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Sample records for rico dominican republic

  1. Rayleigh wave group-velocity across the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, D.; Pulliam, J.; Polanco Rivera, E.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.

    2017-12-01

    The eastern North America-Caribbean (NA-CAR) plate boundary near the islands of Hispaniola (which is comprised of the Dominican Republic and Haiti) and Puerto Rico is a complex transition zone in which strain is accommodated by two transform fault systems and oblique subduction. In 2013, scientists from Baylor University, the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo, and the Puerto Rico Seismic Network deployed 16 broadband stations on the Dominican Republic to expand the local permanent network. The goal of the Greater Antilles Seismic Program (GrASP) is to combine its data with that from permanent networks in Puerto Rico, Haiti, Cuba, the Cayman Islands, and Jamaica to develop a better understanding of the crust and upper mantle structure in the Northeastern Caribbean (Greater Antilles). One important goal of GrASP is to develop robust velocity models that can be used to improve earthquake location and seismic hazard efforts. In this study, we focus on obtaining Rayleigh wave group velocity maps from ambient noise tomography. By cross-correlating ambient seismic noise recorded at 53 stations between 2010 to present, we obtain Green's functions between 1165 pairs of stations. From these, we obtain dispersion curves by the application of FTAN methods with phase-matched filtering. Selection criteria depend on the signal-to-noise ratio and seasonal variability, with further filtering done by rejecting velocities incompatible with maps produced from overdamped tomographic inversions. Preliminary dispersion maps show strong correlations with large-scale geological and tectonic features for periods between 5 - 20 s, such as the Cordillera Central in both the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, the Mona Passage, and the NA-CAR subduction zone. Ongoing efforts focus on including shorter periods in Puerto Rico as its denser station distribution could allow us to retrieve higher resolution group velocity maps.

  2. Ethnogeological Cultural Model of Karst Derived from Traditional Knowledge in Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.; Semken, S. C.; Brandt, E.

    2017-12-01

    Ethnogeology is the scientific study of human relationships with and knowledge of the Earth system, and is typically investigated within the context of a specific culture. Many indigenous and local systems of environmental and place knowledge incorporate empirical observations and culturally framed interpretations of geological features and processes. Ethnogeological interpretations may differ from those of conventional mainstream geoscience, but they are validated by their direct relevance to long-term cultural and environmental resilience and sustainability, typically in challenging environments. Ethnogeologic findings can enrich geoscientific knowledge bases for further research, and inform place-based geoscience education that has been shown to engage and enrich students from diverse underrepresented minority backgrounds. Ethnogeological research blends methods from field geology with methods from field ethnography: such as participant observation, free listing, participatory mapping, and cultural consensus analysis among other methods from rapid participatory assessment. We report here on an ongoing field study in Puerto Rico (PR) and the Dominican Republic (DR) on ethnogeological knowledge of karst topography, geology, and hydrogeology among local cultural indigenous communities such as the Boricua jíbaro and the Dominican campesino. Applied focused ethnographic fieldwork results suggest a good fit for the cultural consensus model about geological processes among culturally expert consultants in DR (4.604) and PR (4.669), as well as competence average with values of 0.552 and 0.628 respectively. This suggests the existence of a regional cultural model for the domain of karst that is shared between PR and DR populations that reside in or near karst terrain. Additional data in support of the cultural model include stories, analogies, and family history using participant observation, and participatory mapping.

  3. Race and nation in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel Baud

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Coloring the Nation: Race and Ethnicity in the Dominican Republic. DAVID HOWARD. Oxford: Signal; Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2001. x + 227 pp. (Paper US$ 19.95 Race and Politics in the Dominican Republic. ERNESTO SAGAS. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2000. xii + 161 pp. (Cloth US$ 49.95, Paper US$ 24.95 Peasants and Religion: A Socioeconomic Study of Dios Olivorio and the Palma Sola Movement in the Dominican Republic. JAN LUNDIUS & MATS LUNDAHL. London: Routledge, 2000. xxvi + 774 pp. (Cloth US$ 135.00 The social and political relations between the Dominican Republic and Haiti, and especially their racial and ethnic contents, are extremely difficult to approach in an even- handed and unbiased way. Much ink has been spilled over the conflictive relations between these two countries, and on race relations in the Dominican Republic. Much of what has been said must be considered unfounded or biased, not to mention sensationalist. The books under review try to pro vide new insights into the issue and at the same time to steer clear of these problems.

  4. TAX EXPENDITURES IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Jenkins; Chun-Yan Kuo

    2004-01-01

    This paper takes a broad approach in the sense that only the fundamental structure elements of each tax system are considered as part of the benchmark tax system. Moreover, this paper will go beyond the traditional tax expenditure reporting by taking into account an ideal tax system with minor distortions as part of the benchmark. Because of having an ideal tax system as a norm, the report makes some judgments about the appropriateness of the ideal tax structure in the Dominican Republic and ...

  5. Renewable energy projects in the Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viani, B.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a US/Dominican Republic program to develop renewable energy projects in the country. The objective is to demonstrate the commercial viability of renewable energy generation projects, primarily small-scale wind and hydropower. Preliminary studies are completed for three micro-hydro projects with a total capacity of 262 kWe, and two small wind power projects for water pumping. In addition wind resource assessment is ongoing, and professional training and technical assistance to potential investors is ongoing. Projects goals include not less than ten small firms actively involved in installation of such systems by September 1998.

  6. Culture care meanings, beliefs, and practices in Rural Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Gretchen

    2010-04-01

    This ethnonursing study explored the meanings, beliefs, and practices of care for rural Dominicans in the Dominican Republic. Leininger's culture care diversity and universality theory, ethnonursing, and four-phase analysis method guided the study. Interviews were conducted with 19 general and 10 key informants. Analysis of interviews revealed three main themes: (a) family presence is essential for meaningful care experiences and care practices, (b) respect and attention are central to the meaning of care and care practices, and (c) rural Dominicans value and use both generic (folk) and professional care practices. Implications and recommendations for nursing practice, education, and research are described.

  7. Area Handbook Series: Dominican Republic and Haiti: Country Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    state) gover- nors appointed by president; municipalities (counties) governed by elected mayors and municipal councils. Politics: Following...Bibliography.) 73 Chapter 3. Dominican Republic: The Economy yj The Plaza del Mercado , Puerto P/a,, ca. 18(73 LONG DEPENDENT ON SUGAR, the Dominican...tribunal and courts of appeal. Justices of the peace exist in each municipality and in the National District. The Constitu- tion also mandates a court

  8. Wave Analysis Study for the Punta Catalina Jetty, Dominican Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Mads Sønderstrup; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    This report deals with a two-dimensional test study to identify the largest significant wave height, the maximum wave height and the largest crest level along the Punta Catalina jetty in the Dominican Republic. The scale used for the model tests was 1:50. Unless otherwise specified all values given...

  9. Mycena sect. Hygrocyboideae in the mountains of the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jean Lodge; B.A. Perry; D.E. Desjardin

    2004-01-01

    A collection of Mycena epipterygia from montane cloud forest in the Dominican Republic was found to have one-fourth to one-half monosporous basidia mixed with bisporous basidia. It is described as a new variety, M. epipterygia var. domingensis Lodge, differing from M. epipterygia var. epipterygioides and other two-spored varieties in having smaller dimensions of spores...

  10. Tourism Labor, Embodied Suffering, and the Deportation Regime in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark; Colón-Burgos, José Félix; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Matiz-Reyes, Armando; Parker, Caroline Mary

    2018-04-17

    In this article, we use syndemic theory to examine socio-structural factors that result in heightened vulnerability to HIV infection and drug addiction among Dominican deportees who survive post-deportation through informal tourism labor. Through an ongoing NIDA-funded ethnographic study of the syndemic of HIV and problematic drug use among men involved in tourism labor in the Dominican Republic, we argue that the legal and political-economic context of the global deportation regime contributes to structural vulnerabilities among deportees in the Dominican Republic, most of whom are men with histories of incarceration in the United States and/or Puerto Rico. While Dominican laws and institutional practices work conjointly with foreign policies to reconfigure non-criminal deportees as hardened criminals unworthy of full citizenship rights, the informal tourism economy provides one of the few absorption points for male deportee labor, linking the deportation regime directly to the Caribbean tourism industry. © 2018 by the American Anthropological Association.

  11. Some Economic Determinants of Haitian Migration to the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Lundahl

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Este ensayo identifica algunos de los principales factores económicos tras la migración de trabajadores rurales haitianos a la República Dominicana. Sobre el trasfondo de las deplorables condiciones de vida y de trabajo enfrentadas por los trabajadores a su llegada, algunas teorías económicas sobre la decisión de migrar son esbozadas y las características de los trabajadores haitianos, de acuerdo a estudios de campo, son presentadas. Después de esto se resume la información más importante en relación con la pobreza rural en Haití y se presenta una explicación basada en la interacción entre crecimiento poblacional y erosión de la tierra, haciendo énfasis en los aspectos de la pobreza relacionados con el ciclo de vida. El ensayo concluye con una aplicación del modelo de migración de Harris-Todaro sobre los datos empíricos. English: The essay identifies some key economic factors behind the migration of Haitian agricultural workers to the Dominican Republic. Against the background of the deplorable working and living conditions facing the workers on their arrival, some economic theories of the migration decision are sketched and the characteristics of the Haitian workers, as they emerge from field studies, are presented. Thereafter the most important information with respect to rural poverty in Haiti is summarized and an explanation that runs in terms of the interaction between population growth and soil erosion is presented and the life-cycle aspects of poverty are highlighted. The essay concludes with an application of the Harris-Todaro model of migration to the empirical data.

  12. Radiopharmaceutical therapy in Dominican Republic. Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johny Osvaldo de los Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper we present experience in Dominican Republic on Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. In our country, there are 8 Center with Nuclear Medicine Department. Only, 7 centers are working with Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. Radioiodine treatment with I-131 in Thyroid diseases(Thyroid Cancer and Hyperthyroidism). This is only Nuclear Medicine therapy available in Dominican Republic. The objectives of this paper are to analyze and assess the difficulties and facilities for the development of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in Dominican Republic. We made surveys with the help of Nuclear Medicine Physicians of different Nuclear Medicine departments. 8 Nuclear Physicians accepted the interview. Two of these Nuclear Medicine Centers are Department of a Cancer Center and they have many patients for therapies. In the majority opinion of Physicians, Cost of Radiopharmaceuticals is principal problem to use Therapy in Dominican Republic. In addition the following problems were identified: Lack of awareness about new therapy in Nuclear Medicine among Physicians of other specialties, lack of adequate training in the current trends of radionuclide therapy and finally lack of basic infrastructure, equipment and finances to buy radiopharmaceuticals and introduce radionuclide therapy. For this reason, Nuclear Medicine Centers prefer to work with only I-131 Therapy and they do not have new programs to start other therapies. In the near future, our department of Nuclear Medicine will work with I-131, pain palliation, treatment of metastatic disease and Treatment of benign diseases. We have interest in offering other therapies in the department and we hope that other departments with more resources, have the same interest, to enhance practice of radionuclide therapy in our country. (author)

  13. Capacity-Building Programs Under the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States signed the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) in August 2004 with five Central American countries (Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua) and the Dominican Republic.

  14. Decontamination gives an brachytherapy installation in the Oncological Institute Dr. Heriberto Pieter, Sacred Domingo, Republic Of the Dominican Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valconi, G.; Sbriz, L.; Prendes, M.; Jova, L.

    1998-01-01

    The work refers of the process carried out by the Cuban and Dominican experts for the decontamination process in the local located destined to the brachytherapy applications in the Oncological Hospital Dr. Heriberto Pieter in Santo Domingo, of the Dominican Republic

  15. Protecting paradise: tourism and AIDS in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, S; Hasbún, J; Butler de Lister, M

    1998-09-01

    This study summarizes results from six data collection instruments administered to tourists, hotel workers, and commercial sex workers (CSWs) in the Dominican Republic (D.R.). The objective of this study was to assess: 1. how HIV/AIDS may affect tourism; 2. how tourists are likely to react to prevention campaigns; and 3. how tourism may affect the spread of HIV/AIDS. It was found that an overwhelming proportion of tourists did not consider the prevalence of HIV to be a factor when making their travel plans, and that most did not consider themselves at greater risk of becoming infected while on holiday than when they were at home. This study determined that the spread of HIV/AIDS was unlikely to affect the demand for tourism services in the D.R. The study also found that most tourists would respond positively to an HIV/AIDS prevention campaign and would not be discouraged from visiting the D.R. because of such campaigns. Those most receptive to prevention efforts were also those who felt they were at highest risk, according to study data. Finally, it was determined that while most tourists probably do not engage in high risk activities, there were some male and female tourists who do engage in sexual encounters with multiple Dominican CSWs and hotel employees. These encounters represent a risk to the health and economic development of the D.R., as well as to tourists and their other sexual partners. Based on these findings, it is recommended that in order to minimize the potential social and economic impact of HIV/AIDS in the D.R., prevention messages need to reach a number of groups which have not yet been adequately targeted. These groups include tourists, with a special emphasis on 'sex tourists', and hotel employees, with a special emphasis on entertainment staff.

  16. Follow-up measles campaign in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The Dominican Republic conducted a national follow-up measles vaccination campaign 6 weeks after sustaining heavy damage from Hurricane Georges, on November 6-12, targeting 830,517 children aged 9 months to 5 years in 29 provinces and the capital city. This campaign was the first mass vaccination effort in the country, following the beginning of the decentralized delivery of health services. Priority was given to vaccinating against diphtheria, whooping cough, and tetanus, especially in refugee camps. More than 500,000 vaccines were given to different age groups, with almost 100,000 of those immunized under 5 years old. Children aged 9 months to 5 years were targeted for immunization regardless of their vaccination status. At the same time, children aged 2 months through 2 years were immunized against poliomyelitis. Vaccination activities were continued until the entire target population was reached and no important side effects have thus far been reported. The government of Mexico donated 300,000 doses of measles vaccine, while other vaccines for the campaign were acquired through the PAHO Revolving Fund for Vaccine Procurement. The decentralized implementation of this campaign allowed the population to actively participate and the resulting high vaccination coverage rates.

  17. The HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the Dominican Republic: Key Contributing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Patria; Malow, Robert; Ruffin, Beverly; Rothe, Eugenio M; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews HIV/AIDS epidemiological data and recent research conducted in the Dominican Republic, with a focus on explaining the variability in estimated seroincidence and prevalence within the country. HIV seroprevalence estimates range from 1.0% (in the general population) to 11.0% among men who have sex with men (MSM). Some have indicated that the highest HIV seroprevalence occurs in Haitian enclaves called bateyes (US Agency for International Development [USAID], 2008), which are migrant worker shantytowns primarily serving the sugar industry in the Dominican Republic. Others report higher or comparable rates to the bateyes in areas related to the tourism and sex industries. As in other Caribbean and Latin American countries, reported HIV transmission in the Dominican Republic is predominantly due to unprotected heterosexual sex and the infection rate has been increasing disproportionally among women. The Dominican Republic represents two thirds of the Hispaniola island; the western one third is occupied by Haiti, the nation with the highest HIV prevalence in the western hemisphere. Although data is limited, it shows important differences in seroprevalence and incidence between these two countries, but commonalities such as poverty, gender inequalities, and stigma appear to be pivotal factors driving the epidemic. This article will discuss these and other factors that may contribute to the HIV epidemic in the Dominican Republic, as well as highlight the gaps in the literature and provide recommendations to guide further work in this area, particularly in the role of governance in sustainable HIV prevention.

  18. The New Roles of the Dominican Armed Forces in the Dominican Republic National Security Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arias, Jose D

    2007-01-01

    ... in the 2005 National Security Plan. The resulting analysis provides a basis for determining what the new roles of the Dominican Armed Forces and the National Police should be for the 21st century...

  19. 77 FR 15397 - Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... lack thereof denied workers their rights under the laws of the Dominican Republic relating to freedom of association, the right to organize, child labor, forced labor, the right to bargain collectively... (``submissions'') regarding labor law matters in Central America and the Dominican Republic. A Federal Register...

  20. The New Policy on Higher Education of the Government of the Dominican Republic: Some Descriptive and Evaluative Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Miguel Jose

    The purpose of this report is to analyze a new higher education policy adoped by the Dominican Republic in Decree 1255 of 1983, "Regulations for Private Higher Education." Geographical, historical, and political characteristics of the Dominican Republic are described, and theoretical and methodological considerations in the study of…

  1. 76 FR 41857 - Petition Under Section 302 on Alleged Expropriations by the Dominican Republic; Decision Not To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... Expropriations by the Dominican Republic; Decision Not To Initiate Investigation AGENCY: Office of the United... (``Section 301'') with respect to alleged expropriations without adequate compensation by the Government of... expropriations without adequate compensation by the Government of the Dominican Republic. The petition states...

  2. Tobacco use in the Dominican Republic: understanding the culture first.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, A M; Ossip-Klein, D J; Diaz, S; Chin, N P; Sierra, E; Quiñones, Z; Dye, T D; McIntosh, S; Armstrong, L

    2006-06-01

    To conduct formative research on the landscape of tobacco use to guide survey and subsequent intervention development in the Dominican Republic (DR). Rapid Assessment Procedures, systematic qualitative methods (participant-observations, in-depth interviewing, focus groups) using bilingual mixed age and gendered teams from the United States and DR. Over 160 adults (men and women), ages 18 to 90 years, current, former and never smokers, community members and leaders from six underserved, economically disadvantaged DR communities. Key domains: tobacco use patterns and attitudes; factors affecting smoking initiation, continuation, quitting; perceived risks/benefits/effects of smoking; and awareness/effects of advertising/regulations. Perceptions of prevalence varied widely. While "everybody" smokes, smokers or ex-smokers were sometimes difficult to find. Knowledge of health risks was limited to the newly mandated statement "Fumar es prejudicial para la salud" [Smoking is harmful to your health]. Smokers started due to parents, peers, learned lifestyle, fashion or as something to do. Smoking served as an escape, relaxation or diversion. Quit attempts relied on personal will, primarily for religious or medical reasons. Social smoking (custom or habit) (lifestyle choice rather than a vice or addiction. Out of respect, smokers selected where they smoked and around whom. Health care providers typically were reactive relative to tobacco cessation, focusing on individuals with smoking related conditions. Tobacco advertising was virtually ubiquitous. Anti-tobacco messages were effectively absent. Cultures of smoking and not smoking coexisted absent a culture of quitting. Systematic qualitative methods provided pertinent information about tobacco attitudes and use to guide subsequent project steps. Integrating qualitative then quantitative research can be replicated in similar countries that lack empirical data on the cultural dimensions of tobacco use.

  3. An Island Drifting Apart. Why Haiti is mired in poverty while the Dominican Republic forges ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankema, E.H.P.; Masé, A.

    2014-01-01

    The 2010 earthquake in Haiti has exposed the extreme vulnerability of a society where the state and the economy simultaneously fail to deliver. The Dominican Republic has witnessed several phases of rapid economic growth since the 1870s and, from the 1970s onwards, a sustained process of political

  4. An Island Drifting Apart. Why Haiti is mired in poverty while the Dominican Republic forges ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankema, E.H.P.; Masé, A.

    The 2010 earthquake in Haiti has exposed the extreme vulnerability of a society where the state and the economy simultaneously fail to deliver. The Dominican Republic has witnessed several phases of rapid economic growth since the 1870s and, from the 1970s onwards, a sustained process of political

  5. An Island Drifting Apart : Why Haiti mires in poverty while the Dominican Republic forges ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frankema, E.H.P.; Masé, A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The 2010 earthquake in Haiti has exposed the extreme vulnerability of a people living in a country where the state and the economy simultaneously fail to deliver. Haiti’s neighbor, the Dominican Republic, has witnessed several phases of strong economic growth since the 1870s and an

  6. Tuberculosis patients in the Dominican Republic face severe direct and indirect costs and need social protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauch, V.M.C.; Melgen, R.; Marcelino, B.; Acosta, I.; Klinkenberg, E.; Suarez, P.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine direct and indirect costs incurred by new, retreatment, and multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) patients in the Dominican Republic before and during diagnosis, and during treatment, to generate an evidence base and formulate recommendations. METHODS: The "Tool to

  7. Critical metals (REE, Sc, PGE) in Ni laterites from Cuba and the Dominican Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aiglsperger, T.; Proenza, J. A.; Lewis, J. F.; Labrador, M.; Svojtka, Martin; Rojas-Purón, A.; Longo, F.; Ďurišová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, March 01 (2016), s. 127-147 ISSN 0169-1368 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Caribbean * Cuba * Dominican Republic * Falcondo mining area * Moa Bay mining area * Ni laterite * Platinum Group Elements * Rare Earth Elements * Scandium Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.095, year: 2016

  8. Paradise in the dark: Dominican Republic, holiday island; Paradies im Dunkeln: Ferieninsel Dominikanische Republik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, J.

    2004-05-01

    The contribution describes travels through the Dominican Republic, where electric power is often failing and renewables are hard to spot. (orig.) [German] 'All inclusive' ist das Motto der Ferieninsel Dominikanische Republik. Nicht immer inklusive ist allerdings Strom und schon gar nicht aus erneuerbaren Energiequellen. Tagebuch einer Reise durch ein Land, in dem es an Energie fehlt. (orig.)

  9. Medical mission to dominican republic: one dermatology group?s experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Atif; Peine, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The intents of this article are to share our experiences during a medical mission in the Dominican Republic and to provide the reader with a cross-sectional view of conditions seen and an overview of interesting and challenging cases encountered. We also discuss treatments and techniques used and share lessons learned. 2013.

  10. High depth, whole-genome sequencing of cholera isolates from Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealfon, Rachel; Gire, Stephen; Ellis, Crystal; Calderwood, Stephen; Qadri, Firdausi; Hensley, Lisa; Kellis, Manolis; Ryan, Edward T; LaRocque, Regina C; Harris, Jason B; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2012-09-11

    Whole-genome sequencing is an important tool for understanding microbial evolution and identifying the emergence of functionally important variants over the course of epidemics. In October 2010, a severe cholera epidemic began in Haiti, with additional cases identified in the neighboring Dominican Republic. We used whole-genome approaches to sequence four Vibrio cholerae isolates from Haiti and the Dominican Republic and three additional V. cholerae isolates to a high depth of coverage (>2000x); four of the seven isolates were previously sequenced. Using these sequence data, we examined the effect of depth of coverage and sequencing platform on genome assembly and identification of sequence variants. We found that 50x coverage is sufficient to construct a whole-genome assembly and to accurately call most variants from 100 base pair paired-end sequencing reads. Phylogenetic analysis between the newly sequenced and thirty-three previously sequenced V. cholerae isolates indicates that the Haitian and Dominican Republic isolates are closest to strains from South Asia. The Haitian and Dominican Republic isolates form a tight cluster, with only four variants unique to individual isolates. These variants are located in the CTX region, the SXT region, and the core genome. Of the 126 mutations identified that separate the Haiti-Dominican Republic cluster from the V. cholerae reference strain (N16961), 73 are non-synonymous changes, and a number of these changes cluster in specific genes and pathways. Sequence variant analyses of V. cholerae isolates, including multiple isolates from the Haitian outbreak, identify coverage-specific and technology-specific effects on variant detection, and provide insight into genomic change and functional evolution during an epidemic.

  11. High depth, whole-genome sequencing of cholera isolates from Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sealfon Rachel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-genome sequencing is an important tool for understanding microbial evolution and identifying the emergence of functionally important variants over the course of epidemics. In October 2010, a severe cholera epidemic began in Haiti, with additional cases identified in the neighboring Dominican Republic. We used whole-genome approaches to sequence four Vibrio cholerae isolates from Haiti and the Dominican Republic and three additional V. cholerae isolates to a high depth of coverage (>2000x; four of the seven isolates were previously sequenced. Results Using these sequence data, we examined the effect of depth of coverage and sequencing platform on genome assembly and identification of sequence variants. We found that 50x coverage is sufficient to construct a whole-genome assembly and to accurately call most variants from 100 base pair paired-end sequencing reads. Phylogenetic analysis between the newly sequenced and thirty-three previously sequenced V. cholerae isolates indicates that the Haitian and Dominican Republic isolates are closest to strains from South Asia. The Haitian and Dominican Republic isolates form a tight cluster, with only four variants unique to individual isolates. These variants are located in the CTX region, the SXT region, and the core genome. Of the 126 mutations identified that separate the Haiti-Dominican Republic cluster from the V. cholerae reference strain (N16961, 73 are non-synonymous changes, and a number of these changes cluster in specific genes and pathways. Conclusions Sequence variant analyses of V. cholerae isolates, including multiple isolates from the Haitian outbreak, identify coverage-specific and technology-specific effects on variant detection, and provide insight into genomic change and functional evolution during an epidemic.

  12. 77 FR 36578 - Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... enforcement of the GODR's laws related to freedom of association, the right to organize, child labor, forced... containing allegations of labor rights violations should specify: (a) which Dominican labor law related to... in the sugar sector their rights under the laws of the Dominican Republic relating to freedom of...

  13. Citizen or Subordinate: Permutations of Belonging in the United States and the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaina Aber

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Dominican Republic and the United States have both experienced tensions arising from migratory flows from poorer, less stable neighbors. Until recently, both countries had constitutions which conferred citizenship by birth with very limited exceptions. Despite these similarities, their respective discourses around jus soli citizenship, particularly for the children of unauthorized migrants from the poorer neighboring countries, have manifested in different ways. The identity of the United States as a nation of immigrants has limited the success of campaigns to revoke jus soli citizenship for the children of unauthorized immigrants, but the persistent articulation of this idea as a response to illegal migration has shifted the parameters of the immigration debate. In the Dominican Republic, the historical construction of national identity and anti-Haitian discourse has led to an evolution in Dominican law which codifies already established practices that deny citizenship to children of Haitian migrants. In both cases, movements that support more inclusive understandings of societal belonging, like the DREAMers in the United States and youth movements in the Dominican Republic, may offer the most effective way of protecting universal jus soli citizenship regimes. 

  14. Intimate Encounters: Affective Economies in Cuba and the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia L. Cabezas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on research in Cuba and the Dominican Republic this paper explores the uses of intimacy in both the corporate sector and in romantic relationships. I use research with hotel workers and with people involved in sexual-affective exchanges connected to tourism to link intimacy to the political economic structures of transnational tourism. These are new spaces of analysis that present practices of transnational corporategenerated intimacy that combine love – or the exploitation of worker’s emotions − and labour. The central aim is to intertwine the intimate with the global, from the formal customer service policies of transnational hotels with the informal, on-the-ground, intimate encounters between tourists and hospitality workers. The commercialization of intimacy, including sexual-affective relations in the delivery of hospitality services, is linked to political and economic processes that are part of transnational tourism practices. This paper challenges the notion that sex tourism and sex work are individualistic practices that exist outside of the spaces of corporate global profit. It further posits that relationships where money is exchanged are not necessarily devoid of care and intimacy.Resumen: Encuentros íntimos: economías afectivas en Cuba y República Dominicana A partir de investigaciones en Cuba y la República Dominicana, este trabajo explora los usos de la intimidad, tanto en el sector empresarial como en las relaciones románticas. Se hicieron investigaciones entre trabajadores de hostelería y personas involucradas en el intercambio afectivosexual relacionado con el turismo con el fin de vincular la intimidad de las estructuras políticoeconómicas del turismo transnacional. Estos son nuevos espacios de análisis que las prácticas de las empresas transnacionales generan por el uso de la intimidad que combinan el amor – o la explotación de las emociones del trabajador – y la mano de obra. El objetivo central

  15. HIV Risk Behavior among Youth in the Dominican Republic: The Role of Alcohol and Other Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jaccard, James; Lushin, Viktor; Martinez, Roberto; Gonzalez, Bernardo; McCarthy, Katharine

    2011-01-01

    Existing literature related to HIV in the Dominican Republic has tended to neglect the unique role of tourism areas as distinct ecologies facilitative of sexual risk behavior, particularly HIV vulnerability and transmission. Furthermore, limited attention has focused on Dominican adolescents living in close proximity to tourism areas who have become increasingly exposed to alcohol due to the expanding tourism industry in the Dominican Republic. While most previous analyses of the effects of alcohol on adolescent sexual risk behavior have focused on the transient effects of alcohol on judgment and decision making, the effects of chronic alcohol use on sexual behavior has been a neglected area of research. Our study explores the relationship between chronic alcohol use, the parent-adolescent relationship, affective factors such as self-esteem, and intentions to engage in sex. We examine the above factors within the context of tourism areas which represent a unique ecology of alcohol availability and consumption and HIV risk. We discuss implications for developing applied family-based programs to target Dominican adolescent alcohol use and sexual risk behavior in tourism areas of high alcohol exposure.

  16. Determinants of primary school enrollment in Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Gönsch, Iris

    2011-01-01

    Education is considered an important means of alleviating poverty and of improving an individual's job and earnings prospects. Nevertheless, in Haiti and the Dominican Republic school enrollment is far from complete and shows notable regional variation. This paper analyzes determinants of primary school enrollment and investigates to what extent differences in schooling are due to individual factors compared to family or community influences. Using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys...

  17. [Some aspects of the relationship between population and ecology in the Dominican Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Billini, B A

    1974-01-01

    This article discusses problems of environmental contamination and natural resource availability and conservation in the Dominican Republic. The major environmental problem at present is fecal contamination of the soil and water as a consequence of lack of sanitary facilities and poor hygiene in the rural areas and marginal neighborhoods of cities. A variety of parasites, amoebas, and pathologic bacteria thrive in this environment and are a particular threat in densely populated urban areas. Contamination of soil and water by organic and inorganic wastes, of which Santo Domingo alone produces 1,200,000 pounds daily, is another problem that has not been resolved in the Dominican Republic or in many developed countries. Contamination of soil by fertilizers and of the coastal waters by oil and petroleum products and raw sewage are growing problems. Air pollution in the capital has increased with the number of cars and the growth of industry, adding to the seriousness of respiratory and industrial health problems. It is common to hear in discussions of the population problem of the Dominican Republic that yet unexploited resources will support a larger future population. However, the sea is becoming contaminated, the exact amounts of mineral resources are unknown, and it is unclear whether the fruits of present exploitation are being wisely invested to support future development. Vast despoliation of the mountainous forests has occurred in mining zones, threatening the rivers that flow from these areas, and deforestation caused by population pressure is another serious problem. The Dominican Republic has 318 persons/sq km compared to 47 in Latin America as a whole. It is estimated that 100% of the cultivable land will be utilized by 1985. Despite serious efforts, agricultural production has not kept pace with population growth.

  18. Perception of beekeepers about the melliferous plants from the Dry Forest of the Northwest (Dominican Republic).

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas May; Sesar Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    The melliferous flora honey and its flowering in the subtropical dry forest area of the Northwest, of the Dominican Republic were studied. A survey of 30 local beekeepers as well as four semi-structured interviews on important plants for beekeeping were applied. Plants were scored according to their importance by observation is confirmed in the field visits bees species observed and consulted information secondary on flowering dates and features honey, secondary data, and applied the index Ja...

  19. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Bronchial Asthma in Children in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Stephanie G; Ramphul, Kamleshun

    2018-02-20

    Background Bronchial asthma is an important health problem worldwide. There is insufficient data on the prevalence of bronchial asthma among school children in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Objective The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of asthma and its related risk factors among school children in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study using a modified questionnaire was conducted in Santo Domingo among 600 children aged three to 11 eleven years. The prevalence of asthma and its associated risk factors such as birth order, family history of asthma, family history of allergy, exposure to pets at home, exposure to tobacco smoke, and source of fuel used at home were collected. The relevant data collected was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 24.0. (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY) software. Results The prevalence of asthma was found to be 22.0%. Age, family history of asthma, family history of allergy, exposure to tobacco smoke, and birth order showed statistical significance. The source of fuel used at home, gender, and exposure to pets were not statistically significant to be considered as risk factors associated with asthma in the population studied. Conclusion With an asthma prevalence of 22.0% in the pediatric population, the Dominican Republic has one of the highest national rates of asthma in the pediatric population in Latin America. Proper education, screening, and prevention can help lower the burden of this disease economically and socially.

  20. Clinical Progress in the Management of Tetralogy of Fallot in the Dominican Republic: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, María T; Vázquez, Marietta; Canarie, Michael F; Toribio, Janet; León-Wyss, Juan

    2017-09-01

    Definitive surgical interventions for Dominican children with congenital heart disease, like those of other low- and middle-income countries, have been historically limited. We undertook review of a case series focusing on the surgical correction of complex forms of tetralogy of Fallot at a single center, CEDIMAT Centro Cardiovascular, in the Dominican Republic, over a 30-month period. According to our criteria, 43 cases were determined to be complex tetralogy of Fallot repairs from the two-year period. Besides tetralogy of Fallot, the cohort had an additional 55 anatomic anomalies that had to be addressed at the time of surgery. Median age at the time of surgery was notably 30 months, and an average of 42 months elapsed from the time of diagnosis to the time of surgery for this group. Only 33% of the cases reviewed had no hypercyanotic crises before repair. Median time to extubation for this group of patients was one day, with a three-day median length of stay in the intensive care setting. Our study importantly captures the present experience of a surgical congenital heart program that has recently transitioned from a traditional "mission model" to a now self-sustaining local practice. Both the number and the complexity of the lesions corrected in this caseload represent an advance from the level of care previously provided to children in the Dominican Republic.

  1. Social stressors, social support, and mental health among Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie N. Kaiser

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This mixed-method study explored the social world of Haitian migrants, examining forms of social support and social stress, as well as their relationship to mental health. Among six Haitian migrant communities in the Cibao Valley of the Dominican Republic, a community-based survey (n = 127 was conducted to assess migration experiences, current stressors, mental health, and functioning. In addition, to explore perceptions and experiences of migration, social interactions, and mental health, the study drew upon in-depth interviews and free-listing activities among Haitian migrants, as well as cognitive interviews with select survey participants. Depressive, anxiety, and mental distress survey scores were associated with 1 negative social interactions (including interrogation or deportation, perceived mistreatment by Dominicans, and overcrowding and 2 lack of social support, including migrating alone. Mental distress scores were higher among women, and being married was associated with higher anxiety scores, potentially reflecting unmet social expectations. In qualitative data, participants emphasized a lack of social support, often referred to as tèt ansanm (literally meaning "heads together" in Haitian Creole or Kreyòl and roughly defined as solidarity or reciprocal social collaboration. The authors of the study propose that the practice of tèt ansanm-also termed konbit, and, in the Dominican Republic, convite-could be used as a means of facilitating positive-contact events among Haitians and Dominicans. These interactions could help counteract social stress and build social capital in settings similar to those of the study.

  2. Globalizing Occupational Therapy: Bridging Gaps in the Pediatric Care of the Dominican Republic, through Education in School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croussett, Yaritza Esthela

    2016-01-01

    In the past, many measures have been taken in the Dominican Republic to address the functional outcomes of a school-aged child with a disability. However, none of these measures have explored or addressed function within context. Under the current paradigm used in the Dominican Republic, similar to the medical model, provision of therapy services…

  3. The Agency's technical co-operation programme with Dominican Republic 1983-1993 country programme summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a review of the Agency's technical co-operation activities in Dominican Republic carried out during 1983-1993. In terms of coverage and analytical depth, country programmes summaries stand somewhere midway between in-depth country programme evaluations and individual project evaluations. They attempt to provide a comprehensive, descriptive picture of the Agency's co-operation with a Member State in a manner that will be particularly useful for programming decisions. The attempt is very much to describe - largely through statistical data - not to provide independent analysis and evaluation

  4. G6PD Deficiency in an HIV Clinic Setting in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Julia Z.; Francis, Richard O.; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel E.; Shirazi, Maryam; Jobanputra, Vaidehi; Hod, Eldad A.; Jhang, Jeffrey S.; Stotler, Brie A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Nicholas, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Because human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients receive prophylaxis with oxidative drugs, those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may experience hemolysis. However, G6PD deficiency has not been studied in the Dominican Republic, where many individuals have African ancestry. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Dominican HIV-infected patients and to attempt to develop a cost-effective algorithm for identifying such individuals. To this end, histories, chart reviews, and G6PD testing were performed for 238 consecutive HIV-infected adult clinic patients. The overall prevalence of G6PD deficiency (8.8%) was similar in males (9.3%) and females (8.5%), and higher in Haitians (18%) than Dominicans (6.4%; P = 0.01). By logistic regression, three clinical variables predicted G6PD status: maternal country of birth (P = 0.01) and a history of hemolysis (P = 0.01) or severe anemia (P = 0.03). Using these criteria, an algorithm was developed, in which a patient subset was identified that would benefit most from G6PD screening, yielding a sensitivity of 94.7% and a specificity of 97.2%, increasing the pretest probability (8.8–15.1%), and halving the number of patients needing testing. This algorithm may provide a cost-effective strategy for improving care in resource-limited settings. PMID:26240158

  5. A study of the dry forest communities in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio García-Fuentes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a floristic and phytosociological study of the dry forest communities of the Dominican Republic. A total of 69 relevés in dry forest biotopes were carried out. The samples were subsequently subjected to Detrended Correspondence Analysis for the determination and study of possible groupings. The study does not cover tree formations growing on serpentines, nor the so-called semideciduous forests, peculiar to areas with higher rainfall. A total of nine phytocoenoses were identified. The most significant results led to the description of six new phytosociological associations: Simaroubetum berteroani(thorny dry forest on coastal dunes, Phyllostylo rhamnoidis-Prosopidetum juliflorae (southern Dominican disturbed dry forest, Consoleo moniliformis-Camerarietum linearifoliae(dry forest on hard limestones, Lemaireocereo hystricis-Prosopidetum juliflorae(northern Dominican disturbed dry forest, Lycio americani-Prosopidetum juliflorae (disturbed dry forest on saline soils and Guettardo ellipticae-Guapiretum discoloris (dry forest on flat-topped hillocks in Montecristi. This is an important step forward in the phytosociological and floristic studies of the Caribbean territories.

  6. A study of the dry forest communities in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fuentes, Antonio; Torres-Cordero, Juan A; Ruiz-Valenzuela, Luis; Lendínez-Barriga, María Lucía; Quesada-Rincón, Juan; Valle-Tendero, Francisco; Veloz, Alberto; León, Yolanda M; Salazar-Mendías, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    This paper is a floristic and phytosociological study of the dry forest communities of the Dominican Republic. A total of 69 relevés in dry forest biotopes were carried out. The samples were subsequently subjected to Detrended Correspondence Analysis for the determination and study of possible groupings. The study does not cover tree formations growing on serpentines, nor the so-called semideciduous forests, peculiar to areas with higher rainfall. A total of nine phytocoenoses were identified. The most significant results led to the description of six new phytosociological associations: Simaroubetum berteroani (thorny dry forest on coastal dunes), Phyllostylo rhamnoidis-Prosopidetum juliflorae (southern Dominican disturbed dry forest), Consoleo moniliformis-Camerarietum linearifoliae (dry forest on hard limestones), Lemaireocereo hystricis-Prosopidetum juliflorae (northern Dominican disturbed dry forest), Lycio americani-Prosopidetum juliflorae (disturbed dry forest on saline soils) and Guettardo ellipticae-Guapiretum discoloris (dry forest on flat-topped hillocks in Montecristi). This is an important step forward in the phytosociological and floristic studies of the Caribbean territories.

  7. [Elements of a better understanding and evaluation of population policy in the Dominican Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M M

    1974-01-01

    This work has 3 objectives: to clarify the concept of population policy, to examine different theoretical approaches to the analysis of a national population policy, and to describe the origin, development, and present characteristics of the population policy of the Dominican Republic. The concept of population policy is often confused with the related concepts of responsible parenthood, family planning, and birth or population control. Population policy may be defined as a coherent group of declarations, decisions, and actions following a rational strategy which, as part of a national development plan, is formulated and implemented by the state and additional social institutions in accordance with national needs. Its final goal is the protection and development of human resources through influencing population characteristics. Although recent attempts to apply the methods of political analysis to the area of population policy all suffer from limitations, 4 frameworks which respectively look at the 3 levels of population policy (the philosophic-ideologic, the scientific, and the practical); at the division of population policy into declarations, decisions, programs, and results; at criteria for evaluating the probability of success of a population policy; and at the stages of development of population policies in dependent countries can be of assistance in understanding and evaluating the population policy of the Dominican Republic. Until 1961, the end of the Trujillo era, a pronatalist attitude predominated in the Dominican Republic, prompted in part by fears of an aggressive and densely populated Haiti sharing the same island. From 1962-66, a gradual change in attitudes began in the private sector as various groups began quiet efforts at family planning and the Dominican Association for Family Welfare was formed and became an affiliate of the International Planned Parenthood Federation. During this stage the government remained neutral or offered quiet support

  8. User's perception of the contraceptive vaginal ring: a field study in Brazil and the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, E E; Reyes, Q; Gomez, F; Portes-Carrasco, R; Faúndes, A

    1983-11-01

    The basis for this report is home interviews of users of the contraceptive vaginal ring and the pill from urban and rural clinics in 2 provinces in the Dominican Republic and clinics from 2 towns and a large city in Brazil. Dominican ring users were significantly more likely to be older than pill users, to have more schooling, and have partners with more education. 6% were illiterate and 75% had only elementary education. 1/10 of the ring users reported having had problems with insertion of the ring and 1/5 had problems removing it. It may be worthwhile to try a narrower, more flexible model that may be easier to insert and remove. 1 out of every 6 users reported vaginal odor, 1 out of 8 reported having felt the ring move in their vagina, and 1/3 were aware of the ring at some time. About 1/2 the women in each country said the ring had changed color during use, and about 1/2 of those who reported the change did not like it. It became light gray and looked dirty. Correction may improve acceptance. 10% reported having expelled the ring. Twice as many ring users reported having menstrual problems. Ring and pill users both reported headaches, vaginal discharge, menstrual pain, and increased libido. A large proportion of ring and pill users experienced decreased duration and amount of menstrual bleeding, which was seen more as a beneficial than a negative effect. The same can be said for weight gain, which was "linked" by 89% of the women in the Dominican Republic. 64% of ring users and 67% of pill users described thier respective method as good or very good. Detailed instructions should accompany the final model. They should say that it is alright for the ring to be any place within tha vagina for it to be effective.

  9. Perceived discrimination, humiliation, and mental health: a mixed-methods study among Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Hunter M; Kaiser, Bonnie N; Foster, Jennifer W; Burgos Minaya, Rosa Y; Kohrt, Brandon A

    2015-01-01

    Many Haitian migrants live and work as undocumented laborers in the Dominican Republic. This study examines the legacy of anti-Haitian discrimination in the Dominican Republic and association of discrimination with mental health among Haitian migrants. This study used mixed methods to generate hypotheses for associations between discrimination and mental health of Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic. In-depth interviews were conducted with 21 Haitian and 18 Dominican community members and clinicians. One hundred and twenty-seven Haitian migrants participated in a pilot cross-sectional community survey. Instruments included culturally adapted Kreyòl versions of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and a locally developed function impairment scale. Haitian migrants described humiliation (imilyasyon) as a reason for mental distress and barrier to health care. Dominicans reported that discrimination (discriminación) was not a current social problem and attributed negative social interactions to sociocultural, behavioral, and biological differences between Dominicans and Haitians. These qualitative findings were supported in the quantitative analyses. Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with depression severity and functional impairment. Perceived mistreatment by Dominicans was associated with a 6.6-point increase in BDI score (90% confidence interval [CI]: 3.29, 9.9). Knowing someone who was interrogated or deported was associated with a 3.4-point increase in BAI score (90% CI: 0.22, 6.64). Both qualitative and quantitative methods suggest that perceived discrimination and the experience of humiliation contribute to Haitian migrant mental ill-health and limit access to health care. Future research should evaluate these associations and identify intervention pathways for both improved treatment access and reduction of discrimination-related health risk factors.

  10. Numerical tool for tsunami risk assessment in the southern coast of Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias Sanchez, J.; Llorente Isidro, M.; Ortega, S.; Gonzalez Vida, J. M., Sr.; Castro, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The southern coast of Dominican Republic is a very populated region, with several important cities including Santo Domingo, its capital. Important activities are rooted in the southern coast including tourism, industry, commercial ports, and, energy facilities, among others. According to historical reports, it has been impacted by big earthquakes accompanied by tsunamis as in Azua in 1751 and recently Pedernales in 2010, but their sources are not clearly identified. The aim of the present work is to develop a numerical tool to simulate the impact in the southern coast of the Dominican Republic of tsunamis generated in the Caribbean Sea. This tool, based on the Tsunami-HySEA model from EDANYA group (University of Malaga, Spain), could be used in the framework of a Tsunami Early Warning Systems due the very short computing times when only propagation is computed or it could be used to assess inundation impact, computing inundation with a initial 5 meter resolution. Numerical results corresponding to three theoretical sources are used to test the numerical tool.

