WorldWideScience

Sample records for rich foreground cluster

  1. A Clustered Extragalactic Foreground Model for the EoR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. G.; Trott, C. M.; Jordan, C. H.

    2018-05-01

    We review an improved statistical model of extra-galactic point-source foregrounds first introduced in Murray et al. (2017), in the context of the Epoch of Reionization. This model extends the instrumentally-convolved foreground covariance used in inverse-covariance foreground mitigation schemes, by considering the cosmological clustering of the sources. In this short work, we show that over scales of k ~ (0.6, 40.)hMpc-1, ignoring source clustering is a valid approximation. This is in contrast to Murray et al. (2017), who found a possibility of false detection if the clustering was ignored. The dominant cause for this change is the introduction of a Galactic synchrotron component which shadows the clustering of sources.

  2. An Improved Cluster Richness Estimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; McKay, Timothy; /Michigan U.; Hao, Jiangang; /Michigan U.; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Hansen, Sarah; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin; /New York U.; Johnston, David; /Houston U.; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Bleem, Lindsey; /Chicago U.; Scranton, Ryan; /Pittsburgh U.

    2009-08-03

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L{sub X}-richness relation, from {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.86 {+-} 0.02){sup 2} to {sigma}{sub lnL{sub X}}{sup 2} = (0.69 {+-} 0.02){sup 2}. Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to our more sophisticated treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L{sub X}-richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can be easily generalized to other mass tracers.

  3. LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zhang, Andrew J. [The Harker School, 500 Saratoga Avenue, San Jose, CA 95129 (United States); Hong, Jerry [Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94301 (United States); Guo, Michelle [Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Guo, Rachel [Irvington High School, 41800 Blacow Road, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Cunha, Katia [Observatório Nacional, São Cristóvão Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2016-03-10

    Although red giants deplete lithium on their surfaces, some giants are Li-rich. Intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars can generate Li through the Cameron–Fowler conveyor, but the existence of Li-rich, low-mass red giant branch (RGB) stars is puzzling. Globular clusters are the best sites to examine this phenomenon because it is straightforward to determine membership in the cluster and to identify the evolutionary state of each star. In 72 hours of Keck/DEIMOS exposures in 25 clusters, we found four Li-rich RGB and two Li-rich AGB stars. There were 1696 RGB and 125 AGB stars with measurements or upper limits consistent with normal abundances of Li. Hence, the frequency of Li-richness in globular clusters is (0.2 ± 0.1)% for the RGB, (1.6 ± 1.1)% for the AGB, and (0.3 ± 0.1)% for all giants. Because the Li-rich RGB stars are on the lower RGB, Li self-generation mechanisms proposed to occur at the luminosity function bump or He core flash cannot explain these four lower RGB stars. We propose the following origin for Li enrichment: (1) All luminous giants experience a brief phase of Li enrichment at the He core flash. (2) All post-RGB stars with binary companions on the lower RGB will engage in mass transfer. This scenario predicts that 0.1% of lower RGB stars will appear Li-rich due to mass transfer from a recently Li-enhanced companion. This frequency is at the lower end of our confidence interval.

  4. Reconceptualizing foregrounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bálint, Katalin; Hakemulder, Frank; Kuijpers, Moniek

    2017-01-01

    The experience of deviation is often referred to as foregrounding and contrasted with the experience of feeling absorbed in a narrative. However, instead of simply assuming that foregrounding and absorption are mutually exclusive, they should also be considered as co-occurring: being absorbed as ...

  5. IMPROVEMENT OF THE RICHNESS ESTIMATES OF maxBCG CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Hansen, Sarah; Becker, Matthew; Bleem, Lindsey; McKay, Timothy; Hao Jiangang; Evrard, August; Wechsler, Risa H.; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Annis, James; Scranton, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Minimizing the scatter between cluster mass and accessible observables is an important goal for cluster cosmology. In this work, we introduce a new matched filter richness estimator, and test its performance using the maxBCG cluster catalog. Our new estimator significantly reduces the variance in the L X -richness relation, from σ lnLx 2 = (0.86±0.02) 2 to σ lnLx 2 = (0.69±0.02) 2 . Relative to the maxBCG richness estimate, it also removes the strong redshift dependence of the L X -richness scaling relations, and is significantly more robust to photometric and redshift errors. These improvements are largely due to the better treatment of galaxy color data. We also demonstrate the scatter in the L X -richness relation depends on the aperture used to estimate cluster richness, and introduce a novel approach for optimizing said aperture which can easily be generalized to other mass tracers.

  6. Haloes and clustering in light, neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, N.A.

    2001-10-01

    Clustering is a relatively widespread phenomenon which takes on many guises across the nuclear landscape. Selected topics concerning the study of halo systems and clustering in light, neutron-rich nuclei are discussed here through illustrative examples taken from the Be isotopic chain. (author)

  7. Holes in the distribution of rich clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of voids in the distribution of Abell clusters of galaxies are described. Cluster voids, such as that in Bootes, serve as markers of large candidate voids of galaxies. The advantages and disadvantages of using rich clusters as tracers of large-scale structures are reviewed. One new 40/h Mpc diameter void of galaxies and clusters in Pisces-Cetus is described in detail. It is found that numerical simulations of models with Gaussian initial conditions do not reproduce the void or filament structures observed within the Abell cluster catalog. The implications of this discrepancy for future observations and models are discussed. 26 references

  8. Low frequency radio observations of five rich clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanisch, R.J.; Erickson, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Observations have been made at 43.0 and 73.8 MHz of five rich x-ray emitting clusters of galaxies: Abell 399/401, Abell 426 (the Perseus cluster), Abell 1367, Abell 1656 (the Coma cluster), and the Virgo cluster. A fan beam synthesis system has been used to search for extended radio emission, i.e., radio halos, in these clusters. Radio halos were detected in the Coma and Virgo clusters. No evidence was found for the existence of 3C84B, the halo source previously thought to exist in the Perseus cluster. If halo sources exist in Abell 399/401 or Abell 1367, they must be quite weak at frequencies less than 100 MHz. The observed sizes of the extended sources in Coma and Virgo imply that the rate of particle propagation away from strong radio galaxies greatly exceeds the Alfven velocity and is probably independent of particle energy

  9. Dynamics of rich clusters of galaxies. I. The Coma cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kent, S.M.; Gunn, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of the Coma cluster are analyzed using self-consistent equilibrium dynamical models. Observational material for Coma is culled from a variety of sources. Projected surface, density, and velocity-dispersion profiles are derived extending out to a radius of 3 0 from the cluster center, which are essentially free from field contamination. Segregation of galaxies by luminosity and morphology are discussed and a quantitative estimate of the latter is made. The method of constructing self-consistent dynamical models is discussed. Four different forms of the distribution function are analyzed allowing for different possible dependences of f on energy and angular momentum. Properties of typical models that might resemble actual clusters are presented, and the importance of having velocity-dispersion information is empha sized. The effect of a central massive object such as a cD galaxy on the core structure is illustrated. A comparison of these models with Coma reveals that only models with a distribution function in which the ratio of tangential to radial velocity dispersions is everywhere constant give acceptable fits. In particular, it is possible to rule out models that have isotropic motions in the core and predominantly radial motions in the halo. For H 0 = 50, the best-fitting models give a total projected mass inside 3 0 of 2.9 x 10 15 M/sub sun/ , a core radius of 340--400 kpc (8.5'--10'), an upper limit to any central massive object of approx.10 13 M/sub sun/ , and a mass-to-blue-light ratio of M/L = 181. From cosmological considerations the cluster ''edge'' is determined to lie at rapprox.5 0 --6 0 . The possible distribution of ''dark matter'' in Coma is discussed and it is argued that this distribution cannot be significantly different from that of the galaxies. The dynamics of morphological segregation are examined quantitatively, and are explained at least qualitatively

  10. Three-dimensional morphological segregation in rich clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador-Sole, E.; Sanroma, M.; Jordana, J.J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The implications of the observed correlation between morphological fractions and projected number density of galaxies in rich clusters are analyzed. It is found that this correlation is the result of a well-defined intrinsic correlation that depends on cluster concentration, whether the observed correlation is strictly universal or not. This dependence is in overall agreement with that expected from the action of mechanisms of environment-induced morphological evolution of galaxies. 30 references

  11. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  12. A GMBCG GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG OF 55,424 RICH CLUSTERS FROM SDSS DR7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jiangang; Annis, James; Johnston, David E.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Gerdes, David; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Busha, Michael; Becker, Matthew; Sheldon, Erin

    2010-01-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red-sequence plus brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red-sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 deg 2 of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  13. Extrinsic Sources of Scatter in the Richness-Mass Relation of Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Rykoff, Eli; /LBL, Berkeley; Koester, Benjamin; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Nord, Brian; /Michigan U.; Wu, Hao-Yi; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2012-03-27

    Maximizing the utility of upcoming photometric cluster surveys requires a thorough understanding of the richness-mass relation of galaxy clusters. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the impact of various sources of observational scatter on this relation. Cluster ellipticity, photometric errors, photometric redshift errors, and cluster-to-cluster variations in the properties of red-sequence galaxies contribute negligible noise. Miscentering, however, can be important, and likely contributes to the scatter in the richness - mass relation of galaxy maxBCG clusters at the low mass end, where centering is more difficult. We also investigate the impact of projection effects under several empirically motivated assumptions about cluster environments. Using SDSS data and the maxBCG cluster catalog, we demonstrate that variations in cluster environments can rarely ({approx} 1%-5% of the time) result in significant richness boosts. Due to the steepness of the mass/richness function, the corresponding fraction of optically selected clusters that suffer from these projection effects is {approx} 5%-15%. We expect these numbers to be generic in magnitude, but a precise determination requires detailed, survey-specific modeling.

  14. EXTRINSIC SOURCES OF SCATTER IN THE RICHNESS-MASS RELATION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozo, Eduardo; Koester, Benjamin; Rykoff, Eli; Nord, Brian; Evrard, August; Wu Haoyi; Wechsler, Risa

    2011-01-01

    Maximizing the utility of upcoming photometric cluster surveys requires a thorough understanding of the richness-mass relation of galaxy clusters. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the impact of various sources of observational scatter on this relation. Cluster ellipticity, photometric errors, photometric redshift errors, and cluster-to-cluster variations in the properties of red-sequence galaxies contribute negligible noise. Miscentering, however, can be important, and likely contributes to the scatter in the richness-mass relation of galaxy maxBCG clusters at the low-mass end, where centering is more difficult. We also investigate the impact of projection effects under several empirically motivated assumptions about cluster environments. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and the maxBCG cluster catalog, we demonstrate that variations in cluster environments can rarely (∼1%-5% of the time) result in significant richness boosts. Due to the steepness of the mass/richness function, the corresponding fraction of optically selected clusters that suffer from these projection effects is ∼5%-15%. We expect these numbers to be generic in magnitude, but a precise determination requires detailed, survey-specific modeling.

  15. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades near chromium-rich clusters in FeCr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonchev, M.; Svetukhin, V.; Gaganidze, E.

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports simulation of cascades in Fe–9 at.%Cr binary alloy containing chromium-rich clusters. The simulation is performed by the molecular dynamics method at the initial temperature of 300 K and primary knock-on atom energy of 15 and 20 keV. Spherical clusters containing 95 at.% of Cr with diameter of 1–5 nm have been considered. The properties of cascade evolution in the presence of chromium-rich cluster are studied. It is shown that these clusters tend to dissolve in collision cascades. However, clusters with diameter of ⩾3 nm exhibit only slight modifications and can be considered stable. Parameters of small (1–2 nm) clusters can change significantly and, in some cases, a 1 nm cluster can be totally dissolved

  16. MD simulation of atomic displacement cascades near chromium-rich clusters in FeCr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhonchev, M., E-mail: tikhonchev@sv.ulsu.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Svetukhin, V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Research Institute of Technology, 42 Leo Tolstoy St., 432970 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Gaganidze, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    The paper reports simulation of cascades in Fe–9 at.%Cr binary alloy containing chromium-rich clusters. The simulation is performed by the molecular dynamics method at the initial temperature of 300 K and primary knock-on atom energy of 15 and 20 keV. Spherical clusters containing 95 at.% of Cr with diameter of 1–5 nm have been considered. The properties of cascade evolution in the presence of chromium-rich cluster are studied. It is shown that these clusters tend to dissolve in collision cascades. However, clusters with diameter of ⩾3 nm exhibit only slight modifications and can be considered stable. Parameters of small (1–2 nm) clusters can change significantly and, in some cases, a 1 nm cluster can be totally dissolved.

  17. Neutron rich clusters and the dynamics of fission and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1988-07-01

    In this lecture I want to discuss experimental evidence for the appearance of cluster aspects in the dynamics of large rearrangement processes, as fusion and fission. Clusters in the sense as used in my lecture are the strongly bound doubly magic nuclei as 20 Ca 28 48 , 28 Ni 50 78 , 132 50 Sn 82 , and 208 82 Pb 126 and the superheavy nucleus 298 114 184 . Two of these nuclei, 78 Ni and 298 114 have not yet been identified. I discuss first the experimental findings from heavy element production. Then I cover the stability of cluster aspects to intrinsic excitation energy in fusion and fission. (orig./HSI)

  18. Properties and origin of the old, metal rich, star cluster, NGC 6791

    OpenAIRE

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution I summarize the unique properties of the old, metal rich, star cluster NGC 6791, with particular emphasis on its population of extreme blue horizontal branch stars. I then conclude providing my personal view on the origin of this fascinating star cluster.

  19. Color-magnitude diagrams for six metal-rich, low-latitude globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandroff, Taft E.

    1988-01-01

    Colors and magnitudes for stars on CCD frames for six metal-rich, low-latitude, previously unstudied globular clusters and one well-studied, metal-rich cluster (47 Tuc) have been derived and color-magnitude diagrams have been constructed. The photometry for stars in 47 Tuc are in good agreement with previous studies, while the V magnitudes of the horizontal-branch stars in the six program clusters do not agree with estimates based on secondary methods. The distances to these clusters are different from prior estimates. Redding values are derived for each program cluster. The horizontal branches of the program clusters all appear to lie entirely redwards of the red edge of the instability strip, as is normal for their metallicities.

  20. Strengthening from Nb-rich clusters in a Nb-microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; Zheng, Tianxiao; Cairney, Julie M.; Kaul, Harold; Williams, James G.; Barbaro, Frank J.; Killmore, Chris R.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that a Nb-microalloyed ultra-thin cast strip steel can be strengthened substantially without compromising ductility by performing a simple heat treatment at 700 °C for 4 min. The strengthening was attributed to a fine dispersion of Nb-rich solute atom clusters. These clusters had an average size of ∼60 atoms at peak hardness and resembled Guinier–Preston zones in Al–Cu alloys. The application of the Ashby–Orowan equation indicates that these clusters are potent strengthening agents when compared to conventional Nb(C,N) precipitation strengthening.

  1. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters II. Sersic 159-03

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    In a series of papers we investigate far-infrared emission from rich galaxy clusters. Maps have been obtained by ISO at 60 mu m, 100 mu m, 135 mu m, and 200 mu m using the PHT-C camera. Ground based imaging and spectroscopy were also acquired. Here we present the results for the cooling flow...

  2. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters I. Abell 2670

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jorgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    1999-01-01

    As part of an investigation of far-infrared emission from rich galaxy clusters the central part of Abell 2670 has been mapped with ISO at 60 mu m, 100 mu m, 135 mu m, and 200 mu m using the PHT-C camera. Point sources detected in the field have infrared fluxes comparable to normal spirals...

  3. ISO far-infrared observations of rich galaxy clusters III. Abell 2029, Abell 2052, Abell 2142

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Jørgensen, H.E.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    A sample of five rich galaxy clusters has been mapped by ISO at 60 mum, 100 mum, 135 mum, and 200 mum using the PHT-C camera. In previous papers Abell 2670 and Sersic 159-03 were discussed. Here we present the results for Abell 2029, Abell 2052, and Abell 2142. The conclusion of the survey...

  4. The peculiar velocities of rich clusters in the hot and cold dark matter scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, George F.; West, Michael J.; Villumsen, Jens V.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the peculiar velocities of rich clusters of galaxies. The peculiar motion of rich clusters in various cosmological scenarios is of interest for a number of reasons. Observationally, one can measure the peculiar motion of clusters to greater distances than galaxies because cluster peculiar motions can be determined to greater accuracy. One can also test the slope of distance indicator relations using clusters to see if galaxy properties vary with environment. We have used N-body simulations to measure the amplitude and rms cluster peculiar velocity as a function of bias parameter in the hot and cold dark matter scenarios. In addition to measuring the mean and rms peculiar velocity of clusters in the two models, we determined whether the peculiar velocity vector of a given cluster is well aligned with the gravity vector due to all the particles in the simulation and the gravity vector due to the particles present only in the clusters. We have investigated the peculiar velocities of rich clusters of galaxies in the cold dark matter and hot dark matter galaxy formation scenarios. We have derived peculiar velocities and associated errors for the scenarios using four values of the bias parameter ranging from b = 1 to b = 2.5. The growth of the mean peculiar velocity with scale factor has been determined and compared to that predicted by linear theory. In addition, we have compared the orientation of force and velocity in these simulations to see if a program such as that proposed by Bertschinger and Dekel (1989) for elliptical galaxy peculiar motions can be applied to clusters. The method they describe enables one to recover the density field from large scale redshift distance samples. The method makes it possible to do this when only radial velocities are known by assuming that the velocity field is curl free. Our analysis suggests that this program if applied to clusters is only realizable for models with a low value of the bias

  5. Photometry of the rich cluster of galaxies 0004.8-3450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic photometry in b, r and i wavebands of an extremely rich cluster of galaxies at 00sup(h)04sup(m).8 - 34 0 50'is presented. The cluster is centred on an unusually elongated cD galaxy. The brighter members of this cluster tend to lie along the axis of the cD. The luminosity function for 1552 galaxies shows, after application of a suitable correction for non-members, a form more characteristic of loose clusters with some spirals than of clusters with cD galaxies. The colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams for a smaller sample of galaxies are discussed. The distributions of very red and blue galaxies show no evidence for a significant proportion of either being cluster members. The cluster probably contains few spirals, although it appears to lie in a supercluster which may contain spirals. A few galaxies are unusually bright in the i band, their properties are discussed briefly. There is some evidence for a deficiency of other elongated galaxies with the same position angle as the cD. The cluster itself is aligned with the cD. (author)

  6. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies for exotic clustering phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Faculty of Science, Sapporo (Japan); Suhara, T. [Matsue College of Technology, Matsue (Japan); Kanada-En' yo, Y. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    We present a review of recent works on clustering phenomena in unstable nuclei studied by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD studies in these decades have uncovered novel types of clustering phenomena brought about by the excess neutrons. Among them, this review focuses on the molecule-like structure of unstable nuclei. One of the earliest discussions on the clustering in unstable nuclei was made for neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. AMD calculations predicted that the ground state clustering is enhanced or reduced depending on the number of excess neutrons. Today, the experiments are confirming this prediction as the change of the proton radii. Behind this enhancement and reduction of the clustering, there are underlying shell effects called molecular and atomic orbits. These orbits form covalent and ionic bonding of the clusters analogous to the atomic molecules. It was found that this ''molecular-orbit picture'' reasonably explains the low-lying spectra of Be isotopes. The molecular-orbit picture is extended to other systems having parity asymmetric cluster cores and to the three cluster systems. O and Ne isotopes are the candidates of the former, while the 3α linear chains in C isotopes are the latter. For both subjects, many intensive studies are now in progress. We also pay a special attention to the observables which are the fingerprint of the clustering. In particular, we focus on the monopole and dipole transitions which are recently regarded as good probe for the clustering. We discuss how they have and will reveal the exotic clustering. (orig.)

  7. Challenges And Results of the Applications of Fuzzy Logic in the Classification of Rich Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girola Schneider, R.

    2017-07-01

    The fuzzy logic is a branch of the artificial intelligence founded on the concept that everything is a matter of degree. It intends to create mathematical approximations on the resolution of certain types of problems. In addition, it aims to produce exact results obtained from imprecise data, for which it is particularly useful for electronic and computer applications. This enables it to handle vague or unspecific information when certain parts of a system are unknown or ambiguous and, therefore, they cannot be measured in a reliable manner. Also, when the variation of a variable can produce an alteration on the others The main focus of this paper is to prove the importance of these techniques formulated from a theoretical analysis on its application on ambiguous situations in the field of the rich clusters of galaxies. The purpose is to show its applicability in the several classification systems proposed for the rich clusters, which are based on criteria such as the level of richness of the cluster, the distribution of the brightest galaxies, whether there are signs of type-cD galaxies or not or the existence of sub-clusters. Fuzzy logic enables the researcher to work with "imprecise" information implementing fuzzy sets and combining rules to define actions. The control systems based on fuzzy logic join input variables that are defined in terms of fuzzy sets through rule groups that produce one or several output values of the system under study. From this context, the application of the fuzzy logic's techniques approximates the solution of the mathematical models in abstractions about the rich galaxy cluster classification of physical properties in order to solve the obscurities that must be confronted by an investigation group in order to make a decision.

  8. AN EXTREME STARBURST IN THE CORE OF A RICH GALAXY CLUSTER AT z = 1.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Tracy; Bonaventura, Nina; Delahaye, Anna; Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C.; DeGroot, Andrew; Wilson, Gillian; Foltz, Ryan; Muzzin, Adam; Chapman, Scott; Cooper, Mike; Lidman, Chris; Surace, Jason; Dunne, Loretta; Geach, James; Hayden, Brian; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Huang, Jiasheng; Pope, Alexandra; Smith, Matthew W. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered an optically rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.7089 with star formation occurring in close proximity to the central galaxy. The system, SpARCS104922.6+564032.5, was detected within the Spitzer Adaptation of the red-sequence Cluster Survey, and confirmed through Keck-MOSFIRE spectroscopy. The rest-frame optical richness of N gal (500 kpc) = 30 ± 8 implies a total halo mass, within 500 kpc, of ∼3.8 ± 1.2 × 10 14 M ⊙ , comparable to other clusters at or above this redshift. There is a wealth of ancillary data available, including Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope optical, UKIRT-K, Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS, and Herschel-SPIRE. This work adds submillimeter imaging with the SCUBA2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. The mid/far-infrared (M/FIR) data detect an Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxy spatially coincident with the central galaxy, with L IR = 6.2 ± 0.9 × 10 12 L ⊙ . The detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at z = 1.7 in a Spitzer-IRS spectrum of the source implies the FIR luminosity is dominated by star formation (an Active Galactic Nucleus contribution of 20%) with a rate of ∼860 ± 130 M ⊙ yr −1 . The optical source corresponding to the IR emission is likely a chain of >10 individual clumps arranged as “beads on a string” over a linear scale of 66 kpc. Its morphology and proximity to the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) imply a gas-rich interaction at the center of the cluster triggered the star formation. This system indicates that wet mergers may be an important process in forming the stellar mass of BCGs at early times

  9. AN EXTREME STARBURST IN THE CORE OF A RICH GALAXY CLUSTER AT z = 1.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Tracy; Bonaventura, Nina; Delahaye, Anna [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, Québec, H3P 1T3 (Canada); Noble, Allison; Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H4 (Canada); DeGroot, Andrew; Wilson, Gillian; Foltz, Ryan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Muzzin, Adam; Chapman, Scott [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Cooper, Mike [Centre for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Lidman, Chris [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Surace, Jason [Spitzer Space Science Centre, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dunne, Loretta [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140 (New Zealand); Geach, James [Center for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Hayden, Brian [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institute fur Astronomie, Auf dem Hugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Huang, Jiasheng [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Pope, Alexandra [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 011003 (United States); Smith, Matthew W. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff, Wales CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-08-20

    We have discovered an optically rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.7089 with star formation occurring in close proximity to the central galaxy. The system, SpARCS104922.6+564032.5, was detected within the Spitzer Adaptation of the red-sequence Cluster Survey, and confirmed through Keck-MOSFIRE spectroscopy. The rest-frame optical richness of N{sub gal} (500 kpc) = 30 ± 8 implies a total halo mass, within 500 kpc, of ∼3.8 ± 1.2 × 10{sup 14} M{sub ⊙}, comparable to other clusters at or above this redshift. There is a wealth of ancillary data available, including Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope optical, UKIRT-K, Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS, and Herschel-SPIRE. This work adds submillimeter imaging with the SCUBA2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and near-infrared imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. The mid/far-infrared (M/FIR) data detect an Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxy spatially coincident with the central galaxy, with L{sub IR} = 6.2 ± 0.9 × 10{sup 12} L{sub ⊙}. The detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at z = 1.7 in a Spitzer-IRS spectrum of the source implies the FIR luminosity is dominated by star formation (an Active Galactic Nucleus contribution of 20%) with a rate of ∼860 ± 130 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The optical source corresponding to the IR emission is likely a chain of >10 individual clumps arranged as “beads on a string” over a linear scale of 66 kpc. Its morphology and proximity to the Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) imply a gas-rich interaction at the center of the cluster triggered the star formation. This system indicates that wet mergers may be an important process in forming the stellar mass of BCGs at early times.

  10. ON THE SERENDIPITOUS DISCOVERY OF A Li-RICH GIANT IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 362

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Orazi, Valentina; Gratton, Raffaele G.; Lucatello, Sara; Momany, Yazan [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122, Padova (Italy); Angelou, George C. [Max Planck Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Bragaglia, Angela; Carretta, Eugenio; Sollima, Antonio [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127, Bologna (Italy); Lattanzio, John C., E-mail: valentina.dorazi@oapd.inaf.it [Monash Centre for Astrophysics (MoCA), Monash University, Melbourne, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2015-03-10

    We have serendipitously identified the first lithium-rich giant star located close to the red giant branch bump in a globular cluster. Through intermediate-resolution FLAMES spectra we derived a lithium abundance of A(Li) = 2.55 (assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium), which is extremely high considering the star’s evolutionary stage. Kinematic and photometric analysis confirm the object as a member of the globular cluster NGC 362. This is the fourth Li-rich giant discovered in a globular cluster, but is the only one known to exist at a luminosity close to the bump magnitude. The three previous detections are clearly more evolved, located close to, or beyond, the tip of their red giant branch. Our observations are able to discard the accretion of planets/brown dwarfs, as well as an enhanced mass-loss mechanism as a formation channel for this rare object. While the star sits just above the cluster bump luminosity, its temperature places it toward the blue side of the giant branch in the color–magnitude diagram. We require further dedicated observations to unambiguously identify the star as a red giant: we are currently unable to confirm whether Li production has occurred at the bump of the luminosity function or if the star is on the pre-zero-age horizontal branch. The latter scenario provides the opportunity for the star to have synthesized Li rapidly during the core helium flash or gradually during its red giant branch ascent via some extra mixing process.

  11. Tracing the Chemical Evolution of Metal-rich Galactic Bulge Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Gonzalez, Cesar; Saviane, Ivo; Geisler, Doug; Villanova, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    We present in this poster the metallicity characterization of the four metal rich Bulge Galactic Gobular Clusters, which have controversial metallicities. We analyzed our high-resolution spectra (using UVES-580nm and GIRAFFE-HR13 setups) for a large sample of RGB/AGB targets in each cluster in order to measure their metallicity and prove or discard the iron spread hypothesis. We have also characterized chemically stars with potentially different iron content by measuring light (O, Na, Mg, Al), alpha (Si, Ca, Ti), iron–peak (V, Cr, Ni, Mn) and s and r process (Y, Zr, Ba, Eu) elements. We have identified possible channels responsible for the chemical heterogeneity of the cluster populations, like AGB or massive fast-rotating stars contamination, or SN explosion. Also, we have analyzed the origin and evolution of these bulge GCs and their connection with the bulge itself.

  12. Temporal clustering of floods in Germany: Do flood-rich and flood-poor periods exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Bruno; Nguyen, Viet Dung; Vorogushyn, Sergiy

    2016-10-01

    The repeated occurrence of exceptional floods within a few years, such as the Rhine floods in 1993 and 1995 and the Elbe and Danube floods in 2002 and 2013, suggests that floods in Central Europe may be organized in flood-rich and flood-poor periods. This hypothesis is studied by testing the significance of temporal clustering in flood occurrence (peak-over-threshold) time series for 68 catchments across Germany for the period 1932-2005. To assess the robustness of the results, different methods are used: Firstly, the index of dispersion, which quantifies the departure from a homogeneous Poisson process, is investigated. Further, the time-variation of the flood occurrence rate is derived by non-parametric kernel implementation and the significance of clustering is evaluated via parametric and non-parametric tests. Although the methods give consistent overall results, the specific results differ considerably. Hence, we recommend applying different methods when investigating flood clustering. For flood estimation and risk management, it is of relevance to understand whether clustering changes with flood severity and time scale. To this end, clustering is assessed for different thresholds and time scales. It is found that the majority of catchments show temporal clustering at the 5% significance level for low thresholds and time scales of one to a few years. However, clustering decreases substantially with increasing threshold and time scale. We hypothesize that flood clustering in Germany is mainly caused by catchment memory effects along with intra- to inter-annual climate variability, and that decadal climate variability plays a minor role.

  13. Differential dynamic microscopy of weakly scattering and polydisperse protein-rich clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Mohammad S.; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Poling-Skutvik, Ryan; Vekilov, Peter G.; Conrad, Jacinta C.

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticle dynamics impact a wide range of biological transport processes and applications in nanomedicine and natural resource engineering. Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) was recently developed to quantify the dynamics of submicron particles in solutions from fluctuations of intensity in optical micrographs. Differential dynamic microscopy is well established for monodisperse particle populations, but has not been applied to solutions containing weakly scattering polydisperse biological nanoparticles. Here we use bright-field DDM (BDDM) to measure the dynamics of protein-rich liquid clusters, whose size ranges from tens to hundreds of nanometers and whose total volume fraction is less than 10-5. With solutions of two proteins, hemoglobin A and lysozyme, we evaluate the cluster diffusion coefficients from the dependence of the diffusive relaxation time on the scattering wave vector. We establish that for weakly scattering populations, an optimal thickness of the sample chamber exists at which the BDDM signal is maximized at the smallest sample volume. The average cluster diffusion coefficient measured using BDDM is consistently lower than that obtained from dynamic light scattering at a scattering angle of 90∘. This apparent discrepancy is due to Mie scattering from the polydisperse cluster population, in which larger clusters preferentially scatter more light in the forward direction.

  14. Cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams: a spectroscopic tool for neutron-rich nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086156; Raabe, Riccardo; Bracco, Angela

    In this thesis work, an exploratory experiment to investigate cluster-transfer reactions with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics is presented. The aim of the experiment was to test the potential of cluster-transfer reactions at the Coulomb barrier, as a possible mean to perform $\\gamma$ spectroscopy studies of exotic neutron-rich nuclei at medium-high energies and spins. The experiment was performed at ISOLDE (CERN), employing the heavy-ion reaction $^{98}$Rb + $^{7}$Li at 2.85 MeV/A. Cluster-transfer reaction channels were studied through particle-$\\gamma$ coincidence measurements, using the MINIBALL Ge array coupled to the charged particle Si detectors T-REX. Sr, Y and Zr neutron-rich nuclei with A $\\approx$ 100 were populated by either triton- or $\\alpha$ transfer from $^{7}$Li to the beam nuclei and the emitted complementary charged fragment was detected in coincidence with the $\\gamma$ cascade of the residues, after few neutrons evaporation. The measured $\\gamma$ spectra were studied in detail and t...

  15. Half-lives of cluster decay of neutron rich nuclei in trans-tin region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swamy, G.S.; Umesh, T.K.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the logarithmic half-life [log 10 (T 1/2 )] values have been reported for the exotic decay of some neutron rich even–even parent nuclei (56≤Z≤64) accompanied by the emission of alpha-like and non-alpha-like clusters in the trans-tin region. These values were calculated by using the single line of universal curve (UNIV) for alpha and cluster radioactive decay as well as the universal decay law (UDL). The half-life values were also separately calculated by considering the interacting nuclear potential barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potentials. The half-life values based on the three calculations mentioned above, were found to agree with one another within a few orders of magnitude. Possible conclusions are drawn based on the present study. (author)

  16. Chemical study of the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 5927

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura-Guzmán, A.; Villanova, S.; Muñoz, C.; Tang, B.

    2018-03-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are natural laboratories where stellar and chemical evolution can be studied in detail. In addition, their chemical patterns and kinematics can tell us to which Galactic structure (disc, bulge, halo or extragalactic) the cluster belongs to. NGC 5927 is one of most metal-rich GCs in the Galaxy and its kinematics links it to the thick disc. We present abundance analysis based on high-resolution spectra of seven giant stars. The data were obtained using Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph/Ultraviolet Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectrograph mounted on UT2 telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The principal objective of this work is to perform a wide and detailed chemical abundance analysis of the cluster and look for possible Multiple Populations (MPs). We determined stellar parameters and measured 22 elements corresponding to light (Na, Al), alpha (O, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti), iron-peak (Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn), and heavy elements (Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd, Eu). We found a mean iron content of [Fe/H] = -0.47 ± 0.02 (error on the mean). We confirm the existence of MPs in this GC with an O-Na anti-correlation, and moderate spread in Al abundances. We estimate a mean [α/Fe] = 0.25 ± 0.08. Iron-peak elements show no significant spread. The [Ba/Eu] ratios indicate a predominant contribution from SNeII for the formation of the cluster.

  17. Primordial inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. I - Density and velocity distributions of galaxies in the vicinities of rich clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, J.; Wilson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The density profiles and Hubble flow deviations in the vicinities of rich galaxy clusters are derived for a variety of models of initial density and velocity perturbations at the recombination epoch. The galaxy correlation function, measured with respect to the Abell clusters, is used to normalize the theoretical models. The angular scales of the required primordial inhomogeneities are calculated. It is found that the resulting density profiles around rich clusters are surprisingly insensitive to the shape of the initial perturbations and also to the cosmological density parameter, Omega. However, it is shown that the distribution of galaxy radial velocities can provide a possible means of deriving Omega.

  18. Constraints on the Richness-Mass Relation and the Optical-SZE Positional Offset Distribution for SZE-Selected Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Saro, A; Rozo, E; Benson, B A; Mohr, J; Rykoff, E S; Soares-Santos, M; Bleem, L; Dodelson, S; Melchior, P; Sobreira, F; Upadhyay, V; Weller, J; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Banerji, M; Bauer, A H; Bayliss, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brodwin, M; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Carlstrom, J E; Capasso, R; Capozzi, D; Carnero Rosell, A; Carrasco Kind, M; Chiu, I; Covarrubias, R; Crawford, T M; Crocce, M; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; de Haan, T; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Fausti Neto, A; Fernandez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gangkofner, C; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gupta, N; Hennig, C; Holzapfel, W L; Honscheid, K; Jain, B; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lin, H; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, Paul; McDonald, M; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reichardt, C L; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Strazzullo, V; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; von der Linden, A; Walker, A R; Wechsler, R H; Wester, W; Zenteno, A; Ziegler, K E

    2015-01-01

    We cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg$^2$ of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between $0.1\\lesssim z\\lesssim 0.8$ in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness $\\lambda$-mass relation with the following function $\\langle\\ln\\lambda|M_{500}\\rangle\\propto B_\\lambda\\ln M_{500}+C_\\lambda\\ln E(z)$ and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses $\\lambda$ to constrain the parameters. We find $B_\\lambda= 1.14^{+0.21}_{-0.18}$ and $C_\\lambda=0.73^{+0.77}_{-0.75}$. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is $\\sigma_{\\ln M|\\lambda} = 0.18^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ at a characteristic richness $\\lambda=70$. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the ma...

  19. Constraints on the Mass–Richness Relation from the Abundance and Weak Lensing of SDSS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Ryoma; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Takada, Masahiro; Miyatake, Hironao; Shirasaki, Masato; More, Surhud; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Osato, Ken

    2018-02-01

    We constrain the scaling relation between optical richness (λ) and halo mass (M) for a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) red-sequence Matched-filter Probabilistic Percolation (redMaPPer) galaxy clusters within the context of the Planck cosmological model. We use a forward modeling approach where we model the probability distribution of optical richness for a given mass, P({ln}λ | M). To model the abundance and the stacked lensing profiles, we use an emulator specifically built to interpolate the halo mass function and the stacked lensing profile for an arbitrary set of halo mass and redshift, which is calibrated based on a suite of high-resolution N-body simulations. We apply our method to 8312 SDSS redMaPPer clusters with 20 ≤ λ ≤ 100 and 0.10 ≤ z λ ≤ 0.33 and show that the lognormal distribution model for P(λ | M), with four free parameters, well reproduces the measured abundances and lensing profiles simultaneously. The constraints are characterized by the mean relation, (M)=A+B{ln}(M/{M}pivot}), with A={3.207}-0.046+0.044 and B={0.993}-0.055+0.041 (68% CL), where the pivot mass scale M pivot = 3 × 1014 h ‑1 M ⊙, and the scatter {σ }lnλ | M}={σ }0+q{ln}(M/{M}pivot}) with {σ }0={0.456}-0.039+0.047 and q=-{0.169}-0.026+0.035. We find that a large scatter in halo masses is required at the lowest-richness bins (20 ≤ λ ≲ 30) in order to reproduce the measurements. Without such a large scatter, the model prediction for the lensing profiles tends to overestimate the measured amplitudes. This might imply a possible contamination of intrinsically low-richness clusters due to the projection effects. Such a low-mass halo contribution is significantly reduced when applying our method to the sample of 30 ≤ λ ≤ 100.

  20. An Extremely Lithium-rich Bright Red Giant in the Globular Cluster M3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert P.; Peterson, Ruth C.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Sneden, Christopher; Fulbright, Jon P.; Langer, G. Edward

    1999-06-01

    We have serendipitously discovered an extremely lithium-rich star on the red giant branch of the globular cluster M3 (NGC 5272). An echelle spectrum obtained with the Keck I High-Resolution Echelle Spectrograph reveals a Li I λ6707 resonance doublet of 520 mÅ equivalent width, and our analysis places the star among the most Li-rich giants known: logε(Li)~=+3.0. We determine the elemental abundances of this star, IV-101, and three other cluster members of similar luminosity and color and conclude that IV-101 has abundance ratios typical of giants in M3 and M13 that have undergone significant mixing. We discuss mechanisms by which a low-mass star may be so enriched in Li, focusing on the mixing of material processed by the hydrogen-burning shell just below the convective envelope. While such enrichment could conceivably happen only rarely, it may in fact regularly occur during giant-branch evolution but be rarely detected because of rapid subsequent Li depletion. Based on observations obtained with the Keck I Telescope of the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the California Association for Research in Astronomy (CARA), Inc., on behalf of the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. This Letter is dedicated to the memory of our beloved colleague Ed Langer, who died after a brief illness on February 16, 1999. Ed brought a unique theoretical perspective to our globular cluster abundance studies. His career truly embodied the academic ideals of inspiration in both teaching and research. He made friends wherever he traveled, and was an inspiration to students. We will miss him greatly.

  1. New experimental investigation of cluster structures in 10 Be and 16 C neutron-rich nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aquila, L.; Acosta, D.; Auditore, L.; Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; De Luca, S.; Francalanza, L.; Gnoffo, B.; Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, I.; Martorana, N. S.; Norella, S.; Pagano, A.; Pagano, E. V.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Quattrocchi, L.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Trifirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Verde, G.; Vigilante, M.

    2017-11-01

    The existence of cluster structures in ^{10} Be and ^{16} C neutron-rich isotopes is investigated via projectile break-up reactions induced on polyethylene (CH _2 target. We used a fragmentation beam constituted by 55MeV/u ^{10} Be and 49MeV/u ^{16} C beams provided by the FRIBs facility at INFN-LNS. Invariant mass spectra of 4{He}+ 6 He and 6{He} + ^{10} Be breakup fragments are reconstructed by means of the CHIMERA 4π detector to investigate the presence of excited states of projectile nuclei characterized by cluster structure. In the first case, we suggest the presence of a new state in ^{10} Be at 13.5MeV. A non-vanishing yield corresponding to 20.6MeV excitation energy of ^{16} C was observed in the 6{He} + ^{10} Be cluster decay channel. To improve the results of the present analysis, a new experiment has been performed recently, taking advantage of the coupling of CHIMERA and FARCOS. In the paper we describe the data reduction process of the new experiment together with preliminary results.

  2. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Relation Between Galaxy Cluster Optical Richness and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Addison, Graeme; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically-selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 square degrees and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 square degrees. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically-selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically-selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. In contrast, the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters shows a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. We conclude that while offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks may be an important component in explaining the discrepancy, it is likely that a combination of factors is responsible for the ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain the difference in measured signals, include a larger percentage of false detections in the

  3. Measuring the Mean and Scatter of the X-ray Luminosity -- Optical Richness Relation for maxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.A.; Evrard, A.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2007-10-02

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  4. Exploring N-Rich Phases in Li(x)N(y) Clusters for Hydrogen Storage at Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Bhattacharya, Saswata

    2015-09-17

    We have performed cascade genetic algorithm and ab initio atomistic thermodynamics under the framework of first-principles-based hybrid density functional theory to study the (meta-)stability of a wide range of Li(x)N(y) clusters. We found that hybrid xc-functional is essential to address this problem as a local/semilocal functional simply fails even to predict a qualitative prediction. Most importantly, we find that though in bulk lithium nitride, the Li-rich phase, that is, Li3N, is the stable stoichiometry; in small Li(x)N(y) clusters, N-rich phases are more stable at thermodynamic equilibrium. We further show that these N-rich clusters are promising hydrogen storage material because of their easy adsorption and desorption ability at respectively low (≤300 K) and moderately high temperature (≥600 K).

  5. Rich Ground State Chemical Ordering in Nanoparticles: Exact Solution of a Model for Ag-Au Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Mahler; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    We show that nanoparticles can have very rich ground state chemical order. This is illustrated by determining the chemical ordering of Ag-Au 309-atom Mackay icosahedral nanoparticles. The energy of the nanoparticles is described using a cluster expansion model, and a Mixed Integer Programming (MIP......) approach is used to find the exact ground state configurations for all stoichiometries. The chemical ordering varies widely between the different stoichiometries, and display a rich zoo of structures with non-trivial ordering....

  6. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, B.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rozo, E.; /Ohio State U.; Evrard, A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Johnston, D.; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, E.; /New York U.; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Lau, E.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Nichol, R.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  7. Rich: Region-based Intelligent Cluster-Head Selection and Node Deployment Strategy in Concentric-based WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN, C.-S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In a random deployment, sensor nodes are scattered randomly in the sensing field. Hence, the coverage can not be guaranteed. In contrast, the coverage of uniformly deployment is in general larger than the random deployment. However, uniformly deployment strategy may cause unbalanced traffic pattern in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. In this situation, larger load may be imposed to CHs (cluster heads around the sink. Therefore, CHs close to the sink use up their energy earlier than those farther away from the sink. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel node deployment strategy in the concentric model, namely, Region-based Intelligent Cluster-Head selection and node deployment strategy (called Rich. The coverage, energy consumption and data routing issues are well investigated and taken into consideration in the proposed Rich scheme. The simulation results show that the proposed Rich alleviates the unbalanced traffic pattern significantly, prolongs network lifetime and achieves satisfactory coverage ratio.

  8. Variable stars in metal-rich globular clusters. IV. Long-period variables in NGC 6496

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Mohamad A. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Layden, Andrew C.; Guldenschuh, Katherine A. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403 (United States); Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Nysewander, M. C.; LaCluyze, A. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Welch, Douglas L., E-mail: mabbas@ari.uni-heidelberg.de, E-mail: laydena@bgsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8 S 4M1 (Canada)

    2015-02-01

    We present VI-band photometry for stars in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 6496. Our time-series data were cadenced to search for long-period variables (LPVs) over a span of nearly two years, and our variability search yielded the discovery of 13 new variable stars, of which 6 are LPVs, 2 are suspected LPVs, and 5 are short-period eclipsing binaries. An additional star was found in the ASAS database, and we clarify its type and period. We argue that all of the eclipsing binaries are field stars, while five to six of the LPVs are members of NGC 6496. We compare the period–luminosity distribution of these LPVs with those of LPVs in the Large Magellanic Cloud and 47 Tucanae, and with theoretical pulsation models. We also present a VI color–magnitude diagram, display the evolutionary states of the variables, and match isochrones to determine a reddening of E(B−V)= 0.21±0.02 mag and apparent distance modulus of 15.60±0.15 mag.

  9. TIME-SERIES PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: M62 (NGC 6266), THE MOST RR LYRAE-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE GALAXY?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, R.; Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.; Kuehn, C. A.; Pritzl, B. J.; Borissova, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present new time-series CCD photometry, in the B and V bands, for the moderately metal-rich ([Fe/H] ≅ -1.3) Galactic globular cluster M62 (NGC 6266). The present data set is the largest obtained so far for this cluster and consists of 168 images per filter, obtained with the Warsaw 1.3 m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory and the 1.3 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, in two separate runs over the time span of 3 months. The procedure adopted to detect the variable stars was the optimal image subtraction method (ISIS v2.2), as implemented by Alard. The photometry was performed using both ISIS and Stetson's DAOPHOT/ALLFRAME package. We have identified 245 variable stars in the cluster fields that have been analyzed so far, of which 179 are new discoveries. Of these variables, 133 are fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars (RRab), 76 are first overtone (RRc) pulsators, 4 are type II Cepheids, 25 are long-period variables (LPVs), 1 is an eclipsing binary, and 6 are not yet well classified. Such a large number of RR Lyrae stars places M62 among the top two most RR Lyrae-rich (in the sense of total number of RR Lyrae stars present) globular clusters known in the Galaxy, second only to M3 (NGC 5272) with a total of 230 known RR Lyrae stars. Since this study covers most but not all of the cluster area, it is not unlikely that M62 is in fact the most RR Lyrae-rich globular cluster in the Galaxy. In like vein, thanks to the time coverage of our data sets, we were also able to detect the largest sample of LPVs known so far in a Galactic globular cluster. We analyze a variety of Oosterhoff type indicators for the cluster, including mean periods, period distribution, Bailey diagrams, and Fourier decomposition parameters (as well as the physical parameters derived therefrom). All of these indicators clearly show that M62 is an Oosterhoff type I system. This is in good agreement with the moderately high metallicity of the cluster, in spite of its

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of galaxy clusters in RCS-1: spectroscopic confirmation, redshift accuracy, and dynamical mass-richness relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbank, David G.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Ellingson, Erica; Blindert, Kris; Yee, H. K. C.; Anguita, T.; Gladders, M. D.; Hall, P. B.; Hertling, G.; Infante, L.; Yan, R.; Carrasco, M.; Garcia-Vergara, Cristina; Dawson, K. S.; Lidman, C.; Morokuma, T.

    2018-05-01

    We present follow-up spectroscopic observations of galaxy clusters from the first Red-sequence Cluster Survey (RCS-1). This work focuses on two samples, a lower redshift sample of ˜30 clusters ranging in redshift from z ˜ 0.2-0.6 observed with multiobject spectroscopy (MOS) on 4-6.5-m class telescopes and a z ˜ 1 sample of ˜10 clusters 8-m class telescope observations. We examine the detection efficiency and redshift accuracy of the now widely used red-sequence technique for selecting clusters via overdensities of red-sequence galaxies. Using both these data and extended samples including previously published RCS-1 spectroscopy and spectroscopic redshifts from SDSS, we find that the red-sequence redshift using simple two-filter cluster photometric redshifts is accurate to σz ≈ 0.035(1 + z) in RCS-1. This accuracy can potentially be improved with better survey photometric calibration. For the lower redshift sample, ˜5 per cent of clusters show some (minor) contamination from secondary systems with the same red-sequence intruding into the measurement aperture of the original cluster. At z ˜ 1, the rate rises to ˜20 per cent. Approximately ten per cent of projections are expected to be serious, where the two components contribute significant numbers of their red-sequence galaxies to another cluster. Finally, we present a preliminary study of the mass-richness calibration using velocity dispersions to probe the dynamical masses of the clusters. We find a relation broadly consistent with that seen in the local universe from the WINGS sample at z ˜ 0.05.

  11. A self-consistent model of rich clusters of galaxies. I. The galactic component of a cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konyukov, M.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that to obtain the distribution function for the galactic component of a cluster reduces in the last analysis to solving the boundary-value problem for the gravitational potential of a self-consistent field. The distribution function is determined by two main parameters. An algorithm is constructed for the solution of the problem, and a program is set up to solve it. It is used to establish the region of values of the parameters in the problem for which solutions exist. The scheme proposed is extended to the case where there exists in the cluster a separate central body with a known density distribution (for example, a cD galaxy). A method is indicated for the estimation of the parameters of the model from the results of observations of clusters of galaxies in the optical range

  12. POST-MERGER SIGNATURES OF RED-SEQUENCE GALAXIES IN RICH ABELL CLUSTERS AT z ∼< 0.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheen, Yun-Kyeong; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Lee, Jaehyun; Ree, Chang H.

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the post-merger signatures of red-sequence galaxies in rich Abell clusters at z ∼ r < –20) cluster red-sequence galaxies show post-merger signatures in four clusters consistently. Most (∼71%) of the featured galaxies were found to be bulge dominated, and for the subsample of bulge-dominated red-sequence galaxies, the post-merger fraction rises to ∼38%. We also found that roughly 4% of bulge-dominated red-sequence galaxies interact (ongoing merger). A total of 42% (38% post-merger, 4% ongoing merger) of galaxies show merger-related features. Compared to a field galaxy study with a similar limiting magnitude by van Dokkum in 2005, our cluster study presents a similar post-merger fraction but a markedly lower ongoing merger fraction. The merger fraction derived is surprisingly high for the high density of our clusters, where the fast internal motions of galaxies are thought to play a negative role in galaxy mergers. The fraction of post-merger and ongoing merger galaxies can be explained as follows. Most of the post-merger galaxies may have carried over their merger features from their previous halo environment, whereas interacting galaxies interact in the current cluster in situ. According to our semi-analytic calculation, massive cluster halos may very well have experienced tens of halo mergers over the last 4-5 Gyr; post-merger features last that long, allowing these features to be detected in our clusters today. The apparent lack of dependence of the merger fraction on the clustocentric distance is naturally explained this way. In this scenario, the galaxy morphology and properties can be properly interpreted only when the halo evolution characteristics are understood first.

  13. The foregrounding of place in Trainspotting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Cassandra; Jensen, Marie Møller; Thiesson, Tine Myrup

    2017-01-01

    (2003), Johnstone (2009, 2010, 2013), and Eckert’s (2008) work on indexicality, we argue that these linguistic features in Trainspotting function as indexical markers connecting the characters and the novel to place, more specifically to Scotland. In the analysis, we explore three channels through which...... the foregrounding of place is evident. First, the foregrounding of place happens through the sheer volume of nonstandard English associated with Scots throughout the novel in that the extensive appearance of nonstandard English deviates from most novels, and in that the nonstandard variety indexes Scotland. Second...... of place happens through the ideology that favours Standard English over nonstandard English. This channel of foregrounding appears through the characters’ ability or inability to style-shift between nonstandard English and Standard English, and the effects of the ability or inability to do so. We argue...

