that question, the present study investigated the relationship between neural pre-stimulus oscillations and verbal memory formation in different sensory modalities. For that purpose, a within-subject design was employed to explore differences between successful and failed memory formation in the visual and auditory modality. Furthermore, associative memory was addressed by presenting the stimuli in combination with background images. Results revealed that similar EEG activity in the low beta frequency range (13-17 Hz is associated with subsequent memory success, independent of stimulus modality. Elevated power prior to stimulus onset differentiated successful from failed memory formation. In contrast, differential effects between modalities were found in the theta band (3-7 Hz, with an increased oscillatory activity before the onset of later remembered visually presented words. In addition, pre-stimulus theta power dissociated between successful and failed encoding of associated context, independent of the stimulus modality of the item itself. We therefore suggest that increased ongoing low beta activity reflects a memory promoting state, which is likely to be moderated by modality-independent attentional or inhibitory processes, whereas high ongoing theta power is suggested as an indicator of the enhanced binding of incoming interlinked information.

  13. Theta-specific susceptibility in a model of adaptive synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Christian; Schmiedt, Joscha T; Pawelzik, Klaus R

    2013-01-01

    Learning and memory formation are processes which are still not fully understood. It is widely believed that synaptic plasticity is the most important neural substrate for both. However, it has been observed that large-scale theta band oscillations in the mammalian brain are beneficial for learning, and it is not clear if and how this is linked to synaptic plasticity. Also, the underlying dynamics of synaptic plasticity itself have not been completely uncovered yet, especially for non-linear interactions between multiple spikes. Here, we present a new and simple dynamical model of synaptic plasticity. It incorporates novel contributions to synaptic plasticity including adaptation processes. We test its ability to reproduce non-linear effects on four different data sets of complex spike patterns, and show that the model can be tuned to reproduce the observed synaptic changes in great detail. When subjected to periodically varying firing rates, already linear pair based spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) predicts a specific susceptibility of synaptic plasticity to pre- and postsynaptic firing rate oscillations in the theta-band. Our model retains this band-pass property, while for high firing rates in the non-linear regime it modifies the specific phase relation required for depression and potentiation. For realistic parameters, maximal synaptic potentiation occurs when the postsynaptic is trailing the presynaptic activity slightly. Anti-phase oscillations tend to depress it. Our results are well in line with experimental findings, providing a straightforward and mechanistic explanation for the importance of theta oscillations for learning.

  14. Theta Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Auditory Verbal Hallucinations : Negative Findings From a Double-Blind-Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Sanne; van Dellen, Edwin; Schutte, Maya J L; Nieuwdorp, Wendy; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W; Sommer, Iris E C

    BACKGROUND: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia are resistant to antipsychotic medication in approximately 25% of patients. Treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for refractory AVH has shown varying results. A stimulation protocol using continuous theta

  15. On the effect of $\\theta_{13}$ on the determination of solar oscillation parameters at KamLAND

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción

    2002-01-01

    If the solution to the solar neutrino puzzle falls in the LMA region, KamLAND should be able to measure with good precision the corresponding oscillation parameters after a few years of data taking. Assuming a positive signal, we study their expected sensitivity to the solar parameters (theta_{12},Delta m^2_{21}) when considered in the framework of three-neutrino mixing after taking into account our ignorance on the mixing angle theta_{13}. We find a simple ``scaling'' dependence of the reconstructed theta_{12} range with the value of theta_{13} while the Delta m^2_{12} range is practically unaffected. Our results show that the net effect is approximately equivalent to an uncertainty on the overall neutrino flux normalization of up to sim 10 %.

  16. Decreased theta power at encoding and cognitive mapping deficits in elderly individuals during a spatial memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithfous, Ségolène; Tromp, Delphine; Dufour, André; Pebayle, Thierry; Goutagny, Romain; Després, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of theta activity in cognitive mapping, and to determine whether age-associated decreased theta power may account for navigational difficulties in elderly individuals. Cerebral activity was recorded using electroencephalograph in young and older individuals performing a spatial memory task that required the creation of cognitive maps. Power spectra were computed in the frontal and parietal regions and correlated with recognition performance. We found that accuracy of cognitive mapping was positively correlated with left frontal theta activity during encoding in young adults but not in older individuals. Compared with young adults, older participants were impaired in the creation of cognitive maps and showed reduced theta and alpha activity at encoding. These results suggest that encoding processes are impaired in older individual, which may explain age-related cognitive mapping deficits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex function theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarason, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Complex Function Theory is a concise and rigorous introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. Written in a classical style, it is in the spirit of the books by Ahlfors and by Saks and Zygmund. Being designed for a one-semester course, it is much shorter than many of the standard texts. Sarason covers the basic material through Cauchy's theorem and applications, plus the Riemann mapping theorem. It is suitable for either an introductory graduate course or an undergraduate course for students with adequate preparation. The first edition was published with the title Notes on Co

  18. Noncommutative quantum electrodynamics from Seiberg-Witten maps to all orders in {theta}{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiner, Joerg