  11. Traumatic Experience and Somatoform Dissociation Among Spirit Possession Practitioners in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffler, Yvonne; Cardeña, Etzel; Reijman, Sophie; Haluza, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies in African contexts have revealed a strong association between spirit possession and severe trauma, with inclusion into a possession cult serving at times a therapeutic function. Research on spirit possession in the Dominican Republic has so far not included quantitative studies of trauma and dissociation. This study evaluated demographic variables, somatoform dissociative symptoms, and potentially traumatizing events in the Dominican Republic with a group of Vodou practitioners that either do or do not experience spirit possession. Inter-group comparisons revealed that in contrast to non-possessed participants (n = 38), those experiencing spirit possession (n = 47) reported greater somatoform dissociation, more problems with sleep, and previous exposure to mortal danger such as assaults, accidents, or diseases. The two groups did not differ significantly in other types of trauma. The best predictor variable for group classification was somatoform dissociation, although those items could also reflect the experience of followers during a possession episode. A factor analysis across variables resulted in three factors: having to take responsibility early on in life and taking on a professional spiritual role; traumatic events and pain; and distress/dissociation. In comparison with the non-possessed individuals, the possessed ones did not seem to overall have a remarkably more severe story of trauma and seemed to derive economic gains from possession practice.

  12. Differential Vulnerability to Hurricanes in Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic: The Contribution of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelheid Pichler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The possible impacts of the level of formal education on different aspects of disaster management, prevention, alarm, emergency, or postdisaster activities, were studied in a comparative perspective for three countries with a comparable exposure to hurricane hazards but different capacities for preventing harm. The study focused on the role of formal education in reducing vulnerability operating through a long-term learning process and put particular emphasis on the education of women. The comparative statistical analysis of the three countries was complemented through qualitative studies in Cuba and the Dominican Republic collected in 2010-2011. We also analyzed to what degree targeted efforts to reduce vulnerability were interconnected with other policy domains, including education and science, health, national defense, regional development, and cultural factors. We found that better education in the population had clear short-term effects on reducing vulnerability through awareness about crucial information, faster and more efficient responses to alerts, and better postdisaster recuperation. However, there were also important longer term effects of educational efforts to reduce social vulnerability through the empowerment of women, its effect on the quality of institutions and social networks for mutual assistance creating a general culture of safety and preparedness. Not surprisingly, on all three accounts Cuba clearly did the best; whereas Haiti was worst, and the Dominican Republic took an intermediate position.

  13. Zika virus infection in 18 travellers returning from Surinam and the Dominican Republic, The Netherlands, November 2015-March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, Janneke W.; Goorhuis, Abraham; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Visser, Leo G.; Koopmans, Marion P.; Reimerink, Johan H.; Grobusch, Martin P.; van der Eijk, Annemiek A.; van den Kerkhof, Johannes H. C. T.; Reusken, Chantal B.; Hahné, Susan J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report 18 cases of confirmed Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in travellers returning to the Netherlands from Surinam (South America, bordering northern Brazil) and the Dominican Republic. In a multi-centre study, we collected epidemiological, virological and clinical characteristics, as well as data

  14. Cooperative of second degree. A necessity for the development of the agricultural cooperativismo of the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Luis Alfonso Alemán

    2015-06-01

    The same one was been of an investigation carried out with the purpose of elaborating a basic text for the program of cooperative formation that is executed in the mark of the consultantship work that is developed to the Agricultural Cooperative Project of Sustainable Development, “Toward a new Agrarian Reformation” that lidera and it coordinates the Agrarian Institute of the Dominican Republic.

  15. The genus Agaricus in the Caribbean. Nine new taxa mostly based on collections from the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis A. ​Parra; Claudio Angelini; Beatriz Ortiz-Santana; Gerardo Mata; Christophe Billette; Carlos Rojo; Jie Chen; Philippe. Callac

    2018-01-01

    Field collections of Agaricus were collected in the Dominican Republic from 2009–2016 with the intent to evaluate the diversity in this genus, which was quasi-unknown in this country. In the same period, studies on tropical Agaricus revealed tropical clades that remained unclassified. A new taxonomic system of classification...

  16. Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. An agreement by Exchange of Letters with the Dominican Republic to amend the Protocol to the Safeguards Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. An agreement by Exchange of Letters with the Dominican Republic to amend the Protocol to the Safeguards Agreement

  17. Sistema de salud de República Dominicana The health system of Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rathe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se describen las condiciones de salud de la República Dominicana y, con mayor detalle, el sistema de salud dominicano, incluyendo su estructura y cobertura, sus fuentes de financiamiento, el gasto en salud, los recursos físicos, materiales y humanos de los que dispone, las tareas de rectoría que desarrolla el Ministerio de Salud Pública y la generación de información. También se discuten la participación de los usuarios en la operación y evaluación del sistema de salud y las más recientes innovaciones implementadas, dentro de las que destacan la nueva Ley General de Salud, la nueva Ley de Seguridad Social y el Plan Decenal de Salud.This paper describes the health conditions in Dominican Republic and the characteristics of the Dominican health system, including its structure and coverage, its financial sources, the health expenditure, the physical, material and human resources available, the stewardship functions developed by the Ministry of Public Health and the generation of health information. The participation of health care users in the operation and evaluation of the system and the most recent policy innovations, including the new General Health Law, the new Social Security Law and the Decennial Health Plan are also discussed.

  18. Quality of housing and allergy to cockroaches in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K C; Brenner, R J

    1996-01-01

    Fifty-one atopic asthmatic and/or allergic rhinitic children and 23 nonatopic control from Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic, were skin tested with an extract mix of three cockroach species (Blattella germanica, Blatta orientalis, and Periplaneta americana). Sixteen percent of the atopics and none of the nonatopics demonstrated positive immediate skin reactions to the cockroach mix (chi 2 = 4.05, p = 0.04). Hypersensitivity was correlated with the quality of the homes; 22% (8/36) of the atopics who lived in a concrete home were skin test positive to the cockroach mix, while none (0/15) of the atopics who lived in a wood home were skin test positive (chi 2 = 4.86, p = 0.03). Although the incidence of cockroach allergy in this study is lower than that found elsewhere, these data support the notion that, in this tropical environment, sensitization to cockroaches is associated with housing quality.

  19. Characterizing HIV epidemiology in stable couples in Cambodia, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaitelly, H; Abu-Raddad, L J

    2016-01-01

    Using a set of statistical methods and HIV mathematical models applied on nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey data, we characterized HIV serodiscordancy patterns and HIV transmission dynamics in stable couples (SCs) in four countries: Cambodia, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and India. The majority of SCs affected by HIV were serodiscordant, and about a third of HIV-infected persons had uninfected partners. Overall, nearly two-thirds of HIV infections occurred in individuals in SCs, but only about half of these infections were due to transmissions within serodiscordant couples. The majority of HIV incidence in the population occurred through extra-partner encounters in SCs. There is similarity in HIV epidemiology in SCs between these countries and countries in sub-Saharan Africa, despite the difference in scale of epidemics. It appears that HIV epidemiology in SCs may share similar patterns globally, possibly because it is a natural 'spillover' effect of HIV dynamics in high-risk populations.

  20. International service learning in the Dominican Republic: An asynchronous pilot in interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Pullen, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Despite the logistical barriers of asynchronous academic calendars, university students in nursing and physical therapy in one academic health centre piloted an international, interprofessional, service learning project in the Dominican Republic. Although the nursing students and physical therapy students were not able to be in-country at the same time, they provided care to a common caseload of traumatic injury patients and those with chronic, debilitating conditions. Interprofessional communication occurred with the development of SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation) reports from the Team Training curriculum of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Students learned the depth of physical therapy and the breadth of nursing. The pilot led to a more refined design to pair nursing and PT students, requiring them to communicate via mobile phone regarding results of examinations, and suggestions for follow-up by the nursing students, to ensure continuity of care and a more comprehensive approach to services.

  1. Diplosmittia caribensis, a new Orthocladiinae (Diptera: Chironomidae) from the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedenbrug, Sofia; Silva, Fabio Laurindo Da

    2016-04-11

    The genus Diplosmittia was erected by Sæther (1981) based on Diplosmittia harrisoni from St. Lucia and St. Vincent in the British West Indies. Prior to the present study the genus comprised nine species, all except D. carinata Sæther were known only from Neotropical Region (Ashe & O'Connor, 2012). During sampling in the surroundings of a highly organic polluted river, in the National Botanical Garden in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, the present second author collected several imagines of Diplosmittia that did not fit any taxon treated in the recent review of the genus (Pinho et al. 2009). In the present paper, the male of this new species is described and illustrated.

  2. Breeding-season food habits of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) in southwestern Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Diet data from 20 Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) nests were collected in southwestern Dominican Republic in 1976, 1982, and 1996. Invertebrates (53.3%) comprised the most numerous prey items (N = 396) delivered to nests by adult owls, but vertebrates (46.7%) were much better represented than in other studies of Burrowing Owl diet. Among vertebrates, birds (28.3% of all items) and reptiles (14.9%) were most important, whereas mammals (1.0%) and amphibians (2.5%) were less commonly delivered to nests. Vertebrates, however, comprised more than twice (69.2%) of the total biomass as invertebrates (30.8%), with birds (50.4%) and reptiles (12.8%) the most important of the vertebrate prey classes. A positive relationship was observed between bird species abundance and number of individuals taken as prey by Burrowing Owls.

  3. Implementation of ICT in the Dominican Republic. Approach to Teachers Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiselis-Rosanna SENA-RIVAS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to investigate teachers’ perception of the EDPJA program in the Dominican Republic, as well as their opinion on ICT training. Likewise, it analyzes, the possibilities that represent the means of technology of the information and communication; in addition, it develops an analysis on the role of ICT in the work rooms, in the same way that influences the teaching-learning processes and the possible technical difficulties that can be generated. From a quantitative study with a non-experimental-transverse exploratory type design. With a probabilistic sample of 100 teachers to whom a survey was applied. The results reveal data that need special attention, given the nature of the context in which the study is developed. In this sense, a high index of teachers recognizes ICT as a fundamental instrument of educational innovation and facilitators of learning; however, they admit that they do not have basic training for their implementation.

  4. Culture and drug susceptibility testing among previously treated tuberculosis patients in the Dominican Republic, 2014

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    Katia J. Romero Mercado

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB is a major public health concern that threatens global progress toward effective TB control. The risk of MDR-TB is increased in patients who have received previous TB treatment. This article describes the performance of culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST in patients registered as previously treated TB patients in the Dominican Republic in 2014, based on operational research that followed a retrospective cohort design and used routine program data. Under the current system of TB culturing and DST, the majority of patients with previously treated TB do not undergo DST, and those who do often experience considerable delay in obtaining their results. The lack of DST and delay in receiving DST results leads to underestimation of the number of MDR-TB cases and hinders the timely initiation of MDR-TB treatment.

  5. Diphtheria in the Dominican Republic: reduction of cases following a large outbreak

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    Zacarías Garib

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the most recent outbreak of diphtheria in the Dominican Republic and the disease's occurrence and vaccination coverage in 2004-2013. METHODS: Clinical data of diphtheria cases that occurred in 2004 and that met the study's case definition were reviewed along with socioeconomic and epidemiological information from the cases' families. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for fatal diphtheria. Routine surveillance and vaccination coverage data are presented. RESULTS: From January 2004-April 2005, a total of 145 diphtheria cases were reported; 80 (66% of the 122 cases reported in 2004 met the case definition; 26 were fatal (case-fatality rate: 32.5%. Incidence was highest in the group 1-4 years of age at 5.3 per 100 000; 62.5% were male. Of the 80 cases, 61 (76% where hospitalized in Hospital A, 17 in Hospital B, and 2 in two other hospitals. Earlier onset (first half of 2004, birth order, and tracheotomy were associated with fatal diphtheria (P < 0.05; cases in Hospital A were also more likely to be fatal (P = 0.066. The average annual diphtheria incidence was 4.91 cases/1 million people in 2000-2003, climbed to 8.8 cases per million in 2004-2005, and dropped to 0.38 in 2006-2014; no diphtheria cases have been reported since 2011. DTP3 vaccination coverage ranged from 72%-81% in 2000-2004 and from 81%-89% in 2005-2013. CONCLUSIONS: The 2004-2005 diphtheria outbreak in the Dominican Republic resulted in important and avoidable morbidity and mortality. Annual cases declined and no cases have been reported in recent years. Maintaining high vaccination coverage and diligent surveillance are crucial to preventing diphtheria outbreaks and controlling the disease.

  6. Diphtheria in the Dominican Republic: reduction of cases following a large outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garib, Zacarías; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Tavarez, Yira; Leal, Irene; Pedreira, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    To describe the most recent outbreak of diphtheria in the Dominican Republic and the disease's occurrence and vaccination coverage in 2004-2013. Clinical data of diphtheria cases that occurred in 2004 and that met the study's case definition were reviewed along with socioeconomic and epidemiological information from the cases' families. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for fatal diphtheria. Routine surveillance and vaccination coverage data are presented. From January 2004-April 2005, a total of 145 diphtheria cases were reported; 80 (66%) of the 122 cases reported in 2004 met the case definition; 26 were fatal (case-fatality rate: 32.5%). Incidence was highest in the group 1-4 years of age at 5.3 per 100 000; 62.5% were male. Of the 80 cases, 61 (76%) where hospitalized in Hospital A, 17 in Hospital B, and 2 in two other hospitals. Earlier onset (first half of 2004), birth order, and tracheotomy were associated with fatal diphtheria (P diphtheria incidence was 4.91 cases/1 million people in 2000-2003, climbed to 8.8 cases per million in 2004-2005, and dropped to 0.38 in 2006-2014; no diphtheria cases have been reported since 2011. DTP3 vaccination coverage ranged from 72%-81% in 2000-2004 and from 81%-89% in 2005-2013. The 2004-2005 diphtheria outbreak in the Dominican Republic resulted in important and avoidable morbidity and mortality. Annual cases declined and no cases have been reported in recent years. Maintaining high vaccination coverage and diligent surveillance are crucial to preventing diphtheria outbreaks and controlling the disease.

  7. Empathic orientation among medical students from three universities in Barranquilla, Colombia and one university in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Narváez, Víctor Patricio; Alonso Palacio, Luz Marina; Caro, Sara Elvira; Silva, María Guadalupe; Castillo, Joel Arboleda; Bilbao, Jorge Luis; Acosta, Jesús Iglesias

    2014-02-01

    To compare empathic orientation among medical students from three schools of medicine in Colombia and one in the Dominican Republic. Empathic orientation of medical students was measured using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE), Spanish version for students (the "S" version) validated in Mexico and Chile, and culturally adapted to Colombia and the Dominican Republic. Data were compared using a three-factor analysis of variance (model III) and a discriminant analysis. No differences in empathic orientation were observed among courses and between sexes, but differences were found in schools of medicine considered as a unit in each studied country. Empathic orientation levels tend to reduce as courses advance. This was observed in both male and female students and in all schools analyzed.

  8. Long-term impacts of tropical storms and earthquakes on human population growth in Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Christian D. Klose; Christian Webersik

    2011-01-01

    Since the 18th century, Haiti and the Dominican Republic have experienced similar natural forces, including earthquakes and tropical storms. These countries are two of the most prone of all Latin American and Caribbean countries to natural hazards events, while Haiti seems to be more vulnerable to natural forces. This article discusses to what extent geohazards have shaped both nation's demographic developments. The data show that neither atmospheric nor seismic forces that directly hit ...

  9. Long-term impacts of tropical storms and earthquakes on human population growth in Haiti and Dominican Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Christian D. Klose; Christian Webersik

    2010-01-01

    The two Caribbean states, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, have experienced similar natural forces since the 18th century, including hurricanes and earthquakes. Although, both countries seem to be two of the most prone of all Latin American and Caribbean countries to natural hazard events, historically, Haiti tends to be more vulnerable to natural forces. The purpose of this article is to understand to what extent geohazards shape demographic changes. Research findings of this study show tha...

  10. Measuring coverage in MNCH: validating women's self-report of emergency cesarean sections in Ghana and the Dominican Republic.

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    Ozge Tunçalp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cesarean section is the only surgery for which we have nearly global population-based data. However, few surveys provide additional data related to cesarean sections. Given weaknesses in many health information systems, health planners in developing countries will likely rely on nationally representative surveys for the foreseeable future. The objective is to validate self-reported data on the emergency status of cesarean sections among women delivering in teaching hospitals in the capitals of two contrasting countries: Accra, Ghana and Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (DR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This study compares hospital-based data, considered the reference standard, against women's self-report for two definitions of emergency cesarean section based on the timing of the decision to operate and the timing of the cesarean section relative to onset of labor. Hospital data were abstracted from individual medical records, and hospital discharge interviews were conducted with women who had undergone cesarean section in two hospitals. The study assessed sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of responses to questions regarding emergency versus non-emergency cesarean section and estimated the percent of emergency cesarean sections that would be obtained from a survey, given the observed prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity from this study. Hospital data were matched with exit interviews for 659 women delivered via cesarean section for Ghana and 1,531 for the Dominican Republic. In Ghana and the Dominican Republic, sensitivity and specificity for emergency cesarean section defined by decision time were 79% and 82%, and 50% and 80%, respectively. The validity of emergency cesarean defined by operation time showed less favorable results than decision time in Ghana and slightly more favorable results in the Dominican Republic. CONCLUSIONS: Questions used in this study to identify emergency cesarean section are promising

  11. Responsive Approaches in Small Wars: The Army and Marine Corps in the Philippines, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    It was the Marines flexibility which allowed them to better understand the sources of instability and the environment to stabilize Haiti. By the time...American security and used diplomatic, economic , and military pressure to encourage stability in the Dominican Republic. The US State Department... instability in the Caribbean as a threat to American economic and security interests. Elihu Root, US Secretary of War, argued in 1902 for military and

  12. Transgender female sex workers’ HIV knowledge, experienced stigma, and condom use in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbun, Julia; Charow, Rebecca; Rosario, Santo; Tillotson, Louise; McGlaughlin, Elaine; Waters, John

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Not only do transgender female sex workers have some of the highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STI), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and experienced stigma, they also have higher likelihood of early sexual debut and some of the lowest levels of educational attainment compared to other stigmatized populations. Some of the most common interventions designed to reduce transmission of HIV and STIs seek to educate high-risk groups on sexual health and encourage condom use across all partner types; however, reaching stigmatized populations, particularly those in resource-limited settings, is particularly challenging. Considering the importance of condom use in stopping the spread of HIV, the aim of this study was two-fold; first to characterize this hard-to-reach population of transgender female sex workers in the Dominican Republic, and second, to assess associations between their HIV knowledge, experienced stigma, and condom use across three partner types. Methods We analyzed self-reported data from the Questionnaire for Transgender Sex Workers (N = 78). Respondents were interviewed at their workplaces. Univariate and bivariate analyses were employed. Fisher Chi-square tests assessed differences in HIV knowledge and experienced stigma by condom use across partner types. Results HIV knowledge was alarmingly low, condom use varied across partner type, and the respondents in our sample had high levels of experienced stigma. Average age of first sexual experience was 13.12 years with a youngest age reported of 7. Dominican Republic statutory rape laws indicate 18 years is the age of consent; thus, many of these transgender women’s first sexual encounters would be considered forcible (rape) and constitute a prosecutable crime. On average, respondents reported 8.45 sexual partners in the prior month, with a maximum of 49 partners. Approximately two thirds of respondents used a condom the last time they had sex with a regular partner. This

  13. Transgender female sex workers' HIV knowledge, experienced stigma, and condom use in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Henna; Hearld, Kristine R; Hasbun, Julia; Charow, Rebecca; Rosario, Santo; Tillotson, Louise; McGlaughlin, Elaine; Waters, John

    2017-01-01

    Not only do transgender female sex workers have some of the highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STI), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and experienced stigma, they also have higher likelihood of early sexual debut and some of the lowest levels of educational attainment compared to other stigmatized populations. Some of the most common interventions designed to reduce transmission of HIV and STIs seek to educate high-risk groups on sexual health and encourage condom use across all partner types; however, reaching stigmatized populations, particularly those in resource-limited settings, is particularly challenging. Considering the importance of condom use in stopping the spread of HIV, the aim of this study was two-fold; first to characterize this hard-to-reach population of transgender female sex workers in the Dominican Republic, and second, to assess associations between their HIV knowledge, experienced stigma, and condom use across three partner types. We analyzed self-reported data from the Questionnaire for Transgender Sex Workers (N = 78). Respondents were interviewed at their workplaces. Univariate and bivariate analyses were employed. Fisher Chi-square tests assessed differences in HIV knowledge and experienced stigma by condom use across partner types. HIV knowledge was alarmingly low, condom use varied across partner type, and the respondents in our sample had high levels of experienced stigma. Average age of first sexual experience was 13.12 years with a youngest age reported of 7. Dominican Republic statutory rape laws indicate 18 years is the age of consent; thus, many of these transgender women's first sexual encounters would be considered forcible (rape) and constitute a prosecutable crime. On average, respondents reported 8.45 sexual partners in the prior month, with a maximum of 49 partners. Approximately two thirds of respondents used a condom the last time they had sex with a regular partner. This was considerably lower than

  14. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Puerto Rico (Fact Sheet); NREL(National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - a U.S. territory located about 60 miles east of the Dominican Republic and directly west of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  15. Illicit drug use and HIV risk in the Dominican Republic: tourism areas create drug use opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Lee, Jane J; Ruiz, Yumary; Hagan, Holly; Delva, Marlyn; Quiñones, Zahira; Kamler, Alexandra; Robles, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    While the Caribbean has the second highest global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence, insufficient attention has been paid to contributing factors of the region's elevated risk. Largely neglected is the potential role of drugs in shaping the Caribbean HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic. Caribbean studies have almost exclusively focused on drug transportation and seldom acknowledged local user economies and drug-related health and social welfare consequences. While tourism is consistently implicated within the Caribbean HIV epidemic, less is known about the intersection of drugs and tourism. Tourism areas represent distinct ecologies of risk often characterised by sex work, alcohol consumption and population mixing between lower and higher risk groups. Limited understanding of availability and usage of drugs in countries such as the Dominican Republic (DR), the Caribbean country with the greatest tourist rates, presents barriers to HIV prevention. This study addresses this gap by conducting in-depth interviews with 30 drug users in Sosúa, a major sex tourism destination of the DR. A two-step qualitative data analysis process was utilised and interview transcripts were systematically coded using a well-defined thematic codebook. Results suggest three themes: (1) local demand shifts drug routes to tourism areas, (2) drugs shape local economies and (3) drug use facilitates HIV risk behaviours in tourism areas.

  16. Methods of mapping ethnographic data on migration, tourism labor, and health risk in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Karina; Padilla, Mark; Scott, Derrick; Colón-Burgos, José Félix; Reyes, Armando Matiz; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    This paper focuses on a mixed-method approach to quantifying qualitative data from the results of an ongoing NIDA-funded ethnographic study entitled "Migration, Tourism, and the HIV/Drug-Use Syndemic in the Dominican Republic". This project represents the first large-scale mixed method study to identify social, structural, environmental, and demographic factors that may contribute to ecologies of health vulnerability within the Caribbean tourism zones. Our research has identified deportation history as a critical factor contributing to vulnerability to HIV, drugs, mental health problems, and other health conditions. Therefore, understanding the movements of our participants became a vital aspect of this research. This paper describes how we went about translating 37 interviews into visual geographic representations. These methods help develop possible strategies for confronting HIV/AIDS and problematic substance use by examining the ways that these epidemics are shaped by the realities of people's labor migration and the spaces they inhabit. Our methods for mapping this qualitative data contribute to the ongoing, broadening capabilities of using GIS in social science research. A key contribution of this work is its integration of different methodologies from various disciplines to help better understand complex social problems.

  17. Factors Related to Pregnancy Among Female Sex Workers Living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernigliaro, Dana; Barrington, Clare; Perez, Martha; Donastorg, Yeycy; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2016-10-01

    Female sex workers (FSWs) living with HIV are a vulnerable population for multiple health concerns and have been vastly understudied in public health literature. This study analyzes factors related to pregnancy among 268 FSWs living with HIV in the Dominican Republic. Results indicate that 34 % of participants had been pregnant since HIV diagnosis. Multivariate analysis revealed significant associations between pregnancy after HIV diagnosis and ART interruption (AOR 2.41; 95 % CI 1.19, 4.94), knowledge of mother-to-child transmission (AOR 2.12; 95 % CI 0.99, 4.55), serostatus disclosure to a sex partner (AOR 2.46; 95 % CI 1.31, 4.62), older age (AOR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.87, 0.95) and a more negative perception of their health provider (AOR 0.56; 95 % CI 0.34, 0.93). Results indicate noteworthy associations between having been pregnant and the health provider experience and ART interruption, indicating a significant need for further research on this population to ensure both maternal and child health.

  18. Horizontal accountability and presidential dominance: a difficult combination. The case of the Dominican Republic, 1967-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiv MARSTEINTREDET

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies horizontal accountability in the Dominican Republic. First it analyses the rules regulating the system of checks and balances. Although important, institutional rules cannot explain the variation in the levels of accountability across time found in the Dominican case. Therefore, the article focuses on the execution of national budgets and the financial situation of the accountability institutions. The article suggests using an index of budgetary disproportionality based on a comparison of the congressionally approved budget and the executed budget to measure the level of horizontal accountability. A multivariate time-series regression analysis shows that budgetary disproportionality increases with presidential dominance. The article concludes that for the period 1967-2009, it is presidential behaviour more than any other factor that has prevented an effective system of checks and balances. Therefore the case confirms O’Donnell’s hypothesis of Delegative Democracies.

  19. Forest baseline and deforestation map of the Dominican Republic through the analysis of time series of MODIS data

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    Florencia Sangermano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deforestation is one of the major threats to habitats in the Dominican Republic. In this work we present a forest baseline for the year 2000 and a deforestation map for the year 2011. Maps were derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Radiometer (MODIS products at 250 m resolution. The vegetation continuous fields product (MOD44B for the year 2000 was used to produce the forest baseline, while the vegetation indices product (MOD13Q1 was used to detect change between 2000 and 2011. Major findings based on the data presented here are reported in the manuscript “Habitat suitability and protection status of four species of amphibians in the Dominican Republic” (Sangermano et al., Appl. Geogr., [7].63, 2015, 55–65

  20. Survival of captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots released in Parque Nacional del Este, Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, J.A.; White, T.H.; Vilella, F.J.; Guerrero, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    We report first-year survival rates of 49 captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) released in Parque Nacional del Este, Dominican Republic. Our goal was to learn about factors affecting postrelease survival. Specifically, we tested if survival was related to movements and whether modifying prerelease protocols influenced survival rates. We also estimated survival in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges (22 September 1998). Twenty-four parrots, fitted with radio-transmitters, were released between 14 September and 12 December 1997. Twenty-five more were released between 29 June and 16 September 1998. First-year survival rates were 30% in 1997 and 29% in 1998. Survival probability was related to bird mobility. In contrast to birds released in 1997, none of the 25 parrots released in 1998 suffered early postrelease mortality (i.e., 3-5 days after release). Two adjustments to prerelease protocols (increased exercise and reduced blood sampling) made in 1998 may have contributed to differences in mobility and survival between years. The reduction of early postrelease mortality in 1998 was encouraging, as was the prospect for higher first-year survival (e.g., 30% to 65%). Only one death was attributed to the immediate impact of the hurricane. Loss of foraging resources was likely a major contributor to ensuing mortality. Birds increased their mobility, presumably in search of food. Survival rates dropped 23% in only eight weeks posthurricane. This study underscores the value of standardized prerelease protocols, and of estimating survival and testing for factors that might influence it. Inferences from such tests will provide the best basis to make adjustments to a release program.

  1. Social Vulnerability to Natural Hazards in Urban Systems. An Application in Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Giovene di Girasole

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The concept of risk has become increasingly complex, and has been used not only in relation to the natural features of a region, but also to its socio-economic context. In this conceptualization, the latter directly influences the capacity of a community to cope with, recover from, and adapt to natural hazards. Conceiving vulnerability as a measure of a socio-ecological system’s resilience, and at the same time, as a multidimensional variable that changes in space and time, makes the study of the different ways in which natural hazards impact on society all the more urgent. This is particularly true for developing countries, where risk related to natural hazards affects populations and areas that must deal with stress conditions, such as humanitarian, social and military emergencies. This article presents a methodology for the analysis of social vulnerability, defined and experimented in the context of the international cooperation project “Estudio de la amenaza sísmica y vulnerabilidad física del Gran Santo Domingo”. The methodology, implemented through the employment of a Geographic Information System, led to the elaboration of a “Social Vulnerability Index” and a “Social Vulnerability Map”. These seek to describe the current condition of vulnerability of the city of Santo Domingo de Guzmán (Distrito Nacional in the Dominican Republic (DR, and are used to define context-related vulnerability scenarios, as well as to indicate the adequate set of mitigation objectives and actions. The results highlight the importance of using social vulnerability study as the point of departure for defining seismic-risk mitigation policies, emergency management, and territorial planning in order to reduce the impacts of disasters.

  2. Sharing medicine: the candidacy of medicines and other household items for sharing, Dominican Republic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N Dohn

    Full Text Available People share medicines and problems can result from this behavior. Successful interventions to change sharing behavior will require understanding people's motives and purposes for sharing medicines. Better information about how medicines fit into the gifting and reciprocity system could be useful in designing interventions to modify medicine sharing behavior. However, it is uncertain how people situate medicines among other items that might be shared. This investigation is a descriptive study of how people sort medicines and other shareable items.This study in the Dominican Republic examined how a convenience sample (31 people sorted medicines and rated their shareability in relation to other common household items. We used non-metric multidimensional scaling to produce association maps in which the distances between items offer a visual representation of the collective opinion of the participants regarding the relationships among the items. In addition, from a pile sort constrained by four categories of whether sharing or loaning the item was acceptable (on a scale from not shareable to very shareable, we assessed the degree to which the participants rated the medicines as shareable compared to other items. Participants consistently grouped medicines together in all pile sort activities; yet, medicines were mixed with other items when rated by their candidacy to be shared. Compared to the other items, participants had more variability of opinion as to whether medicines should be shared.People think of medicines as a distinct group, suggesting that interventions might be designed to apply to medicines as a group. People's differing opinions as to whether it was appropriate to share medicines imply a degree of uncertainty or ambiguity that health promotion interventions might exploit to alter attitudes and behaviors. These findings have implications for the design of health promotion interventions to impact medicine sharing behavior.

  3. Tracing halogen and B cycling in subduction zones based on obducted, subducted and forearc serpentinites of the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagé, Lilianne; Hattori, Keiko

    2017-12-19

    Serpentinites are important reservoirs of fluid-mobile elements in subduction zones, contributing to volatiles in arc magmas and their transport into the Earth's mantle. This paper reports halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) and B abundances of serpentinites from the Dominican Republic, including obducted and subducted abyssal serpentinites and forearc mantle serpentinites. Abyssal serpentinite compositions indicate the incorporation of these elements from seawater and sediments during serpentinization on the seafloor and at slab bending. During their subduction and subsequent lizardite-antigorite transition, F and B are retained in serpentinites, whilst Cl, Br and I are expelled. Forearc mantle serpentinite compositions suggest their hydration by fluids released from subducting altered oceanic crust and abyssal serpentinites, with only minor sediment contribution. This finding is consistent with the minimal subduction of sediments in the Dominican Republic. Forearc mantle serpentinites have F/Cl and B/Cl ratios similar to arc magmas, suggesting the importance of serpentinite dehydration in the generation of arc magmatism in the mantle wedge.

  4. A Syndemic Analysis of Alcohol Use and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Tourism Employees in Sosúa, Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark B.; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Godbole, Ramona

    2012-01-01

    The Dominican Republic has high rates of HIV infection and alcohol consumption. Unfortunately, little research has been focused on the broader sources of the synergy between these two health outcomes. We draw on syndemic theory to argue that alcohol consumption and sexual risk behavior are best analyzed within the context of culture and economy in Caribbean tourism spaces, which produce a synergy between apparently independent outcomes. We sampled 32 men and women working in the tourism industry at alcohol-serving establishments in Sosúa, Dominican Republic. Interviewees described alcohol consumption as an implicit requirement of tourism work, tourism industry business practices that foster alcohol consumption, and an intertwining relationship between alcohol and sexual commerce. The need to establish relationships with tourists, combined with the overconsumption of alcohol, contributed to a perceived loss of sexual control, which participants felt could impede condom use. Interventions should incorporate knowledge of the social context of tourism areas to mitigate the contextual factors that contribute to HIV infection and alcohol consumption among locals. PMID:21859907

  5. A syndemic analysis of alcohol use and sexual risk behavior among tourism employees in Sosúa, Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark B; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Godbole, Ramona

    2012-01-01

    The Dominican Republic has high rates of HIV infection and alcohol consumption. Unfortunately, little research has been focused on the broader sources of the synergy between these two health outcomes. We draw on syndemic theory to argue that alcohol consumption and sexual risk behavior are best analyzed within the context of culture and economy in Caribbean tourism spaces, which produce a synergy between apparently independent outcomes. We sampled 32 men and women working in the tourism industry at alcohol-serving establishments in Sosúa, Dominican Republic. Interviewees described alcohol consumption as an implicit requirement of tourism work, tourism industry business practices that foster alcohol consumption, and an intertwining relationship between alcohol and sexual commerce. The need to establish relationships with tourists, combined with the overconsumption of alcohol, contributed to a perceived loss of sexual control, which participants felt could impede condom use. Interventions should incorporate knowledge of the social context of tourism areas to mitigate the contextual factors that contribute to HIV infection and alcohol consumption among locals.

  6. The Influences of Health Insurance and Access to Information on Prostate Cancer Screening among Men in Dominican Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangmennaang, J.; Luginaah, I.

    2016-01-01

    Although research demonstrates the public health burden of prostate cancer among men in the Caribbean, relatively little is known about the factors that underlie the low levels of testing for the disease among this population. Study Design. A cross-sectional study of prostate cancer testing behaviours among men aged 40-60 years in Dominican Republic using the Demographic and Health Survey (2013). Methods. We use hierarchical binary logit regression models and average treatment effects combined with propensity score matching to explore the determinants of prostate screening as well as the average effect of health insurance coverage on screening. The use of hierarchical binary logit regression enabled us to control for the effect of unobserved heterogeneity at the cluster level that may affect prostate cancer testing behaviours. Results. Screening varied significantly with health insurance coverage, knowledge of cholesterol level, education, and wealth. Insured men were more likely to test for prostate cancer (OR=1.65, P=0.01) compared to the uninsured. Conclusions. The expansion and restructuring of Dominican Republic universal health insurance scheme to ensure equity in access may improve health access that would potentially impact positively on prostate cancer screening among men.

  7. Depression and key associated factors in female sex workers and women living with HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rael, Christine T; Davis, Alissa

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about the mental health of female sex workers and women living with HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic, which impedes HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. This project estimates the prevalence of depression and identifies key contributing factors to this outcome in female sex workers, women living with HIV/AIDS, and a comparison group. Participants were female sex workers (N = 349), women living with HIV/AIDS (N = 213), and a comparison group of HIV-negative women who were not sex workers (N = 314) from the Dominican Republic. Participants completed questionnaires assessing demographic characteristics and depression. Female sex workers and women living with HIV/AIDS completed additional questionnaires ascertaining HIV or sex work-related internalized stigma. Depression was prevalent among female sex workers (70.2%), women living with HIV/AIDS (81.1%), and the comparison group (52.2%). Adjusted logistic regressions showed that internalized stigma was associated with depression for female sex workers (OR = 2.73; 95% CI = 1.95-3.84) and women living with HIV/AIDS (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.86-5.05). Permanent income was associated with this outcome for female sex workers (OR = 0.08; 95% CI = 0.01-0.80) and the comparison group (OR = 0.04; 95% CI = 0.00-0.45).

  8. Description of a new species, Pintomyia dissimilis nov. sp., a phlebotomine fossil from Dominican Republic amber (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguinette Cristiani

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomine sandflies are the vectors of etiological agents of leishmaniases in several areas of the world. In the Neotropical Region, the biodiversity of these insects is more than other regions, probably due the long evolutionary period of this group. Miocene amber from Dominican Republic, currently, has a record of 14 extinct species of Phlebotomine sandflies. Results This paper describes a new fossil species of phlebotomine sandfly from amber found in Dominican Republic. This new species is based on morphological characters of a male such as 5° palpomere longer than 3° + 4°, three well-developed spines in the gonostyle, lateral lobe longer than gonocoxite and permit inclusion of the new species in the genus Pintomyia, series serrana. The paramere, with a curvature in the ventral margin, of the middle of the structure, separates the new species from the others fossils or extant species. Conclusion The new species described in the present study named Pintomyia dissimilis nov. sp. is well differenciated from all known species in this genus.

  9. Report on the activities carried out by 'Sonrisas' to promote oral health: the experience of a Canadian dental hygienist in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsman, Elina

    2007-08-01

    Smiles Foundation is a non-profitable organization established in Canada as a sister foundation to the Dominican Fundacion para la Prevencion y la Salud Bucal de los Ninos "Sonrisas" the Dominican Republic, which provides free dental treatment and oral health education to underprivileged children. Its founder Elina Katsman, a Canadian dental hygienist embarked on this project in 1986, and started giving lectures in the small community of Samana along with two local nurses that she trained in the principles of oral hygiene and related primary health care. Today, the foundation runs eight dental clinics and five mobile units that serve remote areas and has benefited 1,723,119 people in total. The aim of this article was to report on the growth that Smiles Foundation has experienced to promote oral health among children and adults in the Dominican Republic including its activities and the results it has achieved up until 2005.

  10. Cohort study of smoke-free homes in economically disadvantaged communities in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M. Dozier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze household smoking-ban prevalence over time and predictors among communities in the Dominican Republic, historically a significant tobacco-growing country with few tobacco control regulations. METHODS: Baseline (2004 and follow-up surveillance surveys (2006, 2007 (each n > 1 000 randomly selected households conducted in six economically disadvantaged communities (three tobacco-growing and two each urban, peri-urban, and rural assessed household members’ demographics, health status, and household characteristics, including smoking restrictions. RESULTS: Between 2004 and 2007, household smoking-ban prevalence increased in all communities, with overall rates increasing from 23.9% (2004 to 45.3% (2007. Households with smokers adopted smoking bans at lower rates (6%-17% versus those without smokers (which had an adoption rate of 35%-58%. Logistic regression models demonstrated that the associations between allowing smoking in households with no members who smoked and being located in a tobacco-growing community, being a Catholic household, and having a member with a cardiovascular problem were statistically significant. The association between having a child under age 5 or a member with a respiratory condition and prohibiting smoking in the home was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of households banning smoking increased in all communities but remained well below rates in industrialized countries. For low- and middle-income countries or those in early stages of tobacco control, basic awareness-raising measures (including surveillance activities may lead to statistically significant increases in household smoking-ban adoption, particularly among households with no smokers. An increase in household smoking-ban prevalence may result in changes in community norms that can lead to a further increase in the adoption of smoking bans. Having household members who smoke and being in a tobacco-growing community may

  11. Carbon stocks of intact mangroves and carbon emissions arising from their conversion in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, J Boone; Heider, Chris; Norfolk, Jennifer; Payton, Frederick

    2014-04-01

    Mangroves are recognized to possess a variety of ecosystem services including high rates of carbon sequestration and storage. Deforestation and conversion of these ecosystems continue to be high and have been predicted to result in significant carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Yet few studies have quantified the carbon stocks or losses associated with conversion of these ecosystems. In this study we quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of three common mangrove types of the Caribbean as well as those of abandoned shrimp ponds in areas formerly occupied by mangrove-a common land-use conversion of mangroves throughout the world. In the mangroves of the Montecristi Province in Northwest Dominican Republic we found C stocks ranged from 706 to 1131 Mg/ha. The medium-statured mangroves (3-10 m in height) had the highest C stocks while the tall (> 10 m) mangroves had the lowest ecosystem carbon storage. Carbon stocks of the low mangrove (shrub) type (carbon-rich soils as deep as 2 m. Carbon stocks of abandoned shrimp ponds were 95 Mg/ha or approximately 11% that of the mangroves. Using a stock-change approach, the potential emissions from the conversion of mangroves to shrimp ponds ranged from 2244 to 3799 Mg CO2e/ha (CO2 equivalents). This is among the largest measured C emissions from land use in the tropics. The 6260 ha of mangroves and converted mangroves in the Montecristi Province are estimated to contain 3,841,490 Mg of C. Mangroves represented 76% of this area but currently store 97% of the carbon in this coastal wetland (3,696,722 Mg C). Converted lands store only 4% of the total ecosystem C (144,778 Mg C) while they comprised 24% of the area. By these metrics the replacement of mangroves with shrimp and salt ponds has resulted in estimated emissions from this region totaling 3.8 million Mg CO2e or approximately 21% of the total C prior to conversion. Given the high C stocks of mangroves, the high emissions from their conversion, and the other important

  12. Parenting Practices and Associations with Development Delays among Young Children in Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwemedimo, Omolara Thomas; Howlader, Afrin; Pierret, Giselina

    According to the World Health Organization, >200 million children in low- and middle-income countries experience developmental delays. However, household structure and parenting practices have been minimally explored as potential correlates of developmental delay in low- and middle-income countries, despite potential as areas for intervention. The objective of the study was to examine associations of developmental delays with use of World Health Organization-recommended parenting practices among a clinic-based cohort of children aged 6-60 months attending in La Romana, Dominican Republic. This study was conducted among 74 caregiver-child pairs attending the growth-monitoring clinic at Hospital Francisco Gonzalvo in June 2015. The Malawi Developmental Assessment Tool was adapted and performed on each child to assess socioadaptive, fine motor, gross motor, and language development. The IMCI Household Level Survey Questionnaire was used to assess parenting practices. Fisher's exact test was used to determine associations significant at P children had a delay in at least 1 developmental domain. Most caregivers used scolding (43.2%) or spanking (44%) for child discipline. Children who were disciplined by spanking and scolding were more likely to have language delay (P = .007) and socioadaptive delay (P = .077), respectively. On regression analysis, children with younger primary caregivers had 7 times higher odds of language delay (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 7.35, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.52-35.61) and 4 times greater odds of any delay (AOR: 4.72, 95% CI: 1.01-22.22). In addition, children punished by spanking had 5 times higher odds of having language delay (AOR: 5.04, 95% CI: 1.13-22.39). Parenting practices such as harsh punishment and lack of positive parental reinforcement were found to have strong associations with language and socioadaptive delays. Likewise, delays were also more common among children with younger caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Icahn

  13. Changes in health indicators related to health promotion and microcredit programs in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Anita L; Chávez, Andrea; Dohn, Michael N; Saturria, Luis; Pimentel, Carlos

    2004-03-01

    To assess the impact of health promotion programs and microcredit programs on three communities in the Dominican Republic. One community had only the health promotion program, one community had only the microcredit program, and one community had both a health promotion program and a microcredit program. This pilot project examined the hypothesis that the largest changes in 11 health indicators that were studied would be in the community with both a health promotion program and a microcredit program, that there would be intermediate changes in the community with only a health promotion program, and that the smallest changes would be in the community with only a microcredit program. The health promotion programs used community volunteers to address two major concerns: (1) the prevalent causes of mortality among children under 5 years of age and (2) women's health (specifically breast and cervical cancer screening). The microcredit program made small loans to individuals to start or expand small businesses. Outcome measures were based on comparisons for 11 health indicators from baseline community surveys (27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, done in December 2000 and January 2001) and from follow-up surveys (also 27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, in June and July 2002, after the health promotion program had been operating for about 13 months). Households were randomly chosen during both the baseline and follow-up surveys, without regard to their involvement in the microcredit or health promotion programs. The health indicators improved in all three communities. However, the degree of change was different among the communities (P microcredit and health promotion programs had the largest changes for 10 of the 11 health indicators. Multisector development is known to be important on a macroeconomic scale. The results of this pilot project support the view that multisector development is also important on a microeconomic level

  14. Modeling stem increment in individual Pinus occidentalis Sw. trees in La Sierra, Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, S.; Bevilacqua, E.