  14. Application of Delaunay tessellation for the characterization of solute-rich clusters in atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, W.; Philippe, T.; Vurpillot, F.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents an original method for cluster selection in Atom Probe Tomography designed to be applied to large datasets. It is based on the calculation of the Delaunay tessellation generated by the distribution of atoms of a selected element. It requires a single input parameter from the user. Furthermore, no prior knowledge of the material is needed. The sensitivity of the proposed Delaunay cluster selection is demonstrated by its application on simulated APT datasets. A strong advantage of the proposed methodology is that it is reinforced by the availability of an analytical model for the distribution of Delaunay cells circumspheres, which is used to control the accuracy of the cluster selection procedure. Another advantage of the Delaunay cluster selection is the direct calculation of a sharp envelope for each identified cluster or precipitate, which leads to the more appropriate morphology of the objects as they are reconstructed in the APT dataset. -- Research Highligthts: →Original method for cluster selection in Atom Probe Tomography. →Delaunay tessellation generated by the distribution of solute atoms. →Direct calculation of a sharp envelope for each identified cluster or precipitate. →Delaunay cluster selection demonstrated by its application on simulated APT datasets.

  15. Alpha decay and cluster decay of some neutron-rich actinide nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... Abstract. Nuclei in the actinide region are good in exhibiting cluster radioactivity. In the present work, the half-lives of α-decay and heavy cluster emission from certain actinide nuclei have been calculated using cubic plus Yukawa plus exponential model (CYEM). Our model has a cubic potential for the ...

  16. On the Chemical Abundances of Miras in Clusters: V1 in the Metal-rich Globular NGC 5927

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Orazi, V.; Magurno, D.; Bono, G.; Matsunaga, N.; Braga, V. F.; Elgueta, S. S.; Fukue, K.; Hamano, S.; Inno, L.; Kobayashi, N.; Kondo, S.; Monelli, M.; Nonino, M.; Przybilla, N.; Sameshima, H.; Saviane, I.; Taniguchi, D.; Thevenin, F.; Urbaneja-Perez, M.; Watase, A.; Arai, A.; Bergemann, M.; Buonanno, R.; Dall’Ora, M.; Da Silva, R.; Fabrizio, M.; Ferraro, I.; Fiorentino, G.; Francois, P.; Gilmozzi, R.; Iannicola, G.; Ikeda, Y.; Jian, M.; Kawakita, H.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Lemasle, B.; Marengo, M.; Marinoni, S.; Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Minniti, D.; Neeley, J.; Otsubo, S.; Prieto, J. L.; Proxauf, B.; Romaniello, M.; Sanna, N.; Sneden, C.; Takenaka, K.; Tsujimoto, T.; Valenti, E.; Yasui, C.; Yoshikawa, T.; Zoccali, M.

    2018-03-01

    We present the first spectroscopic abundance determination of iron, α-elements (Si, Ca, and Ti), and sodium for the Mira variable V1 in the metal-rich globular cluster NGC 5927. We use high-resolution (R ∼ 28,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (∼200) spectra collected with WINERED, a near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph covering simultaneously the wavelength range 0.91–1.35 μm. The effective temperature and the surface gravity at the pulsation phase of the spectroscopic observation were estimated using both optical (V) and NIR time-series photometric data. We found that the Mira is metal-rich ([Fe/H] = ‑0.55 ± 0.15) and moderately α-enhanced ([α/Fe] = 0.15 ± 0.01, σ = 0.2). These values agree quite well with the mean cluster abundances based on high-resolution optical spectra of several cluster red giants available in the literature ([Fe/H] = ‑ 0.47 ± 0.06, [α/Fe] = + 0.24 ± 0.05). We also found a Na abundance of +0.35 ± 0.20 that is higher than the mean cluster abundance based on optical spectra (+0.18 ± 0.13). However, the lack of similar spectra for cluster red giants and that of corrections for departures from local thermodynamical equilibrium prevents us from establishing whether the difference is intrinsic or connected with multiple populations. These findings indicate a strong similarity between optical and NIR metallicity scales in spite of the difference in the experimental equipment, data analysis, and in the adopted spectroscopic diagnostics. Based on spectra collected with the WINERED spectrograph available as a visitor instrument at the ESO New Technology Telescope (NTT), La Silla, Chile (ESO Proposal: 098.D-0878(A), PI: G. Bono).

  17. The destruction of an Oort Cloud in a rich stellar cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlander, T.; Rickman, H.; Gustafsson, B.

    2017-07-01

    Context. It is possible that the formation of the Oort Cloud dates back to the earliest epochs of solar system history. At that time, the Sun was almost certainly a member of the stellar cluster where it was born. Since the solar birth cluster is likely to have been massive (103-104ℳ⊙), and therefore long-lived, an issue concerns the survival of such a primordial Oort Cloud. Aims: We have investigated this issue by simulating the orbital evolution of Oort Cloud comets for several hundred Myr, assuming the Sun to start its life as a typical member of such a massive cluster. Methods: We have devised a synthetic representation of the relevant dynamics, where the cluster potential is represented by a King model, and about 20 close encounters with individual cluster stars are selected and integrated based on the solar orbit and the cluster structure. Thousands of individual simulations are made, each including 3000 comets with orbits with three different initial semi-major axes. Results: Practically the entire initial Oort Cloud is found to be lost for our choice of semi-major axes (5000-20 000 au), independent of the cluster mass, although the chance of survival is better for the smaller cluster, since in a certain fraction of the simulations the Sun orbits at relatively safe distances from the dense cluster centre. Conclusions: For the range of birth cluster sizes that we investigate, a primordial Oort Cloud will likely survive only as a small inner core with semi-major axes ≲3000 au. Such a population of comets would be inert to orbital diffusion into an outer halo and subsequent injection into observable orbits. Some mechanism is therefore needed to accomplish this transfer, in case the Oort Cloud is primordial and the birth cluster did not have a low mass. From this point of view, our results lend some support to a delayed formation of the Oort Cloud, that occurred after the Sun had left its birth cluster.

  18. Science teachers’ foreground for continued professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that are dedicated to qualify our understanding of the significance of lived experiences as well as foregrounds for science teachers’ participation in professional development. Seven Danish science teachers were interviewed and observed. Three of these teachers exemplify...

  19. Swimming clusters in thallium-rich liquid caesium-thallium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aart, SA; van der Lugt, W; Badyal, YS; Verkerk, P

    The purpose of the work presented here is to obtain structural information on thallium-rich caesium-thallium alloys by means of neutron diffraction. The alloys exhibit a long-range (>1 nm) superstructure. This range increases with the thallium content. The results are interpreted with the help of a

  20. The Case of the Missing Cyanogen-rich AGB Stars in Galactic Globular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, S. W.; Yong, D.; Wylie-de Boer, E. C.

    2012-01-01

    The handful of available observations of AGB stars in Galactic Globular Clusters suggest that the GC AGB populations are dominated by cyanogen-weak stars (eg. Norris et al. 1981; Sneden et al. 2000). This contrasts strongly with the distributions on the RGB (and other) populations, which generall...

  1. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: RELATION BETWEEN GALAXY CLUSTER OPTICAL RICHNESS AND SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Hlozek, Renee [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Addison, Graeme; Dunkley, Joanna; Louis, Thibaut [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Battaglia, Nick [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Battistelli, Elia S. [Department of Physics, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Das, Sudeep [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Devlin, Mark J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Duenner, Rolando [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Gralla, Megan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hilton, Matt [Centre for Astronomy and Particle Theory, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Kosowsky, Arthur [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Lin, Yen-Ting [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); and others

    2013-04-10

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 deg{sup 2} and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 deg{sup 2}. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. Such large offsets between gas peaks and BCGs for optically selected cluster samples seem unlikely given that we find the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters to have a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. It is possible that other effects are lowering the ACT and Planck signals by the same amount, with offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks explaining the remaining difference between ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not

  2. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  3. Robust Foregrounds Removal for 21-cm Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, F.; Ghosh, A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2018-05-01

    Direct detection of the Epoch of Reionization via the redshifted 21-cm line will have unprecedented implications on the study of structure formation in the early Universe. To fulfill this promise current and future 21-cm experiments will need to detect the weak 21-cm signal over foregrounds several order of magnitude greater. This requires accurate modeling of the galactic and extragalactic emission and of its contaminants due to instrument chromaticity, ionosphere and imperfect calibration. To solve for this complex modeling, we propose a new method based on Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) which is able to cleanly separate the cosmological signal from most of the foregrounds contaminants. We also propose a new imaging method based on a maximum likelihood framework which solves for the interferometric equation directly on the sphere. Using this method, chromatic effects causing the so-called ``wedge'' are effectively eliminated (i.e. deconvolved) in the cylindrical (k⊥, k∥) power spectrum.

  4. GPU-Accelerated Foreground Segmentation and Labeling for Real-Time Video Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Real-time and accurate background modeling is an important researching topic in the fields of remote monitoring and video surveillance. Meanwhile, effective foreground detection is a preliminary requirement and decision-making basis for sustainable energy management, especially in smart meters. The environment monitoring results provide a decision-making basis for energy-saving strategies. For real-time moving object detection in video, this paper applies a parallel computing technology to develop a feedback foreground–background segmentation method and a parallel connected component labeling (PCCL algorithm. In the background modeling method, pixel-wise color histograms in graphics processing unit (GPU memory is generated from sequential images. If a pixel color in the current image does not locate around the peaks of its histogram, it is segmented as a foreground pixel. From the foreground segmentation results, a PCCL algorithm is proposed to cluster the foreground pixels into several groups in order to distinguish separate blobs. Because the noisy spot and sparkle in the foreground segmentation results always contain a small quantity of pixels, the small blobs are removed as noise in order to refine the segmentation results. The proposed GPU-based image processing algorithms are implemented using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA toolkit. The testing results show a significant enhancement in both speed and accuracy.

  5. New insights into the origin and evolution of the old, metal-rich open cluster NGC 6791

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Medina, Luis A.; Gieles, Mark; Pichardo, Barbara; Peimbert, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    NGC 6791 is one of the most studied open clusters, it is massive (˜5000 M⊙), located at the solar circle, old (˜8 Gyr) and yet the most metal-rich cluster ([Fe/H] ≃ 0.4) known in the Milky Way. By performing an orbital analysis within a Galactic model including spiral arms and a bar, we found that it is plausible that NGC 6791 formed in the inner thin disc or in the bulge, and later displaced by radial migration to its current orbit. We apply different tools to simulate NGC 6791, including direct N-body summation in time-varying potentials, to test its survivability when going through different Galactic environments. In order to survive the 8-Gyr journey moving on a migrating orbit, NGC 6791 must have been more massive, M0 ≥ 5 × 104 M⊙, when formed. We find independent confirmation of this initial mass in the stellar mass function, which is observed to be flat; this can only be explained if the average tidal field strength experienced by the cluster is stronger than what it is at its current orbit. Therefore, the birth place and journeys of NGC 6791 are imprinted in its chemical composition, in its mass-loss and in its flat stellar mass function, supporting its origin in the inner thin disc or in the bulge.

  6. Formation of vacancy clusters in tungsten crystals under hydrogen-rich condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Daiji; Iwakiri, Hirotomo; Morishita, Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Di-vacancy formation assisted by hydrogen trapping is studied in terms of nucleation free-energies evaluated with density functional theory. Calculations give binding energies for single hydrogen atom as first- and second-nearest-neighbor of di-vacancies of 1.80 and 2.15 eV, respectively, which are significantly larger than that for mono-vacancies. At elevated atomic concentrations of interstitial hydrogen atoms, evaluated nucleation free-energies indicate that the hydrogen assisted di-vacancy formation becomes more favorable. It is suggested that the formation would be preceded by VH cluster formation.

  7. Formation of vacancy clusters in tungsten crystals under hydrogen-rich condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Daiji, E-mail: kato.daiji@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo, E-mail: iwakiri@edu.u-ryukyu.ac.jp [University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Morishita, Kazunori, E-mail: morishita@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Di-vacancy formation assisted by hydrogen trapping is studied in terms of nucleation free-energies evaluated with density functional theory. Calculations give binding energies for single hydrogen atom as first- and second-nearest-neighbor of di-vacancies of 1.80 and 2.15 eV, respectively, which are significantly larger than that for mono-vacancies. At elevated atomic concentrations of interstitial hydrogen atoms, evaluated nucleation free-energies indicate that the hydrogen assisted di-vacancy formation becomes more favorable. It is suggested that the formation would be preceded by VH cluster formation.

  8. Constraining the Scatter in the Mass-Richness Relation of maxBCG Clusters With Weak Lensing and X-ray Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy; /Michigan U.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Hao, Jiangang; /Michigan U.; Hansen, Sarah; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Sheldon, Erin; /New York U.; Johnston, David; /Houston U.; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago /Fermilab

    2009-08-03

    We measure the logarithmic scatter in mass at fixed richness for clusters in the maxBCG cluster catalog, an optically selected cluster sample drawn from SDSS imaging data. Our measurement is achieved by demanding consistency between available weak lensing and X-ray measurements of the maxBCG clusters, and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation inferred from the 400d X-ray cluster survey, a flux limited X-ray cluster survey. We find {sigma}{sub lnM|N{sub 200}} = 0.45{sub -0.18}{sup +0.20} (95%CL) at N{sub 200} {approx} 40, where N{sub 200} is the number of red sequence galaxies in a cluster. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also obtain a constraint on the correlation coefficient between lnL{sub X} and lnM at fixed richness, which is best expressed as a lower limit, r{sub L,M|N} {ge} 0.85 (95% CL). This is the first observational constraint placed on a correlation coefficient involving two different cluster mass tracers. We use our results to produce a state of the art estimate of the halo mass function at z = 0.23 - the median redshift of the maxBCG cluster sample - and find that it is consistent with the WMAP5 cosmology. Both the mass function data and its covariance matrix are presented.

  9. CONSTRAINING THE SCATTER IN THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF maxBCG CLUSTERS WITH WEAK LENSING AND X-RAY DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.; Evrard, August; McKay, Timothy; Hao Jiangang; Becker, Matthew; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Hansen, Sarah; Frieman, Joshua; Sheldon, Erin; Johnston, David; Annis, James

    2009-01-01

    We measure the logarithmic scatter in mass at fixed richness for clusters in the maxBCG cluster catalog, an optically selected cluster sample drawn from Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging data. Our measurement is achieved by demanding consistency between available weak-lensing and X-ray measurements of the maxBCG clusters, and the X-ray luminosity-mass relation inferred from the 400 days X-ray cluster survey, a flux-limited X-ray cluster survey. We find σ lnM|N 200 =0.45 -0.18 +0.20 (95% CL) at N 200 ∼ 40, where N 200 is the number of red sequence galaxies in a cluster. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also obtain a constraint on the correlation coefficient between ln L X and ln M at fixed richness, which is best expressed as a lower limit, r L,M|N ≥ 0.85(95% CL). This is the first observational constraint placed on a correlation coefficient involving two different cluster mass tracers. We use our results to produce a state-of-the-art estimate of the halo mass function at z = 0.23-the median redshift of the maxBCG cluster sample-and find that it is consistent with the WMAP5 cosmology. Both the mass function data and its covariance matrix are presented.

  10. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergner, F., E-mail: f.bergner@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Gillemot, F. [Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 29-33 Konkoly-Thege street, 1121 Budapest XII (Hungary); Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M. [Division of Materials, CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Török, G. [Wigner Research Center for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 29-33 Konkoly-Thege street, 1121 Budapest XII (Hungary); Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstr. 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • TEM and SANS were applied to estimate mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters. • A three-feature dispersed-barrier hardening model was applied to estimate the yield stress increase. • The values and errors of the dimensionless obstacle strength were estimated in a consistent way. • Nanovoids are stronger obstacles for dislocation glide than dislocation loops, loops are stronger than Cu-rich clusters. • For reactor-relevant conditions, Cu-rich clusters contribute most to hardening due to their high number density. - Abstract: Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  11. Novel Techniques for Background / Foreground Rejection in Particle Instruments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Novel Techniques for Background / Foreground Rejection in Particle Instruments project addresses the need for signal contamination and background signal...

  12. ALMA Observations of Gas-rich Galaxies in z ∼ 1.6 Galaxy Clusters: Evidence for Higher Gas Fractions in High-density Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, A. G.; McDonald, M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Muzzin, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON MJ3 1P3 (Canada); Nantais, J. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Fernandez Concha 700, Las Condes 7591538, Santiago, Región Metropolitana (Chile); Rudnick, G. [The University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Van Kampen, E.; Manilla-Robles, A. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Webb, T. M. A.; Delahaye, A. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Wilson, G.; DeGroot, A.; Foltz, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Boone, K.; Hayden, B.; Perlmutter, S. [Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, 366 LeConte Hall, MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Cooper, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Demarco, R. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, Región del Biobío (Chile); Lidman, C., E-mail: noble@mit.edu [Australian Astronomical Observatory, 105 Delhi Road, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia)

    2017-06-20

    We present ALMA CO (2–1) detections in 11 gas-rich cluster galaxies at z ∼ 1.6, constituting the largest sample of molecular gas measurements in z > 1.5 clusters to date. The observations span three galaxy clusters, derived from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey. We augment the >5 σ detections of the CO (2–1) fluxes with multi-band photometry, yielding stellar masses and infrared-derived star formation rates, to place some of the first constraints on molecular gas properties in z ∼ 1.6 cluster environments. We measure sizable gas reservoirs of 0.5–2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉} in these objects, with high gas fractions ( f {sub gas}) and long depletion timescales ( τ ), averaging 62% and 1.4 Gyr, respectively. We compare our cluster galaxies to the scaling relations of the coeval field, in the context of how gas fractions and depletion timescales vary with respect to the star-forming main sequence. We find that our cluster galaxies lie systematically off the field scaling relations at z = 1.6 toward enhanced gas fractions, at a level of ∼4 σ , but have consistent depletion timescales. Exploiting CO detections in lower-redshift clusters from the literature, we investigate the evolution of the gas fraction in cluster galaxies, finding it to mimic the strong rise with redshift in the field. We emphasize the utility of detecting abundant gas-rich galaxies in high-redshift clusters, deeming them as crucial laboratories for future statistical studies.

  13. Quantitative determination of In clustering in In-rich InxGa1−xN thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Fonda, Emiliano; Ciatto, Gianluca; Luca, Marta De; Pettinari, Giorgio; Bisognin, Gabriele; Berti, Marina; Amidani, Lucia; Boscherini, Federico

    2014-01-01

    We investigated atomic ordering in In-rich In x Ga 1−x N epilayers in order to obtain an understanding of whether a deviation from a random distribution of In atoms in the group-III sublattice could be the origin of the strong carrier localization and defect-insensitive emission of these semiconductor alloys. This phenomenon can be exploited for application in optoelectronics. By coupling In K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy and high resolution x-ray diffraction, we were able to discard the hypothesis of significant phase separation into InN + GaN, in agreement with previous N K-edge absorption spectroscopy. However, we found an enrichment of In neighbours in the second atomic shell of In as compared to random statistics (clustering) for x = 0.82, while this is not the case for x = 0.46. This result, which is also supported by optical spectroscopy, is likely to stimulate new theoretical studies on In x Ga 1−x N alloys with a very high In concentration. (paper)

  14. Foreground-background segmentation and attention: a change blindness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Veronica; Turatto, Massimo; Umiltà, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    One of the most debated questions in visual attention research is what factors affect the deployment of attention in the visual scene? Segmentation processes are influential factors, providing candidate objects for further attentional selection, and the relevant literature has concentrated on how figure-ground segmentation mechanisms influence visual attention. However, another crucial process, namely foreground-background segmentation, seems to have been neglected. By using a change blindness paradigm, we explored whether attention is preferentially allocated to the foreground elements or to the background ones. The results indicated that unless attention was voluntarily deployed to the background, large changes in the color of its elements remained unnoticed. In contrast, minor changes in the foreground elements were promptly reported. Differences in change blindness between the two regions of the display indicate that attention is, by default, biased toward the foreground elements. This also supports the phenomenal observations made by Gestaltists, who demonstrated the greater salience of the foreground than the background.

  15. Generating information-rich high-throughput experimental materials genomes using functional clustering via multitree genetic programming and information theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suram, Santosh K; Haber, Joel A; Jin, Jian; Gregoire, John M

    2015-04-13

    High-throughput experimental methodologies are capable of synthesizing, screening and characterizing vast arrays of combinatorial material libraries at a very rapid rate. These methodologies strategically employ tiered screening wherein the number of compositions screened decreases as the complexity, and very often the scientific information obtained from a screening experiment, increases. The algorithm used for down-selection of samples from higher throughput screening experiment to a lower throughput screening experiment is vital in achieving information-rich experimental materials genomes. The fundamental science of material discovery lies in the establishment of composition-structure-property relationships, motivating the development of advanced down-selection algorithms which consider the information value of the selected compositions, as opposed to simply selecting the best performing compositions from a high throughput experiment. Identification of property fields (composition regions with distinct composition-property relationships) in high throughput data enables down-selection algorithms to employ advanced selection strategies, such as the selection of representative compositions from each field or selection of compositions that span the composition space of the highest performing field. Such strategies would greatly enhance the generation of data-driven discoveries. We introduce an informatics-based clustering of composition-property functional relationships using a combination of information theory and multitree genetic programming concepts for identification of property fields in a composition library. We demonstrate our approach using a complex synthetic composition-property map for a 5 at. % step ternary library consisting of four distinct property fields and finally explore the application of this methodology for capturing relationships between composition and catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction for 5429 catalyst compositions in a

  16. Structure and tensile properties of Fe-Cr model alloy strengthened by nano-scale NbC particles derived from controlled crystallization of Nb-rich clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Lei [College of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Guo, Qianying [State Key Lab of Hydraulic Engineering Simulation and Safety, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); Liu, Yongchang, E-mail: licmtju@163.com [State Key Lab of Hydraulic Engineering Simulation and Safety, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); Yu, Liming; Li, Huijun [State Key Lab of Hydraulic Engineering Simulation and Safety, School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China)

    2016-09-30

    This article describes the microstructural evolution and tensile properties of Fe-Cr model alloy strengthened by nano-scale NbC particles. According to the results obtained from X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer, the bcc ultrafine grains and the disordered phase of Nb-rich nano-clusters were observed in the milled powders. The hot pressing (HP) resulted in a nearly equiaxed ferritic grains and dispersed nano-scale NbC (~8 nm) particles. The microstructure studies reveal that the formation of NbC nanoparticles is composed of nucleation and growth of the Nb-rich nano-clusters involving diffusion of their component. At room temperature the material exhibits an ultimate tensile strength of 700 MPa, yield strength of 650 MPa, and total elongation of 11.7 pct. The fracture surface studies reveal that a typical ductile fracture mode has occurred during tensile test.

  17. Ultraviolet electroluminescence from Au/MgO/MgxZn1−xO heterojunction diodes and the observation of Zn-rich cluster emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.Y.; Xu, H.Y.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, C.; Ma, J.G.; Liu, Y.C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, ultraviolet (UV) electroluminescence (EL) is achieved from Au/MgO/Mg x Zn 1−x O heterojunction diodes. The EL mechanism and laser forming process are discussed based on the energy band diagram, impact-ionization process and disordered optical structure. For ZnO and low Mg-content MgZnO devices, their EL spectra show single near-band-edge (NBE) emission. While in high Mg-content MgZnO devices, the emission from self-formed Zn-rich MgZnO clusters is observed and also contribute to the UV EL band. These Zn-rich clusters can act as thermally-stable luminescence centers, suggesting a promising route for developing MgZnO-based UV light-emitting devices. -- Highlights: • A series of Au/MgO/Mg x Zn 1−x O heterojunction diodes with multiple Mg compositions are fabricated and ultraviolet electroluminescence is achieved. • EL mechanism and laser forming process are discussed based on energy band diagram, impact-ionization process and disordered optical structure. • The transition from spontaneous to stimulated emission is observed in these heterojunctions, and the lasing mode is random laser. • In high Mg-content MgZnO devices, the emission from self-formed Zn-rich clusters is observed, which are thermally stable luminescence centers

  18. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi; Broadhurst, Tom

    2013-01-01

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M 200 ∼ 1.4-1.8 × 10 14 M ☉ for the optically detected cluster samples, and M 200 ∼ 5.0 × 10 14 M ☉ for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration

  19. NGC 1980 Is Not a Foreground Population of Orion: Spectroscopic Survey of Young Stars with Low Extinction in Orion A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Apai, Dániel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Zhang, Lan; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Alonso-Martínez, Miguel; Eiroa, Carlos; Wang, Hongchi

    2017-01-01

    We perform a spectroscopic survey of the foreground population in Orion A with MMT/Hectospec. We use these data, along with archival spectroscopic data and photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, and masses for 691 stars. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope data, we characterize the disk properties of these sources. We identify 37 new transition disk (TD) objects, 1 globally depleted disk candidate, and 7 probable young debris disks. We discover an object with a mass of less than 0.018–0.030 M ⊙ , which harbors a flaring disk. Using the H α emission line, we characterize the accretion activity of the sources with disks, and confirm that the fraction of accreting TDs is lower than that of optically thick disks (46% ± 7% versus 73% ± 9%, respectively). Using kinematic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and APOGEE INfrared Spectroscopy of the Young Nebulous Clusters program (IN-SYNC), we confirm that the foreground population shows similar kinematics to their local molecular clouds and other young stars in the same regions. Using the isochronal ages, we find that the foreground population has a median age of around 1–2 Myr, which is similar to that of other young stars in Orion A. Therefore, our results argue against the presence of a large and old foreground cluster in front of Orion A.

  20. NGC 1980 Is Not a Foreground Population of Orion: Spectroscopic Survey of Young Stars with Low Extinction in Orion A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Min; Kim, Jinyoung Serena; Apai, Dániel [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Pascucci, Ilaria [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Zhang, Lan [Key Lab of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, 100012 Beijing (China); Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Alonso-Martínez, Miguel; Eiroa, Carlos [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Wang, Hongchi [Purple Mountain Observatory and Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, 210008 Nanjing (China)

    2017-04-01

    We perform a spectroscopic survey of the foreground population in Orion A with MMT/Hectospec. We use these data, along with archival spectroscopic data and photometric data, to derive spectral types, extinction values, and masses for 691 stars. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope data, we characterize the disk properties of these sources. We identify 37 new transition disk (TD) objects, 1 globally depleted disk candidate, and 7 probable young debris disks. We discover an object with a mass of less than 0.018–0.030 M {sub ⊙}, which harbors a flaring disk. Using the H α emission line, we characterize the accretion activity of the sources with disks, and confirm that the fraction of accreting TDs is lower than that of optically thick disks (46% ± 7% versus 73% ± 9%, respectively). Using kinematic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and APOGEE INfrared Spectroscopy of the Young Nebulous Clusters program (IN-SYNC), we confirm that the foreground population shows similar kinematics to their local molecular clouds and other young stars in the same regions. Using the isochronal ages, we find that the foreground population has a median age of around 1–2 Myr, which is similar to that of other young stars in Orion A. Therefore, our results argue against the presence of a large and old foreground cluster in front of Orion A.

  1. Optimization of the Regularization in Background and Foreground Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and foreground modeling is a typical method in the application of computer vision. The current general “low-rank + sparse” model decomposes the frames from the video sequences into low-rank background and sparse foreground. But the sparse assumption in such a model may not conform with the reality, and the model cannot directly reflect the correlation between the background and foreground either. Thus, we present a novel model to solve this problem by decomposing the arranged data matrix D into low-rank background L and moving foreground M. Here, we only need to give the priori assumption of the background to be low-rank and let the foreground be separated from the background as much as possible. Based on this division, we use a pair of dual norms, nuclear norm and spectral norm, to regularize the foreground and background, respectively. Furthermore, we use a reweighted function instead of the normal norm so as to get a better and faster approximation model. Detailed explanation based on linear algebra about our two models will be presented in this paper. By the observation of the experimental results, we can see that our model can get better background modeling, and even simplified versions of our algorithms perform better than mainstream techniques IALM and GoDec.

  2. The environmental impacts on the star formation main sequence: An Hα study of the newly discovered rich cluster at z = 1.52

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Yusei; Kodama, Tadayuki; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Hayashi, Masao [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tanaka, Ichi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Shimakawa, Rhythm, E-mail: koyama.yusei@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of a strong over-density of galaxies in the field of a radio galaxy at z = 1.52 (4C 65.22) based on our broadband and narrow-band (Hα) photometry with the Subaru Telescope. We find that Hα emitters are located in the outskirts of the density peak (cluster core) dominated by passive red-sequence galaxies. This resembles the situation in lower-redshift clusters, suggesting that the newly discovered structure is a well-evolved rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.5. Our data suggest that the color-density and stellar mass-density relations are already in place at z ∼ 1.5, mostly driven by the passive red massive galaxies residing within r{sub c} ≲ 200 kpc from the cluster core. These environmental trends almost disappear when we consider only star-forming (SF) galaxies. We do not find SFR-density or SSFR-density relations amongst SF galaxies, and the location of the SF main sequence does not significantly change with environment. Nevertheless, we find a tentative hint that star-bursting galaxies (up-scattered objects from the main sequence) are preferentially located in a small group at ∼1 Mpc away from the main body of the cluster. We also argue that the scatter of the SF main sequence could be dependent on the distance to the nearest neighboring galaxy.

  3. A TALE OF A RICH CLUSTER AT z ∼ 0.8 AS SEEN BY THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF ITS EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferré-Mateu, Anna [Subaru Telescope, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Sánchez-Blázquez, Patricia [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Vazdekis, Alexandre; De la Rosa, Ignacio G., E-mail: aferre@naoj.org [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-12-20

    We present a detailed stellar population analysis for a sample of 24 early-type galaxies (ETGs) belonging to the rich cluster RX J0152.7-1357 at z = 0.83. We have derived the age, metallicity, abundance pattern, and star formation history (SFH) for each galaxy individually to further characterize this intermediate-z reference cluster. We then study how these stellar population parameters depend on the local environment. This provides a better understanding on the formation timescales and subsequent evolution of the substructures in this cluster. We have also explored the evolutionary link between z ∼ 0.8 ETGs and those in the local universe by comparing the trends that the stellar population parameters followed with galaxy velocity dispersion at each epoch. We find that the ETGs in Coma are consistent with being the (passively evolving) descendants of the ETG population in RX J10152.7-1357. Furthermore, our results favor a downsizing picture, where the subclumps centers were formed first. These central parts contain the most massive galaxies, which formed the bulk of their stars in a short, burst-like event at high z. On the contrary, the cluster outskirts are populated with less-massive, smaller galaxies that show a wider variety of SFHs. In general, they present extended star formation episodes over cosmic time, which seems to be related to their posterior incorporation into the cluster around 4 Gyr after the initial event of formation.

  4. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  5. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  6. THE EFFECT OF SECOND-GENERATION POPULATIONS ON THE INTEGRATED COLORS OF METAL-RICH GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chul; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Lee, Young-Wook

    2013-01-01

    The mean color of globular clusters (GCs) in early-type galaxies is in general bluer than the integrated color of halo field stars in host galaxies. Metal-rich GCs often appear more associated with field stars than metal-poor GCs, yet show bluer colors than their host galaxy light. Motivated by the discovery of multiple stellar populations in Milky Way GCs, we present a new scenario in which the presence of second-generation (SG) stars in GCs is responsible for the color discrepancy between metal-rich GCs and field stars. The model assumes that the SG populations have an enhanced helium abundance as evidenced by observations, and it gives a good explanation of the bluer optical colors of metal-rich GCs than field stars as well as strong Balmer lines and blue UV colors of metal-rich GCs. Ours may be complementary to the recent scenario suggesting the difference in stellar mass functions (MFs) as an origin for the GC-to-star color offset. A quantitative comparison is given between the SG and MF models.

  7. Towards a methodology for cluster searching to provide conceptual and contextual "richness" for systematic reviews of complex interventions: case study (CLUSTER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrew; Harris, Janet; Croot, Elizabeth; Springett, Jane; Campbell, Fiona; Wilkins, Emma

    2013-09-28

    Systematic review methodologies can be harnessed to help researchers to understand and explain how complex interventions may work. Typically, when reviewing complex interventions, a review team will seek to understand the theories that underpin an intervention and the specific context for that intervention. A single published report from a research project does not typically contain this required level of detail. A review team may find it more useful to examine a "study cluster"; a group of related papers that explore and explain various features of a single project and thus supply necessary detail relating to theory and/or context.We sought to conduct a preliminary investigation, from a single case study review, of techniques required to identify a cluster of related research reports, to document the yield from such methods, and to outline a systematic methodology for cluster searching. In a systematic review of community engagement we identified a relevant project - the Gay Men's Task Force. From a single "key pearl citation" we conducted a series of related searches to find contextually or theoretically proximate documents. We followed up Citations, traced Lead authors, identified Unpublished materials, searched Google Scholar, tracked Theories, undertook ancestry searching for Early examples and followed up Related projects (embodied in the CLUSTER mnemonic). Our structured, formalised procedure for cluster searching identified useful reports that are not typically identified from topic-based searches on bibliographic databases. Items previously rejected by an initial sift were subsequently found to inform our understanding of underpinning theory (for example Diffusion of Innovations Theory), context or both. Relevant material included book chapters, a Web-based process evaluation, and peer reviewed reports of projects sharing a common ancestry. We used these reports to understand the context for the intervention and to explore explanations for its relative

  8. Dissolved Massive Metal-rich Globular Clusters Can Cause the Range of UV Upturn Strengths Found among Early-type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    2018-04-01

    I discuss a scenario in which the ultraviolet (UV) upturn of giant early-type galaxies (ETGs) is primarily due to helium-rich stellar populations that formed in massive metal-rich globular clusters (GCs), which subsequently dissolved in the strong tidal field in the central regions of the massive host galaxy. These massive GCs are assumed to show UV upturns similar to those observed recently in M87, the central giant elliptical galaxy in the Virgo cluster of galaxies. Data taken from the literature reveal a strong correlation between the strength of the UV upturn and the specific frequency of metal-rich GCs in ETGs. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization of GC mass functions, simulations of long-term dynamical evolution of GC systems show that the observed correlation between UV upturn strength and GC specific frequency can be explained by variations in the characteristic truncation mass {{ \\mathcal M }}{{c}} such that {{ \\mathcal M }}{{c}} increases with ETG luminosity in a way that is consistent with observed GC luminosity functions in ETGs. These findings suggest that the nature of the UV upturn in ETGs and the variation of its strength among ETGs are causally related to that of helium-rich populations in massive GCs, rather than intrinsic properties of field stars in massive galactic spheroids. With this in mind, I predict that future studies will find that [N/Fe] decreases with increasing galactocentric radius in massive ETGs, and that such gradients have the largest amplitudes in ETGs with the strongest UV upturns.

  9. Search for Efficient Foreground Subtraction Method in 21cm Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhirup; Choudhury, Madhurima; Chakraborty, Arnab

    2017-06-01

    Observations of the HI 21 cm transition line promises to be an important probe into the cosmic Dark Ages and Epoch of Reionization. Detection of this redshifted 21 cm signal is one of the key science goal for several upcoming and future low frequency radio telescopes like Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA), Square Kilometer Array (SKA) and Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE). One of the challenges for the detection of this signal is the accuracy of the foreground source removal. Several novel techniques have been explored already to remove bright foregrounds from both interferometric as well as total power experiments. Here, we present preliminary results from our investigation on application of Artificial Neural Networks to detect faint 21cm global signal amidst the sea of bright galactic foreground.

  10. An Improved Statistical Point-source Foreground Model for the Epoch of Reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, S. G.; Trott, C. M.; Jordan, C. H. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) (Australia)

    2017-08-10

    We present a sophisticated statistical point-source foreground model for low-frequency radio Epoch of Reionization (EoR) experiments using the 21 cm neutral hydrogen emission line. Motivated by our understanding of the low-frequency radio sky, we enhance the realism of two model components compared with existing models: the source count distributions as a function of flux density and spatial position (source clustering), extending current formalisms for the foreground covariance of 2D power-spectral modes in 21 cm EoR experiments. The former we generalize to an arbitrarily broken power law, and the latter to an arbitrary isotropically correlated field. This paper presents expressions for the modified covariance under these extensions, and shows that for a more realistic source spatial distribution, extra covariance arises in the EoR window that was previously unaccounted for. Failure to include this contribution can yield bias in the final power-spectrum and under-estimate uncertainties, potentially leading to a false detection of signal. The extent of this effect is uncertain, owing to ignorance of physical model parameters, but we show that it is dependent on the relative abundance of faint sources, to the effect that our extension will become more important for future deep surveys. Finally, we show that under some parameter choices, ignoring source clustering can lead to false detections on large scales, due to both the induced bias and an artificial reduction in the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  11. An Improved Statistical Point-source Foreground Model for the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. G.; Trott, C. M.; Jordan, C. H.

    2017-08-01

    We present a sophisticated statistical point-source foreground model for low-frequency radio Epoch of Reionization (EoR) experiments using the 21 cm neutral hydrogen emission line. Motivated by our understanding of the low-frequency radio sky, we enhance the realism of two model components compared with existing models: the source count distributions as a function of flux density and spatial position (source clustering), extending current formalisms for the foreground covariance of 2D power-spectral modes in 21 cm EoR experiments. The former we generalize to an arbitrarily broken power law, and the latter to an arbitrary isotropically correlated field. This paper presents expressions for the modified covariance under these extensions, and shows that for a more realistic source spatial distribution, extra covariance arises in the EoR window that was previously unaccounted for. Failure to include this contribution can yield bias in the final power-spectrum and under-estimate uncertainties, potentially leading to a false detection of signal. The extent of this effect is uncertain, owing to ignorance of physical model parameters, but we show that it is dependent on the relative abundance of faint sources, to the effect that our extension will become more important for future deep surveys. Finally, we show that under some parameter choices, ignoring source clustering can lead to false detections on large scales, due to both the induced bias and an artificial reduction in the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  12. THE OLD, SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER, NGC 6791—ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN TURN-OFF STARS FROM KECK/HIRES SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant Boesgaard, Ann; Lum, Michael G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i at Manoa, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Deliyannis, Constantine P., E-mail: boes@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: mikelum@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: cdeliyan@indiana.edu [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University 727 East 3rd Street, Swain Hall West 319, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The study of star clusters has advanced our understanding of stellar evolution, Galactic chemical evolution, and nucleosynthesis. Here we investigate the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich with high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H] = +0.30 ± 0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and we perform a differential analysis relative to the Sun from our Lunar spectrum also obtained with Keck/HIRES. The O results are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]{sub n} with a mean of –0.06 ± 0.02. This is low with respect to field stars that are also both old and metal-rich and continue the trend of decreasing [O/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H]. The small range in our oxygen abundances is consistent with a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of the old, metal-rich field stars. The two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe. These turn-off-star abundances provide benchmark abundances to investigate whether there are any observable abundance differences with the giants that might arise from nuclear-burning and dredge-up processes. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis and are consistent with the upper limits in similar stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. Our results support the prediction from standard theory that higher-metallicity stars deplete more Li. Probably no stars in NGC 6791 have retained their initial Li.

  13. The origin and orbit of the old, metal-rich, open cluster NGC 6791. Insights from kinematics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jílková, L.; Carraro, G.; Jungwiert, Bruno; Minchev, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 541, April (2012), A64/1-A64/11 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014; GA ČR GD205/08/H005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : galaxy * kinematics and dynamics * open clusters and associations Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2012

  14. Background noise exerts diverse effects on the cortical encoding of foreground sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, B J; Heiser, Marc A; Beitel, Ralph E; Schreiner, Christoph E

    2017-08-01

    In natural listening conditions, many sounds must be detected and identified in the context of competing sound sources, which function as background noise. Traditionally, noise is thought to degrade the cortical representation of sounds by suppressing responses and increasing response variability. However, recent studies of neural network models and brain slices have shown that background synaptic noise can improve the detection of signals. Because acoustic noise affects the synaptic background activity of cortical networks, it may improve the cortical responses to signals. We used spike train decoding techniques to determine the functional effects of a continuous white noise background on the responses of clusters of neurons in auditory cortex to foreground signals, specifically frequency-modulated sweeps (FMs) of different velocities, directions, and amplitudes. Whereas the addition of noise progressively suppressed the FM responses of some cortical sites in the core fields with decreasing signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), the stimulus representation remained robust or was even significantly enhanced at specific SNRs in many others. Even though the background noise level was typically not explicitly encoded in cortical responses, significant information about noise context could be decoded from cortical responses on the basis of how the neural representation of the foreground sweeps was affected. These findings demonstrate significant diversity in signal in noise processing even within the core auditory fields that could support noise-robust hearing across a wide range of listening conditions. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The ability to detect and discriminate sounds in background noise is critical for our ability to communicate. The neural basis of robust perceptual performance in noise is not well understood. We identified neuronal populations in core auditory cortex of squirrel monkeys that differ in how they process foreground signals in background noise and that may

  15. Contributions of Cu-rich clusters, dislocation loops and nanovoids to the irradiation-induced hardening of Cu-bearing low-Ni reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, F.; Gillemot, F.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Serrano, M.; Török, G.; Ulbricht, A.; Altstadt, E.

    2015-06-01

    Dislocation loops, nanovoids and Cu-rich clusters (CRPs) are known to represent obstacles for dislocation glide in neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels, but a consistent experimental determination of the respective obstacle strengths is still missing. A set of Cu-bearing low-Ni RPV steels and model alloys was characterized by means of SANS and TEM in order to specify mean size and number density of loops, nanovoids and CRPs. The obstacle strengths of these families were estimated by solving an over-determined set of linear equations. We have found that nanovoids are stronger than loops and loops are stronger than CRPs. Nevertheless, CRPs contribute most to irradiation hardening because of their high number density. Nanovoids were only observed for neutron fluences beyond typical end-of-life conditions of RPVs. The estimates of the obstacle strength are critically compared with reported literature data.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope-NICMOS Observations of M31'S Metal-Rich Globular Clusters and Their Surrounding Fields. I. Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew W.; Frogel, Jay A.; Freedman, Wendy; Gallart, Carme; Jablonka, Pascale; Ortolani, Sergio; Renzini, Alvio; Rich, R. Michael; Davies, Roger

    2001-05-01

    Astronomers are always anxious to push their observations to the limit-basing results on objects at the detection threshold, spectral features barely stronger than the noise, or photometry in very crowded regions. In this paper we present a careful analysis of photometry in crowded regions and show how image blending affects the results and interpretation of such data. Although this analysis is specifically for our NICMOS observations in M31, the techniques we develop can be applied to any imaging data taken in crowded fields; we show how the effects of image blending will limit even the Next Generation Space Telescope. We have obtained HST-NICMOS observations of five of M31's most metal-rich globular clusters. These data allow photometry of individual stars in the clusters and their surrounding fields. However, to achieve our goals-obtain accurate luminosity functions to compare with their Galactic counterparts, determine metallicities from the slope of the giant branch, identify long-period variables, and estimate ages from the AGB tip luminosity-we must be able to disentangle the true properties of the population from the observational effects associated with measurements made in very crowded fields. We thus use three different techniques to analyze the effects of crowding on our data, including the insertion of artificial stars (traditional completeness tests) and the creation of completely artificial clusters. These computer simulations are used to derive threshold- and critical-blending radii for each cluster, which determine how close to the cluster center reliable photometry can be achieved. The simulations also allow us to quantify and correct for the effects of blending on the slope and width of the RGB at different surface brightness levels. We then use these results to estimate the limits blending will place on future space-based observations. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained at the Space Telescope Science

  17. SPIDER OPTIMIZATION. II. OPTICAL, MAGNETIC, AND FOREGROUND EFFECTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dea, D. T.; Clark, C. N.; Contaldi, C. R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Burger, B.; Davis, G.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Crill, B. P.; Dore, O.; Filippini, J. P.; Bond, J. R.; Farhang, M.; Bonetti, J. A.; Bryan, S.; Chiang, H. C.; Fraisse, A. A.; Fissel, L. M.; Gandilo, N. N.

    2011-01-01

    SPIDER is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with degree-scale resolution over a large fraction of the sky. SPIDER's main goal is to measure the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves through their imprint on the polarization of the CMB if the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, is greater than 0.03. To achieve this goal, instrumental systematic errors must be controlled with unprecedented accuracy. Here, we build on previous work to use simulations of SPIDER observations to examine the impact of several systematic effects that have been characterized through testing and modeling of various instrument components. In particular, we investigate the impact of the non-ideal spectral response of the half-wave plates, coupling between focal-plane components and Earth's magnetic field, and beam mismatches and asymmetries. We also present a model of diffuse polarized foreground emission based on a three-dimensional model of the Galactic magnetic field and dust, and study the interaction of this foreground emission with our observation strategy and instrumental effects. We find that the expected level of foreground and systematic contamination is sufficiently low for SPIDER to achieve its science goals.

  18. Resolving the structure of the Galactic foreground using Herschel measurements and the Kriging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, S.; Bagoly, Z.; Balázs, L. G.; Horvath, I.; Racz, I. I.; Zahorecz, S.; Tóth, L. V.

    2018-05-01

    Investigating the distant extragalactic Universe requires a subtraction of the Galactic foreground. One of the major difficulties deriving the fine structure of the galactic foreground is the embedded foreground and background point sources appearing in the given fields. It is especially so in the infrared. We report our study subtracting point sources from Herschel images with Kriging, an interpolation method where the interpolated values are modelled by a Gaussian process governed by prior covariances. Using the Kriging method on Herschel multi-wavelength observations the structure of the Galactic foreground can be studied with much higher resolution than previously, leading to a better foreground subtraction at the end.

  19. Detectability of tensor modes in the presence of foregrounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarie, Mihail; Hirata, Christopher; Seljak, Uros

    2005-01-01

    In inflationary models gravitational waves are produced in the early universe and generate B-type polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Since B polarization is only generated by gravity waves it does not suffer from the usual cosmic variance. A perfect decomposition of the CMB into B-modes and E-modes would require data from the entire sky, which in practice is not possible because of the foreground contaminants. This leads to mixing of E polarization into B, which introduces cosmic variance contamination of B polarization and reduces sensitivity to gravity wave amplitude even in absence of detector noise. We present numerical results for the uncertainty in the tensor-to-scalar ratio using the Fisher matrix formalism for various resolutions and considering several cuts of the sky, using the foreground model based on dust maps and assuming 90 GHz operating frequency. We find that the usual scaling xutri((T/S))∝f sky -1/2 is significantly degraded and becomes xutri((T/S))∝f sky -2 for f sky >0.7. This dependence is affected only weakly by the choice of sky cuts. To put this into a context of what is required level of foreground cleaning, to achieve a T/S=10 -3 detection at 3σ one needs to observe 15% of the sky as opposed to naive expectation of 0.3%. To prevent contamination over this large sky area at required level one must be able to remove polarized dust emission at or better than 0.1% of unpolarized intensity, assuming the cleanest part of the sky has been chosen. To achieve T/S=10 -4 detection at 3σ one needs to observe 70% of the sky, which is only possible if dust emission is removed everywhere over this region at 0.01% level. Reaching T/S=10 -2 should be easier: 1% of the sky is needed over which polarized emission needs to be removed at 1% of unpolarized intensity if the cleanest region is chosen. These results suggest that foreground contamination may make it difficult to achieve levels below T/S=10 -3

  20. EoR Foregrounds: the Faint Extragalactic Radio Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Isabella

    2018-05-01

    A wealth of new data from upgraded and new radio interferometers are rapidly improving and transforming our understanding of the faint extra-galactic radio sky. Indeed the mounting statistics at sub-mJy and μJy flux levels is finally allowing us to get stringent observational constraints on the faint radio population and on the modeling of its various components. In this paper I will provide a brief overview of the latest results in areas that are potentially important for an accurate treatment of extra-galactic foregrounds in experiments designed to probe the Epoch of Reionization.

  1. Deprojection of rich cluster images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaroubi, S; Squires, G; Hoffman, Y; Silk, J

    1998-01-01

    We consider a general method of deprojecting two-dimensional images to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the projected object, assuming axial symmetry. The method consists of the application of the Fourier slice theorem to the general case in which the axis of symmetry is not

  2. Foreground mitigation strategy for measuring the 21 cm-LAE cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiura, Shintaro; Line, Jack L. B.; Kubota, Kenji; Hasegawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2018-05-01

    The cross power spectrum of the 21 cm signal and Lyman-α emitters (LAEs) is a probe of the Epoch of Reionization. Astrophysical foregrounds do not correlate with the LAE distribution, though the foregrounds contribute to the error. To study the impact of foregrounds on the measurement, we assume realistic observation by the Murchison Widefield Array using a catalogue of radio galaxies, a LAE survey by the Subaru Hyper Supreme-Cam and the redshift of LAEs is determined by the Prime Focus Spectrograph. The HI distribution is estimated from a radiative transfer simulation with models based on results of radiation hydrodynamics simulation. Using these models, we found that the error of cross power spectrum is dominated by foreground terms. Furthermore, we estimate the effects of foreground removal, and find 99% of the foreground removal is required to detect the 21 cm-LAE signal at k ~ 0.4 h Mpc-1.

  3. Galactic neutral hydrogen and the magnetic ISM foreground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. E.

    2018-05-01

    The interstellar medium is suffused with magnetic fields, which inform the shape of structures in the diffuse gas. Recent high-dynamic range observations of Galactic neutral hydrogen, combined with novel data analysis techniques, have revealed a deep link between the morphology of neutral gas and the ambient magnetic field. At the same time, an observational revolution is underway in low-frequency radio polarimetry, driven in part by the need to characterize foregrounds to the cosmological 21-cm signal. A new generation of experiments, capable of high angular and Faraday depth resolution, are revealing complex filamentary structures in diffuse polarization. The relationship between filamentary structures observed in radio-polarimetric data and those observed in atomic hydrogen is not yet well understood. Multiwavelength observations will enable new insights into the magnetic interstellar medium across phases.

  4. Floral foregrounding: A corpus-assisted, cognitive stylistic study of the foregrounding of flowers in Mrs Dalloway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Møller; Lottrup, Katrine; Nordentoft, Signe

    2018-01-01

    The study reported here combines quantitative and qualitative methods from both cognitive stylistics and corpus stylistics to analyze the flower-motif in Virginia Woolf’s novel Mrs Dalloway. The quantitative analysis compared the frequency of flower lemmas in the novel to both a reference corpus...... consisting of Woolf’s other works as well as a general corpus (the BNC). The analysis found significant differences between the frequencies in the novel and both corpora. The qualitative analysis is based on in the statistically significant results and considers cognitive entrenchment and salience...... in relation to these. Furthermore, the analysis also links these two notions to different types of foregrounding as conceptualized in stylistics proper. Finally, aspects of repetition, parallelism and symbolism in relation to the flower-motif are considered. In conclusion, it is found that the flower...

  5. Planck 2015 results. XXV. Diffuse low-frequency Galactic foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vidal, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-01-01

    (abridged) We discuss the Galactic foreground emission between 20 and 100GHz based on observations by Planck/WMAP. The Commander component-separation tool has been used to separate the various astrophysical processes in total intensity. Comparison with RRL templates verifies the recovery of the free-free emission along the Galactic plane. Comparison of the high-latitude Halpha emission with our free-free map shows residuals that correlate with dust optical depth, consistent with a fraction (~30%) of Halpha having been scattered by high-latitude dust. We highlight a number of diffuse spinning dust morphological features at high latitude. There is substantial spatial variation in the spinning dust spectrum, with the emission peak ranging from below 20GHz to more than 50GHz. There is a strong tendency for the spinning dust component near many prominent HII regions to have a higher peak frequency, suggesting that this increase in peak frequency is associated with dust in the photodissociation regions around the n...