    2007-07-03

    The basic question which drove our whole work was to find a meaningful noncommutative gauge theory even for the time-like case ({theta}{sup 0i} {ne}0). Our model is based on two fundamental assumptions. The first assumption is given by the commutation relations. This led to the Moyal-Weyl star-product which replaces all point-like products between two fields. The second assumption is to assume that the model built this way is not only invariant under the noncommutative gauge transformation but also under the commutative one. We chose a gauge fixed action as the fundamental action of our model. After having constructed the action of the NCQED including the Seiberg-Witten maps we were confronted with the problem of calculating the Seiberg-Witten maps to all orders in {theta}{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}. We could calculate the Seiberg-Witten maps order by order in the gauge field, where each order in the gauge field contains all orders in the noncommutative parameter. We realized that already the simplest Seiberg-Witten map for the gauge field is not unique. We examined this ambiguity, which we could parametrised by an arbitrary function *{sub f}. The next step was to derive the Feynman rules for our NCQED. One finds that the propagators remain unchanged so that the free theory is equal to the commutative QED. The fermion-fermion-photon vertex contains not only a phase factor coming from the Moyal-Weyl star-product but also two additional terms which have their origin in the Seiberg-Witten maps. Beside the 3-photon vertex which is already present in NCQED without Seiberg-Witten maps and which has also additional terms coming from the Seiberg-Witten maps, too, one has a contact vertex which couples two fermions with two photons. After having derived all the vertices we calculated the pair annihilation scattering process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} at Born level. We found that the amplitude of the pair annihilation process becomes equal to the amplitude of the NCQED

  19. Increased frontal electroencephalogram theta amplitude in patients with anorexia nervosa compared to healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hestad KA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Knut A Hestad,1–3 Siri Weider,3,4 Kristian Bernhard Nilsen,5–7 Marit Sæbø Indredavik,8,9 Trond Sand7,10 1Department of Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Brumunddal, Norway; 2Department of Public Health, Hedmark University of Applied Sciences, Elverum, Norway; 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 4Department of Psychiatry, Specialised Unit for Eating Disorder Patients, Levanger Hospital, Health Trust Nord-Trøndelag, Levanger, Norway; 5Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 6Department of Work Psychology and Physiology, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, Norway; 7Department of Neurology, Section for Clinical Neurophysiology, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway; 8Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 9Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway; 10Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway Objective: To conduct a blind study of quantitative electroencephalogram-band amplitudes in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN and healthy controls.Methods: Twenty-one patients with AN and 24 controls were examined with eyes-closed 16-channel electroencephalogram. Main variables were absolute alpha, theta, and delta amplitudes in frontal, temporal, and posterior regions.Results: There were no significant differences between the AN patients and controls regarding absolute regional band amplitudes in µV. Borderline significance was found for anterior theta (P=0.051. Significantly increased left and right frontal electrode theta amplitude was found in AN patients (F3, P=0.014; F4, P