    2010-07-01

    One of the most common and important tree characteristics used in forest management decision-making is tree diameter-at-breast height (DBH). This paper presents results on an evaluation of two growth functions developed to model stem diameter increases in individual Pinus occidentalis Sw. trees in La Sierra, Dominican Republic. The first model was developed in order to predict future DBH (FDM) at different intervals of time and the other for predicting growth, that is, periodic annual diameter increment (PADIM). Each model employed two statistical techniques for fitting model parameters: stepwise ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, and mixed models. The two statistical approaches varied in how they accounted for the repeated measurements on individual trees over time, affecting standard error estimates and statistical inference of model parameters. Each approach was evaluated based on six goodness of- fit statistics, using both calibration and validation data sets. The objectives were 1) to determine the best model for predicting future tree DBH; 2) to determine the best model for predicting periodic annual diameter increment, both models using tree size, age, site index and different indices of competitive status; and 3) compare which of these two modeling approaches predicts better the future DBH. OLS provided a better fit for both of the growth functions, especially in regards to bias. Both models showed advantages and disadvantages when they were used to predict growth and future diameter. For the prediction of future diameter with FDM, accuracy of predictions were within one centimeter for a five-year projection interval. The PADIM presented negligible bias in estimating future diameter, although there was a small increase in bias as time of prediction increased. As expected, each model was the best in estimating the response variable it was developed for.. However, a closer examination of the distribution of errors showed a slight advantage of the FDM

  15. Use of Bennett's Hierarchical Model in the Evaluation of the Extension Education Program for Cacao Farmers in the Northeast Region of the Dominican Republic. Summary of Research 54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De los Santos, Saturnino; Norland, Emmalou Van Tilburg

    A study evaluated the cacao farmer training program in the Dominican Republic by testing hypothesized relationships among reactions, knowledge and skills, attitudes, aspirations, and some selected demographic characteristics of farmers who attended programs. Bennett's hierarchical model of program evaluation was used as the framework of the study.…

  16. Zika virus infection in 18 travellers returning from Surinam and the Dominican Republic, The Netherlands, November 2015–March 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. Duijster (Janneke W.); A. Goorhuis (Abraham); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry); L.G. Visser (Leo); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); J.H.J. Reimerink (Johan); M.P. Grobusch (Martin P.); A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); J.H.C.T. van Den Kerkhof (Johannes H. C. T.); C.B.E.M. Reusken (Chantal); S.J. Hahné (Susan); The Dutch Zikv Study Team

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: We report 18 cases of confirmed Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in travellers returning to the Netherlands from Surinam (South America, bordering northern Brazil) and the Dominican Republic. Methods: In a multi-centre study, we collected epidemiological, virological and clinical

  17. Pandemic influenza A(H1N1) outbreak among a group of medical students who traveled to the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Anna; Serrano, Beatriz; Marcos, Maria A; Serradesanferm, Anna; Mensa, Josep; Hayes, Edward; Anton, Andres; Rios, Jose; Pumarola, Tomas; Trilla, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    From the beginning of the influenza pandemic until the time the outbreak described here was detected, 77,201 cases of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) with 332 deaths had been reported worldwide, mostly in the United States and Mexico. All of the cases reported in Spain until then had a recent history of travel to Mexico, the Dominican Republic, or Chile. We describe an outbreak of influenza among medical students who traveled from Spain to the Dominican Republic in June 2009. We collected diagnostic samples and clinical histories from consenting medical students who had traveled to the Dominican Republic and from their household contacts after their return to Spain. Of 113 students on the trip, 62 (55%) developed symptoms; 39 (45%) of 86 students tested had laboratory evidence of influenza A(H1N1) infection. Most students developed symptoms either just before departure from the Dominican Republic or within days of returning to Spain. The estimated secondary attack rate of influenza-like illness among residential contacts of ill students after return to Spain was 2.1%. The attack rate of influenza A(H1N1) can vary widely depending on the circumstances of exposure. We report a high attack rate among a group of traveling medical students but a much lower secondary attack rate among their contacts after return from the trip. These findings may aid the development of recommendations to prevent influenza. © 2011 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  18. Adept at adapting : contributions of sociology to agricultural research for small farmers in developing countries : in case of rice in the Dominican Republic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorman, F.

    1991-01-01

    This book discusses possible contributions of sociology and anthropology to agricultural research. It is based on investigations carried out from 1981 to 1985 in the Dominican Republic in the Adaptive Agricultural Research (AAR) project, a cooperative effort between the Agricultural

  19. Renewing the house : trajectories of social life in the yucayeque (community) of El Cabo, Higüey, Dominican Republic, AD 800 to 1504

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samson, Alice Victoria Maud

    2010-01-01

    What was the pre-Columbian house like? The aim of the PhD research was to come to an archaeological vision of precolonial domestic life in Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti), rather than rely on Spanish colonial descriptions from the 15th and 16th centuries. The dissertation presents

  20. Efficacy Beliefs, Job Satisfaction, Stress and Their Influence on the Occupational Commitment of English-Medium Content Teachers in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouch Gilbert, Rachel; Adesope, Olusola O.; Schroeder, Noah Lee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of efficacy, job satisfaction, job stress and their influence on the occupational commitment of English-medium content teachers. A total of 109 practicing English-medium and Spanish-medium content teachers from the Dominican Republic volunteered to participate in the study. Findings…

  1. Perceived Barriers to Adherence to Tuberculosis Infection Control Measures among Health Care Workers in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Helena J; Veras-Estévez, Bienvenido A; Pomeranz, Jamie L; Pérez-Then, Eddy N; Marcelino, Belkys; Lauzardo, Michael

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Health care workers have an increased risk of infection due to occupational Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure, including multidrug-resistant strains. Health care workers' risk of developing tuberculosis is greater than that of the general population, whether in low-, intermediate- or high-incidence countries. Adherence to infection control measures (administrative controls, environmental controls, and personal respiratory protection) is essential to reduce risk of disease transmission between suspected tuberculosis patients and health care workers, but for different reasons, both objective and subjective, adherence is low. Identifying the causes of low adherence is a prerequisite to effective programming to reduce risk. OBJECTIVE Identify perceived barriers to adherence to tuberculosis infection control measures among health care workers in the Dominican Republic. METHODS During August 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in two tertiary-level hospitals in different regions of the Dominican Republic. A semi-structured interview guide of nine questions was developed, based on the scientific literature and with consensus of clinical experts. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of seven physicians (five men, two women) and two baccalaureate nurses (both women) working in the emergency medicine, internal medicine or nursing departments of those institutions. Question topics included clinical experience of M. tuberculosis infection and disease; knowledge of disease transmission and preventive practices; clinical management strategies; and perceptions of effectiveness of directly observed treatment, short-course, and disease coping strategies. RESULTS Perceived barriers were described as: 1) sense of invincibility of health care workers; 2) personal beliefs of health care workers related to direct patient communication; 3) low provider-to-patient ratios in hospitals; 4) absence of tuberculosis isolation units for

  2. Factors Associated with Health Information Seeking, Processing, and Use Among HIV Positive Adults in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonbraker, Samantha; Befus, Montina; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel; Halpern, Mina; Larson, Elaine

    2017-06-01

    Effective treatment and management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) depend on patients' ability to locate, comprehend, and apply health information. This study's purpose was to identify characteristics associated with these skills among HIV positive adults in the Dominican Republic. An information behavior survey was administered to 107 participants then three logistic regressions were conducted to identify characteristics associated with information seeking, processing, and use. Never having cared for someone who was sick was significantly associated with less information seeking, processing, and use. Males were more likely to be active information seekers and those who had attended the clinic for six or fewer years were less likely to actively seek information. Younger individuals had increased odds of higher information processing and those without comorbidities had increased odds of more information use. Results may inform researchers, organizations, and providers about how patients interact with health information in limited resource settings.

  3. Associations of HIV Testing, Sexual Risk and Access to Prevention Among Female Sex Workers in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lisa G; Bonilla, Luis; Caballero, Tessie; Rodriguez, Martha; Dolores, Yordana; de la Rosa, Miguel Angel; Malla, Annie; Burnett, Janet; Terrero, Víctor; Martinez, Sam; Morgan, Oliver

    2017-08-01

    The Caribbean region has one of the highest proportions of HIV in the general female population attributable to sex work. In 2008 (n = 1256) and 2012 (n = 1525) in the Dominican Republic, HIV biological and behavioral surveys were conducted among female sex workers (FSW) in four provinces using respondent driven sampling. Participants were ≥15 years who engaged in intercourse in exchange for money in the past 6 months and living/working in the study province. There were no statistically significant changes in HIV and other infections prevalence from 2008 to 2012, despite ongoing risky sexual practices. HIV testing and receiving results was low in all provinces. FSW in 2012 were more likely to receive HIV testing and results if they participated in HIV related information and education and had regular checkups at health centers. Further investigation is needed to understand barriers to HIV testing and access to prevention services.

  4. The epidemiology of dependency among urban-dwelling older people in the Dominican Republic; a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferri Cleusa P

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic ageing, and the health transition will soon lead to large increases in the number of dependent older people in low and middle income countries. Despite its importance, this topic has not previously been studied. Methods A cross sectional catchment area one-phase survey of health conditions, dependency, care arrangements and caregiver strain among 2011 people aged 65 years and over in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Results 7.1% of participants required much care and a further 4.7% required at least some care. The prevalence of dependency increased sharply with increasing age. Dependent older people were less likely than others to have a pension and much less likely to have paid work, but no more likely to benefit from financial support from their family. Needing much care was strongly associated with comorbidity between cognitive, psychological and physical health problems. However, dementia made the strongest independent contribution. Among those needing care, those with dementia stood out as being more disabled, as needing more care (particularly support with core activities of daily living, and as being more likely to have paid caregivers. Dementia caregivers experienced more strain than caregivers of those with other health conditions, an effect mediated by behavioural and psychological symptoms. Conclusion Dependency among older people is nearly as prevalent in Dominican Republic as in developed western settings. Non-communicable diseases, particularly dementia are the main contributing factors. Attention needs to be directed towards the development of age-appropriate healthcare, a long-term care policy, and mechanisms for ensuring the social protection of older persons.

  5. Weaving Futures. Family Transnationalism in the migration from Dominican Republic and Brazil to Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pedone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores forms of migrant families’ reorganization within a (new global economic crisis and the hardening of migration control in Europe; based on the cases of Dominican and Brazilian migration to Spain.Our goal is not to characterize the wholeness of strategies from these collectives, instead visualize its heterogeneity. Displacement of Dominican and Brazilian population to Spain shares the role of women as the first link of migration chains. In both cases women are the economic support of transnational families and they lead reunification's processes. Nevertheless, differences in the time spent in the destination country, migratory status, origin (rural-urban, level of education, class and labor insertion in destination country, affect differently, the planning and start up of migration projects, the organization of care and family reunification strategies. These findings question the predominant place granted to national origin in the study of international migration.

  6. Improving maternity care in the Dominican Republic: a pilot study of a community-based participatory research action plan by an international healthcare team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Gossett, Sarah; Burgos, Rosa; Cáceres, Ramona; Tejada, Carmen; Dominguez García, Luis; Ambrosio Rosario, Angel; Almonte, Asela; Perez, Lydia J

    2015-05-01

    This article is a report of the process and results of a feasibility pilot study to improve the quality of maternity care in a sample of 31 women and their newborns delivering in a public, tertiary hospital in the Dominican Republic. The pilot study was the first "action step" taken as a result of a formative, community-based participatory research (CBPR) study conducted between 2008 and 2010 by an interdisciplinary, international partnership of U.S. academic researchers, Dominican medical/nursing personnel, and Dominican community health workers. Health personnel and community health workers separately identified indicators most important to measure quality of antepartum maternity care: laboratory and diagnostic studies and respectful, interpersonal communication. At the midpoint and the completion of data collection, the CBPR team evaluated the change in quality indicators to assess improvement in care. The pilot study supports the idea that joint engagement of community health workers, health personnel, and academic researchers with data creation and patient monitoring is motivating for all to continue to improve services in the cultural context of the Dominican Republic. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Measuring Coverage in MNCH: Validating Women’s Self-Report of Emergency Cesarean Sections in Ghana and the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunçalp, Özge; Stanton, Cynthia; Castro, Arachu; Adanu, Richard; Heymann, Marilyn; Adu-Bonsaffoh, Kwame; Lattof, Samantha R.; Blanc, Ann; Langer, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Background Cesarean section is the only surgery for which we have nearly global population-based data. However, few surveys provide additional data related to cesarean sections. Given weaknesses in many health information systems, health planners in developing countries will likely rely on nationally representative surveys for the foreseeable future. The objective is to validate self-reported data on the emergency status of cesarean sections among women delivering in teaching hospitals in the capitals of two contrasting countries: Accra, Ghana and Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (DR). Methods and Findings This study compares hospital-based data, considered the reference standard, against women’s self-report for two definitions of emergency cesarean section based on the timing of the decision to operate and the timing of the cesarean section relative to onset of labor. Hospital data were abstracted from individual medical records, and hospital discharge interviews were conducted with women who had undergone cesarean section in two hospitals. The study assessed sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of responses to questions regarding emergency versus non-emergency cesarean section and estimated the percent of emergency cesarean sections that would be obtained from a survey, given the observed prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity from this study. Hospital data were matched with exit interviews for 659 women delivered via cesarean section for Ghana and 1,531 for the Dominican Republic. In Ghana and the Dominican Republic, sensitivity and specificity for emergency cesarean section defined by decision time were 79% and 82%, and 50% and 80%, respectively. The validity of emergency cesarean defined by operation time showed less favorable results than decision time in Ghana and slightly more favorable results in the Dominican Republic. Conclusions Questions used in this study to identify emergency cesarean section are promising but insufficient to

  8. Situation Report--Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Laos, Liberia, Republic of Vietnam, Seychelles, Tahiti (French Polynesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in eight foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Dominical Republic, Ethiopia, Gilbert and Ellice Islands, Laos, Liberia, Republic of Vietnam, Seychelles, and Tahiti (French Polynesia). Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two…

  9. Heterosexual transmission of HIV in the Dominican Republic: gendered indicators are associated with disparities in condom use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Michelle M; Andrade, Flavia C D; Raffaelli, Marcela; Iwelunmor, Juliet

    2015-11-23

    Gendered dynamics in heterosexual relationships compromise women's self-efficacy and increase their vulnerability to acquiring HIV. This study examines the impact of socioeconomic determinants, media exposure, and sexual expectations on sexual behaviors of men and women in the Dominican Republic (DR). We analyzed cross-sectional data from 51,018 adults in the Dominican Republic age 15 to 45 years collected by the Demographics and Health Survey (DHS) in 2007. Measures included demographic and socioeconomic indicators, social exposures, sexual expectations and sexual behaviors. Logistic regression models explored gender differences in condom use. Study findings indicated that women were less likely to use a condom at last intercourse than men (odds ratio [OR] = 0.29; 95 % CI = 0.27, 0.31). Among men, secondary (OR = 1.43; 95 % CI = 1.16, 1.76) and higher education (OR = 1.58; 95 % CI = 1.25, 2.00), being in the richest quintile (OR = 1.25; 95 % CI = 1.07, 1.47), and living in a female-headed household (OR = 1.13; 95 % CI 1.03, 1.23) increased the likelihood of condom use. Compared to never married men, currently and formerly married men were less likely to use condoms (OR = 0.03; 95 % CI = 0.03, 0.04 and OR = 0.67; 95 % CI = 0.60, 0.75, respectively). The odds of condom use increased for young women 15-19 years old in comparison with women age 30-34 years, but decreased as they grew older. For women, being in the richer quintile (OR = 1.28; 95 % CI = 1.06, 1.54), living in a female-headed household (OR = 1.26; 1.12, 1.41), and having good access to media (OR = 1.24; 95 % CI = 1.12, 1.42) increased the likelihood of condom use. Being currently married or formerly married and living in rural areas decreased such likelihood among women. Study findings provide evidence that, in the DHS, socioeconomic and cultural differences between men and women affects condom use. Efforts to reduce HIV transmission

  10. Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Study of Oligocene-Holocene Sedimentary Rocks from Northern Dominican Republic: Evidence of Vertical Axis Rotations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anson Sanchez, M.; Kodama, K. P.; Pueyo, E. L.; Soto, R.; Garcia-Senz, J.; Escuder-Viruete, J.; Pastor-Galan, D.

    2017-12-01

    A paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study was conducted in the northern Dominican Republic to detect vertical axis rotations in an active left-lateral, strike slip fault zone. 191 samples from 21 sites were collected from a variety of lithologies including limestones, conglomerates, calcarenites and marls that ranged in age from the Oligocene to the Holocene. The rock magnetic portion of the study focused on the identification of magnetic minerals using coercivity, and Curie temperature (c vs temperature) measurement, modeling of IRM acquisition curves, and thermal demagnetization of IRMs (Lowrie, 19901). In the paleomagnetic portion of the study characteristic remanences (ChRMs) were isolated using thermal demagnetization (19 steps up to 680ºC) and alternating field (AF) demagnetization (17 steps up to 100 mT). In most cases the characteristic remanence is carried by magnetite, with peak unblocking temperatures of 575ºC. This interpretation was supported by c vs. T results that yielded Curie temperatures of 580˚C. In only a few cases (7 samples) higher unblocking temperatures suggested hematite as the magnetic carrier. The modeling of IRM acquisition curves, that shows two coercivity components, further supports the presence of magnetite. 75% of the IRM is carried by the low-coercivity component (100-300 mT, magnetite). 25% of the IRM is carried by the high-coercivity component (1.2-1.6T) characteristic of hematite. The IRM acquisition data was collected from 24 samples (3-4 from each of the lithologies sampled). IRMs were acquired in fields from 4mT to 1T in 23 steps. The paleomagnetic results show a grouping by tectonic blocks with one group having westerly ChRM declinations (268˚-295˚) and a second group having northerly ChRM declinations (357˚-035˚). In most cases, inclinations are intermediate ( 35˚), in agreement with the 24˚-31˚ expected inclinations for Dominican Republic in the period Oligocene to Holocene. The rotation of the tectonic blocks, as

  11. Decision-Making for Risk Management in Sustainable Renewable Energy Facilities: A Case Study in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido C. Guerrero-Liquet

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Today, Renewable Energy Sources (RES are a key pillar to achieving sustainable development, which is the main reason why energy projects are being carried out not only in developed countries but also in many emerging countries. Since the technical and financial risk remains a major barrier to financing renewable energy projects, several mechanisms are available to reduce risks on investment into clean energy projects. This paper discusses risk management tools in solar photovoltaic facilities based on the guide to the Project Management (PMBOK Guide. To do this, a combination of different decision-making methodologies will be carried out. These methodologies enable to not only extract the knowledge by experts but also to know the causes and effects that help to make the best decision. In order to do so, techniques to seek information (Delphi and Checklist as well as diagram techniques such as cause and effect diagrams or Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities and Threats (SWOT are applied. The categorization and prioritization of risks will be carried out through the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. Finally, a sensitivity analysis will allow for providing consistency to the obtained results. A real case in the Dominican Republic will also be presented as case study.

  12. Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Vegetables Imported from the Dominican Republic, India, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Morach, Marina; Zihler Berner, Annina; Hächler, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    To examine to what extent fresh vegetables imported into Switzerland represent carriers of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae, 169 samples of different types of fresh vegetables imported into Switzerland from the Dominican Republic, India, Thailand, and Vietnam were analyzed. Overall, 25.4% of the vegetable samples yielded one or more ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, 78.3% of which were multidrug resistant. Sixty isolates were obtained: Escherichia coli, 26; Klebsiella pneumoniae, 26; Enterobacter cloacae, 6; Enterobacter aerogenes, 1; and Cronobacter sakazakii, 1. We found 29 isolates producing CTX-M-15, 8 producing CTX-M-14, 7 producing CTX-M-55, 3 producing CTX-M-65, 1 each producing CTX-M-1, CTX-M-3, CTX-M-27, and CTX-M-63, 5 producing SHV-2, 3 producing SHV-12, and 1 producing SHV-2a. Four of the E. coli isolates belonged to epidemiologically important clones: CTX-M-15-producing B2:ST131 (1 isolate), D:ST405 (1 isolate), and D:ST38 (2 isolates). One of the D:ST38 isolates belonged to the extraintestinal enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) D:ST38 lineage. Two of the K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to the epidemic clones sequence type 15 (ST15) and ST147. The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic and commensal Enterobacteriaceae in imported agricultural foodstuffs constitutes a source of ESBL genes and a concern for food safety. PMID:25724954

  13. Impact of acid mine drainage from mining exploitations on the Margajita River basin and the Hatillo reservoir (Dominican Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, F.; Salas, J.; Arcos, D.; Archambault, A.; Cottard, F.

    2009-01-01

    Mining of the Pueblo Viejo high-sulphidation epithermal deposit (Dominican Republic) leads to environmental impact due to the formation of acid mine drainage associated with the oxidative dissolution of sulphides and sulpho salts. In addition to the very low pH, the acid waters are capable of transporting away from the mining areas high concentrations of metals and metalloids in solution. In the present work, a geochemical study of sediments deposited in the Hatillo reservoir is carried out. This reservoir is fed by the Margajita and Yuna streams which transport leachates from the Pueblo Viejo and Falcondo-Bonao (Cr-Ni) mining areas, respectively. The results show that these sediments have very high concentrations of Fe, Al and sulphate, along with significant amounts of As, Zn and Te, which are of especial environmental concern. The main contributor to this metal discharge into the reservoir is the Margajita stream, whereas the Yuna stream does not transport significant amounts of metals in solution due to its neutral pH, although it is likely that metals such as Mn, Cr, Ni and Co can be mobilised as a particulate. (Author) 5 refs.

  14. Caribbean Reef Response to Plio-Pleistocene Climate Change: Results of the Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, J.; McNeill, D. F.; Diaz, V.; Swart, P. K.; Pourmand, A.

    2014-12-01

    Caribbean reefs changed profoundly in taxonomic composition, diversity, and dominance structure during late Pliocene and Pleistocene climatic change. These changes coincide with protracted climatic deterioration and cooling between 2.0 to 0.8 Ma, and the onset of high amplitude sea-level fluctuations ~400 ka. The Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP) was initiated to determine how climate change and global high-amplitude sea level changes influenced depositional patterns in Pliocene to Recent reef systems of the Caribbean. A transect of 7 core borings (~700 m total depth) were collected along the southern coast of the DR. New age constraints based on U/Th geochronometry and radiogenic Sr isotopes, combined with depositional lithofacies, faunal indicators, and stable isotope profiles have allowed us to correlate between wells and define the internal anatomy and stratal geometry of the individual reef sigmoids and sigmoid sets. Faunal records suggest most extinction occurred prior to ~1 Ma. Following this extinction, fringing reef margins of the Caribbean display a characteristic zonation in which Acropora palmata dominates shallow high-energy reef crests and Acropora cervicornis calmer fore-reef slopes and backreef lagoons. The dominance of acroporids across this zonation has been attributed to growth rates 5-100 times faster than other corals.

  15. Progress towards Elimination of HIV Mother-to-Child Transmission in the Dominican Republic from 1999 to 2011

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    Osvaldo Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, prevention of mother-to-child transmission (pMTCT using antiretrovirals was introduced in the Dominican Republic (DR. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART was introduced for immunosuppressed persons in 2004 and for pMTCT in 2008. To assess progress towards MTCT elimination, data from requisitions for HIV nucleic acid amplification tests for diagnosis of HIV infection in perinatally exposed infants born in the DR from 1999 to 2011 were analyzed. The MTCT rate was 142/1,274 (11.1% in 1999–2008 and 12/302 (4.0% in 2009–2011 (P<.001, with a rate of 154/1,576 (9.8% for both periods combined. This decline was associated with significant increases in the proportions of women who received prenatal HAART (from 12.3% to 67.9% and infants who received exclusive formula feeding (from 76.3% to 86.1% and declines in proportions of women who received no prenatal antiretrovirals (from 31.9% to 12.2% or received only single-dose nevirapine (from 39.5% to 19.5%. In 2007, over 95% of DR pregnant women received prenatal care, HIV testing, and professionally attended delivery. However, only 58% of women in underserved sugarcane plantation communities (2007 and 76% in HIV sentinel surveillance hospitals (2003–2005 received their HIV test results. HIV-MTCT elimination is feasible but persistent lack of access to critical pMTCT measures must be addressed.

  16. Associations between health literacy, HIV-related knowledge, and information behavior among persons living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonbraker, Samantha; Smaldone, Arlene; Luft, Heidi; Cushman, Linda F; Lerebours Nadal, Leonel; Halpern, Mina; Larson, Elaine

    2018-05-01

    To determine the health literacy levels of persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (PLWH) at a health clinic in the Dominican Republic (DR) and assess associations between health literacy, HIV-related knowledge, and health information behavior (how patients need, seek, receive, and use information). Cross-sectional, descriptive. Participants were 107 PLWH attending the Clinic. A theoretically based, 64-item survey assessing information behavior and HIV-related knowledge was administered in Spanish through individual interviews. Health literacy was assessed using the Short Assessment of Health Literacy-Spanish and English. On average, participants were 40.8 years old and had lived with HIV for 7.7 years. The majority (69.2%) had low health literacy. HIV-related knowledge and information behavior varied by health literacy level and uncertainty regarding a main indicator of disease progression, viral load, was demonstrated regardless of health literacy level. Participants with low health literacy were less likely to answer questions or answer questions correctly and many participants (39.2%) indicated viral transmission can occur through supernatural means. Findings demonstrate unmet information need and that information received may not always be understood. Methods to improve health education are needed to ensure patients receive health information in an understandable way. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Methods of mapping ethnographic data on migration, tourism labor, and health risk in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Karina; Padilla, Mark; Scott, Derrick; Colón-Burgos, José Félix; Reyes, Armando Matiz; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on a mixed-method approach to quantifying qualitative data from the results of an ongoing NIDA-funded ethnographic study entitled “Migration, Tourism, and the HIV/Drug-Use Syndemic in the Dominican Republic”. This project represents the first large-scale mixed method study to identify social, structural, environmental, and demographic factors that may contribute to ecologies of health vulnerability within the Caribbean tourism zones. Our research has identified deportation history as a critical factor contributing to vulnerability to HIV, drugs, mental health problems, and other health conditions. Therefore, understanding the movements of our participants became a vital aspect of this research. This paper describes how we went about translating 37 interviews into visual geographic representations. These methods help develop possible strategies for confronting HIV/AIDS and problematic substance use by examining the ways that these epidemics are shaped by the realities of people’s labor migration and the spaces they inhabit. Our methods for mapping this qualitative data contribute to the ongoing, broadening capabilities of using GIS in social science research. A key contribution of this work is its integration of different methodologies from various disciplines to help better understand complex social problems. PMID:27656039

  18. Alcohol Use and HIV Risk Within Social Networks of MSM Sex Workers in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Diane; Holloway, Ian W; Gildner, Jennifer; Jauregui, Juan C; Garcia Alvarez, Rafael; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent

    2017-11-01

    To examine how alcohol-related HIV risk behaviors within MSM sex workers' social networks (SN) may be associated with individual risk behaviors, respondent-driven and venue-based sampling were used to collect demographic, behavioral and SN characteristics among MSM sex workers in Santo Domingo and Boca Chica (N = 220). The majority of participants reported problem drinking (71.0%) or alcohol use at their last sexual encounter (71.4%). Self-reported problem drinking was associated with SN characteristics (at least one member who recently got drunk aOR = 7.5, no religious/spiritual adviser aOR = 3.0, non-sexual network density aOR = 0.9), while self-reported alcohol use at last sex was associated with individual (drug use at last sex aOR = 4.4) and SN characteristics (at least one member with previous HIV/STI testing aOR = 4.7). Dominican MSM sex workers reported high alcohol use, which may increase their risk for HIV. A better understanding of SN factors associated with individual risk behaviors can help guide appropriate intervention development.

  19. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in children from Verón, a rural city of the Dominican Republic

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    Geers Childers KA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristin A Geers Childers, James R Palmieri, Mindy Sampson, Danielle Brunet Department of Microbiology, Infectious and Emerging Diseases, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, USA Abstract: Gastrointestinal infections impose a great and often silent burden of morbidity and mortality on poor populations in developing countries. The Dominican Republic (DR is a nation on the island of Hispaniola in the Caribbean Sea. Verón is located in La Alta Grácia province in the southeastern corner of the DR. Dominican and Haitian migrant workers come to Verón to work in Punta Cana, a tourist resort area. Few definitive or comprehensive studies of the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic infections have been published in the DR. Historically, most of the definitive studies of water-borne or soil-transmitted parasites in the DR were published more than 30 years ago. Presently, there is a high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasitic infections throughout the poorest areas of the DR and Haiti. In this study we report the prevalence of gastrointestinal protozoan and helminth parasites from children recruited from the Clínica Rural de Verón during 2008 through 2011. Each participant was asked to provide a fecal sample which was promptly examined microscopically for protozoan and helminth parasites using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC fecal flotation technique to concentrate and isolate helminth ova and protozoan cysts. Of the 128 fecal samples examined, 127 were positive for one or more parasites. The age of the infected children ranged from 2–15 years; 61 were males and 66 were females. The only uninfected child was a 9 year old female. Percent infection rates were 43.8% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 8.5% for Enterobius vermicularis, 21.1% for Entamoeba histolytica, and 22.7% for Giardia duodenalis. Of the children examined, 7.8% had double infections. Any plan of action to reduce gastrointestinal parasites in

  20. Disclosure of their HIV status to perinatally infected youth using the adapted Blasini disclosure model in Haiti and the Dominican Republic: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Sagué, Consuelo M.; Dévieux, Jessy; Pinzón-Iregui, Maria Claudia; Lerebours-Nadal, Leonel; Abreu-Pérez, Rosa; Bertrand, Rachel; Rouzier, Vanessa; Gaston, Stephanie; Ibanez, Gladys; Halpern, Mina; Pape, Jean W.; Dorceus, Patricia; Preston, Sharice M.; Dean, Andrew G.; Nicholas, Stephen W.; Blasini, Ileana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the safety, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a culturally-adapted disclosure intervention for perinatally HIV-infected combined antiretroviral therapy patients in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Design A quasi-experimental trial was conducted comparing caregiver–youth pairs who completed the intervention [adapted Blasini disclosure model (aBDM)] to pairs who discontinued aBDM participation before disclosure. aBDM consists of five components: structured healthcare worker training; one-on one pre-disclosure intervention/education sessions for youth (describing pediatric chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes and HIV) and for caregivers (strengthening capacity for disclosure); a scheduled supportive disclosure session; and one-on-one postdisclosure support for caregivers and youth. Methods Caregivers of nondisclosed combined antiretroviral therapy patients aged 10.0–17.8 years were invited to participate. Data were collected by separate one-on-one face-to-face interviews of caregivers and youth by study staff and medical record review by pediatricians at enrollment and 3 months after disclosure or after intervention discontinuation. Results To date, 65 Dominican Republic and 27 Haiti caregiver–youth pairs have enrolled. At enrollment, only 46.4% of youth had viral suppression and 43.4% of caregivers had clinically significant depressive symptomatology. To date, two serious study-related adverse events have occurred. Seven of the 92 (7.6%, 6 in the Dominican Republic) enrolled pairs discontinued participation before disclosure and 39 had completed postdisclosure participation. Median plasma HIV-RNA concentration was lower in youth who completed aBDM than in youth who discontinued participation before aBDM disclosure (<40 versus 8673 copies/ml; P = 0.027). Completers expressed considerable satisfaction with aBDM. Conclusion Preliminary results suggest safety, acceptability, and possible effectiveness of the aBDM. PMID:26049543

  1. A Conflict Transformation Perspective on Efforts to Protect Human Rights of Haitian Migrants and their Descendants in the Dominican Republic

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    Ingvild Skeie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo trata el largo debate en los ámbitos académico y profesional, sobre la relación entre la protección de los derechos humanos y la transformación de conflictos. Son dos enfoques que frecuentemente se han presentado como dos opuestos, representando respectivamente los principios y el pragmatismo. Sin embargo, durante los últimos años, se ha notado una tendencia de considerar cómo ambos campos pueden beneficiarse de las herramientas y las ideas del otro. El artículo utiliza la situación de la República Dominicana como un estudio de caso, observando los esfuerzos de la sociedad civil para promover y proteger los derechos de inmigrantes haitianos y sus descendientes, enfocándose particularmente en el papel de las organizaciones no gubernamentales internacionales (‘INGOs’, por sus siglas en inglés. El artículo argumenta la utilidad de la aplicación del análisis de transformación de conflicto, y específicamente intenta mostrar la relevancia de usar un análisis sistémico de conflicto, analizando y entendiendo los abusos contra los derechos humanos dentro de en una perspectiva más amplia de las relaciones dominico-haitianas. El artículo muestra cómo las intervenciones de las INGO afecta las dinámicas del conflicto tanto positivamente como negativamente, y discute las implicaciones para futuras estrategias para los participantes de la sociedad civil. English: This paper addresses the long-standing debate within academic and practitioner circles about the relationship between human rights protection and conflict transformation. While the two approaches have often been pitted against each other, as representing principles vs. pragmatism respectively, there has over the last years been an increasing tendency to consider how the two camps can benefit from each other's tools and lines of thoughts. The article takes the situation in the Dominican Republic as a case, looking into civil society actors' efforts to promote

  2. Fibrous Platinum-Group Minerals in “Floating Chromitites” from the Loma Larga Ni-Laterite Deposit, Dominican Republic

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    Thomas Aiglsperger

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reports on the observation of enigmatic fibrous platinum-group minerals (PGM found within a chromitite body included in limonite (“floating chromitite” from Ni-laterites in the Dominican Republic. Fibrous PGM have a Ru-Os-Ir-Fe dominated composition and are characterized by fibrous textures explained by grain-forming fibers which are significantly longer (1–5 µm than they are wide (~100 nm. Back-scattered electron (BSE images suggest that these nanofibers are platinum-group elements (PGE-bearing and form <5 µm thick layers of bundles which are oriented orthogonal to grains’ surfaces. Trace amounts of Si are most likely associated with PGE-bearing nanofibers. One characteristic fibrous PGM was studied in detail: XRD analyses point to ruthenian hexaferrum. However, the unpolished fibrous PGM shows numerous complex textures on its surface which are suggestive for neoformation processes: (i features suggesting growth of PGE-bearing nanofibers; (ii occurrence of PGM nanoparticles within film material (biofilm? associated with PGE-bearing nanofibers; (iii a Si-rich and crater-like texture hosting PGM nanoparticles and an Ir-rich accumulation of irregular shape; (iv complex PGM nanoparticles with ragged morphologies, resembling sponge spicules and (v oval forms (<1 µm in diameter with included PGM nanoparticles, similar to those observed in experiments with PGE-reducing bacteria. Fibrous PGM found in the limonite may have formed due to supergene (bio-weathering of fibrous Mg-silicates which were incorporated into desulphurized laurite during stages of serpentinization.

  3. Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, Denise D.; Fulcar, María Altagracia; Terrero, Sergio; Acevedo, Ramón; Farías, Hugo; Palar, Kartika

    2017-01-01

    Background Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. Methods We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. Results Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. Conclusions Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce

  4. Severe food insecurity is associated with overweight and increased body fat among people living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derose, Kathryn P; Ríos-Castillo, Israel; Fulcar, María Altagracia; Payán, Denise D; Palar, Kartika; Escala, Lisbeth; Farías, Hugo; Martínez, Homero

    2018-02-01

    Food insecurity is an important risk factor for overweight and obesity among low-income populations in high income countries, but has not been well-studied among people living with HIV (PLHIV), particularly in resource-poor settings. To explore the association between food insecurity and overweight and obesity among PLHIV in the Dominican Republic, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 160 HIV-infected adults between March-December 2012 in four geographically-dispersed health centers (Santo Domingo, Puerto Plata, San Juan, and Higuey). We collected information on household food insecurity, anthropometric measurements, and socio-demographic data and ran descriptive and multivariate analyses, controlling for fixed effects of clinics and using robust standard errors. Mean age ± SD of participants was 39.9 ± 10.5 years; 68% were women, and 78% were on antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 58% reported severe household food insecurity. After controlling for age, gender, income, having children at home, education, and ART status, severe food insecurity was associated with increased body mass index (BMI) (β = 1.891, p = 0.023) and body fat (β = 4.004, p = 0.007). Age and female gender were also associated with increased body fat (β = 0.259, p insecurity was associated with an increased odds of 3.060 (p = 0.013); no other covariates were independently associated with overweight. The association of severe food insecurity with increased BMI, body fat, and overweight among PLHIV has important implications for clinical care as well as food security and nutrition interventions in resource-poor settings. Integrated programs that combine nutrition education or counseling with sustainable approaches to addressing food insecurity among PLHIV are needed to improve long-term health outcomes of this vulnerable population.

  5. Effects of Hurricane Georges on habitat use by captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) released in the Dominican Republic

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    White, T.H.; Collazo, J.A.; Vilella, F.J.; Guerrero, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    We radio-tagged and released 49 captive-reared Hispaniolan Parrots (Amazona ventralis) in Parque Nacional del Este (PNE), Dominican Republic, during 1997 and 1998. Our primary objective was to develop a restoration program centered on using aviary-reared birds to further the recovery of the critically endangered Puerto Rican Parrot (A. vittata). Hurricane Georges made landfall over the release area on 22 September 1998 with sustained winds of 224 km/h, providing us with a unique opportunity to quantify responses of parrots to such disturbances. Quantitative data on such responses by any avian species are scarce, particularly for Amazona species, many of which are in peril and occur in hurricane-prone areas throughout the Caribbean. Mean home ranges of 18 parrots monitored both before and after the hurricane increased (P = 0.08) from 864 ha (CI = 689-1039 ha) pre-hurricane to 1690 ha (CI = 1003-2377 ha) post-hurricane. The total area traversed by all parrots increased > 300%, from 4884 ha pre-hurricane to 15,490 ha post-hurricane. Before Hurricane Georges, parrot activity was concentrated in coastal scrub, tall broadleaf forest, and abandoned agriculture (conucos). After the hurricane, parrots concentrated their activities in areas of tall broadleaf forest and abandoned conucos. Topographic relief, primarily in the form of large sinkholes, resulted in "resource refugia" where parrots and other frugivores foraged after the hurricane. Habitat use and movement patterns exhibited by released birds highlight the importance of carefully considering effects of season, topography, and overall size of release areas when planning psittacine restorations in hurricane-prone areas. ?? The Neotropical Ornithological Society.

  6. [Breast feeding practice and activities for its promotion in Central America, Panamá and Dominican Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, B; Delgado, H L; Valverde, V; Townsend, J; Fischer, M; Praun, A

    1985-06-01

    This paper summarizes the data presented by the representatives of Central America, Panama and the Dominican Republic at the II Regional Seminar on the Promotion of Breast-Feeding, held in Isla Contadora, Panama, April 25-29, 1983. The representatives of Costa Rica, Honduras and Panama provided up-to-date, representative data in regard to the breast-feeding practice. The average weaning age in the urban and rural areas of Costa Rica is 6 and 4 months, respectively. In Honduras and Panama, 43 and 17% of the infants from urban areas, and 21 and 37% of the babies from rural areas, respectively, were weaned before they reached four months of age. The need for availability of permanent systems to collect information on the breast-feeding practice in the different countries is pointed out. With regard to promotion actions, the absence of a national policy in favor of breast-feeding is evident. Moreover, in the national education systems, little importance is given to the subject. On the other hand, the advances achieved by some hospitals in favoring breast-feeding are mentioned. These include rooming in, the feeding of colostrum to newborns, and the establishment of human milk banks to feed premature babies whose mothers are unable to breast-feed them. Another acknowledged fact is that in the rural areas the agricultural home educators do not reinforce the breast-feeding practice. Also, there is a lack of information on the fulfillment of laws instituted for the protection of pregnant and lactating mothers, as far as pre and postnatal rest is concerned.

  7. Environmental–Structural Interventions to Reduce HIV/STI Risk Among Female Sex Workers in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Deanna; Moreno, Luis; Rosario, Santo; Gomez, Bayardo; Jerez, Hector; Barrington, Clare; Weiss, Ellen; Sweat, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the effectiveness of 2 environmental–structural interventions in reducing risks of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among female sex workers in the Dominican Republic. Methods. Two intervention models were implemented over a 1-year period: community solidarity in Santo Domingo and solidarity combined with government policy in Puerto Plata. Both were evaluated via preintervention–postintervention cross-sectional behavioral surveys, STI testing and participant observations, and serial cross-sectional STI screenings. Results. Significant increases in condom use with new clients (75.3%–93.8%; odds ratio [OR]=4.21; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.55, 11.43) were documented in Santo Domingo. In Puerto Plata, significant increases in condom use with regular partners (13.0%–28.8%; OR=2.97; 95% CI=1.33, 6.66) and reductions in STI prevalence (28.8%–16.3%; OR = 0.50; 95% CI = 0.32, 0.78) were documented, as were significant increases in sex workers’ verbal rejections of unsafe sex (50.0%–79.4%; OR=3.86; 95% CI=1.96, 7.58) and participating sex establishments’ ability to achieve the goal of no STIs in routine monthly screenings of sex workers (OR=1.17; 95% CI=1.12, 1.22). Conclusions. Interventions that combine community solidarity and government policy show positive initial effects on HIV and STI risk reduction among female sex workers. PMID:16317215

  8. Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn P Derose

    Full Text Available Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity.We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV in the Dominican Republic (DR. Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes.Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress.Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to

  9. The Association Between Men's Concern About Demonstrating Masculine Characteristics and Their Sexual Risk Behaviors: Findings from the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; Barrington, Clare; Powell, Wizdom; Gottert, Ann; Lerebours, Leonel; Donastorg, Yeycy; Brito, Maximo O

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative analyses exploring the relationship between masculinities and men's sexual risk behaviors have most commonly used one dimension of masculinities: men's gender ideology. Examining other dimensions may enhance our understanding of and ability to intervene upon this relationship. In this article, we examined the association between gender role conflict/stress (GRC/S)-men's concern about demonstrating masculine characteristics-and three different sexual risk behaviors (having two or more sex partners in the last 30 days; never/inconsistent condom use with non-steady partners; and drinking alcohol at last sex) among a sample of heterosexual men in the Dominican Republic who were participating in an HIV prevention intervention (n = 293). The GRC/S Scale we used was adapted for this specific cultural context and has 17 items (α = 0.75). We used logistic regression to assess the relationship between GRC/S and each sexual behavior, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. In adjusted models, a higher GRC/S score was significantly associated with increased odds of having two or more sex partners in the past 30 days (AOR 1.33, 95 % CI 1.01-1.74), never/inconsistent condom use with non-steady partners (AOR 1.45, 95 % CI 1.04-2.01), and drinking alcohol at last sex (AOR 1.56, 95 % CI 1.13-2.17). These results highlight the importance of expanding beyond gender ideology to understanding the influence of GRC/S on men's sexual risk behaviors. Interventions should address men's concern about demonstrating masculine characteristics to reduce the social and internalized pressure men feel to engage in sexual risk behaviors.

  10. The Changing Face of Plio-Pleistocene Reef Margins: Results of the Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, J.; McNeill, D. F.; Díaz, V.; Swart, P. K.; Pourmand, A.; Grasmueck, M.; Eberli, G. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fringing reef margins of the Caribbean display a characteristic zonation in which Acropora palmata dominates shallow high-energy reef crests and Acropora cervicornis calmer fore-reef slopes and backreef lagoons. The dominance of acroporids across this zonation has been attributed to growth rates 5-100 times faster than other corals. However, the dominance and high accretion potential of acroporid reefs has a relatively recent geologic origin. Caribbean reefs changed profoundly in taxonomic composition, diversity, and dominance structure during late Pliocene and Pleistocene climatic change. These changes coincide with protracted climatic deterioration and cooling between 2.0 to 0.8 Ma, and the onset of high amplitude sea-level fluctuations ~400 ka. The Dominican Republic Drilling Project (DRDP) was initiated to determine how climate change and global high-amplitude sea level changes influenced depositional patterns in Pliocene to Recent reef systems of the Caribbean. A transect of 7 core borings (~700 m total depth) were collected along a transect of the southern coast of the DR in conjunction with over 20 km of ground penetrating radar (GPR) lines. New age constraints based on U/Th geochronometry and radiogenic Sr isotopes, combined with depositional lithofacies, faunal indicators, stable isotope profiles and GPR data have allowed us to correlate between wells and define the internal anatomy and stratal geometry of the individual reef sigmoids and sigmoid sets. The stacking of these sigmoid-shaped reefs produce lateral progradation of approximately 15 km with geometries that generally follow the highstand systems tract model of Pomar and Ward (1994). Based on existing age models eccentricity (high amplitude 100 kyr) sigmoids display increased aggradation and progradation potential compared to reef cycles driven by obliquity (41 kyr).

  11. Modeling Hydrological Services in Shade Grown Coffee Systems: Case Study of the Pico Duarte Region of the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J. D.; Gross, L.; Agosto Filion, N.; Bagstad, K.; Voigt, B. G.; Johnson, G.

    2010-12-01

    The modification of hydrologic systems in coffee-dominated landscapes varies widely according to the degree of shade trees incorporated in coffee farms. Compared to mono-cropping systems, shade coffee can produce both on- and off-farm benefits in the form of soil retention, moderation of sediment transport, and lower hydropower generating costs. The Pico Duarte Coffee Region and surrounding Madres de Las Aguas (Mother of Waters) Conservation Area in the Dominican Republic is emblematic of the challenges and opportunities of ecosystem service management in coffee landscapes. Shade coffee poly-cultures in the region play an essential role in ensuring ecosystem function to conserve water resources, as well as provide habitat for birds, sequester carbon, and provide consumptive resources to households. To model the provision, use, and flow of ecosystem services from coffee farms in the region, an application of the Artificial Intelligence for Ecosystem Services (ARIES) model was developed with particular focus on sediment regulation. ARIES incorporates an array of techniques from data mining, image analysis, neural networks, Bayesian statistics, information theory, and expert systems to model the production, delivery, and demand for ecosystem services. Geospatial data on slope, soils, and vegetation cover is combined with on-farm data collection of coffee production, tree diversity, and intercropping of household food. Given hydropower production and river recreation in the region, the management of sedimentation through on-farm practices has substantial, currently uncompensated value that has received recent attention as the foundation for a payment for ecosystem services system. Scenario analysis of the implications of agro-forestry management choices on farmer livelihoods and the multiple beneficiaries of farm-provided hydrological services provide a foundation for ongoing discussions in the region between local, national, and international interests.