  6. N-Heterocyclic Carbene Coinage Metal Complexes of the Germanium-Rich Metalloid Clusters [Ge9R3]− and [Ge9RI2]2− with R = Si(iPr3 and RI = Si(TMS3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix S. Geitner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis of novel coinage metal NHC (N-heterocyclic carbene compounds of the germanium-rich metalloid clusters [Ge9R3]− and [Ge9RI2]2− with R = Si(iPr3 and RI = Si(TMS3. NHCDippCu{η3Ge9R3} with R = Si(iPr3 (1 represents a less bulky silyl group-substituted derivative of the known analogous compounds with R = Si(iBu3 or Si(TMS3. The coordination of the [NHCDippCu]+ moiety to the cluster unit occurs via one triangular face of the tri-capped trigonal prismatic [Ge9] cluster. Furthermore, a series of novel Zintl cluster coinage metal NHC compounds of the type (NHCM2{η3Ge9RI2} (RI = Si(TMS3 M = Cu, Ag and Au; NHC = NHCDipp or NHCMes is presented. These novel compounds represent a new class of neutral dinuclear Zintl cluster coinage metal NHC compounds, which are obtained either by the stepwise reaction of a suspension of K12Ge17 with Si(TMS3Cl and the coinage metal carbene complexes NHCMCl (M = Cu, Ag, Au, or via a homogenous reaction using the preformed bis-silylated cluster K2[Ge9(Si(TMS32] and the corresponding NHCMCl (M = Cu, Ag, Au complex. The molecular structures of NHCDippCu{η3Ge9(Si(iPr33} (1 and (NHCDippCu2{η3-Ge9(Si(TMS32} (2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. In 2, the coordination of the [NHCDippCu]+ moieties to the cluster unit takes place via both open triangular faces of the [Ge9] entity. Furthermore, all compounds were characterized by means of NMR spectroscopy (1H, 13C, 29Si and ESI-MS.

  7. Model independent foreground power spectrum estimation using WMAP 5-year data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Souradeep, Tarun; Saha, Rajib; Jain, Pankaj

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and implement on WMAP 5 yr data a model independent approach of foreground power spectrum estimation for multifrequency observations of the CMB experiments. Recently, a model independent approach of CMB power spectrum estimation was proposed by Saha et al. 2006. This methodology demonstrates that the CMB power spectrum can be reliably estimated solely from WMAP data without assuming any template models for the foreground components. In the current paper, we extend this work to estimate the galactic foreground power spectrum using the WMAP 5 yr maps following a self-contained analysis. We apply the model independent method in harmonic basis to estimate the foreground power spectrum and frequency dependence of combined foregrounds. We also study the behavior of synchrotron spectral index variation over different regions of the sky. We use the full sky Haslam map as an external template to increase the degrees of freedom, while computing the synchrotron spectral index over the frequency range from 408 MHz to 94 GHz. We compare our results with those obtained from maximum entropy method foreground maps, which are formed in pixel space. We find that relative to our model independent estimates maximum entropy method maps overestimate the foreground power close to galactic plane and underestimates it at high latitudes.

  8. Biophysical characterization of the basic cluster in the transcription repression domain of human MeCP2 with AT-rich DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Ameeq Ul; Lee, Yejin; Hwang, Eunha; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Hong, Eunmi; Byun, Youngjoo; Song, Ji-Joon; Jeon, Young Ho

    2018-01-01

    MeCP2 is a chromatin associated protein which is highly expressed in brain and relevant with Rett syndrome (RTT). There are AT-hook motifs in MeCP2 which can bind with AT-rich DNA, suggesting a role in chromatin binding. Here, we report the identification and characterization of another AT-rich DNA binding motif (residues 295 to 313) from the C-terminal transcription repression domain of MeCP2 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and isothermal calorimetry (ITC). This motif shows a micromolar affinity to AT-rich DNA, and it binds to the minor groove of DNA like AT-hook motifs. Together with the previous studies, our results provide an insight into a critical role of this motif in chromatin structure and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. THE APPLICATION OF CONTINUOUS WAVELET TRANSFORM BASED FOREGROUND SUBTRACTION METHOD IN 21 cm SKY SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Junhua; Xu Haiguang; Wang Jingying; Chen Wen; An Tao

    2013-01-01

    We propose a continuous wavelet transform based non-parametric foreground subtraction method for the detection of redshifted 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization. This method works based on the assumption that the foreground spectra are smooth in frequency domain, while the 21 cm signal spectrum is full of saw-tooth-like structures, thus their characteristic scales are significantly different. We can distinguish them in the wavelet coefficient space easily and perform the foreground subtraction. Compared with the traditional spectral fitting based method, our method is more tolerant to complex foregrounds. Furthermore, we also find that when the instrument has uncorrected response error, our method can also work significantly better than the spectral fitting based method. Our method can obtain similar results with the Wp smoothing method, which is also a non-parametric method, but our method consumes much less computing time

  10. Measuring the Scatter of the Mass–Richness Relation in Galaxy Clusters in Photometric Imaging Surveys by Means of Their Correlation Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campa, Julia; Estrada, Juan; Flaugher, Brenna

    2017-02-03

    The knowledge of the scatter in the mass-observable relation is a key ingredient for a cosmological analysis based on galaxy clusters in a photometric survey. We demonstrate here how the linear bias measured in the correlation function for clusters can be used to determine the value of the scatter. The new method is tested in simulations of a 5.000 square degrees optical survey up to z~1, similar to the ongoing Dark Energy Survey. The results indicate that the scatter can be measured with a precision of 5% using this technique.

  11. Foreground effect on the J-factor estimation of ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Koji; Horigome, Shun-ichi; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Ibe, Masahiro; Sugai, Hajime; Hayashi, Kohei

    2018-05-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) are promising targets for the gamma-ray dark matter (DM) search. In particular, DM annihilation signal is expected to be strong in some of the recently discovered nearby ultra-faint dSphs, which potentially give stringent constraints on the O(1) TeV WIMP DM. However, various non-negligible systematic uncertainties complicate the estimation of the astrophysical factors relevant for the DM search in these objects. Among them, the effects of foreground stars particularly attract attention because the contamination is unavoidable even for the future kinematical survey. In this article, we assess the effects of the foreground contamination on the astrophysical J-factor estimation by generating mock samples of stars in the four ultra-faint dSphs and using a model of future spectrographs. We investigate various data cuts to optimize the quality of the data and apply a likelihood analysis which takes member and foreground stellar distributions into account. We show that the foreground star contaminations in the signal region (the region of interest) and their statistical uncertainty can be estimated by interpolating the foreground star distribution in the control region where the foreground stars dominate the member stars. Such regions can be secured at future spectroscopic observations utilizing a multiple object spectrograph with a large field of view; e.g. the Prime Focus Spectrograph mounted on Subaru Telescope. The above estimation has several advantages: The data-driven estimation of the contamination makes the analysis of the astrophysical factor stable against the complicated foreground distribution. Besides, foreground contamination effect is considered in the likelihood analysis.

  12. From defamiliarization to foregrounding and defeated expectancy: Linguo-stylistic and cognitive sketch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupchyshyna Yuliya

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on revealing the nature of defamiliarization, foregrounding, and defeated expectancy from a linguo-stylistic and cognitive perspective. It has been stated that defamiliarization, composed by different types of foregrounding and defeated expectancy as deviation, generated with a certain stylistic purpose are complex phenomena. The article highlights cognitive factors which ensure the creation of defamiliarization and defeated expectancy in the literary texts.

  13. Real-Time Adaptive Foreground/Background Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridha Sridharan

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The automatic analysis of digital video scenes often requires the segmentation of moving objects from a static background. Historically, algorithms developed for this purpose have been restricted to small frame sizes, low frame rates, or offline processing. The simplest approach involves subtracting the current frame from the known background. However, as the background is rarely known beforehand, the key is how to learn and model it. This paper proposes a new algorithm that represents each pixel in the frame by a group of clusters. The clusters are sorted in order of the likelihood that they model the background and are adapted to deal with background and lighting variations. Incoming pixels are matched against the corresponding cluster group and are classified according to whether the matching cluster is considered part of the background. The algorithm has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated against three other well-known techniques. It demonstrated equal or better segmentation and proved capable of processing 320×240 PAL video at full frame rate using only 35%–40% of a 1.8 GHz Pentium 4 computer.

  14. Isotropy-violation diagnostics for B -mode polarization foregrounds to the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotti, Aditya; Huffenberger, Kevin, E-mail: adityarotti@gmail.com, E-mail: khuffenberger@fsu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida State University, 77 Chieftan Way, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Isotropy-violation statistics can highlight polarized galactic foregrounds that contaminate primordial B -modes in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We propose a particular isotropy-violation test and apply it to polarized Planck 353 GHz data, constructing a map that indicates B -mode foreground dust power over the sky. We build our main isotropy test in harmonic space via the bipolar spherical harmonic basis, and our method helps us to identify the least-contaminated directions. By this measure, there are regions of low foreground in and around the BICEP field, near the South Galactic Pole, and in the Northern Galactic Hemisphere. There is also a possible foreground feature in the BICEP field. We compare our results to those based on the local power spectrum, which is computed on discs using a version of the method of Planck Int. XXX (2016). The discs method is closely related to our isotropy-violation diagnostic. We pay special care to the treatment of noise, including chance correlations with the foregrounds. Currently we use our isotropy tool to assess the cleanest portions of the sky, but in the future such methods will allow isotropy-based null tests for foreground contamination in maps purported to measure primordial B -modes, particularly in cases of limited frequency coverage.

  15. OPENING THE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION WINDOW: MEASUREMENTS OF FOREGROUND ISOLATION WITH PAPER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki [Astronomy Department, U. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, U. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bradley, Richard F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, U. Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; MacMahon, Dave [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, U. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Gugliucci, Nicole E. [Department of Astronomy, U. Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Jacobs, Daniel C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State U., Tempe, AZ (United States); Klima, Patricia J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Manley, Jason; Walbrugh, William P. [Square Kilometer Array, South Africa Project, Cape Town (South Africa); Stefan, Irina I. [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-10

    We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21 cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a {sup w}edge{sup -}like region of two-dimensional (k , k{sub Parallel-To })-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k{sub Parallel-To} values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this ''unsmooth'' emission and image its specific k{sub Parallel-To} modes. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21 cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.

  16. Partitional clustering algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the state-of-the-art in partitional clustering. Clustering, the unsupervised classification of patterns into groups, is one of the most important tasks in exploratory data analysis. Primary goals of clustering include gaining insight into, classifying, and compressing data. Clustering has a long and rich history that spans a variety of scientific disciplines including anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, statistics, mathematics, engineering, and computer science. As a result, numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed since the early 1950s. Among these algorithms, partitional (nonhierarchical) ones have found many applications, especially in engineering and computer science. This book provides coverage of consensus clustering, constrained clustering, large scale and/or high dimensional clustering, cluster validity, cluster visualization, and applications of clustering. Examines clustering as it applies to large and/or high-dimensional data sets commonly encountered in reali...

  17. Source selection for cluster weak lensing measurements in the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medezinski, Elinor; Oguri, Masamune; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Speagle, Joshua S.; Miyatake, Hironao; Umetsu, Keiichi; Leauthaud, Alexie; Murata, Ryoma; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Sifón, Cristóbal; Strauss, Michael A.; Huang, Song; Simet, Melanie; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Masayuki; Komiyama, Yutaka

    2018-03-01

    We present optimized source galaxy selection schemes for measuring cluster weak lensing (WL) mass profiles unaffected by cluster member dilution from the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam Strategic Survey Program (HSC-SSP). The ongoing HSC-SSP survey will uncover thousands of galaxy clusters to z ≲ 1.5. In deriving cluster masses via WL, a critical source of systematics is contamination and dilution of the lensing signal by cluster members, and by foreground galaxies whose photometric redshifts are biased. Using the first-year CAMIRA catalog of ˜900 clusters with richness larger than 20 found in ˜140 deg2 of HSC-SSP data, we devise and compare several source selection methods, including selection in color-color space (CC-cut), and selection of robust photometric redshifts by applying constraints on their cumulative probability distribution function (P-cut). We examine the dependence of the contamination on the chosen limits adopted for each method. Using the proper limits, these methods give mass profiles with minimal dilution in agreement with one another. We find that not adopting either the CC-cut or P-cut methods results in an underestimation of the total cluster mass (13% ± 4%) and the concentration of the profile (24% ± 11%). The level of cluster contamination can reach as high as ˜10% at R ≈ 0.24 Mpc/h for low-z clusters without cuts, while employing either the P-cut or CC-cut results in cluster contamination consistent with zero to within the 0.5% uncertainties. Our robust methods yield a ˜60 σ detection of the stacked CAMIRA surface mass density profile, with a mean mass of M200c = [1.67 ± 0.05(stat)] × 1014 M⊙/h.

  18. PS1-12sk IS A PECULIAR SUPERNOVA FROM A He-RICH PROGENITOR SYSTEM IN A BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY ENVIRONMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Drout, M. R.; Moe, M.; Berger, E.; Brown, W. R.; Lunnan, R.; Smartt, S. J.; Fraser, M.; Kotak, R.; Magill, L.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Huang, K.; Urata, Y.; Mulchaey, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    We report on our discovery and observations of the Pan-STARRS1 supernova (SN) PS1-12sk, a transient with properties that indicate atypical star formation in its host galaxy cluster or pose a challenge to popular progenitor system models for this class of explosion. The optical spectra of PS1-12sk classify it as a Type Ibn SN (SN Ibn; cf. SN 2006jc), dominated by intermediate-width (3 × 10 3 km s –1 ) and time variable He I emission. Our multi-wavelength monitoring establishes the rise time dt ∼ 9-23 days and shows an NUV-NIR spectral energy distribution with temperature ∼> 17 × 10 3 K and a peak magnitude of M z = –18.88 ± 0.02 mag. SN Ibn spectroscopic properties are commonly interpreted as the signature of a massive star (17-100 M ☉ ) explosion within an He-enriched circumstellar medium. However, unlike previous SNe Ibn, PS1-12sk is associated with an elliptical brightest cluster galaxy, CGCG 208–042 (z = 0.054) in cluster RXC J0844.9+4258. The expected probability of an event like PS1-12sk in such environments is low given the measured infrequency of core-collapse SNe in red-sequence galaxies compounded by the low volumetric rate of SN Ibn. Furthermore, we find no evidence of star formation at the explosion site to sensitive limits (Σ Hα ∼ –3 M ☉ yr –1 kpc –2 ). We therefore discuss white dwarf binary systems as a possible progenitor channel for SNe Ibn. We conclude that PS1-12sk represents either a fortuitous and statistically unlikely discovery, evidence for a top-heavy initial mass function in galaxy cluster cooling flow filaments, or the first clue suggesting an alternate progenitor channel for SNe Ibn.

  19. Cluster structures in light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, H.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Clustering in neutron-rich nuclei is discussed. To understand the novel features (1,2,3) of the clustering in neutron-rich nuclei, the basic features of the clustering in stable nuclei (4) are briefly reviewed. In neutron-rich nuclei, the requirement of the stability of clusters is questioned and the threshold rule is no more obeyed. Examples of clustering in Be and B isotopes (4,5) are discussed in some detail. Possible existence of novel type of clustering near neutron dripline is suggested (1). (author)

  20. Mass and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters from Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchior, P.; Suchyta, E.; Huff, E.; Hirsch, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Rykoff, E.; Gruen, D.; Armstrong, R.; Bacon, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bridle, S.; Clampitt, J.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; Jouvel, S.; Krause, E.; Lin, H.; MacCrann, N.; Patton, K.; Plazas, A.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Wilcox, H.; Young, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S. S.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, J. P.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Castander, F. J.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Depoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. F.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G. R.; Jarvis, M.; Karliner, I.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, J. L.; Merritt, K. W.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Neilsen, E.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B. D.; Reil, K.; Roe, N. A.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B. X.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Sypniewski, A. J.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R.; Weller, J.; Wester, W.

    2015-03-31

    We measure the weak-lensing masses and galaxy distributions of four massive galaxy clusters observed during the Science Verification phase of the Dark Energy Survey. This pathfinder study is meant to 1) validate the DECam imager for the task of measuring weak-lensing shapes, and 2) utilize DECam's large field of view to map out the clusters and their environments over 90 arcmin. We conduct a series of rigorous tests on astrometry, photometry, image quality, PSF modeling, and shear measurement accuracy to single out flaws in the data and also to identify the optimal data processing steps and parameters. We find Science Verification data from DECam to be suitable for the lensing analysis described in this paper. The PSF is generally well-behaved, but the modeling is rendered difficult by a flux-dependent PSF width and ellipticity. We employ photometric redshifts to distinguish between foreground and background galaxies, and a red-sequence cluster finder to provide cluster richness estimates and cluster-galaxy distributions. By fitting NFW profiles to the clusters in this study, we determine weak-lensing masses that are in agreement with previous work. For Abell 3261, we provide the first estimates of redshift, weak-lensing mass, and richness. In addition, the cluster-galaxy distributions indicate the presence of filamentary structures attached to 1E 0657-56 and RXC J2248.7-4431, stretching out as far as 1 degree (approximately 20 Mpc), showcasing the potential of DECam and DES for detailed studies of degree-scale features on the sky.

  1. IMAGING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION: LIMITATIONS FROM FOREGROUND CONFUSION AND IMAGING ALGORITHMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, Harish; Udaya Shankar, N.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Tomography of redshifted 21 cm transition from neutral hydrogen using Fourier synthesis telescopes is a promising tool to study the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Limiting the confusion from Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds is critical to the success of these telescopes. The instrumental response or the point-spread function (PSF) of such telescopes is inherently three dimensional with frequency mapping to the line-of-sight (LOS) distance. EoR signals will necessarily have to be detected in data where continuum confusion persists; therefore, it is important that the PSF has acceptable frequency structure so that the residual foreground does not confuse the EoR signature. This paper aims to understand the three-dimensional PSF and foreground contamination in the same framework. We develop a formalism to estimate the foreground contamination along frequency, or equivalently LOS dimension, and establish a relationship between foreground contamination in the image plane and visibility weights on the Fourier plane. We identify two dominant sources of LOS foreground contamination—'PSF contamination' and 'gridding contamination'. We show that PSF contamination is localized in LOS wavenumber space, beyond which there potentially exists an 'EoR window' with negligible foreground contamination where we may focus our efforts to detect EoR. PSF contamination in this window may be substantially reduced by judicious choice of a frequency window function. Gridding and imaging algorithms create additional gridding contamination and we propose a new imaging algorithm using the Chirp Z Transform that significantly reduces this contamination. Finally, we demonstrate the analytical relationships and the merit of the new imaging algorithm for the case of imaging with the Murchison Widefield Array.

  2. PS1-12sk IS A PECULIAR SUPERNOVA FROM A He-RICH PROGENITOR SYSTEM IN A BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Drout, M. R.; Moe, M.; Berger, E.; Brown, W. R.; Lunnan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J.; Fraser, M.; Kotak, R.; Magill, L.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Maths and Physics, Queens University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Huang, K. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Urata, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Mulchaey, J. S., E-mail: nsanders@cfa.harvard.edu [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2013-05-20

    We report on our discovery and observations of the Pan-STARRS1 supernova (SN) PS1-12sk, a transient with properties that indicate atypical star formation in its host galaxy cluster or pose a challenge to popular progenitor system models for this class of explosion. The optical spectra of PS1-12sk classify it as a Type Ibn SN (SN Ibn; cf. SN 2006jc), dominated by intermediate-width (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) and time variable He I emission. Our multi-wavelength monitoring establishes the rise time dt {approx} 9-23 days and shows an NUV-NIR spectral energy distribution with temperature {approx}> 17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} K and a peak magnitude of M{sub z} = -18.88 {+-} 0.02 mag. SN Ibn spectroscopic properties are commonly interpreted as the signature of a massive star (17-100 M{sub Sun }) explosion within an He-enriched circumstellar medium. However, unlike previous SNe Ibn, PS1-12sk is associated with an elliptical brightest cluster galaxy, CGCG 208-042 (z = 0.054) in cluster RXC J0844.9+4258. The expected probability of an event like PS1-12sk in such environments is low given the measured infrequency of core-collapse SNe in red-sequence galaxies compounded by the low volumetric rate of SN Ibn. Furthermore, we find no evidence of star formation at the explosion site to sensitive limits ({Sigma}{sub H{alpha}} {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). We therefore discuss white dwarf binary systems as a possible progenitor channel for SNe Ibn. We conclude that PS1-12sk represents either a fortuitous and statistically unlikely discovery, evidence for a top-heavy initial mass function in galaxy cluster cooling flow filaments, or the first clue suggesting an alternate progenitor channel for SNe Ibn.

  3. Extracting foreground ensemble features to detect abnormal crowd behavior in intelligent video-surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Tung; Wang, Shuenn-Jyi; Tsai, Chung-Hsien

    2017-09-01

    Public safety is a matter of national security and people's livelihoods. In recent years, intelligent video-surveillance systems have become important active-protection systems. A surveillance system that provides early detection and threat assessment could protect people from crowd-related disasters and ensure public safety. Image processing is commonly used to extract features, e.g., people, from a surveillance video. However, little research has been conducted on the relationship between foreground detection and feature extraction. Most current video-surveillance research has been developed for restricted environments, in which the extracted features are limited by having information from a single foreground; they do not effectively represent the diversity of crowd behavior. This paper presents a general framework based on extracting ensemble features from the foreground of a surveillance video to analyze a crowd. The proposed method can flexibly integrate different foreground-detection technologies to adapt to various monitored environments. Furthermore, the extractable representative features depend on the heterogeneous foreground data. Finally, a classification algorithm is applied to these features to automatically model crowd behavior and distinguish an abnormal event from normal patterns. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method's performance is both comparable to that of state-of-the-art methods and satisfies the requirements of real-time applications.

  4. Constraining Polarized Foregrounds for EoR Experiments. II. Polarization Leakage Simulations in the Avoidance Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G.; Foster, G.; Grobler, T. L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140 (South Africa); Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Martinot, J. Z. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Thyagarajan, N. [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Dillon, J. S. [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Parsons, A. R., E-mail: cnunhokee@gmail.com [Dept. of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    A critical challenge in the observation of the redshifted 21 cm line is its separation from bright Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds. In particular, the instrumental leakage of polarized foregrounds, which undergo significant Faraday rotation as they propagate through the interstellar medium, may harmfully contaminate the 21 cm power spectrum. We develop a formalism to describe the leakage due to instrumental widefield effects in visibility-based power spectra measured with redundant arrays, extending the delay-spectrum approach presented in Parsons et al. We construct polarized sky models and propagate them through the instrument model to simulate realistic full-sky observations with the Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization. We find that the leakage due to a population of polarized point sources is expected to be higher than diffuse Galactic polarization at any k mode for a 30 m reference baseline. For the same reference baseline, a foreground-free window at k > 0.3 h Mpc{sup −1} can be defined in terms of leakage from diffuse Galactic polarization even under the most pessimistic assumptions. If measurements of polarized foreground power spectra or a model of polarized foregrounds are given, our method is able to predict the polarization leakage in actual 21 cm observations, potentially enabling its statistical subtraction from the measured 21 cm power spectrum.

  5. An Overview of DNA Microarray Grid Alignment and Foreground Separation Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajcsy Peter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper overviews DNA microarray grid alignment and foreground separation approaches. Microarray grid alignment and foreground separation are the basic processing steps of DNA microarray images that affect the quality of gene expression information, and hence impact our confidence in any data-derived biological conclusions. Thus, understanding microarray data processing steps becomes critical for performing optimal microarray data analysis. In the past, the grid alignment and foreground separation steps have not been covered extensively in the survey literature. We present several classifications of existing algorithms, and describe the fundamental principles of these algorithms. Challenges related to automation and reliability of processed image data are outlined at the end of this overview paper.

  6. Cluster harvesting by successive reduction of a metal halide with a nonconventional reduction agent: a benefit for the exploration of metal-rich halide systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströbele, Markus; Mos, Agnieszka; Meyer, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-06-17

    The preparation of thermally labile compounds is a great temptation in chemistry which requires a careful selection of reaction media and reaction conditions. With a new scanning technique denoted here as Cluster Harvesting, a whole series of metal halide compounds is detected by differential thermal analysis (DTA) in fused silica tubes and structurally characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Experiments of the reduction of tungsten hexahalides with elemental antimony and iron are presented. A cascade of six compounds is identified during the reduction with antimony, and five compounds or phases are monitored following the reduction with iron. The crystal structure of Fe2W2Cl10 is reported, and two other phases in the Fe-W-Cl system are discussed.

  7. Using dynamic mode decomposition for real-time background/foreground separation in video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Jose Nathan; Grosek, Jacob; Brunton, Steven; Fu, Xing; Pendergrass, Seth

    2017-06-06

    The technique of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is disclosed herein for the purpose of robustly separating video frames into background (low-rank) and foreground (sparse) components in real-time. Foreground/background separation is achieved at the computational cost of just one singular value decomposition (SVD) and one linear equation solve, thus producing results orders of magnitude faster than robust principal component analysis (RPCA). Additional techniques, including techniques for analyzing the video for multi-resolution time-scale components, and techniques for reusing computations to allow processing of streaming video in real time, are also described herein.

  8. From Foreground to Background: How Task-Neutral Context Influences Contextual Cueing of Visual Search

    OpenAIRE

    Zang, Xuelian; Geyer, Thomas; Assump??o, Leonardo; M?ller, Hermann J.; Shi, Zhuanghua

    2016-01-01

    Selective attention determines the effectiveness of implicit contextual learning (e.g., Jiang and Leung, 2005). Visual foreground-background segmentation, on the other hand, is a key process in the guidance of attention (Wolfe, 2003). In the present study, we examined the impact of foreground-background segmentation on contextual cueing of visual search in three experiments. A visual search display, consisting of distractor ‘L’s and a target ‘T’, was overlaid on a task-neutral cuboid on the s...

  9. Foreground removal from CMB temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.

    2008-01-01

    the CMB temperature signal from the combined signal CMB and the foregrounds has been investigated. As a specific example, we have analysed simulated data, as expected from the ESA Planck CMB mission. A simple multilayer perceptron neural network with 2 hidden layers can provide temperature estimates over...... CMB signal it is essential to minimize the systematic errors in the CMB temperature determinations. Following the available knowledge of the spectral behavior of the Galactic foregrounds simple power law-like spectra have been assumed. The feasibility of using a simple neural network for extracting...

  10. Subspace K-means clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Marieke E.; Ceulemans, Eva; De Roover, Kim; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2013-01-01

    To achieve an insightful clustering of multivariate data, we propose subspace K-means. Its central idea is to model the centroids and cluster residuals in reduced spaces, which allows for dealing with a wide range of cluster types and yields rich interpretations of the clusters. We review the

  11. Foreground Subtraction and Signal reconstruction in redshifted 21cm Global Signal Experiments using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Madhurima; Datta, Abhirup

    2018-05-01

    Observations of HI 21cm transition line is a promising probe into the Dark Ages and Epoch-of-Reionization. Detection of this redshifted 21cm signal is one of the key science goal for several upcoming low-frequency radio telescopes like HERA, SKA and DARE. Other global signal experiments include EDGES, LEDA, BIGHORNS, SCI-HI, SARAS. One of the major challenges for the detection of this signal is the accuracy of the foreground source removal. Several novel techniques have been explored already to remove bright foregrounds from both interferometric as well as total power experiments. Here, we present preliminary results from our investigation on application of ANN to detect 21cm global signal amidst bright galactic foreground. Following the formalism of representing the global 21cm signal by 'tanh' model, this study finds that the global 21cm signal parameters can be accurately determined even in the presence of bright foregrounds represented by 3rd order log-polynomial or higher.

  12. Segmentation of foreground apple targets by fusing visual attention mechanism and growth rules of seed points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, W.; Shang, W.; Shao, Y.; Wang, D.; Yu, X.; Song, H.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate segmentation of apple targets is one of the most important problems to be solved in the vision system of apple picking robots. This work aimed to solve the difficulties that background targets often bring to foreground targets segmentation, by fusing the visual attention mechanism and the growth rule of seed points. Background targets could be eliminated by extracting the ROI (region of interest) of apple targets; the ROI was roughly segmented on the HSV color space, and then each of the pixels was used as a seed growing point. The growth rule of the seed points was adopted to obtain the whole area of apple targets from seed growing points. The proposed method was tested with 20 images captured in a natural scene, including 54 foreground apple targets and approximately 84 background apple targets. Experimental results showed that the proposed method can remove background targets and focus on foreground targets, while the k-means algorithm and the chromatic aberration algorithm cannot. Additionally, its average segmentation error rate was 13.23%, which is 2.71% higher than that of the k-means algorithm and 2.95% lower than that of the chromatic aberration algorithm. In conclusion, the proposed method contributes to the vision system of apple-picking robots to locate foreground apple targets quickly and accurately under a natural scene. (Author)

  13. Understanding (Galactic) Foreground Emission: A Road To Success For The LOFAR-EoR Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelic, Vibor; Lofar Eor Team, [Unknown

    The LOFAR-EoR experiment will use the innovative technology and capabilities of the radio telescope LOFAR to study the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). However, feeble cosmological radiation is swamped by the prominent foreground emission of our Galaxy and other extragalactic radio sources. This

  14. From Foreground to Background: How Task-Neutral Context Influences Contextual Cueing of Visual Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xuelian; Geyer, Thomas; Assumpção, Leonardo; Müller, Hermann J; Shi, Zhuanghua

    2016-01-01

    Selective attention determines the effectiveness of implicit contextual learning (e.g., Jiang and Leung, 2005). Visual foreground-background segmentation, on the other hand, is a key process in the guidance of attention (Wolfe, 2003). In the present study, we examined the impact of foreground-background segmentation on contextual cueing of visual search in three experiments. A visual search display, consisting of distractor 'L's and a target 'T', was overlaid on a task-neutral cuboid on the same depth plane (Experiment 1), on stereoscopically separated depth planes (Experiment 2), or spread over the entire display on the same depth plane (Experiment 3). Half of the search displays contained repeated target-distractor arrangements, whereas the other half was always newly generated. The task-neutral cuboid was constant during an initial training session, but was either rotated by 90° or entirely removed in the subsequent test sessions. We found that the gains resulting from repeated presentation of display arrangements during training (i.e., contextual-cueing effects) were diminished when the cuboid was changed or removed in Experiment 1, but remained intact in Experiments 2 and 3 when the cuboid was placed in a different depth plane, or when the items were randomly spread over the whole display but not on the edges of the cuboid. These findings suggest that foreground-background segmentation occurs prior to contextual learning, and only objects/arrangements that are grouped as foreground are learned over the course of repeated visual search.

  15. Foreground removal from CMB temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Jørgensen, H. E.

    2008-12-01

    One of the main obstacles for extracting the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) signal from observations in the mm-submm range is the foreground contamination by emission from Galactic components: mainly synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emission. Due to the statistical nature of the intrinsic CMB signal it is essential to minimize the systematic errors in the CMB temperature determinations. Following the available knowledge of the spectral behavior of the Galactic foregrounds simple power law-like spectra have been assumed. The feasibility of using a simple neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal from the combined signal CMB and the foregrounds has been investigated. As a specific example, we have analysed simulated data, as expected from the ESA Planck CMB mission. A simple multilayer perceptron neural network with 2 hidden layers can provide temperature estimates over more than 80 per cent of the sky that are to a high degree uncorrelated with the foreground signals. A single network will be able to cover the dynamic range of the Planck noise level over the entire sky.

  16. Explicit Foreground and Background Modeling in The Classification of Text Blocks in Scene Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sriman, Bowornrat; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2015-01-01

    Achieving high accuracy for classifying foreground and background is an interesting challenge in the field of scene image analysis because of the wide range of illumination, complex background, and scale changes. Classifying fore- ground and background using bag-of-feature model gives a good result.

  17. A foreground object features-based stereoscopic image visual comfort assessment model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xin; Jiang, G.; Ying, H.; Yu, M.; Ding, S.; Peng, Z.; Shao, F.

    2014-11-01

    Since stereoscopic images provide observers with both realistic and discomfort viewing experience, it is necessary to investigate the determinants of visual discomfort. By considering that foreground object draws most attention when human observing stereoscopic images. This paper proposes a new foreground object based visual comfort assessment (VCA) metric. In the first place, a suitable segmentation method is applied to disparity map and then the foreground object is ascertained as the one having the biggest average disparity. In the second place, three visual features being average disparity, average width and spatial complexity of foreground object are computed from the perspective of visual attention. Nevertheless, object's width and complexity do not consistently influence the perception of visual comfort in comparison with disparity. In accordance with this psychological phenomenon, we divide the whole images into four categories on the basis of different disparity and width, and exert four different models to more precisely predict its visual comfort in the third place. Experimental results show that the proposed VCA metric outperformance other existing metrics and can achieve a high consistency between objective and subjective visual comfort scores. The Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are over 0.84 and 0.82, respectively.

  18. Basic horizons of development at the foregrounds of the Early Medieval hillfort of Budeč

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartošková, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2012), s. 59-88 ISSN 0323-1267 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : Early Middle Ages * Bohemia * Budeč * hillfort * foregrounds * stratigraphy * chronology Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  19. Foreground removal from WMAP 7 yr polarization maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    . As a concrete example, the WMAP 7-year polarization data, the most reliable determination of the polarization properties of the CMB, has been analyzed. The analysis has adopted the frequency maps, noise models, window functions and the foreground models as provided by the WMAP Team, and no auxiliary data...

  20. THE LISA GRAVITATIONAL WAVE FOREGROUND: A STUDY OF DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, Ashley J.; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Benacquista, Matthew; Williams, Gabriel; Larson, Shane L.

    2010-01-01

    Double white dwarfs (WDs) are expected to be a source of confusion-limited noise for the future gravitational wave observatory LISA. In a specific frequency range, this 'foreground noise' is predicted to rise above the instrumental noise and hinder the detection of other types of signals, e.g., gravitational waves arising from stellar-mass objects inspiraling into massive black holes. In many previous studies, only detached populations of compact object binaries have been considered in estimating the LISA gravitational wave foreground signal. Here, we investigate the influence of compact object detached and Roche-Lobe overflow (RLOF) Galactic binaries on the shape and strength of the LISA signal. Since >99% of remnant binaries that have orbital periods within the LISA sensitivity range are WD binaries, we consider only these binaries when calculating the LISA signal. We find that the contribution of RLOF binaries to the foreground noise is negligible at low frequencies, but becomes significant at higher frequencies, pushing the frequency at which the foreground noise drops below the instrumental noise to >6 mHz. We find that it is important to consider the population of mass-transferring binaries in order to obtain an accurate assessment of the foreground noise on the LISA data stream. However, we estimate that there still exists a sizeable number (∼11,300) of Galactic double WD binaries that will have a signal-to-noise ratio >5, and thus will be potentially resolvable with LISA. We present the LISA gravitational wave signal from the Galactic population of WD binaries, show the most important formation channels contributing to the LISA disk and bulge populations, and discuss the implications of these new findings.

  1. Quasars in galaxy cluster environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, E.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of radio loud quasars is found to be strongly dependent upon their galaxy cluster environment. Previous studies have shown that bright quasars are found in rich clusters, while high luminosity quasars are found only in poorer environments. The analysis of low luminosity radio quiet quasars indicate that they are never found in rich environments, suggesting that they are a physically different class of objects. Properties of the quasar environment are investigated to determine constraints on the physical mechanisms of quasar formation and evolution. The optical cluster morphology indicates that the cluster cores have smaller radii and higher galaxy densities than are typical for low redshift clusters of similar richness. Radio morphologies may indicate that the formation of a dense intra-cluster medium is associated with the quasars' fading at these epochs. Galaxy colors appear to be normal, but there may be a tendency for clusters associated with high luminosity quasars to contain a higher fraction of gas-rich galaxies than those associated with low luminosity quasars. Multislit spectroscopic observations of galaxies associated with high luminosity quasars indicate that quasars are preferentially located in regions of low relative velocity dispersion, either in rich clusters of abnormally low dispersion, or in poor groups which are dynamically normal. This suggests that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play a role in quasar formation and sustenanace. Virialization of rich clusters and the subsequent increase in galaxy velocities may therefore be responsible for the fading of quasars in rich environments

  2. Robust Optical Richness Estimation with Reduced Scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykoff, E.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Koester, B.P.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Rozo, E.; /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Evrard, A.E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Hansen, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Hao, J.; /Fermilab; Johnston, D.E.; /Fermilab; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-07

    Reducing the scatter between cluster mass and optical richness is a key goal for cluster cosmology from photometric catalogs. We consider various modifications to the red-sequence matched filter richness estimator of Rozo et al. (2009b), and evaluate their impact on the scatter in X-ray luminosity at fixed richness. Most significantly, we find that deeper luminosity cuts can reduce the recovered scatter, finding that {sigma}{sub ln L{sub X}|{lambda}} = 0.63 {+-} 0.02 for clusters with M{sub 500c} {approx}> 1.6 x 10{sup 14} h{sub 70}{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The corresponding scatter in mass at fixed richness is {sigma}{sub ln M|{lambda}} {approx} 0.2-0.3 depending on the richness, comparable to that for total X-ray luminosity. We find that including blue galaxies in the richness estimate increases the scatter, as does weighting galaxies by their optical luminosity. We further demonstrate that our richness estimator is very robust. Specifically, the filter employed when estimating richness can be calibrated directly from the data, without requiring a-priori calibrations of the red-sequence. We also demonstrate that the recovered richness is robust to up to 50% uncertainties in the galaxy background, as well as to the choice of photometric filter employed, so long as the filters span the 4000 {angstrom} break of red-sequence galaxies. Consequently, our richness estimator can be used to compare richness estimates of different clusters, even if they do not share the same photometric data. Appendix A includes 'easy-bake' instructions for implementing our optimal richness estimator, and we are releasing an implementation of the code that works with SDSS data, as well as an augmented maxBCG catalog with the {lambda} richness measured for each cluster.

  3. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  4. EoR imaging with the SKA: the challenge of foreground removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Anna

    2018-05-01

    21-cm observations of the Cosmic dawn (CD) and Epoch of Reionization (EoR) are one of the high priority science objectives for SKA Low. One of the most difficult aspects of the 21-cm measurement is the presence of foreground emission, due to our Galaxy and extragalactic sources, which is about four orders of magnitude brighter than the cosmological signal. While end-to-end simulations are being produced to investigate in details the foreground subtraction strategy, it is useful to complement this thorough but time-consuming approach with simpler, quicker ways to evaluate performance and identify possible critical steps. In this work, I present a forecast method, based on Bonaldi et al. (2015), Bonaldi & Ricciardi (2011), to understand the level of residual contamination after a component separation step, and its impact on our ability to investigate CD and EoR.

  5. Foreground removal from Planck Sky Model temperature maps using a MLP neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Hebert, K.

    2009-08-01

    Unfortunately, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is contaminated by emission originating in the Milky Way (synchrotron, free-free and dust emission). Since the cosmological information is statistically in nature, it is essential to remove this foreground emission and leave the CMB with no systematic errors. To demonstrate the feasibility of a simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal, we have analyzed a specific data set, namely the Planck Sky Model maps, developed for evaluation of different component separation methods before including them in the Planck data analysis pipeline. It is found that a MLP neural network can provide a CMB map of about 80 % of the sky to a very high degree uncorrelated with the foreground components. Also the derived power spectrum shows little evidence for systematic errors.

  6. BAYESIAN SEMI-BLIND COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR FOREGROUND REMOVAL IN INTERFEROMETRIC 21 cm OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bunn, Emory F. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sutter, P. M. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wandelt, Benjamin D., E-mail: lzhang263@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present a new Bayesian semi-blind approach for foreground removal in observations of the 21 cm signal measured by interferometers. The technique, which we call H i Expectation–Maximization Independent Component Analysis (HIEMICA), is an extension of the Independent Component Analysis technique developed for two-dimensional (2D) cosmic microwave background maps to three-dimensional (3D) 21 cm cosmological signals measured by interferometers. This technique provides a fully Bayesian inference of power spectra and maps and separates the foregrounds from the signal based on the diversity of their power spectra. Relying only on the statistical independence of the components, this approach can jointly estimate the 3D power spectrum of the 21 cm signal, as well as the 2D angular power spectrum and the frequency dependence of each foreground component, without any prior assumptions about the foregrounds. This approach has been tested extensively by applying it to mock data from interferometric 21 cm intensity mapping observations under idealized assumptions of instrumental effects. We also discuss the impact when the noise properties are not known completely. As a first step toward solving the 21 cm power spectrum analysis problem, we compare the semi-blind HIEMICA technique to the commonly used Principal Component Analysis. Under the same idealized circumstances, the proposed technique provides significantly improved recovery of the power spectrum. This technique can be applied in a straightforward manner to all 21 cm interferometric observations, including epoch of reionization measurements, and can be extended to single-dish observations as well.

  7. From foreground to background: how task-neutral context influences contextual cueing of visual search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian eZang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective attention determines the effectiveness of implicit contextual learning (e.g., Jiang & Leung, 2005. Visual foreground-background segmentation, on the other hand, is a key process in the guidance of attention (Wolfe, 2003. In the present study, we examined the impact of foreground-background segmentation on contextual cueing of visual search in three experiments. A visual search display, consisting of distractor ‘L’s and a target ‘T’, was overlaid on a task-neutral cuboid on the same depth plane (Experiment 1, on stereoscopically separated depth planes (Experiment 2, or spread over the entire display on the same depth plane (Experiment 3. Half of the search displays contained repeated target-distractor arrangements, whereas the other half was always newly generated. The task-neutral cuboid was constant during an initial training session, but was either rotated by 90º or entirely removed in the subsequent test sessions. We found that the gains resulting from repeated presentation of display arrangements during training (i.e., contextual-cueing effects were diminished when the cuboid was changed or removed in Experiment 1, but remained intact in Experiments 2 and 3 when the cuboid was placed in a different depth plane, or when the items were randomly spread over the whole display but not on the edges of the cuboid. These findings suggest that foreground-background segmentation occurs prior to contextual learning, and only objects/arrangements that are grouped as foreground are learned over the course of repeated visual search.

  8. From Foreground to Background: How Task-Neutral Context Influences Contextual Cueing of Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xuelian; Geyer, Thomas; Assumpção, Leonardo; Müller, Hermann J.; Shi, Zhuanghua

    2016-01-01

    Selective attention determines the effectiveness of implicit contextual learning (e.g., Jiang and Leung, 2005). Visual foreground-background segmentation, on the other hand, is a key process in the guidance of attention (Wolfe, 2003). In the present study, we examined the impact of foreground-background segmentation on contextual cueing of visual search in three experiments. A visual search display, consisting of distractor ‘L’s and a target ‘T’, was overlaid on a task-neutral cuboid on the same depth plane (Experiment 1), on stereoscopically separated depth planes (Experiment 2), or spread over the entire display on the same depth plane (Experiment 3). Half of the search displays contained repeated target-distractor arrangements, whereas the other half was always newly generated. The task-neutral cuboid was constant during an initial training session, but was either rotated by 90° or entirely removed in the subsequent test sessions. We found that the gains resulting from repeated presentation of display arrangements during training (i.e., contextual-cueing effects) were diminished when the cuboid was changed or removed in Experiment 1, but remained intact in Experiments 2 and 3 when the cuboid was placed in a different depth plane, or when the items were randomly spread over the whole display but not on the edges of the cuboid. These findings suggest that foreground-background segmentation occurs prior to contextual learning, and only objects/arrangements that are grouped as foreground are learned over the course of repeated visual search. PMID:27375530

  9. Extracting foreground-obscured μ-distortion anisotropies to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remazeilles, M.; Chluba, J.

    2018-04-01

    Correlations between cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature, polarization and spectral distortion anisotropies can be used as a probe of primordial non-Gaussianity. Here, we perform a reconstruction of μ-distortion anisotropies in the presence of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, applying the so-called Constrained ILC component separation method to simulations of proposed CMB space missions (PIXIE, LiteBIRD, CORE, PICO). Our sky simulations include Galactic dust, Galactic synchrotron, Galactic free-free, thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, as well as primary CMB temperature and μ-distortion anisotropies, the latter being added as correlated field. The Constrained ILC method allows us to null the CMB temperature anisotropies in the reconstructed μ-map (and vice versa), in addition to mitigating the contaminations from astrophysical foregrounds and instrumental noise. We compute the cross-power spectrum between the reconstructed (CMB-free) μ-distortion map and the (μ-free) CMB temperature map, after foreground removal and component separation. Since the cross-power spectrum is proportional to the primordial non-Gaussianity parameter, fNL, on scales k˜eq 740 Mpc^{-1}, this allows us to derive fNL-detection limits for the aforementioned future CMB experiments. Our analysis shows that foregrounds degrade the theoretical detection limits (based mostly on instrumental noise) by more than one order of magnitude, with PICO standing the best chance at placing upper limits on scale-dependent non-Gaussianity. We also discuss the dependence of the constraints on the channel sensitivities and chosen bands. Like for B-mode polarization measurements, extended coverage at frequencies ν ≲ 40 GHz and ν ≳ 400 GHz provides more leverage than increased channel sensitivity.

  10. Comparison of spatial models for foreground-background segmentation in underwater videos

    OpenAIRE

    Radolko, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The low-level task of foreground-background segregation is an important foundation for many high-level computer vision tasks and has been intensively researched in the past. Nonetheless, unregulated environments usually impose challenging problems, especially the difficult and often neglected underwater environment. There, among others, the edges are blurred, the contrast is impaired and the colors attenuated. Our approach to this problem uses an efficient Background Subtraction algorithm and...

  11. Semi-Automatic Removal of Foreground Stars from Images of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Zsolt

    1996-07-01

    A new procedure, designed to remove foreground stars from galaxy proviles is presented here. Although several programs exist for stellar and faint object photometry, none of them treat star removal from the images very carefully. I present my attempt to develop such a system, and briefly compare the performance of my software to one of the well-known stellar photometry packages, DAOPhot (Stetson 1987). Major steps in my procedure are: (1) automatic construction of an empirical 2D point spread function from well separated stars that are situated off the galaxy; (2) automatic identification of those peaks that are likely to be foreground stars, scaling the PSF and removing these stars, and patching residuals (in the automatically determined smallest possible area where residuals are truly significant); and (3) cosmetic fix of remaining degradations in the image. The algorithm and software presented here is significantly better for automatic removal of foreground stars from images of galaxies than DAOPhot or similar packages, since: (a) the most suitable stars are selected automatically from the image for the PSF fit; (b) after star-removal an intelligent and automatic procedure removes any possible residuals; (c) unlimited number of images can be cleaned in one run without any user interaction whatsoever. (SECTION: Computing and Data Analysis)

  12. Absence of missing mass in clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, B.I.

    1981-01-01

    The evaluation of the radial-velocity dispersion in clusters of galaxies is considered by using order statistics to reduce the distortions introduced by foreground and background galaxies and by large errors in velocity measurement. For four nearby clusters of galaxies, including the Coma cluster, velocity dispersions are obtained which are approximately four times lower than previously reported values. It is found that more remote galaxies exhibit the same tendency to a reduction in missing mass. A detailed examination of the statistical properties of galaxies in the Virgo cluster reveals that the cluster might not actually exist, but may be just a large excess in the number density of bright galaxies, possibly the result of an increase in the visibility of objects in the appropriate directions. It is concluded that the presence of a large amount of missing mass in clusters of galaxies is yet to be proven.

  13. Decay analysis of compound nuclei formed in reactions with exotic neutron-rich 9Li projectile and the synthesis of 217At* within the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Kaushal, Pooja; Hemdeep; Gupta, Raj K.

    2018-01-01

    The decay of various compound nuclei formed via exotic neutron-rich 9Li projectile is studied within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM). Following the earlier work of one of us (RKG) and collaborators (M. Kaur et al. (2015) [1]), for an empirically fixed neck-length parameter ΔRemp, the only parameter in the DCM, at a given incident laboratory energy ELab, we are able to fit almost exactly the (total) fusion cross section σfus =∑x=16σxn for 9Li projectile on 208Pb and other targets, with σfus depending strongly on the target mass of the most abundant isotope and its (magic) shell structure. This result shows the predictable nature of the DCM. The neck-length parameter ΔRemp is fixed empirically for the decay of 217At* formed in 9Li + 208Pb reaction at a fixed laboratory energy ELab, and then the total fusion cross section σfus calculated for all other reactions using 9Li as a projectile on different targets. Apparently, this procedure could be used to predict σfus for 9Li-induced reactions where experimental data are not available. Furthermore, optimum choice of "cold" target-projectile combinations, forming "hot" compact configurations, are predicted for the synthesis of compound nucleus 217At* with 8Li + 209Pb as one of the target-projectile combination, or another (t , p) combination 48Ca + 169Tb, with a doubly magic 48Ca, as the best possibility.

  14. Nighttime Foreground Pedestrian Detection Based on Three-Dimensional Voxel Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian detection is among the most frequently-used preprocessing tasks in many surveillance application fields, from low-level people counting to high-level scene understanding. Even though many approaches perform well in the daytime with sufficient illumination, pedestrian detection at night is still a critical and challenging problem for video surveillance systems. To respond to this need, in this paper, we provide an affordable solution with a near-infrared stereo network camera, as well as a novel three-dimensional foreground pedestrian detection model. Specifically, instead of using an expensive thermal camera, we build a near-infrared stereo vision system with two calibrated network cameras and near-infrared lamps. The core of the system is a novel voxel surface model, which is able to estimate the dynamic changes of three-dimensional geometric information of the surveillance scene and to segment and locate foreground pedestrians in real time. A free update policy for unknown points is designed for model updating, and the extracted shadow of the pedestrian is adopted to remove foreground false alarms. To evaluate the performance of the proposed model, the system is deployed in several nighttime surveillance scenes. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is capable of nighttime pedestrian segmentation and detection in real time under heavy occlusion. In addition, the qualitative and quantitative comparison results show that our work outperforms classical background subtraction approaches and a recent RGB-D method, as well as achieving comparable performance with the state-of-the-art deep learning pedestrian detection method even with a much lower hardware cost.

  15. Nighttime Foreground Pedestrian Detection Based on Three-Dimensional Voxel Surface Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Fangbing; Wei, Lisong; Yang, Tao; Lu, Zhaoyang

    2017-10-16

    Pedestrian detection is among the most frequently-used preprocessing tasks in many surveillance application fields, from low-level people counting to high-level scene understanding. Even though many approaches perform well in the daytime with sufficient illumination, pedestrian detection at night is still a critical and challenging problem for video surveillance systems. To respond to this need, in this paper, we provide an affordable solution with a near-infrared stereo network camera, as well as a novel three-dimensional foreground pedestrian detection model. Specifically, instead of using an expensive thermal camera, we build a near-infrared stereo vision system with two calibrated network cameras and near-infrared lamps. The core of the system is a novel voxel surface model, which is able to estimate the dynamic changes of three-dimensional geometric information of the surveillance scene and to segment and locate foreground pedestrians in real time. A free update policy for unknown points is designed for model updating, and the extracted shadow of the pedestrian is adopted to remove foreground false alarms. To evaluate the performance of the proposed model, the system is deployed in several nighttime surveillance scenes. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is capable of nighttime pedestrian segmentation and detection in real time under heavy occlusion. In addition, the qualitative and quantitative comparison results show that our work outperforms classical background subtraction approaches and a recent RGB-D method, as well as achieving comparable performance with the state-of-the-art deep learning pedestrian detection method even with a much lower hardware cost.

  16. Foreground removal from Planck Sky Model temperature maps using a MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Hebert, K.