  20. Indirect measurement of $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$ (or $M_W$) using $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ pairs from $\\gamma^*/Z$ bosons produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; Amidei, Dante E; Anastassov, Anton Iankov; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, Giorgio; Appel, Jeffrey A; Arisawa, Tetsuo; Artikov, Akram Muzafarovich; Asaadi, Jonathan A; Ashmanskas, William Joseph; Auerbach, Benjamin; Aurisano, Adam J; Azfar, Farrukh A; Badgett, William Farris; Bae, Taegil; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Barria, Patrizia; Bartos, Pavol; Bauce, Matteo; Bedeschi, Franco; Behari, Satyajit; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, James Nugent; Benjamin, Douglas P; Beretvas, Andrew F; Bhatti, Anwar Ahmad; Bland, Karen Renee; Blumenfeld, Barry J; Bocci, Andrea; Bodek, Arie; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, Joseph Francis; Boveia, Antonio; Brigliadori, Luca; Bromberg, Carl Michael; Brucken, Erik; Budagov, Ioulian A; Budd, Howard Scott; Burkett, Kevin Alan; Busetto, Giovanni; Bussey, Peter John; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buzatu, Adrian; Calamba, Aristotle; Camarda, Stefano; Campanelli, Mario; Canelli, Florencia; Carls, Benjamin; Carlsmith, Duncan L; Carosi, Roberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Casal Larana, Bruno; Casarsa, Massimo; Castro, Andrea; Catastini, Pierluigi; Cauz, Diego; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Chen, Yen-Chu; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chlachidze, Gouram; Cho, Kihyeon; Chokheli, Davit; Clark, Allan Geoffrey; Clarke, Christopher Joseph; Convery, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, John Stephen; Corbo, Matteo; Cordelli, Marco; Cox, Charles Alexander; Cox, David Jeremy; Cremonesi, Matteo; Cruz Alonso, Daniel; Cuevas Maestro, Javier; Culbertson, Raymond Lloyd; D'Ascenzo, Nicola; Datta, Mousumi; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demortier, Luc M; Deninno, Maria Maddalena; D'Errico, Maria; Devoto, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Dittmann, Jay Richard; Donati, Simone; D'Onofrio, Monica; Dorigo, Mirco; Driutti, Anna; Ebina, Koji; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Elagin, Andrey L; Erbacher, Robin D; Errede, Steven Michael; Esham, Benjamin; Farrington, Sinead Marie; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Field, Richard D; Flanagan, Gene U; Forrest, Robert David; Franklin, Melissa EB; Freeman, John Christian; Frisch, Henry J; Funakoshi, Yujiro; Galloni, Camilla; Garfinkel, Arthur F; Garosi, Paola; Gerberich, Heather Kay; Gerchtein, Elena A; Giagu, Stefano; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Gibson, Karen Ruth; Ginsburg, Camille Marie; Giokaris, Nikos D; Giromini, Paolo; Giurgiu, Gavril A; Glagolev, Vladimir; Glenzinski, Douglas Andrew; Gold, Michael S; Goldin, Daniel; Golossanov, Alexander; Gomez, Gervasio; Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim T; González López, Oscar; Gorelov, Igor V; Goshaw, Alfred T; Goulianos, Konstantin A; Gramellini, Elena; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grosso-Pilcher, Carla; Group, Robert Craig; Guimaraes da Costa, Joao; Hahn, Stephen R; Han, Ji-Yeon; Happacher, Fabio; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Matthew Frederick; Harr, Robert Francis; Harrington-Taber, Timothy; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Hays, Christopher Paul; Heinrich, Joel G; Herndon, Matthew Fairbanks; Hocker, James Andrew; Hong, Ziqing; Hopkins, Walter Howard; Hou, Suen Ray; Hughes, Richard Edward; Husemann, Ulrich; Hussein, Mohammad; Huston, Joey Walter; Introzzi, Gianluca; Iori, Maurizio; Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich; James, Eric B; Jang, Dongwook; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha Anjalike; Jeon, Eun-Ju; Jindariani, Sergo Robert; Jones, Matthew T; Joo, Kyung Kwang; Jun, Soon Yung; Junk, Thomas R; Kambeitz, Manuel; Kamon, Teruki; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kasmi, Azeddine; Kato, Yukihiro; Ketchum, Wesley Robert; Keung, Justin Kien; Kilminster, Benjamin John; Kim, DongHee; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Min Jeong; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Soo Bong; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kirby, Michael H; Knoepfel, Kyle James; Kondo, Kunitaka; Kong, Dae Jung; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Kotwal, Ashutosh Vijay; Kreps, Michal; Kroll, IJoseph; Kruse, Mark Charles; Kuhr, Thomas; Kurata, Masakazu; Laasanen, Alvin Toivo; Lammel, Stephan; Lancaster, Mark; Lannon, Kevin Patrick; Latino, Giuseppe; Lee, Hyun Su; Lee, Jaison; Leo, Sabato; Leone, Sandra; Lewis, Jonathan D; Limosani, Antonio; Lipeles, Elliot David; Lister, Alison; Liu, Hao; Liu, Qiuguang; Liu, Tiehui Ted; Lockwitz, Sarah E; Loginov, Andrey Borisovich; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucà, Alessandra; Lueck, Jan; Lujan, Paul Joseph; Lukens, Patrick Thomas; Lungu, Gheorghe; Lys, Jeremy E; Lysak, Roman; Madrak, Robyn Leigh; Maestro, Paolo; Malik, Sarah Alam; Manca, Giulia; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Marchese, Luigi; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marino, Christopher Phillip; Martínez-Perez, Mario; Matera, Keith; Mattson, Mark Edward; Mazzacane, Anna; Mazzanti, Paolo; McNulty, Ronan; Mehta, Andrew; Mehtala, Petteri; Mesropian, Christina; Miao, Ting; Mietlicki, David John; Mitra, Ankush; Miyake, Hideki; Moed, Shulamit; Moggi, Niccolo; Moon, Chang-Seong; Moore, Ronald Scott; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mukherjee, Aseet; Muller, Thomas; Murat, Pavel A; Mussini, Manuel; Nachtman, Jane Marie; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Naganoma, Junji; Nakano, Itsuo; Napier, Austin; Nett, Jason Michael; Neu, Christopher Carl; Nigmanov, Turgun S; Nodulman, Lawrence J; Noh, Seoyoung; Norniella Francisco, Olga; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oh, Seog Hwan; Oh, Young-do; Oksuzian, Iuri Artur; Okusawa, Toru; Orava, Risto Olavi; Ortolan, Lorenzo; Pagliarone, Carmine Elvezio; Palencia, Jose Enrique; Palni, Prabhakar; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Parker, William Chesluk; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paulini, Manfred; Paus, Christoph Maria Ernst; Phillips, Thomas J; Piacentino, Giovanni M; Pianori, Elisabetta; Pilot, Justin Robert; Pitts, Kevin T; Plager, Charles; Pondrom, Lee G; Poprocki, Stephen; Potamianos, Karolos Jozef; Pranko, Aliaksandr Pavlovich; Prokoshin, Fedor; Ptohos, Fotios K; Punzi, Giovanni; Ranjan, Niharika; Redondo Fernández, Ignacio; Renton, Peter B; Rescigno, Marco; Rimondi, Franco; Ristori, Luciano; Robson, Aidan; Rodriguez, Tatiana Isabel; Rolli, Simona; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roser, Robert Martin; Rosner, Jonathan L; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz Jimeno, Alberto; Russ, James S; Rusu, Vadim Liviu; Sakumoto, Willis Kazuo; Sakurai, Yuki; Santi, Lorenzo; Sato, Koji; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schlabach, Philip; Schmidt, Eugene E; Schwarz, Thomas A; Scodellaro, Luca; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seidel, Sally C; Seiya, Yoshihiro; Semenov, Alexei; Sforza, Federico; Shalhout, Shalhout Zaki; Shears, Tara G; Shepard, Paul F; Shimojima, Makoto; Shochet, Melvyn J; Shreyber-Tecker, Irina; Simonenko, Alexander V; Sliwa, Krzysztof Jan; Smith, John Rodgers; Snider, Frederick Douglas; Song, Hao; Sorin, Maria Veronica; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stancari, Michelle Dawn; Stentz, Dale James; Strologas, John; Sudo, Yuji; Sukhanov, Alexander I; Suslov, Igor M; Takemasa, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Yuji; Tang, Jian; Tecchio, Monica; Teng, Ping-Kun; Thom, Julia; Thomson, Evelyn Jean; Thukral, Vaikunth; Toback, David A; Tokar, Stanislav; Tollefson, Kirsten Anne; Tomura, Tomonobu; Tonelli, Diego; Torre, Stefano; Torretta, Donatella; Totaro, Pierluigi; Trovato, Marco; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Uozumi, Satoru; Velev, Gueorgui; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Vernieri, Caterina; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Vizán Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Vogel, Marcelo; Volpi, Guido; Vázquez-Valencia, Elsa Fabiola; Wagner, Peter; Wallny, Rainer S; Wang, Song-Ming; Waters, David S; Wester, William Carl; Whiteson, Daniel O; Wicklund, Arthur Barry; Wilbur, Scott; Williams, Hugh H; Wilson, Jonathan Samuel; Wilson, Peter James; Winer, Brian L; Wittich, Peter; Wolbers, Stephen A; Wolfe, Homer; Wright, Thomas Roland; Wu, Xin; Wu, Zhenbin; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Daisuke; Yang, Tingjun; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yu Chul; Yao, Wei-Ming; Yeh, Gong Ping; Yi, Kai; Yoh, John; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Takuo; Yu, Geum Bong; Yu, Intae; Zanetti, Anna Maria; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2014-04-04