  12. Factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV in the Dominican Republic: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derose, Kathryn P; Payán, Denise D; Fulcar, María Altagracia; Terrero, Sergio; Acevedo, Ramón; Farías, Hugo; Palar, Kartika

    2017-01-01

    Food insecurity contributes to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV. In Latin America and the Caribbean, structural factors such as poverty, stigma, and inequality disproportionately affect women and may fuel both the HIV epidemic and food insecurity. We examined factors contributing to food insecurity among women living with HIV (WLHIV) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Data collection included in-depth, semi-structured interviews in 2013 with 30 WLHIV with indications of food insecurity who resided in urban or peri-urban areas and were recruited from local HIV clinics. In-person interviews were conducted in Spanish. Transcripts were coded using content analysis methods and an inductive approach to identify principal and emergent themes. Respondents identified economic instability as the primary driver of food insecurity, precipitated by enacted stigma in the labor and social domains. Women described experiences of HIV-related labor discrimination in formal and informal sectors. Women commonly reported illegal HIV testing by employers, and subsequent dismissal if HIV-positive, especially in tourism and free trade zones. Enacted stigma in the social domain manifested as gossip and rejection by family, friends, and neighbors and physical, verbal, and sexual abuse by intimate partners, distancing women from sources of economic and food support. These experiences with discrimination and abuse contributed to internalized stigma among respondents who, as a result, were fearful and hesitant to disclose their HIV status; some participants reported leaving spouses and/or families, resulting in further isolation from economic resources, food and other support. A minority of participants described social support by friends, spouses, families and support groups, which helped to ameliorate food insecurity and emotional distress. Addressing food insecurity among WLHIV requires policy and programmatic interventions to enforce existing laws designed to protect the

  13. Implications of the Central America-Dominican Republic-Free Trade Agreement for the nutrition transition in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Corinna; Thow, Anne Marie

    2008-11-01

    To identify potential impacts of the Central America-Dominican Republic-Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) on food consumption patterns associated with the nutrition transition, obesity, and diet-related chronic diseases. Examination of CAFTA-DR agreement to identify measures that have the potential to affect food availability and retail prices. CAFTA-DR includes agreements on tariffs, tariff-rate quotas (TRQs), and sanitary and phytosanitary regulations with direct implications for the availability and prices of various foods. Agreements on investment, services, and intellectual property rights (IPR) are also relevant because they create a business climate more conducive to long-term investment by the transnational food industry. Trade liberalization under CAFTA-DR is likely to increase availability and lower relative prices of two food groups associated with the nutrition transition: meat and processed foods. These outcomes are expected to occur as the direct result of increased imports from the United States and increased production by U.S. companies based in Central America, and the indirect result of increased domestic meat production (due to increased availability of cheaper animal feed) and increased production of processed foods by domestic companies (due to a more competitive market environment). CAFTA-DR is likely to further the nutrition transition in Central America by increasing the consumption of meat; highly processed foods; and new, non-traditional foods. The public health community should be more aware of the implications of trade agreements for dietary health. Governments and related stakeholders should assess the coherence between changes fostered by specific trade agreements with national policies on diet and nutrition.

  14. Community Health Workers and Use of mHealth: Improving Identification of Pregnancy Complications and Access to Care in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnell, Susan; Griggs, Anne; Avila, Gloria; Mack, Jonathan; Bush, Ruth A; Vignato, Julie; Connelly, Cynthia D

    2018-05-01

    This article presents the feasibility and acceptability of using mobile health technology by community health workers (CHWs) in San Juan Province, Dominican Republic, to improve identification of pregnancy complications and access to care for pregnant women. Although most women in the Dominican Republic receive four antenatal care visits, poor women and adolescents in remote areas are more likely to have only one initial prenatal visit to verify the pregnancy. This community-based research began when community leaders raised concern about the numbers of their mothers who died in childbirth annually; San Juan's maternal mortality rate is 144/100,000 compared to the Caribbean rate of 85/100,000. Eight CHWs in three communities were taught to provide third-trimester antenatal assessment, upload the data on a mobile phone application, send the data to the local physician who monitored data for "red flags," and call directly if a mother had an urgent problem. Fifty-two pregnant women enrolled, 38 were followed to delivery, 95 antenatal care postintake were provided, 2 urgent complications required CHW home management of mothers, and there were 0 deaths. Stakeholders endorsed acceptability of intervention. Preliminary data suggest CHWs using mobile health technology is feasible, linking underserved and formal health care systems with provision of primary care in mothers' homes.

  15. [Diagnosis of capacity to perform essential public health functions in the Central American countries, the Dominican Republic, and the Mexican states of Chiapas and Quintana Roo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Block, Miguel Ángel; González Robledo, Luz María; Cuadra Hernández, Silvia Magali

    2013-04-01

    Characterize the capacity of public and private institutions in the Central American countries, the Dominican Republic, and the Mexican states of Chiapas and Quintana Roo to perform essential public health functions (EPHFs). An online survey of 83 organizations in Belize, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, and the Mexican states of Chiapas and Quintana Roo was conducted to learn about their capacity to perform each of the 11 EPHFs. The results were validated in a workshop with representatives of the ministries of health from the seven countries and the two participating Mexican states. High levels of performance capacity were found most often for EPHF 1 (monitoring, evaluation, and analysis of health status of the population), EPHF 2.1.1 (surveillance, research, and control of risks and threats to public health from infectious diseases), and EPHF 5 (policy development and health planning). The greatest weakness was found in EPHF 2.1.2 (surveillance, research, and monitoring of noninfectious diseases). Asymmetries in EPHF performance within each country mainly revealed weaknesses in the laboratory and public health research functions. In the countries and territories analyzed, there is a need to improve strategic performance in most of the EPHFs, as well as to strengthen infrastructure, upgrade equipment, and further develop human resources at both the strategic and the tactical levels. A regional approach should be used to take advantage of the different levels of capacity, with a view to greater strengthening and enhanced technical support and cooperation.

  16. Validity of measures of pain and symptoms in HIV/AIDS infected households in resources poor settings: results from the Dominican Republic and Cambodia

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    Morineau Guy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV/AIDS treatment programs are currently being mounted in many developing nations that include palliative care services. While measures of palliative care have been developed and validated for resource rich settings, very little work exists to support an understanding of measurement for Africa, Latin America or Asia. Methods This study investigates the construct validity of measures of reported pain, pain control, symptoms and symptom control in areas with high HIV-infected prevalence in Dominican Republic and Cambodia Measures were adapted from the POS (Palliative Outcome Scale. Households were selected through purposive sampling from networks of people living with HIV/AIDS. Consistencies in patterns in the data were tested used Chi Square and Mantel Haenszel tests. Results The sample persons who reported chronic illness were much more likely to report pain and symptoms compared to those not chronically ill. When controlling for the degrees of pain, pain control did not differ between the chronically ill and non-chronically ill using a Mantel Haenszel test in both countries. Similar results were found for reported symptoms and symptom control for the Dominican Republic. These findings broadly support the construct validity of an adapted version of the POS in these two less developed countries. Conclusion The results of the study suggest that the selected measures can usefully be incorporated into population-based surveys and evaluation tools needed to monitor palliative care and used in settings with high HIV/AIDS prevalence.

  17. Detection of quinolones in commercial eggs obtained from farms in the Espaíllat Province in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, S; de los Santos, F Solís; Andino, A G; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the use of quinolones in broiler chickens resulted in residues in retail poultry meat obtained from nine districts in the Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic. Residues in poultry products are a concern due to consumer allergies and the potential to develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the use of quinolones in poultry production and our previous findings in poultry meat, the objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of quinolone residues in eggs. Samples were collected from 48 different farms located in three of the four municipalities (Moca, Cayetano Germosén, and Jamao) of the Espaíllat Province. Each farm was sampled three times between July and September for a total of 144 samples. Samples were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for quinolone residues using the Equinox test. Operation systems (cage or floor), seasonality, and location were considered along with egg-producer sizes that were defined as small scale, eggs per day; medium scale, 30,000 to 60,000 eggs per day; or large scale, >60,000 eggs per day. From small-, medium-, and large-scale producers, 69, 50, and 40% of samples were positive for quinolone residues, respectively. A greater number of samples were positive (61%) in floor-laying hen producers compared with those using cages (40%). In the Jamao municipality, 67% of the samples were positive compared with Moca and Cayetano Germosén, where 56 and 25% of samples were positive, respectively. Sampling time had an effect on percent positives: samples collected in July, August, and September were 71, 19, and 63% positive, respectively. Overall, 51% of the samples obtained from eggs produced in the province of Espaíllat were positive for quinolone residues at levels higher than the maximum limits for edible tissue established by the regulatory agencies, including the European Union and U.S. Department of Agriculture. The results obtained from this research confirmed the presence of quinolone

  18. Analysis for the Curricular Design of Tourism Studies in the Dominican Republic: Competences and Professional Profiles to Enable the Prospective Development of the Tourism

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    David Peguero Manzanares

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research project launched by the Ministry of Higher Education, Science and Technology of the Dominican Republic in 2011 with the aim of drawing up a formal and methodological basis that is used as a guideline to redefine the Bachelor’s Degree in Tourism. The main strategic lines of action derived from two essential requirements: the need to cater for a wider range of professional profiles and the need for curricular touristification. On the one hand, the focus was on the development of the graduates’ competences in all the cognitive areas involved in tourism to enable them to set up and manage tourist companies, products and destinations. This would generate innovative options of economic revitalization, decentralizing the current focus on the hospitality industry and incorporating new professional contexts with growth potential in the Dominican tourism sector. On the other hand, tourism-related subjects were reinforced and close cooperation with professionals on active service was highly recommended. Given the heterogeneity of current and potential local tourist destinations, the idiosyncrasy of each regional educational setting was taken into account to encourage entrepreneurship by empowering future managers of small and medium sized companies to make the most of their resources.

  19. 'We talk, we do not have shame': addressing stigma by reconstructing identity through enhancing social cohesion among female sex workers living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Maria Augusta; Barrington, Clare; Kennedy, Caitlin; Perez, Martha; Donastorg, Yeycy; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2017-05-01

    This study explores social cohesion as a strategy used by female sex workers to address layered HIV and sex work-related stigma. Data derive from a thematic analysis of 23 in-depth interviews and 2 focus groups with female sex workers living with HIV enrolled in a multi-level HIV/STI prevention, treatment and care intervention in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Drawing on Foucault's conceptualisation of modern power, discipline and resistance, we argue that social cohesion provides the psychosocial space (of trust, solidarity and mutual aid) to subvert oppressive societal norms, enabling the reconstruction of identity. Among study participants, identity reconstruction happened through the production, repetition and performance of new de-stigmatised narratives that emerged and were solidified through collective interaction. Findings highlight that enabling the collective reconstruction of identity through social cohesion - rather than solely attempting to change individual beliefs - is a successful approach to addressing stigma.

  20. Abriendo Puertas: Feasibility and Effectiveness a Multi-Level Intervention to Improve HIV Outcomes Among Female Sex Workers Living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Deanna; Barrington, Clare; Donastorg, Yeycy; Perez, Martha; Galai, Noya

    2016-09-01

    Female sex workers (FSW) are disproportionately affected by HIV. Yet, few interventions address the needs of FSW living with HIV. We developed a multi-level intervention, Abriendo Puertas (Opening Doors), and assessed its feasibility and effectiveness among a cohort of 250 FSW living with HIV in the Dominican Republic. We conducted socio-behavioral surveys and sexually transmitted infection and viral load testing at baseline and 10-month follow-up. We assessed changes in protected sex and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) with logistic regression using generalized estimating equations. Significant pre-post intervention changes were documented for adherence (72-89 %; p sex (71-81 %; p sex (AOR 1.76; 95 % CI 1.09-2.84). Illicit drug use was negatively associated with both ART adherence and protected sex. Abriendo Puertas is feasible and effective in improving behavioral HIV outcomes in FSW living with HIV.

  1. Ethical challenges for international collaborative research partnerships in the context of the Zika outbreak in the Dominican Republic: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canario Guzmán, Julio Arturo; Espinal, Roberto; Báez, Jeannette; Melgen, Ricardo Elias; Rosario, Patricia Antonia Pérez; Mendoza, Eddys Rafael

    2017-09-25

    The establishment of international collaborative research partnerships in times of infectious disease outbreaks of international importance has been considered an ethical imperative. Frail health research systems in low- and middle-income countries can be an obstacle to achieve the goal of knowledge generation and the search for health equity before, during and after infectious disease outbreaks. A qualitative case study was conducted to identify the challenges and opportunities facing the Dominican Republic with regards to developing international collaborative research partnerships in the context of the Zika outbreak and its ethical implications. Researchers conducted 34 interviews (n = 30 individual; n = 4 group) with 39 participants (n = 23 males; n = 16 females) representing the government, universities, international donor agencies, non-governmental organisations, community-based organisations and medical societies, in two metropolitan cities. Five international collaborative research projects related to the Zika virus were identified. Major ethical challenges were linked to the governance of health research, training of human resources, the institutionalisation of scientific activity, access to research funds and cultural aspects. Capacity-building was not necessarily a component of some partnership agreements. With few exceptions, local researchers were merely participating in data collection and less on defining the problem. Opportunities for collaborative work included the possibility of participation in international research consortiums through calls for proposals. The Dominican government and research stakeholders can contribute to the international response to the Zika virus through active participation in international collaborative research partnerships; however, public recognition of the need to embrace health research as part of public policy efforts is warranted. A working group led by the government and formed by national and

  2. Local Site Characterization Using HVSR, ReMi, and SPAC, Study Case: Soccer Field At Autonomous University of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upegui Botero, F. M.; Rojas Mercedes, N.; Huerta-Lopez, C.; Martinez-Cruzado, J. A.; Suárez, L.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano Moreno, V.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake effects are frequently quantified by the energy liberated at the source, and the degree of damage produced in urban areas. The damage of historic events such as the Mw=8.3, September 19, 1985 Mexico City Earthquake was dominated by the amplification of seismic waves due to local site conditions. The assessment of local site effects can be carried out with site response analyses in order to determine the properties of the subsoil such as the dominant period, and the Vs30. The evaluation of the aforementioned properties is through the analysis of ground motion. However, in locations with low seismicity, the most convenient method to assess the site effect is the analysis of ambient vibration measurements. The Spatial Auto Correlation method (SPAC) can be used to determine a Vs30 model from ambient vibration measurements using a triangular array of sensors. Refraction Microtremor (ReMi) considers the phase velocity of the Rayleigh waves can be separated of apparent velocities; the aim of the ReMI method is to obtain the Vs30 model. The HVSR technique or Nakamura's method has been adopted to obtain the resonant frequency of the site from the calculation of ratio between the Fourier amplitude spectra or PSD spectrum of the horizontal and vertical components of ambient vibration. The aim of this work is to compare the results using different techniques to assess local site conditions in the urban area of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. The data used was collected during the Pan-American Advance Studies Institute (PASI), Workshop held in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic from July 14 to 25, 2013. The PASI was sponsored by IRIS Consortium, NSF and DOE. Results obtained using SPAC, and ReMi, show a comparable model of surface waves velocities. In addition to the above, the HVSR method is combined with the stiffness matrices method for layered soils to calculate a model of velocities and the predominant period on the site. As part of this work a comparison with

  3. Impact of a private sector living wage intervention on depressive symptoms among apparel workers in the Dominican Republic: a quasi-experimental study.

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    Burmaster, Katharine B; Landefeld, John C; Rehkopf, David H; Lahiff, Maureen; Sokal-Gutierrez, Karen; Adler-Milstein, Sarah; Fernald, Lia C H

    2015-08-03

    Poverty reduction interventions through cash transfers and microcredit have had mixed effects on mental health. In this quasi-experimental study, we evaluate the effect of a living wage intervention on depressive symptoms of apparel factory workers in the Dominican Republic. Two apparel factories in the Dominican Republic. The final sample consisted of 204 hourly wage workers from the intervention (99) and comparison (105) factories. In 2010, an apparel factory began a living wage intervention including a 350% wage increase and significant workplace improvements. The wage increase was plausibly exogenous because workers were not aware of the living wage when applying for jobs and expected to be paid the usual minimum wage. These individuals were compared with workers at a similar local factory paying minimum wage, 15-16 months postintervention. Workers' depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Ordinary least squares and Poisson regressions were used to evaluate treatment effect of the intervention, adjusted for covariates. Intervention factory workers had fewer depressive symptoms than comparison factory workers (unadjusted mean CES-D scores: 10.6 ± 9.3 vs 14.7 ± 11.6, p = 0.007). These results were sustained when controlling for covariates (β = -5.4, 95% CI -8.5 to -2.3, p = 0.001). In adjusted analyses using the standard CES-D clinical cut-off of 16, workers at the intervention factory had a 47% reduced risk of clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms compared with workers at the comparison factory (23% vs 40%). Policymakers have long grappled with how best to improve mental health among populations in low-income and middle-income countries. We find that providing a living wage and workplace improvements to improve income and well-being in a disadvantaged population is associated with reduced depressive symptoms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  4. Chlorophyll and suspended sediment mapping to the Caribbean Sea from rivers in the capital city of the Dominican Republic using ALOS AVNIR-2 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuno, Yuji; Miño, Esteban R; Nakai, Satoshi; Mutsuda, Hidemi; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Castro, Rolando; García, Amarillis; Peña, Rosanna; Rodríguez, Marcos; Depratt, G Conrado

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to study the distribution of contaminants in rivers that flow into the Caribbean Sea using chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and suspended sediment (SS) as markers and ALOS AVNIR-2 satellite sensor data. The Haina River (HN) and Ozama and Isabela Rivers (OZ-IS) that flow through the city of Santo Domingo, the capital of the Dominican Republic, were chosen. First, in situ spectral reflectance/Chl-a and SS datasets obtained from these rivers were acquired in March 2011 (case A: with no rain influence) and June 2011 (case B: with rain influence), and the estimation algorithm of Chl-a and SS using AVNIR-2 data was developed from the datasets. Moreover, the developed algorithm was applied to AVNIR-2 data in November 2010 for case A and August 2010 for case B. Results revealed that for Chl-a and SS estimations under cases A and B conditions, the reflectance ratio of AVNIR-2 band 4 and band 3 (AV4/AV3) and the reflectance of AVNIR-2 band 4 (AV4) were effective. The Chl-a and SS mapping results obtained using AVNIR-2 data corresponded with the field survey results. Finally, an outline of the distribution of contaminants at the mouth of the river that flows into the Caribbean Sea was obtained for both rivers in cases A and B.

  5. Vitamin D status of wild Ricord's iguanas (Cyclura ricordii) and captive and wild rhinoceros iguanas (Cyclura cornuta cornuta) in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramer, Jan C; Maria, Roberto; Reichard, Tim; Tolson, Peter J; Chen, Tai C; Holick, Michael F

    2005-06-01

    Calcidiol (25-hydroxyvitamin D) values are reported for 22 wild Ricord's iguanas (Cyclura ricordii) and seven wild rhinoceros iguanas (Cyclura cornuta cornuta). Calcitriol (1,25-hydroxyvitamin D) values are reported for 12 wild Ricord's iguanas and seven wild rhinoceros iguanas. These animals were captured as part of a larger health assessment study being conducted on Ricord's iguanas in Isla Cabritos National Park, Dominican Republic. A total of 13 captive rhinoceros iguanas held outdoors at Parque Zoológico Nacional were also sampled for comparison. Mean concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were 554 nmol/L (222 ng/ml) with a range of 250-1,118 nmol/L (100-448 ng/ml) for wild Ricord's iguanas, 332 nmol/L (133 ng/ml) with a range of 260-369 nmol/L (104-148 ng/ml) for wild rhinoceros iguanas, and 317 nmol/L (127 ng/ml) with a range of 220-519 nmol/L (88-208 ng/ml) for captive rhinoceros iguanas. On the basis of these results, serum concentrations of at least 325 nmol/L (130 ng/ml) for 25-hydroxyvitamin D should be considered normal for healthy Ricord's and rhinoceros iguanas.

  6. HIV Stigma Mediates the Association Between Social Cohesion and Consistent Condom Use Among Female Sex Workers Living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Maria Augusta; Nguyen, Trang Q; Barrington, Clare; Perez, Martha; Donastorg, Yeycy; Kerrigan, Deanna

    2018-07-01

    Evidence indicates that social cohesion is a successful strategy to improve consistent condom use (CCU) among female sex workers. However, the individual and layered or combined effect that various types of overlapping stigmas may have on CCU between female sex workers living with HIV and their clients and steady partners has not been analyzed. Drawing on the Abriendo Puertas cohort of female sex workers living with HIV in the Dominican Republic, we used structural equation modeling to test the hypothesis that both HIV stigma and sex work stigma mediate the association between social cohesion and CCU and that they have a layered effect. The results indicated that HIV stigma mediated the association between social cohesion and CCU with clients and partners, while sex work-related stigma did not. There was no evidence of a layered HIV stigma and sex work stigma effect, which may be due to methodological limitations to handle highly correlated latent variables. Findings highlight the need to address internalized HIV stigma within the context of community-based approaches to enhance their HIV prevention impact. This will help to reduce the risk of HIV re-infection with a new distinct HIV viral strain, STI infection, and onward HIV transmission among female sex workers living with HIV.

  7. Glowing seashells: diversity of fossilized coloration patterns on coral reef-associated cone snail (Gastropoda: Conidae shells from the Neogene of the Dominican Republic.

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    Jonathan R Hendricks

    Full Text Available The biology of modern Conidae (cone snails--which includes the hyperdiverse genus Conus--has been intensively studied, but the fossil record of the clade remains poorly understood, particularly within an evolutionary framework. Here, ultraviolet light is used to reveal and characterize the original shell coloration patterns of 28 species of cone snails from three Neogene coral reef-associated deposits from the Cibao Valley, northern Dominican Republic. These fossils come from the upper Miocene Cercado Fm. and lower Pliocene Gurabo Fm., and range in age from about 6.6-4.8 Ma. Comparison of the revealed coloration patterns with those of extant species allow the taxa to be assigned to three genera of cone snails (Profundiconus, Conasprella, and Conus and at least nine subgenera. Thirteen members of these phylogenetically diverse reef faunas are described as new species. These include: Profundiconus? hennigi, Conasprella (Ximeniconus ageri, Conus anningae, Conus lyelli, Conus (Atlanticonus? franklinae, Conus (Stephanoconus gouldi, Conus (Stephanoconus bellacoensis, Conus (Ductoconus cashi, Conus (Dauciconus garrisoni, Conus (Dauciconus? zambaensis, Conus (Spuriconus? kaesleri, Conus (Spuriconus? lombardii, and Conus (Lautoconus? carlottae. Each of the three reef deposits contain a minimum of 14-16 cone snail species, levels of diversity that are similar to modern Indo-Pacific reef systems. Finally, most of the 28 species can be assigned to modern clades and thus have important implications for understanding the biogeographic and temporal histories of these clades in tropical America.

  8. Examining the policy climate for HIV prevention in the Caribbean tourism sector: a qualitative study of policy makers in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark B; Reyes, Armando Matiz; Connolly, Maureen; Natsui, Shaw; Puello, Adrian; Chapman, Helena

    2012-05-01

    The Caribbean has the highest prevalence rates of HIV/AIDS outside sub-Saharan Africa, and a broad literature suggests an ecological association between tourism areas and sexual vulnerability. Tourism employees have been shown to engage in high rates of sexual risk behaviours. Nevertheless, no large-scale or sustained HIV prevention interventions have been conducted within the tourism industry. Policy barriers and resources are under-studied. In order to identify the policy barriers and resources for HIV prevention in the tourism sector, our research used a participatory approach involving a multisectoral coalition of representatives from the tourism industry, government, public health and civil society in the Dominican Republic. We conducted 39 in-depth semi-structured interviews with policy makers throughout the country focusing on: prior experiences with HIV prevention policies and programmes in the tourism sector; barriers and resources for such policies and programmes; and future priorities and recommendations. Findings suggest perceptions among policy makers of barriers related to the mobile nature of tourism employees; the lack of centralized funding; fear of the 'image problem' associated with HIV; and the lack of multisectoral policy dialogue and collaboration. Nevertheless, prior short-term experiences and changing attitudes among some private sector tourism representatives suggest emerging opportunities for policy change. We argue that the time is ripe for dialogue across the public-private divide in order to develop regulatory mechanisms, joint responsibilities and centralized funding sources to ensure a sustainable response to the HIV-tourism linkage. Policy priorities should focus on incorporating HIV prevention as a component of occupational health; reinforcing workers' health care rights as guaranteed by existing law; using private sector tourism representatives who support HIV prevention as positive role models for national campaigns; and

  9. A Clinical Trial to Introduce Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in Areas of High Prevalence in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Maximo O.; Lerebours, Leonel; Volquez, Claudio; Basora, Emmanuel; Khosla, Shaveta; Lantigua, Flavia; Flete, Roberto; Rosario, Riqui; Rodriguez, Luis A.; Fernandez, Mathius; Donastorg, Yeycy; Bailey, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision (VMMC) is an effective strategy to reduce the risk of HIV infection. Studies conducted in the Dominican Republic (DR) suggest that acceptability of VMMC among men may be as high as 67%. The goal of this clinical trial was to assess the acceptability, uptake and safety for VMMC services in two areas of high HIV prevalence in the country. Methods This was a single-arm, non-randomized, pragmatic clinical trial. Study personnel received background information about the risks and benefits of VMMC and practical training on the surgical technique. A native speaking research assistant administered a questionnaire of demographics, sexual practices and knowledge about VMMC. One week after the surgery, participants returned for wound inspection and to answer questions about their post-surgical experience. Results 539 men consented for the study. Fifty seven were excluded from participation for medical or anatomical reasons and 28 decided not to have the procedure after providing consent. A total of 454 men were circumcised using the Forceps Guided Method Under Local Anesthesia. The rate of adverse events (AE) was 4.4% (20% moderate, 80% mild). There were no serious AEs and all complications resolved promptly with treatment. Eighty eight percent of clients reported being “very satisfied” and 12% were “somewhat satisfied” with the outcome at the one-week postoperative visit. Conclusions Recruitment and uptake were satisfactory. Client satisfaction with VMMC was high and the rate of AEs was low. Roll out of VMMC in targeted areas of the DR is feasible and should be considered. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02337179 PMID:26367187

  10. Pliocene-Lower Pleistocene shallow-water mixed siliciclastics and carbonates (Yanigua and Los Haitises formations) in eastern Hispaniola (Dominican Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Juan C.; Díaz de Neira, Alberto; Lasseur, Eric; Mediato, José; Aguirre, Julio; Abad, Manuel; Hernaiz-Huerta, Pedro P.; Monthel, Jacques; Pérez-Valera, Fernando; Lopera, Eusebio

    2012-07-01

    The virtually unfolded sedimentary cover of the Cordilleras Central and Oriental in the eastern Dominican Republic (eastern Hispaniola, tropical North Atlantic) largely consists of Pliocene to Early Pleistocene mixed siliciclastics and carbonates. These deposits have been grouped into two laterally interfingering mapping units, the Yanigua and Los Haitises formations. The former (mainly siliciclastics) comprises marl, marly limestone, and minor conglomerate, sandstone, lignite, and carbonaceous clay and crops out closest to the basement. The Los Haitises Formation mainly consists of limestone and intercalating beds of marly limestone and marl. Lithological mapping at the 1:50,000 scale and facies analysis of twelve measured sections and of additional fourteen outcrops suggest that these deposits mainly formed on a shallow-water marine platform fringing the precursor reliefs of the Cordillera Oriental and the southeastern end of the Cordillera Central. Only a limited proportion of sediment formed in floodplains and marshes. Marl and marly limestone dominated the inner platform sediments. Terrigenous mud decreased away from the emergent basement and carbonate sedimentation dominated the more external platform. Corals, molluscs, echinoids, foraminifers, bryozoans, coralline algae, and Halimeda are the main components with varying amounts of carbonate mud. The platform was generally a low-energy environment with seagrass patches. In the inner platform, corals grew as isolated colonies or as small patch reefs dominated by Porites in marly and bioclastic substrates. Branching corals (Stylophora and Acropora) grew in extensive carpets in more distal areas. At least in the last stage of its development (Early Pleistocene), the platform was rimmed by a reef barrier similar to the Holocene Caribbean barrier reefs, with Acropora gr. palmata, A. cervicornis, Porites, Montastrea, Siderastrea, and Diploria as the main reef builders.

  11. Civil society and political power in the Dominican Republic Sociedad civil y poder político en República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana MORGAN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Latin American context, the Dominican Republic displays high levels of civic engagement and political activism, yet they have not translated into a civil society that is able to exercise considerable influence in reforming the political system or enhancing democracy. Building on this observation, this article explores two questions. The first is if there is tendency toward dual participation in civic and political organizations, which reduces civil society’s ability to pressure political parties and the State. The second refers to the nature of the connections that civil society participants have with the State and with political parties. The analysis demonstrates that an important segment of the population that participates in civic associations also participates in political parties and in clientelist networks.República Dominicana registra un alto nivel de asociacionismo social y activismo político en el contexto latinoamericano. Esto, sin embargo, no se ha traducido en mayor capacidad de la sociedad civil dominicana para reformar el sistema político y mejorar la democracia. Con este planteamiento de fondo, se exploran dos preguntas. La primera es si existe una tendencia a la coparticipación en las organizaciones sociales y políticas que reduce la capacidad de presión de la sociedad civil sobre los partidos y el Estado. La segunda refiere a la naturaleza del vínculo de los participantes en organizaciones de la sociedad civil con el Estado y los partidos. El análisis muestra el involucramiento de un segmento de participantes en actividades cívicas, también en actividades partidarias y en redes clientelares.

  12. Medical students' perceptions about the added educational value of student-run HIV/AIDS educational campaigns in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Helena J; Bottentuit-Rocha, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This purpose of this report was to examine the perceptions of medical students about the strengths, limitations, and recommendations for improvement of the first known student-run HIV/AIDS educational campaigns in the Dominican Republic (DR), as they relate to the added value applied to their educational training. A retrospective review was conducted on evaluation reports completed by five medical students who coordinated the implementation of three annual HIV/AIDS educational campaigns in five DR communities, between 2012 and 2014. Thematic analysis was used to identify emerging themes related to perceived strengths, limitations, and recommendations for improvement and develop an acronym related to program strengths as value added to medical education. Students highlighted that program strengths were the use of social media technology to facilitate communication and culture-based creativity to capture the attention of target audiences; and limitations were inadequate financial support and HIV-related cultural stigma, due to lack of disease knowledge and awareness or perceived contrasts between the federal system and faith-based community. Recommendations for program improvement, such as comprehensive event preparation and knowing the target audience, were described as key to maximizing the delivery of health messages. Our results highlighted that medical students gained expertise in the effective use of social media technology, culture-based creativity, and team synergy to disseminate HIV/AIDS health information across five DR communities. Students participated in these extracurricular community health campaigns, strengthening skills in communication, health advocacy, and leadership for their medical training. They served as human resources for health and can pave the way as future clinicians and indispensable health educators in local and national health collaborations.

  13. Abriendo Puertas: baseline findings from an integrated intervention to promote prevention, treatment and care among FSW living with HIV in the Dominican Republic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeycy Donastorg

    Full Text Available Female sex workers (FSW are often the focus of primary HIV prevention efforts. However, little attention has been paid to the prevention, treatment, and care needs of FSW living with HIV. Based on formative research, we developed an integrated model to promote prevention and care for FSW living with HIV in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, including (1 individual counseling and education; (2 peer navigation; (3 clinical provider training; and (4 community mobilization. We enrolled 268 FSW living with HIV into the intervention and conducted socio-behavioral surveys, sexually transmitted infection (STI testing, and viral load (VL assessments. We used multivariate logistic regression to identify behavioral and socio-demographic factors associated with detectable VL (>50 copies/mL and STI prevalence. Over half of all participants (51.9% had a detectable VL, even though most received HIV-related care in the last 6 months (85.1% and were currently on anti-retroviral treatment (ART (72.4%. Factors positively associated with a detectable VL included being 18-35 years of age (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 2.46, 95% CI 1.31-4.60, having ever used drugs (AOR 2.34, 95% CI 1.14-4.79, and having ever interrupted ART (AOR 3.09, 95% CI 1.44-6.59. Factors protective against having a detectable VL included being single (AOR 0.45, 95% 0.20-0.98 and being currently on ART (AOR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.41. Nearly one-quarter (23.1% had an STI, which was associated with being single (AOR 3.21, 95% CI 1.27-8.11 and using drugs in the last 6 months (AOR 3.54, 95% CI 1.32-9.45. Being on ART was protective against STI (AOR 0.51, 95% CI 0.26-1.00. Baseline findings indicate significant barriers to VL suppression and STI prevention among FSW living with HIV and highlight gaps in the continuum of HIV care and treatment. These findings have important implications for both the individual health of FSW and population-level HIV transmission dynamics.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of environmental-structural communication interventions for HIV prevention in the female sex industry in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, Michael; Kerrigan, Deanna; Moreno, Luis; Rosario, Santo; Gomez, Bayardo; Jerez, Hector; Weiss, Ellen; Barrington, Clare

    2006-01-01

    Behavior change communication often focuses on individual-level variables such as knowledge, perceived risk, self-efficacy, and behavior. A growing body of evidence suggests, however, that structural interventions to change the policy environment and environmental interventions designed to modify the physical and social environment further bolster impact. Little is known about the cost-effectiveness of such comprehensive intervention programs. In this study we use standard cost analysis methods to examine the incremental cost-effectiveness of two such interventions conducted in the Dominican Republic in sex establishments. In Santo Domingo the intervention was environmental; in Puerto Plata it was both environmental and structural (levying financial sanctions on sex establishment owners who failed to follow the intervention). The interventions in both sites included elements found in more conventional behavior change communication (BCC) programs (e.g., community mobilization, peer education, educational materials, promotional stickers). One key aim was to examine whether the addition of policy regulation was cost-effective. Data for the analysis were gleaned from structured behavioral questionnaires administered to female sex workers and their male regular paying partners in 41 sex establishments conducted pre- and post-intervention (1 year follow-up); data from HIV sentinel surveillance, STI screening results conducted for the intervention; and detailed cost data we collected. We estimated the number of HIV infections averted from each of the two intervention models and converted these estimates to the number of disability life years saved as compared with no intervention. One-way, two-way, three-way, and multivariate sensitivity analysis were conducted on model parameters. We examine a discount rate of 0%, 3% (base case), and 6% for future costs and benefits. The intervention conducted in Santo Domingo (community mobilization, promotional media, and interpersonal

  15. How accurate is our misinformation? A randomized comparison of four survey interview methods to measure risk behavior among young adults in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Vivo

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the most effective survey interview method for measuring risk behavior among young adults in the Dominican Republic. Methods: 1200 young adults were randomized to one of four different survey interview methods: two interviewer-assisted methods [face-to-face interview (FTFI, and computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI], and two self-administered methods [self-administered interview (SAI, and audio computer-assisted, self-administered interview (ACASI]. Youth were asked about a wide range of youth-specific risk behaviors, including violence, substance use, as well as sexual and reproductive health. Quality of data collected was examined by looking at how the survey was administered, including identifying two sources of errors that typically threaten data quality11 This study assumes that bias does not change with sample size. In order to increase the sample size, the data collection period was extended, leaving everything else unchanged. It is, therefore, assumed that the decreasing effects of the learning curve are negligible.: (i errors at the individual level with regards to survey methodology performance and cognitive difficulties [measured with the Response Consistency Index (RCI]; and (ii errors at the aggregate level (how desirability bias, interviewer gender, and interview privacy settings affect responses. Results: No statistically significant differences in participant non-response rates were found at the individual level across all survey interview methods. At the individual question level, self-completion methods generated higher non-response and error rates than assisted methods. The SAI method showed the poorest performance of all four methods in terms of non-response rate (1.6%22 Percentage of data with non-response values at the question level. and RCI (83.0%.At the aggregate level, the prevalence of several key risk indicators was statistically significant between methods. Using means-adjustment for

  16. Alliances, party-switching and pork-barrel politics: the Dominican Republic 2010 legislative elections Aliados, tránsfugas y barrilitos: las elecciones legislativas de 2010 en República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén BENITO SÁNCHEZ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the explanatory factors of the outcome of the legislative and municipal elections of 2010 in Dominican Republic and the recent transformation experienced by the Dominican party system from a tripartism to a plural bipartism.. The leadership of President Fernández, its image, popularity, and pragmatism, are the key factors in the electoral success of the PLD, favored by endemic factionalism into the PRD and the progressive collapse of the PRSC as well. In this context, the PLD consolidated its electoral dominance thanks to the support of minority parties and will control the Legislative branch for the next six years.Este artículo analiza las claves explicativas de los resultados de las elecciones legislativas y municipales de 2010 en República Dominicana así como de la reciente transformación que ha experimentado el sistema de partidos dominicano, del tripartidismo al bipartidismo plural. El liderazgo del presidente Leonel Fernández, su imagen, popularidad y pragmatismo son la clave del éxito electoral del PLD, favorecido también por el faccionalismo endémico del PRD y la descomposición progresiva del PRSC. En esta contienda, el PLD consolida su dominio electoral gracias al apoyo de los partidos minoritarios y se asegura el control del Legislativo durante los próximos seis años.

  17. Duration of maternal breast-feeding in the Dominican Republic Duración de la lactancia materna en la República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonelo E. Bautista

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The study reported here explored the influence of maternal, health care, pregnancy, and child-related factors upon the duration of total breast-feeding (DTBF in the Dominican Republic. The data for the study, which included 1984 mother-child pairs representative of the Dominican population, came from the National Health Survey of 1991. The child in each of the mother-child pairs was the mother's last-born child who had been breast-fed and was less than 3 years of age at the time of the survey. Interviews with the mothers were used to collect information about the duration of breast-feeding and the factors studied (including maternal age, urban/rural residence, parity, mother's socioeconomic status, maternal education, maternal employment, mother's desire for pregnancy, type of delivery, place of delivery, the type of health worker attending the delivery, the child's sex, the child's birth weight, the time elapsed between delivery and initiation of breast-feeding, the child's age at complete weaning, and the child's age at the time of the survey. The child's risk of complete weaning at different ages was calculated using the life table method, and the independent effect of each of the study variables was estimated using Cox's regression model. The median DTBF was 7 months. The risk that a child would be completely weaned (the relative rate of complete weaning, or RRCW was found to be higher among children who received foods other than breast milk and water while still breast-feeding (RRCW = 8.56; 95% CI = 4.25-17.20, whose mothers had some university education (RRCW = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.24-1.77, who began breast-feeding a day or more after delivery (RRCW = 1.25; 95% CI = 1.11-1.40, who were born in either public health institutions (RRCW = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.24-2.11 or private health institutions (RRCW = 2.19; 95% CI = 1.65-2.91, and who were the first-born of mothers with low socioeconomic status (RRCW = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.45-2.24. According to the

  18. Abordaje didáctico de la comprensión de los problemas algebraicos en el nivel secundario de la República Dominicana / A didactic approach to algebraic problems understanding at public junior high scools of Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Altagracia Castro Araujo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper describes partial results of a research on the understanding of algebraic problems in the secondary level of the Dominican Republic, where the current state of this problem is characterized in public schools in the country with the objective of offering a didactic approach. The research was carried out with the use of methods of the theoretical level, in particular, the analysis-synthesis and the documentary revision, as well as empirical methods. For the characterization, the indicators of teaching planning dimensions, execution of teaching-learning the process of the understanding of algebraic problems and analysis of the performance of the students in the understanding of algebraic problems are established. From this characterization, a methodological strategy was designed as a solution to the problem described. Keywords: problem-solving, abstract thinking, instructional design, teaching method.

  19. A Cross-National Comparison of Suicide Attempts, Drug Use, and Depressed Mood Among Dominican Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Juan B; Masyn, Katherine E; Thorpe, Lorna E; Peña, Stephanie M; Caine, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    We compared suicide attempts, depressed mood, and drug use of 1,710 Dominican public high school students in New York City (NYC) and 9,573 in the Dominican Republic (DR) in 2009. Compared to DR Dominicans, NYC Dominicans were more likely to have reported lifetime marijuana use (27.6% vs. 1.5%), lifetime inhalant use (11.0% vs. 7.6%), lifetime other drug use (9.9% vs. 3.0%), depressed mood (31.3% vs. 27.2%), and suicide attempt (13.8% vs. 8.8%). The results of this study supported the hypothesis that substantial increases in illicit drug use, especially cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, and methamphetamines, among NYC Dominican youth account for their increased risk for suicide attempts compared to their DR Dominican counterparts. It also identified suicide attempts as a public health problem among NYC Dominicans, the largest NYC Latino immigrant population. © 2015 The American Association of Suicidology.

  20. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 23 November 2006. It was signed in Vienna on 20 September 2007

  1. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 23 November 2006. It was signed in Vienna on 20 September 2007 [es

  2. Hydropower scene: boost for Dominican power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    When it is completed in 1991, the 150 MW Jiguey-Aguacate multi-purpose hydropower scheme will be the largest hydro project in the Dominican Republic. Construction of the scheme was recommended as a result of various studies carried out by the Instituto Nacional de Recursos Hidraulicos (INDHRI), which examined the hydropower potential of the Niazo river. Work is now in progress on site, with commissioning of the first unit expected in 1990.

  3. Effects of Free Trade Agreements on Foreign Trade: Predictions for Puerto Rico in the face of CAFTA-DR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Signoret

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects of regional free trade agreements on international trade activity. The analysis estimates gravity models of trade that serve to assess the likely impact of CAFTA-DR on Puerto Rico and United States’ foreign trade. The estimated effects of CAFTA-DR on the US are invariably modest. For the case of Puerto Rico, the effects are of considerably larger importance, albeit still somewhat small. The inclusion of the Dominican Republic into the Agreement, however, is critical for these latter results.

  4. From Quisqueya: In Search of New Horizons. Dominican Cultural Heritage Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Anibal; Aquino, Jaime; Lantigua, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Digna; Soto, Alejandro

    This cultural heritage resource guide has been prepared as a tool for teachers to help them understand the cultural heritage of Dominican students and their communities. The Dominican Republic, which occupies two-thirds of the island of Hispaniola, has a long history dominated by the struggle for independence. In their efforts to create a better…

  5. Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. An agreement by Exchange of Letters with the Dominican Republic to amend the Protocol to the Safeguards Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Exchange of Letters, constituting an agreement to amend the Protocol to the Agreement between the Dominican Government and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Member States of the Agency [es

  6. Discovery of Ni-smectite-rich saprolite at Loma Ortega, Falcondo mining district (Dominican Republic): geochemistry and mineralogy of an unusual case of "hybrid hydrous Mg silicate - clay silicate" type Ni-laterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauler, Esperança; Lewis, John F.; Villanova-de-Benavent, Cristina; Aiglsperger, Thomas; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Domènech, Cristina; Gallardo, Tamara; Longo, Francisco; Galí, Salvador

    2017-10-01

    Hydrous Mg silicate-type Ni-laterite deposits, like those in the Falcondo district, Dominican Republic, are dominated by Ni-enriched serpentine and garnierite. Recently, abundant Ni-smectite in the saprolite zone have been discovered in Loma Ortega, one of the nine Ni-laterite deposits in Falcondo. A first detailed study on these Ni-smectites has been performed (μXRD, SEM, EPMA), in addition to a geochemical and mineralogical characterisation of the Loma Ortega profile (XRF, ICP-MS, XRD). Unlike other smectite occurrences in laterite profiles worldwide, the Loma Ortega smectites are trioctahedral and exhibit high Ni contents never reported before. These Ni-smectites may be formed from weathering of pyroxene and olivine, and their composition can be explained by the mineralogy and the composition of the Al-depleted, olivine-rich parent ultramafic rock. Our study shows that Ni-laterites are mineralogically complex, and that a hydrous Mg silicate ore and a clay silicate ore can be confined to the same horizon in the weathering profile, which has significant implications from a recovery perspective. In accordance, the classification of "hybrid hydrous Mg silicate - clay silicate" type Ni-laterite deposit for Loma Ortega would be more appropriate.

  7. Physical activity and experience of total knee replacement in patients one to four years postsurgery in the dominican republic: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenquist, Derek S; Elman, Scott A; Davis, Aileen M; Bogart, Laura M; Brownlee, Sarah A; Sanchez, Edward S; Santiago, Adianez; Ghazinouri, Roya; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the second leading cause of years lived with disability globally. Total knee replacement (TKR) offers patients with advanced arthritis relief from pain and the opportunity to return to physical activity. We investigated the impact of TKR on physical activity for patients in a developing nation. As part of the Operation Walk Boston surgical mission program, we interviewed 18 Dominican patients (78% women) who received TKR about their level of physical activity after surgery. Qualitative interviews were conducted in Spanish, and English transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Most patients found that TKR increased their participation in physical activities in several life domains, such as occupational or social pursuits. Some patients limited their own physical activities due to uncertainty about medically appropriate levels of joint use and postoperative physical activity. Many patients noted positive effects of TKR on mood and mental health. For most patients in the study, religion offered a framework for understanding their receipt of and experience with TKR. Our findings underscore the potential of TKR to permit patients in the developing world to return to physical activities. This research also demonstrates the influence of patients' education, culture, and religion on patients' return to physical activity. As the global burden of musculoskeletal disease increases, it is important to characterize the impact of activity limitation on patients' lives in diverse settings and the potential for surgical intervention to ease the burden of chronic arthritis. Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. African Journals Online: Syrian Arab Republic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Democratic Republic, Congo, Republic, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Curaçao, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, Arab Rep.