    2009-01-01

    with no systematic errors. To demonstrate the feasibility of a simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal, we have analyzed a specific data set, namely the Planck Sky Model maps, developed for evaluation of different component separation methods before including them...... in the Planck data analysis pipeline. It is found that a MLP neural network can provide a CMB map of about 80% of the sky to a very high degree uncorrelated with the foreground components. Also the derived power spectrum shows little evidence for systematic errors....

  17. Foregrounds in the BOOMERANG-LDB data: a preliminary rms analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Masi, S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Crill, B. P.; de Bernardis, P.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V. V.; Lange, A. E.; Martinis, L.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield, C. B.

    2000-01-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the BOOMERanG LDB maps, focused on foregrounds. BOOMERanG detects dust emission at moderately low galactic latitudes ($b > -20^o$) in bands centered at 90, 150, 240, 410 GHz. At higher Galactic latitudes, we use the BOOMERanG data to set conservative upper limits on the level of contamination at 90 and 150 GHz. We find that the mean square signal correlated with the IRAS/DIRBE dust template is less than 3% of the mean square signal due to CMB anisotropy.

  18. Toward an understanding of foreground emission in the BICEP2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flauger, Raphael; Hill, J. Colin; Spergel, David N.

    2014-01-01

    BICEP2 has reported the detection of a degree-scale B-mode polarization pattern in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and has interpreted the measurement as evidence for primordial gravitational waves. Motivated by the profound importance of the discovery of gravitational waves from the early Universe, we examine to what extent a combination of Galactic foregrounds and lensed E-modes could be responsible for the signal. We reanalyze the BICEP2 results and show that the 100 ×150 GHz and 150 ×150 GHz data are consistent with a cosmology with r=0.2 and negligible foregrounds, but also with a cosmology with r=0 and a significant dust polarization signal. We give independent estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region using a number of different approaches: (1) data-driven models based on Planck 353 GHz intensity, polarization fractions inferred from the same Planck data used by the BICEP2 team but corrected for CMB and CIB contributions, and polarization angles from starlight polarization data or the Planck sky model; (2) the same set of pre-Planck models used by the BICEP2 team but taking into account the higher polarization fractions observed in the CMB- and CIB-corrected map; (3) a measurement of neutral hydrogen gas column density N HI in the BICEP2 region combined with an extrapolation of a relation between HI column density and dust polarization derived by Planck; and (4) a dust polarization map based on digitized Planck data, which we only use as a final cross-check. While these approaches are consistent with each other, the expected amplitude of the dust polarization power spectrum remains uncertain by about a factor of three. The lower end of the prediction leaves room for a primordial contribution, but at the higher end the dust in combination with the standard CMB lensing signal could account for the BICEP2 observations, without requiring the existence of primordial gravitational waves. By measuring the cross-correlations between the

  19. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errard, Josquin [Sorbonne Universités, Institut Lagrange de Paris (ILP), 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Feeney, Stephen M.; Jaffe, Andrew H. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Peiris, Hiranya V., E-mail: josquin.errard@lpnhe.in2p3.fr, E-mail: s.feeney@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: a.jaffe@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)∼1.3×10{sup −4}, σ(n{sub t})∼0

  20. Radio investigations of clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentijn, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis contains a number of papers of the series entitled, A Westerbork Survey of Rich Clusters of Galaxies. The primary aim was to study the radio characteristics of cluster galaxies and especially the question whether their ''radio-activity'' is influenced by their location inside a cluster. It is enquired whether the presence of an intra-cluster medium (ICM), or the typical cluster evolution or cluster dynamical processes can give rise to radio-observable effects on the behaviour of cluster galaxies. 610 MHz WSRT observations of the Coma cluster (and radio observations of the Hercules supercluster) are presented. Extended radio sources in Abell clusters are then described. (Auth.)

  1. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  2. FOREGROUND CONTAMINATION IN INTERFEROMETRIC MEASUREMENTS OF THE REDSHIFTED 21 cm POWER SPECTRUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.

    2009-01-01

    Subtraction of astrophysical foreground contamination from 'dirty' sky maps produced by simulated measurements of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) has been performed by fitting a third-order polynomial along the spectral dimension of each pixel in the data cubes. The simulations are the first to include the unavoidable instrumental effects of the frequency-dependent primary antenna beams and synthesized array beams. They recover the one-dimensional spherically binned input redshifted 21 cm power spectrum within ∼1% over the scales probed most sensitively by the MWA (0.01 ∼ -1 ) and demonstrate that realistic instrumental effects will not mask the epoch of reionization signal. We find that the weighting function used to produce the dirty sky maps from the gridded visibility measurements is important to the success of the technique. Uniform weighting of the visibility measurements produces the best results, whereas natural weighting significantly worsens the foreground subtraction by coupling structure in the density of the visibility measurements to spectral structure in the dirty sky map data cube. The extremely dense uv-coverage of the MWA was found to be advantageous for this technique and produced very good results on scales corresponding to |u| ∼< 500λ in the uv-plane without any selective editing of the uv-coverage.

  3. Foreground removal from WMAP 5 yr temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: One of the main obstacles for extracting the cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal from observations in the mm/sub-mm range is the foreground contamination by emission from Galactic component: mainly synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust emission. The statistical nature of the intrinsic CMB signal makes it essential to minimize the systematic errors in the CMB temperature determinations. Methods: The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract the CMB signal from detailed simulated data has already been demonstrated. Here, simple neural networks are applied to the WMAP 5 yr temperature data without using any auxiliary data. Results: A simple multilayer perceptron neural network with two hidden layers provides temperature estimates over more than 75 per cent of the sky with random errors significantly below those previously extracted from these data. Also, the systematic errors, i.e. errors correlated with the Galactic foregrounds, are very small. Conclusions: With these results the neural network method is well prepared for dealing with the high - quality CMB data from the ESA Planck Surveyor satellite. unknown author type, collab

  4. Coma cluster of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  5. Modeling the Radio Foreground for Detection of CMB Spectral Distortions from the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyanarayana Rao, Mayuri; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Shankar, N Udaya [Raman Research Institute, C V Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Chluba, Jens, E-mail: mayuris@rri.res.in [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Cosmic baryon evolution during the Cosmic Dawn and Reionization results in redshifted 21-cm spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These encode information about the nature and timing of first sources over redshifts 30–6 and appear at meter wavelengths as a tiny CMB distortion along with the Galactic and extragalactic radio sky, which is orders of magnitude brighter. Therefore, detection requires precise methods to model foregrounds. We present a method of foreground fitting using maximally smooth (MS) functions. We demonstrate the usefulness of MS functions over traditionally used polynomials to separate foregrounds from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) signal. We also examine the level of spectral complexity in plausible foregrounds using GMOSS, a physically motivated model of the radio sky, and find that they are indeed smooth and can be modeled by MS functions to levels sufficient to discern the vanilla model of the EoR signal. We show that MS functions are loss resistant and robustly preserve EoR signal strength and turning points in the residuals. Finally, we demonstrate that in using a well-calibrated spectral radiometer and modeling foregrounds with MS functions, the global EoR signal can be detected with a Bayesian approach with 90% confidence in 10 minutes’ integration.

  6. Foreground removal from WMAP 5 yr temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    CMB signal makes it essential to minimize the systematic errors in the CMB temperature determinations. Methods. The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract the CMB signal from detailed simulated data has already been demonstrated. Here, simple neural networks are applied to the WMAP 5...... yr temperature data without using any auxiliary data. Results. A simple multilayer perceptron neural network with two hidden layers provides temperature estimates over more than 75 per cent of the sky with random errors significantly below those previously extracted from these data. Also......, the systematic errors, i.e. errors correlated with the Galactic foregrounds, are very small. Conclusions. With these results the neural network method is well prepared for dealing with the high-quality CMB data from the ESA Planck Surveyor satellite. © ESO, 2010....

  7. Neutral Hydrogen Structures Trace Dust Polarization Angle: Implications for Cosmic Microwave Background Foregrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S E; Hill, J Colin; Peek, J E G; Putman, M E; Babler, B L

    2015-12-11

    Using high-resolution data from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array HI (GALFA-Hi) survey, we show that linear structure in Galactic neutral hydrogen (Hi) correlates with the magnetic field orientation implied by Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission. The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. At high Galactic latitudes, where the Planck data are noise dominated, the Hi data provide an independent constraint on the Galactic magnetic field orientation, and hence the local dust polarization angle. We detect strong cross-correlations between template maps constructed from estimates of dust intensity combined with either Hi-derived angles, starlight polarization angles, or Planck 353 GHz angles. The Hi data thus provide a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination.

  8. Subspace K-means clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Marieke E; Ceulemans, Eva; De Roover, Kim; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2013-12-01

    To achieve an insightful clustering of multivariate data, we propose subspace K-means. Its central idea is to model the centroids and cluster residuals in reduced spaces, which allows for dealing with a wide range of cluster types and yields rich interpretations of the clusters. We review the existing related clustering methods, including deterministic, stochastic, and unsupervised learning approaches. To evaluate subspace K-means, we performed a comparative simulation study, in which we manipulated the overlap of subspaces, the between-cluster variance, and the error variance. The study shows that the subspace K-means algorithm is sensitive to local minima but that the problem can be reasonably dealt with by using partitions of various cluster procedures as a starting point for the algorithm. Subspace K-means performs very well in recovering the true clustering across all conditions considered and appears to be superior to its competitor methods: K-means, reduced K-means, factorial K-means, mixtures of factor analyzers (MFA), and MCLUST. The best competitor method, MFA, showed a performance similar to that of subspace K-means in easy conditions but deteriorated in more difficult ones. Using data from a study on parental behavior, we show that subspace K-means analysis provides a rich insight into the cluster characteristics, in terms of both the relative positions of the clusters (via the centroids) and the shape of the clusters (via the within-cluster residuals).

  9. Clustering environments of BL Lac objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Ronald; Ellingson, Erica; Stocke, John T.; Yee, H. K. C.

    1993-01-01

    We report measurements of the amplitude of the BL Lac galaxy spatial covariance function, B(gb), for the fields of five BL Lacertae objects. We present evidence for rich clusters around MS 1207+39 and MS 1407+59, and confirm high richness for the cluster containing H0414+009. We discuss the ease of 3C 66 A and find evidence for a poor cluster based on an uncertain redshift of z = 0.444. These data suggest that at least some BL Lac objects are consistent with being FR 1 radio galaxies in rich clusters.

  10. Clusters in nuclei. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is presently one of the domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics facing both the greatest challenges and opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physics decided to team up in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This first volume, gathering seven extensive lectures, covers the follow topics: - Cluster Radioactivity - Cluster States and Mean Field Theories - Alpha Clustering and Alpha Condensates - Clustering in Neutron-rich Nuclei - Di-neutron Clustering - Collective Clusterization in Nuclei - Giant Nuclear Molecules By promoting new ideas and developments while retaining a pedagogical nature of presentation throughout, these lectures will both serve as a reference and as advanced teaching material for future courses and schools in the fields of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics. (orig.)

  11. The opacity of spiral galaxy disks. IV. Radial extinction profiles from counts of distant galaxies seen through foreground disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, BW; Gonzalez, RA; Allen, RJ; van der Kruit, PC

    Dust extinction can be determined from the number of distant field galaxies seen through a spiral disk. To calibrate this number for the crowding and confusion introduced by the foreground image, Gonzalez et al. and Holwerda et al. developed the Synthetic Field Method (SFM), which analyzes synthetic

  12. The Youth Worker as Jazz Improviser: Foregrounding Education "In the Moment" within the Professional Development of Youth Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pete

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for the foregrounding of improvisation and education "in the moment" within youth workers' professional development. Devised in collaboration with third-year Youth and Community Work students and lecturers at a university in Birmingham, this participatory action research project drew on work of jazz ethnomusicologists…

  13. Globular clusters and galaxy halos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Bergh, S.

    1984-01-01

    Using semipartial correlation coefficients and bootstrap techniques, a study is made of the important features of globular clusters with respect to the total number of galaxy clusters and dependence of specific galaxy cluster on parent galaxy type, cluster radii, luminosity functions and cluster ellipticity. It is shown that the ellipticity of LMC clusters correlates significantly with cluster luminosity functions, but not with cluster age. The cluter luminosity value above which globulars are noticeably flattened may differ by a factor of about 100 from galaxy to galaxy. Both in the Galaxy and in M31 globulars with small core radii have a Gaussian distribution over luminosity, whereas clusters with large core radii do not. In the cluster systems surrounding the Galaxy, M31 and NGC 5128 the mean radii of globular clusters was found to increase with the distance from the nucleus. Central galaxies in rich clusters have much higher values for specific globular cluster frequency than do other cluster ellipticals, suggesting that such central galaxies must already have been different from normal ellipticals at the time they were formed

  14. Cluster headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... Doctors do not know exactly what causes cluster headaches. They ... (chemical in the body released during an allergic response) or ...

  15. Using foreground/background analysis to determine leaf and canopy chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, J. E.; Ustin, S. L.; Hart, Q. J.; Jacquemoud, S.; Smith, M. O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) has become a well established procedure for analyzing imaging spectrometry data, however, the technique is relatively insensitive to minor sources of spectral variation (e.g., discriminating stressed from unstressed vegetation and variations in canopy chemistry). Other statistical approaches have been tried e.g., stepwise multiple linear regression analysis to predict canopy chemistry. Grossman et al. reported that SMLR is sensitive to measurement error and that the prediction of minor chemical components are not independent of patterns observed in more dominant spectral components like water. Further, they observed that the relationships were strongly dependent on the mode of expressing reflectance (R, -log R) and whether chemistry was expressed on a weight (g/g) or are basis (g/sq m). Thus, alternative multivariate techniques need to be examined. Smith et al. reported a revised SMA that they termed Foreground/Background Analysis (FBA) that permits directing the analysis along any axis of variance by identifying vectors through the n-dimensional spectral volume orthonormal to each other. Here, we report an application of the FBA technique for the detection of canopy chemistry using a modified form of the analysis.

  16. Toward an Understanding of Foreground Emission in the BICEP2 Region

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    BICEP2 has reported the detection of a degree-scale B-mode polarization pattern in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and has interpreted the measurement as evidence for primordial gravitational waves. Motivated by the profound importance of the discovery of gravitational waves from the early Universe, I will discuss to what extent a combination of Galactic foregrounds and lensed E-modes could be responsible for the signal. I will present independent estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region using several different approaches. These estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region are consistent with each other, but the expected amplitude of the dust polarization power spectrum is uncertain by about a factor of three. The lower end of the prediction leaves room for a primordial contribution, but at the higher end the dust in combination with the standard CMB lensing signal could account for the BICEP2 observations, without requiring the existence of primordial gravitatio...

  17. Salient Region Detection by Fusing Foreground and Background Cues Extracted from Single Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangqiang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliency detection is an important preprocessing step in many application fields such as computer vision, robotics, and graphics to reduce computational cost by focusing on significant positions and neglecting the nonsignificant in the scene. Different from most previous methods which mainly utilize the contrast of low-level features, various feature maps are fused in a simple linear weighting form. In this paper, we propose a novel salient object detection algorithm which takes both background and foreground cues into consideration and integrate a bottom-up coarse salient regions extraction and a top-down background measure via boundary labels propagation into a unified optimization framework to acquire a refined saliency detection result. Wherein the coarse saliency map is also fused by three components, the first is local contrast map which is in more accordance with the psychological law, the second is global frequency prior map, and the third is global color distribution map. During the formation of background map, first we construct an affinity matrix and select some nodes which lie on border as labels to represent the background and then carry out a propagation to generate the regional background map. The evaluation of the proposed model has been implemented on four datasets. As demonstrated in the experiments, our proposed method outperforms most existing saliency detection models with a robust performance.

  18. Statistical measures of galaxy clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to the large-scale distribution of galaxies and ways in which this distribution may be statistically measured. Galaxy clustering is hierarchical in nature, so that the positions of clusters of galaxies are themselves spatially clustered. A simple identification of groups of galaxies would be an inadequate description of the true richness of galaxy clustering. Current observations of the large-scale structure of the universe and modern theories of cosmology may be studied with a statistical description of the spatial and velocity distributions of galaxies. 8 refs

  19. Weighted Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ackerman, Margareta; Ben-David, Shai; Branzei, Simina

    2012-01-01

    We investigate a natural generalization of the classical clustering problem, considering clustering tasks in which different instances may have different weights.We conduct the first extensive theoretical analysis on the influence of weighted data on standard clustering algorithms in both...... the partitional and hierarchical settings, characterizing the conditions under which algorithms react to weights. Extending a recent framework for clustering algorithm selection, we propose intuitive properties that would allow users to choose between clustering algorithms in the weighted setting and classify...

  20. Simulated predictions for H I at z = 3.35 with the Ooty Wide Field Array - I. Instrument and the foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthi, Visweshwar Ram; Chatterjee, Suman; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Bharadwaj, Somnath

    2017-11-01

    Foreground removal is the most important step in detecting the large-scale redshifted H I 21-cm signal. Modelling foreground spectra is challenging and is further complicated by the chromatic response of the telescope. We present a multifrequency angular power spectrum (MAPS) estimator for use in a survey for redshifted H I 21-cm emission from z ˜ 3.35 and demonstrate its ability to accurately characterize the foregrounds. This survey will be carried out with the two wide-field interferometer modes of the upgraded Ooty Radio Telescope, called the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA), at 326.5 MHz. We have tailored the two-visibility correlation for OWFA to estimate the MAPS and test it with simulated foregrounds. In the process, we describe a software model that encodes the geometry and the details of the telescope and simulates a realistic model for the bright radio sky. This article presents simulations that include the full chromatic response of the telescope in addition to the frequency dependence intrinsic to the foregrounds. We find that the visibility correlation MAPS estimator recovers the input angular power spectrum accurately and that the instrument response to the foregrounds dominates the systematic errors in the recovered foreground power spectra.

  1. Back- and fore-grounding ontology: exploring the linkages between critical realism, pragmatism, and methodologies in health & rehabilitation sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForge, Ryan; Shaw, Jay

    2012-03-01

    Back- and fore-grounding ontology: exploring the linkages between critical realism, pragmatism, and methodologies in health & rehabilitation sciences As two doctoral candidates in a health and rehabilitation sciences program, we describe in this paper our respective paradigmatic locations along a quite nonlinear ontological-epistemological-axiological-methodological chain. In a turn-taking fashion, we unpack the tenets of critical realism and pragmatism, and then trace the linkages from these paradigmatic locations through to the methodological choices that address a community-based research problem. Beyond serving as an answer to calls for academics in training to demonstrate philosophical-theoretical-methodological integrity and coherence in their scholarship, this paper represents critical realism and its fore-grounding of a deeply stratified ontology in reflexive relation to pragmatism and its back-grounding of ontology. We conclude by considering the merits and challenges of conducting research from within singular versus proliferate paradigmatic perspectives. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. A Foreground Masking Strategy for [C II] Intensity Mapping Experiments Using Galaxies Selected by Stellar Mass and Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G.; Moncelsi, L.; Viero, M. P.; Silva, M. B.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A. R.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Uzgil, B.; Hunacek, J. R.; Zemcov, M.

    2018-04-01

    Intensity mapping provides a unique means to probe the epoch of reionization (EoR), when the neutral intergalactic medium was ionized by energetic photons emitted from the first galaxies. The [C II] 158 μm fine-structure line is typically one of the brightest emission lines of star-forming galaxies and thus a promising tracer of the global EoR star formation activity. However, [C II] intensity maps at 6 ≲ z ≲ 8 are contaminated by interloping CO rotational line emission (3 ≤ J upp ≤ 6) from lower-redshift galaxies. Here we present a strategy to remove the foreground contamination in upcoming [C II] intensity mapping experiments, guided by a model of CO emission from foreground galaxies. The model is based on empirical measurements of the mean and scatter of the total infrared luminosities of galaxies at z {10}8 {M}ȯ selected in the K-band from the COSMOS/UltraVISTA survey, which can be converted to CO line strengths. For a mock field of the Tomographic Ionized-carbon Mapping Experiment, we find that masking out the “voxels” (spectral–spatial elements) containing foreground galaxies identified using an optimized CO flux threshold results in a z-dependent criterion {m}{{K}}AB}≲ 22 (or {M}* ≳ {10}9 {M}ȯ ) at z cost of a moderate ≲8% loss of total survey volume.

  3. Pleiades cluster. IV. The visit of a molecular CO cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, M.

    1987-01-01

    The location, size, and mass of the CO molecular cloud seen in the direction of the Pleiades cluster is determined from a study of the polarization and reddening of cluster members and nonmembers. Arguments are presented against both a foreground and background location of the molecular cloud, so that the cloud should be presently situated inside the cluster. Stellar reddening determinations with the appropriate value of R = 3.3 for the region, as well as star counts, lead to a determination of a total extinction of A(V) in the range of 1.0-1.6 mag for the central region of the CO cloud. The extinction determinations for cluster members and background stars indicate a mass of 20 solar masses for the CO cloud visiting the Pleiades cluster. 20 references

  4. Cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, R

    1992-11-01

    Cluster management is a management model that fosters decentralization of management, develops leadership potential of staff, and creates ownership of unit-based goals. Unlike shared governance models, there is no formal structure created by committees and it is less threatening for managers. There are two parts to the cluster management model. One is the formation of cluster groups, consisting of all staff and facilitated by a cluster leader. The cluster groups function for communication and problem-solving. The second part of the cluster management model is the creation of task forces. These task forces are designed to work on short-term goals, usually in response to solving one of the unit's goals. Sometimes the task forces are used for quality improvement or system problems. Clusters are groups of not more than five or six staff members, facilitated by a cluster leader. A cluster is made up of individuals who work the same shift. For example, people with job titles who work days would be in a cluster. There would be registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, nursing assistants, and unit clerks in the cluster. The cluster leader is chosen by the manager based on certain criteria and is trained for this specialized role. The concept of cluster management, criteria for choosing leaders, training for leaders, using cluster groups to solve quality improvement issues, and the learning process necessary for manager support are described.

  5. The CAPRICE RICH detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Codino, A.; Grimani, C. [Perugia Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Perugia (Italy); De Pascale, M.P. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica]|[INFN, Sezione Univ. `Tor Vergata` Rome (Italy); Cafagna, F. [Bari Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Bari (Italy); Golden, R.L. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Particle Astrophysics Lab.; Brancaccio, F.; Bocciolini, M. [Florence Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Florence (Italy); Barbiellini, G.; Boezio, M. [Trieste Univ. (Italy)]|[INFN, Trieste (Italy)

    1995-09-01

    A compact RICH detector has been developed and used for particle identification in a balloon borne spectrometer to measure the flux of antimatter in the cosmic radiation. This is the first RICH detector ever used in space experiments that is capable of detecting unit charged particles, such as antiprotons. The RICH and all other detectors performed well during the 27 hours long flight.

  6. Detecting Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Eric Jones [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies gravitationally lens the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) leading to a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurement of the cluster lensing effect offers the exciting possibility of constraining the masses of galaxy clusters using CMB data alone. Improved constraints on cluster masses are in turn essential to the use of clusters as cosmological probes: uncertainties in cluster masses are currently the dominant systematic affecting cluster abundance constraints on cosmology. To date, however, the CMB cluster lensing signal remains undetected because of its small magnitude and angular size. In this thesis, we develop a maximum likelihood approach to extracting the signal from CMB temperature data. We validate the technique by applying it to mock data designed to replicate as closely as possible real data from the South Pole Telescope’s (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) survey: the effects of the SPT beam, transfer function, instrumental noise and cluster selection are incorporated. We consider the effects of foreground emission on the analysis and show that uncertainty in amount of foreground lensing results in a small systematic error on the lensing constraints. Additionally, we show that if unaccounted for, the SZ effect leads to unacceptably large biases on the lensing constraints and develop an approach for removing SZ contamination. The results of the mock analysis presented here suggest that a 4σ first detection of the cluster lensing effect can be achieved with current SPT-SZ data.

  7. Isotopic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraedts, J.M.P.

    1983-01-01

    Spectra of isotopically mixed clusters (dimers of SF 6 ) are calculated as well as transition frequencies. The result leads to speculations about the suitability of the laser-cluster fragmentation process for isotope separation. (Auth.)

  8. Cluster Headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a role. Unlike migraine and tension headache, cluster headache generally isn't associated with triggers, such as foods, hormonal changes or stress. Once a cluster period begins, however, drinking alcohol ...

  9. Cluster Headache

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Iris

    1985-01-01

    Cluster headache is the most severe primary headache with recurrent pain attacks described as worse than giving birth. The aim of this paper was to make an overview of current knowledge on cluster headache with a focus on pathophysiology and treatment. This paper presents hypotheses of cluster headache pathophysiology, current treatment options and possible future therapy approaches. For years, the hypothalamus was regarded as the key structure in cluster headache, but is now thought to be pa...

  10. Categorias Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Dayane Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Neste trabalho apresentamos as categorias cluster, que foram introduzidas por Aslak Bakke Buan, Robert Marsh, Markus Reineke, Idun Reiten e Gordana Todorov, com o objetivo de categoriíicar as algebras cluster criadas em 2002 por Sergey Fomin e Andrei Zelevinsky. Os autores acima, em [4], mostraram que existe uma estreita relação entre algebras cluster e categorias cluster para quivers cujo grafo subjacente é um diagrama de Dynkin. Para isto desenvolveram uma teoria tilting na estrutura triang...

  11. Meaningful Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  12. Horticultural cluster

    OpenAIRE

    SHERSTIUK S.V.; POSYLAYEVA K.I.

    2013-01-01

    In the article there are the theoretical and methodological approaches to the nature and existence of the cluster. The cluster differences from other kinds of cooperative and integration associations. Was develop by scientific-practical recommendations for forming a competitive horticultur cluster.

  13. Statistical simulations of the dust foreground to cosmic microwave background polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansyngel, F.; Boulanger, F.; Ghosh, T.; Wandelt, B.; Aumont, J.; Bracco, A.; Levrier, F.; Martin, P. G.; Montier, L.

    2017-07-01

    The characterization of the dust polarization foreground to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a necessary step toward the detection of the B-mode signal associated with primordial gravitational waves. We present a method to simulate maps of polarized dust emission on the sphere that is similar to the approach used for CMB anisotropies. This method builds on the understanding of Galactic polarization stemming from the analysis of Planck data. It relates the dust polarization sky to the structure of the Galactic magnetic field and its coupling with interstellar matter and turbulence. The Galactic magnetic field is modeled as a superposition of a mean uniform field and a Gaussian random (turbulent) component with a power-law power spectrum of exponent αM. The integration along the line of sight carried out to compute Stokes maps is approximated by a sum over a small number of emitting layers with different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field. The model parameters are constrained to fit the power spectra of dust polarization EE, BB, and TE measured using Planck data. We find that the slopes of the E and B power spectra of dust polarization are matched for αM = -2.5, an exponent close to that measured for total dust intensity but larger than the Kolmogorov exponent - 11/3. The model allows us to compute multiple realizations of the Stokes Q and U maps for different realizations of the random component of the magnetic field, and to quantify the variance of dust polarization spectra for any given sky area outside of the Galactic plane. The simulations reproduce the scaling relation between the dust polarization power and the mean total dust intensity including the observed dispersion around the mean relation. We also propose a method to carry out multifrequency simulations, including the decorrelation measured recently by Planck, using a given covariance matrix of the polarization maps. These simulations are well suited to optimize

  14. Unveiling hidden properties of young star clusters: differential reddening, star-formation spread, and binary fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, C.; Lima, E. F.; Bica, E.

    2012-04-01

    Context. Usually, important parameters of young, low-mass star clusters are very difficult to obtain by means of photometry, especially when differential reddening and/or binaries occur in large amounts. Aims: We present a semi-analytical approach (ASAmin) that, when applied to the Hess diagram of a young star cluster, is able to retrieve the values of mass, age, star-formation spread, distance modulus, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. Methods: The global optimisation method known as adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) is used to minimise the residuals between the observed and simulated Hess diagrams of a star cluster. The simulations are realistic and take the most relevant parameters of young clusters into account. Important features of the simulations are a normal (Gaussian) differential reddening distribution, a time-decreasing star-formation rate, the unresolved binaries, and the smearing effect produced by photometric uncertainties on Hess diagrams. Free parameters are cluster mass, age, distance modulus, star-formation spread, foreground and differential reddening, and binary fraction. Results: Tests with model clusters built with parameters spanning a broad range of values show that ASAmin retrieves the input values with a high precision for cluster mass, distance modulus, and foreground reddening, but they are somewhat lower for the remaining parameters. Given the statistical nature of the simulations, several runs should be performed to obtain significant convergence patterns. Specifically, we find that the retrieved (absolute minimum) parameters converge to mean values with a low dispersion as the Hess residuals decrease. When applied to actual young clusters, the retrieved parameters follow convergence patterns similar to the models. We show how the stochasticity associated with the early phases may affect the results, especially in low-mass clusters. This effect can be minimised by averaging out several twin clusters in the

  15. Cluster Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Mukesh; Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Suresh, Sangeetha

    2018-01-01

    sell their products successfully in international markets, but there is also an increasingly large consumer base within India. Indeed, Indian industrial clusters have contributed to a substantial part of this growth process, and there are several hundred registered clusters within the country...... of this handbook, which focuses on the role of CSR in MSMEs. Hence we contribute to the literature on CSR in industrial clusters and specifically CSR in Indian industrial clusters by investigating the drivers of CSR in India’s industrial clusters....

  16. Measuring the Largest Angular Scale CMB B-mode Polarization with Galactic Foregrounds on a Cut Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Duncan J.; Larson, David; Marriage, Tobias A.; Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Appel, John W.; Bennett, Charles L.; Chuss, David T.; Eimer, Joseph R.; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Miller, Nathan J.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the effectiveness of foreground cleaning in the recovery of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization sourced by gravitational waves for tensor-to-scalar ratios in the range 0\\lt r\\lt 0.1. Using the planned survey area, frequency bands, and sensitivity of the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS), we simulate maps of Stokes Q and U parameters at 40, 90, 150, and 220 GHz, including realistic models of the CMB, diffuse Galactic thermal dust and synchrotron foregrounds, and Gaussian white noise. We use linear combinations (LCs) of the simulated multifrequency data to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of r, the relative scalar amplitude s, and LC coefficients. We find that for 10,000 simulations of a CLASS-like experiment using only measurements of the reionization peak ({\\ell }≤slant 23), there is a 95% C.L. upper limit of r\\lt 0.017 in the case of no primordial gravitational waves. For simulations with r=0.01, we recover at 68% C.L. r={0.012}-0.006+0.011. The reionization peak corresponds to a fraction of the multipole moments probed by CLASS, and simulations including 30≤slant {\\ell }≤slant 100 further improve our upper limits to r\\lt 0.008 at 95% C.L. (r={0.010}-0.004+0.004 for primordial gravitational waves with r = 0.01). In addition to decreasing the current upper bound on r by an order of magnitude, these foreground-cleaned low multipole data will achieve a cosmic variance limited measurement of the E-mode polarization’s reionization peak.

  17. Research: Rags to Rags? Riches to Riches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone has read about what might be called the "gold gap"--how the rich in this country are getting richer and controlling an ever-larger share of the nation's wealth. The Century Foundation has started publishing "Reality Check", a series of guides to campaign issues that sometimes finds gaps in these types of cherished delusions. The guides…

  18. Filaments and clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltan, A.

    1987-01-01

    A statistical test to investigate filaments of galaxies is performed. Only particular form of filaments is considered, viz. filaments connecting Abell clusters of galaxies. Relative position of triplets ''cluster - field object - cluster'' is analysed. Though neither cluster sample nor field object sample are homogeneous and complete only peculiar form of selection effects could affect the present statistics. Comparison of observational data with simulations shows that less than 15 per cent of all field galaxies is concentrated in filaments connecting rich clusters. Most of the field objects used in the analysis are not normal galaxies and it is possible that this conclusion is not in conflict with apparent filaments seen in the Lick counts and in some nearby 3D maps of the galaxy distribution. 26 refs., 2 figs. (author)

  19. Data Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  20. Cluster evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffer, R.

    1987-01-01

    The galaxy and cluster luminosity functions are constructed from a model of the mass distribution based on hierarchical clustering at an epoch where the matter distribution is non-linear. These luminosity functions are seen to reproduce the present distribution of objects as can be inferred from the observations. They can be used to deduce the redshift dependence of the cluster distribution and to extrapolate the observations towards the past. The predicted evolution of the cluster distribution is quite strong, although somewhat less rapid than predicted by the linear theory

  1. Kings Today, Rich Tomorrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattoum, Asma

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the King vs. Rich dilemma that founder-CEOs face at IPO. When undertaking IPO, founders face two options. They can either get rich, but then run the risk of losing the control over their firms; or they can remain kings by introducing defensive mechanisms, but this is likel...

  2. Developments on RICH detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.

    1996-01-01

    The RICH (ring imaging Cherenkov) detector which is dedicated to Cherenkov radiation detection is described. An improvement made by replacing photo sensible vapor with solid photocathode is studied. A RICH detector prototype with a CsI photocathode has been built in Saclay and used with Saturne. The first results are presented. (A.C.)

  3. The Zone of Avoidance as an X-ray absorber - the role of the galactic foreground modelling Swift XRT spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, I. I.; Bagoly, Z.; Tóth, L. V.; Balázs, L. G.; Horvath, I.; Zahorecz, S.

    2018-05-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosive events in the Universe. The prompt gamma emission is followed by an X-ray afterglow that is also detected for over nine hundred GRBs by the Swift BAT and XRT detectors. The X-ray afterglow spectrum bears essential information about the burst, and the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). Since the radiation travels through the line of sight intergalactic medium and the ISM in the Milky Way, the observed emission is influenced by extragalactic and galactic components. The column density of the Galactic foreground ranges several orders of magnitudes, due to both the large scale distribution of ISM and its small scale structures. We examined the effect of local HI column density on the penetrating X-ray emission, as the first step towards a precise modeling of the measured X-ray spectra. We fitted the X-ray spectra using the Xspec software, and checked how the shape of the initially power low spectrum changes with varying input Galactic HI column density. The total absorbing HI column is a sum of the intrinsic and Galactic component. We also investigated the model results for the intrinsic component varying the Galactic foreground. We found that such variations may alter the intrinsic hydrogen column density up to twenty-five percent. We will briefly discuss its consequences.

  4. Selective attention to task-irrelevant emotional distractors is unaffected by the perceptual load associated with a foreground task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindi Attar, Catherine; Müller, Matthias M

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that emotionally arousing stimuli are preferentially processed in the human brain. Whether or not this preference persists under increased perceptual load associated with a task at hand remains an open question. Here we manipulated two possible determinants of the attentional selection process, perceptual load associated with a foreground task and the emotional valence of concurrently presented task-irrelevant distractors. As a direct measure of sustained attentional resource allocation in early visual cortex we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) elicited by distinct flicker frequencies of task and distractor stimuli. Subjects either performed a detection (low load) or discrimination (high load) task at a centrally presented symbol stream that flickered at 8.6 Hz while task-irrelevant neutral or unpleasant pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) flickered at a frequency of 12 Hz in the background of the stream. As reflected in target detection rates and SSVEP amplitudes to both task and distractor stimuli, unpleasant relative to neutral background pictures more strongly withdrew processing resources from the foreground task. Importantly, this finding was unaffected by the factor 'load' which turned out to be a weak modulator of attentional processing in human visual cortex.

  5. Selective attention to task-irrelevant emotional distractors is unaffected by the perceptual load associated with a foreground task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hindi Attar

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that emotionally arousing stimuli are preferentially processed in the human brain. Whether or not this preference persists under increased perceptual load associated with a task at hand remains an open question. Here we manipulated two possible determinants of the attentional selection process, perceptual load associated with a foreground task and the emotional valence of concurrently presented task-irrelevant distractors. As a direct measure of sustained attentional resource allocation in early visual cortex we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs elicited by distinct flicker frequencies of task and distractor stimuli. Subjects either performed a detection (low load or discrimination (high load task at a centrally presented symbol stream that flickered at 8.6 Hz while task-irrelevant neutral or unpleasant pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS flickered at a frequency of 12 Hz in the background of the stream. As reflected in target detection rates and SSVEP amplitudes to both task and distractor stimuli, unpleasant relative to neutral background pictures more strongly withdrew processing resources from the foreground task. Importantly, this finding was unaffected by the factor 'load' which turned out to be a weak modulator of attentional processing in human visual cortex.

  6. Cultural differences in the visual processing of meaning: detecting incongruities between background and foreground objects using the N400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Sharon G; Ando, Yumi; Huang, Carol; Yee, Alicia; Lewis, Richard S

    2010-06-01

    East Asians have been found to allocate relatively greater attention to background objects, whereas European Americans have been found to allocate relatively greater attention to foreground objects. This is well documented across a variety of cognitive measures. We used a modification of the Ganis and Kutas (2003) N400 event-related potential design to measure the degree to which Asian Americans and European Americans responded to semantic incongruity between target objects and background scenes. As predicted, Asian Americans showed a greater negativity to incongruent trials than to congruent trials. In contrast, European Americans showed no difference in amplitude across the two conditions. Furthermore, smaller magnitude N400 incongruity effects were associated with higher independent self-construal scores. These data suggest that Asian Americans are processing the relationship between foreground and background objects to a greater degree than European Americans, which is consistent with hypothesized greater holistic processing among East Asians. Implications for using neural measures, the role of semantic processing to understand cultural differences in cognition, and the relationship between self construal and neural measures of cognition are discussed.

  7. Development of High Frequency Transition-Edge-Sensor Polarimeters for Next Generation Cosmic Microwave Background Experiments and Galactic Foreground Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Samantha; Sierra, Carlos E.; Austermann, Jason Edward; Beall, James; Becker, Dan; Dober, Bradley; Duff, Shannon; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Van Lanen, Jeffrey L.; McMahon, Jeff; Simon, Sara M.; Ullom, Joel; Vissers, Michael R.; NIST Quantum Sensors Group

    2018-06-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide a powerful tool for probing the earliest moments of the universe and therefore have the potential to transform our understanding of cosmology. In particular, precision measurements of its polarization can reveal the existence of gravitational waves produced during cosmic inflation. However, these observations are complicated by the presence of astrophysical foregrounds, which may be separated by using broad frequency coverage, as the spectral energy distribution between foregrounds and the CMB is distinct. For this purpose, we are developing large-bandwidth, feedhorn-coupled transition-edge-sensor (TES) arrays that couple polarized light from waveguide to superconducting microstrip by use of a symmetric, planar orthomode transducer (OMT). In this work, we describe two types of pixels, an ultra-high frequency (UHF) design, which operates from 195 GHz-315 GHz, and an extended ultra-high frequency (UHF++) design, which operates from 195 GHz-420 GHz, being developed for next generation CMB experiments that will come online in the next decade, such as CCAT-prime and the Simons Observatory. We present the designs, simulation results, fabrication, and preliminary measurements of these prototype pixels.

  8. CONSTRAINING POLARIZED FOREGROUNDS FOR EoR EXPERIMENTS. I. 2D POWER SPECTRA FROM THE PAPER-32 IMAGING ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S. A.; Aguirre, J. E.; Moore, D. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nunhokee, C. D.; Bernardi, G. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, Grahamstown (South Africa); Pober, J. C. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI (United States); Ali, Z. S.; DeBoer, D. R.; Parsons, A. R. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bradley, R. F. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Carilli, C. L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM (United States); Gugliucci, N. E. [Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH (United States); Jacobs, D. C. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Klima, P. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); MacMahon, D. H. E. [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Manley, J. R.; Walbrugh, W. P. [SKA South Africa, Pinelands (South Africa); Stefan, I. I., E-mail: saulkohn@sas.upenn.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    Current generation low-frequency interferometers constructed with the objective of detecting the high-redshift 21 cm background aim to generate power spectra of the brightness temperature contrast of neutral hydrogen in primordial intergalactic medium. Two-dimensional (2D) power spectra (power in Fourier modes parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight) that formed from interferometric visibilities have been shown to delineate a boundary between spectrally smooth foregrounds (known as the wedge ) and spectrally structured 21 cm background emission (the EoR window ). However, polarized foregrounds are known to possess spectral structure due to Faraday rotation, which can leak into the EoR window. In this work we create and analyze 2D power spectra from the PAPER-32 imaging array in Stokes I, Q, U, and V. These allow us to observe and diagnose systematic effects in our calibration at high signal-to-noise within the Fourier space most relevant to EoR experiments. We observe well-defined windows in the Stokes visibilities, with Stokes Q, U, and V power spectra sharing a similar wedge shape to that seen in Stokes I. With modest polarization calibration, we see no evidence that polarization calibration errors move power outside the wedge in any Stokes visibility to the noise levels attained. Deeper integrations will be required to confirm that this behavior persists to the depth required for EoR detection.

  9. FOREGROUND MODEL AND ANTENNA CALIBRATION ERRORS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF THE SKY-AVERAGED λ21 cm SIGNAL AT z∼ 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardi, G. [SKA SA, 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa); McQuinn, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Greenhill, L. J., E-mail: gbernardi@ska.ac.za [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    The most promising near-term observable of the cosmic dark age prior to widespread reionization (z ∼ 15-200) is the sky-averaged λ21 cm background arising from hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. Though an individual antenna could in principle detect the line signature, data analysis must separate foregrounds that are orders of magnitude brighter than the λ21 cm background (but that are anticipated to vary monotonically and gradually with frequency, e.g., they are considered {sup s}pectrally smooth{sup )}. Using more physically motivated models for foregrounds than in previous studies, we show that the intrinsic spectral smoothness of the foregrounds is likely not a concern, and that data analysis for an ideal antenna should be able to detect the λ21 cm signal after subtracting a ∼fifth-order polynomial in log ν. However, we find that the foreground signal is corrupted by the angular and frequency-dependent response of a real antenna. The frequency dependence complicates modeling of foregrounds commonly based on the assumption of spectral smoothness. Our calculations focus on the Large-aperture Experiment to detect the Dark Age, which combines both radiometric and interferometric measurements. We show that statistical uncertainty remaining after fitting antenna gain patterns to interferometric measurements is not anticipated to compromise extraction of the λ21 cm signal for a range of cosmological models after fitting a seventh-order polynomial to radiometric data. Our results generalize to most efforts to measure the sky-averaged spectrum.

  10. Origin of the latitudinal richness gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engemann, Kristine; Sandel, Brody Steven; Enquist, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial variation in richness patterns must be due to variation in rates of speciation, extinction, immigration and emigration. Hotspots of diversity can occur either because they are hotspots of speciation (cradles) or cold spots of extinction (museums) – two major hypotheses that make contrasting...... predictions for the phylogenetic structure of communities. We test these hypotheses by comparing centers of species richness and phylogenetic clustering for vascular plants in the New World. Range maps for 88,417 plant species were extracted from the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN) database...... and combined with the BIEN mega phylogeny of >80,000 species. We calculated the Phylogenetic Diversity Index (PDI) and Net Relatedness Index (NRI) for each cell in a 100×100 km grid using a new computationally efficient algorithm. Species richness patterns were compared to patterns of PDI and NRI. We found...

  11. Butterfly Species Richness in Selected West Albertine Rift Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Kasangaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The butterfly species richness of 17 forests located in the western arm of the Albertine Rift in Uganda was compared using cluster analysis and principal components analysis (PCA to assess similarities among the forests. The objective was to compare the butterfly species richness of the forests. A total of 630 butterfly species were collected in 5 main families. The different species fell into 7 ecological groupings with the closed forest group having the most species and the swamp/wetland group with the fewest number of species. Three clusters were obtained. The first cluster had forests characterized by relatively high altitude and low species richness despite the big area in the case of Rwenzori and being close to the supposed Pleistocene refugium. The second cluster had forests far away from the supposed refugium except Kisangi and moderate species richness with small areas, whereas the third cluster had those forests that were more disturbed, high species richness, and low altitudinal levels with big areas.

  12. Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: Cluster science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, J.-B.; Bonaldi, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Hagstotz, S.; Diego, J. M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Grandis, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ferraro, S.; Tramonte, D.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Basu, K.; Battye, R. A.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greenslade, J.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maffei, B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Roman, M.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.

    2018-04-01

    ). Cosmological constraints from CORE cluster counts alone are competitive with other scheduled large scale structure surveys in the 2020's for measuring the dark energy equation-of-state parameters w0 and wa (σw0=0.28, σwa=0.31). In combination with primary CMB constraints, CORE cluster counts can further reduce these error bars on w0 and wa to 0.05 and 0.13 respectively, and constrain the sum of the neutrino masses, Σ mν, to 39 meV (1 sigma). The wide frequency coverage of CORE, 60–600 GHz, will enable measurement of the relativistic thermal SZE by stacking clusters. Contamination by dust emission from the clusters, however, makes constraining the temperature of the intracluster medium difficult. The kinetic SZE pairwise momentum will be extracted with 0S/N=7 in the foreground-cleaned CMB map. Measurements of TCMB(z) using CORE clusters will establish competitive constraints on the evolution of the CMB temperature: (1+z)1‑β, with an uncertainty of σβ lesssim 2.7× 10‑3 at low redshift (z lesssim 1). The wide frequency coverage also enables clean extraction of a map of the diffuse SZE signal over the sky, substantially reducing contamination by foregrounds compared to the Planck SZE map extraction. Our analysis of the one-dimensional distribution of Compton-y values in the simulated map finds an order of magnitude improvement in constraints on σ8 over the Planck result, demonstrating the potential of this cosmological probe with CORE.

  13. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.

    2017-10-06

    Background: Software Effort Estimation (SEE) can be formulated as an online learning problem, where new projects are completed over time and may become available for training. In this scenario, a Cross-Company (CC) SEE approach called Dycom can drastically reduce the number of Within-Company (WC) projects needed for training, saving the high cost of collecting such training projects. However, Dycom relies on splitting CC projects into different subsets in order to create its CC models. Such splitting can have a significant impact on Dycom\\'s predictive performance. Aims: This paper investigates whether clustering methods can be used to help finding good CC splits for Dycom. Method: Dycom is extended to use clustering methods for creating the CC subsets. Three different clustering methods are investigated, namely Hierarchical Clustering, K-Means, and Expectation-Maximisation. Clustering Dycom is compared against the original Dycom with CC subsets of different sizes, based on four SEE databases. A baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number of CC subsets to be pre-defined, and a poor choice can negatively affect predictive performance. EM enables Dycom to automatically set the number of CC subsets while still maintaining or improving predictive performance with respect to the baseline WC model. Clustering Dycom with Hierarchical Clustering did not offer significant advantage in terms of predictive performance. Conclusion: Clustering methods can be an effective way to automatically generate Dycom\\'s CC subsets.

  14. Clustering analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romli

    1997-01-01

    Cluster analysis is the name of group of multivariate techniques whose principal purpose is to distinguish similar entities from the characteristics they process.To study this analysis, there are several algorithms that can be used. Therefore, this topic focuses to discuss the algorithms, such as, similarity measures, and hierarchical clustering which includes single linkage, complete linkage and average linkage method. also, non-hierarchical clustering method, which is popular name K -mean method ' will be discussed. Finally, this paper will be described the advantages and disadvantages of every methods

  15. Cluster analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Everitt, Brian S; Leese, Morven; Stahl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Cluster analysis comprises a range of methods for classifying multivariate data into subgroups. By organizing multivariate data into such subgroups, clustering can help reveal the characteristics of any structure or patterns present. These techniques have proven useful in a wide range of areas such as medicine, psychology, market research and bioinformatics.This fifth edition of the highly successful Cluster Analysis includes coverage of the latest developments in the field and a new chapter dealing with finite mixture models for structured data.Real life examples are used throughout to demons

  16. Cluster editing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böcker, S.; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-01-01

    . The problem has been the inspiration for numerous algorithms in bioinformatics, aiming at clustering entities such as genes, proteins, phenotypes, or patients. In this paper, we review exact and heuristic methods that have been proposed for the Cluster Editing problem, and also applications......The Cluster Editing problem asks to transform a graph into a disjoint union of cliques using a minimum number of edge modifications. Although the problem has been proven NP-complete several times, it has nevertheless attracted much research both from the theoretical and the applied side...

  17. Occupational Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  18. Fuzzy Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berks, G.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf von; Jantzen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    A symptom is a condition indicating the presence of a disease, especially, when regarded as an aid in diagnosis.Symptoms are the smallest units indicating the existence of a disease. A syndrome on the other hand is an aggregate, set or cluster of concurrent symptoms which together indicate...... and clustering are the basic concerns in medicine. Classification depends on definitions of the classes and their required degree of participant of the elements in the cases' symptoms. In medicine imprecise conditions are the rule and therefore fuzzy methods are much more suitable than crisp ones. Fuzzy c......-mean clustering is an easy and well improved tool, which has been applied in many medical fields. We used c-mean fuzzy clustering after feature extraction from an aphasia database. Factor analysis was applied on a correlation matrix of 26 symptoms of language disorders and led to five factors. The factors...

  19. Cluster generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchev, Todor I [Urbana, IL; Petrov, Ivan G [Champaign, IL

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  20. Cluster Bulleticity

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657−56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025−12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary ‘baryonic’ matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. C...

  1. Cluster headache

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur ...

  2. Fine structure of Galactic foreground ISM towards high-redshift AGN - utilizing Herschel PACS and SPIRE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, K.; Pinter, S.; Frey, S.; Tóth, L. V.

    2018-05-01

    One of the most certain ways to determine star formation rate in galaxies is based on far infrared (FIR) measurements. To decide the origin of the observed FIR emission, subtracting the Galactic foreground is a crucial step. We utilized Herschel photometric data to determine the hydrogen column densities in three galactic latitude regions, at b = 27°, 50° and -80°. We applied a pixel-by-pixel fit to the spectral energy distribution (SED) for the images aquired from parallel PACS-SPIRE observations in all three sky areas. We determined the column densities with resolutions 45'' and 6', and compared the results with values estimated from the IRAS dust maps. Column densities at 27° and 50° galactic latitudes determined from the Herschel data are in a good agreement with the literature values. However, at the highest galactic latitude we found that the column densities from the Herschel data exceed those derived from the IRAS dust map.

  3. Status of Foreground and Instrument Challenges for 21cm EoR experiments - Design Strategies for SKA and HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan

    2018-05-01

    Direct detection of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) via redshifted 21 cm line of H i will reveal the nature of the first stars and galaxies as well as revolutionize our understanding of a poorly explored evolutionary phase of the Universe. Projects such as the MWA, LOFAR, and PAPER commenced in the last decade with the promise of high significance statistical detection of the EoR, but have so far only weakly constrained models owing to unforeseen challenges from bright foreground sources and instrument systematics. It is essential for next generation instruments like the HERA and SKA to have these challenges addressed. I present an analysis of these challenges - wide-field measurements, antenna beam chromaticity, reflections in the instrument, and antenna position errors - along with performance specifications and design solutions that will be critical to designing successful next-generation instruments in enabling the first detection and also in placing meaningful constraints on reionization models.