    Drell-Yan lepton pairs are produced in the process $p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^- + X$ through an intermediate $\\gamma^*/Z$ boson. The forward-backward asymmetry in the polar-angle distribution of the $\\mu^-$ as a function of the invariant mass of the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ pair is used to obtain the effective leptonic determination $\\sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ of the electroweak-mixing parameter $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$, from which the value of $\\sin^2 \\theta_W$ is derived assuming the standard model. The measurement sample, recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF), corresponds to 9.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-momentum energy of 1.96 TeV, and is the full CDF Run II data set. The value of $\\sin^2 \\theta^{lept}_{eff}$ is found to be 0.2315 +- 0.0010, where statistical and systematic uncertainties are combined in quadrature. When interpreted within the context of the standard model using the on-shell renormalization scheme, where $\\sin^2 \\theta_W = 1 - M_W^2/M_Z^2$, the...

  1. An application of Jacquet-Langlands correspondence to transfer operators for geodesic flows on Riemann surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momeni, Arash; Venkov, Alexei

    In the paper as a new application of the Jacquet-Langlands correspondence we connect the transfer operators for different cofinite Fuchsian groups by comparing the corresponding Selberg zeta functions....

  2. Diacylglycerol kinase theta and zeta isoforms : regulation of activity, protein binding partners and physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, Alrik Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) yielding phosphatidic acid (PA). In this thesis, we investigated which structural domains of DGKtheta are required for DGK activity. Furthermore, we showed that DGKzeta binds to and is activated by the

  3. Desynchronization of Theta-Phase Gamma-Amplitude Coupling during a Mental Arithmetic Task in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Won Kim

    Full Text Available Theta-phase gamma-amplitude coupling (TGC measurement has recently received attention as a feasible method of assessing brain functions such as neuronal interactions. The purpose of this electroencephalographic (EEG study is to understand the mechanisms underlying the deficits in attentional control in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD by comparing the power spectra and TGC at rest and during a mental arithmetic task.Nineteen-channel EEGs were recorded from 97 volunteers (including 53 subjects with ADHD from a camp for hyperactive children under two conditions (rest and task performance. The EEG power spectra and the TGC data were analyzed. Correlation analyses between the Intermediate Visual and Auditory (IVA continuous performance test (CPT scores and EEG parameters were performed.No significant difference in the power spectra was detected between the groups at rest and during task performance. However, TGC was reduced during the arithmetic task in the ADHD group compared with the normal group (F = 16.70, p < 0.001. The TGC values positively correlated with the IVA CPT scores but negatively correlated with theta power.Our findings suggest that desynchronization of TGC occurred during the arithmetic task in ADHD children. TGC in ADHD children is expected to serve as a promising neurophysiological marker of network deactivation during attention-demanding tasks.