  9. The Text of the Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1974-02-21

    The text of the Agreement, and of the Protocol thereto, between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 11 October 1973, pursuant to Article 24. Protocol entered into force on the same date, pursuant to Article II thereof.

  10. The Text of the Agreement between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The text of the Agreement, and of the Protocol thereto, between the Dominican Republic and the Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 11 October 1973, pursuant to Article 24. Protocol entered into force on the same date, pursuant to Article II thereof.

  11. Energy in the Dominican Republic. A few historical considerations of the problems and integration of renewable energies; L’énergie en République Dominicaine. Quelques considérations historiques du problème et de l’impulsion des énergies renouvelables.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priam, Judith

    2015-01-15

    Energy production on islands is based, as on continents, on fossil fuels. In the Dominican Republic, the production has been insufficient, a recognized fact since 1897. In 1998, the opening to privatization of energy services was impelled by the Comisión para la Reforma de la Empresa Pública (CREP). Then the promulgation of the Ley General de Electricidad in July 2001 by decree #125 is a first step for renewable energy integration in the electric system. We present a historical approach to the energy problem using documents of 1897, 1946, 1989 and 2001(point 1). Then we present the components of energy production in the Dominican Republic by 2000 (point 2). The demand reached for that year 2000 MW, with only 1600 MW installed capacity. Some elements of the first institutional and legislative impulses to integrate renewable energy in the system are included (point 3). Finally, we underline the last 2013 crisis and show how only fossil energy allows to respond rapidly (point 4). In fact, renewable energies require a long term for planning and execution.

  12. Dominican NGOs move from competition to collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, H

    1995-07-01

    In 1992, the seven nongovernmental organizations (NGO) working to prevent HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic received most of their funding and technical assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID). In September 1992, however, USAID's AIDSTECH project asked the AIDS Control and Prevention (AIDSCAP) Project to prepare the NGOs for the time when USAID would no longer be their main source of support. To that end, AIDSCAP worked with NGO staff to assess their technical, managerial, and administrative needs, and identified a lack of administrative and managerial experience among many NGO staff. AIDSCAP therefore developed an institutional strengthening plan, including a series of capacity building workshops, in 1993. Many NGOs, however, foreseeing the impending need to compete with other NGOs for limited funds, were not interested in sharing ideas and working together. This article describes how Coordinadora de Animacion Socio-Cultural (CASCO) and the Instituto Dominicano de Desarrollo Integral (IDDI) competed in the context of uncertainty over continued donor funding, but now meet regularly to coordinate HIV/AIDS prevention projects for youth in the Dominican Republic.

  13. Impact of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine on bacterial meningitis in the Dominican Republic Impacto de la vacuna conjugada contra Haemophilus influenzae tipo b sobre la meningitis bacteriana en la República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen H. Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Widespread use of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib vaccines has dramatically reduced the burden of Hib disease throughout the Americas. Few studies have evaluated the impact of Hib vaccination on non-culture-confirmed disease. This study analyzed trends in probable bacterial meningitis before and after the introduction of Hib vaccine in the Dominican Republic and estimated vaccine effectiveness against Hib meningitis. METHODS: Meningitis cases among children OBJETIVOS: El uso generalizado de la vacuna contra Haemophilus influenzae tipo b (Hib ha permitido reducir radicalmente la carga de enfermedad por Hib en las Américas. Pocos estudios han evaluado el impacto de la vacunación contra Hib sobre los casos no confirmados mediante cultivo. En este estudio se analizaron las tendencias en el número de casos probables de meningitis bacteriana antes y después de la introducción de la vacuna contra Hib en la República Dominicana y se estimó la eficacia de la vacuna contra la meningitis. MÉTODOS: Se identificaron los casos de meningitis en niños menores de 5 años a partir de los registros de ingreso del principal hospital pediátrico de Santo Domingo entre 1998 y 2004. Los casos de meningitis con probable etiología bacteriana se clasificaron según criterios de laboratorio; los casos confirmados contaban con cultivo bacteriano positivo o detección de antígenos específicos en el líquido cefalorraquídeo. Se calcularon las tasas de incidencia acumulada de casos confirmados y probables de meningitis en los niños que vivían en el Distrito Nacional. Los casos confirmados de meningitis por Hib se incorporaron a un estudio de casos y controles -pareados según la edad y el barrio de residencia- para calcular la eficacia de la vacuna. RESULTADOS: Antes de la introducción de la vacuna, la tasa anual de meningitis de posible etiología bacteriana era de 49 casos por 100 000 niños menores de 5 años; de los casos confirmados de

  14. Tuberculosis patients in the Dominican Republic face severe direct and indirect costs and need social protection Los pacientes con tuberculosis en la República Dominicana afrontan altos costos directos e indirectos, y necesitan protección social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Mauch

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine direct and indirect costs incurred by new, retreatment, and multidrug-resistant (MDR tuberculosis (TB patients in the Dominican Republic before and during diagnosis, and during treatment, to generate an evidence base and formulate recommendations. METHODS: The "Tool to Estimate Patients' Costs" was adapted to the local setting, translated into Spanish, and pretested. Patients attending 32 randomly selected health facilities in six chosen study areas on the study days were interviewed. Responses from patients 18-65 years old who had received treatment for at least one month and provided signed informed consent were collected, entered into a database, and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 200 patients were interviewed. For most respondents, direct and indirect costs increased while income decreased. Total costs amounted to a median of US$ 908 for new patients, US$ 432 for retreatment patients, and US$ 3 557 for MDR-TB patients. The proportion of patients without a regular income increased from 1% to 54% because of falling ill with TB. Following its review of the study results the Ministry of Health has made efforts to allocate public funds for food supplements and to include in- and outpatient TB services in the national health insurance schemes. CONCLUSIONS: Free TB diagnosis and treatment are not enough to alleviate the financial constraints experienced by vulnerable groups as a result of the illness. Health insurance covering TB in- and outpatient costs is critical to prevent TB-related financial hardship.OBJETIVO: Examinar los costos directos e indirectos afrontados por los pacientes con tuberculosis en la República Dominicana, ya sea por un tratamiento nuevo, por retratamiento, o por una tuberculosis multirresistente (MR, antes y a lo largo del proceso diagnóstico y durante el tratamiento, con objeto de generar una base de datos probatorios y formular recomendaciones. MÉTODOS: El "Instrumento de cálculo de los costos

  15. The PACARDO research project: youthful drug involvement in Central America and the Dominican Republic Proyecto de investigación PACARDO: el consumo de drogas entre la juventud en Centroamérica y la República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Dormitzer

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the occurrence and school-level clustering of drug involvement among school-attending adolescent youths in each of seven countries in Latin America, drawing upon evidence from the PACARDO research project, a multinational collaborative epidemiological research study. METHODS: During 1999-2000, anonymous self-administered questionnaires on drug involvement and related behaviors were administered to a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample that included a total of 12 797 students in the following seven countries: Costa Rica (n= 1 702, the Dominican Republic (n= 2 023, El Salvador (n= 1 628, Guatemala (n= 2 530, Honduras (n= 1 752, Nicaragua (n= 1 419, and Panama (n= 1 743. (The PACARDO name concatenates PA for Panamá,CA for Centroamérica,and RDO for República Dominicana. Estimates for exposure opportunity and actual use of alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, cocaine (crack/coca paste, amphetamines and methamphetamines, tranquilizers, ecstasy, and heroin were assessed via responses about questions on age of first chance to try each drug, and first use. Logistic regression models accounting for the complex survey design were used to estimate the associations of interest. RESULTS: Cumulative occurrence estimates for alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, and illegal drug use for the overall sample were, respectively: 52%, 29%, 5%, 4%, and 5%. In comparison to females, males were more likely to use alcohol, tobacco, inhalants, marijuana, and illegal drugs; the odds ratio estimates were 1.3, 2.1, 1.6, 4.1, and 3.2, respectively. School-level clustering was noted in all countries for alcohol and tobacco use; it was also noted in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama for illegal drug use. CONCLUSIONS: This report sheds new light on adolescent drug experiences in Panama, the five Spanish-heritage countries of Central America, and the Dominican Republic, and presents the first estimates of school

  16. Scleroderma in the Caribbean: characteristics in a Dominican case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Paola; Vásquez, Ricardo; López, Persio David; Then, Jossiell; Tineo, Carmen; Loyo, Esthela

    2014-01-01

    Scleroderma is a rare disease with limited data in Latin America. Preliminary genetic studies suggest a strong African ascendance in the Dominican Republic, which could modulate the expression of the disease. The objective of this study is to describe the clinical and demographic characteristics of scleroderma in a series of 26 Dominican patients. Patients who fulfilled the EULAR/ACR criteria for scleroderma were selected from the Rheumatology Department of a tertiary health center; systemic sclerosis subtypes were defined according to the EULAR classification. Clinical and demographic information was obtained retrospectively from clinical records. Mean age at time of onset was 32.6±15 years; 68% of patients had 40 years of age or less. 73% of patients was feminine, with a female:male ratio of 2.7:1. The most affected systems were pulmonary and gastrointestinal; renal affection was scarce. Anti-Scl-70 antibodies were positive in 64% of patients, sometimes in coexistence with anti-centromere antibodies. The prevalence of systemic sclerosis is lower in the Dominican population than the reported elsewhere. The age of onset of the disease seems to be lower in the Dominican population than that reported in literature. A different pattern of autoantibodies is observed in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Behavioral problems and tobacco use among adolescents in Central America and the Dominican Republic Problemas conductuales y consumo de tabaco en adolescentes de Centroamérica y la República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Vittetoe

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between behavioral problems and tobacco use among adolescent students in six countries of Central America and in the Dominican Republic. Methods. Data were drawn from a multinational collaborative study that included questionnaire surveys of between 451 and 1 170 school-attending adolescents in each of the seven countries studied. Assessments were based on an adapted, Spanish-language version of the Drug Use Screening Inventory (DUSI. The conditional form of logistic regression was employed for analysis, matching students on type of school and area, with further statistical adjustments for sex, age, and selected risk factors. Results. Occurrence of tobacco use was observed to vary dramatically from country to country. Nonetheless, for the combined group of countries, the estimated odds of tobacco use in youths at the highest levels of behavioral problems was more than five times that for youths at the lowest levels, after controlling for sex, age, lack of participation in recreational activities, level of irritability, and levels of problems with school, family, and mental health. Country- specific analyses show that youths at the highest levels of behavioral problems have a consistently greater occurrence of tobacco use as compared to youths at the lowest levels of behavioral problems. Conclusions. These findings are concordant with prior studies on tobacco use among adolescents with behavioral problems. Although the magnitude of observed associations varied according to the country of residence, the strength of these associations and their significance by conventional standards were observed in nearly all the countries sampled. This is the first study in these seven countries on potentially causal relationships such as these. More research is needed to augment our knowledge regarding the observed cross-country differences and ultimately to develop, implement, and evaluate

  18. Perceived social support, self esteem, and pregnancy status among Dominican adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babington, Lynn M; Malone, Linda; Kelley, Barbara R

    2015-05-01

    Adolescent pregnancy is a major health concern among Dominicans in the U.S. and in the Dominican Republic (DR). Twenty three percent of adolescents age 15-19 have experienced pregnancy and this trend is rising. The purpose of this study was to explore and compare social support, self-esteem and pregnancy between Dominican adolescents in the DR with those who have immigrated to the U.S. This study used an exploratory, descriptive design including study samples from both the U.S. and DR. Findings showed that young women with stronger social support and higher self esteem experienced lower pregnancy rates in both the DR and U.S. Neither self esteem nor social support was found to be predictors of pregnancy. Important findings from this study will inform the development of interventions aimed at preventing pregnancy in adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Horizontal accountability and presidential dominance: a difficult combination. The case of the Dominican Republic, 1967-2009 Rendición de cuentas horizontal y preponderancia presidencial: una combinación difícil. El caso de República Dominicana, 1967-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiv MARSTEINTREDET

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article studies horizontal accountability in the Dominican Republic. First it analyses the rules regulating the system of checks and balances. Although important, institutional rules cannot explain the variation in the levels of accountability across time found in the Dominican case. Therefore, the article focuses on the execution of national budgets and the financial situation of the accountability institutions. The article suggests using an index of budgetary disproportionality based on a comparison of the congressionally approved budget and the executed budget to measure the level of horizontal accountability. A multivariate time-series regression analysis shows that budgetary disproportionality increases with presidential dominance. The article concludes that for the period 1967-2009, it is presidential behaviour more than any other factor that has prevented an effective system of checks and balances. Therefore the case confirms O’Donnell’s hypothesis of Delegative Democracies.Este artículo estudia la rendición de cuentas horizontal en República Dominicana. Primero se estudian las normas constitucionales que regulan el sistema de pesos y contrapesos. Aunque importantes, estas no explican la gran variación en niveles de rendición de cuentas observada en el caso dominicano. Por lo tanto, el trabajo se enfoca en el ejercicio de los gastos de los presupuestos nacionales y la situación financiera de las instituciones de control. El artículo sugiere analizar la situación presupuestaria de las instituciones fiscalizadoras y propone utilizar la desproporcionalidad entre el presupuesto aprobado y el ejecutado como un indicador del nivel de rendición de cuentas en un país. Un análisis multivariado de regresión de series de tiempo demuestra que la desproporcionalidad presupuestal aumenta con la preponderancia presidencial. Se concluye que, para el caso dominicano en el período 1967-2009, el comportamiento de varios presidentes m

  20. Description of Pintomyia (Pifanomyia falcaorum sp. n. (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae, a Fossil Sand Fly from Dominican Amber

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    Reginaldo Peçanha Brazil

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of sand fly, Pintomyia (Pifanomyia falcaorum is described from an amber originated from the northern mountain range of Dominican Republic. The male sand fly specimen is well preserved and most features used in Phlebotominae taxonomy are seen with remarkable clarity.

  1. 'Western Union daddies' and their quest for authenticity: an ethnographic study of the Dominican gay sex tourism industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    This article draws on ethnographic research among two categories of male sex workers in the Dominican Republic in order to describe the relationships between gay male tourists and the Dominican men they hire on their trips to the Caribbean. Drawing on both qualitative interview data and quantitative surveys, the discussion examines the usefulness of theories of 'authenticity,' as they have been applied in the analysis of tourist practices more generally, in accounting for the behaviors and practices of male sex workers and their foreign gay clients. While the flow of international remittances from 'Western Union daddies' to their Dominican 'boys' creates a continuous reminder of the utilitarian nature of the exchange, both sex workers and clients are motivated to camouflage this instrumentality in their construction of a more 'authentic,' fulfilling relationship. The article examines the consequences of this ambivalent negotiation for the emotional and economic organization of gay male sex tourism in the Caribbean.

  2. Passion Plays: The Dominican Diaspora in Waddys Jáquez’s P.A.R.G.O.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Horn

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes how the play P.A.R.G.O. (2001, written, directed, and performed by the Dominican Waddys Jáquez represents the contemporary experience of the Dominican diaspora. Jaquéz himself forms part of a new generation of diasporic artists who frequently return “home,” to the Dominican Republic, and who, unlike the previous generation of diasporic artists and writers, continue to find their most valuable audience there. This tendency towards an increasing interconnectivity between diaspora and homeland is represented and a/effectively reinforced in P.A.R.G.O. The play brings the experience of the diaspora close to home for the audience, not by compelling them to identify with the characters’ particular identities, but rather by placing center stage their ongoing negotiations and “making do” with personal and economic difficulties that define their lives both at home and abroad.

  3. Association between embB mutations and ethambutol resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Cuba and the Dominican Republic: reproducible patterns and problems Asociación entre las mutaciones en embB y la resistencia a etambutol en aislamientos de Mycobacterium tuberculosis de Cuba y República Dominicana: patrones y problemas reproducibles

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    Elba Guerrero

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The relation of ethambutol resistance to embB mutations remains unclear, and there are no reports on ethambutol resistance from the Caribbean. We examined the sequence of embB in 57 distinct Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR and non-MDR strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, mostly from Cuba and the Dominican Republic. embB306 codon mutations were found exclusively in MDR-TB, but in both ethambutol sensitive and resistant strains. Valine substitutions predominated in ethambutol resistant strains, while isoleucine replacements were more common in sensitive strains. Three ethambutol resistant MDR strains without embB306 substitutions had replacements in embB406 or embB497, but these were also found in ethambutol sensitive MDR strains. The results confirm previous findings that amino acid substitutions in EmbB306, EmbB406 and EmbB497 are found only in MDR-TB strains but in both phenotypically resistant and sensitive strains. One ethambutol resistant non-MDR strain did not have any embB mutation suggesting that other undefined mutations can also confer ethambutol resistance.La relación entre resistencia a etambutol y mutaciones en embB no se ha establecido claramente y no existen comunicaciones sobre la resistencia a etambutol en cepas provenientes de países Caribeños. Se evaluó la secuencia del gen embB en 57 cepas de Mycobacterium tuberculosis multi-drogo resistentes (MDR y no-MDR, la mayoría aislada en Cuba y República Dominicana. Se encontraron mutaciones en el codón embB306 exclusivamente en cepas MDR, tanto en cepas sensibles como resistentes a etambutol. Tres cepas MDR resistentes a etambutol, sin sustituciones en embB306, tenían mutaciones en los codones embB406 o embB497, pero estos cambios se encontraron también en cepas sensibles. Los resultados confirman otros estudios, mostrando que sustituciones aminoacídicas en EmbB306, EmbB406 y EmbB497 se encuentran exclusivamente en cepas MDR, tanto resistentes como sensibles a etambutol

  4. Uneven exchange and urban binational complexes in Dominican Republic’s border with Haiti

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    Haroldo Dilla Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dominican/Haitian border is signed by profound asymmetries and the predominance of a relation of uneven exchange in benefit of Dominican Republic. Transborder relations summary this contradictory relation, but at the same time constitute the only form of survival for more than half million of Haitians that inhabit the region. This article discusses the history of this relation and its present tendencies, including the formation of economic regions and urban binational systems. The weakness of regulatory public policies and the aggressive action of the market generate a very contradictory setting that could lead to conflicts by the use of shared natural resources, the exploitation of the Haitian labour force, and the agitation of nationalist positions.

  5. The relationship between nutritional and sociodemographic factors and the likelihood of children in the Dominican Republic having a BCG scar Relación entre los factores nutricionales y sociodemográficos y la probabilidad de que los niños de la República Dominicana tengan cicatriz de BCG

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    Eddy Pérez-Then

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To critically assess the prevalence among schoolchildren 6 to 9 years of age throughout the Dominican Republic of a bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccination scar, and to examine the relationship between nutritional and sociodemographic factors and the likelihood of having a BCG scar. METHODS: This correlational study used the database of the Second National Census on Height and Weight of Elementary School First Grade Students, which was conducted in the Dominican Republic August 2001-May 2002, to provide a critical assessment of BCG coverage nationwide. The Census information for the children included the presence of BCG scar, their nutritional status, and basic demographic data. We developed a new sociodemographic indicator, the "Rosa Index," to examine the potential influence of poverty and other environmental characteristics on scar presence. We used logistic regression models to predict the presence of a BCG scar. RESULTS: An overall BCG scar prevalence of 55.3% (85 644/154 887 was found. Malnourished children were less likely to have a BCG scar than were children with adequate nutritional status (odds ratio = 0.91; 95% confidence interval: 0.87, 0.95, P OBJETIVOS: Evaluar críticamente la prevalencia de cicatrices por la vacunación con el bacilo de Calmette-Guérin (BCG en niños de 6 a 9 años de la República Dominicana y examinar la relación entre los factores nutricionales y socioeconómicos y la probabilidad de tener cicatriz de BCG. MÉTODOS: Para este estudio correlacional se empleó la base de datos del II Censo Nacional de Talla y Peso en Escolares de Primer Grado de Básica, realizado en la República Dominicana entre agosto de 2001 y mayo de 2002, para evaluar críticamente el nivel de cobertura nacional de la vacunación con BCG. Entre la información censal de los niños estaban si tenían cicatriz de BCG, su estado nutricional y sus datos demográficos básicos. Se desarrolló un nuevo indicador sociodemogr

  6. Not Haitian: Exploring the Roots of Dominican Identity

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    Valerie Lamb

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A literature review supplemented by interview data from a small sample of Haitian and Dominican immigrants living in Miami, Florida elucidates the complexities of Afrolatino-Dominican identity. The data include Dominican recollections of childhood warnings about threats posed by Haitians allegedly willing to cast spells and act as agents of punishment for misbehaving Dominican children. These data are consistent with antihaitianismo and the tendency for Dominicans to deny their African heritage in favor of their European Hispanic roots. The paper also explains how Dominicans’ ethnic flexibility in navigating “racialized” social space in the US is relevant to future census measurement of race and ethnicity.

  7. The New Roles of the Dominican Armed Forces in the Dominican Republic National Security Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Defensa e Identidad Nacional (Santo Domingo: Editora Corripio, Julio 2006), 312. 3Ibid., 312. 4Leo Reyez, “Presidente visita la Academia Militar...14Pared, Seguridad, Defensa e Identidad Nacional, 221. 20 CHAPTER 3 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Research Concept This chapter addresses research methodology...capacity that the military have to dissuade external and internal threats. Vice Admiral Pared Perez, in his book Seguridad, Defensa e Identidad

  8. Phylogenetic placement of the Dominican Republic endemic genus Sarcopilea (Urticaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jestrow, B.; Valdés, James J.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Francisco-Ortega, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2012), s. 592-600 ISSN 0040-0262 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : CAM * Caribbean Islands * cystoliths * epistomatic * hyperstomatic * hydathodes * phylogenetics * Pilea * Sarcopilea * succulent * Urticaceae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.782, year: 2012

  9. Review: The birds of Hispaniola: Haiti and the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne J. Arendt

    2005-01-01

    The following critiques express the opinions of the individual evaluators regarding the strengths, weaknesses, and value of the books they review. As such, the appraisals are subjective assessments and do not necessarily refl ect the opinions of the editors or any offi cial policy of the American Ornithologists’ Union.

  10. Diagnóstico de la capacidad para el ejercicio de las funciones esenciales de salud pública en países de Mesoamérica, los estados mexicanos de Chiapas y Quintana Roo y la República Dominicana Diagnosis of capacity to perform essential public health functions in the Central American countries, the Dominican Republic, and the Mexican states of Chiapas and Quintana Roo

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    Miguel Ángel González Block

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Caracterizar la capacidad para el desempeño de las funciones esenciales de la salud pública (FESP de las instituciones públicas y privadas en países de Mesoamérica, los estados mexicanos de Chiapas y Quintana Roo y la República Dominicana. MÉTODOS: Se aplicó una encuesta en línea a 83 organizaciones de Belice, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panamá, la República Dominicana y los estados mexicanos de Chiapas y Quintana Roo sobre la capacidad de cumplir cada una de las 11 FESP. Los resultados se validaron en un taller con representantes de los ministerios de salud de los siete países y los dos estados mexicanos participantes. RESULTADOS: La mayor capacidad para el desempeño se identificó en la FESP 1 (monitoreo, evaluación y análisis del estado de salud de la población, la FESP 2.1.1 (vigilancia, investigación y control de riesgos y amenazas a la salud pública para enfermedades infecciosas y la FESP 5 (desarrollo de políticas y planificación en salud. La mayor debilidad se encontró en la FESP 2.1.2 (vigilancia, investigación y monitoreo de las enfermedades no infecciosas. Las asimetrías en el desempeño de las FESP al interior de cada país indican debilidades en las funciones de los laboratorios y de la investigación en salud pública. CONCLUSIONES: Se requiere mejorar el desempeño estratégico en la mayor parte de las FESP en los países y territorios analizados y reforzar la infraestructura, el equipamiento y los recursos humanos, tanto a nivel estratégico como táctico. Se debe aplicar un enfoque regional para aprovechar la capacidad diferencial con vistas al fortalecimiento y el apoyo técnico cooperativo.OBJECTIVE: Characterize the capacity of public and private institutions in the Central American countries, the Dominican Republic, and the Mexican states of Chiapas and Quintana Roo to perform essential public health functions (EPHFs. METHODS: An online survey of 83 organizations

  11. The embodiment of tourism among bisexually-behaving Dominican male sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Mark B

    2008-10-01

    While theories of "structure" and social inequality have increasingly informed global health efforts for HIV prevention--with growing recognition of the linkages between large-scale political and economic factors in the distribution and impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic--there is still little theorization of precisely how structural factors shape the very bodies and sexualities of specific populations and groups. In order to extend the theoretical understanding of these macro-micro linkages, this article examines how the growth of the tourism industry in the Dominican Republic has produced sexual practices and identities that reflect both the influence of large-scale structural processes and the resistant responses of local individuals. Drawing on social science theories of political economy, embodiment, and authenticity, I argue that an understanding of patterns of sexuality and HIV risk in the region requires analysis of how political-economic transformations related to tourism intersect with the individual experiences and practices of sexuality on the ground. The analysis draws on long-term ethnographic research with bisexually behaving male sex workers in two cities in the Dominican Republic, including participant observation, in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. By examining the global and local values placed on these men's bodies and the ways sex workers use their bodies to broker tourists' pleasure, we may better understand how the large-scale structures of the tourism industry are linked to the specific meanings and practices of sexuality.

  12. Capacidad de uso de las tierras en la microcuenca El Limón, complejo de cuencas Sabana Yegua, República Dominicana Land use capacity in the mini watershed El Limón, Sabana Yegua Watershed Complex, Dominican Republic

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    Maldané Cuello Espinoza

    2013-03-01

    recomendadas son las de labranza mínima, rotación de cultivos, uso de barreras muertas con residuos de cosecha, barreras vivas con el uso de material biológico de la zona y terrazas individuales en sistemas agroforestales. Estas prácticas son alternativas para que los productores continúen desarrollando los sistemas de producción que tradicionalmente utilizan, con un criterio técnico de manejo.This study conduced the biophysical analysis of El Limón micro watershed within the high land Sabana Yegua watershed, Dominican Republic. The objective of the research was directed to determine its land capacity use, taking into account limitations of soils, climate and geomorphology. It proposes a series of management practices as options to reduce erosion, improve soil and roads conditions, in order to get better conditions for a rational system management. In this way, for reaching such objective for the first time some basic elements could be established and integrated to deal with the accelerated degradation problem affecting the area under study. For getting this purpose fundamental parameters were established, such as factors related to erosion, soil, drainage and climate, in function of the methodology MAG/ FAO/UNED (1996 used in Costa Rica to determine land capacity use, which has been adapted to the area under study. This methodology has been used as the basic tool in this essay, integrating land classes from class I to class VIII in acordance with the frecuency and level limitations identified. For its application in the Limón micro watershed, we included other physical parameters that were not observed in this methodology, such as soil apparent density and the climatic parameters, such as rain and temperature daily registers, the last two in order to determine the life zone. The research established that the land classes in El Limón micro watershed include land from class III to VIII. All land classes are able for protection, forestry systems and agroforestry. In

  13. Immunogenicity and safety of three aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted vaccines with reduced doses of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV-Al) compared with standard IPV in young infants in the Dominican Republic: a phase 2, non-inferiority, observer-blinded, randomised, and controlled dose investigation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Luis; Pedersen, Rasmus S; Peña, Lourdes; Olsen, Klaus J; Andreasen, Lars V; Kromann, Ingrid; Nielsen, Pernille I; Sørensen, Charlotte; Dietrich, Jes; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S; Thierry-Carstensen, Birgit

    2017-07-01

    Cost and supply constraints are key challenges in the use of inactivated polio vaccine (IPV). Dose reduction through adsorption to aluminium hydroxide (Al) is a promising option, and establishing its effectiveness in the target population is a crucial milestone in developing IPV-Al. The aim of this clinical trial was to show the non-inferiority of three IPV-Al vaccines to standard IPV. In this phase 2, non-inferiority, observer-blinded, randomised, controlled, single-centre trial in the Dominican Republic, healthy infants aged 6 weeks, not previously polio vaccinated, were allocated after computer-generated randomisation by block-size of four, to receive one of four IPV formulations (three-times reduced dose [1/3 IPV-Al], five-times reduced dose [1/5 IPV-Al], ten-times reduced dose [1/10 IPV-Al], or IPV) intramuscularly in the thigh at 6, 10, and 14 weeks of age. The primary outcome was seroconversion for poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 with titres more than or equal to four-fold higher than the estimated maternal antibody titre and more than or equal to 8 after three vaccinations. Non-inferiority was concluded if the lower two-sided 90% CI of the seroconversion rate difference between IPV-Al and IPV was greater than -10%. The safety analyses were based on the safety analysis set (randomly assigned participants who received at least one trial vaccination) and the immunogenicity analyses were based on the per-protocol population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov registration, number NCT02347423. Between Feb 2, 2015, and Sept 26, 2015, we recruited 824 infants. The per-protocol population included 820 infants; 205 were randomly assigned to receive 1/3 IPV-Al, 205 to receive 1/5 IPV-Al, 204 to receive 1/10 IPV-Al, and 206 to receive IPV. The proportion of individuals meeting the primary endpoint of seroconversion for poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3 was already high for the three IPV-Al vaccines after two vaccinations, but was higher after three vaccinations

  14. Changes in health indicators related to health promotion and microcredit programs in the Dominican Republic Cambios en los indicadores de salud relacionados con programas de promoción de la salud y de microcréditos en la República Dominicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita L. Dohn

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of health promotion programs and microcredit programs on three communities in the Dominican Republic. One community had only the health promotion program, one community had only the microcredit program, and one community had both a health promotion program and a microcredit program. This pilot project examined the hypothesis that the largest changes in 11 health indicators that were studied would be in the community with both a health promotion program and a microcredit program, that there would be intermediate changes in the community with only a health promotion program, and that the smallest changes would be in the community with only a microcredit program. METHODS: The health promotion programs used community volunteers to address two major concerns: (1 the prevalent causes of mortality among children under 5 years of age and (2 women's health (specifically breast and cervical cancer screening. The microcredit program made small loans to individuals to start or expand small businesses. Outcome measures were based on comparisons for 11 health indicators from baseline community surveys (27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, done in December 2000 and January 2001 and from follow-up surveys (also 27 households surveyed in each of the three communities, in June and July 2002, after the health promotion program had been operating for about 13 months. Households were randomly chosen during both the baseline and follow-up surveys, without regard to their involvement in the microcredit or health promotion programs. RESULTS: The health indicators improved in all three communities. However, the degree of change was different among the communities (P RESUMEN OBJETIVO: Evaluar el impacto de programas de promoción de la salud y de microcréditos en tres comunidades de la República Dominicana. Una comunidad tenía solo un programa de promoción de la salud, otra contaba solo con un programa de microcr

  15. Implications of the Central America-Dominican Republic-Free Trade Agreement for the nutrition transition in Central America Implicaciones del Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Centroamérica y República Dominicana sobre la transición alimentaria en Centroamérica

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    Corinna Hawkes

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To identify potential impacts of the Central America-Dominican Republic-Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR on food consumption patterns associated with the nutrition transition, obesity, and diet-related chronic diseases. METHODS: Examination of CAFTA-DR agreement to identify measures that have the potential to affect food availability and retail prices. RESULTS: CAFTA-DR includes agreements on tariffs, tariff-rate quotas (TRQs, and sanitary and phytosanitary regulations with direct implications for the availability and prices of various foods. Agreements on investment, services, and intellectual property rights (IPR are also relevant because they create a business climate more conducive to long-term investment by the transnational food industry. Trade liberalization under CAFTA-DR is likely to increase availability and lower relative prices of two food groups associated with the nutrition transition: meat and processed foods. These outcomes are expected to occur as the direct result of increased imports from the United States and increased production by U.S. companies based in Central America, and the indirect result of increased domestic meat production (due to increased availability of cheaper animal feed and increased production of processed foods by domestic companies (due to a more competitive market environment. CONCLUSIONS: CAFTA-DR is likely to further the nutrition transition in Central America by increasing the consumption of meat; highly processed foods; and new, non-traditional foods. The public health community should be more aware of the implications of trade agreements for dietary health. Governments and related stakeholders should assess the coherence between changes fostered by specific trade agreements with national policies on diet and nutrition.OBJETIVOS: Identificar el posible impacto del Tratado de Libre Comercio entre Centroamérica y República Dominicana (TLCCA-RD sobre el patrón de consumo de alimentos

  16. Knowledge, perceptions, and experiences of Dominicans with diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Aponte, Judith; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Alcantara, Robinson

    2012-01-01

    Dominicans, one of the fastest growing Hispanic subgroups in New York City (NYC), have a high rate of diabetes. A qualitative study exploring Dominicans’ knowledge, perceptions, and experiences in managing their diabetes was conducted. There were a total of 40 participants who were Spanish speaking Dominicans, 40 to 74 years of age, diagnosed with diabetes and NYC residents. Four focus groups were conducted in Spanish, which were recorded and then transcribed into English. Content analysis wa...

  17. HIV sexual risk behavior and family dynamics in a Dominican tourism town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Padilla, Mark; Cedar, Anna Lindberg; Lee, Jane; Robles, Gabriel

    2013-10-01

    Expansion of the tourism industry in the Dominican Republic has had far-reaching health consequences for the local population. Research suggests families with one or more members living in tourism areas experience heightened vulnerability to HIV/STIs due to exposure to tourism environments, which can promote behaviors such as commercial and transactional sex and elevated alcohol use. Nevertheless, little is known about how tourism contexts influence family dynamics, which, in turn, shape HIV risk. This qualitative study examined family relationships through in-depth interviews with 32 adults residing in Sosúa, an internationally known destination for sex tourism. Interviewees situated HIV risk within a context of limited employment opportunities, high rates of migration, heavy alcohol use, and separation from family. This study has implications for effective design of health interventions that make use of the role of the family to prevent HIV transmission in tourism environments.

  18. HIV Sexual Risk Behavior and Family Dynamics in a Dominican Tourism Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Padilla, Mark; Cedar, Anna Lindberg; Lee, Jane; Robles, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Expansion of the tourism industry in the Dominican Republic has had far-reaching health consequences for the local population. Research suggests families with one or more members living in tourism areas experience heightened vulnerability to HIV/STIs due to exposure to tourism environments, which can promote behaviors such as commercial and transactional sex and elevated alcohol use. Nevertheless, little is known about how tourism contexts influence family dynamics, which, in turn, shape HIV risk. This qualitative study examined family relationships through in-depth interviews with 32 adults residing in Sosúa, an internationally known destination for sex tourism. Interviewees situated HIV risk within a context of limited employment opportunities, high rates of migration, heavy alcohol use, and separation from family. This study has implications for effective design of health interventions that make use of the role of the family to prevent HIV transmission in tourism environments. PMID:23436038

  19. The Intersection of Dominican Values and Women's and Gender Studies Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Tara M.

    2016-01-01

    The missions of Women's and Gender Studies programs coincide directly with Dominican values in their commitments to fostering compassion and justice. Just as Dominican clergy during the civil rights movement challenged false notions of biological, cultural, and social difference that contributed to racist practices, Dominican educators today…

  20. HIV infection and prevention of mother-to-child transmission in childbearing women: La Romana, Dominican Republic, 2002-2006 Infección por el VIH en parturientas y prevención de la transmisión madre-hijo en La Romana, República Dominicana, 2002-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Román-Poueriet

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To strengthen prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (pMTCT program implementation in La Romana (LR province, by estimating HIV prevalence and identifying characteristics associated with HIV infection in parturients. METHODS: Umbilical cord blood samples were collected at seven obstetrical sites where over 95% of LR's deliveries occur during four phases (pilot, expanded pilot, full study, and pMTCT program monitoring from 2 August 2002 to 30 September 2006. Results were linked to data abstracted from delivery records. RESULTS: HIV seroprevalence was 2.6% (263/10 040 overall; 114/4 452, full-study phase (95% confidence interval = 2.1%-3.1%. Most HIV-infected parturients were Dominican (68.9% and urban (64.0%. However, prevalence was higher among Haitians (3.7% than Dominicans (2.3% (p OBJETIVOS: Fortalecer el programa de prevención de la transmisión de la infección por el VIH madre-hijo (PPTIMH en la provincia de La Romana (LR, mediante la estimación de la prevalencia y la identificación de las características asociadas con esta infección en las mujeres parturientas. MÉTODOS: Se tomaron muestras de sangre del cordón umbilical en siete puntos de atención obstétrica, que concentran más de 95% de los partos de LR, durante las cuatro fases de estudio (piloto, piloto extendido, estudio completo y monitoreo del PPTIMH entre el 2 de agosto de 2002 y el 30 de septiembre de 2006. Los resultados se enlazaron con los datos extraídos de los registros de parto. RESULTADOS: La seroprevalencia al VIH fue de 2,6% (263/10 040 general; 114/4 452 en la fase de estudio completo; intervalo de confianza de 95%: 2,1% a 3,1%. La mayoría de las parturientas infectadas eran dominicanas (68,9% y de zonas urbanas (64,0%. No obstante, la prevalencia fue mayor en las haitianas (3,7% que en las dominicanas (2,3%; P < 0,001 - especialmente en las de 21 a 25 años (5,2% frente a 2,3%; P < 0,001- y de bateyes y zonas rurales y periurbanas con

  1. CONOCIMIENTO DE LA LEY GENERAL DE SALUD RESPECTO DE LAS TRANSFUSIONES SANGUÍNEAS EN MÉDICOS Y PACIENTES TESTIGOS DE JEHOVÁ DEL HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DE REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA CONHECIMENTO DA LEI GERAL DE SAÚDE - RESPEITO ÀS TRANSFUSÕES SANGUÍNEAS EM MÉDICOS E PACIENTES TESTEMUNHAS DE JEOVÁ DO HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA KNOWLEDGE OF GENERAL HEALTH LAW WITH RESPECT TO BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS BY PHYSICIANS AND PATIENTS JEHOVAH WITNESSES IN HOSPITAL DR. DARIO CONTRERAS OF DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Díaz Santana

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio evalúa hasta qué grado el cuerpo médico del Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conoce, respeta, informa y aplica la Ley General de Salud, con relación al derecho del paciente Testigo de Jehová de negarse a ser transfundido (respeto a su autonomía. También si los Testigos de Jehová conocen la Ley General de Salud y hasta qué grado se han beneficiado con la puesta en marcha de la misma. El estudio reveló que ni médicos ni Testigos de Jehová conocen suficientemente dicha ley.Este estudo avalia quanto o corpo médico do Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conhece, respeita, informa e aplica a Lei Geral de Saúde em relação aos direitos do paciente Testemunha de Jeová de negar-se a ser transfundido (respeito a sua autonomia; também se os Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem a Lei Geral de Saúde e até que ponto têm se beneficiado diante dessa proposição. O estudo revelou que nem médicos, nem Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem de fato essa lei.This study evaluates up to which degree physicians of Hospital Dr. Dario Contreras of Dominican Republic know, respect, inform and apply the General Health Law in relation to the right of Jehovah witness patients to refuse being blood transfused (respect to their autonomy. It also evaluates whether Jehovah witnesses know General Health Law and in which degree they have been benefited by putting it into practice. The study reveals that Jehovah Witnesses do not know the law.

  2. Discrimination and Acculturative Stress among First-Generation Dominicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo; Panchanadeswaran, Subadra

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between discriminatory experiences and acculturative stress levels among a sample of 283 Dominican immigrants. Findings from a linear regression analysis revealed that experiences of daily racial discrimination and major racist events were significant predictors of acculturative stress after controlling…

  3. Discrimination, Stress, and Acculturation among Dominican Immigrant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Beverly Araujo

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have well established the association between discriminatory experiences, life chances, and mental health outcomes among Latino/as, especially among Mexican Americans. However, few studies have focused on the impact of stress or the moderating effects of low acculturation levels among recent immigrants, such as Dominicans. Using the…

  4. Case Study of a Gifted and Talented Catholic Dominican Nun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The case of a gifted and talented Catholic Dominican nun is described and analysed in the context of Renzulli's Three-Ring Conception of Giftedness and Gagne's Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent. Using qualitative methods, semi-structured interviews of relevant individuals were conducted and analysed. Based on the conclusions of this…

  5. The Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement (DR-CAFTA): Understanding the Reasons Why the Dominican Republic (DR) Joined the CAFTA Negotiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Consultor ve país requiere de estrategia desarrollo ante TLC,” Listín Diario, August 31, 2007, http://www.listin.com.do/app/article.aspx?id=26672... estrategia desarrollo ante TLC.” Listín Diario, August 31, 2007, http://www.listin.com.do/app/article.aspx?id=26672 (accessed June 3, 2009). Acosta

  6. Dominican Children with HIV Not Receiving Antiretrovirals: Massage Therapy Influences their Behavior and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Reif

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-eight children (M age = 4.8 years infected with HIV/AIDS and living in the Dominican Republic were randomly assigned to a massage therapy or a play session control group. The children in the massage therapy group received two weekly 20-min massages for 12 weeks; the children in the control group participated in a play session (coloring, playing with blocks for the same duration and length as the massage therapy group. Overall, the children in the massage therapy group improved in self-help abilities and communication, suggesting that massage therapy may enhance daily functioning for children with HIV/AIDS. Moreover, the HIV infected children who were six or older also showed a decrease in internalizing behaviors; specifically depressive/anxious behaviors and negative thoughts were reduced. Additionally, baseline assessments revealed IQ equivalence below normal functioning for 70% of the HIV infected children and very high incidences of mood problems (depression, withdrawn for 40% of the children and anxiety problems for 20% of the children, suggesting the need for better monitoring and alternative interventions in countries with limited resources to improve cognition and the mental health status of children infected with HIV/AIDS.

  7. Seismic and tsunami hazard in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, William P.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Rodriguez, Rafael W.; ten Brink, Uri S.

    1999-01-01

    first day of the workshop, participants from universities, federal institutions, and consulting firms in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the continental U.S., Dominican Republic, and Europe reviewed the present state of knowledge including a review and discussion of present plate models, recent GPS and seismic reflection data, seismicity, paleoseismology, and tsunamis. The state of earthquake/tsunami studies in Puerto Rico was presented by several faculty members from the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. A preliminary seismic hazard map was presented by the USGS and previous hazard maps and economic loss assessments were considered. During the second day, the participants divided into working groups and prepared specific recommendations for future activities in the region along the six following topics below. Highlights of these recommended activities are:Marine geology and geophysics – Acquire deep-penetration seismic reflection and refraction data, deploy temporary ocean bottom seismometer arrays to record earthquakes, collect high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and side scan sonar data of the region, and in particular, the near shore region, and conduct focussed high-resolution seismic studies around faults. Determine slip rates of specific offshore faults. Assemble a GIS database for available marine geological and geophysical data.Paleoseismology and active faults - Field reconnaissance aimed at identifying Quaternary faults and determining their paleoseismic chronology and slip rates, as well as identifying and dating paleoliquefaction features from large earthquakes. Quaternary mapping of marine terraces, fluvial terraces and basins, beach ridges, etc., to establish framework for understanding neotectonic deformation of the island. Interpretation of aerial photography to identify possible Quaternary faults.Earthquake seismology – Determine an empirical seismic attenuation function using observations from local seismic networks and recently

  8. Biological characterization of venom peptides from the neotropical social waps Polistes major major (Dominican Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slaninová, Jiřina; Fučík, Vladimír; Borovičková, Lenka; Čeřovský, Václav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 151, S1 (2007), s. 87-89 ISSN 1213-8118. [Pharmacological Days. Czech and Slovak Pharmacological Meeting /57./. Olomouc, 12.09.2007-14.09.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : venom peptides * Polistes major major Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  9. Digital Reading and Reading Competence: The Influence in the Z Generation from the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiama-Espaillat, Cristina; Mayor-Ruiz, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Most Latin American countries are focused upon improving learning quality by providing schools with technological resources, as if their sole presence was enough to develop 21st Century skills. Digital reading is not an end in itself; it is a tool that a user selects, depending on the desired purpose and uses it in specific contexts. Adolescents…

  10. Development of a Career Path for Non Commissioned Officers in the Army of the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-23

    obtenidas para el uso de imágenes, mapas, gráficos y cualesquiera otros materiales incorporados en el manuscrito. El autor puede estar sujeto a más...proponer un plan de desarrollo para la carrera de suboficiales, a fin de que el Ejército pueda incorporarla eficientemente, logrando así un nuevo talento...eficientemente, logrando así un nuevo talento humano cimentado en un liderazgo competente y en valores que puedan ser multiplicados en todos los niveles de

  11. Sexual Risk Behavior Among Military Personnel Stationed at Border-Crossing Zones in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    members of the FFAA and were ≥ 18 years of age. Measures The questionnaire was similar to a knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) survey and...1175. 9. Choi YJ, Lee WH, Rha KH, Xin ZC, Choi YD, Choi HK. Masturbation and its relationship to sexual activities of young males in Korean mil- itary...Casey SE, Tommy J, Saldinger M. Changes in HIV/ AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and practices among commercial sex workers and military forces in Port Loko

  12. Telecommunication Policy in the Caribbean: A Comparison of Telecommunications in the Dominican Republic and Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Mexico and South America. By 1625, French buccaneers had established a settlement on the island of Tortuga and survived by pirating English and Spanish...smaller islands in its territory; these are: Ile de la Gonave, Ile de la Tortue ( Tortuga Island), Grande Cayemite, and Ile de la Vache. The island

  13. Military Intervention in Latin America: Analysis of the 1965 Crisis in the Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-03

    8217Lowenthal, p. 131. * 102Gleijeses, p. 261. A lO3NExercito Brasileiro -Instrumento De Paz Na America Cen- tral, Historia Do Exercito Brasileiro Vol. 3...a) Military strategies must be governed by political objec- tives; (b) the U.S. would not be responsible for an "American Budapest " * in Santo...re- membered for putting down the revolt in a fashion reminiscent of the USSR in Budapest . Bloodshed would have to be minimized at all costs if the

  14. Prospective elemental analysis of algal biomass accumulated at the dominican republic Shores during 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández, Fernando; Boluda, Carlos José; Olivera, Jesús; Gómez, Luis Alberto Guillermo Bolivar; Gómez, Enmanuel Echavarría Aris Mendis

    2017-01-01

    The massive accumulation and decomposition of the Sargassum natans and Sargassum fluitans brown seaweeds on the Antillean shores has become a major problem in Central America and the Caribbean, seriously affecting tourism. However, the value of the algal biomass should not be underestimated, since it contains bioactive compounds with industrial application or in a more traditional use as fertilizers. On the other hand, seaweeds have the ability to bioaccumulate toxic metals such as Hg, Pb, Cd, Ni and Cr, among others. In order to ensure the safety of this biological material in its possible applications, it has been carried out a prospective study of the content in different transition metals and rare earths. Slightly elevated mercury levels were detected, which could limit the use of biomass. The content in Sc (scandium), Y (yttrium) and 14 lanthanides (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu), collectively known as rare earths, was also determined, being higher than in the ocean levels. This is consistent with the hypothesis that places the origin of these algae to more southern latitudes, where they proliferate in the shelter of the mouth of large rivers. (author)

  15. 75 FR 50695 - Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... revised to capitalize the first letter in each of the words ``generally accepted accounting principles... ``generally accepted accounting principles'', consistent with the manner in which those words are used... ``generally accepted accounting principles'' and adding, in their place, the words ``Generally Accepted...