  4. The Ursa Major Cluster of galaxies .1. Cluster definition and photometric data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tully, RB; Verheijen, MAW; Pierce, MJ; Wainscoat, RJ

    1996-01-01

    The Ursa Major Cluster has received remarkably little attention, although it is as near as the Virgo Cluster and contains a comparable number of H I-rich galaxies. In this paper, criteria for group membership are discussed and data are presented for 79 galaxies identified with the group. Of these,

  5. Comparison of Intra-cluster and M87 Halo Orphan Globular Clusters in the Virgo Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Tiffany Kaye; Tuan, Jin Zong; Martellini, Adhara; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Toloba, Elisa; Peng, Eric; Longobardi, Alessia; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) — GCs with no identifiable nearby host galaxy — discovered in NGVS, a 104 deg2 CFHT/MegaCam imaging survey. At the distance of the Virgo cluster, GCs are bright enough to make good spectroscopic targets and many are barely resolved in good ground-based seeing. Our orphan GC sample is derived from a subset of NGVS-selected GC candidates that were followed up with Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy. While our primary spectroscopic targets were candidate GC satellites of Virgo dwarf elliptical and ultra-diffuse galaxies, many objects turned out to be non-satellites based on a radial velocity mismatch with the Virgo galaxy they are projected close to. Using a combination of spectral characteristics (e.g., absorption vs. emission), Gaussian mixture modeling of radial velocity and positions, and extreme deconvolution analysis of ugrizk photometry and image morphology, these non-satellites were classified into: (1) intra-cluster GCs (ICGCs) in the Virgo cluster, (2) GCs in the outer halo of M87, (3) foreground Milky Way stars, and (4) background galaxies. The statistical distinction between ICGCs and M87 halo GCs is based on velocity distributions (mean of 1100 vs. 1300 km/s and dispersions of 700 vs. 400 km/s, respectively) and radial distribution (diffuse vs. centrally concentrated, respectively). We used coaddition to increase the spectral SNR for the two classes of orphan GCs and measured the equivalent widths (EWs) of the Mg b and H-beta absorption lines. These EWs were compared to single stellar population models to obtain mean age and metallicity estimates. The ICGCs and M87 halo GCs have = –0.6+/–0.3 and –0.4+/–0.3 dex, respectively, and mean ages of >~ 5 and >~ 10 Gyr, respectively. This suggests the M87 halo GCs formed in relatively high-mass galaxies that avoided being tidally disrupted by M87 until they were close to the cluster center, while IGCCs formed in relatively low-mass galaxies that were

  6. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  7. The CBM RICH project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Boldyreva, N. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [ITEP Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [University Gießen (Germany); Eom, J. [Pusan National University (Korea, Republic of); Eschke, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Höhne, C. [University Gießen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kleipa, V. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kochenda, L. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Kolb, B. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Kopfer, J. [University Wuppertal (Germany); Kravtsov, P. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Lebedev, S.; Lebedeva, E. [University Gießen (Germany); Leonova, E. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); and others

    2014-12-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment will study the properties of super dense nuclear matter by means of heavy ion collisions at the future FAIR facility. An integral detector component is a large Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector with CO{sub 2} gas radiator, which will mainly serve for electron identification and pion suppression necessary to access rare dileptonic probes like e{sup +}e{sup −} decays of light vector mesons or J/Ψ. We describe the design of this future RICH detector and focus on results obtained by building a CBM RICH detector prototype tested at CERN-PS.

  8. Dynamics, Chemical Abundances, and ages of Globular Clusters in the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhathakurta, Puragra; NGVS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    We present a study of the dynamics, metallicities, and ages of globular clusters (GCs) in the Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey (NGVS), a deep, multi-band (u, g, r, i, z, and Ks), wide-field (104 deg2) imaging survey carried out using the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and MegaCam imager. GC candidates were selected from the NGVS survey using photometric and image morphology criteria and these were followed up with deep, medium-resolution, multi-object spectroscopy using the Keck II 10-m telescope and DEIMOS spectrograph. The primary spectroscopic targets were candidate GC satellites of dwarf elliptical (dE) and ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the Virgo cluster. While many objects were confirmed as GC satellites of Virgo dEs and UDGs, many turned out to be non-satellites based on their radial velocity and/or positional mismatch any identifiable Virgo cluster galaxy. We have used a combination of spectral characteristics (e.g., presence of absorption vs. emission lines), new Gaussian mixture modeling of radial velocity and sky position data, and a new extreme deconvolution analysis of ugrizKs photometry and image morphology, to classify all the objects in our sample into: (1) GC satellites of dE galaxies, (2) GC satellites of UDGs, (3) intra-cluster GCs (ICGCs) in the Virgo cluster, (4) GCs in the outer halo of the central cluster galaxy M87, (5) foreground Milky Way stars, and (6) distant background galaxies. We use these data to study the dynamics and dark matter content of dE and UDGs in the Virgo cluster, place important constraints on the nature of dE nuclei, and study the origin of ICGCs versus GCs in the remote M87 halo.We are grateful for financial support from the NSF and NASA/STScI.

  9. Foreground and Sensitivity Analysis for Broadband (2D) 21 cm-Lyα and 21 cm-Hα Correlation Experiments Probing the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neben, Abraham R.; Stalder, Brian; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Tonry, John L.

    2017-11-01

    A detection of the predicted anticorrelation between 21 cm and either Lyα or Hα from the epoch of reionization (EOR) would be a powerful probe of the first galaxies. While 3D intensity maps isolate foregrounds in low-{k}\\parallel modes, infrared surveys cannot yet match the field of view and redshift resolution of radio intensity mapping experiments. In contrast, 2D (I.e., broadband) infrared intensity maps can be measured with current experiments and are limited by foregrounds instead of photon or thermal noise. We show that 2D experiments can measure most of the 3D fluctuation power at klimit on residual foregrounds of the 21 cm-Lyα cross-power spectrum at z˜ 7 of {{{Δ }}}2text{kJy sr}}-1 {{mK}}) (95%) at {\\ell }˜ 800. We predict levels of foreground correlation and sample variance noise in future experiments, showing that higher-resolution surveys such as LOFAR, SKA-LOW, and the Dark Energy Survey can start to probe models of the 21 cm-Lyα EOR cross spectrum.

  10. Neutron rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, R.

    1979-01-01

    If some β - emitters are particularly interesting to study in light, medium, and heavy nuclei, another (and also) difficult problem is to know systematically the properties of these neutron rich nuclei far from the stability line. A review of some of their characteristics is presented. How far is it possible to be objective in the interpretation of data is questioned and implications are discussed

  11. Clustering Dycom

    KAUST Repository

    Minku, Leandro L.; Hou, Siqing

    2017-01-01

    baseline WC model is also included in the analysis. Results: Clustering Dycom with K-Means can potentially help to split the CC projects, managing to achieve similar or better predictive performance than Dycom. However, K-Means still requires the number

  12. Toward understanding environmental effects in SDSS clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einasto, Jaan; Tago, E.; Einasto, M.; Saar, E.; Suhhonenko, I.; /Tartu Observ.; Heinamaki, P.; /Tartu Observ. /Tuorla Observ.; Hutsi, G.; /Tartu Observ. /Garching, Max; Tucker, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    We find clusters and superclusters of galaxies using the Data Release 1 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine the luminosity function of clusters and find that clusters in a high-density environment have a luminosity a factor of {approx}5 higher than in a low-density environment. We also study clusters and superclusters in numerical simulations. Simulated clusters in a high-density environment are also more massive than those in a low-density environment. Comparison of the density distribution at various epochs in simulations shows that in large low-density regions (voids) dynamical evolution is very slow and stops at an early epoch. In contrast, in large regions of higher density (superclusters) dynamical evolution starts early and continues until the present; here particles cluster early, and by merging of smaller groups very rich systems of galaxies form.

  13. The CBM RICH project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Akishin, P. [Laboratory of Information Technologies, Joint Institute for Nuclear research (JINR-LIT), Dubna (Russian Federation); Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Belogurov, S. [SSC RF ITEP, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bendarouach, J. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Boldyreva, N. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Chernogorov, A. [SSC RF ITEP, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Deveaux, C. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Dobyrn, V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Dürr, M. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Eschke, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Förtsch, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Heep, J.; Höhne, C. [Institute of Physics II and Institute of Applied Physics, Justus Liebig University Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Kampert, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); and others

    2017-02-11

    The CBM RICH detector is an integral component of the future CBM experiment at FAIR, providing efficient electron identification and pion suppression necessary for the measurement of rare dileptonic probes in heavy ion collisions. The RICH design is based on CO{sub 2} gas as radiator, a segmented spherical glass focussing mirror with Al+MgF{sub 2} reflective coating, and Multianode Photomultipliers for efficient Cherenkov photon detection. Hamamatsu H12700 MAPMTs have recently been selected as photon sensors, following an extensive sensor evaluation, including irradiation tests to ensure sufficient radiation hardness of the MAPMTs. A brief overview of the detector design and concept is given, results on the radiation hardness of the photon sensors are shown, and the development of a FPGA-TDC based readout chain is discussed.

  14. The CLEO RICH detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artuso, M.; Ayad, R.; Bukin, K.; Efimov, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Dambasuren, E.; Kopp, S.; Li, Ji; Majumder, G.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Wang, J.C.; Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Maravin, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Smith, A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design, construction and performance of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector (RICH) constructed to identify charged particles in the CLEO experiment. Cherenkov radiation occurs in LiF crystals, both planar and ones with a novel 'sawtooth'-shaped exit surface. Photons in the wavelength interval 135-165nm are detected using multi-wire chambers filled with a mixture of methane gas and triethylamine vapor. Excellent π/K separation is demonstrated

  15. CBM RICH geometry optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Tariq; Hoehne, Claudia [II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures in A+A collisions from 2-11 AGeV (SIS100) beam energy. The main electron identification detector in the CBM experiment will be a RICH detector with a CO{sub 2} gaseous-radiator, focusing spherical glass mirrors, and MAPMT photo-detectors being placed on a PMT-plane. The RICH detector is located directly behind the CBM dipole magnet. As the final magnet geometry is now available, some changes in the RICH geometry become necessary. In order to guarantee a magnetic field of 1 mT at maximum in the PMT plane for effective operation of the MAPMTs, two measures have to be taken: The PMT plane is moved outwards of the stray field by tilting the mirrors by 10 degrees and shielding boxes have been designed. In this contribution the results of the geometry optimization procedure are presented.

  16. THE MASSIVE DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY: THE FIRST DISTANT GALAXY CLUSTER DISCOVERED BY WISE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gettings, Daniel P.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Stanford, S. Adam; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Masci, Frank J.; Papovich, Casey; Tanaka, Ichi; Wright, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of a z = 0.99 galaxy cluster discovered using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). This is the first z ∼ 1 cluster candidate from the Massive Distant Clusters of WISE Survey to be confirmed. It was selected as an overdensity of probable z ∼> 1 sources using a combination of WISE and Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 photometric catalogs. Deeper follow-up imaging data from Subaru and WIYN reveal the cluster to be a rich system of galaxies, and multi-object spectroscopic observations from Keck confirm five cluster members at z = 0.99. The detection and confirmation of this cluster represents a first step toward constructing a uniformly selected sample of distant, high-mass galaxy clusters over the full extragalactic sky using WISE data.

  17. Extended radio sources in the cluster environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.O. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Extended radio galaxies that lie in rich and poor clusters were studied. A sample of 3CR and 4C radio sources that spatially coincide with poor Zwicky clusters of galaxies was observed to obtain accurate positions and flux densities. Then interferometer observations at a resolution of approx. = 10 arcsec were performed on the sample. The resulting maps were used to determine the nature of the extended source structure, to make secure optical identifications, and to eliminate possible background sources. The results suggest that the environments around both classical double and head-tail radio sources are similar in rich and poor clusters. The majority of the poor cluster sources exhibit some signs of morphological distortion (i.e., head-tails) indicative of dynamic interaction with a relatively dense intracluster medium. A large fraction (60 to 100%) of all radio sources appear to be members of clusters of galaxies if one includes both poor and rich cluster sources. Detailed total intensity and polarization observations for a more restricted sample of two classical double sources and nine head-tail galaxies were also performed. The purpose was to examine the spatial distributions of spectral index and polarization. Thin streams of radio emission appear to connect the nuclear radio-point components to the more extended structures in the head-tail galaxies. It is suggested that a non-relativistic plasma beam can explain both the appearance of the thin streams and larger-scale structure as well as the energy needed to generate the observed radio emission. The rich and poor radio cluster samples are combined to investigate the relationship between source morphology and the scale sizes of clustering. There is some indication that a large fraction of radio sources, including those in these samples, are in superclusters of galaxies

  18. Identification of rice cultivar with exclusive characteristic to Cd using a field-polluted soil and its foreground application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jie; Wei, Shuhe; Niu, Rongcheng; Li, Yunmeng; Wang, Shanshan; Zhu, Jiangong

    2013-04-01

    Using low-accumulative plant, especially excluder crop, to safely produce food is one of the very important technologies of phytoremediation, which is practical to safe production and long-term remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil. A pot experiment using field cadmium (Cd)-contaminated soil (Cd concentration was 0.75 mg kg(-1)) was conducted to compare Cd accumulation differences among 39 normal rice cultivars (Japonica) in Shenyang region of China for food safety and high grain yield aim. The results showed that brown grain Cd concentration in 12 rice cultivars of a total of 39 tested cultivars was lower than 0.2 mg kg(-1) (Agricultural Trade Standard of Nonpollution Food for Rice of China, NY 5115-2008). In these 12 cultivars, Cd enrichment factors (Cd concentration ratio in shoot to that in soil) of nine cultivars were lower than 1. Likewise, Cd translocation factors (Cd concentration ratio in shoot to that in root) of eight cultivars were lower than the 0.28 average. Furthermore, grain yield per pot of seven cultivars were higher than the average 18.4 g pot(-1). Four cultivars, i.e., Shendao 5, Tianfu 1, Fuhe 90, and Yanfeng 47 showed Cd-exclusive characteristic and better foreground application.

  19. Efficient Foreground Extraction From HEVC Compressed Video for Application to Real-Time Analysis of Surveillance 'Big' Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bhaskar; Kundu, Malay K

    2015-11-01

    While surveillance video is the biggest source of unstructured Big Data today, the emergence of high-efficiency video coding (HEVC) standard is poised to have a huge role in lowering the costs associated with transmission and storage. Among the benefits of HEVC over the legacy MPEG-4 Advanced Video Coding (AVC), is a staggering 40 percent or more bitrate reduction at the same visual quality. Given the bandwidth limitations, video data are compressed essentially by removing spatial and temporal correlations that exist in its uncompressed form. This causes compressed data, which are already de-correlated, to serve as a vital resource for machine learning with significantly fewer samples for training. In this paper, an efficient approach to foreground extraction/segmentation is proposed using novel spatio-temporal de-correlated block features extracted directly from the HEVC compressed video. Most related techniques, in contrast, work on uncompressed images claiming significant storage and computational resources not only for the decoding process prior to initialization but also for the feature selection/extraction and background modeling stage following it. The proposed approach has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated against several other state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Geometric and electronic structures of small GaN clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Bin; Cao Peilin

    2004-08-02

    The geometric and electronic structures of Ga{sub x}N{sub y} (x+y{<=}8) clusters have been calculated using a full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital method, combined with molecular dynamics and simulated annealing techniques. It is found that the structures, binding energies and HOMO-LUMO gaps of these clusters strongly depend on their size and composition. The lowest energy structures of these clusters are obtained, and the trends in the geometries are discussed. The binding energy of the cluster increases as the size of cluster increases. N-rich cluster has larger binding energy than Ga-rich ones. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of these clusters are evaluated.

  1. Cluster forcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Budde

    The cluster theory attributed to Michael Porter has significantly influenced industrial policies in countries across Europe and North America since the beginning of the 1990s. Institutions such as the EU, OECD and the World Bank and governments in countries such as the UK, France, The Netherlands...... or management. Both the Accelerate Wales and the Accelerate Cluster programmes target this issue by trying to establish networks between companies that can be used to supply knowledge from research institutions to manufacturing companies. The paper concludes that public sector interventions can make...... businesses. The universities were not considered by the participating companies to be important parts of the local business environment and inputs from universities did not appear to be an important source to access knowledge about new product development or new techniques in production, distribution...

  2. Regional Innovation Clusters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — The Regional Innovation Clusters serve a diverse group of sectors and geographies. Three of the initial pilot clusters, termed Advanced Defense Technology clusters,...

  3. Cluster analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mucha, Hans-Joachim; Sofyan, Hizir

    2000-01-01

    As an explorative technique, duster analysis provides a description or a reduction in the dimension of the data. It classifies a set of observations into two or more mutually exclusive unknown groups based on combinations of many variables. Its aim is to construct groups in such a way that the profiles of objects in the same groups are relatively homogenous whereas the profiles of objects in different groups are relatively heterogeneous. Clustering is distinct from classification techniques, ...

  4. Complex brain networks: From topological communities to clustered

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Complex brain networks: From topological communities to clustered dynamics ... Recent research has revealed a rich and complicated network topology in the cortical connectivity of mammalian brains. ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News.

  5. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections

  6. Is the Comma cluster a zel'dovich disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.A.; Gregory, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    The two-dimensional structure of the Coma cluster is analyzed with the use of galaxies from a wide-area redshift survey. Since redshift observations allow us to sort cluster galaxies from foreground and background galaxies, we can accurately trace the cluster structure to large radii. The following results have been obtained: (1) The center of mass of the Coma cluster is coincident with NGC 4874, the brightest S0 (or cD) galaxy. (2) The cluster has an elliptical shape with axis ratio-0.55 and position angle 67 0 . (3) There is a sharp falloff in the distribution of bright galaxies at a radius ab)/sup 1/2/=rapprox. =3.1. (4) The radial distribution of galaxies contains a slight secondary maximum at a radius (ab) 12 =rapprox. =1 0 .4. The observations are used to show that the cluster may be composed of two components, a central spherical core plus a more widely idspersed flattened disk. We suggest that the observed structure of Coma can be consistently explained using the model of Doroshkevich, Sunyaev, and Zel'kovich which involves the formation of massive protoclusters prior to the epoch of galaxy formation

  7. Intrinsic alignment of redMaPPer clusters: cluster shape-matter density correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uitert, Edo; Joachimi, Benjamin

    2017-07-01

    We measure the alignment of the shapes of galaxy clusters, as traced by their satellite distributions, with the matter density field using the public redMaPPer catalogue based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey-Data Release 8 (SDSS-DR8), which contains 26 111 clusters up to z ˜ 0.6. The clusters are split into nine redshift and richness samples; in each of them, we detect a positive alignment, showing that clusters point towards density peaks. We interpret the measurements within the tidal alignment paradigm, allowing for a richness and redshift dependence. The intrinsic alignment (IA) amplitude at the pivot redshift z = 0.3 and pivot richness λ = 30 is A_IA^gen=12.6_{-1.2}^{+1.5}. We obtain tentative evidence that the signal increases towards higher richness and lower redshift. Our measurements agree well with results of maxBCG clusters and with dark-matter-only simulations. Comparing our results to the IA measurements of luminous red galaxies, we find that the IA amplitude of galaxy clusters forms a smooth extension towards higher mass. This suggests that these systems share a common alignment mechanism, which can be exploited to improve our physical understanding of IA.

  8. A New Database of Digits Extracted from Coins with Hard-to-Segment Foreground for Optical Character Recognition Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu Pan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the release date struck on a coin is important information of its monetary type, recognition of extracted digits may assist in identification of monetary types. However, digit images extracted from coins are challenging for conventional optical character recognition methods because the foreground of such digits has very often the same color as their background. In addition, other noises, including the wear of coin metal, make it more difficult to obtain a correct segmentation of the character shape. To address those challenges, this article presents the CoinNUMS database for automatic digit recognition. The database CoinNUMS, containing 3,006 digit images, is divided into three subsets. The first subset CoinNUMS_geni consists of 606 digit images manually cropped from high-resolution photographs of well-conserved coins from GENI coin photographs; the second subset CoinNUMS_pcgs_a consists of 1,200 digit images automatically extracted from a subset of the USA_Grading numismatic database containing coins in different quality; the last subset CoinNUMS_pcgs_m consists of 1,200 digit images manually extracted from the same coin photographs as CoinNUMS_pcgs_a. In CoinNUMS_pcgs_a and CoinNUMS_pcgs_m, the digit images are extracted from the release date. In CoinNUMS_geni, the digit images can come from the cropped date, the face value, or any other legends containing digits in the coin. To show the difficulty of these databases, we have tested recognition algorithms of the literature. The database and the results of the tested algorithms will be freely available on a dedicated website.1

  9. Global 21 cm Signal Extraction from Foreground and Instrumental Effects. I. Pattern Recognition Framework for Separation Using Training Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauscher, Keith; Rapetti, David; Burns, Jack O.; Switzer, Eric

    2018-02-01

    The sky-averaged (global) highly redshifted 21 cm spectrum from neutral hydrogen is expected to appear in the VHF range of ∼20–200 MHz and its spectral shape and strength are determined by the heating properties of the first stars and black holes, by the nature and duration of reionization, and by the presence or absence of exotic physics. Measurements of the global signal would therefore provide us with a wealth of astrophysical and cosmological knowledge. However, the signal has not yet been detected because it must be seen through strong foregrounds weighted by a large beam, instrumental calibration errors, and ionospheric, ground, and radio-frequency-interference effects, which we collectively refer to as “systematics.” Here, we present a signal extraction method for global signal experiments which uses Singular Value Decomposition of “training sets” to produce systematics basis functions specifically suited to each observation. Instead of requiring precise absolute knowledge of the systematics, our method effectively requires precise knowledge of how the systematics can vary. After calculating eigenmodes for the signal and systematics, we perform a weighted least square fit of the corresponding coefficients and select the number of modes to include by minimizing an information criterion. We compare the performance of the signal extraction when minimizing various information criteria and find that minimizing the Deviance Information Criterion most consistently yields unbiased fits. The methods used here are built into our widely applicable, publicly available Python package, pylinex, which analytically calculates constraints on signals and systematics from given data, errors, and training sets.

  10. An improved K-means clustering method for cDNA microarray image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T N; Li, T J; Shao, G F; Wu, S X

    2015-07-14

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool for human genetic research and other biomedical applications. Numerous improvements to the standard K-means algorithm have been carried out to complete the image segmentation step. However, most of the previous studies classify the image into two clusters. In this paper, we propose a novel K-means algorithm, which first classifies the image into three clusters, and then one of the three clusters is divided as the background region and the other two clusters, as the foreground region. The proposed method was evaluated on six different data sets. The analyses of accuracy, efficiency, expression values, special gene spots, and noise images demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in improving the segmentation quality.

  11. HEAO A-1 observations of x ray emitting clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies were known to be sources of x ray emission. Statistical analysis of how the x ray emission from clusters is related to other cluster properties was limited by the small number of clusters observed in the x ray region and the completeness of the x ray sample being considered. Both of these limitations are solved by producing a flux-limited catalog of x ray emitting Abell clusters of galaxies and using this catalog to investigate how the x ray emission correlates with other cluster properties. X ray data from the HEAO A-1 experiment were used to search for x ray emission from Abell clusters of galaxies. Selection criteria were chosen to ensure that the resulting catalog was complete and as free as possible from selection effects. The resulting identifications and x ray luminosities were used to check correlations with other cluster properties. Special consideration was given to observational selection effects and consistency checks. The data were consistent with all clusters of galaxies being x ray emitters beyond some limiting luminosity, which depends on cluster richness. Furthermore, the x ray luminosity of clusters is correlated with the richness of the cluster, its galaxy content, and the spacial distribution and galaxy content of galaxies within the cluster. It is concluded that the x ray emission from clusters of galaxies depends not only on the richness of the cluster but also the morphology of the cluster

  12. The clustered nucleus-cluster structures in stable and unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freer, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The subject of clustering has a lineage which runs throughout the history of nuclear physics. Its attraction is the simplification of the often uncorrelated behaviour of independent particles to organized and coherent quasi-crystalline structures. In this review the ideas behind the development of clustering in light nuclei are investigated, mostly from the stand-point of the harmonic oscillator framework. This allows a unifying description of alpha-conjugate and neutron-rich nuclei, alike. More sophisticated models of clusters are explored, such as antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. A number of contemporary topics in clustering are touched upon; the 3α-cluster state in 12 C, nuclear molecules and clustering at the drip-line. Finally, an understanding of the 12 C+ 12 C resonances in 24 Mg, within the framework of the theoretical ideas developed in the review, is presented

  13. Nuclear clustering - a cluster core model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Selvi, G.; Nandhini, N.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear clustering, similar to other clustering phenomenon in nature is a much warranted study, since it would help us in understanding the nature of binding of the nucleons inside the nucleus, closed shell behaviour when the system is highly deformed, dynamics and structure at extremes. Several models account for the clustering phenomenon of nuclei. We present in this work, a cluster core model study of nuclear clustering in light mass nuclei

  14. Multiple populations along the asymptotic giant branch of the globular cluster M 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lardo, C.; Salaris, M.; Savino, A.; Donati, P.; Stetson, P. B.; Cassisi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all Galactic globular clusters host stars that display characteristic abundance anti-correlations, like the O-rich/Na-poor pattern typical of field halo stars, together with O-poor/Na-rich additional components. A recent spectroscopic investigation questioned the presence of O-poor/Na-rich

  15. Near infrared photometry of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.L.; Menzies, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    Photographic photometry on the V, Isub(K) system has been obtained for giant stars in the metal-rich globular clusters NGC 5927, 6171, 6352, 6356, 6388, 6522, 6528, 6712 and 6723. Colour-magnitude diagrams are presented. These data, with earlier observations of NGC 104 (47 Tuc), yield new parameters to describe the giant branch. These are the colour of the red variables, represented by their mean colour (V - Isub(K)) 0 or by the colour (V - Isub(K))sub(BO) of the bluest red variable on the giant branch of a cluster, and ΔV' which is the magnitude difference between the horizontal branch and the highest point on the giant branch. The latter is independent of reddening, since the giant branch of the most metal-rich clusters passes through a maximum in the V, V - Isub(K) plane. These parameters are correlated with the metal content, deduced from integrated photometry: the red variables are redder and the giant branch fainter the higher the metal content. Comparison with theoretical evolutionary tracks suggests that the range in metal content of these clusters is at most a factor of 10, the most metal-rich clusters possibly approaching the solar value. The cluster giant branches and those of open clusters, groups and field stars of the old disk population are compared. The assumption that all the globular clusters have an absolute magnitude on the horizontal branch of Msub(v) = + 0.9, as found recently for 47 Tuc, gives good agreement between the magnitudes of giant stars in the most metal rich of the globular clusters and those of field stars deduced from statistical parallaxes and moving group parallaxes. The values of the parameters ΔV' and (V - Isub(k))sub(BO) also approach those in the moving groups. The globular clusters have a longer horizontal branch, however, and the subgiants are bluer even when the values of ) 7Fe/H{ appear to be the same. (author). )

  16. Cluster headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  17. The detection of neutron clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, F.M.; Labiche, M.; Orr, N.A.; Angelique, J.C. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire] [and others

    2001-11-01

    A new approach to the production and detection of bound neutron clusters is presented. The technique is based on the breakup of beams of very neutron-rich nuclei and the subsequent detection of the recoiling proton in a liquid scintillator. The method has been tested in the breakup of {sup 11}Li, {sup 14}Be and {sup 15}B beams by a C target. Some 6 events were observed that exhibit the characteristics of a multi-neutron cluster liberated in the breakup of {sup 14}Be, most probably in the channel {sup 10}Be+{sup 4}n. The various backgrounds that may mimic such a signal are discussed in detail. (author)

  18. Groups and clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijleveld, W.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, a correlative study is performed with respect to the radio and X-ray parameters of galaxy clusters and groups of galaxies (Msub(v)-Psub(1.4); Msub(v)-Lsub(x); Lsub(x)-Psub(1.4); R-Msub(v) correlations). Special attention is paid to correlations with cD and elliptical galaxies. It is concluded that in rich clusters massive cD galaxies form; massive galaxies are able to bind a large X-ray halo; strong X-ray emitters fuel their central radio sources at a high rate; the total gas content of groups is low, which implies that the contribution of groups to the total matter density in the universe is small. (Auth.)

  19. LHCB RICH gas system proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Bosteels, Michel; Haider, S

    2001-01-01

    Both LHCb RICH will be operated with fluorocarbon as gas radiator. RICH 1 will be filled with 4m^3 of C4F10 and RICH 2 with 100m^3 of CF4. The gas systems will run as a closed loop circulation and a gas recovery system within the closed loop is planned for RICH 1, where the recovery of the CF4 will only be realised during filling and emptying of the detector. Inline gas purification is foreseen for the gas systems in order to limit water and oxygen impurities.

  20. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in REXCESS Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarsma, Deborah B.; Leisman, L.; Bruch, S.; Donahue, M.

    2009-01-01

    Most galaxy clusters contain a Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) which is larger than the other cluster ellipticals and has a more extended profile. In the hierarchical model, the BCG forms through many galaxy mergers in the crowded center of the cluster, and thus its properties give insight into the assembly of the cluster as a whole. In this project, we are working with the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS) team (Boehringer et al 2007) to study BCGs in 33 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters, 0.055 < z < 0.183. We are imaging the BCGs in R band at the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research (SOAR) in Chile. In this poster, we discuss our methods and give preliminary measurements of the BCG magnitudes, morphology, and stellar mass. We compare these BCG properties with the properties of their host clusters, particularly of the X-ray emitting gas.

  1. Information rich display design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Robin; Braseth, Alf Ove; Veland, Oeystein

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the concept Information Rich Displays. The purpose of Information Rich Displays (IRDs) is to condensate prevailing information in process displays in such a way that each display format (picture) contains more relevant information for the user. Compared to traditional process control displays, this new concept allows the operator to attain key information at a glance and at the same time allows for improved monitoring of larger portions of the process. This again allows for reduced navigation between both process and trend displays and ease the cognitive demand on the operator. This concept has been created while working on designing display prototypes for the offshore petroleum production facilities of tomorrow. Offshore installations basically consist of wells, separation trains (where oil, gas and water are separated from each other), an oil tax measurement system (where oil quality is measured and the pressure increased to allow for export), gas compression (compression of gas for export) and utility systems (water treatment, chemical systems etc.). This means that an offshore control room operator has to deal with a complex process that comprises several functionally different systems. The need for a new approach to offshore display format design is in particular based on shortcomings in today's designs related to the keyhole effect, where the display format only reveals a fraction of the whole process. Furthermore, the upcoming introduction of larger off- and on-shore operation centres will increase the size and complexity of the operators' work domain. In the light of the increased demands on the operator, the proposed IRDs aim to counter the negative effects this may have on the workload. In this work we have attempted to classify the wide range of different roles an operator can have in different situations. The information content and amount being presented to the operator in a display should be viewed in context of the roles the

  2. Acute ethanol has biphasic effects on short- and long-term memory in both foreground and background contextual fear conditioning in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulick, Danielle; Gould, Thomas J

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol is a frequently abused, addictive drug that impairs cognitive function. Ethanol may disrupt cognitive processes by altering attention, short-term memory, and/or long-term memory. Interestingly, some research suggests that ethanol may enhance cognitive processes at lower doses. The current research examined the dose-dependent effects of ethanol on contextual and cued fear conditioning. In addition, the present studies assessed the importance of stimulus salience in the effects of ethanol and directly compared the effects of ethanol on short-term and long-term memory. This study employed both foreground and background fear conditioning, which differ in the salience of contextual stimuli, and tested conditioning at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 1 week in order to assess the effects of ethanol on short-term and long-term memory. Foreground conditioning consisted of 2 presentations of a foot shock unconditioned stimulus (US) (2 seconds, 0.57 mA). Background conditioning consisted of 2 auditory conditioned stimulus (30 seconds, 85 dB white noise)-foot shock (US; 2 seconds, 0.57 mA) pairings. For both foreground and background conditioning, ethanol enhanced short-term and long-term memory for contextual and cued conditioning at a low dose (0.25 g/kg) and impaired short-term and long-term memory for contextual and cued conditioning at a high dose (1.0 g/kg). These results suggest that ethanol has long-lasting, biphasic effects on short-term and long-term memory for contextual and cued conditioning. Furthermore, the effects of ethanol on contextual fear conditioning are independent of the salience of the context.

  3. The neutrino opacity of neutron rich matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcain, P.N., E-mail: pabloalcain@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, FCEyN, UBA and IFIBA, Conicet, Pabellón 1, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFIBA-CONICET (Argentina); Dorso, C.O. [Departamento de Física, FCEyN, UBA and IFIBA, Conicet, Pabellón 1, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFIBA-CONICET (Argentina)

    2017-05-15

    The study of neutron rich matter, present in neutron star, proto-neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae, can lead to further understanding of the behavior of nuclear matter in highly asymmetric nuclei. Heterogeneous structures are expected to exist in these systems, often referred to as nuclear pasta. We have carried out a systematic study of neutrino opacity for different thermodynamic conditions in order to assess the impact that the structure has on it. We studied the dynamics of the neutrino opacity of the heterogeneous matter at different thermodynamic conditions with semiclassical molecular dynamics model already used to study nuclear multifragmentation. For different densities, proton fractions and temperature, we calculate the very long range opacity and the cluster distribution. The neutrino opacity is of crucial importance for the evolution of the core-collapse supernovae and the neutrino scattering.

  4. Clusters of galaxies associated with quasars. I. 3C 206

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, E.; Yee, H.K.C.; Green, R.F.; Kinman, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    Multislit spectroscopy and three-color CCD photometry of the galaxies in the cluster associated with the quasar 3C 206 (PKS 0837-12) at z = 0.198 are presented. This cluster is the richest environment of any low-redshift quasar observed in an Abell richness class 1 cluster. The cluster has a very flattened structure and a very concentrated core about the quasar. Most of the galaxies in this field have colors and luminosities consistent with normal galaxies at this redshift. The background-corrected blue fraction of galaxies is consistent with values for other rich clusters. The existence of several blue galaxies in the concentrated cluster core is an anomaly for a region of such high galaxy density, however, suggesting the absence of a substantial intracluster medium. This claim is supported by the Fanaroff-Riley (1974) class II morphology of the radio source. The velocity dispersion calculated from 11 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members is 500 + or - 110 km/s, which is slightly lower than the average for Abell class 1 clusters. A high frequency of interaction between the quasar host galaxy and cluster core members at low relative velocities, and a low intracluster gas pressure, may comprise a favorable environment for quasar activity. The properties of the cluster of galaxies associated with 3C 206 are consistent with this model. 59 refs

  5. THE DYNAMICAL STATE OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AND THE FORMATION OF CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coziol, R.; Andernach, H.; Caretta, C. A.; Alamo-MartInez, K. A.; Tago, E.

    2009-01-01

    A large sample of Abell clusters of galaxies, selected for the likely presence of a dominant galaxy, is used to study the dynamical properties of the brightest cluster members (BCMs). From visual inspection of Digitized Sky Survey images combined with redshift information we identify 1426 candidate BCMs located in 1221 different redshift components associated with 1169 different Abell clusters. This is the largest sample published so far of such galaxies. From our own morphological classification we find that ∼92% of the BCMs in our sample are early-type galaxies and 48% are of cD type. We confirm what was previously observed based on much smaller samples, namely, that a large fraction of BCMs have significant peculiar velocities. From a subsample of 452 clusters having at least 10 measured radial velocities, we estimate a median BCM peculiar velocity of 32% of their host clusters' radial velocity dispersion. This suggests that most BCMs are not at rest in the potential well of their clusters. This phenomenon is common to galaxy clusters in our sample, and not a special trait of clusters hosting cD galaxies. We show that the peculiar velocity of the BCM is independent of cluster richness and only slightly dependent on the Bautz-Morgan type. We also find a weak trend for the peculiar velocity to rise with the cluster velocity dispersion. The strongest dependence is with the morphological type of the BCM: cD galaxies tend to have lower relative peculiar velocities than elliptical galaxies. This result points to a connection between the formation of the BCMs and that of their clusters. Our data are qualitatively consistent with the merging-groups scenario, where BCMs in clusters formed first in smaller subsystems comparable to compact groups of galaxies. In this scenario, clusters would have formed recently from the mergers of many such groups and would still be in a dynamically unrelaxed state.

  6. Diversity among galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, M.F.; Rood, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The classification of galaxy clusters is discussed. Consideration is given to the classification scheme of Abell (1950's), Zwicky (1950's), Morgan, Matthews, and Schmidt (1964), and Morgan-Bautz (1970). Galaxies can be classified based on morphology, chemical composition, spatial distribution, and motion. The correlation between a galaxy's environment and morphology is examined. The classification scheme of Rood-Sastry (1971), which is based on clusters's morphology and galaxy population, is described. The six types of clusters they define include: (1) a cD-cluster dominated by a single large galaxy, (2) a cluster dominated by a binary, (3) a core-halo cluster, (4) a cluster dominated by several bright galaxies, (5) a cluster appearing flattened, and (6) an irregularly shaped cluster. Attention is also given to the evolution of cluster structures, which is related to initial density and cluster motion

  7. The HectoMAP Cluster Survey. I. redMaPPer Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J.; Rines, Kenneth J.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Utsumi, Yousuke; Diaferio, Antonaldo

    2018-04-01

    We use the dense HectoMAP redshift survey to explore the properties of 104 redMaPPer cluster candidates. The redMaPPer systems in HectoMAP cover the full range of richness and redshift (0.08 systems included in the Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam public data release are bona fide clusters. The median number of spectroscopic members per cluster is ∼20. We include redshifts of 3547 member candidates listed in the redMaPPer catalog whether they are cluster members or not. We evaluate the redMaPPer membership probability spectroscopically. The purity (number of real systems) in redMaPPer exceeds 90% even at the lowest richness. Three massive galaxy clusters (M ∼ 2 × 1013 M ⊙) associated with X-ray emission in the HectoMAP region are not included in the public redMaPPer catalog with λ rich > 20, because they lie outside the cuts for this catalog.

  8. Intergalactic stellar populations in intermediate redshift clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, J.; Giraud, E.; Toledo, I.; Selman, F.; Quintana, H.

    2012-11-01

    A substantial fraction of the total stellar mass in rich clusters of galaxies resides in a diffuse intergalactic component usually referred to as the intracluster light (ICL). Theoretical models indicate that these intergalactic stars originate mostly from the tidal interaction of the cluster galaxies during the assembly history of the cluster, and that a significant fraction of these stars could have formed in situ from the late infall of cold metal-poor gas clouds on to the cluster. However, these models also overpredict the fraction of stellar mass in the ICL by a substantial margin, something that is still not well understood. The models also make predictions about the age distribution of the ICL stars, which may provide additional observational constraints. Here we present population synthesis models for the ICL of an intermediate redshift (z = 0.29) X-ray cluster that we have extensively studied in previous papers. The advantage of observing intermediate redshift clusters rather than nearby ones is that the former fit the field of view of multi-object spectrographs in 8-m telescopes and therefore permit us to encompass most of the ICL with only a few well-placed slits. In this paper we show that by stacking spectra at different locations within the ICL it is possible to reach sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratios to fit population synthesis models and derive meaningful results. The models provide ages and metallicities for the dominant populations at several different locations within the ICL and the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) halo, as well as measures of the kinematics of the stars as a function of distance from the BCG. We thus find that the ICL in our cluster is dominated by old metal-rich stars, at odds with what has been found in nearby clusters where the stars that dominate the ICL are old and metal poor. While we see weak evidence of a young, metal-poor component, if real, these young stars would amount to less than 1 per cent of the total ICL

  9. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark. The longit...... but being quick to withdraw in times of crisis....

  10. Clustering of correlated networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorogovtsev, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    We obtain the clustering coefficient, the degree-dependent local clustering, and the mean clustering of networks with arbitrary correlations between the degrees of the nearest-neighbor vertices. The resulting formulas allow one to determine the nature of the clustering of a network.

  11. Relevant Subspace Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Günnemann, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Subspace clustering aims at detecting clusters in any subspace projection of a high dimensional space. As the number of possible subspace projections is exponential in the number of dimensions, the result is often tremendously large. Recent approaches fail to reduce results to relevant subspace...... clusters. Their results are typically highly redundant, i.e. many clusters are detected multiple times in several projections. In this work, we propose a novel model for relevant subspace clustering (RESCU). We present a global optimization which detects the most interesting non-redundant subspace clusters...... achieves top clustering quality while competing approaches show greatly varying performance....

  12. Young star clusters in nearby molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getman, K. V.; Kuhn, M. A.; Feigelson, E. D.; Broos, P. S.; Bate, M. R.; Garmire, G. P.

    2018-06-01

    The SFiNCs (Star Formation in Nearby Clouds) project is an X-ray/infrared study of the young stellar populations in 22 star-forming regions with distances ≲ 1 kpc designed to extend our earlier MYStIX (Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray) survey of more distant clusters. Our central goal is to give empirical constraints on cluster formation mechanisms. Using parametric mixture models applied homogeneously to the catalogue of SFiNCs young stars, we identify 52 SFiNCs clusters and 19 unclustered stellar structures. The procedure gives cluster properties including location, population, morphology, association with molecular clouds, absorption, age (AgeJX), and infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) slope. Absorption, SED slope, and AgeJX are age indicators. SFiNCs clusters are examined individually, and collectively with MYStIX clusters, to give the following results. (1) SFiNCs is dominated by smaller, younger, and more heavily obscured clusters than MYStIX. (2) SFiNCs cloud-associated clusters have the high ellipticities aligned with their host molecular filaments indicating morphology inherited from their parental clouds. (3) The effect of cluster expansion is evident from the radius-age, radius-absorption, and radius-SED correlations. Core radii increase dramatically from ˜0.08 to ˜0.9 pc over the age range 1-3.5 Myr. Inferred gas removal time-scales are longer than 1 Myr. (4) Rich, spatially distributed stellar populations are present in SFiNCs clouds representing early generations of star formation. An appendix compares the performance of the mixture models and non-parametric minimum spanning tree to identify clusters. This work is a foundation for future SFiNCs/MYStIX studies including disc longevity, age gradients, and dynamical modelling.

  13. The C4 clustering algorithm: Clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Nichol, Robert; Reichart, Dan; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Annis, James; McKay, Timothy; Bahcall, Neta; Bernardi, Mariangela; Boehringer,; Connolly, Andrew; Goto, Tomo; Kniazev, Alexie; Lamb, Donald; Postman, Marc; Schneider, Donald; Sheth, Ravi; Voges, Wolfgang; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Portsmouth U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the ''C4 Cluster Catalog'', a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster-finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects that have plagued previous optical cluster selection. The present C4 catalog covers {approx}2600 square degrees of sky and ranges in redshift from z = 0.02 to z = 0.17. The mean cluster membership is 36 galaxies (with redshifts) brighter than r = 17.7, but the catalog includes a range of systems, from groups containing 10 members to massive clusters with over 200 cluster members with redshifts. The catalog provides a large number of measured cluster properties including sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r-band optical luminosity (L{sub r}), velocity dispersion, as well as quantitative measures of substructure and the surrounding large-scale environment. We use new, multi-color mock SDSS galaxy catalogs, empirically constructed from the {Lambda}CDM Hubble Volume (HV) Sky Survey output, to investigate the sensitivity of the C4 catalog to the various algorithm parameters (detection threshold, choice of passbands and search aperture), as well as to quantify the purity and completeness of the C4 cluster catalog. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is {approx_equal}90% complete and 95% pure above M{sub 200} = 1 x 10{sup 14} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}} and within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the SDSS DR2 data, we show that the C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 {le} z {le} 0.12. Using the mock galaxy catalogs and the full HV dark matter simulations, we show that the L{sub r} of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M{sub 200}) than the galaxy line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster

  14. Cluster ion beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popok, V.N.; Prasalovich, S.V.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Campbell, E.E.B.

    2001-01-01

    A brief state-of-the-art review in the field of cluster-surface interactions is presented. Ionised cluster beams could become a powerful and versatile tool for the modification and processing of surfaces as an alternative to ion implantation and ion assisted deposition. The main effects of cluster-surface collisions and possible applications of cluster ion beams are discussed. The outlooks of the Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus (CIDA) being developed in Guteborg University are shown

  15. An observational study of disk-population globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armandroff, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Integrated-light spectroscopy was obtained for twenty-seven globular clusters at the Ca II infrared triplet. Line strengths and radial velocities were measured from the spectra. For the well-studied clusters in the sample, the strength of the CA II lines is very well correlated with previous metallicity estimates obtained using a variety of techniques. The greatly reduced effect of interstellar extinction at these wavelengths compared to the blue region of the spectrum has permitted observations of some of the most heavily reddened clusters in the Galaxy. For several such clusters, the Ca II triplet metallicities are in poor agreement with metallicity estimates from infrared photometry by Malkan. Color-magnitude diagrams were constructed for six previously unstudied metal-rich globular clusters and for the well-studied cluster 47 Tuc. The V magnitudes of the horizontal branch stars in the six clusters are in poor agreement with previous estimates based on secondary methods. The horizontal branch morphologies and reddenings of the program clusters were also determined. Using the improved set of metallicities, radial velocities, and distance moduli, the spatial distribution, kinematics, and metallicity distribution of the Galactic globulars were analyzed. The revised data supports Zinn's conclusion that the metal-rich clusters form a highly flattened, rapidly rotating disk system, while the metal-poor clusters make up the familiar, spherically distributed, slowly rotating halo population. The scale height, metallicity distribution, and kinematics of the metal-rich globulars are in good agreement with those of the stellar thick disk. Luminosity functions were constructed, and no significant difference is found between disk and halo samples. Metallicity gradients seem to be present in the disk cluster system. The implications of these results for the formation and evol

  16. 4C radio sources in clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHardy, I.M.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of a complete sample of 4C and 4CT radio sources in Abell clusters with the Cambridge One-Mile telescope are analysed. It is concluded that radio sources are strongly concentrated towards the cluster centres and are equally likely to be found in clusters of any richness. The probability of a galaxy of a given absolute magnitude producing a source above a given luminosity does not depend on cluster membership. 4C and 4CT radio sources in clusters, selected at 178 MHz, occur preferentially in Bautz-Morgan (BM) class 1 clusters, whereas those selected at 1.4 GHz do not. The most powerful radio source in the cluster is almost always associated with the optically brightest galaxy. The average spectrum of 4C sources in the range 408 to 1407 MHz is steeper in BM class 1 than in other classes. Spectra also steepen with cluster richness. the morphology of 4C sources in clusters depends strongly on BM class and, in particular, radio-trail sources occur only in BM classes II, II-III and III. (author)

  17. Intracluster age gradients in numerous young stellar clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getman, K. V.; Feigelson, E. D.; Kuhn, M. A.; Bate, M. R.; Broos, P. S.; Garmire, G. P.

    2018-05-01

    The pace and pattern of star formation leading to rich young stellar clusters is quite uncertain. In this context, we analyse the spatial distribution of ages within 19 young (median t ≲ 3 Myr on the Siess et al. time-scale), morphologically simple, isolated, and relatively rich stellar clusters. Our analysis is based on young stellar object (YSO) samples from the Massive Young Star-Forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-ray and Star Formation in Nearby Clouds surveys, and a new estimator of pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar ages, AgeJX, derived from X-ray and near-infrared photometric data. Median cluster ages are computed within four annular subregions of the clusters. We confirm and extend the earlier result of Getman et al. (2014): 80 per cent of the clusters show age trends where stars in cluster cores are younger than in outer regions. Our cluster stacking analyses establish the existence of an age gradient to high statistical significance in several ways. Time-scales vary with the choice of PMS evolutionary model; the inferred median age gradient across the studied clusters ranges from 0.75 to 1.5 Myr pc-1. The empirical finding reported in the present study - late or continuing formation of stars in the cores of star clusters with older stars dispersed in the outer regions - has a strong foundation with other observational studies and with the astrophysical models like the global hierarchical collapse model of Vázquez-Semadeni et al.

  18. Massive Star Clusters in Ongoing Galaxy Interactions: Clues to Cluster Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, William C.; Borne, Kirk D.

    2003-09-01

    We present HST WFPC2 observations, supplemented by ground-based Hα data, of the star-cluster populations in two pairs of interacting galaxies selected for being in very different kinds of encounters seen at different stages. Dynamical information and n-body simulations provide the details of encounter geometry, mass ratio, and timing. In NGC 5752/4 we are seeing a weak encounter, well past closest approach, after about 2.5×108 yr. The large spiral NGC 5754 has a normal population of disk clusters, while the fainter companion NGC 5752 exhibits a rich population of luminous clusters with a flatter luminosity function. The strong, ongoing encounter in NGC 6621/2, seen about 1.0×108 yr past closest approach between roughly equal-mass galaxies, has produced an extensive population of luminous clusters, particularly young and luminous in a small region between the two nuclei. This region is dynamically interesting, with such a strong perturbation in the velocity field that the rotation curve reverses sign. From these results, in comparison with other strongly interacting systems discussed in the literature, cluster formation requires a threshold level of perturbation, with stage of the interaction a less important factor. The location of the most active star formation in NGC 6621/2 draws attention to a possible role for the Toomre stability threshold in shaping star formation in interacting galaxies. The rich cluster populations in NGC 5752 and NGC 6621 show that direct contact between gas-rich galaxy disks is not a requirement to form luminous clusters and that they can be triggered by processes happening within a single galaxy disk (albeit triggered by external perturbations). Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  19. Management of cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe...... or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness...... and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment...

  20. Symmetries of cluster configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, P.

    1975-01-01

    A deeper understanding of clustering phenomena in nuclei must encompass at least two interrelated aspects of the subject: (A) Given a system of A nucleons with two-body interactions, what are the relevant and persistent modes of clustering involved. What is the nature of the correlated nucleon groups which form the clusters, and what is their mutual interaction. (B) Given the cluster modes and their interaction, what systematic patterns of nuclear structure and reactions emerge from it. Are there, for example, families of states which share the same ''cluster parents''. Which cluster modes are compatible or exclude each other. What quantum numbers could characterize cluster configurations. There is no doubt that we can learn a good deal from the experimentalists who have discovered many of the features relevant to aspect (B). Symmetries specific to cluster configurations which can throw some light on both aspects of clustering are discussed

  1. Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stühmer, Roland; Dörflinger, Jörg; Rahmani, Tirdad; Thomas, Susan; Stojanovic, Ljiljana

    Rich Internet Applications significantly raise the user experience compared with legacy page-based Web applications because of their highly responsive user interfaces. Although this is a tremendous advance, it does not solve the problem of the one-size-fits-all approach1 of current Web applications. So although Rich Internet Applications put the user in a position to interact seamlessly with the Web application, they do not adapt to the context in which the user is currently working. In this paper we address the on-the-fly personalization of Rich Internet Applications. We introduce the concept of ARRIAs: Adaptive Reactive Rich Internet Applications and elaborate on how they are able to adapt to the current working context the user is engaged in. An architecture for the ad hoc adaptation of Rich Internet Applications is presented as well as a holistic framework and tools for the realization of our on-the-fly personalization approach. We divided both the architecture and the framework into two levels: offline/design-time and online/run-time. For design-time we explain how to use ontologies in order to annotate Rich Internet Applications and how to use these annotations for conceptual Web usage mining. Furthermore, we describe how to create client-side executable rules from the semantic data mining results. We present our declarative lightweight rule language tailored to the needs of being executed directly on the client. Because of the event-driven nature of the user interfaces of Rich Internet Applications, we designed a lightweight rule language based on the event-condition-action paradigm.2 At run-time the interactions of a user are tracked directly on the client and in real-time a user model is built up. The user model then acts as input to and is evaluated by our client-side complex event processing and rule engine.