  4. Intermittent theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation for autism spectrum disorder: an open-label pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Abujadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Theta-burst stimulation (TBS modulates synaptic plasticity more efficiently than standard repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivery and may be a promising modality for neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD. At present there are few effective interventions for prefrontal cortex dysfunction in ASD. We report on an open-label, pilot study of intermittent TBS (iTBS to target executive function deficits and restricted, repetitive behaviors in male children and adolescents with ASD. Methods: Ten right-handed, male participants, aged 9-17 years with ASD were enrolled in an open-label trial of iTBS treatment. Fifteen sessions of neuronavigated iTBS at 100% motor threshold targeting the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were delivered over 3 weeks. Results: Parent report scores on the Repetitive Behavior Scale Revised and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale demonstrated improvements with iTBS treatment. Participants demonstrated improvements in perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and total time for the Stroop test. The iTBS treatments were well tolerated with no serious adverse effects. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that further controlled interventional studies of iTBS for ASD are warranted.

  5. Application of alpha/theta neurofeedback and heart rate variability training to young contemporary dancers: state anxiety and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzelier, J H; Thompson, T; Redding, E; Brandt, R; Steffert, T

    2014-07-01

    As one in a series on the impact of EEG-neurofeedback in the performing arts, we set out to replicate a previous dance study in which alpha/theta (A/T) neurofeedback and heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback enhanced performance in competitive ballroom dancers compared with controls. First year contemporary dance conservatoire students were randomised to the same two psychophysiological interventions or a choreology instruction comparison group or a no-training control group. While there was demonstrable neurofeedback learning, there was no impact of the three interventions on dance performance as assessed by four experts. However, HRV training reduced anxiety and the reduction correlated with improved technique and artistry in performance; the anxiety scale items focussed on autonomic functions, especially cardiovascular activity. In line with the putative impact of hypnogogic training on creativity A/T training increased cognitive creativity with the test of unusual uses, but not insight problems. Methodological and theoretical implications are considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. On the Existence of Non-Oscillatory Phase Functions for Second Order Ordinary Differential Equations in the High-Frequency Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-04

    L2 pRq and ensures the convergence of the improper Riemann integrals (140). 7. Fourier estimate In this section, we derive a pointwise estimate on...improper Riemann integral . If, however, we assume the function p appearing in (122) is an element of L1 pRq and impose the hypotheses of Theorem 18 on the...decomposed as the sum of a nonoscillatory function h0 and a highly oscillatory function h1 of small magnitude. However, the solution of (15) is actually

  7. Fronto-parietal and fronto-temporal theta phase synchronization for visual and auditory-verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Kitajo, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    In humans, theta phase (4-8 Hz) synchronization observed on electroencephalography (EEG) plays an important role in the manipulation of mental representations during working memory (WM) tasks; fronto-temporal synchronization is involved in auditory-verbal WM tasks and fronto-parietal synchronization is involved in visual WM tasks. However, whether or not theta phase synchronization is able to select the to-be-manipulated modalities is uncertain. To address the issue, we recorded EEG data from subjects who were performing auditory-verbal and visual WM tasks; we compared the theta synchronizations when subjects performed either auditory-verbal or visual manipulations in separate WM tasks, or performed both two manipulations in the same WM task. The auditory-verbal WM task required subjects to calculate numbers presented by an auditory-verbal stimulus, whereas the visual WM task required subjects to move a spatial location in a mental representation in response to a visual stimulus. The dual WM task required subjects to manipulate auditory-verbal, visual, or both auditory-verbal and visual representations while maintaining auditory-verbal and visual representations. Our time-frequency EEG analyses revealed significant fronto-temporal theta phase synchronization during auditory-verbal manipulation in both auditory-verbal and auditory-verbal/visual WM tasks, but not during visual manipulation tasks. Similarly, we observed significant fronto-parietal theta phase synchronization during visual manipulation tasks, but not during auditory-verbal manipulation tasks. Moreover, we observed significant synchronization in both the fronto-temporal and fronto-parietal theta signals during simultaneous auditory-verbal/visual manipulations. These findings suggest that theta synchronization seems to flexibly connect the brain areas that manipulate WM.

  8. Fronto-parietal and fronto-temporal theta phase synchronization for visual and auditory-verbal working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eKawasaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In humans, theta phase (4–8 Hz synchronization observed on electroencephalography (EEG plays an important role in the manipulation of mental representations during working memory (WM tasks; fronto-temporal synchronization is involved in auditory-verbal WM tasks and fronto-parietal synchronization is involved in visual WM tasks. However, whether or not theta phase synchronization is able to select the to-be-manipulated modalities is uncertain. To address the issue, we recorded EEG data from subjects who were performing auditory-verbal and visual WM tasks; we compared the theta synchronizations when subjects performed either auditory-verbal or visual manipulations in separate WM tasks, or performed both two manipulations in the same WM task. The auditory-verbal WM task required subjects to calculate numbers presented by an auditory-verbal stimulus, whereas the visual WM task required subjects to move a spatial location in a mental representation in response to a visual stimulus. The dual WM task required subjects to manipulate auditory-verbal, visual, or both auditory-verbal and visual representations while maintaining auditory-verbal and visual representations. Our time-frequency EEG analyses revealed significant fronto-temporal theta phase synchronization during auditory-verbal manipulation in both auditory-verbal and auditory-verbal/visual WM tasks, but not during visual manipulation tasks. Similarly, we observed significant fronto-parietal theta phase synchronization during visual manipulation tasks, but not during auditory-verbal manipulation tasks. Moreover, we observed significant synchronization in both the fronto-temporal and fronto-parietal theta signals during simultaneous auditory-verbal/visual manipulations. These findings suggest that theta synchronization seems to flexibly connect the brain areas that manipulate WM.