  16. Three-Dimensional Model Test Study of Xbloc Armoured Breakwaters at Punta Catalina, Dominican Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røge, Mads Sønderstrup; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    The present report presents results from a three-dimensional model test study carried out at Aalborg University in the period June 2015 – August 2015. The objectives of the model tests were to study the stability of the Xbloc armoured breakwaters at Punta Catalina under short-crested wave attack...

  17. Studies in neotropical polypores. 11, Antrodia aurantia, a new species from the Dominican Republic, Greater Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jean Lodge; Leif Ryvarden; Omar Paino Perdomo-Sanchez

    2001-01-01

    Antrodia aurantia Lodge, Ryvarden & Perdomo-Sanchez is described as new. It has bright orange resupinate basidiomes that lack rhizomorphs and has pores that are deep, soft, large, and angular to sinuous; it is associated with a brown rot on Pinus occidentalis. A key to all American Antrodia and Diplomitoporus species is provided.

  18. Social vulnerability to natural hazards in urban systems : An application in Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    di Girasole, Eleonora Giovene; Cannatella, D.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of risk has become increasingly complex, and has been used not only in relation to the natural features of a region, but also to its socio-economic context. In this conceptualization, the latter directly influences the capacity of a community to cope with, recover from, and adapt to

  19. Elite Settlements and Democracy in Latin America: The Dominican Republic and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    Social Indicators, volume 2, 3d edition, (New Haven: Yale Wuiversity Press, 1983), pg. 48. UOn a scale from one to seven, one being the greatest...Handbook of Political and Social Indicators, volume 1, 3d edition, (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1983), pg. 209. 107 (12% in 1977) was organized.53...Westview Press, 1988. Si. Lima: Impresora La Republica S.A. Smith, Michael. Political correspondent for Lima Times during Constituent Assembly. Lima, Peru

  20. Between Corporatism and Socialism: Navigating the Waters of International Education in the Dominican Republic and Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivras, Korine N.; Scarpaci, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    The Caribbean has long afforded U.S. and Canadian geographers with a rich venue of study-abroad opportunities. Physical and human geography classes are particularly well-suited to the myriad political, social, and environmental landscapes of the region. This article summarizes a few key experiences that have emerged in forging study-abroad venues…

  1. PROSPECTIVE ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF ALGAL BIOMASS ACUMULATED AT THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC SHORES DURING 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernández

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The massive accumulation and decomposition of the Sargassum natans and Sargassum fluitans brown seaweeds on the Antillean shores has become a major problem in Central America and the Caribbean, seriously affecting tourism. However, the value of the algal biomass should not be underestimated, since it contains bioactive compounds with industrial application or in a more traditional use as fertilizers. On the other hand, seaweeds have the ability to bioaccumulate toxic metals such as Hg, Pb, Cd, Ni and Cr, among others. In order to ensure the safety of this biological material in its possible applications, it has been carried out a prospective study of the content in different transition metals and rare earths. Slightly elevated mercury levels were detected, which could limit the use of biomass. The content in Sc (scandium, Y (yttrium and 14 lanthanides (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu, collectively known as rare earths, was also determined, being higher than in the ocean levels. This is consistent with the hypothesis that places the origin of these algae to more southern latitudes, where they proliferate in the shelter of the mouth of large rivers.

  2. Two new fossil species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) from Baltic and Dominican Amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two new species of Cryptocephalus Geoffroy (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are described and illustrated from fossil resin: Cryptocephalus groehni sp. nov (Baltic amber) and Cryptocephalus kheelorum sp. nov. (Dominican amber). These are the first described species of Cryptocephalinae from fossil resin. ...

  3. Risk behaviours and prevalence of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in a group of Dominican gay men, other men who have sex with men and transgender women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Maximo O; Hodge, David; Donastorg, Yeycy; Khosla, Shaveta; Lerebours, Leonel; Pope, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to estimate the point prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI) and to investigate the sexual practices and behaviours associated with STIs in a group of gay men, other men who have sex with men and transgender women (GMT) in the province of La Romana, Dominican Republic. Design A cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of GMT persons. Setting The study was conducted in the province of La Romana, Dominican Republic, in June–July 2013. Participants Out of 117 GMT persons screened, a total of 100 completed the study. Participants had to be at least 18 years of age, reside in La Romana and have had sex with another man in the preceding 12 months. All participants were interviewed and tested for STI. Primary outcome measure The main outcome of interest was the detection of any STI (HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), syphilis, hepatitis B or C) by serology. Results Among 100 participants, the median age was 22 years (range 18–65). One-third had consumed illicit drugs the preceding year and only 43% consistently used condoms. Prevalence was 38% for HSV-2, 5% for HIV and 13% for syphilis. There were no cases of hepatitis B or C. Factors associated with the odds of a STI were age >22 years (OR=11.1, 95% CI 3.6 to 34.5), receptive anal intercourse (OR=4.2, 95% CI 1.3 to 13.6) and having ≥2 male sexual partners during the preceding month (OR=4, 95% CI 1.3 to 12.5). Conclusions In this group of GMT persons, seroprevalence of STI was high, and a number of risk behaviours were associated with STI. These preliminary data will help inform policy and programmes to prevent HIV/STI in GMT persons in the region. PMID:25926151

  4. The Myth of the Male Breadwinner: Women and Industrialization in the Caribbean by Helen I. Safa

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, WM

    1996-01-01

    What are the implications of women's entry into the industrial workforce for their empowerment at the level of the household, workplace, and political arena? Helen Safa's book compares the experiences of women in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Cuba to provide an insightful commentary on the gendered dimensions of the international division of labor. She documents changes in women's status as Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic moved from import-substitution to e...

  5. Role of a Semiotics-Based Curriculum in Empathy Enhancement: A Longitudinal Study in Three Dominican Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Empathy in the context of patient care is defined as a predominantly cognitive attribute that involves an understanding of the patient's experiences, concerns, and perspectives, combined with a capacity to communicate this understanding and an intention to help. In medical education, it is recognized that empathy can be improved by interventional approaches. In this sense, a semiotic-based curriculum could be an important didactic tool for improving medical empathy. The main purpose of this study was to determine if in medical schools where a semiotic-based curriculum is offered, the empathetic orientation of medical students improves as a consequence of the acquisition and development of students' communication skills that are required in clinician-patient encounters. Design: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in three medical schools of the Dominican Republic that offer three different medical curricula: (i) a theoretical and practical semiotic-based curriculum; (ii) a theoretical semiotic-based curriculum; and (iii) a curriculum without semiotic courses. The Jefferson scale of empathy was administered in two different moments to students enrolled in pre-clinical cycles of those institutions. Data was subjected to comparative statistical analysis and logistic regression analysis. Results: The study included 165 students (55 male and 110 female). Comparison analysis showed statistically significant differences in the development of empathy among groups ( p semiotic-based curriculum contributed toward the enhancement of empathy. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the importance of medical semiotics as a didactic teaching method for improving beginners' empathetic orientation in patients' care.

  6. Fatalism or Destiny? A Qualitative Study and Interpretative Framework on Dominican Women’s Breast Cancer Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez, Karen R.; Aguirre, Alejandra N.; Viladrich, Anahí; Céspedes, Amarilis; De La Cruz, Ana Alicia

    2008-01-01

    Background A growing literature on Latino’s beliefs about cancer focuses on the concept of fatalismo (fatalism), despite numerous conceptual ambiguities concerning its meaning, definition, and measurement. This study explored Latina women’s views on breast cancer and screening within a cultural framework of destino (“destiny”), or the notion that both personal agency and external forces can influence health and life events Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 Latinas from the Dominican Republic aged 40 or over. Results Respondents reported complex notions of health locus of control that encompassed both internal (e.g., individual action) and external (e.g., the will of God) forces shaping breast cancer prevention efforts. Furthermore, women actively participated in screening because they believed that cancer could become a death sentence if diagnosed late or left untreated. Discussion In contrast to simplistic notions of “fatalism”, our analysis suggests complex strategies and beliefs regarding breast cancer and cancer screening that speak of resiliency rather than hopelessness. PMID:18253833

  7. Parenting practices among Dominican and Puerto Rican mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Dittus, Patricia; Jaccard, James; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida; Acosta, Neifi

    2007-01-01

    This study presents descriptive qualitative data about Latino parenting practices in an urban context. Focus groups were conducted with Dominican and Puerto Rican mother-adolescent pairs in the Bronx borough of NewYork City. When parenting style typologies are integrated with the Latino cultural components familismo, respeto, personalismo, and simpatía, Latino parenting practices and their underlying styles are better understood. Content analysis of parents' focus groups revealed five essential Latino parenting practices: (1) ensuring close monitoring of adolescents; (2) maintaining warm and supportive relationships characterized by high levels of parent-adolescent interaction and sharing; (3) explaining parental decisions and actions; (4) making an effort to build and improve relationships; and (5) differential parenting practices based on adolescents' gender. Mothers reported concerns related to the risks associated with living in an urban area, exposure to different cultural values, and opportunities for engaging in risky behaviors. Adolescents' recommendations for effective parenting strategies were similar to the practices reported by their mothers. The study has important applied implications for culturally competent social work practice with Latino adolescents and their families.

  8. REFERENCIAL TEÓRICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Fernandes de Souza

    Full Text Available A autora aborda o conhecimento teórico na enfermagem, focaliza algumas publicações consideradas importantes sobre o mesmo e tece considerações sobre modelos conceituais e teorias como referencial para atuação profissional.

  9. Puerto Rico, humedales [Puerto Rico, wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. Briane; Hefner, John M.; Dopazo, Teresa

    1999-01-01

    La isla de Puerto Rico, localizada al noreste del Mar Caribe y sus islas principales, Vieques, Culebra e Isla de Mona, poseen humedales en abundancia . El clima subtropical, la lluvia abundante y las complejas formas topográficas y geológicas de estas islas dan origen a los humedales, que varían desde los raros e inusuales bosques cubiertos por nubes en las tierras altas, hasta los extensos manglares, yerbas marinas y arrecifes de coral a lo largo de las costas Norte y Sur. Sin embargo, los humedales en Puerto Rico han disminuido en los últimos siglos como resultado del aumento en el desarrollo agrícola, poblacional y turístico. Algunos tipos de humedales como los bosques de palo de pollo (Pterocarpus officinalis) se han reducido a sólo unos pocos remanentes (figura 1).Biológicamente hablando, los humedales de las islas están entre las áreas más productivas. Los humedales asociados con el bosque pluvial en las tierras altas del interior de Puerto Rico contienen varias plantas raras y especies de animales que no se encuentran en otras partes de la Isla. El agua de escorrentía proveniente de los humedales en las partes altas de la Isla proveen una fuente de agua que utilizan varias ciudades para abasto público. Los humedales costeros como los mangles, los colchones de yerbas marinas y los arrecifes de coral proveen áreas para la reproducción y crianza de varios peces, crustáceos y otras especies en la cadena alimenticia (López y otros, 1988). De esta manera, los humedales costeros contribuyen a la productividad biológica de las aguas llanas del mar alrededor de las islas . Los humedales también estabilizan las costas atrapando y reteniendo sedimentos no consolidados y amortiguan la acción de las olas y de las tormentas que tienen el potencial de causar daños en la zona.El valor de los humedales de Puerto Rico para la vida silvestre está muy bien documentado . Por ejemplo, las salinas de Cabo Rojo, en la costa suroeste, proveen áreas para el

  10. Caribic EEG. A new regulation speeds up the solar power market in the Dominical Republic; Karibik-EEG. Eine neue Richtlinie belebt den Solarstrommarkt in der Dominikanischen Republik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosell, Alejandro Diego

    2011-09-15

    In spite of its sunny weather conditions, the Dominican Republic so far has only solar systems with a total of 500 kW. But a new law came into force that permits backward current meters. Those who generate more power than they consume will even get a reimbursement. With additional tax exemptions, the payback period of solar systems will be only a few years.

  11. Analysis of Preference of Incentives to Innovation of Dominican Manufacturing and Service Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Gómez-Valenzuela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is analyzed  the structure of preference of incentives to innovation of Dominican manufacturing and services firms.  The analysis of preference was  carried out using a Conjoint Analysis. In  total  326 firms were surveyed across the country.   According to the main findings,   Dominican firms prefer combinations of incentives to minimize tax liabilities but also to reduce uncertainty related to innovation activities.   In terms of preference, no statistically significant differences between manufacturing and service firms were found.

  12. Dominican and Puerto Rican Mother-Adolescent Communication: Maternal Self-Disclosure and Youth Risk Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    A communication framework was developed to examine the influence of maternal use of self-disclosure on adolescent intentions to smoke cigarettes and to engage in sexual intercourse. Data were collected from 516 Dominican and Puerto Rican mother-adolescent dyads. Statistical analyses were conducted in AMOS using structural equation modeling.…

  13. Racial Identity Attitudes and Ego Identity Statuses in Dominican and Puerto Rican College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Delida

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relation between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses in 94 Dominican and Puerto Rican Latino college students in an urban public college setting. Simultaneous regression analyses were conducted to test the relation between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses, and findings indicated that…

  14. Dominican Family Networks and United States Immigration Policy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Vivian; Weiss, Carol I.

    1979-01-01

    This analysis of the acculturative process of one immigrant Dominican family shows that United States immigration policy forces the separation of families. Immigration regulations do not recognize the cooperating kin groups as "family," and thus necessitate extra-legal strategies to reunify these extended families. (MC)

  15. Self-reported parenting practices in Dominican and Puerto Rican mothers of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther J; Eyberg, Sheila M

    2002-09-01

    Explored self-reported parenting in a Hispanic sample of mothers living in the mainland United States using a cultural framework. Participants were 130 immigrant or first-generation Dominican and Puerto Rican mothers with a child between the ages of 2 and 6 years. Mothers completed questionnaires related to their parenting behavior and also filled out a detailed demographic form and a measure of acculturation. Results suggested that both Dominican and Puerto Rican mothers engage in high levels of praise and physical affection and low levels of harsh, inconsistent, and punitive parenting behaviors. Dominican and Puerto Rican parenting was similar on measures of authoritarian and permissive parenting, but differences emerged on a measure of authoritative parenting and when parenting was considered at the more detailed level of individual behaviors. Parenting was related to several demographic characteristics, including father's education level and child age; more specifically, higher paternal education and younger age of the child were related to higher levels of authoritative parenting by mothers. Parenting and acculturation were generally not related. Discussion focused on a culturally sensitive interpretation of normative parenting among Dominican and Puerto Rican mothers.

  16. Role of a Semiotics-Based Curriculum in Empathy Enhancement: A Longitudinal Study in Three Dominican Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat San-Martín

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empathy in the context of patient care is defined as a predominantly cognitive attribute that involves an understanding of the patient’s experiences, concerns, and perspectives, combined with a capacity to communicate this understanding and an intention to help. In medical education, it is recognized that empathy can be improved by interventional approaches. In this sense, a semiotic-based curriculum could be an important didactic tool for improving medical empathy. The main purpose of this study was to determine if in medical schools where a semiotic-based curriculum is offered, the empathetic orientation of medical students improves as a consequence of the acquisition and development of students’ communication skills that are required in clinician–patient encounters.Design: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in three medical schools of the Dominican Republic that offer three different medical curricula: (i a theoretical and practical semiotic-based curriculum; (ii a theoretical semiotic-based curriculum; and (iii a curriculum without semiotic courses. The Jefferson scale of empathy was administered in two different moments to students enrolled in pre-clinical cycles of those institutions. Data was subjected to comparative statistical analysis and logistic regression analysis.Results: The study included 165 students (55 male and 110 female. Comparison analysis showed statistically significant differences in the development of empathy among groups (p < 0.001. Logistic regression confirmed that gender, age, and a semiotic-based curriculum contributed toward the enhancement of empathy.Conclusion: These findings demonstrate the importance of medical semiotics as a didactic teaching method for improving beginners’ empathetic orientation in patients’ care.

  17. Puerto Rico Soil Erodibility (Kffact)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Puerto Rico soil erodibility (Kffactor) - low values indicate low vulnerability to erosion, higher values mean higher susceptibility to runoff.

  18. Columbia University Puerto Rico Study.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Lifetime childhood asthma prevalence (LCAP) percentages in Puerto Rico Health Regions (HR) are substantially higher in northeastern vs. southwestern HR. Higher...

  19. Quantitative physical and chemical variables used to assess erosion and fertility loss in tropical Dominican and Haitian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J.; Alexis, S.; Vizcayno, C.; Hernández, A. J.

    2009-04-01

    The Pedernales province (Dominican Republic) has the main part of the only Biosphere Reserve in that Caribbean Island, including the Bahoruco and Jaragua National Parks. In these Parks is possible to find almost the totality of tropical forest ecosystems (evergreen rain forest, latifoliated forest, dry forest and mangrove forest on mainland), as well as the most frequent soil uses in the Dominican country. The consulted bibliography about the soils is very scarce and it does not give any information relating to this natural resource, which is basic for a sustainable development management in this territory. When Christopher Columbus reached the island, its plant cover constituted 95% of the land. This was largely because the limited, rudimentary tools used by the Indians to exploit the soil, allowed them to maintain a well-balanced ecological system. The initial type of agriculture practised by the indigenous inhabitants was scarcely destructive and based on vegetatively reproducing crops propagated through cuttings, but later forest burning was an especially significant management practice aimed at releasing nutrients into the soil, in an environment in which under natural conditions, particularly those of the rainforest, these were mostly locked within plant structures. The colonial system, on the contrary, brought with it more elaborate methods and utensils enabling them to cultivate cereals (somewhat unknown to the native Indians) and to rear livestock (cows, goats) yet contributed to the growth of deforestation. Agricultural activities were not confined to the plains; even the virgin woods of the mountains were exploited. The monocrops grown across vast expanses rapidly rid the soil of its productive capacity. Cutting down and burning forest for agricultural uses, and also industrial exploitation of bauxite and limestone produced also important alterations in the soil processes. Agricultural activities were not confined to the plains; even the virgin woods of

  20. Los insectos de Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Torres; S. Medina Gaud

    1998-01-01

    This paper is a brief summary of the natural history and importance of the insects of Puerto Rico. We briefly discuss the orders of insects present in Puerto Rico and some of their families. Where possible, we have tried to avoid technical terms for better comprehension of a general audience. We present the observations or characteristics of insects that humans admire...

  1. Qualitative needs assessment of HIV services among Dominican, Mexican and Central American immigrant populations living in the New York City area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlin, M G; Shulman, L

    2004-05-01

    This paper reports on research designed to assess access to care by Latino immigrant populations in the New York area. A qualitative approach and methods were employed, involving focus groups with PLWAs (persons living with AIDS) and affected men and women from Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Central America to explore the perceptions, beliefs, experiences and knowledge of HIV care issues. A total of 57 men and women participated, ranging in age from 19-61. Results included detailed information on cultural meanings of HIV/AIDS; experience of stigma and rejection; gendered health-seeking behaviour; testing issues; and satisfaction with services. Data support the conclusion that to be effective in reaching and providing services to these immigrant groups, it is crucial to understand the environment from which they come and the impact of immigration. Poverty, repressive governments, lack of education/literacy, ethnicity, class, colour-based stigma and cultural norms are crucial factors in determining their attitudes, motivations, decisions and behaviour. AIDS agencies were seen to play a crucial role in connecting PLWAs to services and resources. The key elements for the provision of services to this population appear to be those that build on cultural norms and network human and institutional resources.

  2. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  3. Dominican and Haitian Neighbors: Making Moral Attitudes and Working Relationships in the Banana Bateyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Wynne

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo responde a la necesidad de explorar cómo el acto de equilibrio del estado Dominicano, sujeto a la demanda económica de mano de obra inmigrante, por un lado, y a la presión política que exige la exclusión de los haitianos de la sociedad dominicana, por el otro, es negociado localmente. Con base en investigación etnográfica en comunidades bananeras llamadas bateyes, este artículo presenta un análisis de las respuestas locales a los cambios causados por la llegada de un creciente número de inmigrantes haitianos. Aun cuando los inmigrantes haitianos son considerados necesarios para la producción bananera, el coexistir con ellos genera incertidumbres sobre violencia e identidad entre los dominicanos. Este artículo argumenta que los residentes dominicanos hacen frente a estos sentimientos de incertidumbre mediante la cultivación de una aparente superioridad moral sobre sus vecinos haitianos. Finalmente, este artículo sugiere que las prácticas de los dominicanos, quienes luchan por ganarse la vida a la par de sus vecinos haitianos, revelan una relación complicada no sólo por la existencia de una ideología anti-haitiana, pero por una vida precaria, históricamente construida, que marginaliza a los residentes de los bateyes en su conjunto. English: This article addresses the need to explore how the Dominican state’s ongoing balancing act between the economic demand for migrant workers and the political pressure to exclude Haitians from Dominican society is negotiated locally. Based on ethnographic research conducted in banana-growing communities called 'bateyes', this article provides an analysis of local responses to changes occurring with the arrival of increasingly more Haitian residents. While Haitian migrants are regarded as necessary for banana production, living among them triggers insecurities about violence and identity among Dominicans. The article argues that Dominican residents cope with these feelings of

  4. Differences in Attitudes Toward Living Kidney Donation Among Dominican Immigrants Living in Spain and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, A; López-Navas, A I; Sánchez, Á; Flores-Medina, J; Ayala, M A; Garrido, G; Sebastián, M J; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Ramis, G; Hernández, A M; Ramírez, P; Parrilla, P

    2018-03-01

    The Dominican population has a double-emigration pathway: one is to the USA, by proximity, and the other is to Spain, by sociocultural identification. Our aim was to determine attitudes toward living organ donation among Dominicans residing in Florida (USA) and Spain. All study participants were at least 15 years old and living in either Florida (USA) or Spain, and stratified by gender and age. A questionnaire on attitudes toward living kidney donation ("PCID-LKD Ríos") was used. The support of immigrant associations in Florida and Spain was required to advise on survey locations. Data obtained were anonymized and self-administered. The study questionnaire was completed by 123 Dominicans, 68% of whom were in favor of living related kidney donation. There were differences (P = .004) according to the country of residence. Eighty-one percent of Spain's Dominican residents were in favor, compared with 56% of Florida's residents. Factors associated with attitude toward donation were level of education (P donation (P = .006), attitude toward cadaveric organ donation (P donation (P = .046). Attitudes toward living kidney donation among immigrant Dominicans varies between Spain and the USA, with the former showing a more positive view. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cement, concrete, construction and quality discussed by lETCC scientists in Venezuela and the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calleja, José

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available Not availableLa Asociación Venezolana de Ingeniería de Inspección, Dirección y Supervisión de Obras (AVIDISO, como parte del Colegio de Ingenieros de Venezuela, organizó, para celebrar en los días 1 al 6 de septiembre de 1975, un ''Curso sobre Tecnología y Control de Calidad en la Construcción de Obras de Concreto".

  6. Establishment of the west indian fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) parasitoid Doryctobracon areolatus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    The West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), infests numerous fruit species, particularly Anacardiaceae and most importantly mango (Mangifera indica L.). Widespread in the Neotropics, it was first reported in Hispaniola nearly 70 years ago. Continental populations are attacked by the op...

  7. Parenting Values and Parenting Stress among Impoverished Village and Middle-Class Small City Mothers in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Darlene C.; Schneider, Barry H.

    2009-01-01

    Poverty is known to influence parenting values, parenting stress, psychological adjustment, and social support according to North American research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether poverty might work in similar ways in a collectivistic Latin culture. The participants were primary caregivers in two distinct communities in the…

  8. Social Perception of Risk and Protection Factors for the Children of Emigrant Mothers: A Study in the Dominican Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Uriarte Arciniega

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La feminización de la migración laboral altera los roles y relaciones familiares e impacta en el desarrollo de los niños que quedan en el lugar de origen. El objetivo del estudio es mostrar los factores de riesgo y de protección percibidos en la sociedad dominicana para los hijos cuando emigra la madre. Como factores de riesgo destacan: la falta de comunicaciones entre madre e hijo; ser exigente en las relaciones; y el ambiente familiar sustituto anómalo. En cambio, son factores de protección: la comunicación frecuente con la madre y las relaciones afectuosas entre la tutora y el hijo. Cuando ésta es un familiar muy cercano a la madre, fomenta valores como el ahorro, el esfuerzo y el sacrificio. Los resultados de la percepción social coinciden con la literatura existente, pero se discute si los factores percibidos son los que más afectan el desarrollo psicosocial de los niños que quedan atrás por la migración.

  9. 77 FR 30329 - Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement; Notice of Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... rights under Honduran labor law relating to freedom of association, the right to organize, the right to.... Submission 2012-01 alleges that the GOH's actions or lack thereof denied workers their rights under the laws... the enforcement of labor laws, failure of STSS officials to grant union recognition or verify mandated...

  10. Everyday Expertise in Self-Management of Diabetes in the Dominican Republic: Implications for Learning and Performance Support Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Paulino, Lisette G.

    2012-01-01

    An epidemic such as diabetes is an extremely complex public health, economic and social problem that is difficult to solve through medical expertise alone. Evidence-based models for improving healthcare delivery systems advocate educating patients to become more active participants in their own care. This shift demands preparing chronically ill…

  11. Power Pack: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965-1966 (Leavenworth Papers, Number 15)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-01

    Center (Centro de Entrenamiento de las Fuerzas 22 Elias Wessin y Wessin Armadas, or CEFA), an elite group of nearly 2,000 specially trained infan- try...battalion combat team battalion landing team Centro de Entrenamiento de las Fuerzas Armadas (Armed Forces Training Cen- ter) Central Intelligence...operations. As with Lebanon in 1958, the Domin- ican intervention was a joint operation. In general terms, many of the de - ficiencies revealed in joint

  12. Early Childhood Internalizing Problems in Mexican- and Dominican-Origin Children: The Role of Cultural Socialization and Parenting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther; Barajas-Gonzalez, R. Gabriela; Huang, Keng-Yen; Brotman, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined mother- and teacher-rated internalizing behaviors (i.e., anxiety, depression and somatization symptoms) among young children using longitudinal data from a community sample of 661 Mexican and Dominican families, and tested a conceptual model in which parenting (mother’s socialization messages and parenting practices) predicted child internalizing problems 12 months later. Children evidenced elevated levels of mother-rated anxiety at both time points. Findings also supported the validity of the proposed parenting model for both Mexican and Dominican families. Though there were different pathways to child anxiety, depression and somatization among Mexican and Dominican children, socialization messages and authoritarian parenting were positively associated with internalizing symptoms for both groups. PMID:26042610

  13. Early Childhood Internalizing Problems in Mexican- and Dominican-Origin Children: The Role of Cultural Socialization and Parenting Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, Esther; Barajas-Gonzalez, R Gabriela; Huang, Keng-Yen; Brotman, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    This study examined mother- and teacher-rated internalizing behaviors (i.e., anxiety, depression, and somatization symptoms) among young children using longitudinal data from a community sample of 661 Mexican and Dominican families and tested a conceptual model in which parenting (mother's socialization messages and parenting practices) predicted child internalizing problems 12 months later. Children evidenced elevated levels of mother-rated anxiety at both time points. Findings also supported the validity of the proposed parenting model for both Mexican and Dominican families. Although there were different pathways to child anxiety, depression, and somatization among Mexican and Dominican children, socialization messages and authoritarian parenting were positively associated with internalizing symptoms for both groups.

  14. Revival and Identification of Bacterial Spores in 25- to 40-Million-Year-Old Dominican Amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Raul J.; Borucki, Monica K.

    1995-05-01

    A bacterial spore was revived, cultured, and identified from the abdominal contents of extinct bees preserved for 25 to 40 million years in buried Dominican amber. Rigorous surface decontamination of the amber and aseptic procedures were used during the recovery of the bacterium. Several lines of evidence indicated that the isolated bacterium was of ancient origin and not an extant contaminant. The characteristic enzymatic, biochemical, and 16S ribosomal DNA profiles indicated that the ancient bacterium is most closely related to extant Bacillus sphaericus.

  15. The Indians of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Robert; And Others

    Produced for use in a coordinated program of studies for students in the Connecticut Migratory Children's Program and for other students whose native language is Spanish, this book about the Indians of Puerto Rico is intended as supplementary reading material for pre-school through fifth grade. The book, illustrated with black and white drawings,…

  16. Cobertura desarrollada de Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Gould; Sebastian Martinuzzi; Olga M. Ramos Gonzalez

    2008-01-01

    Este mapa representa la cobertura desarrollada en Puerto Rico (Martinuzzi et al. 2007). Cobertura desarrollada se define aqui como areas urbanas, construidas y sin vegetacion, que resultan de actividad humana. Tipicamente, estas incluyen estructuras construidas, concreto, asfalto, u otra infraestructura. La cobertura desarrollada se creo mediante el analisis de...

  17. How discrimination and stress affects self-esteem among Dominican immigrant women: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchanadeswaran, Subadra; Dawson, Beverly Araujo

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to the health disparities among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States is very important given the growing Latina population. Although researchers have investigated the health and mental health status among Latinas, the relationship between mental health and self-esteem has not been given a lot of attention. Given that self-esteem is a proxy for mental health status, investigations exploring the factors that can negatively affect self-esteem are needed. Therefore, the current study examined the influence of discrimination and stress on self-esteem among Dominican immigrant women. A cross-sectional study was undertaken among 235 immigrant Dominican women in New York City. Women (age 18-49 years) and in the United States for fewer than 20 years were more likely to report experiencing discrimination compared to women older than age 50 years and in the United States for more than 20 years. After controlling for age, time in the United States, educational level, and income, high levels of discrimination (-0.09, p < 0.01) and stress (-0.69, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with reduced self-esteem. Interventions with Latino/a populations, especially women, need to acknowledge their individual evaluations of the discriminatory and stressful experiences that negatively influence their self-esteem and subsequently their mental health status.

  18. 40 CFR 131.40 - Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico 131.40 Section 131.40... Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.40 Puerto Rico (a) Use designations for marine waters. In addition to the Commonwealth's adopted use designations, the following waterbodies in Puerto Rico...

  19. Analogia ad legendum. Semantic, practical and compositional function of two pulpits in the Dominican church in Lublin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kluz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dominican church in Lublin contains an unusual example of two pulpits in a sacred interior, which are situated vis-à-vis at the rood arch. They were sculpted by Sebastian Zeisl, who, with the aid of his workshop, made the rococo furnishing of the church in the years 1756–1761. The sculptural decoration of the pulpits makes references to their preaching function, as well as to Dominican spirituality. The solution formally seems to have been inspired by the compositional model of two pulpits on either side of the altar, an elaboration of the symmetrical (stage-like organization of the sacred interior. The fact that the contractor was familiar with such layout could stem from the impact exerted by local inspiration (e.g. St. Anne’s church in Lubartów or the artist’s earlier Central European experience, probably including his education among Viennese artists. However, the construction of two Dominican pulpits, both of which were used (none of them is apparent may indicate that their roles could go beyond merely compositional ones. It seems that their emergence was influenced by individual needs of the Lublin Dominican monastery, especially their preaching practices. The knowledge gained so far allows us to suspect that the construction of the two pulpits is related to their role in the liturgy, namely the polemical sermons practised by the Order of Preachers in Lublin.

  20. Belonging, Place, and Identity: The Role of Social Trust in Developing the Civic Capacities of Transnational Dominican Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Patrick Joseph

    2017-01-01

    In the context of transnational migration, schools are reimagining their role in preparing students to become democratic citizens. The qualitative research study described in this article explores the places where five Dominican transnational youth attending a New York City public high school for late-arriving migrants enacted their civic…

  1. Drinking and Driving in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Vaeth, Patrice A C; Romano, Eduardo; Canino, Glorisa

    2018-01-09

    Epidemiological information is lacking for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) in Puerto Rico. To examine the prevalence and correlates of DUI in Puerto Rico. Data are from a household sample of 1510 individuals, aged 18-64 years in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The response rate was 83%. The rate of 12 month self-reported DUI was 20% among men and 8% among women (p Puerto Rico was high, but the proportion of people arrested for DUI in a span of 12 months or during their lifetime was low. Stricter enforcement of DUI laws may be necessary to minimize DUI in urban Puerto Rico.

  2. Central Asian Republic Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CAR Info is designed and managed by the Central Asian Republic Mission to fill in the knowledge and reporting gaps in existing agency systems for that Mission. It...

  3. Canyons off northwest Puerto Rico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.D.; Glover, L.K.; Hollister, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    The Nuclear-Research Submarine NR-1 was used to study morphoplogy, sediment, and sediment-water interactions off the northwest coast of Puerto Rico. New detailed bathymetry from the surface-support ship, USS Portland, shows several submarine canyons in the area, some of them unreported previously. The north coast canyons, Arecibo, Tiberones and Quebradillas, are primarily erosional features although no recent turbidity-current evidence is seen. The canyons are presently filling with river-transported sediments. (orig./ME)

  4. Kyrgyz Republic; Selected Issues

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2013-01-01

    Performance of the banking sector during the crisis and challenges are discussed. The impact of the political crisis on the banking sector is outlined. The Kyrgyz Republic is one of the most open economies in the world. Gross international reserves (GIR) in the Kyrgyz Republic have increased more than sixfold in the last decade. Gold exports, remittances, and official development assistance have become important sources of reserve accumulation. The current level of reserves in the Kyrgyz Repu...

  5. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  6. The Puerto Rico Healthcare Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is an organized nonincorporated territory of the United States with a population of more than 3.5 million U.S. citizens. The island has been the focus of much recent attention due to the recent default on its debt (estimated at more than $70 billion), high poverty rates, and increasing unemployment. Less attention, however, has been given to the island's healthcare system, which many believe is on the verge of collapsing. Healthcare makes up 20% of the Puerto Rican economy, and this crisis affects reimbursement rates for physicians while promoting the disintegration of the island's healthcare infrastructure. A major contributor relates to a disparity in federal funding provided to support the island's healthcare system when compared with that provided to the states in the mainland and Hawaii. Puerto Rico receives less federal funding for healthcare than the other 50 states and the District of Columbia even though it pays its share of social security and Medicare taxes. To make matters worse, the U.S. Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services is planning soon to implement another 11% cut in Medical Advantage reimbursements. This disparity in support for healthcare is considered responsible for ∼$25 billion of Puerto Rico's total debt. The impact of these events on the health of Puerto Ricans in the island cannot be entirely predicted, but the loss of healthcare providers and diminished access to care are a certainty, and quality care will suffer, leading to serious implications for those with chronic medical disorders including respiratory disease.

  7. Los bosques de Puerto Rico, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humfredo Marcano Vega; Thomas J. Brandeis; Jeffery A. Turner; No Other

    2015-01-01

    Este informe presenta los resultados del cuarto inventario forestal de las islas del Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico. El área de bosque en la isla grande de Puerto Rico se mantuvo constante o aumentó ligeramente del año 2004 al 2009. Este cambio parece indicar que la tasa de incremento de cubierta forestal en la isla grande de Puerto Rico ha disminuido desde que...

  8. Manatee mortality in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignucci-Giannoni, A. A.; Montoya-Ospina, R. A.; Jimenez-Marrero, N. M.; Rodriguez-Lopez, M.; Williams, E.H.; Bonde, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    The most pressing problem in the effective management of the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) in Puerto Rico is mortality due to human activities. We assessed 90 cases of manatee strandings in Puerto Rico based on historical data and a coordinated carcass salvage effort from 1990 through 1995. We determined patterns of mortality, including type of event, condition of carcasses, spatial and temporal distribution, gender, size/age class, and the cause of death. The spatial distribution of stranding events was not uniform, with the north, northeast, and south coasts having the highest numbers. Six clusters representing the highest incidence included the areas of Fajardo and Ceiba, Bahia de Jobos, Toa Baja, Guayanilla, Cabo Rojo, and Rio Grande to Luquillo. The number of reported cases has increased at an average rate of 9.6%/yr since 1990. The seasonality of stranding events showed a bimodal pattern, from February through April and in August and September. Most identified causes of death were due to human interaction, especially captures and watercraft collisions. Natural causes usually involved dependent calves. From 1990 through 1995, most deaths were attributed to watercraft collisions. A reduction in anthropogenic mortality of this endangered species can be accomplished only through education and a proactive management and conservation plan that includes law enforcement, mortality assessment, scientific research, rescue and rehabilitation, and inter- and intraagency cooperation.

  9. Evolution and classification of Elaphoglossum and Asplenium ferns on Cuba, and discovery of a Miocene Elaphoglossum in Dominican amber

    OpenAIRE

    Lóriga Piñero, Josmaily

    2018-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the systematics and evolution of Neotropical ferns of the genera Elaphoglossum and Asplenium, with particular focus on the species of Cuba and the West Indies. It also includes an analysis and description of an Elaphoglossum frond fragment preserved in Miocene Dominican amber. The worldwide genera Elaphoglossum with 600 species and Asplenium with 685 species are the most species-rich groups of leptosporangiate ferns. On Cuba, Elaphoglossum has 34 species and Asple...

  10. Guardians of the Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    them reason to make use of it to the best advantage of life and convenience." John Locke, An Essay Concerning the True Original Extent and End of Civil...a contextual conception of justice early in the Republic, when the young character Polemarchus offers and adopts the opinion of the lyric poet

  11. Czech Republic [2016

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrnáč, Aleš; Petrúšek, Ivan; Linek, Lukáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 1 (2016), s. 69-75 ISSN 2047-8852 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29032S Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : Czech politics * political parties * Czech Republic Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Sciences http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/2047-8852.12130/full

  12. Duelo lírico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Casis

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available Juan Casís, editor Contiene: -El centenario o la generación polemista / Javier Arango Ferrer -Prólogo / Roberto Liévano -A un gran poeta / Un poeta oscuro -A un poeta oscuro / Eduardo Castillo -A un poeta pequeño / Un poeta oscuro -Al poeta E. C. / Luis Paredes -A un poeta oscuro y pequeño / Eduardo Castillo -Un sonámbulo / Un poeta oscuro -A dos poetas líricos / Joaquin Güell -La tregua de Dios / Miguel Rasch Isla -Epílogo  -Por la cruz de la espada / Eduardo Castillo  -Evangelio poético / Ángel María Céspedes -El símbolo / Delio Seravile -Brindis / Raimundo Rivas

  13. Hospitalidade Organizacional: Panorama Teórico-Empírico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Carvalho dos Santos Claro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste texto é o de apresentar as discussões teórico-conceituais sobre Hospitalidade, particularmente a vertente da Hospitalidade Organizacional (HO, que se ocupa das relações hospitaleiras no ambiente do espaço de trabalho. Trata-se de um estudo exploratório, baseado em revisão bibliográfica, seguida de pesquisa de campo por meio de levantamento junto a gestores de pessoas (especialistas ou juízes, sobre o entendimento do tema, visando contribuir para a futura criação de escala de medida para quantificar o grau de HO em uma organização. Como resultado, apresenta-se contribuição teórica para o amadurecimento desta tendência organizacional e indicadores que poderão ser futuramente usados em estudos empíricos e na construção de um instrumento com escala validada para ser utilizada em organizações em qualquer setor de atividade econômica. Palavras-chave: Hospitalidade. Hospitalidade Organizacional. Gestão de Pessoas.Organizational Hospitality: Theorical and Empirical Developments This paper aim is to present the theoretical and conceptual discussions about hospitality, particularly the  Organizational Hospitality (OH, which is concerned with the hospitable relations in the workplace. It’s an exploratory study, based on literature review and field survey with people managers (experts or judges about their understanding about the question. The result indicates that the development of organizational indicators could be used in future empirical studies and to the construction of a validated scale that can be used in any sector of the economic activity. Keywords: Hospitality. Organizational Hospitality. People Management. Indicators.José Alberto Carvalho dos Santos Claro – Doutor. Professor Adjunto da Universidade Federal de São Paulo [UNIFESP], Campus Baixada Santista, Santos, SP. Endereço Lattes http://lattes.cnpq.br/0865792662046289 E-mail: albertoclaro@albertoclaro.pro.br  

  14. Decapod crustaceans from the Neogene of the Caribbean: diversity, distribution and prospectus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, J.S.H.; Portell, R.W.; Donovan, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The Neogene decapod crustaceans are reviewed from Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao, Anguilla, Barbados, Carriacou, Costa Rica, Cuba, Florida, Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic), Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts, Tintamare Island, Trinidad and Venezuela. The most widely distributed

  15. Caribbean Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kris

    1991-01-01

    The Caribbean is a rich breeding ground for African-derived music. A synopsis is given of the music of the following countries and styles: (1) Jamaica; (2) Trinidad and Tobago; (3) Calypso; (4) steel pan; (5) Haiti; (6) Dominican Republic; (7) Cuba; (8) Puerto Rico; and (9) other islands. (SLD)

  16. Library and Archival Resources for Social Science Research in the Spanish, French, Dutch Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Thomas G.

    The working paper describes how a social scientist might go about locating resources for any particular study. Researchers are directed to non-Caribbean based material in European Archives as well as collections in the United States. Caribbean resources are analyzed by county. The countries include Cuba, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico,…

  17. Project Aprendizaje, 1988-89. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Tomi D.; Velasquez, Clara

    In it's first year, Project Aprendizaje served 250 students from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico at Seward Park High School in Manhattan (New York). Project objectives were to improve participants' language skills in Spanish and English, help participants successfully complete content area courses needed for graduation, and provide career…

  18. Multiple Introductions of Zika Virus into the United States Revealed Through Genomic Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the US Army, the...Central Americas (Guatemala, Mexico, Suriname, and Venezuela ), the Caribbean (Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Martinique, and Puerto Rico), and

  19. Egyptian Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In this work are given the principal news concerning petroleum and natural gas in Egyptian Arab Republic. An important discovery of natural gas has been made in Khalda (Egyptian Arab Republic). The discovery well will be temporarily abandoned until it is connected to the egyptian pipeline system. In 1996 the south Khalda will be explored with at least two well drilling. The transit duties by the Suez canal for liquefied natural gas exports have decreased of 35%. The Arab Petroleum Pipeline Company studies a connection project of the trans saudi pipeline with the Suez mediterranean pipeline. The Egyptian General Petroleum Corporation will furnish 2,5 milliards of m 3 per year of natural gas to Israel during 20 years. (O.L.). 2 figs

  20. Czech Republic [2011

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Linek, Lukáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, 7-8 (2011), s. 948-954 ISSN 0304-4130 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP408/10/0584 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : Czech politics * political parties * Czech republic Subject RIV: AD - Politology ; Political Science s Impact factor: 1.478, year: 2011 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1475-6765.2011.02017.x/full

  1. Una mirada hacia las actitudes lingüísticas en Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M. Mojica De León

    2014-11-01

    one spoken in Spain, although they reject some of the characteristics of both dialects. In addition, dialects of migratory groups, such as Dominicans in Puerto Rico, are perceived as less prestigious.