  2. The cluster environments of powerful, high-redshift radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We present deep imaging of a sample of 25 powerful radio galaxies in the redshift range 0.15 gr ) about each source, a measure of the richness of environment. The powerful radio galaxies in this sample at z>0.3 occupy environments nearly as rich on average as Abell class 0 clusters of galaxies, about three times richer than the environments of the z<0.3 radio galaxies. This trend in cluster environment is consistent with that seen in radio-loud quasars over the same redshift range. Our previous work on the 3CR sample suggested that the fundamental parameter which correlates with the richness of environment might be the radio luminosity of the galaxy, rather than its redshift. Our direct imaging confirms that the most powerful radio galaxies do inhabit rich environments. (author)

  3. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark, 1963......-2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing...... in new resources to the cluster but being quick to withdraw in times of crisis....

  4. LoCuSS: weak-lensing mass calibration of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Nobuhiro; Smith, Graham P.

    2016-10-01

    We present weak-lensing mass measurements of 50 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at 0.15 ≤ z ≤ 0.3, based on uniform high-quality observations with Suprime-Cam mounted on the 8.2-m Subaru telescope. We pay close attention to possible systematic biases, aiming to control them at the ≲4 per cent level. The dominant source of systematic bias in weak-lensing measurements of the mass of individual galaxy clusters is contamination of background galaxy catalogues by faint cluster and foreground galaxies. We extend our conservative method for selecting background galaxies with (V - I') colours redder than the red sequence of cluster members to use a colour-cut that depends on cluster-centric radius. This allows us to define background galaxy samples that suffer ≤1 per cent contamination, and comprise 13 galaxies per square arcminute. Thanks to the purity of our background galaxy catalogue, the largest systematic that we identify in our analysis is a shape measurement bias of 3 per cent, that we measure using simulations that probe weak shears up to g = 0.3. Our individual cluster mass and concentration measurements are in excellent agreement with predictions of the mass-concentration relation. Equally, our stacked shear profile is in excellent agreement with the Navarro Frenk and White profile. Our new Local Cluster Substructure Survey mass measurements are consistent with the Canadian Cluster Cosmology Project and Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble surveys, and in tension with the Weighing the Giants at ˜1σ-2σ significance. Overall, the consensus at z ≤ 0.3 that is emerging from these complementary surveys represents important progress for cluster mass calibration, and augurs well for cluster cosmology.

  5. Keck Spectroscopy of Globular Clusters in the Elliptical Galaxy NGC 3610

    OpenAIRE

    Strader, Jay; Brodie, Jean P.; Schweizer, Francois; Larsen, Soeren S.; Seitzer, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    We present moderate-resolution Keck spectra of nine candidate globular clusters in the possible merger-remnant elliptical galaxy NGC 3610. Eight of the objects appear to be bona fide globular clusters of NGC 3610. We find that two of the clusters belong to an old metal-poor population, five to an old metal-rich population, and only one to an intermediate-age metal-rich population. The estimated age of the intermediate-age cluster is 1-5 Gyr, which is in agreement with earlier estimates of the...

  6. Comprehensive cluster analysis with Transitivity Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Emig, Dorothea; Truss, Anke; Albrecht, Mario; Böcker, Sebastian; Baumbach, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Transitivity Clustering is a method for the partitioning of biological data into groups of similar objects, such as genes, for instance. It provides integrated access to various functions addressing each step of a typical cluster analysis. To facilitate this, Transitivity Clustering is accessible online and offers three user-friendly interfaces: a powerful stand-alone version, a web interface, and a collection of Cytoscape plug-ins. In this paper, we describe three major workflows: (i) protein (super)family detection with Cytoscape, (ii) protein homology detection with incomplete gold standards and (iii) clustering of gene expression data. This protocol guides the user through the most important features of Transitivity Clustering and takes ∼1 h to complete.

  7. TT2014 meeting report on the 12th Transgenic Technology meeting in Edinburgh: new era of transgenic technologies with programmable nucleases in the foreground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Inken M; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2015-02-01

    The 12th Transgenic Technology meeting was held in Edinburgh on 6th-8th October 2014 and interest to participate in the meeting overcame all expectations. The TT2014 was the largest meeting ever with more than 540 scientists, technicians, and students from all over the world. The meeting had an excellent scientific program that brought information on the latest ground-breaking technologies for gene targeting and genome editing using programmable nucleases into the foreground. These presentations were well balanced with several highlights over viewing topics in embryonic stem cell research, embryogenesis, disease models, and animals in agriculture. Ample space was reserved also for short talks presenting technical development and for highlighting posters contributions. A highlight of the meeting was the award of the 10th International Society of Transgenic Technologies Prize to Janet Rossant for her outstanding contributions in the field of mouse embryogenesis.

  8. Multiply imaged Transient Events in Cluster Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimha, Delampady

    2018-04-01

    ARIES had a successful gravitational microlens project during 1998-2002. A similar monitor for Transient Events in galaxies at high redshift lensed by rich galaxy-clusters provides a challenging possibility with important cosmological implications. Rich galaxy-clusters at intermediate redshifts are powerful gravitational lenses which produce multiple images, in the shape of giant arcs of 5-20" extent, of distant background galaxies in their field. Weak lens shear of the background galaxy distribution can reliably trace the lens mass profile. Multiple images of supernovae or GRBs in the background galaxies can be recorded in a systematic monitor of the system. An unlensed high redshift supernova might not be observable, but when lensed by a galaxy-cluster, it will stand out because the point event brightens relative to the host. The color profile of a high redshift lensed point event will be much more reliable than an unlensed one due to much less host contamination. An estimate of the time delay enables observation of the full light curve of the subsequent images of the event. ARIES can have outside collaboration for multiband simultaneous lightcurves of other images. The measured time delay and position of images of the transient event provide better cosmological constraints including distance scale of the Universe. The Devasthal telescope can detect one or more events by monitoring half a dozen cluster fields over three years time.

  9. LMC clusters: young

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    The young globular clusters of the LMC have ages of 10 7 -10 8 y. Their masses and structure are similar to those of the smaller galactic globular clusters. Their stellar mass functions (in the mass range 6 solar masses to 1.2 solar masses) vary greatly from cluster to cluster, although the clusters are similar in total mass, age, structure and chemical composition. It would be very interesting to know why these clusters are forming now in the LMC and not in the Galaxy. The author considers the 'young globular' or 'blue populous' clusters of the LMC. The ages of these objects are 10 7 to 10 8 y, and their masses are 10 4 to 10 5 solar masses, so they are populous enough to be really useful for studying the evolution of massive stars. The author concentrates on the structure and stellar content of these young clusters. (Auth.)

  10. Star clusters and associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruprecht, J.; Palous, J.

    1983-01-01

    All 33 papers presented at the symposium were inputted to INIS. They dealt with open clusters, globular clusters, stellar associations and moving groups, and local kinematics and galactic structures. (E.S.)

  11. Cluster beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiglioni, F.; Coutant, J.; Fois, M.

    1978-01-01

    Areas of possible applications of cluster injection are discussed. The deposition inside the plasma of molecules, issued from the dissociation of the injected clusters, has been computed. Some empirical scaling laws for the penetration are given

  12. Globally linked vortex clusters in trapped wave fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasovan, Lucian-Cornel; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Torres, Juan P.; Torner, Lluis; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2002-01-01

    We put forward the existence of a rich variety of fully stationary vortex structures, termed H clusters, made of an increasing number of vortices nested in paraxial wave fields confined by trapping potentials. However, we show that the constituent vortices are globally linked, rather than products of independent vortices. Also, they always feature a monopolar global wave front and exist in nonlinear systems, such as the Bose-Einstein condensates. Clusters with multipolar global wave fronts are nonstationary or, at best, flipping

  13. Clustering at high redshifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaver, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence for clustering of and with high-redshift QSOs is discussed. QSOs of different redshifts show no clustering, but QSOs of similar redshifts appear to be clustered on a scale comparable to that of galaxies at the present epoch. In addition, spectroscopic studies of close pairs of QSOs indicate that QSOs are surrounded by a relatively high density of absorbing matter, possibly clusters of galaxies

  14. Modeling the formation of globular cluster systems in the Virgo cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    2014-01-01

    The mass distribution and chemical composition of globular cluster (GC) systems preserve fossil record of the early stages of galaxy formation. The observed distribution of GC colors within massive early-type galaxies in the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey (ACSVCS) reveals a multi-modal shape, which likely corresponds to a multi-modal metallicity distribution. We present a simple model for the formation and disruption of GCs that aims to match the ACSVCS data. This model tests the hypothesis that GCs are formed during major mergers of gas-rich galaxies and inherit the metallicity of their hosts. To trace merger events, we use halo merger trees extracted from a large cosmological N-body simulation. We select 20 halos in the mass range of 2 × 10 12 to 7 × 10 13 M ☉ and match them to 19 Virgo galaxies with K-band luminosity between 3 × 10 10 and 3 × 10 11 L ☉ . To set the [Fe/H] abundances, we use an empirical galaxy mass-metallicity relation. We find that a minimal merger ratio of 1:3 best matches the observed cluster metallicity distribution. A characteristic bimodal shape appears because metal-rich GCs are produced by late mergers between massive halos, while metal-poor GCs are produced by collective merger activities of less massive hosts at early times. The model outcome is robust to alternative prescriptions for cluster formation rate throughout cosmic time, but a gradual evolution of the mass-metallicity relation with redshift appears to be necessary to match the observed cluster metallicities. We also affirm the age-metallicity relation, predicted by an earlier model, in which metal-rich clusters are systematically several billion younger than their metal-poor counterparts.

  15. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor M. Molnar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard LCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant ($Lambda$ and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM, structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging.Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang,hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics.The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions:the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulenceare developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thusour review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clustersis to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses.New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopeswill come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities,we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  16. Size selected metal clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. The Optical Absorption Spectra of Small Silver Clusters (5-11) ... Soft Landing and Fragmentation of Small Clusters Deposited in Noble-Gas Films. Harbich, W.; Fedrigo, S.; Buttet, J. Phys. Rev. B 1998, 58, 7428. CO combustion on supported gold clusters. Arenz M ...

  17. The Durban Auto Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jochen; Robbins, Glen; Barnes, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the formation of the Durban Auto Cluster in the context of trade liberalization. It argues that the improvement of operational competitiveness of firms in the cluster is prominently due to joint action. It tests this proposition by comparing the gains from cluster activities...

  18. Marketing research cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nebojša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available One area of applications of cluster analysis in marketing is identification of groups of cities and towns with similar demographic profiles. This paper considers main aspects of cluster analysis by an example of clustering 12 cities with the use of Minitab software.

  19. Marketing research cluster analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marić Nebojša

    2002-01-01

    One area of applications of cluster analysis in marketing is identification of groups of cities and towns with similar demographic profiles. This paper considers main aspects of cluster analysis by an example of clustering 12 cities with the use of Minitab software.

  20. Minimalist's linux cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang-Yeong; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Seyong

    2004-01-01

    Using barebone PC components and NIC's, we construct a linux cluster which has 2-dimensional mesh structure. This cluster has smaller footprint, is less expensive, and use less power compared to conventional linux cluster. Here, we report our experience in building such a machine and discuss our current lattice project on the machine

  1. Range-clustering queries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrahamsen, M.; de Berg, M.T.; Buchin, K.A.; Mehr, M.; Mehrabi, A.D.

    2017-01-01

    In a geometric k -clustering problem the goal is to partition a set of points in R d into k subsets such that a certain cost function of the clustering is minimized. We present data structures for orthogonal range-clustering queries on a point set S : given a query box Q and an integer k>2 , compute

  2. Cosmology with cluster surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Surveys of clusters of galaxies provide us with a powerful probe of the den- sity and nature of the dark energy. The red-shift distribution of detected clusters is highly sensitive to the dark energy equation of state parameter w. Upcoming Sunyaev–. Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys would provide us large yields of clusters to ...

  3. Asteroseismic inferences on red giants in open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811 using Kepler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hekker, S.; Basu, S.; Stello, D.

    2011-01-01

    and metallicity contribute to the observed difference in locations in the H-R diagram of the old metal-rich cluster NGC 6791 and the middle-aged solar-metallicity cluster NGC 6819. For the young cluster NGC 6811, the explanation of the position of the stars in the H-R diagram challenges the assumption of solar...

  4. The STAR-RICH Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lasiuk, B; Braem, André; Cozza, D; Davenport, M; De Cataldo, G; Dell'Olio, L; Di Bari, D; Di Mauro, A; Dunlop, J C; Finch, E; Fraissard, Daniel; Franco, A; Gans, J; Ghidini, B; Harris, J W; Horsley, M; Kunde, G J; Lasiuk, B; Lesenechal, Y; Majka, R D; Martinengo, P; Morsch, Andreas; Nappi, E; Paic, G; Piuz, François; Posa, F; Raynaud, J; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Santiard, Jean-Claude; Satinover, J; Schyns, E M; Smirnov, N; Van Beelen, J; Williams, T D; Xu, Z

    2002-01-01

    The STAR-RICH detector extends the particle idenfication capabilities of the STAR spectrometer for charged hadrons at mid-rapidity. It allows identification of pions and kaons up to ~3 GeV/c and protons up to ~5 GeV/c. The characteristics and performance of the device in the inaugural RHIC run are described.

  5. SOFTWARE SUPPORT FOR RICH PICTURES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valente, Andrea; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2010-01-01

    Rich pictures (RP) are common in object-oriented analysis and design courses, but students seem to have problems in integrating them in their projects' workflow. A new software tool is being developed, specific for RP authoring. To better understand students' issues and working practice with RP...

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC3115 & NGC1399 VEGAS-SSS globular clusters (Cantiello+, 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantiello, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Spavone, M.; Paolillo, M.; Capaccioli, M.; Limatola, L.; Grado, A.; Iodice, E.; Raimondo, G.; Napolitano, N.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Brocato, E.; Forbes, D. A.; Hilker, M.; Mieske, S.; Peletier, R.; van de Ven, G.; Schipani, P.

    2017-11-01

    Photometric catalogs for globular cluster (GC) candidates over the the 1 sq. degree area around NGC3115 and NGC1399 (ngc3115.dat and ngc1399.dat). The catalogues are based on u-, g- and i- band images from the VST elliptical galaxies survey (VEGAS). Aperture magnitudes, corrected for aperture correction are reported. We also provide the full catalogs of matched sources, which also include the matched background and foreground sources in the frames (ngc3115_full.dat and ngc1399_full.dat). (4 data files).

  7. Cluster analysis for applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anderberg, Michael R

    1973-01-01

    Cluster Analysis for Applications deals with methods and various applications of cluster analysis. Topics covered range from variables and scales to measures of association among variables and among data units. Conceptual problems in cluster analysis are discussed, along with hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering methods. The necessary elements of data analysis, statistics, cluster analysis, and computer implementation are integrated vertically to cover the complete path from raw data to a finished analysis.Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the subject o

  8. Clusters in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Following the pioneering discovery of alpha clustering and of molecular resonances, the field of nuclear clustering is today one of those domains of heavy-ion nuclear physics that faces the greatest challenges, yet also contains the greatest opportunities. After many summer schools and workshops, in particular over the last decade, the community of nuclear molecular physicists has decided to collaborate in producing a comprehensive collection of lectures and tutorial reviews covering the field. This third volume follows the successful Lect. Notes Phys. 818 (Vol. 1) and 848 (Vol. 2), and comprises six extensive lectures covering the following topics:  - Gamma Rays and Molecular Structure - Faddeev Equation Approach for Three Cluster Nuclear Reactions - Tomography of the Cluster Structure of Light Nuclei Via Relativistic Dissociation - Clustering Effects Within the Dinuclear Model : From Light to Hyper-heavy Molecules in Dynamical Mean-field Approach - Clusterization in Ternary Fission - Clusters in Light N...

  9. Spatial cluster modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Andrew B

    2002-01-01

    Research has generated a number of advances in methods for spatial cluster modelling in recent years, particularly in the area of Bayesian cluster modelling. Along with these advances has come an explosion of interest in the potential applications of this work, especially in epidemiology and genome research. In one integrated volume, this book reviews the state-of-the-art in spatial clustering and spatial cluster modelling, bringing together research and applications previously scattered throughout the literature. It begins with an overview of the field, then presents a series of chapters that illuminate the nature and purpose of cluster modelling within different application areas, including astrophysics, epidemiology, ecology, and imaging. The focus then shifts to methods, with discussions on point and object process modelling, perfect sampling of cluster processes, partitioning in space and space-time, spatial and spatio-temporal process modelling, nonparametric methods for clustering, and spatio-temporal ...

  10. Clusters and how to make it work : Cluster Strategy Toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manickam, Anu; van Berkel, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Clusters are the magic answer to regional economic development. Firms in clusters are more innovative; cluster policy dominates EU policy; ‘top-sectors’ and excellence are the choice of national policy makers; clusters are ‘in’. But, clusters are complex, clusters are ‘messy’; there is no clear

  11. Structure of neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarewicz, W.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The uncharted regions of the (N,Z) plane contain information that can answer many questions of fundamental importance for science: How many protons and neutrons can be clustered together by the strong interaction to form a bound nucleus? What are the proton and neutron magic numbers of the exotic nuclei? What are the properties of very short-lived exotic nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios? What is the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction in a nucleus that has a very large neutron excess? Nuclear life far from stability is different from that around the stability line; the promised access to completely new combinations of proton and neutron numbers offers prospects for new structural phenomena. The main objective of this talk is to discuss some of the challenges and opportunities of research with exotic nuclei. The covered topics will include: Theoretical challenges; Skins and halos in heavy nuclei; Shape coexistence in exotic nuclei; Beta-decays of neutron-rich nuclei. (author)

  12. The properties of the disk system of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandroff, Taft E.

    1989-01-01

    A large refined data sample is used to study the properties and origin of the disk system of globular clusters. A scale height for the disk cluster system of 800-1500 pc is found which is consistent with scale-height determinations for samples of field stars identified with the Galactic thick disk. A rotational velocity of 193 + or - 29 km/s and a line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 59 + or - 14 km/s have been found for the metal-rich clusters.

  13. Properties of the disk system of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armandroff, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    A large refined data sample is used to study the properties and origin of the disk system of globular clusters. A scale height for the disk cluster system of 800-1500 pc is found which is consistent with scale-height determinations for samples of field stars identified with the Galactic thick disk. A rotational velocity of 193 + or - 29 km/s and a line-of-sight velocity dispersion of 59 + or - 14 km/s have been found for the metal-rich clusters. 70 references

  14. Agricultural Clusters in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.A.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Michael Porter was the first to use the term cluster in an economic context. He introduced the term in The Competitive Advantage of Nations (1990). The term cluster is also known as business cluster, industry cluster, competitive cluster or Porterian cluster. This article aims at determining and

  15. SU(3) symmetries in exotic neutron-rich nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    We examine the structure of the exotic neutron-rich nucleus 11 Li with an emphasis on understanding the origin of the soft E1 resonance and the neuron halo. The similarities and differences between shell model and di-neutron cluster model descriptions of the system are displayed using the Hecht expansion techniques. We find that the ground state 11 Li as described in large shell model calculations is well approximated by the di-neutron cluster state. In contrast to the ground state, the soft E1 model of 11 Li appears to have a more complicated structure and the E1 strength of this resonance is very sensitive to cancellations between p→s and p→d contributions to the dipole matrix elements. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Open source clustering software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoon, M J L; Imoto, S; Nolan, J; Miyano, S

    2004-06-12

    We have implemented k-means clustering, hierarchical clustering and self-organizing maps in a single multipurpose open-source library of C routines, callable from other C and C++ programs. Using this library, we have created an improved version of Michael Eisen's well-known Cluster program for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux/Unix. In addition, we generated a Python and a Perl interface to the C Clustering Library, thereby combining the flexibility of a scripting language with the speed of C. The C Clustering Library and the corresponding Python C extension module Pycluster were released under the Python License, while the Perl module Algorithm::Cluster was released under the Artistic License. The GUI code Cluster 3.0 for Windows, Macintosh and Linux/Unix, as well as the corresponding command-line program, were released under the same license as the original Cluster code. The complete source code is available at http://bonsai.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/mdehoon/software/cluster. Alternatively, Algorithm::Cluster can be downloaded from CPAN, while Pycluster is also available as part of the Biopython distribution.

  17. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). XXXII. A Search for Globular Cluster Substructures in the Virgo Galaxy Cluster Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powalka, Mathieu; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Longobardi, Alessia; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Alamo-Martínez, Karla; Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Durrell, Patrick; Eigenthaler, Paul; Ferrarese, Laura; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Hudelot, Patrick; Liu, Chengze; Mei, Simona; Muñoz, Roberto P.; Roediger, Joel; Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hongxin

    2018-03-01

    Substructure in globular cluster (GC) populations around large galaxies is expected in galaxy formation scenarios that involve accretion or merger events, and it has been searched for using direct associations between GCs and structure in the diffuse galaxy light, or with GC kinematics. Here, we present a search for candidate substructures in the GC population around the Virgo cD galaxy M87 through the analysis of the spatial distribution of the GC colors. The study is based on a sample of ∼1800 bright GCs with high-quality u, g, r, i, z, K s photometry, selected to ensure a low contamination by foreground stars or background galaxies. The spectral energy distributions of the GCs are associated with formal estimates of age and metallicity, which are representative of its position in a 4D color space relative to standard single stellar population models. Dividing the sample into broad bins based on the relative formal ages, we observe inhomogeneities that reveal signatures of GC substructures. The most significant of these is a spatial overdensity of GCs with relatively young age labels, of diameter ∼0.°1 (∼30 kpc), located to the south of M87. The significance of this detection is larger than about 5σ after accounting for estimates of random and systematic errors. Surprisingly, no large Virgo galaxy is present in this area that could potentially host these GCs. But candidate substructures in the M87 halo with equally elusive hosts have been described based on kinematic studies in the past. The number of GC spectra available around M87 is currently insufficient to clarify the nature of the new candidate substructure.

  18. X-ray clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    This work is in three chapters, of which the first is an introduction to clusters of galaxies. The second chapter describes the HEAO A-2 Survey of Abell Clusters. The 225 clusters of galaxies listed in Abell's (1958) catalog which are of distance class four or less, were surveyed for 2 to 10 keV x-ray emission. Thirty-two identifications of x-ray sources with the clusters were made, fluxes and error boxes were determined for these sources; twelve of the identifications are new. The x-ray luminosity function has been derived and analytical fits have been made, the best fit is f(L) = 26.9 x 10 -8 exp( - L 44 /1.7) per Mpc per 10 44 erg s -1 per 2 to 10 keV band pass. The relationship between x-ray luminosity, Bautz-Morgan type, Rood-Sastry type, and richness has also been examined. The contribution of clusters to the x-ray background has been calculated from the luminosity function and has been found to be 3.5%, and with 90% certainty, less than 8% in the 2 to 10 keV band pass, assuming that clusters were not brighter in the past than they are at present. If they were bright enough in the past to account for the x-ray background, the evolution must have scaled more rapidly than (1 + z) 7 if clusters formed at z = 3, or (1 + z) 5 if clusters formed at z = 10. Chapter Three examines x-ray emission from poor clusters of galaxies. Burns and Owens' (1979) sample of 25 4C radio sources which coincide with Zwicky clusters of galaxies has been searched for x-ray emission in the HEAO A-2 data base. X-ray emission was detected from five sources at the 3sigma level, two exceeded 5 sigma. The search for x-ray emission was prompted by the knowledge of the existence of distorted radio sources in the clusters. The distortion implies the presence of a relatively dense intracluster medium which is expected to produce thermal bremsstrahlung x-ray emission

  19. Low surface brightness galaxies in the cluster A1367

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.I.; Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    We have obtained deep CCD frames of apparently blank regions of sky in the hope of detecting very low surface brightness (LSB) objects in the cluster A1367. We discuss our data reduction, and image detection and selection techniques. If the galaxies detected are actually cluster members then they are dwarfs and the conclusions of a previous paper on the Fornax cluster are essentially confirmed. One area of variance is that the lowest surface brightness galaxies do not appear to be preferentially concentrated towards the cluster centre. This can be explained by there being a much larger density of dwarf galaxies over this bright galaxy-rich region of the universe. We find over our small area approximately four times as many LSB galaxies as would be expected from our Fornax data. We speculate on the possible origin and likely intensity of intergalactic light within clusters. (author)

  20. The (TNO) Speaker Diarization System for NIST Rich Transcription Evaluation 2005 for meeting data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, D.A. van

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. The TNO speaker speaker diarization system is based on a standard BIC segmentation and clustering algorithm. Since for the NIST Rich Transcription speaker dizarization evaluation measure correct speech detection appears to be essential, we have developed a speech activity detector (SAD) as

  1. Combining Galaxy-Galaxy Lensing and Galaxy Clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Youngsoo [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Krause, Elisabeth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Jain, Bhuvnesh [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Amara, Adam [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Becker, Matt [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bridle, Sarah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Clampitt, Joseph [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Crocce, Martin [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Honscheid, Klaus [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gaztanaga, Enrique [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sanchez, Carles [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wechsler, Risa [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Combining galaxy-galaxy lensing and galaxy clustering is a promising method for inferring the growth rate of large scale structure, a quantity that will shed light on the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a prime candidate for such an analysis, with its measurements of both the distribution of galaxies on the sky and the tangential shears of background galaxies induced by these foreground lenses. By constructing an end-to-end analysis that combines large-scale galaxy clustering and small-scale galaxy-galaxy lensing, we also forecast the potential of a combined probes analysis on DES datasets. In particular, we develop a practical approach to a DES combined probes analysis by jointly modeling the assumptions and systematics affecting the different components of the data vector, employing a shared halo model, HOD parametrization, photometric redshift errors, and shear measurement errors. Furthermore, we study the effect of external priors on different subsets of these parameters. We conclude that DES data will provide powerful constraints on the evolution of structure growth in the universe, conservatively/ optimistically constraining the growth function to 8%/4.9% with its first-year data covering 1000 square degrees, and to 4%/2.3% with its full five-year data covering 5000 square degrees.

  2. AN IMPROVED FUZZY CLUSTERING ALGORITHM FOR MICROARRAY IMAGE SPOTS SEGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Biju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An automatic cDNA microarray image processing using an improved fuzzy clustering algorithm is presented in this paper. The spot segmentation algorithm proposed uses the gridding technique developed by the authors earlier, for finding the co-ordinates of each spot in an image. Automatic cropping of spots from microarray image is done using these co-ordinates. The present paper proposes an improved fuzzy clustering algorithm Possibility fuzzy local information c means (PFLICM to segment the spot foreground (FG from background (BG. The PFLICM improves fuzzy local information c means (FLICM algorithm by incorporating typicality of a pixel along with gray level information and local spatial information. The performance of the algorithm is validated using a set of simulated cDNA microarray images added with different levels of AWGN noise. The strength of the algorithm is tested by computing the parameters such as the Segmentation matching factor (SMF, Probability of error (pe, Discrepancy distance (D and Normal mean square error (NMSE. SMF value obtained for PFLICM algorithm shows an improvement of 0.9 % and 0.7 % for high noise and low noise microarray images respectively compared to FLICM algorithm. The PFLICM algorithm is also applied on real microarray images and gene expression values are computed.

  3. Electron: Cluster interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E ∼ 0.1 to E ∼ 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na 8 , Na 20 , Na 40 . The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size

  4. Clustering high dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2012-01-01

    High-dimensional data, i.e., data described by a large number of attributes, pose specific challenges to clustering. The so-called ‘curse of dimensionality’, coined originally to describe the general increase in complexity of various computational problems as dimensionality increases, is known...... to render traditional clustering algorithms ineffective. The curse of dimensionality, among other effects, means that with increasing number of dimensions, a loss of meaningful differentiation between similar and dissimilar objects is observed. As high-dimensional objects appear almost alike, new approaches...... for clustering are required. Consequently, recent research has focused on developing techniques and clustering algorithms specifically for high-dimensional data. Still, open research issues remain. Clustering is a data mining task devoted to the automatic grouping of data based on mutual similarity. Each cluster...

  5. Planck early results. XII. Cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich optical scaling relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal-to-richness scaling relation (Y500 - N200) for the MaxBCG cluster catalogue. Employing a multi-frequency matched filter on the Planck sky maps, we measure the SZ signal for each cluster by adapting the filter according to weak-lensing calibrated mass-r...

  6. Substructure in clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitchett, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Optical observations suggesting the existence of substructure in clusters of galaxies are examined. Models of cluster formation and methods used to detect substructure in clusters are reviewed. Consideration is given to classification schemes based on a departure of bright cluster galaxies from a spherically symmetric distribution, evidence for statistically significant substructure, and various types of substructure, including velocity, spatial, and spatial-velocity substructure. The substructure observed in the galaxy distribution in clusters is discussed, focusing on observations from general cluster samples, the Virgo cluster, the Hydra cluster, Centaurus, the Coma cluster, and the Cancer cluster. 88 refs

  7. CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF ABELL 1142: A COOL-CORE CLUSTER LACKING A CENTRAL BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Yuanyuan; Weeren, Reinout van [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Buote, David A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Gastaldello, Fabio, E-mail: yuanyuan.su@cfa.harvard.edu [INAF-IASF-Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2016-04-10

    Abell 1142 is a low-mass galaxy cluster at low redshift containing two comparable brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) resembling a scaled-down version of the Coma Cluster. Our Chandra analysis reveals an X-ray emission peak, roughly 100 kpc away from either BCG, which we identify as the cluster center. The emission center manifests itself as a second beta-model surface brightness component distinct from that of the cluster on larger scales. The center is also substantially cooler and more metal-rich than the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which makes Abell 1142 appear to be a cool-core cluster. The redshift distribution of its member galaxies indicates that Abell 1142 may contain two subclusters, each of which contain one BCG. The BCGs are merging at a relative velocity of ≈1200 km s{sup −1}. This ongoing merger may have shock-heated the ICM from ≈2 keV to above 3 keV, which would explain the anomalous L{sub X}–T{sub X} scaling relation for this system. This merger may have displaced the metal-enriched “cool core” of either of the subclusters from the BCG. The southern BCG consists of three individual galaxies residing within a radius of 5 kpc in projection. These galaxies should rapidly sink into the subcluster center due to the dynamical friction of a cuspy cold dark matter halo.

  8. Nuclear cluster states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, W.D.M.; Merchant, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    We review clustering in light nuclei including molecular resonances in heavy ion reactions. In particular we study the systematics, paying special attention to the relationships between cluster states and superdeformed configurations. We emphasise the selection rules which govern the formation and decay of cluster states. We review some recent experimental results from Daresbury and elsewhere. In particular we report on the evidence for a 7-α chain state in 28 Si in experiments recently performed at the NSF, Daresbury. Finally we begin to address theoretically the important question of the lifetimes of cluster states as deduced from the experimental energy widths of the resonances. (Author)

  9. 15th Cluster workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Laakso, Harri; Escoubet, C. Philippe; The Cluster Active Archive : Studying the Earth’s Space Plasma Environment

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000 the ESA Cluster mission has been investigating the small-scale structures and processes of the Earth's plasma environment, such as those involved in the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetospheric plasma, in global magnetotail dynamics, in cross-tail currents, and in the formation and dynamics of the neutral line and of plasmoids. This book contains presentations made at the 15th Cluster workshop held in March 2008. It also presents several articles about the Cluster Active Archive and its datasets, a few overview papers on the Cluster mission, and articles reporting on scientific findings on the solar wind, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause and the magnetotail.

  10. Clusters in simple fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sator, N.

    2003-01-01

    This article concerns the correspondence between thermodynamics and the morphology of simple fluids in terms of clusters. Definitions of clusters providing a geometric interpretation of the liquid-gas phase transition are reviewed with an eye to establishing their physical relevance. The author emphasizes their main features and basic hypotheses, and shows how these definitions lead to a recent approach based on self-bound clusters. Although theoretical, this tutorial review is also addressed to readers interested in experimental aspects of clustering in simple fluids

  11. Annealing and deposition effects of the chemical composition of silicon rich nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Stimpel-Lindner, T.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon-rich nitride, deposited by LPCVD, is a low stress amorphous material with a high refractive index. After deposition the silicon-rich nitride thin film is annealed at temperatures above 1100 oC to break N-H bonds, which have absorption peaks in the wavelength band important for optical...... in optical waveguides. This means that the annealing temperature must be high enough to break the N-H bonds, but no so high as to produce clusters. Therefore, the process window for an annealing step lies between 1100 and 1150 oC. The chemical composition of amorphous silicon-rich nitride has been...... investigated by Rutherford back scattering (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The influence of deposition parameters and annealing temperatures on the stoichiometry and the chemical bonds will be discussed. The origin of the clusters has been found to be silicon due to severe silicon out...

  12. Study of a few cluster candidates in the Magellanic Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Samyaday; Subramaniam Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2018-06-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (LMC & SMC) are gas rich, metal poor, dwarf satellite galaxies to our Milky Way that are interacting with each other. The Magellanic Bridge (MB), joining the larger and smaller Cloud is considered to be a signature of this interaction process. Studies have revealed that the MB, apart from gas also hosts stellar populations and star clusters. The number of clusters, with well-estimated parameters within the MB is still underway. In this work, we study a sample of 9 previously cataloged star clusters in the MB region. We use Washington C, Harris R and Cousins I bands data from literature, taken using the 4-m Blanco telescope to estimate the cluster properties (size, age, reddening). We also identify and separate out genuine cluster candidates from possible clusters/asterism. The increase in number of genuine cluster candidates with well-estimated parameters is important in the context of understanding cluster formation and evolution in such low-metallicity, and tidally disrupted environment. The clusters studied here can also help estimate distances to different parts of the MB, as recent studies indicate that portions of MB near the SMC is a closer to us, than the LMC.

  13. Adaptive density trajectory cluster based on time and space distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fagui; Zhang, Zhijie

    2017-10-01

    There are some hotspot problems remaining in trajectory cluster for discovering mobile behavior regularity, such as the computation of distance between sub trajectories, the setting of parameter values in cluster algorithm and the uncertainty/boundary problem of data set. As a result, based on the time and space, this paper tries to define the calculation method of distance between sub trajectories. The significance of distance calculation for sub trajectories is to clearly reveal the differences in moving trajectories and to promote the accuracy of cluster algorithm. Besides, a novel adaptive density trajectory cluster algorithm is proposed, in which cluster radius is computed through using the density of data distribution. In addition, cluster centers and number are selected by a certain strategy automatically, and uncertainty/boundary problem of data set is solved by designed weighted rough c-means. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can perform the fuzzy trajectory cluster effectively on the basis of the time and space distance, and obtain the optimal cluster centers and rich cluster results information adaptably for excavating the features of mobile behavior in mobile and sociology network.

  14. The pulsation mode and period-luminosity relationship of cool variables in globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitelock, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The period-luminosity-temperature relationship for globular cluster red and yellow variables is examined. The results suggest that the higher temperature, more metal-deficient cluster variables pulsate in the fundamental mode, while the lower temperature more metal-rich variables pulsate in the first overtone. On the assumption that this is correct, a relationship between fundamental period and bolometric magnitude is derived for cluster variables with observed periods of between 1 and 300 days. (author)

  15. Effect of the horizontal branch on the colours of globular clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sil' chenko, O K [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Gosudarstvennyj Astronomicheskij Inst. ' ' GAISh' '

    1963-05-01

    The influence of the horizontal branch (HB) on the integral UBV colours of globular clusters is studied by means of statistical analysis of the colour-magnitude diagram catalogue for globular clusters of our Galaxy. The colour correction for HB is shown to be always negative. It turns out to be small for m. tal-rich globular clusters ((Fe/H)>-1.1) and independent on the HB shape for metal-poor ones.

  16. Effect of the horizontal branch on the colours of globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sil'chenko, O.K.

    1963-01-01

    The influence of the horizontal branch (HB) on the integral UBV colours of globular clusters is studied by means of statistical analysis of the colour-magnitude diagram catalogue for globular clusters of our Galaxy. The colour correction for HB is shown to be always negative. It turns out to be small for m. tal-rich globular clusters ([Fe/H]>-1.1) and independent on the HB shape for metal-poor ones

  17. CALCIUM-RICH GAP TRANSIENTS: SOLVING THE CALCIUM CONUNDRUM IN THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray measurements suggest that the abundance of calcium in the intracluster medium is higher than can be explained using favored models for core-collapse and Type Ia supernovae alone. We investigate whether the ''calcium conundrum'' in the intracluster medium can be alleviated by including a contribution from the recently discovered subclass of supernovae known as calcium-rich gap transients. Although the calcium-rich gap transients make up only a small fraction of all supernovae events, we find that their high calcium yields are sufficient to reproduce the X-ray measurements found for nearby rich clusters. We find the χ 2 goodness-of-fit metric improves from 84 to 2 by including this new class. Moreover, calcium-rich supernovae preferentially occur in the outskirts of galaxies making it easier for the nucleosynthesis products of these events to be incorporated in the intracluster medium via ram-pressure stripping. The discovery of calcium-rich gap transients in clusters and groups far from any individual galaxy suggests that supernovae associated with intracluster stars may play an important role in enriching the intracluster medium. Calcium-rich gap transients may also help explain anomalous calcium abundances in many other astrophysical systems including individual stars in the Milky Way, the halos of nearby galaxies, and the circumgalactic medium. Our work highlights the importance of considering the diversity of supernovae types and corresponding yields when modeling the abundance of the intracluster medium and other gas reservoirs

  18. Lifting to cluster-tilting objects in higher cluster categories

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Pin

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we consider the $d$-cluster-tilted algebras, the endomorphism algebras of $d$-cluster-tilting objects in $d$-cluster categories. We show that a tilting module over such an algebra lifts to a $d$-cluster-tilting object in this $d$-cluster category.

  19. HTML5 rich media foundation

    CERN Document Server

    David, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Learn about the new ways in which video and audio can be easily embedded into your HTML5 Web pages. Discover how you can create new Web media content and how JavaScript, CSS, and SVG can be integrated to create a compelling, rich media foundation for your work. HTML 5, is the first major update to the core language of the Web in over a decade The focus of this book is on innovations that most directly effect Web site design and multimedia integration The companion Web site features working demonstrations and tutorial media for hands-on pract

  20. Neurostimulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe L; Barloese, Mads; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neurostimulation has emerged as a viable treatment for intractable chronic cluster headache. Several therapeutic strategies are being investigated including stimulation of the hypothalamus, occipital nerves and sphenopalatine ganglion. The aim of this review is to provide...... effective strategy must be preferred as first-line therapy for intractable chronic cluster headache....

  1. Cauchy cluster process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an instance of the well-know Neyman–Scott cluster process model with clusters having a long tail behaviour. In our model the offspring points are distributed around the parent points according to a circular Cauchy distribution. Using a modified Cramér-von Misses test...

  2. When Clusters become Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.W. Phlippen (Sandra); G.A. van der Knaap (Bert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractPolicy makers spend large amounts of public resources on the foundation of science parks and other forms of geographically clustered business activities, in order to stimulate regional innovation. Underlying the relation between clusters and innovation is the assumption that co-located

  3. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  4. Cluster growth kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovik, V.M.; Gal'perin, A.G.; Rikhvitskij, V.S.; Lushnikov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    Processes of some traffic blocking coming into existence are considered as probabilistic ones. We study analytic solutions for models for the dynamics of both cluster growth and cluster growth with fragmentation in the systems of finite number of objects. Assuming rates constancy of both coalescence and fragmentation, the models under consideration are linear on the probability functions

  5. Alpha clustering in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodgson, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nucleon clustering in nuclei are described, with reference to both nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, and the advantages of using the cluster formalism to describe a range of phenomena are discussed. It is shown that bound and scattering alpha-particle states can be described in a unified way using an energy-dependent alpha-nucleus potential. (author)

  6. Improved optical mass tracer for galaxy clusters calibrated using weak lensing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Hirata, C.; Bahcall, N.; Seljak, U.

    2008-11-01

    We develop an improved mass tracer for clusters of galaxies from optically observed parameters, and calibrate the mass relation using weak gravitational lensing measurements. We employ a sample of ~13000 optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) maxBCG catalogue, with photometric redshifts in the range 0.1-0.3. The optical tracers we consider are cluster richness, cluster luminosity, luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and combinations of these parameters. We measure the weak lensing signal around stacked clusters as a function of the various tracers, and use it to determine the tracer with the least amount of scatter. We further use the weak lensing data to calibrate the mass normalization. We find that the best mass estimator for massive clusters is a combination of cluster richness, N200, and the luminosity of the BCG, LBCG: , where is the observed mean BCG luminosity at a given richness. This improved mass tracer will enable the use of galaxy clusters as a more powerful tool for constraining cosmological parameters.

  7. Conservation and Biodiversity of Rich Fens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel

    2014-01-01

    Rich fen is a habitat type dependent on a constant supply of nutrient poor, calcium rich groundwater. A high, stable groundwater table, relatively high pH combined with nutrient poor conditions support a special and very species rich vegetation including many rare and threatened plant species. In...

  8. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  9. Mathematical classification and clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Mirkin, Boris

    1996-01-01

    I am very happy to have this opportunity to present the work of Boris Mirkin, a distinguished Russian scholar in the areas of data analysis and decision making methodologies. The monograph is devoted entirely to clustering, a discipline dispersed through many theoretical and application areas, from mathematical statistics and combina­ torial optimization to biology, sociology and organizational structures. It compiles an immense amount of research done to date, including many original Russian de­ velopments never presented to the international community before (for instance, cluster-by-cluster versions of the K-Means method in Chapter 4 or uniform par­ titioning in Chapter 5). The author's approach, approximation clustering, allows him both to systematize a great part of the discipline and to develop many in­ novative methods in the framework of optimization problems. The optimization methods considered are proved to be meaningful in the contexts of data analysis and clustering. The material presented in ...

  10. Neutrosophic Hierarchical Clustering Algoritms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rıdvan Şahin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Interval neutrosophic set (INS is a generalization of interval valued intuitionistic fuzzy set (IVIFS, whose the membership and non-membership values of elements consist of fuzzy range, while single valued neutrosophic set (SVNS is regarded as extension of intuitionistic fuzzy set (IFS. In this paper, we extend the hierarchical clustering techniques proposed for IFSs and IVIFSs to SVNSs and INSs respectively. Based on the traditional hierarchical clustering procedure, the single valued neutrosophic aggregation operator, and the basic distance measures between SVNSs, we define a single valued neutrosophic hierarchical clustering algorithm for clustering SVNSs. Then we extend the algorithm to classify an interval neutrosophic data. Finally, we present some numerical examples in order to show the effectiveness and availability of the developed clustering algorithms.

  11. The Difference Between Clusters and Groups: A Journey from Cluster Cores to Their Outskirts and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Richard G.; Balogh, Michael L.

    In this review, we take the reader on a journey. We start by looking at the properties of galaxies in the cores of rich clusters. We have focused on the overall picture: star formation in clusters is strongly suppressed relative to field galaxies at the same redshift. We will argue that the increasing activity and blue populations of clusters with redshift results from a greater level of activity in field galaxies rather than a change in the transformation imposed by the cluster environment. With this in mind, we travel out from the cluster, focusing first on the properties of galaxies in the outskirts of clusters and then on galaxies in isolated groups. At low redshift, we are able to efficiently probe these environments using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2dF redshift surveys. These allow an accurate comparison of galaxy star formation rates in different regions. The current results show a strong suppression of star formation above a critical threshold in local density. The threshold seems similar regardless of the overall mass of the system. At low redshift at least, only galaxies in close, isolated pairs have their star formation rate boosted above the global average. At higher redshift, work on constructing homogeneous catalogs of galaxies in groups and in the infall regions of clusters is still at an early stage. In the final section, we draw these strands together, summarizing what we can deduce about the mechanisms that transform star-forming field galaxies into their quiescent cluster counterparts. We discuss what we can learn about the impact of environment on the global star formation history of the Universe.

  12. The Most Massive Star Clusters: Supermassive Globular Clusters or Dwarf Galaxy Nuclei?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, William

    2004-07-01

    Evidence is mounting that the most massive globular clusters, such as Omega Centauri and M31-G1, may be related to the recently discovered "Ultra-Compact Dwarfs" and the dense nuclei of dE, N galaxies. However, no systematic imaging investigation of these supermassive globular clusters - at the level of Omega Cen and beyond - has been done, and we do not know what fraction of them might bear the signatures {such as large effective radii or tidal tails} of having originated as dE nuclei. We propose to use the ACS/WFC to obtain deep images of 18 such clusters in NGC 5128 and M31, the two nearest rich globular cluster systems. These globulars are the richest star clusters that can be found in nature, the biggest of them reaching 10^7 Solar masses, and they are likely to represent the results of star formation under the densest and most extreme conditions known. Using the profiles of the clusters including their faint outer envelopes, we will carry out state-of-the-art dynamical modelling of their structures, and look for any clear evidence which would indicate that they are associated with stripped satellites. This study will build on our previous work with STIS and WFPC2 imaging designed to study the 'Fundamental Plane' of globular clusters. When our new work is combined with Archival WFPC2, STIS, and ACS material, we will also be able to construct the definitive mapping of the Fundamental Plane of globular clusters at its uppermost mass range, and confirm whether or not the UCD and dE, N objects occupy a different structural parameter space.

  13. Multiple Stellar Populations in Star Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, G.

    2013-09-01

    For half a century it had been astronomical dogma that a globular cluster (GC) consists of stars born at the same time out of the same material, and this doctrine has borne rich fruits. In recent years, high resolution spectroscopy and high precision photometry (from space and ground-based observations) have shattered this paradigm, and the study of GC populations has acquired a new life that is now moving it in new directions. Evidence of multiple stellar populations have been identified in the color-magnitude diagrams of several Galactic and Magellanic Cloud GCs where they had never been imagined before.

  14. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /CCAPP; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Hansen, Sarah M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Hao, Jia; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Northwestern U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Sheldon, Erin S.; /Brookhaven; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  15. Herd Clustering: A synergistic data clustering approach using collective intelligence

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Kachun; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Chan, Takming

    2014-01-01

    , this principle is used to develop a new clustering algorithm. Inspired by herd behavior, the clustering method is a synergistic approach using collective intelligence called Herd Clustering (HC). The novel part is laid in its first stage where data instances

  16. THE HST/ACS COMA CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. INTERGALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AND THE MASSIVE GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEM AT THE CORE OF THE COMA GALAXY CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Eric W.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Hammer, Derek; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Carter, David; Balcells, Marc; Bridges, Terry; Chiboucas, Kristin; Del Burgo, Carlos; Graham, Alister W.; Guzman, Rafael; Hudson, Michael J.; Matkovic, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Intracluster stellar populations are a natural result of tidal interactions in galaxy clusters. Measuring these populations is difficult, but important for understanding the assembly of the most massive galaxies. The Coma cluster of galaxies is one of the nearest truly massive galaxy clusters and is host to a correspondingly large system of globular clusters (GCs). We use imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey to present the first definitive detection of a large population of intracluster GCs (IGCs) that fills the Coma cluster core and is not associated with individual galaxies. The GC surface density profile around the central massive elliptical galaxy, NGC 4874, is dominated at large radii by a population of IGCs that extend to the limit of our data (R +4000 -5000 (systematic) IGCs out to this radius, and that they make up ∼70% of the central GC system, making this the largest GC system in the nearby universe. Even including the GC systems of other cluster galaxies, the IGCs still make up ∼30%-45% of the GCs in the cluster core. Observational limits from previous studies of the intracluster light (ICL) suggest that the IGC population has a high specific frequency. If the IGC population has a specific frequency similar to high-S N dwarf galaxies, then the ICL has a mean surface brightness of μ V ∼ 27 mag arcsec -2 and a total stellar mass of roughly 10 12 M sun within the cluster core. The ICL makes up approximately half of the stellar luminosity and one-third of the stellar mass of the central (NGC 4874+ICL) system. The color distribution of the IGC population is bimodal, with blue, metal-poor GCs outnumbering red, metal-rich GCs by a ratio of 4:1. The inner GCs associated with NGC 4874 also have a bimodal distribution in color, but with a redder metal-poor population. The fraction of red IGCs (20%), and the red color of those GCs, implies that IGCs can originate from the halos of relatively massive, L* galaxies, and not solely from the disruption of

  17. Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio [Richland, WA; Calapristi, Augustin J [West Richland, WA; Crow, Vernon L [Richland, WA; Hetzler, Elizabeth G [Kennewick, WA; Turner, Alan E [Kennewick, WA

    2009-12-22

    Document clustering methods, document cluster label disambiguation methods, document clustering apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described. In one aspect, a document clustering method includes providing a document set comprising a plurality of documents, providing a cluster comprising a subset of the documents of the document set, using a plurality of terms of the documents, providing a cluster label indicative of subject matter content of the documents of the cluster, wherein the cluster label comprises a plurality of word senses, and selecting one of the word senses of the cluster label.

  18. Cluster-cluster correlations and constraints on the correlation hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, A. J. S.; Gott, J. R., III

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that galaxies cluster around clusters at least as strongly as they cluster around galaxies imposes constraints on the hierarchy of correlation amplitudes in hierachical clustering models. The distributions which saturate these constraints are the Rayleigh-Levy random walk fractals proposed by Mandelbrot; for these fractal distributions cluster-cluster correlations are all identically equal to galaxy-galaxy correlations. If correlation amplitudes exceed the constraints, as is observed, then cluster-cluster correlations must exceed galaxy-galaxy correlations, as is observed.

  19. Formation of stable products from cluster-cluster collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamanova, Denitsa; Grigoryan, Valeri G; Springborg, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The formation of stable products from copper cluster-cluster collisions is investigated by using classical molecular-dynamics simulations in combination with an embedded-atom potential. The dependence of the product clusters on impact energy, relative orientation of the clusters, and size of the clusters is studied. The structures and total energies of the product clusters are analysed and compared with those of the colliding clusters before impact. These results, together with the internal temperature, are used in obtaining an increased understanding of cluster fusion processes

  20. The leucine-rich repeat structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, J; Hindle, K L; McEwan, P A; Lovell, S C

    2008-08-01

    The leucine-rich repeat is a widespread structural motif of 20-30 amino acids with a characteristic repetitive sequence pattern rich in leucines. Leucine-rich repeat domains are built from tandems of two or more repeats and form curved solenoid structures that are particularly suitable for protein-protein interactions. Thousands of protein sequences containing leucine-rich repeats have been identified by automatic annotation methods. Three-dimensional structures of leucine-rich repeat domains determined to date reveal a degree of structural variability that translates into the considerable functional versatility of this protein superfamily. As the essential structural principles become well established, the leucine-rich repeat architecture is emerging as an attractive framework for structural prediction and protein engineering. This review presents an update of the current understanding of leucine-rich repeat structure at the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary levels and discusses specific examples from recently determined three-dimensional structures.