  9. A Comparison of Frontal Theta Activity During Shooting among Biathletes and Cross-Country Skiers before and after Vigorous Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Luchsinger

    Full Text Available Previous studies using electroencephalography (EEG to monitor brain activity have linked higher frontal theta activity to more focused attention and superior performance in goal-directed precision tasks. In biathlon, shooting performance requires focused attention after high-intensity cross-country skiing.To compare biathletes (serving as experts and cross-country skiers (novices and examine the effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity during shooting.EEG frontal theta (4-7 Hz activity was compared between nine biathletes and eight cross-country skiers at comparable skiing performance levels who fired 100 shots on a 5-m indoor shooting range in quiescent condition followed by 20 shots after each of five 6-min high-intensity roller skiing sessions in the skating technique on a treadmill.Biathletes hit 80±14% and 81±10% before and after the roller skiing sessions, respectively. For the cross-country skiers these values were significantly lower than for the biathletes and amounted to 39±13% and 44±11% (p<0.01. Biathletes had on average 6% higher frontal theta activity during shooting as compared to cross-country skiers (F1,15 = 4.82, p = 0.044, but no significant effect of vigorous exercise on frontal theta activity in either of the two groups were found (F1,15 = 0.14, p = 0.72.Biathletes had significantly higher frontal theta activity than cross-country skiers during shooting, indicating higher focused attention in biathletes. Vigorous exercise did not decrease shooting performance or frontal theta activity during shooting in biathletes and cross-country skiers.

  10. Deficient Event-Related Theta Oscillations in Individuals at Risk for Alcoholism: A Study of Reward Processing and Impulsivity Features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chella Kamarajan

    Full Text Available Individuals at high risk to develop alcoholism often manifest neurocognitive deficits as well as increased impulsivity. Event-related oscillations (EROs have been used to effectively measure brain (dysfunction during cognitive tasks in individuals with alcoholism and related disorders and in those at risk to develop these disorders. The current study examines ERO theta power during reward processing as well as impulsivity in adolescent and young adult subjects at high risk for alcoholism.EROs were recorded during a monetary gambling task (MGT in 12-25 years old participants (N = 1821; males = 48% from high risk alcoholic families (HR, N = 1534 and comparison low risk community families (LR, N = 287 from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA. Impulsivity scores and prevalence of externalizing diagnoses were also compared between LR and HR groups.HR offspring showed lower theta power and decreased current source density (CSD activity than LR offspring during loss and gain conditions. Younger males had higher theta power than younger females in both groups, while the older HR females showed more theta power than older HR males. Younger subjects showed higher theta power than older subjects in each comparison. Differences in topography (i.e., frontalization between groups were also observed. Further, HR subjects across gender had higher impulsivity scores and increased prevalence of externalizing disorders compared to LR subjects.As theta power during reward processing is found to be lower not only in alcoholics, but also in HR subjects, it is proposed that reduced reward-related theta power, in addition to impulsivity and externalizing features, may be related in a predisposition to develop alcoholism and related disorders.

  11. Theta band oscillations reflect more than entrainment: behavioral and neural evidence demonstrates an active chunking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xiangbin; Tian, Xing; Doelling, Keith; Poeppel, David