  2. Puerto Rico Above Ground Biomass Map, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This image dataset details the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico above-ground forest biomass (AGB) (baseline 2000) developed by the United States (US) Environmental...

  3. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: HABITATS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  4. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  5. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: KARST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  6. Puerto Rico Relative Vulnerability to Erosion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical factors, such as the slope of the land, the texture of the soil, and the precipitation regime influence erosion in an area. Parts of Puerto Rico are very...

  7. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  8. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: BIRDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  9. Puerto Rico ESI and RSI: WETLANDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  10. Breast Cancer Epidemiology in Puerto Rico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nazario, Cruz M; Freudenheim, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This project has two mayor goals: to design and conduct a pilot case-control breast cancer study among Puerto Rican women, and to train and develop researchers in breast cancer at the University of Puerto Rico...

  11. Estimated Bathymetry of the Puerto Rico shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This classification of estimated depth represents the relative bathymetry of Puerto Rico's shallow waters based on Landsat imagery for NOAA's Coastal Centers for...

  12. Puerto Rico: Information for Status Deliberations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Rico has suffered a temporary setback from the destruction caused by Hurricane Hugo , both the availability and quality of the island’s housing stock...34"ý Prnce omi Puerto Rico aw (US li ANTIUDAN (U.S.) ,M S oh’ Montserrat (UK) !tGuadsiffupe (FR.) HONDURAS DOMdINICA Caribbean Sea Rosea q Martinique...Housing (the most recent data available). While the island has suffered a temporary setback because of the destruction caused by Hurricane Hugo

  13. 27 CFR 26.126 - Taxpayment in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxpayment in Puerto Rico..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Liquors and Articles Purchased by Tourists in Puerto Rico § 26.126 Taxpayment in Puerto Rico. Liquors upon which all...

  14. Sources for the study of the history of the dominican studium generale in Krakow in the modern era. The state of research and research perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiktor Szymborski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Main objective of the essay under consideration was investigation and characterized most important source materials stocked at the Archive of the Cracow’s Dominican Province to present the history of their studium generale during the Modern period. Also, the current knowledge of a.m. period of studium generale was screened- out and some searching hypothesis were proposed concerning the history of the Cracow’s Dominican studium generale. The searching time frame have been limited to XVI up to XVII century. Taken into consideration, the current status of research works performed so far, one ought to stated that the Modern Epoch has not been searched out with the same consciousness compare to the Medieval one. As the most important printed source materials, one ought to account the documents issued by the general and provincial chapters of the Convent. The documents of the provincial chapters have been listed and screened by Father Fabian Madura, and were stocked as the typescript formats at the Cracow’s Dominican Convent Library. Based on the searched source materials of General Chapter of Dominican Convent at Cracow, it is possible to present the general overview of the convent education system and its changes in due time. Due to the records found it would be possible to identify – position and name – the Dominicans nominated to the Convent stadium generale. The most important manuscript stocked at the Cracow’s Dominican Convent Archive as the education system is concern, is so called Liber Studii Generalis cracoviensis (rkps 20. This manuscript covers the list of friars who have been nominated to work at stadium generale. A.m. document has to verify and compare with other sources. Taken into consideration above mention facts, it seems to be as most important searching activities to describe the convent society of the Cracow’s Dominicans. At the essay some detailed searching hypothesis were presented, such as searching and reviewing

  15. Decorative carving in Chapter-House of Dominican Monastery in Cracow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Walczak

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The history of the chapter house of the Dominican Friars in Cracow is not known in greater detail. Only two medieval documents with a mention of it are known. In in capitulo fratrum ordinis Praedicatorum Cracoviae of 1244 an endowment for the Cistercian monastery in Mogiła was confirmed. In Cracovie in capitulo fratrum predicatorum of 1306 the purchase of land in Dąbie, near Cracow, was certified. Marcin Szyma estimated that these notes cannot be ascribed to one building, which means that there were two gathering places for monks, one built after the other. Szyma locates the oldest chapter-house in the site of today’s sacristy and links it with a brick wall with a biforium window and portal remains, found in the western wall of the building. The older record marks terminus ante quern, and comparative chronology and analysis of style point to 1240s as the date of extension of the house. A new chapter house was built in Szyma’s assessment at the end of that century, and certainly before 1306. The building has fairly rich decorative carving, infrequently mentioned in historical records. The portal in the western wall of the chapter house has had three preserved, if tumbledown, consoles carved in yellowish, fine-grained sandstone. The closest analogies to these decorations are to be found in edifices built for the last members of the Premyslids dynasty, especially for king Premyslav Otokar II in the third quarter of the 13th century. In works connected with the “Premyslids building school” compact, block-like shapes of caps, ‘coated’ with tiny leaves and decorative ‘crowns’ at rib base were fairly common. Consoles in a portal of the oldest fragment of Śpilberk in Brno or chapels in the castles in Bezdez, Horsovsky Tyn, Zvikov and Buchlov are of special importance for these considerations. Czech examples most often employ a variety of flora, yet, even here, in the portal caps of the monastery in Hradiśte on Jizerou (ca 1260 we

  16. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Thermo King de Puerto Rico Incorporated in Arecibo, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermo King de Puerto Rico, Inc. facility is located in the Zeno Gandia Industrial Area in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Major features of the facility include six buildings used for manufacturing and storage, a wastewater treatment plant, a hazardous waste and no

  17. Persistencia del conducto onfalomesentérico

    OpenAIRE

    Mariño, Laura P.; Fraga, Juan I.; Rubio, Soraya; Segarra, Juan; Gaetano, Mauro; Ossés, José A.

    2009-01-01

    La persistencia del conducto onfalomesentérico es una de las formas de presentación más raras de los restos embrionarios derivados de este conducto. Se presenta el caso de un recién nacido en el que se constata salida de contenido intestinal a través del ombligo. Se confirma el diagnóstico de persistencia del conducto onfalomesentérico mediante fistulografía umbilical, procediéndose a su corrección quirúrgica (resección de conducto onfalomesentérico). Se describe la metodología diagnóstica, s...

  18. Thermoluminescence dosimetry in Northwest Puerto Rico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, A.M.; Clements, R.G.; Rosa, L.I.; Santos, F.

    1975-01-01

    In October, 1973, the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority sought the initiation of studies aimed at determining background radiological characteristics of the northwestern quadrant of Puerto Rico using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Some of the studies were required for supporting data for the environmental report submitted as part of the licensing procedure in the establishment of thermonuclear electric power generation facilities in Barrio Islote, Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Previous studies of radiological characteristics of the area had been made using sodium iodide sensing equipment in an airplane flying at an altitude of 500 ft. The results are expressed in counts per second, and provide useful comparative levels for radioactivity measured with the thermoluminescent detectors. (U.S.)

  19. Uukuniemi virus, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna; Zelená, Hana; Papadopoulou, Elpida; Mrázek, Jakub

    2018-04-20

    Following the identification of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome and Heartland viruses, the interest on tick-borne phleboviruses has increased rapidly. Uukuniemi virus has been proposed as a model for tick-borne phleboviruses. However, the number of available sequences is limited. In the current study we performed whole-genome sequencing on two Uukuniemi viral strains isolated in 2000 and 2004 from Ixodes ricinus ticks in the Czech Republic. Both strains cluster together with Potepli63 strain isolated in the country in 1963. Although the Czech strains were isolated many years apart, a high identity was seen at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, suggesting that UUKV has a relatively stable genome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasma rico en plaquetas vs. plasma rico en factores de crecimiento

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco Luna, Joaquín; Bonete Lluch, D.; Gomar Sancho, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    El desarrollo de los preparados plasmáticos ha generado grandes expectativas en la reparación ósea y han alcanzado gran desarrollo comercial de los kits de obtención del Plasma Rico en Plaquetas (PRP), también conocido como concentrado rico en plaquetas (PRC), gel de plaquetas autólogo, y plasma rico en factores de crecimiento (PRF) y su efecto sobre la regeneración esquelética. La generación de concentrados plasmáticos de plaquetas tiene como objetivo la liberación de factores de...

  1. Yemen Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    The government of the Yemen Arab Republic does not have a population policy, but promotes family planning for health reasons since one of its goals is to reduce maternal and child mortality and morbidity. The 2nd 5-Year Plan (1982-86) aims for increased gross domestic product and per capita income, regional development, infrastructure development, job creation, and human resources mobilization. The population increased from 4.8 million in 1970 to 5.8 million in 1980 and is projected to reach 6.5 million by 1985 (indicating a 2.4% growth rate from 1980-1985). Life expectancy is 44 years for both sexes; infant mortality now stands at a high 156/1000 due largely to early marriage and little maternal care. The government concentrates on improving health care, mainly through its national health plans, by emphasizing immunization, education, and training doctors abroad. Current total fertility is 6.7, the birth rate is 48.5/1000, and the average age at marriage for girls is 13. Contraceptives and sterilization are available; abortion for contraceptive purposes is illegal. Up to 30% of Yemen's labor force may have emigrated to neighboring Gulf states and Saudi Arabia. The shortage in labor is partially made up by immigrants from the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen, but the government still considers emigration too high since many of those who leave are the most skilled. There is no policy on international migration, due to the great value of remittances, but the government would like to encourage return migration. Yemen's urban population increased from 1.9% in 1950 to 15.3% in 1980. 4/5 of the population live in 5 of Yemen's 10 governorates. The government's policy seeks to strengthen the agricultural sector, improve living quality in rural areas, build up a balanced regional infrastructure, and establish more educational opportunities in small cities and villages.

  2. “Neither Here Nor There.” The Experience of Borderless Nation in Contemporary Dominican-American Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Majkowska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available “Neither Here Nor There.” The Experience of Borderless Nation in Contemporary Dominican-American Literature Discussing migrant identities, critics very often focus on the state in-between, the state between the borders, or being neither here nor there, and a migrant group that seems to epitomize this in-between condition is the Dominican-Americans. Consequently, the article seeks to examine the experience of in-betweenness, of being suspended between the boundaries and borders of two countries in selected texts of contemporary Dominican-American writers: Junot Díaz’s novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and a short story “Monstro,” and Angie Cruz’s Soledad. It aims to analyze how the texts discuss the experience of in-betweenness through hybridity (for instance intertextuality and magical realism with the use of tools offered by the neo-baroque esthetics.   „Ani tu, ani tam”. Doświadczenie narodu bez granic we współczesnej literaturze dominikańsko-amerykańskiej Analiza tożsamości imigrantów często skupia się na byciu pomiędzy, egzystowaniu między granicami, a także braku przynależności do żadnej z kultur. Grupa, która wydaje się uosabiać ten stan, to migranci z Republiki Dominikany w Stanach Zjednoczonych. Niniejszy artykuł podejmuje temat doświadczenia bycia pomiędzy, zawieszenia pomiędzy granicami i między dwoma krajami w wybranych tekstach współczesnych pisarzy dominikańsko-amerykańskich: powieści Krótki i niezwykły żywot Oscara Wao i opowiadania „Monstro” Junota Díaza oraz powieści Soledad Angie Cruz. Celem artykułu jest analiza doświadczenia bycia pomiędzy wyrażanego poprzez hybrydę, czemu służą narzędzia oferowane przez estetykę neobarokową, a także poprzez intertekstualność i realizm magiczny.

  3. Sex Differences and Depression in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canino, Glorisa J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined sex differences in rates of depressive disorders and depressive symptomatology, as measured by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule, for an island-wide probability sample of Puerto Rico. Found depression significantly more prevalent among women than men. Discusses risk factors from a sex-role and cultural perspective. (Author/KS)

  4. Island in Crisis: Response to Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2018-01-01

    On September 6, 2017, Hurricane Irma, a Category 5 storm packing winds of 185 miles per hour skirted the northern coast of Puerto Rico, leaving 1 million residents without electrical power. Schools were closed for 5 days, but a major calamity was narrowly avoided. Overall, residents were grateful for their good fortune, but the same could not be…

  5. Tortuguero Bay [Puerto Rico] environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, E.D.; Youngbluth, M.J.; Nutt, M.E.; Yoshioka, P.; Canoy, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    Site selection surveys and environmental research studies of seven coastal sites in Puerto Rico for construction of power generating facilities were carried out. Data are presented on the physical, chemical, and geological parameters of the Tortuguero Bay site, and the ecological parameters of zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, plant and fish communities. (U.S.)

  6. Areas naturales protegidas de Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Gould; Maya Quinones; Mariano Solórzano; Waldemar Alcobas; Caryl Alarcon

    2011-01-01

    En este mapa mostramos las areas naturales protegidas designadas para la conservacion de los recursos naturales en Puerto Rico y regiones reguladas por ley con el potencial de mejorar la conservacion de los mismos. La designacion de areas protegidas es un proceso dinamico debido a que es el resultado de la constante evolucion de valores en los diferentes sectores de la...

  7. Lichens in Puerto Rico: an ecosystem approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel A. Mercado-Díaz; William A. Gould; Grizelle Gonzalez; Robert. Lücking

    2015-01-01

    This work presents basic information on tropical lichenology. It also describes general aspects about the ecology and biodiversity of these organisms in eight forest ecosystems present along an elevational gradient in northeastern Puerto Rico. These ecosystems consist of elfin woodlands, palo colorado, sierra palm, tabonuco, lowland moist, dry, mangrove, and...

  8. A Chronological History of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Federico Ribes

    This book presents a chronological history of Puerto Rico from prehistory and discovery through December of 1972. It includes information on the persons and events that influenced the course of Puerto Rican history. A table of contents and a selective index are included. (Author/AM)

  9. Implementation of a General Reform Plan in the Army of the Dominican Republic (IMPLEMENTACI N DE UNA REFORMA INTEGRAL EN EL EJ RCITO DE LA REPUBLICA DOMINICANA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    CIENCIAS Y ARTES MILITARES Estudios Generales Por TTE.COR. MANUEL A. CARRASCO GUERRERO B.A., Technical University of Santiago-Utesa......otras sinceramente muchas gracias. v TABLA DE CONTENIDO Páginas MAESTRÍA EN CIENCIAS Y ARTES MILITARES PAGINA DE APROBACION DE LA TESIS

  10. Antimicrobial activity of analogues of a peptide isolated from venom glands of social wasps Polistes major major inhabiting the Dominican Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Rudolf; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Šafařík, Martin; Borovičková, Lenka; Fučík, Vladimír; Čeřovský, Václav; Slaninová, Jiřina

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2008), s. 99-99 ISSN 1075-2617. [European Peptide Symposium /30./. 31.08.2008-05.09.2008, Helsinki] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : peptides from venom glands * Polistes major * synthesis and antimicrobial activity * analogues Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  11. District magnitude and voter turnout a multi-level analysis of self-reported voting in the 32 Dominican Republic districts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, K.T.E.; Spierings, N.

    2010-01-01

    Although studies of electoral participation in established democracies are abundant, little attention has been devoted to Latin American democracies and few studies combine individual-level and contextual-level variables. We focus on electoral participation in 32 districts of a Latin American

  12. Expanding Public/Private Partnerships For Improving Basic Education through School Sponsorship in the Dominican Republic. Final Report. Basic Education and Policy Support Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Patricia; Kane, Michael

    The Basic Education and Policy Support Activity (BEPS), a new five-year initiative sponsored by United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) Center for Human Capacity Development, is designed to improve the quality, effectiveness, and access to formal and nonformal basic education. BEPS operates through both core funds and buy-ins…

  13. Perceptions of breast and cervical cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in Rhode Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Roberta E; Risica, Patricia Markham

    2004-01-01

    This study explored perceptions of cancer, risk, and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in Rhode Island. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a community-based sample of 147 adults. Perceived risks for breast cancer were predominantly associated with carelessness about health care, trauma to the breast, and breastfeeding. Cervical cancer risks were mostly attributed to carelessness about health care and sexual behaviors. A strong sense of fatalism and embarrassment coexisted with positive beliefs about check-ups and screening. Participants cited confianza (trust, confidence) in their doctor, and their doctor's provision of information and explanations, as important factors in decreasing embarrassment and increasing their likelihood of getting screened. While familiarity with mammography and Pap testing was great among participants, many did not practice sustained, regular screening, and held misconceptions about tests and screening guidelines. Respondents' perceptions of having sufficient information often did not correspond to their having the accurate information necessary to promote informed screening decisions.

  14. Sexual Migration and HIV Risk in a Sample of Brazilian, Colombian and Dominican Immigrant MSM Living in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Lugo, Karen; Barnett, Andrew; Pinho, Veronica; Reisen, Carol; Poppen, Paul; Zea, Maria Cecilia

    2018-03-01

    We examined motivations for migration to the United States (US) among 482 Brazilian, Colombian, and Dominican men who have sex with men (MSM). Participants' most common reason for migration was to improve their financial situation (49%), followed by sexual migration in order to affirm their sexual orientation (40%). Fewer endorsed sexual migration motivated by avoiding persecution due to being gay (13%). We conducted further analyses among 276 participants who migrated after age 15 and were HIV-negative at the time of migration. We hypothesized that sexual migration would be associated with greater likelihood of HIV acquisition post-migration. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that sexual migration motivated by avoiding persecution due to being gay was associated with increased odds of contracting HIV after arrival in the US whereas sexual migration to lead a gay life was not. Our findings highlight the importance of addressing the negative impact of anti-gay discrimination in countries of origin.

  15. The Dominicans, The Third Order and a social order. Santafé de Bogotá. XVI-XIX centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Elvis Plata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their arrival in New Granada, the dominicans promoted the so called “Third Order”, which brought a number of lay organizations such as fraternities, sororities and devouts groups. This article analyzes such organizations as key nodes of colonial society, through a symbiotic relationship with the colonial elite, which continued until the dawn of republican era. This link were favored by institutions such as chaplaincies and pious deeds. It allowed, among other things, the provision of many of the new members of the order and endowed convents of movable and immovable property and capital necessary for its functioning, in exchange for ensuring social order and provide prestige for this life and salvation for the other. This successful model was torn apart with the advent of the Enlightenment and will fall precipitously shortly after Independence.

  16. The 9th International Countercurrent Chromatography Conference held at Dominican University, Chicago, USA, August 1-3, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, J Brent; McAlpine, James B; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2017-10-20

    The 9th International Countercurrent Chromatography Conference (CCC 2016) was held at Dominican University near Chicago, IL (USA), from August 1st-3rd, 2016. The biennial CCC 20XX conferences provide an opportunity for countercurrent chromatography and centrifugal partition chromatography (CCC/CPC) manufactures, marketers, theorists, and research scientists to gather together socially, learn from each other, and advance countercurrent separation technology. A synopsis of the conference proceedings as well as a series of short reviews of the special edition articles is included in this document. Many productive discussions and collegial conversation at CCC 2016 attested to the liveliness, connectivity, and productivity of the global countercurrent research community and bodes well for the success of the 10th conference at the University of Braunschweig, Germany on August 1-3, 2018. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. U.S. Wood Shipments to Puerty Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    James E. Granskog

    1992-01-01

    Puerto Rico's importance as an offshore market for U.S. wood products is often overlooked. Because of its unique Commonwealth status, trade flows between the United States and Puerto Rico are recorded separately and are not counted in the U.S. foreign trade statistics. In 1991, wood product shipments from the United States to Puerto Rico totaled more than $83...

  18. Situation Reports--Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in eight foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Afghanistan, Cyprus, Iran, Kenya, Lebanese Republic, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), and People's Democratic Republic of Yemen. Information is provided under two topics, general background and…

  19. Proteome analysis of the hypercholestrolemic rat, RICO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.Y.; Park, K.-S.; Paik, Y.-K.; Seong, J.-K.

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to develop novel markers for hypercholesterolemia, hepatic tissues and serum prepared from hypeicholesterolemic rat (i e RICO) were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF). Results were compared to those of paired inbreed rat (WKY). Comparative analysis of the respective spot patterns in 2DE revealed that the numbers of differential expression proteins were identified in serum and liver tissues of RICO. Some of the representative proteins annotated in 2DE were apolipoprotein family and numerous lipid metabolism related proteins. Especially, we found that protein disulfide isomerase subunits (ER-60) in 2DE have differential post-translational modification pattern by MALDI-ToF analysis. Our results suggest that the proteomic analysis of these proteins might be a novel approach to identify the molecular events in detail during lipid disorder such atherosclerosis

  20. Atomic industry of the Republic of Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhakishev, M.E.; Yazikov, V.G.; Dujsebaev, B.O.

    2001-01-01

    The report presents a structure of uranium-extractive industry in the Republic of Kazakhstan and the prospects of atomic industry in the Republic of Kazakhstan in the aspect of uranium world market tendencies. (author)

  1. Breast Cancer Epidemiology in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Preparándonos para vencer: Programa para identificar las necesidades de información y apoyo para las mujeres sobrevivientes de cáncer de mama...of recruitment. Controls were identified from participants in the Estudio Continuo de Salud (ECS), a National Health Survey in Puerto Rico, which was...menopausal at interview, as expected by the age criteria for inclusion . Eighty eight percent (88%) of the participants had their first pregnancy before age

  2. Aves municipales oficiales de Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos M. Domínguez Cristóbal

    2009-01-01

    Las aves constituyen uno de los recursos de muy poco uso como símbolo oficial representativo de los municipios en Puerto Rico. Es muy probable que la decisión que màs pueda influenciar en esa selección esté relacionada con la movilidad de las aves ya que éstas no se limitan a una municipalidad en específico...

  3. Sand and gravel resources of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rafael W.

    Many of Puerto Rico's beaches are eroding, and though rates of erosion vary, it is a major concern for the tourism and residential development industries. More than 85 percent of the population lives within 7 kilometers of the coast and they are heavily dependent on tourists that are attracted by the island's beaches and coral reefs. High-quality scientific data are needed to help formulate public policy regarding residential and commercial construction along the coast, beach replenishment, and future use of marine resources. Scientists have long recognized that the causes of coastal land loss are not limited to a relative rise in sea level, but can be manmade as well. For example, sediment supply to beaches especially along the north shore of Puerto Rico has been strongly affected by upstream river channeling, dam construction, various agricultural practices, paving and urbanization, as well as shallow-water oceanographic processes. The response to coastal erosion in Puerto Rico has been mostly crisis based leading to engineered solutions that have a negative effect on the coastal environment.

  4. Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    The Central African Republic contains 242,000 square miles, which rolling terrain almost 2000 feet above sea level. The climate is tropical, and it has a population of 2.8 million people with a 2.5% growth rate. There are more than 80 ethnic groups including Baya 34%, Banda 28%, Sara 10%, Mandja 9%, Mboum 9%, and M'Baka 7%. The religions are traditional African 35%, protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, and Muslim 15%, and the languages are French and Sangho. The infant mortality rate is 143/1000, with expectancy at 49 years and a 40% literacy rate. The work force of 1 million is 70% agricultural, industry 6% and commerce and service 6% and government 3%. The government consists of a president assisted by cabinet ministers and a single party. Natural resources include diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil, and major industries are beverages, textiles, and soap. Agricultural products feature coffee, cotton, peanuts, tobacco, food crops and livestock. Most of the population live in rural areas and most of the 80 ethnic groups have their own language. This is one of the world's least developed countries, with a per capita income of $375/year. The main problems with development are the poor transportation infrastructure, and the weak internal and international marketing systems. The US and various international organizations have aided in agriculture development, health programs, and family planning. US investment is mainly in diamond and gold mining, and although oil drilling has been successful it is not economically feasible at current prices.

  5. The Constitution of the Republic of Estonia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Sisaldab ka: The Constitution of the Republic of Estonia Amendment Act. The Constitution of the Republic of Estonia Implementation Act. Act to Amend the Constitution of the Republic of Estonia for Election of Local Government Councils for Term of Four Years

  6. The Constitution of the Republic of Estonia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Raamat sisaldab ka: The Constitution of the Republic of Estonia amendment act ; The Constitution of the Republic of Estonia implementation act ; Act to amend the Constitution of the Republic of Estonia for election of local government councils for term of four years

  7. An analysis of a historical report on experiments in physics conducted by the Dominicans in Grodno in 1793 for the Polish king (in Polish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Wyka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available From June to November 1793 Grodno (now Belarus was the place of the last session of Parliament of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, with the participation of king Stanisław August Poniatowski, and it was where the second partition of Poland was approved. In the days free of parliamentary debates, Grodno’s Dominicans prepared a series of physics experiments for the king. The course of the experiments and their subject matter is known from a press release (Pismo Peryodyczne Korrespondenta 2, January 9, 1794, pp. 35–42. It is a type of daily report informing about 18 meetings, each time indicating their subject matter. This report was sufficient to recreate the course and the type of the experiments. Three thematic groups presented by the Dominicans can be distinguished. The first is a presentation of the physics cabinet – the king was visited, among others, the Nooth’s apparatus to produce “carbonated water”, a geological collection and other items used in the later shows. The second series of demonstrations was devoted to issues related to electricity. The idea and nature of lightning was also demonstrated. The third series of presentations concerned the properties of gases. In addition to other demonstrations, the Dominicans prepared an experiment which presented the process of producing water from oxygen and hydrogen. The experiment lasted all day, during which the reagents were measured: the volume of gases that were used and the mass of the water obtained. The report brings a lot of important information, indicating the level of scientific knowledge and the experimental skills of the Dominicans. It is evidence of how modern physics was taught by the Dominicans with the use of appropriate instruments for this purpose. It is also a source of knowledge about school equipment in Poland. Additionally, the report is so far one of the few well-documented public demonstrations prepared for the king. It also confirms the view that the

  8. Nuclear legislation in Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuller, J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the status of nuclear legislation in the Czech Republic, specifying the fields of nuclear activities covered, partially covered and uncovered by the present legislation. The licensing process and the competence and powers of the State Office for Nuclear Safety are also briefly described

  9. Safeguards in the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav, J.

    2010-01-01

    The former Czechoslovakia acceded to the Non-Proliferation Treaty in 1968. Based on requirements of the Safeguard Agreement the State System of Accounting for and Control of nuclear material has been established. After dissolution of Czechoslovakia the Slovak Republic succeeded to the Safeguards Agreement. As a regulator the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) has been constituted. After European Union (EU) accession EU legislation became valid in the Slovak republic. Atomic Law No. 541/2004 Coll. on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy adopts this legislation. In the frame of strengthening the IAEA safeguards an implementation of the Protocol Additional became actual. The Protocol Additional was signed by the government of the Slovak Republic in September 1999. On 1 December 2005 safeguards agreement INFCIRC/193 including the relevant Additional Protocol entered into force. As an instrument supporting non-proliferation of nuclear weapons a control of export/import of nuclear material, nuclear related and dual-use material following the EC regulation 428/2009 of 5 May 2009 setting up a Community regime for the control of exports, transfer, brokering and transit of dual use items. The execution of accountancy and control of nuclear material inspection activities has been considerably influenced by the implementation of integrated safeguards, implemented in the Slovak Republic on 1 September 2009. The aim of mentioned integrated safeguards regime is to decrease the amount and difficulty of inspections. At the same time the possibility of accountancy and control of nuclear material inspections announced 24 hours in advance took effect. The execution of Protocol Additional inspections remains the same. Additionally to international safeguards system UJD has kept the national safeguards system which observes all nuclear material on the territory of the Slovak Republic. The government of the Slovak Republic plays active role within activities of the NSG

  10. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-9 - Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Puerto Rico. 1.1402(a)-9 Section 1.1402(a)-9...) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(a)-9 Puerto Rico. (a) Residents. A resident of Puerto... alien, a citizen of the United States, or a citizen of Puerto Rico, shall compute his net earnings from...

  11. Plasma rico en plaquetas Platelet -rich plasma

    OpenAIRE

    J. González Lagunas

    2006-01-01

    El Plasma Rico en Plaquetas es una suspensión concentrada de la sangre centrifugada que contiene elevadas concentraciones de trombocitos. Durante los últimos años, este producto ha aparecido de forma repetida en publicaciones científicas y en medios de comunicación generales como un producto que por sus características induce la curación y regeneración de los tejidos. La premisa de su uso es que las elevadas concentraciones de plaquetas en el PRP, liberan cantidades significativas de factores...

  12. Plasma rico em plaquetas na Implantologia

    OpenAIRE

    Rego, Luis André Ferreira Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Projeto de Pós-Graduação/Dissertação apresentado à Universidade Fernando Pessoa como parte dos requisitos para obtenção do grau de Mestre em Medicina Dentária As reabilitações orais implanto-suportadas resolveram grandes limitações das próteses removíveis convencionais. No entanto, o tempo de espera e o sucesso no tratamento com implantes trouxeram novos desafios, tal como o uso de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas para promoção da osteointegração. O plasma rico em plaquetas é definido c...

  13. histórico da tecnologia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Cezar de Freitas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza la contribución de Álvaro Vieira Pinto para los estudios de economía y educación. Su concepto de trabajo tecnológicamente elaborado puede ser reconocido como resultado de una profunda investigación sobre las relaciones humanas que encontramos en la “cultura de la economía”. Su camino teórico hasta los escritos de Marx, muestran una capacidad erudita de relacionar educación y emancipación política con la historia de la tecnología.

  14. HIV/AIDS in a Puerto Rican/Dominican Community: A Collaborative Project with a Botanical Shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Melvin; Santiago, Jorge

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of the literature concerning HIV/AIDS in Latino communities in the United States and Puerto Rico. Discusses the presence of botanical shops (where herbal medicines and other healing paraphernalia can be purchased) in Latino culture. Describes Projecto Cooperacion, a project that utilized botanical shops as a means of…

  15. English, Spanish and Ethno-Racial Receptivity in a New Destination: A Case Study of Dominican Immigrants in Reading, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, R.S.

    2015-01-01

    Scant information is available on experiences with language among immigrant populations in new destinations. This study provides a multi-dimensional portrait of the linguistic incorporation of Dominican immigrants in the “majority-minority” city of Reading, Pennsylvania. The results show that daily life for most largely occurs in a Spanish-language milieu, but English proficiency and use in social networks is primarily a function of exposure to the United States. This is consistent with the standard narrative of assimilation models. At the same time, negative experiences with the use of both English and Spanish suggest that the linguistic context of reception is inhospitable for a substantial share of this population. Negative experiences with English are particularly likely to be mentioned by those with dark skin and greater cumulative exposure. Lastly, language plays an important role in experiences with ethno-racial enmity more broadly. Nonetheless, the persistent effect of skin tone indicates that such experiences are not reducible to language per se. PMID:26004453

  16. Lutzomyia adiketis sp. n. (Diptera: Phlebotomidae, a vector of Paleoleishmania neotropicum sp. n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae in Dominican amber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poinar George

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amber fossils can be used to trace the history of disease-vector associations because microorganisms are preserved "in situ" inside the alimentary tract and body cavity of blood-sucking insects. Results Lutzomyia adiketis sp. n. (Phlebotomidae: Diptera is described from Dominican amber as a vector of Paleoleishmania neotropicum sp. n. (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae. The fossil sand fly differs from all previously described extinct and extant members of the genus by the following combination of characters: Sc forked with the branches meeting the costa and radius veins; wing L/W value of 4.1; a δ value of 18; a ratio β/α value of 0.86, and the shape and size of the spatulate rods on the ninth sternite. The trypanosomatid is characterized by the structure of its promastigotes, amastigotes and paramastigotes and its transmission by an extinct species of sand fly. Conclusion Morphological characters show that the fossil sand fly is a new extinct species and that it is host to a digenetic species of trypanosomatid. This study provides the first fossil evidence that Neotropical sand flies were vectors of trypanosomatids in the mid-Tertiary (20–30 mya.

  17. English, Spanish and ethno-racial receptivity in a new destination: A case study of Dominican immigrants in Reading, PA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropesa, R S

    2015-07-01

    Scant information is available on experiences with language among immigrant populations in new destinations. This study provides a multi-dimensional portrait of the linguistic incorporation of Dominican immigrants in the "majority-minority" city of Reading, Pennsylvania. The results show that daily life for most largely occurs in a Spanish-language milieu, but English proficiency and use in social networks is primarily a function of exposure to the United States. This is consistent with the standard narrative of assimilation models. At the same time, negative experiences with the use of both English and Spanish suggest that the linguistic context of reception is inhospitable for a substantial share of this population. Negative experiences with English are particularly likely to be mentioned by those with dark skin and greater cumulative exposure. Lastly, language plays an important role in experiences with ethno-racial enmity more broadly. Nonetheless, the persistent effect of skin tone indicates that such experiences are not reducible to language per se. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Burden of stroke in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Juan; Santiago, Fernando; González, Juan; Rodríguez, Abiezer; Pericchi, Luis; Rodríguez-Mercado, Rafael; Nobo, Ulises

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and the first cause of long-term disability in Puerto Rico. Trained staff reviewed and independently validated the medical records of patients who had been hospitalized with possible stroke at any of the 20 largest hospitals located in Puerto Rico during 2007, 2009, and 2011. The mean age of the 5005 newly diagnosed stroke patients (51·2% female) was 70 years. At the time of hospitalization, women were 4½ years older, were less likely to be married (60·2% vs. 39·9%, P diabetes (56·0% vs. 54·8%), hypertension (89·1% vs. 85·0%), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-Chol) > 100 mg/dL (65·7% vs. 57·5%) P < 0·05. Ischemic stroke represented 75% of all types of strokes. Atrial fibrillation was mentioned in 7·9% of the medical records. The risk for dying before discharge was similar for both genders, but was 40% higher for women than for men at one-year follow-up: age-adjusted odds ratio = 1·4 (95% confidence interval = 1·2-1·5). © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  19. Estimated water use in Puerto Rico, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Rivera, Wanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Water-use data were aggregated for the 78 municipios of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for 2010. Five major offstream categories were considered: public-supply water withdrawals and deliveries, domestic and industrial self-supplied water use, crop-irrigation water use, and thermoelectric-power freshwater use. One instream water-use category also was compiled: power-generation instream water use (thermoelectric saline withdrawals and hydroelectric power). Freshwater withdrawals for offstream use from surface-water [606 million gallons per day (Mgal/d)] and groundwater (118 Mgal/d) sources in Puerto Rico were estimated at 724 million gallons per day. The largest amount of freshwater withdrawn was by public-supply water facilities estimated at 677 Mgal/d. Public-supply domestic water use was estimated at 206 Mgal/d. Fresh groundwater withdrawals by domestic self-supplied users were estimated at 2.41 Mgal/d. Industrial self-supplied withdrawals were estimated at 4.30 Mgal/d. Withdrawals for crop irrigation purposes were estimated at 38.2 Mgal/d, or approximately 5 percent of all offstream freshwater withdrawals. Instream freshwater withdrawals by hydroelectric facilities were estimated at 556 Mgal/d and saline instream surface-water withdrawals for cooling purposes by thermoelectric-power facilities was estimated at 2,262 Mgal/d.

  20. SEMBLANZA DEL PROFESOR EDMUNDO RICO "1897 - 1967"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Agusti Pastor

    1981-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Finalizaba el año de 1925 cuando un jurado, reunido en los viejos claustros de Santa Inés, otorgaba a EDMUNDO RICO el grado de Doctor en Medicina y Cirugía. Ese jurado examinador integrado por los profesionales más destacados de la época y presidido por el Profesor José María Lombana Barreneche, estaba constituido por los profesores Carios Esguerra, Roberto Franco, Luis Felipe Calderón y Juan N. Corpas, siendo Secretario de la Facultad el entonces muy joven médico José del Carmen Acosta. Es de anotar que los hombres mencionados llenan todo un periodo médico en 10 que va corrido del presente siglo.

    La tesis del graduado versaba sobre la patogenia y tratamiento de la rabia y en ella exhibía ya el novel galeno su estilo inconfundible, por ser tan personal; esa tesis todavía tiene actualidad y en ella se describe, como en una novela de suspenso, la carrera a muerte que se entabla a través del sistema nervioso, entre el virus de la hidrofobia y las antitoxinas
    correspondientes, siendo la meta de la carrera los centros nerviosos superiores. No es de extrañar que ya Rico exhibiera veteranía en su amena prosa, si siendo estudiante había escrito numerosas siluetas sobre varios profesores y había colaborado ocasionalmente en la prensa periódica.
    Estaba en vigencia en aquéllos tiempos la antigua y gallarda usanza de respetar, acatar y estimar a los profesores de la Facultad. Y en verdad que Rico siempre fue fiel a tal postulado de elemental hidalguía, a pesar de ser un hombre esencialmente irreverente. Eran los tiempos en que a la muerte del Profesor Rivas, su cadáver fue transportado en hombros por sus alumnos reprobados.
    Regían por entonces los principios de la medicina francesa, a la sazón a la cabeza de la ciencia universal, y por tanto Rico fue a perfeccionar sus estudios a la antigua Lutecia. Alli al comienzo siguió cursillos de cirugía, abandonándolos prestamente para dedicarse a las ciencias psicol

  1. Sport in the German Democratic Republic and the People's Republic of China. A Sociopolitical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Thomas D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of sports in the German Democratic Republic and the People's Republic of China is both propagandist and ideological. International sports competition can enhance the country's image and domestic sport is a means of political socialization. (DF)

  2. 33 CFR 165.755 - Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto Rico (a) The following area is established as a safety zone during the... the Eco-Electrica waterfront facility in Guayanilla Bay, Puerto Rico. The safety zone remains in... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Guayanilla, Puerto...

  3. 78 FR 3495 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13437 and 13438] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00017 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Dated 01/03/2013. Incident: Heavy...

  4. 75 FR 39060 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12214 and 12215] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00009 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-1919-DR...

  5. 76 FR 55155 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12768 and 12769] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017-DR), dated 08/ 27/2011...

  6. 76 FR 67244 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12768 and 12769] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 5. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017...

  7. 75 FR 51294 - Puerto Rico Disaster # PR-00010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12270 and 12271] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00010 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of PUERTO RICO dated 08/11/2010. Incident: Severe...

  8. 76 FR 59179 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12768 and 12769] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017...

  9. 75 FR 69733 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12368 and 12369] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00012 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico...

  10. 75 FR 68394 - Puerto Rico Disaster # PR-00012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12368 and 12369 Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00012 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA--1946--DR...

  11. 78 FR 4966 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 13445 and 13446] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00018 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico dated 01/10/2013. Incident: Tropical...

  12. 76 FR 55154 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12770 and 12771] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00015 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017-DR...

  13. 76 FR 56858 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12768 and 12769] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4017...

  14. 76 FR 44647 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12699 and 12700] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00013 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4004-DR...

  15. 76 FR 66768 - Puerto Rico Disaster #PR-00016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12897 and 12898] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (FEMA-4040-DR), dated 10/ 18/2011...

  16. 75 FR 2165 - Puerto Rico Disaster No. PR-00007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration Nos. 12004 and 12005; Puerto Rico Disaster No. PR-00007] Puerto Rico Disaster No. PR-00007 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the Commonwealth of...

  17. Uso de terreno urbano y rural en Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian Martinuzzi; William A. Gould; Olga M. Ramos Gonzalez; Maya Quinones; Michael E. Jimenez

    2008-01-01

    El Proyecto de Analisis de Gap de Puerto Rico (PRGAP) (Gould et al. 2008) desarrollo tres usos de terrenos para Puerto Rico: Urbano, Suburbano, y Rural (Martinuzzi et al. 2007). Estas regiones tambien pueden ser consideradas como urbano, densamente-poblado rural, y escasamente-poblado rural, o como urbano y area silvestre con una interfase de area silvestre-urbana. La...

  18. Characterization of the Network of Protected Areas in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Castro-Prieto; Maya Quinones; William Gould

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to describe the biodiversity and associated landscape diversity and forest cover characteristics within the network of terrestrial protected areas in Puerto Rico. We conducted spatial analysis to quantify different indicators of diversity at these sites. We found that protected areas in Puerto Rico overlap the most species-rich regions on the island,...

  19. 29 CFR 510.20 - Wage surveys in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO... qualify for an extended minimum wage phase-in, the government of Puerto Rico would be required to furnish... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wage surveys in Puerto Rico. 510.20 Section 510.20 Labor...

  20. Analisis espacial de las areas protegidas terrestres de Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Quinones; W.A. Gould; J. Castro-Prieto; S. Martinuzzi

    2013-01-01

    En este mapa de investigacion describimos las areas protegidas terrestres de Puerto Rico basado en elementos naturales y antropogenicos del paisaje. Utilizamos datos geoespaciales para calcular la extension y representatividad de elementos del paisaje dentro de las areas protegidas de Puerto Rico, i.e., cobertura del terreno (Gould et al. 2007), asentamientos urbanos...

  1. The Portuguese Republic at One Hundred

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Richard; Pinto, António Costa

    2012-01-01

    In October 1910 a revolution drove out the king of Portugal and established the Portuguese Republic. In 1926 a military coup overthrew the parliamentary system and led to the authoritarian regime of Salazar, but in April 1974 a revolution led by the military restored the parliamentary republic. In this book edited by Richard Herr (Berkeley) and António Costa Pinto (Lisbon), eighteen Portuguese and American authors present essays in celebration of the centennial of the Portuguese Republic. Wit...

  2. Speak up of minister of environment of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklos, L.

    2000-01-01

    A short review in situation of radiation monitoring in the Slovak Republic, activities of Ministry of Environment of the Slovak Republic, as well as review of the international agreements signed by the Slovak Republic are given

  3. All projects related to | Page 200 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: WATER DISTRIBUTION, Natural Resources, LOW INCOME GROUPS, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, INVESTMENT POLICY, POLICY MAKING, Governance, ELECTRONIC PUBLISHING, GUATEMALA. Region: Dominican Republic, Guatemala, North and Central America, Canada, Panama. Program: Climate Change.

  4. Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaal, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the role of the Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic in radiation protection in the Slovak Republic. Public Health Authority is budgetary organization, which depends on the funding of the Ministry of Health. As the state administration authority performs execution of state regulatory activities in the field of health protection in Slovak republic and radiation protection as well. Radiation Protection Supervision is performed according to the act on public health protection. Organization scheme of radiation protection in the Slovak Republic is presented

  5. Czech Republic joins IPPOG as member

    CERN Multimedia

    'marcelloni, claudia

    2018-01-01

    Czech Republic became an official IPPOG member on April 21 2018. The MOU between Czech Republic and IPPOG was previously signed by the director of the Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. IPPOG chairs confirmed the agreement by signing the MOU during the meeting in Pisa in presence of IPPOG representative for Czech Republic dr. Vojtech Pleskot from the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague. Dr. Vojtech Pleskot replaces Dr. Jiri Rames who did an excellent job during his long term work in the EPPOG and IPPOG.

  6. Do corpo histérico ao "corpus" teórico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ramos de Farias

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo aborda a maneira pela qual Freud, de forma original, efetuou uma leitura no corpo-sintoma da histérica e construiu uma clínica inédita destinada ao tratamento das neuroses. Esta clínica, fundada na transferência, é suportada pelo edifício teórico que tem o inconsciente e a sexualidade como paradigmas.

  7. 78 FR 20887 - Approval of Subzone Status; Pepsi Cola Puerto Rico Distributing, LLC, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [S-132-2012] Approval of Subzone Status; Pepsi Cola Puerto Rico Distributing, LLC, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico On December 7, 2012, the Executive Secretary... activation limit of FTZ 7, on [[Page 20888

  8. International franchising decision-making: a model for country choice

    OpenAIRE

    Baena Graciá, Verónica; Cerviño Fernández, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines how a number of market conditions may drive diffusion of franchising. It considers a sample of 63 Spanish franchisors operating through 2321 franchisee outlets across 20 different Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, and Venezuela in January 2011. Results conclude that geographical and cultu...

  9. Searching for Stability: The U.S. Development of Constabulary Forces in Latin America and the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Receiverships in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.3 The Navy ran the Virgin Islands until 1931, Guam until 1950, and Ameri- can Samoa until 1951...in Puerto Rico, at both ends of the Canal Zone in Panama, at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba, and in the Virgin Islands. In addition, interest was...Panamanian holiday island of Taboga. Panama quickly followed the US lead in declaring war on the Central Powers, but its major role was harassing resident

  10. Victory, Stalemate and Defeat During the Spanish Caribbean Insurgencies of 1868-1878

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Press of America, Inc., 2009. Bell, Ian. The Dominican Republic. Boulder: Westview Press, 1981. de Navascues y Aisa , Nicasio. "Parte de la Alcaldia de...2006. Jimenez de Wagenheim, Olga. El grito de Lares sus causas y sus hombres. 4th Edition . Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico: Ediciones Huracan, Inc., 1999...1987. Marti, Jose. Our America: Writing on Latin America and the Struggle for Cuban Independence. Edited by Philip S. Foner. Translated by Elinor

  11. International Migration and Gender in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Douglas S.; Fischer, Mary J.; Capoferro, Chiara

    2006-01-01

    We review census data to assess the standing of five Latin American nations on a gender continuum ranging from patriarchal to matrifocal. We show that Mexico and Costa Rica lie close to one another with a highly patriarchal system of gender relations whereas Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic are similar in having a matrifocal system. Puerto Rico occupies a middle position, blending characteristics of both systems. These differences yield different patterns of female relative to male migrat...