  1. Heavy cluster in cold nuclear rearrangements in fusion and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the appearance of cluster aspects in the dynamics of large rearrangements processes, as fusion and fission, is presented. Clusters in the sense as used in the following are strongly bound, doubly magic neutron rich nuclei as 48 Ca 28 , 78 Ni 50 , 132 Sn 82 , and 208 Pb 126 , the spherical nuclei Z=114 - 126 and N=184, and nuclei with closed shells N=28, 50, 82, and 126, and Z=28, 50, and 82. As with increasing nucleon numbers, the absolute shell corrections to the binding energies increase, the strongest effects are to be observed for the higher shells. The 132 cluster manifests itself in low energy fission (Faissner, H. and Wildermuth, K. Nucl. Phys., 58 (1964) 177). The 208 Pb cluster gave the new radioactivity (Rose, M.J. and Jones G.A., Nature, 307 (1984) 245) and the first superheavy elements (SHE) (Armbruster P., Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 35 (1985) 135-94; Munzenberg, G. Rep. Progr. Phys., 51 (1988) 57). The paper discuss experiments concerning the stability of clusters to intrinsic excitation energy in fusion and fission (Armbruster, P. Lect. Notes Phys., 158 (1982) 1). and the manifestation of clusters in the fusion entrance channel (Armbruster, P., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn., 58 (1989) 232). The importance of compactness of the clustering system seems to be equally decisive in fission and fusion. Finally, it s covered the importance of clusters for the production of SHEs)

  2. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN M81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nantais, Julie B.; Huchra, John P.; Zezas, Andreas; Gazeas, Kosmas; Strader, Jay

    2011-01-01

    We perform aperture photometry and profile fitting on 419 globular cluster (GC) candidates with m V ≤ 23 mag identified in Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys BVI imaging, and estimate the effective radii of the clusters. We identify 85 previously known spectroscopically confirmed clusters, and newly identify 136 objects as good cluster candidates within the 3σ color and size ranges defined by the spectroscopically confirmed clusters, yielding a total of 221 probable GCs. The luminosity function peak for the 221 probable GCs with estimated total dereddening applied is V ∼ (20.26 ± 0.13) mag, corresponding to a distance of ∼3.7 ± 0.3 Mpc. The blue and red GC candidates, and the metal-rich and metal-poor spectroscopically confirmed clusters, respectively, are similar in half-light radius. Red confirmed clusters are about 6% larger in median half-light radius than blue confirmed clusters, and red and blue good GC candidates are nearly identical in half-light radius. The total population of confirmed and 'good' candidates shows an increase in half-light radius as a function of galactocentric distance.

  3. Tune Your Brown Clustering, Please

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derczynski, Leon; Chester, Sean; Bøgh, Kenneth Sejdenfaden

    2015-01-01

    Brown clustering, an unsupervised hierarchical clustering technique based on ngram mutual information, has proven useful in many NLP applications. However, most uses of Brown clustering employ the same default configuration; the appropriateness of this configuration has gone predominantly...

  4. Dynamical history of a binary cluster: Abell 3653

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Turgay; Hudaverdi, Murat

    2017-12-01

    We study the dynamical structure of a bimodal galaxy cluster Abell 3653 at z = 0.1089 using optical and X-ray data. Observations include archival data from the Anglo-Australian Telescope, X-ray observatories XMM-Newton and Chandra. We draw a global picture for A3653 using galaxy density, X-ray luminosity and temperature maps. The galaxy distribution has a regular morphological shape at the 3 Mpc size. The galaxy density map shows an elongation in the east-west direction, which perfectly aligns with the extended diffuse X-ray emission. We detect two dominant groups around the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). BCG1 (z = 0.1099) can be associated with the main cluster A3653E, and a foreground subcluster A3653W is concentrated at BCG2 (z = 0.1075). Both X-ray peaks are dislocated from the BCGs by ∼35 kpc, which suggest an ongoing merger process. We measure the subcluster gas temperatures of 4.67 and 3.66 keV, respectively. Two-body dynamical analysis shows that A3653E and A3653W are very likely gravitationally bound (93.5 per cent probability). The highly favoured scenario suggests that the two subclusters have a mass ratio of 1.4 and are colliding close to the plane of sky (α = 17.61°) at 2400 km s-1, and will undergo core passage in 380 Myr. The temperature map also significantly shows a shock-heated gas (6.16 keV) between the subclusters, which confirms the supersonic infalling scenario.

  5. Cluster Management Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Normann, Leo; Agger Nielsen, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    of how it was legitimized as a “ready-to-use” management model. Further, our account reveals how cluster management translated into considerably different local variants as it travelled into specific organizations. However, these processes have not occurred sequentially with cluster management first...... legitimized at the field level, then spread, and finally translated into action in the adopting organizations. Instead, we observed entangled field and organizational-level processes. Accordingly, we argue that cluster management institutionalization is most readily understood by simultaneously investigating...

  6. The concept of cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lea Louise Holst; Møller, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    villages in order to secure their future. This paper will address the concept of cluster-villages as a possible approach to strengthen the conditions of contemporary Danish villages. Cluster-villages is a concept that gather a number of villages in a network-structure where the villages both work together...... to forskellige positioner ser vi en ny mulighed for landsbyudvikling, som vi kalder Clustervillages. In order to investigate the potentials and possibilities of the cluster-village concept the paper will seek to unfold the concept strategically; looking into the benefits of such concept. Further, the paper seeks...

  7. Raspberry Pi super cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Andrew K

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a step-by-step, tutorial-based approach which will teach you how to develop your own super cluster using Raspberry Pi computers quickly and efficiently.Raspberry Pi Super Cluster is an introductory guide for those interested in experimenting with parallel computing at home. Aimed at Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, this book is a primer for getting your first cluster up and running.Basic knowledge of C or Java would be helpful but no prior knowledge of parallel computing is necessary.

  8. Introduction to cluster dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Reinhard, Paul-Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Clusters as mesoscopic particles represent an intermediate state of matter between single atoms and solid material. The tendency to miniaturise technical objects requires knowledge about systems which contain a ""small"" number of atoms or molecules only. This is all the more true for dynamical aspects, particularly in relation to the qick development of laser technology and femtosecond spectroscopy. Here, for the first time is a highly qualitative introduction to cluster physics. With its emphasis on cluster dynamics, this will be vital to everyone involved in this interdisciplinary subje

  9. Contextualizing the Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    This dissertation examines the case of the palm oil cluster in Malaysia and Indonesia, today one of the largest agricultural clusters in the world. My analysis focuses on the evolution of the cluster from the 1880s to the 1970s in order to understand how it helped these two countries to integrate...... into the global economy in both colonial and post-colonial times. The study is based on empirical material drawn from five UK archives and background research using secondary sources, interviews, and archive visits to Malaysia and Singapore. The dissertation comprises three articles, each discussing a major under...

  10. Atomic cluster collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  11. Rich Language Analysis for Counterterrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidère, Mathieu; Howard, Newton; Argamon, Shlomo

    Accurate and relevant intelligence is critical for effective counterterrorism. Too much irrelevant information is as bad or worse than not enough information. Modern computational tools promise to provide better search and summarization capabilities to help analysts filter and select relevant and key information. However, to do this task effectively, such tools must have access to levels of meaning beyond the literal. Terrorists operating in context-rich cultures like fundamentalist Islam use messages with multiple levels of interpretation, which are easily misunderstood by non-insiders. This chapter discusses several kinds of such “encryption” used by terrorists and insurgents in the Arabic language, and how knowledge of such methods can be used to enhance computational text analysis techniques for use in counterterrorism.

  12. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio, E-mail: fabien@ift.unesp.br, E-mail: rosenfel@ift.unesp.br [ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research, Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  13. WHERE DO THE ALPS' FOOTHILLS END? THE DEPTHS OF THE PRE-CENOZOIC BASEMENT IN THE FOREGROUND OF VAS-HEGY– ALPOKALJA, WESTERN HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SZÉKELY BALÁZS

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the past three decades numerous researches have been published containing maps describing basement morphology. The first basement interpretations were based on the correlation of borehole data, then in the ’80s further seismic surveys offered the possibility to refine the outcomes. We collected and compared these data – by following a geoinformatical approach - and integrated them during the preparation stage of the measurement obtained in the 2012 field trip of Eötvös Loránd University, Department of Geophysics and Space Science. By summing up all the data we are able to create a more accurate Pre-Cenozioc basemap of the studied area. The map covers approx. 300 km2 area in the west of Hungary, between the national border and Szombathely, in the eastern foreground of Vas-hegy. We compared five basemaps (KILENYI & RUMPLER 1984, FLÜGEL 1988, KILÉNYI & ŠEFARA 1989, DANK & FÜLÖP 1990, HASS et al. 2010, two magnetic (HOFFER 1960, FANCSIK et al. 2006, a Bouguer-anomaly map (FANCSIK et al. 2005 and torsion balance anomaly map (VAJK 1938. Apparently, by this comparison we can see that the depth of Pre-Cenozoic basement is interpreted in different ways in each article. In contradictory and information deficient areas an attempt was made to produce supplement data with seismic and magnetic measurements. Eventually, a refined Pre-Cenozoic basemap of the area has been created with the help of our complementing measurements, the old maps and more than twenty boreholes reaching basement. Our results revealed an eastern foothill buried under the surface, although the saddle morphology is unlikely. The model contains a basement with fairly steady slope based on industrial sesmic surveys, our results doubt its hole-like feature.

  14. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  15. Energy efficiency in the foreground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baettig, I.

    2006-01-01

    In this interview with Eberhard Jochem, professor at the Centre for Energy Policy and Economics at the Federal Institute of Science and Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland, several energy-relevant topics are discussed. These include high oil prices, possible power shortages and binding commitments in the climate-protection area. The question is asked, how, in consideration of such general conditions, energy use and energy supply should develop in Switzerland. Options for increasing efficiency or the tapping of new energy sources is discussed, as is Switzerland's increasing energy consumption. The '2000 Watt' concept being worked on at the ETH and the activities needed for its realisation are discussed. The effects of this concept on economical and business development are discussed. The potential of renewable forms of energy and the possibility of building combined gas and steam power stations are looked at. Ways of promoting renewable energy and questions concerning the extent of the state intervention in the energy business are considered

  16. FURTHER DEFINITION OF THE MASS-METALLICITY RELATION IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER SYSTEMS AROUND BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockcroft, Robert; Harris, William E.; Wehner, Elizabeth M. H.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Rothberg, Barry

    2009-01-01

    We combine the globular cluster (GC) data for 15 brightest cluster galaxies and use this material to trace the mass-metallicity relations (MMRs) in their globular cluster systems (GCSs). This work extends previous studies which correlate the properties of the MMR with those of the host galaxy. Our combined data sets show a mean trend for the metal-poor subpopulation that corresponds to a scaling of heavy-element abundance with cluster mass Z ∼ M 0.30±0.05 . No trend is seen for the metal-rich subpopulation which has a scaling relation that is consistent with zero. We also find that the scaling exponent is independent of the GCS specific frequency and host galaxy luminosity, except perhaps for dwarf galaxies. We present new photometry in (g',i') obtained with Gemini/GMOS for the GC populations around the southern giant ellipticals NGC 5193 and IC 4329. Both galaxies have rich cluster populations which show up as normal, bimodal sequences in the color-magnitude diagram. We test the observed MMRs and argue that they are statistically real, and not an artifact caused by the method we used. We also argue against asymmetric contamination causing the observed MMR as our mean results are no different from other contamination-free studies. Finally, we compare our method to the standard bimodal fitting method (KMM or RMIX) and find our results are consistent. Interpretation of these results is consistent with recent models for GC formation in which the MMR is determined by GC self-enrichment during their brief formation period.

  17. Metal cluster compounds - chemistry and importance; clusters containing isolated main group element atoms, large metal cluster compounds, cluster fluxionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walther, B.

    1988-01-01

    This part of the review on metal cluster compounds deals with clusters containing isolated main group element atoms, with high nuclearity clusters and metal cluster fluxionality. It will be obvious that main group element atoms strongly influence the geometry, stability and reactivity of the clusters. High nuclearity clusters are of interest in there own due to the diversity of the structures adopted, but their intermediate position between molecules and the metallic state makes them a fascinating research object too. These both sites of the metal cluster chemistry as well as the frequently observed ligand and core fluxionality are related to the cluster metal and surface analogy. (author)

  18. The next generation Virgo cluster survey. VIII. The spatial distribution of globular clusters in the Virgo cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrell, Patrick R.; Accetta, Katharine [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; McConnachie, Alan; Gwyn, Stephen [Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hongxin [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Puzia, Thomas H.; Jordán, Andrés [Institute of Astrophysics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Av. Vicu' a Mackenna 4860, Macul 7820436, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Liu, Chengze [Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Courteau, Stéphane [Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Duc, Pierre-Alain [AIM Paris Saclay, CNRS/INSU, CEA/Irfu, Université Paris Diderot, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex (France); Emsellem, Eric [Université de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 av. Charles André, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, ENS de Lyon (France); and others

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large-scale study of the distribution of globular clusters (GCs) throughout the Virgo cluster, based on photometry from the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), a large imaging survey covering Virgo's primary subclusters (Virgo A = M87 and Virgo B = M49) out to their virial radii. Using the g{sub o}{sup ′}, (g' – i') {sub o} color-magnitude diagram of unresolved and marginally resolved sources within the NGVS, we have constructed two-dimensional maps of the (irregular) GC distribution over 100 deg{sup 2} to a depth of g{sub o}{sup ′} = 24. We present the clearest evidence to date showing the difference in concentration between red and blue GCs over the full extent of the cluster, where the red (more metal-rich) GCs are largely located around the massive early-type galaxies in Virgo, while the blue (metal-poor) GCs have a much more extended spatial distribution with significant populations still present beyond 83' (∼215 kpc) along the major axes of both M49 and M87. A comparison of our GC maps to the diffuse light in the outermost regions of M49 and M87 show remarkable agreement in the shape, ellipticity, and boxiness of both luminous systems. We also find evidence for spatial enhancements of GCs surrounding M87 that may be indicative of recent interactions or an ongoing merger history. We compare the GC map to that of the locations of Virgo galaxies and the X-ray intracluster gas, and find generally good agreement between these various baryonic structures. We calculate the Virgo cluster contains a total population of N {sub GC} = 67, 300 ± 14, 400, of which 35% are located in M87 and M49 alone. For the first time, we compute a cluster-wide specific frequency S {sub N,} {sub CL} = 2.8 ± 0.7, after correcting for Virgo's diffuse light. We also find a GC-to-baryonic mass fraction ε {sub b} = 5.7 ± 1.1 × 10{sup –4} and a GC-to-total cluster mass formation efficiency ε {sub t} = 2.9 ± 0.5 × 10{sup –5

  19. Disentangling Porterian Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagtfelt, Tue

    , contested theory become so widely disseminated and applied as a normative and prescriptive strategy for economic development? The dissertation traces the introduction of the cluster notion into the EU’s Lisbon Strategy and demonstrates how its inclusion originates from Porter’s colleagues: Professor Örjan...... to his membership on the Commission on Industrial Competitiveness, and that the cluster notion found in his influential book, Nations, represents a significant shift in his conception of cluster compared with his early conceptions. This shift, it is argued, is a deliberate attempt by Porter to create...... a paradigmatic textbook that follows Kuhn’s blueprint for scientific revolutions by instilling Nations with circular references and thus creating a local linguistic holism conceptualized through an encompassing notion of cluster. The dissertation concludes that the two research questions are philosophically...

  20. Remarks on stellar clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1985-01-01

    In the following, a few simple remarks on the evolution and properties of stellar clusters will be collected. In particular, globular clusters will be considered. Though details of such clusters are often not known, a few questions can be clarified with the help of primitive arguments. These are:- why are spherical clusters spherical, why do they have high densities, why do they consist of approximately a million stars, how may a black hole of great mass form within them, may they be the origin of gamma-ray bursts, may their invisible remnants account for the missing mass of our galaxy. The available data do not warrant a detailed evaluation. However, it is remarkable that exceedingly simple models can shed some light on the questions enumerated above. (author)

  1. From collisions to clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukonen, Ville; Bork, Nicolai; Vehkamaki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    -principles molecular dynamics collision simulations of (sulphuric acid)1(water)0, 1 + (dimethylamine) → (sulphuric acid)1(dimethylamine)1(water)0, 1 cluster formation processes. The simulations indicate that the sticking factor in the collisions is unity: the interaction between the molecules is strong enough...... control. As a consequence, the clusters show very dynamic ion pair structure, which differs from both the static structure optimisation calculations and the equilibrium first-principles molecular dynamics simulations. In some of the simulation runs, water mediates the proton transfer by acting as a proton...... to overcome the possible initial non-optimal collision orientations. No post-collisional cluster break up is observed. The reasons for the efficient clustering are (i) the proton transfer reaction which takes place in each of the collision simulations and (ii) the subsequent competition over the proton...

  2. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  3. How Clusters Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology innovation clusters are geographic concentrations of interconnected companies, universities, and other organizations with a focus on environmental technology. They play a key role in addressing the nation’s pressing environmental problems.

  4. Evolution of clustered storage

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Van de Vyvre, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The session actually featured two presentations: * Evolution of clustered storage by Lance Hukill, Quantum Corporation * ALICE DAQ - Usage of a Cluster-File System: Quantum StorNext by Pierre Vande Vyvre, CERN-PH the second one prepared at short notice by Pierre (thanks!) to present how the Quantum technologies are being used in the ALICE experiment. The abstract to Mr Hukill's follows. Clustered Storage is a technology that is driven by business and mission applications. The evolution of Clustered Storage solutions starts first at the alignment between End-users needs and Industry trends: * Push-and-Pull between managing for today versus planning for tomorrow * Breaking down the real business problems to the core applications * Commoditization of clients, servers, and target devices * Interchangeability, Interoperability, Remote Access, Centralized control * Oh, and yes, there is a budget and the "real world" to deal with This presentation will talk through these needs and trends, and then ask the question, ...

  5. Galaxy clusters and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    White, S

    1994-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are the largest coherent objects in Universe. It has been known since 1933 that their dynamical properties require either a modification of the theory of gravity, or the presence of a dominant component of unseen material of unknown nature. Clusters still provide the best laboratories for studying the amount and distribution of this dark matter relative to the material which can be observed directly -- the galaxies themselves and the hot,X-ray-emitting gas which lies between them.Imaging and spectroscopy of clusters by satellite-borne X -ray telescopes has greatly improved our knowledge of the structure and composition of this intergalactic medium. The results permit a number of new approaches to some fundamental cosmological questions,but current indications from the data are contradictory. The observed irregularity of real clusters seems to imply recent formation epochs which would require a universe with approximately the critical density. On the other hand, the large baryon fraction observ...

  6. Applications of Clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Applications of Clustering. Biology – medical imaging, bioinformatics, ecology, phylogenies problems etc. Market research. Data Mining. Social Networks. Any problem measuring similarity/correlation. (dimensions represent different parameters)

  7. Clustering Game Behavior Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauckhage, C.; Drachen, Anders; Sifa, Rafet

    2015-01-01

    of the causes, the proliferation of behavioral data poses the problem of how to derive insights therefrom. Behavioral data sets can be large, time-dependent and high-dimensional. Clustering offers a way to explore such data and to discover patterns that can reduce the overall complexity of the data. Clustering...... and other techniques for player profiling and play style analysis have, therefore, become popular in the nascent field of game analytics. However, the proper use of clustering techniques requires expertise and an understanding of games is essential to evaluate results. With this paper, we address game data...... scientists and present a review and tutorial focusing on the application of clustering techniques to mine behavioral game data. Several algorithms are reviewed and examples of their application shown. Key topics such as feature normalization are discussed and open problems in the context of game analytics...

  8. Clustering on Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezeshkian, Weria; Ipsen, John H

    2018-01-01

    Clustering of extracellular ligands and proteins on the plasma membrane is required to perform specific cellular functions, such as signaling and endocytosis. Attractive forces that originate in perturbations of the membrane's physical properties contribute to this clustering, in addition to direct...... protein-protein interactions. However, these membrane-mediated forces have not all been equally considered, despite their importance. In this review, we describe how line tension, lipid depletion, and membrane curvature contribute to membrane-mediated clustering. Additional attractive forces that arise...... from protein-induced perturbation of a membrane's fluctuations are also described. This review aims to provide a survey of the current understanding of membrane-mediated clustering and how this supports precise biological functions....

  9. Air void clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Air void clustering around coarse aggregate in concrete has been identified as a potential source of : low strengths in concrete mixes by several Departments of Transportation around the country. Research was : carried out to (1) develop a quantitati...

  10. Environment-based selection effects of Planck clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosyra, R.; Gruen, D.; Seitz, S.; Mana, A.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sanchez, A.; Bender, R.

    2015-07-24

    We investigate whether the large-scale structure environment of galaxy clusters imprints a selection bias on Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) catalogues. Such a selection effect might be caused by line of sight (LoS) structures that add to the SZ signal or contain point sources that disturb the signal extraction in the SZ survey. We use the Planck PSZ1 union catalogue in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) region as our sample of SZ-selected clusters. We calculate the angular two-point correlation function (2pcf) for physically correlated, foreground and background structure in the RedMaPPer SDSS DR8 catalogue with respect to each cluster. We compare our results with an optically selected comparison cluster sample and with theoretical predictions. In contrast to the hypothesis of no environment-based selection, we find a mean 2pcf for background structures of -0.049 on scales of ≲40 arcmin, significantly non-zero at ~4σ, which means that Planck clusters are more likely to be detected in regions of low background density. We hypothesize this effect arises either from background estimation in the SZ survey or from radio sources in the background. We estimate the defect in SZ signal caused by this effect to be negligibly small, of the order of ~10-4 of the signal of a typical Planck detection. Analogously, there are no implications on X-ray mass measurements. However, the environmental dependence has important consequences for weak lensing follow up of Planck galaxy clusters: we predict that projection effects account for half of the mass contained within a 15 arcmin radius of Planck galaxy clusters. We did not detect a background underdensity of CMASS LRGs, which also leaves a spatially varying redshift dependence of the Planck SZ selection function as a possible cause for our findings.

  11. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY (NGVS). I. INTRODUCTION TO THE SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrarese, Laura; Côté, Patrick; Gwyn, S. D. J.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; McConnachie, Alan W.; Blakeslee, John P.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Peng, Eric W.; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Boselli, A.; Mei, Simona; Erben, Thomas; Durrell, Patrick R.; Christopher Mihos, J.; Jordán, Andrés; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lançon, Ariane; Emsellem, Eric; Balogh, Michael L.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic

    2012-01-01

    The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) is a program that uses the 1 deg 2 MegaCam instrument on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope to carry out a comprehensive optical imaging survey of the Virgo cluster, from its core to its virial radius—covering a total area of 104 deg 2 —in the u*griz bandpasses. Thanks to a dedicated data acquisition strategy and processing pipeline, the NGVS reaches a point-source depth of g ≈ 25.9 mag (10σ) and a surface brightness limit of μ g ∼ 29 mag arcsec –2 (2σ above the mean sky level), thus superseding all previous optical studies of this benchmark galaxy cluster. In this paper, we give an overview of the technical aspects of the survey, such as areal coverage, field placement, choice of filters, limiting magnitudes, observing strategies, data processing and calibration pipelines, survey timeline, and data products. We also describe the primary scientific topics of the NGVS, which include: the galaxy luminosity and mass functions; the color-magnitude relation; galaxy scaling relations; compact stellar systems; galactic nuclei; the extragalactic distance scale; the large-scale environment of the cluster and its relationship to the Local Supercluster; diffuse light and the intracluster medium; galaxy interactions and evolutionary processes; and extragalactic star clusters. In addition, we describe a number of ancillary programs dealing with 'foreground' and 'background' science topics, including the study of high-inclination trans-Neptunian objects; the structure of the Galactic halo in the direction of the Virgo Overdensity and Sagittarius Stream; the measurement of cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy, and cluster lensing; and the identification of distant galaxy clusters, and strong-lensing events.

  12. Speaker segmentation and clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Kotti, M; Moschou, V; Kotropoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    07.08.13 KB. Ok to add the accepted version to Spiral, Elsevier says ok whlile mandate not enforced. This survey focuses on two challenging speech processing topics, namely: speaker segmentation and speaker clustering. Speaker segmentation aims at finding speaker change points in an audio stream, whereas speaker clustering aims at grouping speech segments based on speaker characteristics. Model-based, metric-based, and hybrid speaker segmentation algorithms are reviewed. Concerning speaker...

  13. Fermion cluster algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2000-01-01

    Cluster algorithms have been recently used to eliminate sign problems that plague Monte-Carlo methods in a variety of systems. In particular such algorithms can also be used to solve sign problems associated with the permutation of fermion world lines. This solution leads to the possibility of designing fermion cluster algorithms in certain cases. Using the example of free non-relativistic fermions we discuss the ideas underlying the algorithm

  14. BUILDING e-CLUSTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Davidovic

    2013-01-01

    E-clusters are strategic alliance in TIMES technology sector (Telecommunication, Information technology, Multimedia, Entertainment, Security) where products and processes are digitalized. They enable horizontal and vertical integration of small and medium companies and establish new added value e-chains. E-clusters also build supply chains based on cooperation relationship, innovation, organizational knowledge and compliance of intellectual properties. As an innovative approach for economic p...

  15. Clusters and exotic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt is made to present some data which may be construed as indicating that perhaps clusters play a role in high energy and exotic pion or kaon interactions with complex (A much greater than 16) nuclei. Also an attempt is made to summarize some very recent experimental work on pion interactions with nuclei which may or may not in the end support a picture in which clusters play an important role. (U.S.)

  16. Robust continuous clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sohil Atul; Koltun, Vladlen

    2017-09-12

    Clustering is a fundamental procedure in the analysis of scientific data. It is used ubiquitously across the sciences. Despite decades of research, existing clustering algorithms have limited effectiveness in high dimensions and often require tuning parameters for different domains and datasets. We present a clustering algorithm that achieves high accuracy across multiple domains and scales efficiently to high dimensions and large datasets. The presented algorithm optimizes a smooth continuous objective, which is based on robust statistics and allows heavily mixed clusters to be untangled. The continuous nature of the objective also allows clustering to be integrated as a module in end-to-end feature learning pipelines. We demonstrate this by extending the algorithm to perform joint clustering and dimensionality reduction by efficiently optimizing a continuous global objective. The presented approach is evaluated on large datasets of faces, hand-written digits, objects, newswire articles, sensor readings from the Space Shuttle, and protein expression levels. Our method achieves high accuracy across all datasets, outperforming the best prior algorithm by a factor of 3 in average rank.

  17. Cluster bomb ocular injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Hamade, Haya; Ghaddar, Ayman; Mokadem, Ahmad Samih; El Hajj Ali, Mohamad; Awwad, Shady

    2012-01-01

    To present the visual outcomes and ocular sequelae of victims of cluster bombs. This retrospective, multicenter case series of ocular injury due to cluster bombs was conducted for 3 years after the war in South Lebanon (July 2006). Data were gathered from the reports to the Information Management System for Mine Action. There were 308 victims of clusters bombs; 36 individuals were killed, of which 2 received ocular lacerations and; 272 individuals were injured with 18 receiving ocular injury. These 18 surviving individuals were assessed by the authors. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% (20/308) of cluster bomb victims. Trauma to multiple organs occurred in 12 of 18 cases (67%) with ocular injury. Ocular findings included corneal or scleral lacerations (16 eyes), corneal foreign bodies (9 eyes), corneal decompensation (2 eyes), ruptured cataract (6 eyes), and intravitreal foreign bodies (10 eyes). The corneas of one patient had extreme attenuation of the endothelium. Ocular injury occurred in 6.5% of cluster bomb victims and 67% of the patients with ocular injury sustained trauma to multiple organs. Visual morbidity in civilians is an additional reason for a global ban on the use of cluster bombs.

  18. Radio continuum processes in clusters of galaxies; Proceedings of the Workshop, Green Bank, WV, Aug. 4-8, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'dea, C.P.; Uson, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of clusters of galaxies are examined in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include radio surveys of clusters, accretion flows, wide-angle-tail radio sources, the interaction of radio sources with the intracluster medium, diffuse emission in clusters, cluster dynamics, and the environment of powerful radio sources. Particular attention is given to a local perspective on galaxies in rich clusters, X-ray observations of clusters, VLA observations of distant clusters, the halo of Vir A at 327 MHz, Exosat observations of the Vir Cluster, accretion flows in elliptical galaxies, jet disruption in wide-angle-tail radio galaxies, beam trajectories in the intracluster medium, the Suniaev-Zel'dovich effect, dark matter in clusters, and the H I environment of high-redshift quasars

  19. Two genetic loci produce distinct carbohydrate-rich structural components of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lisa; Kolter, Roberto

    2004-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms, which are cellular aggregates encased in an extracellular matrix. Molecular genetics studies of three common autoaggregative phenotypes, namely wrinkled colonies, pellicles, and solid-surface-associated biofilms, led to the identification of two loci, pel and psl, that are involved in the production of carbohydrate-rich components of the biofilm matrix. The pel gene cluster is involved in the production of a glucose-rich matrix material in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 (L. Friedman and R. Kolter, Mol. Microbiol. 51:675-690, 2004). Here we investigate the role of the pel gene cluster in P. aeruginosa strain ZK2870 and identify a second genetic locus, termed psl, involved in the production of a mannose-rich matrix material. The 11 predicted protein products of the psl genes are homologous to proteins involved in carbohydrate processing. P. aeruginosa is thus able to produce two distinct carbohydrate-rich matrix materials. Either carbohydrate-rich matrix component appears to be sufficient for mature biofilm formation, and at least one of them is required for mature biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains PA14 and ZK2870. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  20. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  1. THE SLOAN BRIGHT ARCS SURVEY: TEN STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSING CLUSTERS AND EVIDENCE OF OVERCONCENTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Matthew P. [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Lin, Huan; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Diehl, H. Thomas; Kubik, Donna; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Tucker, Douglas [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    We describe 10 strong lensing galaxy clusters of redshift 0.26 {<=} z {<=} 0.56 that were found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present measurements of richness (N{sub 200}), mass (M{sub 200}), and velocity dispersion for the clusters. We find that in order to use the mass-richness relation from Johnston et al., which was established at mean redshift of 0.25, it is necessary to scale measured richness values up by 1.47. Using this scaling, we find richness values for these clusters to be in the range of 22 {<=} N{sub 200} {<=} 317 and mass values to be in the range of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} {<=} M{sub 200} {<=} 30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }. We also present measurements of Einstein radius, mass, and velocity dispersion for the lensing systems. The Einstein radii ({theta}{sub E}) are all relatively small, with 5.''4 {<=} {theta}{sub E} {<=} 13''. Finally, we consider if there is evidence that our clusters are more concentrated than {Lambda}CDM would predict. We find that six of our clusters do not show evidence of overconcentration, while four of our clusters do. We note a correlation between overconcentration and mass, as the four clusters showing evidence of overconcentration are all lower-mass clusters. For the four lowest mass clusters the average value of the concentration parameter c{sub 200} is 11.6, while for the six higher-mass clusters the average value of c{sub 200} is 4.4. {Lambda}CDM would place c{sub 200} between 3.4 and 5.7.

  2. Cluster dynamics at different cluster size and incident laser wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Tara; Bernardinello, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    X-ray emission spectra from aluminum clusters of diameter -0.4 μm and gold clusters of dia. ∼1.25 μm are experimentally studied by irradiating the cluster foil targets with 1.06 μm laser, 10 ns (FWHM) at an intensity ∼10 12 W/cm 2 . Aluminum clusters show a different spectra compared to bulk material whereas gold cluster evolve towards bulk gold. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of cluster dimension, laser wavelength and pulse duration. PIC simulations are performed to study the behavior of clusters at higher intensity I≥10 17 W/cm 2 for different size of the clusters irradiated at different laser wavelengths. Results indicate the dependence of cluster dynamics on cluster size and incident laser wavelength

  3. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2006-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  4. Cluster fusion algorithm: application to Lennard-Jones clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.; Greiner, Walter

    2008-01-01

    paths up to the cluster size of 150 atoms. We demonstrate that in this way all known global minima structures of the Lennard-Jones clusters can be found. Our method provides an efficient tool for the calculation and analysis of atomic cluster structure. With its use we justify the magic number sequence......We present a new general theoretical framework for modelling the cluster structure and apply it to description of the Lennard-Jones clusters. Starting from the initial tetrahedral cluster configuration, adding new atoms to the system and absorbing its energy at each step, we find cluster growing...... for the clusters of noble gas atoms and compare it with experimental observations. We report the striking correspondence of the peaks in the dependence of the second derivative of the binding energy per atom on cluster size calculated for the chain of the Lennard-Jones clusters based on the icosahedral symmetry...

  5. Protogalaxy interactions in newly formed clusters: Galaxy luminosities, colors, and intergalactic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1978-01-01

    The role of protogalaxy interactions in galactic evolution is studied during the formation of galaxy clusters. In the early stages of the collapse, coalescent encounters of protogalaxies lead to the development of a galactic luminosity function. Once galaxies acquire appreciable random motions, mutual collisions between galaxies in rich clusters will trigger the collapse of interstellar clouds to form stars. This provides both a source for enriched intracluster gas and an interpretation of the correlation between luminosity and color for cluster elliptical galaxies. Other observational consequences that are considered include optical, X-ray, and diffuse nonthermal radio emission from newly formed clusters of galaxies

  6. MEASUREMENT OF THE HALO BIAS FROM STACKED SHEAR PROFILES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covone, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli " Federico II," Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Sereno, Mauro [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Kilbinger, Martin [CEA/Irfu/SAp Saclay, Laboratoire AIM, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cardone, Vincenzo F. [I.N.A.F.-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Roma) (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    We present observational evidence of the two-halo term in the stacked shear profile of a sample of ∼1200 optically selected galaxy clusters based on imaging data and the public shear catalog from the CFHTLenS. We find that the halo bias, a measure of the correlated distribution of matter around galaxy clusters, has amplitude and correlation with galaxy cluster mass in very good agreement with the predictions based on the LCDM standard cosmological model. The mass-concentration relation is flat but higher than theoretical predictions. We also confirm the close scaling relation between the optical richness of galaxy clusters and their mass.

  7. Proton-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitenzahl, I.R.; Timmes, F.X.; Marin-Lafleche, A.; Brown, E.; Magkotsios, G.; Truran, J.

    2008-01-01

    Proton-rich material in a state of nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is one of the least studied regimes of nucleosynthesis. One reason for this is that after hydrogen burning, stellar evolution proceeds at conditions of an equal number of neutrons and protons or at a slight degree of neutron-richness. Proton-rich nucleosynthesis in stars tends to occur only when hydrogen-rich material that accretes onto a white dwarf or a neutron star explodes, or when neutrino interactions in the winds from a nascent proto-neutron star or collapsar disk drive the matter proton-rich prior to or during the nucleosynthesis. In this Letter we solve the NSE equations for a range of proton-rich thermodynamic conditions. We show that cold proton-rich NSE is qualitatively different from neutron-rich NSE. Instead of being dominated by the Fe-peak nuclei with the largest binding energy per nucleon that have a proton-to-nucleon ratio close to the prescribed electron fraction, NSE for proton-rich material near freezeout temperature is mainly composed of 56Ni and free protons. Previous results of nuclear reaction network calculations rely on this nonintuitive high-proton abundance, which this Letter explains. We show how the differences and especially the large fraction of free protons arises from the minimization of the free energy as a result of a delicate competition between the entropy and nuclear binding energy.

  8. GibbsCluster: unsupervised clustering and alignment of peptide sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Alvarez, Bruno; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    motif characterizing each cluster. Several parameters are available to customize cluster analysis, including adjustable penalties for small clusters and overlapping groups and a trash cluster to remove outliers. As an example application, we used the server to deconvolute multiple specificities in large......-scale peptidome data generated by mass spectrometry. The server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GibbsCluster-2.0....

  9. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM GALAXY CLUSTERING AND THE MASS-TO-NUMBER RATIO OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Blanton, Michael R.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Becker, Matthew R.; Rozo, Eduardo; Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H.; Zehavi, Idit; Busha, Michael T.; Koester, Benjamin P.

    2012-01-01

    We place constraints on the average density (Ω m ) and clustering amplitude (σ 8 ) of matter using a combination of two measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: the galaxy two-point correlation function, w p (r p ), and the mass-to-galaxy-number ratio within galaxy clusters, M/N, analogous to cluster M/L ratios. Our w p (r p ) measurements are obtained from DR7 while the sample of clusters is the maxBCG sample, with cluster masses derived from weak gravitational lensing. We construct nonlinear galaxy bias models using the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) to fit both w p (r p ) and M/N for different cosmological parameters. HOD models that match the same two-point clustering predict different numbers of galaxies in massive halos when Ω m or σ 8 is varied, thereby breaking the degeneracy between cosmology and bias. We demonstrate that this technique yields constraints that are consistent and competitive with current results from cluster abundance studies, without the use of abundance information. Using w p (r p ) and M/N alone, we find Ω 0.5 m σ 8 = 0.465 ± 0.026, with individual constraints of Ω m = 0.29 ± 0.03 and σ 8 = 0.85 ± 0.06. Combined with current cosmic microwave background data, these constraints are Ω m = 0.290 ± 0.016 and σ 8 = 0.826 ± 0.020. All errors are 1σ. The systematic uncertainties that the M/N technique are most sensitive to are the amplitude of the bias function of dark matter halos and the possibility of redshift evolution between the SDSS Main sample and the maxBCG cluster sample. Our derived constraints are insensitive to the current level of uncertainties in the halo mass function and in the mass-richness relation of clusters and its scatter, making the M/N technique complementary to cluster abundances as a method for constraining cosmology with future galaxy surveys.

  10. COSMOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS FROM GALAXY CLUSTERING AND THE MASS-TO-NUMBER RATIO OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10013 (United States); Sheldon, Erin S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Becker, Matthew R.; Rozo, Eduardo [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Zu, Ying; Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zehavi, Idit [Department of Astronomy and CERCA, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Busha, Michael T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Koester, Benjamin P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 6037 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    We place constraints on the average density ({Omega}{sub m}) and clustering amplitude ({sigma}{sub 8}) of matter using a combination of two measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: the galaxy two-point correlation function, w{sub p} (r{sub p} ), and the mass-to-galaxy-number ratio within galaxy clusters, M/N, analogous to cluster M/L ratios. Our w{sub p} (r{sub p} ) measurements are obtained from DR7 while the sample of clusters is the maxBCG sample, with cluster masses derived from weak gravitational lensing. We construct nonlinear galaxy bias models using the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) to fit both w{sub p} (r{sub p} ) and M/N for different cosmological parameters. HOD models that match the same two-point clustering predict different numbers of galaxies in massive halos when {Omega}{sub m} or {sigma}{sub 8} is varied, thereby breaking the degeneracy between cosmology and bias. We demonstrate that this technique yields constraints that are consistent and competitive with current results from cluster abundance studies, without the use of abundance information. Using w{sub p} (r{sub p} ) and M/N alone, we find {Omega}{sup 0.5}{sub m}{sigma}{sub 8} = 0.465 {+-} 0.026, with individual constraints of {Omega}{sub m} = 0.29 {+-} 0.03 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.85 {+-} 0.06. Combined with current cosmic microwave background data, these constraints are {Omega}{sub m} = 0.290 {+-} 0.016 and {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.826 {+-} 0.020. All errors are 1{sigma}. The systematic uncertainties that the M/N technique are most sensitive to are the amplitude of the bias function of dark matter halos and the possibility of redshift evolution between the SDSS Main sample and the maxBCG cluster sample. Our derived constraints are insensitive to the current level of uncertainties in the halo mass function and in the mass-richness relation of clusters and its scatter, making the M/N technique complementary to cluster abundances as a method for constraining cosmology with future galaxy

  11. The weak lensing analysis of the CFHTLS and NGVS RedGOLD galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parroni, C.; Mei, S.; Erben, T.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Raichoor, A.; Ford, J.; Licitra, R.; Meneghetti, M.; Hildebrandt, H.; Miller, L.; Côté, P.; Covone, G.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Duc, P.-A.; Ferrarese, L.; Gwyn, S. D. J.; Puzia, T. H.

    2017-12-01

    An accurate estimation of galaxy cluster masses is essential for their use in cosmological and astrophysical studies. We studied the accuracy of the optical richness obtained by our RedGOLD cluster detection algorithm tep{licitra2016a, licitra2016b} as a mass proxy, using weak lensing and X-ray mass measurements. We measured stacked weak lensing cluster masses for a sample of 1323 galaxy clusters in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey W1 and the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey at 0.2z<0.5, in the optical richness range 10-70. We tested different weak lensing mass models that account for miscentering, non-weak shear, the two-halo term, the contribution of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy, and the intrinsic scatter in the mass-richness relation. We calculated the coefficients of the mass-richness relation, and of the scaling relations between the lensing mass and X-ray mass proxies.

  12. Topological defect clustering and plastic deformation mechanisms in functionalized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ricardo; Araujo, Joice; Chacham, Helio

    2011-03-01

    We present ab initio results suggesting that strain plays a central role in the clustering of topological defects in strained and functionalized graphene models. We apply strain onto the topological-defect graphene networks from our previous work, and obtain topological-defect clustering patterns which are in excellent agreement with recent observations in samples of reduced graphene oxide. In our models, the graphene layer, containing an initial concentration of isolated topological defects, is covered by hydrogen or hydroxyl groups. Our results also suggest a rich variety of plastic deformation mechanism in functionalized graphene systems. We acknowledge support from the Brazilian agencies: CNPq, Fapemig, and INCT-Materiais de Carbono.

  13. Cluster Implantation and Deposition Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Muhammad; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    In the current report, a design and capabilities of a cluster implantation and deposition apparatus (CIDA) involving two different cluster sources are described. The clusters produced from gas precursors (Ar, N etc.) by PuCluS-2 can be used to study cluster ion implantation in order to develop...

  14. Cosmological constraints from Chandra observations of galaxy clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven W

    2002-09-15

    Chandra observations of rich, relaxed galaxy clusters allow the properties of the X-ray gas and the total gravitating mass to be determined precisely. Here, we present results for a sample of the most X-ray luminous, dynamically relaxed clusters known. We show that the Chandra data and independent gravitational lensing studies provide consistent answers on the mass distributions in the clusters. The mass profiles exhibit a form in good agreement with the predictions from numerical simulations. Combining Chandra results on the X-ray gas mass fractions in the clusters with independent measurements of the Hubble constant and the mean baryonic matter density in the Universe, we obtain a tight constraint on the mean total matter density of the Universe, Omega(m), and an interesting constraint on the cosmological constant, Omega(Lambda). We also describe the 'virial relations' linking the masses, X-ray temperatures and luminosities of galaxy clusters. These relations provide a key step in linking the observed number density and spatial distribution of clusters to the predictions from cosmological models. The Chandra data confirm the presence of a systematic offset of ca. 40% between the normalization of the observed mass-temperature relation and the predictions from standard simulations. This finding leads to a significant revision of the best-fit value of sigma(8) inferred from the observed temperature and luminosity functions of clusters.

  15. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AS CRADLES OF LIFE AND ADVANCED CIVILIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefano, R. Di [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (United States); Ray, A., E-mail: rdistefano@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (India)

    2016-08-10

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations in compact dense ellipsoids. There is no star formation and there are no core-collapse supernovae, but several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk, facilitating interstellar communication and travel. The potent combination of long-term stability and high stellar densities provides a globular cluster opportunity. Yet the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, as stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. We find, however, that large portions of many globular clusters are “sweet spots,” where habitable-zone planetary orbits are stable for long times. Globular clusters in our own and other galaxies are, therefore, among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). We use the Drake equation to compare the likelihood of advanced civilizations in globular clusters to that in the Galactic disk. We also consider free-floating planets, since wide-orbit planets can be ejected to travel through the cluster. Civilizations spawned in globular clusters may be able to establish self-sustaining outposts, reducing the probability that a single catastrophic event will destroy the civilization. Although individual civilizations may follow different evolutionary paths, or even be destroyed, the cluster may continue to host advanced civilizations once a small number have jumped across interstellar space. Civilizations residing in globular clusters could therefore, in a sense, be immortal.

  16. GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AS CRADLES OF LIFE AND ADVANCED CIVILIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefano, R. Di; Ray, A.

    2016-01-01

    Globular clusters are ancient stellar populations in compact dense ellipsoids. There is no star formation and there are no core-collapse supernovae, but several lines of evidence suggest that globular clusters are rich in planets. If so, and if advanced civilizations can develop there, then the distances between these civilizations and other stars would be far smaller than typical distances between stars in the Galactic disk, facilitating interstellar communication and travel. The potent combination of long-term stability and high stellar densities provides a globular cluster opportunity. Yet the very proximity that promotes interstellar travel also brings danger, as stellar interactions can destroy planetary systems. We find, however, that large portions of many globular clusters are “sweet spots,” where habitable-zone planetary orbits are stable for long times. Globular clusters in our own and other galaxies are, therefore, among the best targets for searches for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI). We use the Drake equation to compare the likelihood of advanced civilizations in globular clusters to that in the Galactic disk. We also consider free-floating planets, since wide-orbit planets can be ejected to travel through the cluster. Civilizations spawned in globular clusters may be able to establish self-sustaining outposts, reducing the probability that a single catastrophic event will destroy the civilization. Although individual civilizations may follow different evolutionary paths, or even be destroyed, the cluster may continue to host advanced civilizations once a small number have jumped across interstellar space. Civilizations residing in globular clusters could therefore, in a sense, be immortal.

  17. On the nature of the Cu-rich aggregates in brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Brendan; Robison, Gregory; Osborn, Jenna; Kay, Martin; Thompson, Peter; Davis, Katherine; Zakharova, Taisiya; Antipova, Olga; Pushkar, Yulia

    2017-04-01

    Fulfilling a bevy of biological roles, copper is an essential metal for healthy brain function. Cu dyshomeostasis has been demonstrated to be involved in some neurological conditions including Menkes and Alzheimer’s diseases. We have previously reported localized Cu-rich aggregates in astrocytes of the subventricular zone (SVZ) in rodent brains with Cu concentrations in the hundreds of millimolar. Metallothionein, a cysteine-rich protein critical to metal homeostasis and known to participate in a variety of neuroprotective and neuroregenerative processes, was proposed as a binding protein. Here, we present an analysis of metallothionein(1,2) knockout (MTKO) mice and age-matched controls using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. In large structures such as the corpus callosum, cortex, and striatum, there is no significant difference in Cu, Fe, or Zn concentrations in MTKO mice compared to age-matched controls. In the astrocyte-rich subventricular zone where Cu-rich aggregates reside, approximately 1/3 as many Cu-rich aggregates persist in MTKO mice resulting in a decrease in periventricular Cu concentration. Aggregates in both wild-type and MTKO mice show XANES spectra characteristic of CuxSy multimetallic clusters and have similar [S]/[Cu] ratios. Consistent with assignment as a CuxSy multimetallic cluster, the astrocyte-rich SVZ of both MTKO and wild-type mice exhibit autofluorescent bodies, though MTKO mice exhibit fewer. Furthermore, XRF imaging of Au-labeled lysosomes and ubiquitin demonstrates a lack of co-localization with Cu-rich aggregates suggesting they are not involved in a degradation pathway. Overall, these data suggest that Cu in aggregates is bound by either metallothionein-3 or a yet unknown protein similar to metallothionein.

  18. Projected coupled cluster theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yiheng; Henderson, Thomas M; Zhao, Jinmo; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2017-08-14

    Coupled cluster theory is the method of choice for weakly correlated systems. But in the strongly correlated regime, it faces a symmetry dilemma, where it either completely fails to describe the system or has to artificially break certain symmetries. On the other hand, projected Hartree-Fock theory captures the essential physics of many kinds of strong correlations via symmetry breaking and restoration. In this work, we combine and try to retain the merits of these two methods by applying symmetry projection to broken symmetry coupled cluster wave functions. The non-orthogonal nature of states resulting from the application of symmetry projection operators furnishes particle-hole excitations to all orders, thus creating an obstacle for the exact evaluation of overlaps. Here we provide a solution via a disentanglement framework theory that can be approximated rigorously and systematically. Results of projected coupled cluster theory are presented for molecules and the Hubbard model, showing that spin projection significantly improves unrestricted coupled cluster theory while restoring good quantum numbers. The energy of projected coupled cluster theory reduces to the unprojected one in the thermodynamic limit, albeit at a much slower rate than projected Hartree-Fock.

  19. Globular Clusters - Guides to Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Richtler, Tom; Joint ESO-FONDAP Workshop on Globular Clusters

    2009-01-01

    The principal question of whether and how globular clusters can contribute to a better understanding of galaxy formation and evolution is perhaps the main driving force behind the overall endeavour of studying globular cluster systems. Naturally, this splits up into many individual problems. The objective of the Joint ESO-FONDAP Workshop on Globular Clusters - Guides to Galaxies was to bring together researchers, both observational and theoretical, to present and discuss the most recent results. Topics covered in these proceedings are: internal dynamics of globular clusters and interaction with host galaxies (tidal tails, evolution of cluster masses), accretion of globular clusters, detailed descriptions of nearby cluster systems, ultracompact dwarfs, formations of massive clusters in mergers and elsewhere, the ACS Virgo survey, galaxy formation and globular clusters, dynamics and kinematics of globular cluster systems and dark matter-related problems. With its wide coverage of the topic, this book constitute...

  20. Spanning Tree Based Attribute Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Jorge, Cordero Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    Attribute clustering has been previously employed to detect statistical dependence between subsets of variables. We propose a novel attribute clustering algorithm motivated by research of complex networks, called the Star Discovery algorithm. The algorithm partitions and indirectly discards...... inconsistent edges from a maximum spanning tree by starting appropriate initial modes, therefore generating stable clusters. It discovers sound clusters through simple graph operations and achieves significant computational savings. We compare the Star Discovery algorithm against earlier attribute clustering...

  1. Clustering of transmutation elements tantalum, rhenium and osmium in tungsten in a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-08-01

    The formation of transmutation solute-rich precipitates has been reported to seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten in a fusion environment. However, the underlying mechanisms controlling the formation of the precipitates are still unknown. In this study, first-principles calculations are therefore performed to systemically determine the stable structures and binding energies of solute clusters in tungsten consisting of tantalum, rhenium and osmium atoms as well as irradiation-induced vacancies. These clusters are known to act as precursors for the formation of precipitates. We find that osmium can easily segregate to form clusters even in defect-free tungsten alloys, whereas extremely high tantalum and rhenium concentrations are required for the formation of clusters. Vacancies greatly facilitate the clustering of rhenium and osmium, while tantalum is an exception. The binding energies of vacancy-osmium clusters are found to be much higher than those of vacancy-tantalum and vacancy-rhenium clusters. Osmium is observed to strongly promote the formation of vacancy-rhenium clusters, while tantalum can suppress the formation of vacancy-rhenium and vacancy-osmium clusters. The local strain and electronic structure are analyzed to reveal the underlying mechanisms governing the cluster formation. Employing the law of mass action, we predict the evolution of the relative concentration of vacancy-rhenium clusters. This work presents a microscopic picture describing the nucleation and growth of solute clusters in tungsten alloys in a fusion reactor environment, and thereby explains recent experimental phenomena.

  2. OSO 8 X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies. I - Observations of twenty clusters: Physical correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, R. F.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Smith, B. W.

    1978-01-01

    OSO 8 X-ray spectra from 2 to 20 keV have been analyzed for 26 clusters of galaxies. For 20 clusters temperatures, emission integrals, iron abundances, and low-energy absorption measurements are presented. The data give, in general, better fits to thermal bremsstrahlung than to power-law models. Eight clusters have positive iron emission-line detections at the 90% confidence level, and all 20 cluster spectra are consistent with Fe/H = 0.000014 by number with the possible exception of Virgo. Thus it is confirmed that X-ray emission in this energy band is predominantly thermal radiation from hot intracluster gas rather than inverse Compton radiation. Physical correlations between X-ray spectral parameters and other cluster properties are examined. It is found that (1) the X-ray temperature is approximately proportional to the square of the velocity dispersion of the galaxies; (2) the emission integral is a strong function of the X-ray temperature; (3) the X-ray temperature and emission integral are better correlated with cluster central-galaxy density than with richness; and (4) the fraction of galaxies which are spirals is correlated with the observed ram pressure in the cluster core.