    2017-10-17

    Parsing continuous acoustic streams into perceptual units is fundamental to auditory perception. Previous studies have uncovered a cortical entrainment mechanism in the delta and theta bands (~1-8 Hz) that correlates with formation of perceptual units in speech, music, and other quasi-rhythmic stimuli. Whether cortical oscillations in the delta-theta bands are passively entrained by regular acoustic patterns or play an active role in parsing the acoustic stream is debated. Here, we investigate cortical oscillations using novel stimuli with 1/f modulation spectra. These 1/f signals have no rhythmic structure but contain information over many timescales because of their broadband modulation characteristics. We chose 1/f modulation spectra with varying exponents of f, which simulate the dynamics of environmental noise, speech, vocalizations, and music. While undergoing magnetoencephalography (MEG) recording, participants listened to 1/f stimuli and detected embedded target tones. Tone detection performance varied across stimuli of different exponents and can be explained by local signal-to-noise ratio computed using a temporal window around 200 ms. Furthermore, theta band oscillations, surprisingly, were observed for all stimuli, but robust phase coherence was preferentially displayed by stimuli with exponents 1 and 1.5. We constructed an auditory processing model to quantify acoustic information on various timescales and correlated the model outputs with the neural results. We show that cortical oscillations reflect a chunking of segments, > 200 ms. These results suggest an active auditory segmentation mechanism, complementary to entrainment, operating on a timescale of ~200 ms to organize acoustic information. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Theta-Gamma Coding Meets Communication-through-Coherence: Neuronal Oscillatory Multiplexing Theories Reconciled.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas McLelland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Several theories have been advanced to explain how cross-frequency coupling, the interaction of neuronal oscillations at different frequencies, could enable item multiplexing in neural systems. The communication-through-coherence theory proposes that phase-matching of gamma oscillations between areas enables selective processing of a single item at a time, and a later refinement of the theory includes a theta-frequency oscillation that provides a periodic reset of the system. Alternatively, the theta-gamma neural code theory proposes that a sequence of items is processed, one per gamma cycle, and that this sequence is repeated or updated across theta cycles. In short, both theories serve to segregate representations via the temporal domain, but differ on the number of objects concurrently represented. In this study, we set out to test whether each of these theories is actually physiologically plausible, by implementing them within a single model inspired by physiological data. Using a spiking network model of visual processing, we show that each of these theories is physiologically plausible and computationally useful. Both theories were implemented within a single network architecture, with two areas connected in a feedforward manner, and gamma oscillations generated by feedback inhibition within areas. Simply increasing the amplitude of global inhibition in the lower area, equivalent to an increase in the spatial scope of the gamma oscillation, yielded a switch from one mode to the other. Thus, these different processing modes may co-exist in the brain, enabling dynamic switching between exploratory and selective modes of attention.

  13. EEG theta and beta power spectra in adolescents with ADHD versus adolescents with ASD + ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, M; van Boxtel, G J M; Popma, A; Bongers, I L; Denissen, A J M; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch

    2015-08-01

    Attention problems are common in youngsters with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well as in adolescents with combined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ADHD. However, it is unknown whether there is psychophysiological overlap and/or a difference in electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra between ADHD and comorbid ASD and ADHD (ASD + ADHD), on and off stimulant medication. To explore potential differences and overlap, measures of theta and beta power in adolescents diagnosed with ADHD (n = 33) versus adolescents with combined ASD + ADHD (n = 20), categorized by stimulant medication use (57 % of the total sample), were compared. EEG measures were acquired in three conditions: (1) resting state, eyes closed (2) resting state, eyes open and (3) during an oddball task. In addition, performance on the d2 attention test was analyzed. Adolescents with ADHD displayed more absolute theta activity than adolescents with ASD + ADHD during the eyes open and task conditions, independent of stimulant medication use. In addition, only the adolescents with ADHD showed an association between diminished attention test performance and increased theta in the eyes open condition. Results of the current study suggest that although there is behavioral overlap between ADHD characteristics in adolescents with ADHD and adolescents with combined ASD + ADHD, the underlying psychophysiological mechanisms may be different. Adolescents with ASD + ADHD exhibited fewer of the EEG physiological signs usually associated with ADHD, although there was an overlap in attentional problems between the groups. This may indicate that treatments developed for ADHD work differently in some adolescents with ASD + ADHD and adolescents with ADHD only.

  14. Cerebellar Intermittent Theta-Burst Stimulation and Motor Control Training in Individuals with Cervical Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradnam, Lynley V; McDonnell, Michelle N; Ridding, Michael C

    2016-11-23

    There is emerging evidence that cervical dystonia is a neural network disorder with the cerebellum as a key node. The cerebellum may provide a target for neuromodulation as a therapeutic intervention in cervical dystonia. This study aimed to assess effects of intermittent theta-burst stimulation of the cerebellum on dystonia symptoms, quality of life, hand motor dexterity and cortical neurophysiology using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sixteen participants with cervical dystonia were randomised into real or sham stimulation groups. Cerebellar neuromodulation was combined with motor training for the neck and an implicit learning task. The intervention was delivered over 10 working days. Outcome measures included dystonia severity and pain, quality of life, hand dexterity, and motor-evoked potentials and cortical silent periods recorded from upper trapezius muscles. Assessments were taken at baseline and after 5 and 10 days, with quality of life also measured 4 and 12 weeks later. Intermittent theta-burst stimulation improved dystonia severity (Day 5, -5.44 points; p = 0.012; Day 10, -4.6 points; p = 0.025), however, effect sizes were small. Quality of life also improved (Day 5, -10.6 points, p = 0.012; Day 10, -8.6 points, p = 0.036; Week 4, -12.5 points, p = 0.036; Week 12, -12.4 points, p = 0.025), with medium or large effect sizes. There was a reduction in time to complete the pegboard task pre to post intervention (both p < 0.008). Cortical neurophysiology was unchanged by cerebellar neuromodulation. Intermittent theta-burst stimulation of the cerebellum may improve cervical dystonia symptoms, upper limb motor control and quality of life. The mechanism likely involves promoting neuroplasticity in the cerebellum although the neurophysiology remains to be elucidated. Cerebellar neuromodulation may have potential as a novel treatment intervention for cervical dystonia, although larger confirmatory studies are required.