  12. Land Use, Conservation, Forestry, and Agriculture in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Gould

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Global food security concerns emphasize the need for sustainable agriculture and local food production. In Puerto Rico, over 80 percent of food is imported, and local production levels have reached historical lows. Efforts to increase local food production are driven by government agencies, non-government organizations, farmers, and consumers. Integration of geographic information helps plan and balance the reinvention and invigoration of the agriculture sector while maintaining ecological services. We used simple criteria that included currently protected lands and the importance of slope and forest cover in protection from erosion to identify land well-suited for conservation, agriculture and forestry in Puerto Rico. Within these categories we assessed U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA farmland soils classification data, lands currently in agricultural production, current land cover, and current land use planning designations. We found that developed lands occupy 13 percent of Puerto Rico; lands well-suited for conservation that include protected areas, riparian buffers, lands surrounding reservoirs, wetlands, beaches, and salt flats, occupy 45 percent of Puerto Rico; potential working lands encompass 42 percent of Puerto Rico. These include lands well-suited for mechanized and non-mechanized agriculture, such as row and specialty crops, livestock, dairy, hay, pasture, and fruits, which occupy 23 percent of Puerto Rico; and areas suitable for forestry production, such as timber and non-timber products, agroforestry, and shade coffee, which occupy 19 percent of Puerto Rico.

  13. African Journals Online: Central African Republic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online: Central African Republic. Home > African Journals Online: Central African Republic. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free to read Titles This ...

  14. Country Profile : The Republic of Utopia

    OpenAIRE

    Shemella, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Seminar participants will be engaged in six simulation exercises throughout this course. Each simulation focuses on one aspect of crafting a civil-military response to terrorism in an imaginary country, the republic of Utopia. The present fact sheet offers some basic information on the Republic of Utopia. Seminar participants should read this fact sheet prior to the start of the first simulation exercise.

  15. A Cultural Resources Reconnaissance of Five Projects in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Memorias de Melgarejo). Melgarejo mentions that one of these three mills was located next to the mouth of the Loiza River, and that this was also the...Mexico. Cordova, Pedro Tomas de Memorias historicas de Puerto Rico. D-3 D’Alzina, Ismael 1957 Historia gr~fica de Puerto Rico, 1. Primera Epoca. Ed...Servidumbre de faja de terreno de 5.0 metros de ancho y 400.46 metros de largo a favor de la Autoridad de Acueductos y Alcantarillados de Puerto Rico

  16. Geology of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, E.F.; Wicks, Carol M.; Mylroie, J.; Troester, J.; Alexander, E.C.; Carew, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Isla de Mona is a carbonate island located in the Mona Passage 68 km west of Puerto Rico. The tectonically uplifted island is 12 km by 5 km, with an area of 55 km2, and forms a raised flat-topped platform or meseta. The meseta tilts gently to the south and is bounded by near vertical cliffs on all sides. These cliffs rise from 80 m above sea level on the north to 20 m above the sea on the southern coast. Along the southwestern and western side of the island a three- to six-meter-high Pleistocene fossil reef abuts the base of the cliff to form a narrow coastal plain. The meseta itself consists of two Mio-Pliocene carbonate units, the lower Isla de Mona Dolomite and the upper Lirio Limestone. Numerous karst features, including a series of flank margin caves primarily developed at the Lirio Limestone/Isla de Mona Dolomite contact, literally ring the periphery of the island.

  17. Plasma rico en plaquetas Platelet -rich plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. González Lagunas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available El Plasma Rico en Plaquetas es una suspensión concentrada de la sangre centrifugada que contiene elevadas concentraciones de trombocitos. Durante los últimos años, este producto ha aparecido de forma repetida en publicaciones científicas y en medios de comunicación generales como un producto que por sus características induce la curación y regeneración de los tejidos. La premisa de su uso es que las elevadas concentraciones de plaquetas en el PRP, liberan cantidades significativas de factores de crecimiento. En este artículo se van a recoger las evidencias científicas que se han presentado en la literatura médica con respecto al PRP y a la curación ósea, así como las diferentes aplicaciones clínicas que se han sugerido.Platelet-rich plasma is a by-product of centrifuged whole blood that contains high levels of thrombocytes. In the last decade, scientific and media interest has been generated by this product that apparently has the capacity of inducing and promoting tissue healing and regeneration. The premise of its use is that the large number of platelets in PRP release significant amounts of growth factors. In this paper, a critical review of the medical literature regarding PRP and bone healing will be presented. Also, the suggested clinical applications of the product will be addressed.

  18. Economic Cost of Dengue in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasa, Yara A.; Shepard, Donald S.; Zeng, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dengue, endemic in Puerto Rico, reached a record high in 2010. To inform policy makers, we derived annual economic cost. We assessed direct and indirect costs of hospitalized and ambulatory dengue illness in 2010 dollars through surveillance data and interviews with 100 laboratory-confirmed dengue patients treated in 2008–2010. We corrected for underreporting by using setting-specific expansion factors. Work absenteeism because of a dengue episode exceeded the absenteeism for an episode of influenza or acute otitis media. From 2002 to 2010, the aggregate annual cost of dengue illness averaged $38.7 million, of which 70% was for adults (age 15+ years). Hospitalized patients accounted for 63% of the cost of dengue illness, and fatal cases represented an additional 17%. Households funded 48% of dengue illness cost, the government funded 24%, insurance funded 22%, and employers funded 7%. Including dengue surveillance and vector control activities, the overall annual cost of dengue was $46.45 million ($12.47 per capita). PMID:22556069

  19. Radionuclide content of soils from Barrio Islote, Arecibo, Puerto Rico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, A.McB.; Clements, R.G.

    1976-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present and interpret gamma ray energy spectra from natural radioactivity and fallout radionuclides measured on soil samples collected in the projected thermonuclear power plant exclusion zone in Barrio Islote, Puerto Rico

  20. Américo Negrette and Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Moscovich

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a historical review of the seminal clinical contribution of Professor Américo Negrette, a Venezuelan neurologist, to the evolution of scientific knowledge about Huntington's disease.

  1. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island Ground Validation Points 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile denotes the location of underwater photos and videos taken in shallow water (0-35m) benthic habitats surrounding Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra...

  2. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island Accuracy Assessment Points - 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This shapefile denotes the location of underwater photos and videos taken in shallow water (0-35m) benthic habitats surrounding Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra...

  3. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  4. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammals)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  5. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Lines and Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  6. Puerto Rico ESI and RSI: SHELFBND (Shelf Boundary)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  7. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: BENTHIC (Benthic Marine Habitats)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  8. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: MGT (Management Areas)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  9. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  10. National Status and Trends: Guanica, Puerto Rico Contaminants Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project assesses chemical contaminant status in sediment and coral tissues (Porites astroides) collected in and around Guanica Bay, Puerto Rico in 2009....

  11. 75 FR 68393 - Puerto Rico Disaster # PR-00011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12366 and 12367] Puerto Rico Disaster PR-00011 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster [[Page 68394

  12. Particulate Air Contamination in Puerto Rico: A Student Involvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a research project undertaken by physics undergraduate students to monitor particulate air contamination in Ponce, Puerto Rico, and to determine the meteorological factors which contribute to it. (GA)

  13. Summit to Sea Characterization of Coastal Watersheds - Puerto Rico 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Characterization of Coastal Watershed for Puerto Rico, Culebra Island and Vieques Island, is a GIS products suite consisting of layers derived from diverse...

  14. Fajardo, Puerto Rico Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Fajardo, Puerto Rico Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  15. Ponce, Puerto Rico Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ponce, Puerto Rico Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  16. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  17. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: INVERT (Invertebrate Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  18. Arecibo, Puerto Rico Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Arecibo, Puerto Rico Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  19. San Juan, Puerto Rico Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The San Juan, Puerto Rico Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  20. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  1. Puerto Rico ESI/RSI: REPTILES (Reptiles and Amphibians)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) and Reach Sensitivity Index (RSI) data for Puerto Rico. ESI data characterize estuarine...

  2. Rainfall-induced landslide susceptibility zonation of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara Lepore; Sameer A. Kamal; Peter Shanahan; Rafael L. Bras

    2011-01-01

    Landslides are a major geologic hazard with estimated tens of deaths and $1–2 billion in economic losses per year in the US alone. The island of Puerto Rico experiences one or two large events per year, often triggered in steeply sloped areas by prolonged and heavy rainfall. Identifying areas susceptible to landslides thus has great potential value for Puerto Rico and...

  3. 20 CFR 404.1089 - Figuring net earnings for residents and nonresidents of Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... nonresidents of Puerto Rico. 404.1089 Section 404.1089 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... Puerto Rico. (a) Residents. If you are a resident of Puerto Rico, whether or not you are an alien, a citizen of the United States, or a citizen of Puerto Rico, you must figure your net earnings from self...

  4. Skin cancer in Puerto Rico: a multiannual incidence comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre-Lugo, Eneida M; Figueroa, Luz D; Sánchez, Jorge L; Morales-Burgos, Adisbeth; Conde, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase worldwide. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of skin cancer in Puerto Rico in a selected year (2005) and to compare these findings with those previously reported for Puerto Rico in 1974 and 1981 and with other countries. The data was collected from the pathology reports corresponding to the period of January to December 2005 of 21 participating Pathology Laboratories throughout Puerto Rico. The rate and distribution of the main types of skin cancer was calculated based on sex, age, anatomic location and laterality. The incidence of skin cancer in Puerto Rico for 2005 was 6,568 cases, which represent a rate of 167.9 per 100,000 inhabitants. The most common type of skin cancer was basal-cell carcinoma. Skin cancer was more common in males except for melanoma, which was more common in females. The incidence increases with age on all types of skin cancer. The head and neck area was the most frequent location, except for melanoma in women, which was more common on the legs. The incidence rate was 41.5/100,000 in 1974, 52.5/100,000 in 1981 and 167.9/100,000 in 2005, a 305% increase. We found an increasing incidence of skin cancer in Puerto Rico when compared with previous reported data. This analysis provides a comprehensive evaluation of the epidemiology of skin cancer in Puerto Rico.

  5. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Salinas), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  6. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Maunabo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  7. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Isla de Mona), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  8. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Ceiba), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  9. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Luquillo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  10. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Maunabo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  11. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Isla de Desecheo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  12. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Barceloneta), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  13. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (San Juan), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  14. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Salinas), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  15. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Barcelon), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  16. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Arroyo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  17. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (East Culebra), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  18. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (La Pargue), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  19. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Candelero), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  20. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Rincon), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  1. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Guayanil), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  2. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (La Parguera), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  3. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Mayaguez), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  4. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands;Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Cabo Rojo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  5. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Cabo Rojo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  6. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (East Culebra), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  7. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Isla de Vieques), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  8. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Isla de Culebra), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  9. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Ponce), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  10. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Isabela), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  11. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Candelero), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  12. Benthic Habitats of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; Photomosaic of Puerto Rico (Arroyo), 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photographs using the Habitat Digitizer Extension. Aerial...

  13. 78 FR 65268 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... India, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Thailand, the... Vladimirov at (202) 482- 0665 (the Philippines); Jason Rhoads at (202) 482-0123 (Saudi Arabia); Thomas... tubular goods from India, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan...

  14. The environment of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Brechtl, J.; Havlikova, J.; Herdova, V.; Klindova, A.; Kmitova, V.; Lacikova, D.; Lacova, L.; Lieskovska, Z.; Mrva, I.; Plesnikova, T.; Sestakova, Z.; Toma, P.; Vilinovic, K.

    1999-01-01

    This report of the Ministry of the Environment of the Slovak Republic deals with next areas of the environment of the Slovak Republic in 1999: (1) Basic information about the Slovak republic; (2) The environmental protection; (3) The cultural monuments protection; (4) The world and natural heritage; (5) The biodiversity; (6) The territorial system of ecological stability; (7) The environmental regional partition; (8) Components of the environment and their protection; (9) Environmental risk factors (radiation and others); (10) Health and age of population; (11) Ministration on environment; (12 ) International co-operation. Alphabetical list of abbreviations and texts to pictures are included

  15. Crisis and reform of religious life between 14th and 16th centuries and its impact on the Dominican monastery in Łęczyca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Stolarczyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although to a lesser degree, the 14th century crisis of religious life also embraced Mendicant Orders, including the Order of Preachers. Dominican brothers were obliged to respect the principles written down in the rule of St Augustine as well as in the constitution of the order which regulated the life of the Order as well as defined the Order’s organizational structure. Friars however, sometimes gave in to temptation and broke the rules of their communities. The convents’ style of life with characteristic disregard for the notion of religious community in the order and omnipresent individualism in every field was in conflict with the spirit and content of the rules and constitution of the Dominican, and was referred to as conventualism. The call to initiate a thorough reform of the law in the Order was given by Master General Raymond of Capua. At his command in every Dominican province within one year one monastery with at least 12 brothers was required to introduce the rule of regular observance – the renewal of relations from the period of the formation of the Order and strict adherence (observare to the Order’s rules. The basic condition of the observance was enclosure. Observant Convents were excluded from the authority of the Provincial and subjected to the power of vicars designated by the Master General. This led to the creation of separate congregations sometimes uniting reformed monasteries from different provinces and countries. In the Polish province the observant reform officially began on 30 July 1432 in the Wroclaw monastery of St. Adalbert. The success of the reform was confirmed by Chelmno Chapter in 1519 only in the orders in Glogow, Legnica, Krosno (part of Silesia province as well as in part of Mazovia province, whereas the entire division of the province of Greater Poland together with the Łęczyca monastery was subjected to special care of Andrew from Parczew. The same chapter tells Vicar General of the province

  16. Invasive cancer incidence - Puerto Rico, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Mary Elizabeth; Henley, S Jane; Singh, Simple D; Wilson, Reda J; Ortiz-Ortiz, Karen J; Ríos, Naydi Pérez; Torres Cintrón, Carlos R; Luna, Guillermo Tortolero; Zavala Zegarra, Diego E; Ryerson, A Blythe

    2015-04-17

    Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and death in Puerto Rico. To set a baseline for identifying new trends and patterns of cancer incidence, Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry staff and CDC analyzed data from Puerto Rico included in U.S. Cancer Statistics (USCS) for 2007-2011, the most recent data available. This is the first report of invasive cancer incidence rates for 2007-2011 among Puerto Rican residents by sex, age, cancer site, and municipality. Cancer incidence rates in Puerto Rico were compared with those in the U.S. population for 2011. A total of 68,312 invasive cancers were diagnosed and reported in Puerto Rico during 2007-2011. The average annual incidence rate was 330 cases per 100,000 persons. The cancer sites with the highest cancer incidence rates included prostate (152), female breast (84), and colon and rectum (43). Cancer incidence rates varied by municipality, particularly for prostate, lung and bronchus, and colon and rectum cancers. In 2011, cancer incidence rates in Puerto Rico were lower for all cancer sites and lung and bronchus, but higher for prostate and thyroid cancers, compared with rates within the U.S. Identifying these variations can aid evaluation of factors associated with high incidence, such as cancer screening practices, and development of targeted cancer prevention and control efforts. Public health professionals can monitor cancer incidence trends and use these findings to evaluate the impact of prevention efforts, such as legislation prohibiting tobacco use in the workplace and public places and the Puerto Rico Cessation Quitline in decreasing lung and other tobacco-related cancers.

  17. Puerto Rico and Florida manatees represent genetically distinct groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A.; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; King, Timothy L.; Bonde, Robert K.; Gray, Brian A.; McGuire, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus) populations in Florida (T. m. latirostris) and Puerto Rico (T. m. manatus) are considered distinct subspecies and are listed together as endangered under the United States Endangered Species Act. Sustained management and conservation efforts for the Florida subspecies have led to the suggested reclassification of the species to a threatened or delisted status. However, the two populations are geographically distant, morphologically distinct, and habitat degradation and boat strikes continue to threaten the Puerto Rico population. Here, 15 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial control region sequences were used to determine the relatedness of the two populations and investigate the genetic diversity and phylogeographic organization of the Puerto Rico population. Highly divergent allele frequencies were identified between Florida and Puerto Rico using microsatellite (F ST = 0.16; R ST = 0.12 (P ST = 0.66; Φ ST = 0.50 (P E = 0.45; NA = 3.9), were similar, but lower than those previously identified in Florida (HE = 0.48, NA = 4.8). Within Puerto Rico, the mitochondrial genetic diversity values (π = 0.001; h = 0.49) were slightly lower than those previously reported (π = 0.002; h = 0.54) and strong phylogeographic structure was identified (F ST global = 0.82; Φ ST global = 0.78 (P population size (N = 250), and distinct threats and habitat emphasize the need for separate protections in Puerto Rico. Conservation efforts including threat mitigation, migration corridors, and protection of subpopulations could lead to improved genetic variation in the endangered Puerto Rico manatee population.

  18. Energy policy of the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecina, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with the state and perspectives of energy production in the Czech Republic up to 2030 year. Share of energy consumption as well as perspectives of nuclear energy are discussed

  19. Measured radon inside housings the Republic Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.; Arnaud, M.; Lopez, F.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    They have been measured the radon concentration in houses in different city's in Argentina Republic. For they were used it as method mensuration detectors appearances nuclear detecting electrets and detectors based on the adsorption radon in activated carbon

  20. NPPCI - topics in the German Democratic Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenbein, D.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes research and development activities in the field of computerized operator support systems, self-powered detectors, boiling diagnostic and loose part detection systems in the German Democratic Republic

  1. English in the Czech Republic: Linguists’ perspectives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaderka, Petr; Prošek, Martin

    -, č. 28 (2014), s. 173-198 ISSN 0933-1883 Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : language situation * English as a global language * attitudes towards English * national language institution * sociolinguistics * Czech Republic Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  2. Renewable energy support in Republic of Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Minovski, Dragan; Sarac, Vasilija; Bozinovski, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Republic of Macedonia is, highly dependent on energy commodities import. Apart the whole consumption of natural gas and oil, 30% from the total annual consumption of electrical energy is from import. In order to increase electrical energy production from RES Government of the Republic of Macedonia, together with Energy Regulatory Commission and Energy Agency brought new Energy Law and new regulations for renewable energy sources. For the different type of renewable energy source is determinat...

  3. Nuclear - a chance for the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazdera, F.

    2007-01-01

    The contribution is structured as follows: Physical principles of gaining nuclear energy; Specifics of power generation by nuclear and fossil fuel fired power plants; The nuclear fuel cycle; The potential of nuclear power; Global conflicts of nuclear power plant suppliers; Can power consumption be reduced by energy savings? What is better for the Czech Republic: the carbon tax or the emission trading scheme? In conclusion, the future benefits and requirements are summarized with respect to the Czech Republic. (P.A.)

  4. Energy policy of Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Bong-ki

    2006-01-01

    No other country in the world has so few resources of fossil sources of energy and depends on imports of power as the Republic of Korea. As a consequence of economical and political processes of globalization, new challenges are developed: elevated regional and global conflicts relating to resources as well as new possibilities of cooperation by means of amore intensely international division of labour. Under this aspect, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on the energy policy of the Republic of Korea. Especially, the author reports on the following aspects: (a) Characteristics of the power structure of the Republic of Korea; (b) National energy policy and measures for energy security; (c) Practical measures of energy security; (d) Regional co-operation for energy security from the view of the Republic of Korea. The Republic of Korea has a very weak energy structure and strongly depends on foreign countries. Among the successful measures of energy security, there exist measures for energy saving in industrial areas, diversification of sources of energy and exporting countries, increase of competitiveness of the energy economy due to restructuring and privatization of national companies as well as liberalisation of the energy market. Investments in the research of energy saving technologies and renewable energy such as solar energy, hydraulic power and fuel cells are trend-setting. The development of new sources of energy and the increase of the self-fund relating to petroleum, coal and natural gas are encouraging. The Republic of Korea is not attached at the international power net. Therefore, the Republic of Korea highly is susceptible according to energy crisis. The elevated dependence from other countries will exist furthermore. The Republic of Korea should expend its activities relating to foreign affairs and the large oil producers

  5. Source, Use, and Disposition of Freshwater in Puerto Rico, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Rivera, Wanda L.

    2010-01-01

    Water diverted from streams and pumped from wells constitutes the main sources of water for the 78 municipios of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. A better understanding is needed about water-use patterns, particularly about the amount of water used, where and how this water is used and disposed, and how human activities impact water resources. Irrigation practices, indoor and outdoor household uses, industrial uses, and commercial and mining withdrawals affect reservoirs, streams, and aquifers. Accurate and accessible water information for Puerto Rico is critical to ensure that water managers have the ability to protect and conserve this natural resource. The population of Puerto Rico increased 15 percent, from 3.4 million in 1985 to 3.9 million people 2005 and resulted in an increased demand for freshwater, mostly for the public-supply water use category. Almost 99 percent of the residents in Puerto Rico were served by public-supply water systems in 2005. One of the major challenges that water managers confront is the need to provide sufficient freshwater availability in the densely populated areas. Public-supply water is provided by the Puerto Rico Aqueducts and Sewers Authority (PRASA) and by non-PRASA systems. Non-PRASA systems refer to community-operated water systems (water systems that serve a rural or suburban housing area).

  6. Cosas de mujeres: familias monoparentales dominicanas en Barcelona y Nueva York Women’s issues: Dominican single-parent families in Barcelona and New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalina Alcalde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerosos estudios a escala internacional y española avalan en la actualidad el riesgo de pobreza que presentan los hogares monoparentales encabezados por mujeres en las sociedades contemporáneas desarrolladas. Este artículo recoge  algunos de los principales resultados de sendas investigaciones llevadas a cabo en las ciudades de Barcelona y Nueva York sobre la incidencia de estas formas de hogar entre las mujeres inmigrantes, focalizando el análisis en las mujeres dominicanas.Several international and Spanish studies have shown that one-parent families are at considerable risk of poverty in contemporary and developed societies, particularly when the mother is the head, which is usually the case. This paper  provides the main results of some research carried out in Barcelona and New York about one-parent families and immigrant women, with particular emphasis on Dominican women.

  7. Violencia y seguridad democrática en República Dominicana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobea Castellanos, L.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411278835

    2011-01-01

    Based on research in poor urban neighborhoods of the Dominican Republic and work with the Dominican government, this study explores how the state and the most vulnerable members of Dominican society have come to terms with a new complex criminality. A “young” democracy, the Dominican state has

  8. Situation Report--Barbados, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Italy, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malagasy Republic (Madagascar), Malaysia (West), Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, and Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 15 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Barbados, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Italy, Lesotho, Luxembourg, Malagasy Republic, Malaysia (West), Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Syrian Arab Republic, and Yogoslavia. Information…

  9. Parámetros cuantitativos para la evaluación de la suscepti­bilidad a la erosión de suelos tropicales dominicanos Quantitative parameters for assessing susceptibility to erosion in tropical Dominican soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Hernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La capa superficial de los suelos de dife­rentes tipos de bosques tropicales húmedos y secos presentes en la provincia de Peder­nales (República Dominicana, ha sido eva­luada mediante diferentes parámetros rela­cionados con el proceso de erosión: tamaño de partículas, cociente limo/arcilla y un es­timador de la posibilidad de pérdida de sue-lo. Algunos de los ecosistemas más valiosos están amenazados por talas y quemas y por la implantación de cafetales, de ahí el interés y objetivo de este trabajo, para ver como es­tos usos y manejos afectan a los suelos. Los resultados se presentan comparando los pa­rámetros estudiados en 79 muestras analiza­das según las unidades paisajísticas (bos­ques con y sin usos agropascícolas, así co­mo según las litologías predominantes en las mismas: calizas cristalinas, calizas car­bonatadas sobre alteritas y calizas coralinas. El trabajo muestra por vez primera para esta región, parámetros cuantitativos respecto a procesos edáficos vinculados a la erosión en dicho territorio. Otro dato relativamente no­vedoso es el utilizar la metodología láser para los análisis del tamaño de partículas.The topsoil layers (0-20 cm of different types of wet and dry tropical forests of the Pedernales province (Dominican Republic, both natural and cultivated, were assessed in terms of different parameters related to the erosion processes: particle size, silt/clay ra­tio, and an estimate of the possible soil loss. Some of the soils of the most valuable eco­systems are threatened by the introduction of coffee and hence the interest and objec­tive of this work. We present these data for 79 soil samples according to the corresponding landscape units (forests along with their dominant lithologies (crystalline limestones, carbon­ated limestones on alterites and coral lime­stones. The novelty of this study is that it uses quantitative variables to describe ed­aphic processes linked to erosion in

  10. Cardiovascular services and human resources in Puerto Rico - 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Palmieri, Mario R

    2009-01-01

    Available information (2004-2008) concerning population statistics, the occurrence of cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular services and human resources in Puerto Rico is presented. Relevant information concerning life expectancy at birth, death by specific causes in a recent four years period, the commonest causes of death, and the related cardiovascular risk factors prevalence data available is included. The surgical and medical interventional services rendered to cardiovascular patients in different institutions and their locations in Puerto Rico in the year 2008 is presented. Some remarks concerning the productivity of physicians by our Schools of Medicine is included. Information about ACGME accredited postgraduate cardiovascular training programs conducted in Puerto Rico is presented. Data concerning the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, overweight and obesity obtained by BRFSS in presented.

  11. Recent Advances in Dengue: Relevance to Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyd, David H.; Sharp, Tyler M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue represents an increasingly important public health challenge in Puerto Rico, with recent epidemics in 2007, 2010, and 2012–2013. Although recent advances in dengue vaccine development offer hope for primary prevention, the role of health professionals in the diagnosis and management of dengue patients is paramount. Case definitions for dengue, dengue with warning signs, and severe dengue provide a framework to guide clinical decision-making. Furthermore, the differentiation between dengue and other acute febrile illnesses, such as leptospirosis and chikungunya, is necessary for the appropriate diagnosis and management of cases. An understanding of dengue epidemiology and surveillance in Puerto Rico provides context for clinicians in epidemic and non-epidemic periods. This review aims to improve health professionals’ ability to diagnose dengue, and as highlight the relevance of recent advances in dengue prevention and management in Puerto Rico. PMID:26061055

  12. [Legal secrecy: abortion in Puerto Rico from 1937 to 1970].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Arias, R E

    1998-03-01

    The essay discusses abortion in Puerto Rico from 1937 to 1970, concentrating in its legal status as well as its social practice. The research documents the contradictions between the legality of the procedure and a social practice characterized by secrecy. The essay discusses the role of the Clergy Consultation Service on Abortion in promoting the legal practice of absortion in Puerto Rico. It also discusses the ambivalent role of medical doctors who, despite being legally authorized to perform abortions to protect the life and health of women, refused to perform the procedure arguing abortion was illegal. The essay concludes with a brief discussion on perceptions of illegality regarding abortion, emphasizing the contradictions between the practice of abortion and that of sterilization in Puerto Rico.

  13. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyes, John D.; De Anda, Mindi Farber; Torres, Wenceslao

    1999-08-11

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The Puerto Rico facility is presently the largest operating battery storage system in the world and has successfully provided frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reseme to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. However, the facility has suffered accelerated cell failures in the past year and PREPA is committed to restoring the plant to full capacity. This represents the first repowering of a large utility battery facility. PREPA and its vendors and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation, which are summarized in this paper.

  14. Leprosy in Puerto Rico: insight into the new millennia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín, Diana C; Candelario, Nicole; Carrasquillo, Osward Y; Figueroa, Luz; Sánchez, Jorge L

    2017-04-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) defined the elimination of the disease as a global prevalence of less than one case per 10,000 population. However, disease transmission is an ongoing worldwide public health concern, as evidenced by the more than 220,000 new cases diagnosed each year. This study is an update of the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico for the period of 2000-2014. A retrospective analysis of data was obtained from the Tropical Disease Clinic (TDC) of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. Sixty-three new cases of leprosy are detailed in this study. Disease incidence and prevalence were 1.65 and 5.26 per 100,000 inhabitants (of the island of Puerto Rico), respectively, and an average of 4.2 new cases per year. Most of the male patients in the study suffered from lepromatous leprosy (P = 0.026). In all, 47 (74.6%) patients had been born in Puerto Rico, and 29 (46%) had an affected family member or were in close contact with someone with leprosy. Compared to those of previous studies, these results demonstrate a decrease in both the incidence and prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico over the past 15 years. The relatively high prevalence of leprosy in Puerto Rico means that it remains endemic on the island. Concerted efforts must be undertaken to achieve the goal of the elimination of this old and stigmatized disease. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  15. ??ndice num??rico de un espacio de Banach

    OpenAIRE

    Mart??n Su??rez, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    El ??ndice num??rico de un espacio de Banach se define como la mayor constante de equivalencia entre el radio num??rico y la norma usual en el ??lgebra de todos los operadores lineales y continuos sobre ??l. Este concepto fue introducido por G. Lumer en 1968, y estudiado por matem??ticos como F. Bonsall, J. Duncan, C. McGregor, J. Pryce y A. White. En la tesis se hace un estudio sistem??tica de este concepto. Por una parte, se estudia el comportamiento del ??ndice num??ri...

  16. Plasma rico en plaquetas en pacientes con gonartrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez López, Alejandro; Ortega González, Carlos; García Lorenzo, Yenima; Arias Sifontes, Joanka; Ruiz de Villa Suárez, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Fundamento: la aplicación del plasma rico en plaquetas se ha convertido en una modalidad de tratamiento para pacientes con gonartrosis, tanto de forma aislada como en combinación con otros procedimientos. Objetivo: actualizar al personal médico sobre aspectos esenciales relacionados con la aplicación del plasma rico en plaquetas en pacientes con gonartrosis. Método: se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de un total de 300 artículos originales publicados en Pubmed, Hinari y Medline, mediante e...

  17. The People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, M.

    1990-01-01

    Concern about the proliferation of nuclear weapons has undergone a perceptible shift in focus. As the contributions to this book attest, we are placing more emphasis on the multiplication of sources for weapons-related materials and technology, the growth of sophisticated industrial and engineering capabilities in threshold states, and the condition of latent---or potential---proliferation they can create. A cardinal feature of this picture is the role played by new suppliers in the nuclear marketplace who offer a variety of materials, equipment, and services that cover an impressive span of the fuel cycle. Most prominent among them is the People's Republic of China. China is in the forefront of our attention for several notable reasons. It is, for one thing, a weapons state possessing a significant nuclear force comprising hundreds of warheads and a formidable array of delivery systems (including ballistic missiles and nuclear submarines). The size and composition of its forces bespeaks a sophisticated set of resource, engineering, and manufacturing capabilities covering uranium processing and enrichment, heavy water, fuel fabrication, warhead design, plutonium reprocessing, and nuclear waste management. This formidable military program, dating back to the 1950s, has endowed the PRC with extensive experience in nearly all facets of nuclear operations and management

  18. Population change in the former Soviet Republics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haub, C

    1994-12-01

    Demographic trends in the former Soviet Republics and Russia are summarized and discussed in this publication. The former Soviet Republics in Europe as well as Georgia and Armenia had completed or almost completed their demographic transition before October 1991. Other Central Asian republics experienced reduced mortality, but, despite rapid declines, fertility is still above replacement level (at 3-4 children per woman). The economic and social dislocation of the breakup of the republics has hastened fertility decline. The annual population growth rate of the USSR in the mid-1980s was 0.9%; this rate declined to 0.4% in 1991, and the decline has continued. The 1991 population of the USSR was 289.1 million. Between 1989 and 1991, the crude birth rate was 18/1000 population, and the crude death rate was 10/1000. The net migration rate of -4/1000 helped to reduce growth. Total fertility in the USSR was 2.3 children in 1990. In Russia, fertility declined from 1.9 in 1990 to 1.4 in 1993. The preferred family size in Russia was 1.9 in 1990 and 1.5 in 1993. This decline occurred due to lack of confidence in the economy and insufficient income. Only 19% of women used contraception in 1990. Marriages declined after 1990. Age pyramids were similar in the republics in that there was a narrowing in the proportion aged 45-49 years, and the male population aged over 65 years was diminished, due to the effect of World War II. The cohort of those aged 20-24 years in 1992 was very small due to the small parental birth cohort. The differences in the republics was characterized as broad-based in the younger ages because of high fertility. The number of childbearing women will remain large. Life expectancy has been 70 years since the 1950s and has declined in some republics due to substandard health care, lack of job safety measures, and alcoholism. Some republics experienced increased life expectancy, but, after 1991, mortality increased. Tajikistan had the highest infant mortality

  19. La política social. Presupuestos teóricos y horizonte histórico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Fernández Riquelme

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo proponemos una revisión de los presupuestos teóricos de la Política Social, como ciencia normativa y autónoma, en su devenir histórico, su pluralidad doctrinal y su diversidad institucional, en especial del actual modelo del Estado del Bienestar. Asimismo, abordamos el impacto en la misma de una nueva cuestión social, el desarrollo humano integral, a inicios del siglo XXI, ante fenómenos como la “Europa social”, la sociedad del bienestar y la globalización.

  20. Shapefile of the bathymetric contours of Lago Lucchetti, Puerto Rico, September 2013-May 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a sedimentation survey of Lago Lucchetti, Yauco, Puerto Rico, in 2013–14 in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer...

  1. Contributions to the study of gasteromycetes of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel M. Nieves-Rivera; D. Jean. Lodge; Orson K. Miller

    1998-01-01

    Battarrea stevenii and Tulostoma cf. meridionale, two cosmopolitan taxa are reported as new records for Puerto Rico. Both species were collected from the same disturbed subtropical dry forested area. A partial checklist of the taxa of macromycetes collected from Boquer*on Commonwealth- and Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuges is also provided.

  2. Relations between Study and Employment: Music Graduates in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Ileana S.; Lorenzo, Oswaldo

    2013-01-01

    Higher education programs in Puerto Rico include undergraduate degrees in music, music education, composition, popular music, jazz and Caribbean music, and, most recently, a master’s degree in music education. However, little is known about what music graduates do after concluding college. Do they work in music-related areas? Are they satisfied…

  3. Guide to the ecological systems of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Miller; A.E. Lugo

    2009-01-01

    This guide is an introduction to the ecological systems of Puerto Rico. It covers the diversity of ecological systems in the island, their most common plant and animal species, and salient aspects of their structure and functioning. Terrestrial, wetland, coastal, and marine ecosystems are included, as well as agroforest and urban systems. The discussion of the...

  4. Disinfection Alternatives for Small Communities in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disinfection Alternatives for Small Communities in Puerto Rico Craig Patterson1, Graciela Ramirez Toro2, Harvey Minnigh2, Cristina Maldonado3, and Rajib Sinha4 1U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development, 2Centro de Educación, Conservación e Interpretación Ambiental (CECIA),...

  5. Food resource partitioning inb syntopic nectarivorous bats on Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    We analyzed stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) to estimate the importance of plants and insects to the diet of two nectar-feeding bats on Puerto Rico, the brown flower bat (Erophylla bombifrons) and the Greater Antillean long-tongued bat (Monophyllus redmani). Concentrations of stable ...

  6. Convective mixing by internal waves in the Puerto Rico Trench

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.; Gostiaux, L.

    2016-01-01

    A2.4 km long deep-sea mooringwas deployed for 14 months in the Puerto Rico Trench, the deepestpart of the Atlantic Ocean. Below its top buoyancy package, the mooring line held a 200 m long stringof high-resolution temperature sensors and a current meter. Over the instrumented range between6,004 and

  7. Diversity of Papaya ringspot virus isolates in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) devastates papaya production worldwide. In Puerto Rico, papaya fields can be completely infected with PRSV within a year of planting. Information about the diversity of the Puerto Rican PRSV population is relevant in order to establish a control strategy in the island. T...

  8. Trailblazing the Carbon Cycle of Tropical Forests from Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Brown; Ariel Lugo

    2017-01-01

    We review the literature that led to clarifying the role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle from a time when they were considered sources of atmospheric carbon to the time when they were found to be atmospheric carbon sinks. This literature originates from work conducted by US Forest Service scientists in Puerto Rico and their collaborators. It involves the...

  9. Diameter growth of subtropical trees in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis

    2009-01-01

    Puerto Rico’s forests consist of young, secondary stands still recovering from a long history of island-wide deforestation that largely abated in the mid-20th century. Limited knowledge about growth rates of subtropical tree species in these forests makes it difficult to accurately predict forest yield, biomass accumulation, and carbon...

  10. 76 FR 47286 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Disaster Declaration 12699 and 12700 Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00013 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of Puerto...

  11. 76 FR 59178 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12770 and 12771] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  12. 76 FR 63699 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12770 and 12771] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  13. 75 FR 76517 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12368 and 12369] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00012 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  14. 76 FR 62133 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12770 and 12771] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 3. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance only for the...

  15. 76 FR 56861 - Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12770 and 12771] Puerto Rico Disaster Number PR-00015 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  16. Sistema de Vigilancia de Influenza de Puerto Rico |

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral Salud por Poblaciones Salud Sexual Suicidio Tabaquismo Vacunación Violación/Agresión Sexual Rico VIH Publicaciones sobre la Salud Otras Publicaciones Registros Suicidio Tuberculosis Centro de Suicidio Tuberculosis Recent Ávisos Públicos Reglamentación Informe de Casos del Síndrome de Guillain

  17. Urban and rural land use in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian Martinuzzi; William A. Gould; Olga M. Ramos Gonzalez; Maya Quinones; Michael E. Jimenez

    2008-01-01

    We have developed three land use regions for Puerto Rico: Urban, Suburban, and Rural (Gould et al. 2008; Martinuzzi et al. 2007). These three regions can also be considered urban, densely-populated rural, and sparsely-populated rural or as urban and wildland with a wildland-urban interface. The suburban use is the most dynamic in terms of population growth and land...

  18. English Acquisition in Puerto Rico: Teachers' Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein Ebsworth, Miriam; Ebsworth, Timothy John; Cai, Chencen

    2018-01-01

    Acquiring English in Puerto Rico involves the perceived advantages of bilingualism in contact with socio-political and economic forces that encourage and constrain the development of a population that is bilingual and biliterate in Spanish and English. Using a mixed design we report the perspectives of 86 experienced English teachers on the…

  19. Land Use, Conservation, Forestry, and Agriculture in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    William A. Gould; Frank H. Wadsworth; Maya Quinones; Stephen J. Fain; Nora L. Álvarez-Berríos

    2017-01-01

    Global food security concerns emphasize the need for sustainable agriculture and local food production. In Puerto Rico, over 80 percent of food is imported, and local production levels have reached historical lows. Efforts to increase local food production are driven by government agencies, non-government organizations, farmers, and consumers. Integration of geographic...

  20. Lichenological studies in Puerto Rico: history and current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel A. Mercado-Diaz; Eugenio Santiago-Valentin

    2010-01-01

    European scientists initiated lichenology in Puerto Rico in the 19th century. Activity of the discipline increased notably on the island during the first three decades of the 20th century, primarily by the field explorations and publications of the New York Botanical Garden scientists and associates (A. A. Heller, N. L. and E. G. Britton, L. W. Riddle), and by the work...

  1. Earthworm communities along an elevation gradient in Northeastern Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizelle Gonzalez; Emerita Garcia; Veronica Cruz; Sonia Borges; Marcela Zalamea; Maria M. Rivera

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we describe earthworm communities along an elevation gradient of eight forest types in Northeastern Puerto Rico, and determine whether their abundance, biomass and/or diversity is related to climatic, soil physical/chemical and/or biotic characteristics. We found that the density, biomass, and diversity of worms varied significantly among forest types....

  2. 76 FR 60513 - Puerto Rico; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... resulting from Hurricane Irene beginning on August 21, 2011, and continuing, are of sufficient severity and... adversely affected by this declared emergency: All 78 municipalities in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for... Unemployment Assistance (DUA); 97.046, Fire Management Assistance Grant; 97.048, Disaster Housing Assistance to...

  3. The green areas of San Juan, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    O.M. Ramos-Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Green areas, also known as green infrastructure or urban vegetation, are vital to urbanites for their critical roles in mitigating urban heat island effects and climate change and for their provision of multiple ecosystem services and aesthetics. Here, I provide a high spatial resolution snapshot of the green cover distribution of the city of San Juan, Puerto Rico, by...

  4. ITER delegation visits the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.

    2003-01-01

    Following the expression of interest of the Republic of Korea in joining the ITER Negotiations, a technical delegation from the ITER International Team and the Participant Teams visited the country on 14-16 April 2003. The goal was to assess, through visits to laboratories and some relevant industries, the capability of the Republic of Korea to contribute 'in kind' to ITER construction. There is presently in the Republic of Korea a strong interest at Government and industry levels in supporting fusion research within the framework of the long term development of alternative energy supplies. The large investment in the Korean Superconducting Tokamak (KSTAR), a very ambitious project from a previously very limited programme, is a concrete demonstration of this interest and the expression of interest to participate in ITER follows the same line

  5. Highly qualified in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Čuhlová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyse the current situation of the highly qualified in the Czech Republic applying the ISCO qualification. Previous studies suggest that educational attainment has an important impact on labour market performance and national competitiveness. Data analyses approved that highly qualified workforce positively influences economic situation of the EU–15 Member States they work in. However, this hypothesis was disapproved for the EU–10+3 Member States joining the EU after 2004. The difference can be explained by the various stage in convergence process since some New Member States are still in transformation period. We positively appraise the significant growth of fraction of the highly qualified in the Czech Republic since 2004, especially in the major group Professionals involving the most qualified workforce. The same trend happened also for the highly qualified foreigners in the Czech Republic, however their attracting still remains a challenge.

  6. 40 CFR 81.77 - Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.77 Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region. The Puerto Rico Air Quality Control Region...

  7. 77 FR 48504 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Economic Value of Puerto Rico's Coral Reef...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Economic Value of Puerto Rico's Coral Reef Ecosystems for Recreation-Tourism... the market and non-market economic values of Puerto Rico's coral reef ecosystems. Estimates will be... Puerto Rico's coral reef ecosystems. The required information is to conduct focus groups to help in...

  8. 75 FR 1543 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Puerto Rico; Guaynabo PM10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Control of Atmospheric Pollution. On July 15, 2009, the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board submitted... Control of Atmospheric Pollution Commonwealth Puerto Rico regulations effective date EPA approval date... analysis and revisions to Rules 102 and 423 of the Puerto Rico Regulation for the Control of Atmospheric...

  9. 42 CFR 412.374 - Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412.374 Payments to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. (a) FY 1998 through FY 2004. Payments for capital-related...

  10. 5 CFR 532.275 - Special wage schedules for ship surveyors in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... in Puerto Rico. 532.275 Section 532.275 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... schedules for ship surveyors in Puerto Rico. (a) The Department of Defense shall establish special wage schedules for nonsupervisory ship surveyors and supervisory ship surveyors in Puerto Rico. (b) Rates shall...

  11. 42 CFR 412.370 - General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Special Rules for Puerto Rico Hospitals § 412.370 General provisions for hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Except as provided in § 412.374, hospitals located in Puerto Rico are subject to the rules in this subpart governing the prospective payment...

  12. 77 FR 52310 - Expansion of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, San Juan, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... 61, San Juan, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18... Order: Whereas, the Puerto Rico Trade and Export Company, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 61, submitted an application to the Board for authority to expand FTZ 61 to include a site in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, adjacent...

  13. 7 CFR 318.13-24 - Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. 318.13-24 Section 318... Articles From Hawaii and the Territories § 318.13-24 Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico. Sweet potatoes from Puerto Rico may be moved interstate to Atlantic Coast ports north of and including Baltimore, MD, under...

  14. 27 CFR 19.396 - Spirits removed for shipment to Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spirits removed for shipment to Puerto Rico. 19.396 Section 19.396 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO... § 19.396 Spirits removed for shipment to Puerto Rico. Spirits removed for shipment to Puerto Rico with...

  15. 26 CFR 1.933-1 - Exclusion of certain income from sources within Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Puerto Rico. 1.933-1 Section 1.933-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Exclusion of certain income from sources within Puerto Rico. (a) General rule. (1) An individual (whether a United States citizen or an alien), who is a bona fide resident of Puerto Rico during the entire taxable...

  16. 47 CFR 73.1210 - TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false TV/FM dual-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico...-language broadcasting in Puerto Rico. (a) For the purpose of this section, dual-language broadcasting shall... a different language. (b) Television and Class A television licensees in Puerto Rico may enter into...

  17. 42 CFR 412.220 - Special treatment of certain hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Puerto Rico. 412.220 Section 412.220 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.220 Special treatment of certain hospitals located in Puerto Rico. Subpart G of this part sets...

  18. 78 FR 9884 - Approval of Subzone Status; Zimmer Manufacturing BV; Ponce, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ...; Zimmer Manufacturing BV; Ponce, Puerto Rico Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act... subzone at the facility of Zimmer Manufacturing BV located in Ponce, Puerto Rico (FTZ Docket B-81-2012... hereby approves subzone status at the facility of Zimmer Manufacturing BV located in Ponce, Puerto Rico...

  19. 19 CFR 7.2 - Insular possessions of the United States other than Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... than Puerto Rico. 7.2 Section 7.2 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... NAVAL STATION § 7.2 Insular possessions of the United States other than Puerto Rico. (a) Insular possessions of the United States other than Puerto Rico are also American territory but, because those insular...

  20. 42 CFR 412.204 - Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. 412... Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs for Hospitals Located in Puerto Rico § 412.204 Payment to hospitals located in Puerto Rico. (a) FY 1988 through FY 1997. For discharges occurring on or after October...