  15. An overview of the theta - S correlations in Fram Strait based on the MIZEX 84 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Schlichtholz

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The water masses in Fram Strait have been analyzed on the basis of hydrographic casts taken in summer 1984 during the MIZEX 84 experiment. In particular, theta-S diagrams for 16 areas, each 5o in longitude and 1o in latitude, covering the strait from 77oN to 81oN are used to characterize the water masses and discuss their possible origin. Near the surface, the East Greenland Polar Front clearly separates the lighter, cold and fresh Polar Water (PW from the heavier, warm and saline Atlantic Water (AW. In the upper ocean, the data show a large spreading of the temperature maximum in the theta-S space associated with different modes of the AW recirculating southward below the PW. Two geographically distinct salinity minima are found in the intermediate layer below the AW. The denser one, in the Boreas Basin, is a feature typical of the Arctic Intermediate Water (AIW formed by winter convection to the south of the strait, while the lighter one is sandwiched in the Arctic Ocean outflow between the AW layer and the Upper Polar Deep Water (UPDW characterized by a downward salinity increase. In the deep layer, two salinity maxima are present. The shallower (and warmer one, associated with the Canadian Basin Deep Water (CBDW, appears all along the East Greenland Slope. A similar but weaker maximum is also found in the southeastern part of the strait. This maximum is perhaps a remnant of the maximum in the East Greenland Current after it has been recirculated back to the strait around the cyclonic gyres of the Nordic Seas. The deeper one appears typically as a near-bottom salinity jump characteristic of the Eurasian Basin Deep Water (EBDW. The jump is found in two distinct areas of the strait, to the north-west in the Lena Trough and to the south-east in the rift valley of the Knipovich Ridge. The maximum in the former area should have been advected from the Arctic Ocean below the CBDW, while the maximum in the latter area might have originated from

  16. Slow oscillation electrical brain stimulation during waking promotes EEG theta activity and memory encoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirov, Roumen; Weiss, Carsten; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2009-01-01

    The application of transcranial slow oscillation stimulation (tSOS; 0.75 Hz) was previously shown to enhance widespread endogenous EEG slow oscillatory activity when applied during a sleep period characterized by emerging endogenous slow oscillatory activity. Processes of memory consolidation...... in a marked and widespread increase in EEG theta (4-8 Hz) activity. During wake, tSOS did not enhance consolidation of memories when applied after learning, but improved encoding of hippocampus-dependent memories when applied during learning. We conclude that the EEG frequency and related memory processes...

  17. Chromatically unique 6-bridge graph theta(a,a,a,b,b,c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S.A. Karim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available For a graph $G$, let $P(G,\\lambda$ denote the chromatic polynomial of $G$. Two graphs $G$ and $H$ are chromatically equivalent if they share the same chromatic polynomial. A graph $G$ is chromatically unique if for any graph chromatically equivalent to $G$ is isomorphic to $G$. In this paper, the chromatically unique of a new family of 6-bridge graph $\\theta(a,a,a,b,b,c$ where $2\\le a\\le b\\le c$ is investigated.

  18. On the 2m 2m 2m-th power mean of Dirichlet L-functions with the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    p, a0,a1,...,ak) = 1, for any integer m, ... power mean of Dirichlet L-functions with the weight of the general trigonometric sums and give an interesting asymptotic ..... where ζ(s) is the Riemann zeta-function and. ∏ p0=p denotes the product over ...

  19. Zeta Functions of Complexes Arising from PGL(3)

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ming-Hsuan; Li, Wen-Ching Winnie

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we obtain a closed form expression of the zeta function $Z(X_\\Gamma, u)$ of a finite quotient $X_\\Gamma = \\Gamma \\backslash PGL_3(F)/PGL_3(O_F)$ of the Bruhat-Tits building of $PGL_3$ over a nonarchimedean local field $F$. Analogous to a graph zeta function, $Z(X_\\Gamma, u)$ is a rational function and it satisfies the Riemann hypothesis if and only if $X_\\Gamma$ is a Ramanujan complex.

  20. Theta synchronization between medial prefrontal cortex and cerebellum is associated with adaptive performance of associative learning behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Yi-jie; Yang, Li; Sui, Jian-feng; Hu, Zhi-an; Hu, Bo

    2016-02-16

    Associative learning is thought to require coordinated activities among distributed brain regions. For example, to direct behavior appropriately, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) must encode and maintain sensory information and then interact with the cerebellum during trace eyeblink conditioning (TEBC), a commonly-used associative learning model. However, the mechanisms by which these two distant areas interact remain elusive. By simultaneously recording local field potential (LFP) signals from the mPFC and the cerebellum in guinea pigs undergoing TEBC, we found that theta-frequency (5.0-12.0 Hz) oscillations in the mPFC and the cerebellum became strongly synchronized following presentation of auditory conditioned stimulus. Intriguingly, the conditioned eyeblink response (CR) with adaptive timing occurred preferentially in the trials where mPFC-cerebellum theta coherence was stronger. Moreover, both the mPFC-cerebellum theta coherence and the adaptive CR performance were impaired after the disruption of endogenous orexins in the cerebellum. Finally, association of the mPFC -cerebellum theta coherence with adaptive CR performance was time-limited occurring in the early stage of associative learning. These findings suggest that the mPFC and the cerebellum may act together to contribute to the adaptive performance of associative learning behavior by means of theta synchronization.