  3. The coma cluster after lunch: Has a galaxcy group passed through the cluster core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jack O.; Roettiger, Kurt; Ledlow, Michael; Klypin, Anatoly

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the Coma cluster has recently undergone a collision with the NGC 4839 galaxy group. The ROSAT X-ray morphology, the Coma radio halo, the presence of poststarburst galaxies in the bridge between Coma and NGC 4839, the usually high velocity dispersion for the NGC 4839 group, and the position of a large-scale galaxy filament to the NE of Coma are all used to argue that the NGC 4839 group passed through the core of Coma approximately 2 Gyr ago. We present a new Hydro/N-body simulation of the merger between a galaxy group and a rich cluster that reproduces many of the observed X-ray and optical properties of Coma/NGC 4839.

  4. Evolution of Epiphytism and Fruit Traits Act Unevenly on the Diversification of the Species-Rich Genus Peperomia (Piperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzke, Lena; Goetghebeur, Paul; Neinhuis, Christoph; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie; Wanke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The species-rich genus Peperomia (Black Pepper relatives) is the only genus among early diverging angiosperms where epiphytism evolved. The majority of fruits of Peperomia release sticky secretions or exhibit hook-shaped appendages indicative of epizoochorous dispersal, which is in contrast to other flowering plants, where epiphytes are generally characterized by fruit morphological adaptations for anemochory or endozoochory. We investigate fruit characters using Cryo-SEM. Comparative phylogenetic analyses are applied for the first time to include life form and fruit character information to study diversification in Peperomia. Likelihood ratio tests uncover correlated character evolution. We demonstrate that diversification within Peperomia is not homogenous across its phylogeny, and that net diversification rates increase by twofold within the most species-rich subgenus. In contrast to former land plant studies that provide general evidence for increased diversification in epiphytic lineages, we demonstrate that the evolution of epiphytism within Peperomia predates the diversification shift. An epiphytic-dependent diversification is only observed for the background phylogeny. An elevated frequency of life form transitions between epiphytes and terrestrials and thus evolutionary flexibility of life forms is uncovered to coincide with the diversification shift. The evolution of fruits showing dispersal related structures is key to diversification in the foreground region of the phylogeny and postdates the evolution of epiphytism. We conclude that the success of Peperomia, measured in species numbers, is likely the result of enhanced vertical and horizontal dispersal ability and life form flexibility but not the evolution of epiphytism itself.

  5. Exotic cluster structures on

    CERN Document Server

    Gekhtman, M; Vainshtein, A

    2017-01-01

    This is the second paper in the series of papers dedicated to the study of natural cluster structures in the rings of regular functions on simple complex Lie groups and Poisson-Lie structures compatible with these cluster structures. According to our main conjecture, each class in the Belavin-Drinfeld classification of Poisson-Lie structures on \\mathcal{G} corresponds to a cluster structure in \\mathcal{O}(\\mathcal{G}). The authors have shown before that this conjecture holds for any \\mathcal{G} in the case of the standard Poisson-Lie structure and for all Belavin-Drinfeld classes in SL_n, n<5. In this paper the authors establish it for the Cremmer-Gervais Poisson-Lie structure on SL_n, which is the least similar to the standard one.

  6. From superdeformation to clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betts, R R [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Physics Div.

    1992-08-01

    Much of the discussion at the conference centred on superdeformed states and their study by precise gamma spectrometry. The author suggests that the study of superdeformation by fission fragments and by auto-scattering is of importance, and may become more important. He concludes that there exists clear evidence of shell effects at extreme deformation in light nuclei studied by fission or cluster decay. The connection between the deformed shell model and the multi-center shell model can be exploited to give give insight into the cluster structure of these extremely deformed states, and also gives hope of a spectroscopy based on selection rules for cluster decay. A clear disadvantage at this stage is inability to make this spectroscopy more quantitative through calculation of the decay widths. The introduction of a new generation of high segmentation, high resolution, particle arrays has and will have a major impact on this aspect of the study of highly deformed nuclei. 20 refs., 16 figs.

  7. Weakly bound structures in neutron rich Si isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Saxena, G.; Yadav, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    Production of radioactive beams have facilitated the nuclear structure studies away from the line of β-stability, especially for the neutron rich drip line nuclei. Theoretical investigations of these nuclei have been carried out by using various approaches viz. few body model or clusters, shell model and mean field theories, both nonrelativistic as well as relativistic mean field (RMF). The advantage of the RMF approach, however, is that in this treatment the spin-orbit interaction is included in a natural way. This is especially advantageous for the description of drip-line nuclei for which the spin-orbit interaction plays an important role. In this communication we report briefly the results of our calculations for the Si isotopes carried out within the framework of RMF + BCS approach

  8. Nitrogen-rich heterocycles as reactivity retardants in shocked insensitive explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaa, M Riad; Reed, Evan J; Fried, Laurence E; Goldman, Nir

    2009-04-22

    We report the first quantum-based multiscale simulations to study the reactivity of shocked perfect crystals of the insensitive energetic material triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB). Tracking chemical transformations of TATB experiencing overdriven shock speeds of 9 km/s for up to 0.43 ns and 10 km/s for up to 0.2 ns reveal high concentrations of nitrogen-rich heterocyclic clusters. Further reactivity of TATB toward the final decomposition products of fluid N(2) and solid carbon is inhibited due to the formation of these heterocycles. Our results thus suggest a new mechanism for carbon-rich explosive materials that precedes the slow diffusion-limited process of forming the bulk solid from carbon clusters and provide fundamental insight at the atomistic level into the long reaction zone of shocked TATB.

  9. The enigma of the open cluster M29 (NGC 6913) solved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straižys, V.; Milašius, K.; Černis, K.; Kazlauskas, A.; Zdanavičius, K.; Zdanavičius, J.; Laugalys, V. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, Goštauto 12, Vilnius LT-01108 (Lithuania); Boyle, R. P. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Vrba, F. J. [U.S. Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, P.O. Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ 86002 (United States); Munari, U. [INAF Astronomical Observatory of Padova, I-36012, Asiago (VI) (Italy); Walborn, N. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Janusz, R. [University School " Ignatianum," Cracow (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Determining the distance to the open cluster M29 (NGC 6913) has proven difficult, with distances determined by various authors differing by a factor of two or more. To solve this problem, we have initiated a new photometric investigation of the cluster in the Vilnius seven-color photometric system, supplementing it with available data in the BV and JHK {sub s} photometric systems and spectra of the nine brightest stars of spectral classes O and B. Photometric spectral classes and luminosities of 260 stars in a 15' × 15' area down to V = 19 mag are used to investigate the interstellar extinction run with distance and to estimate the distance of the Great Cygnus Rift, ∼ 800 pc. The interstellar reddening law in the optical and near-infrared regions is found to be close to normal, with the ratio of extinction to color excess R{sub BV} = 2.87. The extinction A{sub V} of cluster members is between 2.5 and 3.8 mag, with a mean value of 2.97 mag, or E {sub B–V} = 1.03. The average distance of eight stars of spectral types O9-B2 is 1.54 ± 0.15 kpc. Two stars from the seven brightest stars are field stars: HDE 229238 is a background B0.5 supergiant and HD 194378 is a foreground F star. In the intrinsic color-magnitude diagram, seven fainter stars of spectral classes B3-B8 are identified as possible members of the cluster. The 15 selected members of the cluster of spectral classes O9-B8 plotted on the log L/L {sub ☉} versus log T {sub eff} diagram, together with the isochrones from the Padova database, give the age of the cluster as 5 ± 1 Myr.

  10. LHCb RICH1 Engineering Design Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, N; Metlica, F; Muir, A; Phillips, A; Buckley, A; Gibson, V; Harrison, K; Jones, C R; Katvars, S G; Lazzeroni, C; Storey, J; Ward, CP; Wotton, S; Alemi, M; Arnabaldi, C; Bellunato, T F; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Negri, P; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Chamonal, R; Eisenhardt, S; Lawrence, J; McCarron, J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Walker, A; Cuneo, S; Fontanelli, F; Gracco, Valerio; Mini, G; Musico, P; Petrolini, A; Sannino, M; Bates, A; MacGregor, A; O'Shea, V; Parkes, C; Paterson, S; Petrie, D; Pickford, A; Rahman, M; Soler, F; Allebone, L; Barber, J H; Cameron, W; Clark, D; Dornan, Peter John; Duane, A; Egede, U; Hallam, R; Howard, A; Plackett, R; Price, D; Savidge, T; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Websdale, D M; Adinolfi, M; Bibby, J H; Cioffi, C; Gligorov, Vladimir V; Harnew, N; Harris, F; McArthur, I A; Newby, C; Ottewell, B; Rademacker, J; Senanayake, R; Somerville, L P; Soroko, A; Smale, N J; Topp-Jørgensen, S; Wilkinson, G; Yang, S; Benayoun, M; Khmelnikov, V A; Obraztsov, V F; Densham, C J; Easo, S; Franek, B; Kuznetsov, G; Loveridge, P W; Morrow, D; Morris, JV; Papanestis, A; Patrick, G N; Woodward, M L; Aglieri-Rinella, G; Albrecht, A; Braem, André; Campbell, M; D'Ambrosio, C; Forty, R W; Frei, C; Gys, Thierry; Jamet, O; Kanaya, N; Losasso, M; Moritz, M; Patel, M; Piedigrossi, D; Snoeys, W; Ullaland, O; Van Lysebetten, A; Wyllie, K

    2005-01-01

    This document describes the concepts of the engineering design to be adopted for the upstream Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH1) of the reoptimized LHCb detector. Our aim is to ensure that coherent solutions for the engineering design and integration for all components of RICH1 are available, before proceeding with the detailed design of these components.

  11. Island Species Richness Increases with Habitat Diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortal, J.; Triantis, K.A.; Meiri, S.; Thebault, E.M.C.; Sfenthourakis, S.

    2009-01-01

    Species richness is commonly thought to increase with habitat diversity. However, a recent theoretical model aiming to unify niche and island biogeography theories predicted a hump-shaped relationship between richness and habitat diversity. Given the contradiction between model results and previous

  12. Refractory chronic cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Edvinsson, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cluster headache (CCH) often resists to prophylactic pharmaceutical treatments resulting in patients' life damage. In this rare but pragmatic situation escalation to invasive management is needed but framing criteria are lacking. We aimed to reach a consensus for refractory CCH definition...... for clinical and research use. The preparation of the final consensus followed three stages. Internal between authors, a larger between all European Headache Federation members and finally an international one among all investigators that have published clinical studies on cluster headache the last five years...

  13. I Cluster geografici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Rosina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Geographic ClustersOver the past decade, public alphanumeric database have been growing at exceptional rate. Most of data can be georeferenced, so that is possible gaining new knowledge from such databases. The contribution of this paper is two-fold. We first present a model of geographic clusters, which uses only geographic and functionally data properties. The model is useful to process huge amount of public/government data, even daily upgrading. After that, we merge the model into the framework GEOPOI (GEOcoding Points Of Interest, and show some graphic map results.

  14. I Cluster geografici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Rosina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Clusters Over the past decade, public alphanumeric database have been growing at exceptional rate. Most of data can be georeferenced, so that is possible gaining new knowledge from such databases. The contribution of this paper is two-fold. We first present a model of geographic clusters, which uses only geographic and functionally data properties. The model is useful to process huge amount of public/government data, even daily upgrading. After that, we merge the model into the framework GEOPOI (GEOcoding Points Of Interest, and show some graphic map results.

  15. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  16. Platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, M; Karkos, P D; Markou, K; Grigoriadis, N

    2016-12-01

    Platelet-rich plasma is a novel material that is being used more frequently in many surgical specialties. A literature review on the current and potential uses of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology was performed. There is limited evidence on the use of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology compared with other specialties: only 11 studies on various subspecialties (otology, rhinology and laryngology) were included in the final review. Based on the limited number of studies, we cannot draw safe conclusions about the value of platelet-rich plasma in otolaryngology. Nevertheless, the available literature suggests that platelet-rich plasma holds promise for future research and may have a number of clinical applications.

  17. The evolution of early-type galaxies in distant clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, S.A.; Eisenhardt, P.R.; Dickinson, M.

    1998-01-01

    We present results from an optical-infrared photometric study of early-type (E+S0) galaxies in 19 galaxy clusters out to z=0.9. The galaxy sample is selected on the basis of morphologies determined from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 images and is photometrically defined in the K band in order to minimize redshift-dependent selection biases. Using new ground-based photometry in five optical and infrared bands for each cluster, we examine the evolution of the color-magnitude relation for early-type cluster galaxies, considering its slope, intercept, and color scatter around the mean relation. New multiwavelength photometry of galaxies in the Coma Cluster is used to provide a baseline sample at z∼0 with which to compare the distant clusters. The optical - IR colors of the early-type cluster galaxies become bluer with increasing redshift in a manner consistent with the passive evolution of an old stellar population formed at an early cosmic epoch. The degree of color evolution is similar for clusters at similar redshift and does not depend strongly on the optical richness or X-ray luminosity of the cluster, which suggests that the history of early-type galaxies is relatively insensitive to environment, at least above a certain density threshold. The slope of the color-magnitude relationship shows no significant change out to z=0.9, which provides evidence that it arises from a correlation between galaxy mass and metallicity, not age. Finally, the intrinsic scatter in the optical - IR colors of the galaxies is small and nearly constant with redshift, which indicates that the majority of giant, early-type galaxies in clusters share a common star formation history, with little perturbation due to uncorrelated episodes of later star formation. Taken together, our results are consistent with models in which most early-type galaxies in rich clusters are old, formed the majority of their stars at high redshift in a well-synchronized fashion, and evolved quiescently

  18. Floral abundance, richness, and spatial distribution drive urban garden bee communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia, M; Philpott, S M

    2017-10-01

    In urban landscapes, gardens provide refuges for bee diversity, but conservation potential may depend on local and landscape features. Foraging and population persistence of bee species, as well as overall pollinator community structure, may be supported by the abundance, richness, and spatial distribution of floral resources. Floral resources strongly differ in urban gardens. Using hand netting and pan traps to survey bees, we examined whether abundance, richness, and spatial distribution of floral resources, as well as ground cover and garden landscape surroundings influence bee abundance, species richness, and diversity on the central coast of California. Differences in floral abundance and spatial distribution, as well as urban cover in the landscape, predicted different bee community variables. Abundance of all bees and of honeybees (Apis mellifera) was lower in sites with more urban land cover surrounding the gardens. Honeybee abundance was higher in sites with patchy floral resources, whereas bee species richness and bee diversity was higher in sites with more clustered floral resources. Surprisingly, bee species richness and bee diversity was lower in sites with very high floral abundance, possibly due to interactions with honeybees. Other studies have documented the importance of floral abundance and landscape surroundings for bees in urban gardens, but this study is the first to document that the spatial arrangement of flowers strongly predicts bee abundance and richness. Based on these findings, it is likely that garden managers may promote bee conservation by managing for floral connectivity and abundance within these ubiquitous urban habitats.

  19. Spatial Substructure in the M87 Globular Cluster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuting; Zhang, Yunhao; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric; Lim, Sungsoon

    2018-01-01

    Based on the observation of Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS) project, we obtained the u,g,r,i,z and Ks band photometric information of all the objects in the 2 degree × 2 degree area (Pilot Region) around M87, the major subcluster of Virgo. By adapting an Extreme Deconvolution method, which classifies objects into Globular Clusters (GCs), galaxies and foreground stars with their color and morphology data, we got a purer-than-ever GC distribution map with a depth to gmag=25 in Pilot Region. After masking galaxy GCs, smoothing with a 10arcmin Gaussian kernel and performing a flat field correction, we show the GC density map of M87, and got a good sersic fitting of GC radial distribution with a sersic index~2.2 in the central ellipse part (45arcmin semi major axis area of M87). We quantitatively compared our GC sample with a substructure-free mock data set, which was generated from the smoothed density map as well as the sersic fitting, by calculating the 2 point correlation function (TPCF) value in different parts of the map. After separately performing such comparison with mocks based on different galaxy masking radii which vary from 4 times g band effective radius to 10, we found signals of remarkable spatial enhancement in certain directions in the central ellipse of M87, as well as halo substructures shown as lumpiness and holes in the outer region. We present the estimated scales of these substructures from the TPCF results, and, managed to locate them with a statistical analysis of the pixelized GC map. Apart from all results listed above, we discuss the constant, extra-galactic substructure signal at a scale of ~3kpc, which does not diminish with masking sizes, as the evidence of merging and accretion history of M87.

  20. Multi-Optimisation Consensus Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Swift, Stephen; Liu, Xiaohui

    Ensemble Clustering has been developed to provide an alternative way of obtaining more stable and accurate clustering results. It aims to avoid the biases of individual clustering algorithms. However, it is still a challenge to develop an efficient and robust method for Ensemble Clustering. Based on an existing ensemble clustering method, Consensus Clustering (CC), this paper introduces an advanced Consensus Clustering algorithm called Multi-Optimisation Consensus Clustering (MOCC), which utilises an optimised Agreement Separation criterion and a Multi-Optimisation framework to improve the performance of CC. Fifteen different data sets are used for evaluating the performance of MOCC. The results reveal that MOCC can generate more accurate clustering results than the original CC algorithm.

  1. Photochemistry in rare gas clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, T.; Haeften, K. von; Pietrowski, R. von

    1999-01-01

    In this contribution photochemical processes in pure rare gas clusters will be discussed. The relaxation dynamics of electronically excited He clusters is investigated with luminescence spectroscopy. After electronic excitation of He clusters many sharp lines are observed in the visible and infrared spectral range which can be attributed to He atoms and molecules desorbing from the cluster. It turns out that the desorption of electronically excited He atoms and molecules is an important decay channel. The findings for He clusters are compared with results for Ar clusters. While desorption of electronically excited He atoms is observed for all clusters containing up to several thousand atoms a corresponding process in Ar clusters is only observed for very small clusters (N<10). (orig.)

  2. Photochemistry in rare gas clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, T.; Haeften, K. von; Pietrowski, R. von [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor; Laarman, T. [Universitaet Hamburg, II. Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    In this contribution photochemical processes in pure rare gas clusters will be discussed. The relaxation dynamics of electronically excited He clusters is investigated with luminescence spectroscopy. After electronic excitation of He clusters many sharp lines are observed in the visible and infrared spectral range which can be attributed to He atoms and molecules desorbing from the cluster. It turns out that the desorption of electronically excited He atoms and molecules is an important decay channel. The findings for He clusters are compared with results for Ar clusters. While desorption of electronically excited He atoms is observed for all clusters containing up to several thousand atoms a corresponding process in Ar clusters is only observed for very small clusters (N<10). (orig.)

  3. Globular clusters, old and young

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samus', N.N.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of similarity of and difference in the globular and scattered star clusters is considered. Star clusters in astronomy are related either to globular or to scattered ones according to the structure of Hertzsprung-Russell diagram constructed for star clusters, but not according to the appearance. The qlobular clusters in the Galaxy are composed of giants and subgiants, which testifies to the old age of the globular clusters. The Globular clusters in the Magellanic clouds are classified into ''red'' ones - similar to the globular clusters of the Galaxy, and ''blue'' ones - similar to them in appearance but differing extremely by the star composition and so by the age. The old star clusters are suggested to be called globular ones, while another name (''populous'', for example) is suggested to be used for other clusters similar to globular ones only in appearance

  4. Clustering of resting state networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H Lee

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to demonstrate a hierarchical structure of resting state activity in the healthy brain using a data-driven clustering algorithm.The fuzzy-c-means clustering algorithm was applied to resting state fMRI data in cortical and subcortical gray matter from two groups acquired separately, one of 17 healthy individuals and the second of 21 healthy individuals. Different numbers of clusters and different starting conditions were used. A cluster dispersion measure determined the optimal numbers of clusters. An inner product metric provided a measure of similarity between different clusters. The two cluster result found the task-negative and task-positive systems. The cluster dispersion measure was minimized with seven and eleven clusters. Each of the clusters in the seven and eleven cluster result was associated with either the task-negative or task-positive system. Applying the algorithm to find seven clusters recovered previously described resting state networks, including the default mode network, frontoparietal control network, ventral and dorsal attention networks, somatomotor, visual, and language networks. The language and ventral attention networks had significant subcortical involvement. This parcellation was consistently found in a large majority of algorithm runs under different conditions and was robust to different methods of initialization.The clustering of resting state activity using different optimal numbers of clusters identified resting state networks comparable to previously obtained results. This work reinforces the observation that resting state networks are hierarchically organized.

  5. Clustering in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The importance of local variations in patterns of health and disease are increasingly recognised, but, particularly in the case of tropical infections, available methods and resources for characterising disease clusters in time and space are limited. Whilst the Global Positioning System. (GPS) allows accurate and ...

  6. Hardness of Clustering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Hardness of Clustering. Both k-means and k-medians intractable (when n and d are both inputs even for k =2). The best known deterministic algorithms. are based on Voronoi partitioning that. takes about time. Need for approximation – “close” to optimal.

  7. On small clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardes, N.

    1984-01-01

    A discussion is presented of zero-point motion effects on the binding energy of a small cluster of identical particles interacting through short range attractive-repulsive forces. The model is appropriate to a discussion of both Van der Waals as well as nuclear forces. (Author) [pt

  8. Emergence of regional clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Østergaard, Christian Richter; Dalum, Bent

    2010-01-01

    The literature on regional clusters has increased considerably during the last decade. The emergence and growth patterns are usually explained by such factors as unique local culture, regional capabilities, tacit knowledge or the existence of location-specific externalities (knowledge spillovers...

  9. Supersonic copper clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, D.E.; Hansen, S.G.; Geusic, M.E.; Michalopoulos, D.L.; Smalley, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Copper clusters ranging in size from 1 to 29 atoms have been prepared in a supersonic beam by laser vaporization of a rotating copper target rod within the throat of a pulsed supersonic nozzle using helium for the carrier gas. The clusters were cooled extensively in the supersonic expansion [T(translational) 1 to 4 K, T(rotational) = 4 K, T(vibrational) = 20 to 70 K]. These clusters were detected in the supersonic beam by laser photoionization with time-of-flight mass analysis. Using a number of fixed frequency outputs of an exciplex laser, the threshold behavior of the photoionization cross section was monitored as a function of cluster size.nce two-photon ionization (R2PI) with mass selective detection allowed the detection of five new electronic band systems in the region between 2690 and 3200 A, for each of the three naturally occurring isotopic forms of Cu 2 . In the process of scanning the R2PI spectrum of these new electronic states, the ionization potential of the copper dimer was determined to be 7.894 +- 0.015 eV

  10. Greedy subspace clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We consider the problem of subspace clustering: given points that lie on or near the union of many low-dimensional linear subspaces, recover the subspaces. To this end, one first identifies sets of points close to the same subspace and uses the sets ...

  11. Clustering method for counting passengers getting in a bus with single camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Yanning; Shao, Dapei; Li, Ying

    2010-03-01

    Automatic counting of passengers is very important for both business and security applications. We present a single-camera-based vision system that is able to count passengers in a highly crowded situation at the entrance of a traffic bus. The unique characteristics of the proposed system include, First, a novel feature-point-tracking- and online clustering-based passenger counting framework, which performs much better than those of background-modeling-and foreground-blob-tracking-based methods. Second, a simple and highly accurate clustering algorithm is developed that projects the high-dimensional feature point trajectories into a 2-D feature space by their appearance and disappearance times and counts the number of people through online clustering. Finally, all test video sequences in the experiment are captured from a real traffic bus in Shanghai, China. The results show that the system can process two 320×240 video sequences at a frame rate of 25 fps simultaneously, and can count passengers reliably in various difficult scenarios with complex interaction and occlusion among people. The method achieves high accuracy rates up to 96.5%.

  12. Data clustering algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Charu C

    2013-01-01

    Research on the problem of clustering tends to be fragmented across the pattern recognition, database, data mining, and machine learning communities. Addressing this problem in a unified way, Data Clustering: Algorithms and Applications provides complete coverage of the entire area of clustering, from basic methods to more refined and complex data clustering approaches. It pays special attention to recent issues in graphs, social networks, and other domains.The book focuses on three primary aspects of data clustering: Methods, describing key techniques commonly used for clustering, such as fea

  13. Cluster model of the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, H.; Ikeda, K.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the development of the cluster model study. The stress is put on two points; one is how the cluster structure has come to be regarded as a fundamental structure in light nuclei together with the shell-model structure, and the other is how at present the cluster model is extended to and connected with the studies of the various subjects many of which are in the neighbouring fields. The authors the present the main theme with detailed explanations of the fundamentals of the microscopic cluster model which have promoted the development of the cluster mode. Examples of the microscopic cluster model study of light nuclear structure are given

  14. Dust Evolution in Galaxy Cluster Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjergo, Eda; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia; Tornatore, Luca; Borgani, Stefano

    2018-06-01

    We implement a state-of-the-art treatment of the processes affecting the production and Interstellar Medium (ISM) evolution of carbonaceous and silicate dust grains within SPH simulations. We trace the dust grain size distribution by means of a two-size approximation. We test our method on zoom-in simulations of four massive (M200 ≥ 3 × 1014M⊙) galaxy clusters. We predict that during the early stages of assembly of the cluster at z ≳ 3, where the star formation activity is at its maximum in our simulations, the proto-cluster regions are rich in dusty gas. Compared to the case in which only dust production in stellar ejecta is active, if we include processes occurring in the cold ISM,the dust content is enhanced by a factor 2 - 3. However, the dust properties in this stage turn out to be significantly different from those observationally derived for the average Milky Way dust, and commonly adopted in calculations of dust reprocessing. We show that these differences may have a strong impact on the predicted spectral energy distributions. At low redshift in star forming regions our model reproduces reasonably well the trend of dust abundances over metallicity as observed in local galaxies. However we under-produce by a factor of 2 to 3 the total dust content of clusters estimated observationally at low redshift, z ≲ 0.5 using IRAS, Planck and Herschel satellites data. This discrepancy does not subsist by assuming a lower sputtering efficiency, which erodes dust grains in the hot Intracluster Medium (ICM).

  15. Formation and reversion of clusters during natural aging and subsequent artificial aging in an Al–Mg–Si alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruga, Yasuhiro, E-mail: aruga.yasuhiro@kobelco.com [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Kozuka, Masaya, E-mail: kozuka.masaya@kobelco.com [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 1-5-5 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Takaki, Yasuo, E-mail: takaki.yasuo@kobelco.com [Aluminum Sheets and Coils Research Department, Aluminum & Copper Business, Kobe Steel, Ltd., 15 Kinugaoka, Moka, Tochigi 321-4367 (Japan); Sato, Tatsuo, E-mail: sato.t.ap@m.titech.ac.jp [Precision and Intelligence Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259-R2-18, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2015-04-17

    The continuous changes in number density, size distribution and chemical composition of clusters during natural aging (NA), and subsequent artificial aging (AA) at 443 K, in an Al–0.62Mg–0.93Si (mass%) alloy have been evaluated using atom probe tomography. The data show almost no change in the average size and Mg/Si ratio (at% ratio) of clusters during NA. The highest hardness and most-dense clusters, following NA, and the largest drop in hardness, during AA for 1.2 ks, are observed in the material with the longest NA period. In contrast with the published literature, which suggests that only small clusters revert into solution, the number density of clusters decreased, with no dependence on the cluster size, during AA for 1.2 ks, resulting in a slight decrease in the average radius of clusters. Things to be emphasized are that the number density of clusters with the Mg/Si ratio below 0.4 stays pretty much the same during AA, whereas other clusters decrease during the first 1.2 ks and then increase again during the prolonged AA for up to 3.6 ks. This work is the first to reveal that the typical Si-rich clusters can neither be dissolved nor grow further, although the size is small. In other words, it is believed that the typical Si-rich clusters can lead to the retardation of the hardness increase during AA called as negative effect of NA.

  16. Formation and reversion of clusters during natural aging and subsequent artificial aging in an Al–Mg–Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aruga, Yasuhiro; Kozuka, Masaya; Takaki, Yasuo; Sato, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    The continuous changes in number density, size distribution and chemical composition of clusters during natural aging (NA), and subsequent artificial aging (AA) at 443 K, in an Al–0.62Mg–0.93Si (mass%) alloy have been evaluated using atom probe tomography. The data show almost no change in the average size and Mg/Si ratio (at% ratio) of clusters during NA. The highest hardness and most-dense clusters, following NA, and the largest drop in hardness, during AA for 1.2 ks, are observed in the material with the longest NA period. In contrast with the published literature, which suggests that only small clusters revert into solution, the number density of clusters decreased, with no dependence on the cluster size, during AA for 1.2 ks, resulting in a slight decrease in the average radius of clusters. Things to be emphasized are that the number density of clusters with the Mg/Si ratio below 0.4 stays pretty much the same during AA, whereas other clusters decrease during the first 1.2 ks and then increase again during the prolonged AA for up to 3.6 ks. This work is the first to reveal that the typical Si-rich clusters can neither be dissolved nor grow further, although the size is small. In other words, it is believed that the typical Si-rich clusters can lead to the retardation of the hardness increase during AA called as negative effect of NA

  17. Science from a glimpse: Hubble SNAPshot observations of massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, A.; Ebeling, H.

    2018-06-01

    Hubble Space Telescope SNAPshot surveys of 86 X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.3 0.3. Examining the evolution of the slope of the cluster red sequence, we observe at best a slight decrease with redshift, indicating minimal age contribution since z ˜ 1. Congruent to previous studies' findings, we note that the two BCGs which are significantly bluer (≥5σ) than their clusters' red sequences reside in relaxed clusters and exhibit pronounced internal structure. Thanks to our targets' high X-ray luminosity, the subset of our sample observed with Chandra adds valuable leverage to the X-ray luminosity-optical richness relation, which, albeit with substantial scatter, is now clearly established from groups to extremely massive clusters of galaxies. We conclude that SNAPshot observations of MACS clusters stand to continue to play a vital pathfinder role for astrophysical investigations across the entire electromagnetic spectrum.

  18. A Measurement of CMB Cluster Lensing with SPT and DES Year 1 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, E.J.; et al.

    2017-08-03

    Clusters of galaxies gravitationally lens the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, resulting in a distinct imprint in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurement of this effect offers a promising way to constrain the masses of galaxy clusters, particularly those at high redshift. We use CMB maps from the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) survey to measure the CMB lensing signal around galaxy clusters identified in optical imaging from first year observations of the Dark Energy Survey. We detect lensing of the CMB by the galaxy clusters at 6.5$\\sigma$ significance. Using the measured lensing signal, we constrain the amplitude of the relation between cluster mass and optical richness to roughly $20\\%$ precision, finding good agreement with recent constraints obtained with galaxy lensing. The error budget is dominated by statistical noise but includes significant contributions from systematic biases due to the thermal SZ effect and cluster miscentering.

  19. TreeCluster: Massively scalable transmission clustering using phylogenetic trees

    OpenAIRE

    Moshiri, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Background: The ability to infer transmission clusters from molecular data is critical to designing and evaluating viral control strategies. Viral sequencing datasets are growing rapidly, but standard methods of transmission cluster inference do not scale well beyond thousands of sequences. Results: I present TreeCluster, a cross-platform tool that performs transmission cluster inference on a given phylogenetic tree orders of magnitude faster than existing inference methods and supports multi...

  20. The CfA-Rosat Survey of Distant Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Brian

    1998-01-01

    We (Vikhlinin, McNamara, Forman, Jones, Hornstrup, Quintana) have completed a new survey of distant clusters of galaxies, which we use to to study cluster evolution over cosmological timescales. The clusters were identified as extended X-ray sources in 650 ROSAT PSPC images of high Galactic latitude fields. Our catalog of approximately 230 extended X-ray sources covers 160 square degrees on the sky. Ours is the largest of the several ROSAT serendipitous cluster surveys in progress (e.g. SHARC, Rosati, WARPS etc.). Using V,R,I imagery obtained at several observatories, we find that greater than 90% of the X-ray sources are associated with distant clusters of galaxies. We have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for nearly 80 clusters in our catalog, and we have measured photometric redshifts for the remaining clusters. Our sample contains more than 20 clusters at z > 0.5. I will discuss the logN-logS relationship for our clusters. Because our large survey area, we are able to confirm the evolution of the most luminous distant clusters first seen in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. In addition, I will discuss the relationships between optical richness, core radius, and X-ray luminosity for distant, X-ray-selected clusters.

  1. Gas cluster ion beam assisted NiPt germano-silicide formation on SiGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S., E-mail: asozcan@us.ibm.com [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Lavoie, Christian; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Alptekin, Emre; Zhu, Frank [IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Center, 2070 Route 52, Hopewell Junction, New York 12533 (United States); Leith, Allen; Pfeifer, Brian D.; LaRose, J. D.; Russell, N. M. [TEL Epion Inc., 900 Middlesex Turnpike, Bldg. 6, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    We report the formation of very uniform and smooth Ni(Pt)Si on epitaxially grown SiGe using Si gas cluster ion beam treatment after metal-rich silicide formation. The gas cluster ion implantation process was optimized to infuse Si into the metal-rich silicide layer and lowered the NiSi nucleation temperature significantly according to in situ X-ray diffraction measurements. This novel method which leads to more uniform films can also be used to control silicide depth in ultra-shallow junctions, especially for high Ge containing devices, where silicidation is problematic as it leads to much rougher interfaces.

  2. Neutron rich nuclei around 132Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Sarmishtha

    2016-01-01

    The neutron rich nuclei with few particles or holes in 132 Sn have various experimental and theoretical interest to understand the evolution of nuclear structure around the doubly magic shell closure Z=50 and N=82. Some of the exotic neutron rich nuclei in this mass region are situated near waiting points in the r-process path and are of special astrophysical interest. Neutron rich nuclei near 132 Sn have been studied using fission fragment spectroscopy. The lifetime of low lying isomeric states have been precisely measured and the beta decay from the ground and isomeric states have been characterized using gamma-ray spectroscopy

  3. Firm size diversity, functional richness, and resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmestani, A.S.; Allen, Craig R.; Mittelstaedt, J.D.; Stow, C.A.; Ward, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper applies recent advances in ecology to our understanding of firm development, sustainability, and economic development. The ecological literature indicates that the greater the functional richness of species in a system, the greater its resilience - that is, its ability to persist in the face of substantial changes in the environment. This paper focuses on the effects of functional richness across firm size on the ability of industries to survive in the face of economic change. Our results indicate that industries with a richness of industrial functions are more resilient to employment volatility. ?? 2006 Cambridge University Press.

  4. The rotation of galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovmassian, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The method for detection of the galaxy cluster rotation based on the study of distribution of member galaxies with velocities lower and higher of the cluster mean velocity over the cluster image is proposed. The search for rotation is made for flat clusters with a/b> 1.8 and BMI type clusters which are expected to be rotating. For comparison there were studied also round clusters and clusters of NBMI type, the second by brightness galaxy in which does not differ significantly from the cluster cD galaxy. Seventeen out of studied 65 clusters are found to be rotating. It was found that the detection rate is sufficiently high for flat clusters, over 60 per cent, and clusters of BMI type with dominant cD galaxy, ≈ 35 per cent. The obtained results show that clusters were formed from the huge primordial gas clouds and preserved the rotation of the primordial clouds, unless they did not have mergings with other clusters and groups of galaxies, in the result of which the rotation has been prevented

  5. INTRINSIC ALIGNMENT OF CLUSTER GALAXIES: THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jiangang; Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Feldmann, Robert; Annis, James; Johnston, David E.; Lin Huan; McKay, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    We present measurements of two types of cluster galaxy alignments based on a volume limited and highly pure (≥90%) sample of clusters from the GMBCG catalog derived from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR7). We detect a clear brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) alignment (the alignment of major axis of the BCG toward the distribution of cluster satellite galaxies). We find that the BCG alignment signal becomes stronger as the redshift and BCG absolute magnitude decrease and becomes weaker as BCG stellar mass decreases. No dependence of the BCG alignment on cluster richness is found. We can detect a statistically significant (≥3σ) satellite alignment (the alignment of the major axes of the cluster satellite galaxies toward the BCG) only when we use the isophotal fit position angles (P.A.s), and the satellite alignment depends on the apparent magnitudes rather than the absolute magnitudes of the BCGs. This suggests that the detected satellite alignment based on isophotal P.A.s from the SDSS pipeline is possibly due to the contamination from the diffuse light of nearby BCGs. We caution that this should not be simply interpreted as non-existence of the satellite alignment, but rather that we cannot detect them with our current photometric SDSS data. We perform our measurements on both SDSS r-band and i-band data, but do not observe a passband dependence of the alignments.

  6. Single-cluster dynamics for the random-cluster model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Y.; Qian, X.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    We formulate a single-cluster Monte Carlo algorithm for the simulation of the random-cluster model. This algorithm is a generalization of the Wolff single-cluster method for the q-state Potts model to noninteger values q>1. Its results for static quantities are in a satisfactory agreement with those

  7. Choosing the Number of Clusters in K-Means Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinley, Douglas; Brusco, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Steinley (2007) provided a lower bound for the sum-of-squares error criterion function used in K-means clustering. In this article, on the basis of the lower bound, the authors propose a method to distinguish between 1 cluster (i.e., a single distribution) versus more than 1 cluster. Additionally, conditional on indicating there are multiple…

  8. Cyanogen strengths of globular cluster post-main-sequence stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesser, J.E.; Hartwick, F.D.A.; McClure, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    CN strengths in the peculiar clusters ω Cen and M22 and the metal-rich clusters 47 Tuc, M71, and NGC 6352 are found to vary markedly from star to star. The strong variations in CN strength found earlier for ω Cen by Norris and Bessell and by Dickens and Bell are shown to extend to fainter stars, although expected correlations of CN strength with position in the color-magnitude (C-M) diagram are less evident in our sample. Several CN and metal-strong stars were also observed in M22. We conclude that CN, once it appears in globular clusters, can vary much more than it does in equivalent Population I samples, a result we briefly examine in light of current understanding regarding physical processes in the stars themselves and of models of galactic chemical evolution

  9. Fluorine Abundances of AGB Stars in Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, A.; Lebzelter, T.; Aringer, B.; Hinkle, K. H.; Nowotny, W.

    2015-08-01

    We have measured the abundance of fluorine, [F/Fe], in a number of AGB stars in stellar clusters have correlated the results with their C/O ratios. This allows us to investigate the change in the fluorine abundance along the evolution on the giant branch. The target list includes primarily O-rich stars in three LMC globular clusters - NGC 1806, NGC 1846 and NGC 1978 - as well as Rup 106 and 47 Tuc in our Galaxy. The observational data were obtained with the PHOENIX spectrograph, and the COMA code was used for modelling the synthetic spectra. Within individual clusters, we find consistent [F/Fe] values at similar C/O for most of our target stars.

  10. The distribution of dark matter in the A2256 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J. Patrick; Briel, Ulrich G.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Using spatially resolved X-ray spectroscopy, it was determined that the X-ray emitting gas in the rich cluster A2256 is nearly isothermal to a radius of at least 0.76/h Mpc, or about three core radii. These data can be used to measure the distribution of the dark matter in the cluster. It was found that the total mass interior to 0.76/h Mpc and 1.5/h Mpc is (0.5 +/- 0.1 and 1.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 15)/h of the solar mass respectively where the errors encompass the full range allowed by all models used. Thus, the mass appropriate to the region where spectral information was obtained is well determined, but the uncertainties become large upon extrapolating beyond that region. It is shown that the galaxy orbits are midly anisotropic which may cause the beta discrepancy in this cluster.

  11. Heavy hitters via cluster-preserving clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Nelson, Jelani; Nguyen, Huy L.

    2016-01-01

    In the turnstile lp heavy hitters problem with parameter ε, one must maintain a high-dimensional vector xεRn subject to updates of the form update (i,Δ) causing the change xi≤ ← xi + Δ, where iε[n], ΔεR. Upon receiving a query, the goal is to report every "heavy hitter" iε[n] with |xi| ≥ε......|x|p as part of a list L⊆[n] of size O(1/εp), i.e. proportional to the maximum possible number of heavy hitters. For any pε(0,2] the COUNTSKETCH of [CCFC04] solves lp heavy hitters using O(ε-plog n) words of space with O(log n) update time, O(nlog n) query time to output L, and whose output after any query......, providing correctness whp. In fact, a simpler version of our algorithm for p = 1 in the strict turnstile model answers queries even faster than the "dyadic trick" by roughly a log n factor, dominating it in all regards. Our main innovation is an efficient reduction from the heavy hitters to a clustering...

  12. Evolution of the spherical clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdin, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    The possible processes of the Galaxy spherical clusters formation and evolution are described on a popular level. The orbits of spherical cluster motion and their spatial velocities are determined. Given are the distrbutions of spherical cluster stars according to their velocities and the observed distribution of spherical clusters in the area of the Galaxy slow evolution. The dissipation and dynamic friction processes destructing clusters with the mass less than 10 4 of solar mass and bringing about the reduction of clusters in the Galaxy are considered. The paradox of forming mainly X-ray sources in spherical clusters is explained. The schematic image of possible ways of forming X-ray sources in spherical clusters is given

  13. Structure and bonding in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1991-10-01

    We review here the recent progress made in the understanding of the electronic and atomic structure of small clusters of s-p bonded materials using the density functional molecular dynamics technique within the local density approximation. Starting with a brief description of the method, results are presented for alkali metal clusters, clusters of divalent metals such as Mg and Be which show a transition from van der Waals or weak chemical bonding to metallic behaviour as the cluster size grows and clusters of Al, Sn and Sb. In the case of semiconductors, we discuss results for Si, Ge and GaAs clusters. Clusters of other materials such as P, C, S, and Se are also briefly discussed. From these and other available results we suggest the possibility of unique structures for the magic clusters. (author). 69 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  14. Random matrix improved subspace clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Couillet, Romain; Kammoun, Abla

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a spectral method for statistical subspace clustering. The method is built upon standard kernel spectral clustering techniques, however carefully tuned by theoretical understanding arising from random matrix findings. We show

  15. Eclipsing binaries in open clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southworth, John; Clausen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August......Stars: fundamental parameters - Stars : binaries : eclipsing - Stars: Binaries: spectroscopic - Open clusters and ass. : general Udgivelsesdato: 5 August...

  16. Multi-temporal clustering of continental floods and associated atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyu; Zhang, Yongqiang

    2017-12-01

    Investigating clustering of floods has important social, economic and ecological implications. This study examines the clustering of Australian floods at different temporal scales and its possible physical mechanisms. Flood series with different severities are obtained by peaks-over-threshold (POT) sampling in four flood thresholds. At intra-annual scale, Cox regression and monthly frequency methods are used to examine whether and when the flood clustering exists, respectively. At inter-annual scale, dispersion indices with four-time variation windows are applied to investigate the inter-annual flood clustering and its variation. Furthermore, the Kernel occurrence rate estimate and bootstrap resampling methods are used to identify flood-rich/flood-poor periods. Finally, seasonal variation of horizontal wind at 850 hPa and vertical wind velocity at 500 hPa are used to investigate the possible mechanisms causing the temporal flood clustering. Our results show that: (1) flood occurrences exhibit clustering at intra-annual scale, which are regulated by climate indices representing the impacts of the Pacific and Indian Oceans; (2) the flood-rich months occur from January to March over northern Australia, and from July to September over southwestern and southeastern Australia; (3) stronger inter-annual clustering takes place across southern Australia than northern Australia; and (4) Australian floods are characterised by regional flood-rich and flood-poor periods, with 1987-1992 identified as the flood-rich period across southern Australia, but the flood-poor period across northern Australia, and 2001-2006 being the flood-poor period across most regions of Australia. The intra-annual and inter-annual clustering and temporal variation of flood occurrences are in accordance with the variation of atmospheric circulation. These results provide relevant information for flood management under the influence of climate variability, and, therefore, are helpful for developing

  17. FIRST Bent-Double Radio Sources: Tracers of High-Redshift Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanton, E. L.; Gregg, M. D.; Helfand, D. J.; Becker, R. H.; White, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    Bent-double radio sources can act as tracers for clusters of galaxies. We present imaging and spectroscopic observations of the environments surrounding 10 of these sources (most of them wide-angle tails [WATs]) selected from the VLA FIRST survey. Our results reveal a previously unknown cluster associated with eight of the radio sources with redshifts in the range 0.33< z<0.85; furthermore, we cannot rule out that the other two bent doubles may be associated with clusters at higher redshift. Richness measurements indicate that these clusters are typical of the majority of those found in the Abell catalog, with a range of Abell richness classes from 0 to 2. The line-of-sight velocity dispersions are very different from cluster to cluster, ranging from approximately 300 to 1100 km s-1. At the upper end of these intervals, we may be sampling some of the highest redshift massive clusters known. Alternatively, the large velocity dispersions measured in some of the clusters may indicate that they are merging systems with significant substructure, consistent with recent ideas concerning WAT formation (Burns et al.). (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society

  18. Thermodynamics of neutron-rich nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Jorge A., E-mail: jorgelopez@utep.edu [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968, U.S.A (United States); Porras, Sergio Terrazas, E-mail: sterraza@uacj.mx; Gutiérrez, Araceli Rodríguez, E-mail: al104010@alumnos.uacj.mx [Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2016-07-07

    This manuscript presents methods to obtain properties of neutron-rich nuclear matter from classical molecular dynamics. Some of these are bulk properties of infinite nuclear matter, phase information, the Maxwell construction, spinodal lines and symmetry energy.

  19. Dynamical aspects of galaxy clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fall, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    Some recent work on the origin and evolution of galaxy clustering is reviewed, particularly within the context of the gravitational instability theory and the hot big-bang cosmological model. Statistical measures of clustering, including correlation functions and multiplicity functions, are explained and discussed. The close connection between galaxy formation and clustering is emphasized. Additional topics include the dependence of galaxy clustering on the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations and the mean mass density of the Universe. (author)

  20. [Cluster analysis in biomedical researches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akopov, A S; Moskovtsev, A A; Dolenko, S A; Savina, G D

    2013-01-01

    Cluster analysis is one of the most popular methods for the analysis of multi-parameter data. The cluster analysis reveals the internal structure of the data, group the separate observations on the degree of their similarity. The review provides a definition of the basic concepts of cluster analysis, and discusses the most popular clustering algorithms: k-means, hierarchical algorithms, Kohonen networks algorithms. Examples are the use of these algorithms in biomedical research.

  1. THE ASSEMBLY OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrier, Joel C.; Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Purcell, Chris W.; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2009-01-01

    We study the formation of 53 galaxy cluster-size dark matter halos (M = 10 14.0-14.76 M sun ) formed within a pair of cosmological Λ cold dark matter N-body simulations, and track the accretion histories of cluster subhalos with masses large enough to host ∼0.3 L * galaxies. By associating subhalos with cluster galaxies, we find the majority of galaxies in clusters experience no 'preprocessing' in the group environment prior to their accretion into the cluster. On average, 70% of cluster galaxies fall into the cluster potential directly from the field, with no luminous companions in their host halos at the time of accretion; less than 12% are accreted as members of groups with five or more galaxies. Moreover, we find that cluster galaxies are significantly less likely to have experienced a merger in the recent past (∼<6 Gyr) than a field halo of the same mass. These results suggest that local cluster processes such as ram pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or strangulation play the dominant role in explaining the difference between cluster and field populations at a fixed stellar mass, and that pre-evolution or past merging in the group environment is of secondary importance for setting cluster galaxy properties for most clusters. The accretion times for z = 0 cluster members are quite extended, with ∼20% incorporated into the cluster halo more than 7 Gyr ago and ∼20% within the last 2 Gyr. By comparing the observed morphological fractions in cluster and field populations, we estimate an approximate timescale for late-type to early-type transformation within the cluster environment to be ∼6 Gyr.

  2. Chronorisk in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads; Haddock, Bryan; Lund, Nunu T

    2018-01-01

    and a spectral analysis identifying oscillations in risk. Results The Gaussian model fit for the chronorisk distribution for all patients reporting diurnal rhythmicity (n = 286) had a goodness of fit R2 value of 0.97 and identified three times of increased risk peaking at 21:41, 02:02 and 06:23 hours....... In subgroups, three to five modes of increased risk were found and goodness of fit values ranged from 0.85-0.99. Spectral analysis revealed multiple distinct oscillation frequencies in chronorisk in subgroups including a dominant circadian oscillation in episodic patients and an ultradian in chronic....... Conclusions Chronorisk in cluster headache can be characterised as a sum of individual, timed events of increased risk, each having a Gaussian distribution. In episodic cluster headache, attacks follow a circadian rhythmicity whereas, in the chronic variant, ultradian oscillations are dominant reflecting...

  3. CSR in Industrial Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Pillay, Renginee G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The paper seeks to review the literature on CSR in industrial clusters in developing countries, identifying the main strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in this literature, pointing to future research directions and policy implications in the area of CSR and industrial cluster development....... Design/methodology/approach – A literature review is conducted of both academic and policy-oriented writings that contain the keywords “industrial clusters” and “developing countries” in combination with one or more of the following terms: corporate social responsibility, environmental management, labor...... standards, child labor, climate change, social upgrading, and environmental upgrading. The authors examine the key themes in this literature, identify the main gaps, and point to areas where future work in this area could usefully be undertaken. Feedback has been sought from some of the leading authors...

  4. Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.; Richter, O. G.; Materne, J.

    1981-09-01

    The large-scale structure of the universe is dominated by clustering. Most galaxies seem to be members of pairs, groups, clusters, and superclusters. To that degree we are able to recognize a hierarchical structure of the universe. Our local group of galaxies (LG) is centred on two large spiral galaxies: the Andromeda nebula and our own galaxy. Three sr:naller galaxies - like M 33 - and at least 23 dwarf galaxies (KraanKorteweg and Tammann, 1979, Astronomische Nachrichten, 300, 181) can be found in the evironment of these two large galaxies. Neighbouring groups have comparable sizes (about 1 Mpc in extent) and comparable numbers of bright members. Small dwarf galaxies cannot at present be observed at great distances.

  5. Leveraging data rich environments using marketing analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Holtrop, Niels

    2017-01-01

    With the onset of what is popularly known as “big data”, increased attention is being paid to creating value from these data rich environments. Within the field of marketing, the analysis of customer and market data supported by models is known as marketing analytics. The goal of these analyses is to enhance managerial decision making regarding marketing problems. However, before these data rich environments can be used to guide managerial decision making, firms need to grasp the process of d...

  6. Text Clustering Algorithm Based on Random Cluster Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays clustering has become a popular text mining algorithm, but the huge data can put forward higher requirements for the accuracy and performance of text mining. In view of the performance bottleneck of traditional text clustering algorithm, this paper proposes a text clustering algorithm with random features. This is a kind of clustering algorithm based on text density, at the same time using the neighboring heuristic rules, the concept of random cluster is introduced, which effectively reduces the complexity of the distance calculation.

  7. On clusters and clustering from atoms to fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, PJ

    1993-01-01

    This book attempts to answer why there is so much interest in clusters. Clusters occur on all length scales, and as a result occur in a variety of fields. Clusters are interesting scientifically, but they also have important consequences technologically. The division of the book into three parts roughly separates the field into small, intermediate, and large-scale clusters. Small clusters are the regime of atomic and molecular physics and chemistry. The intermediate regime is the transitional regime, with its characteristics including the onset of bulk-like behavior, growth and aggregation, a

  8. Cosmology, Clusters and Calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

    2005-01-01

    I will review the current state of Cosmology with Clusters and discuss the application of microcalorimeter arrays to this field. With the launch of Astro-E2 this summer and a slew of new missions being developed, microcalorimeters are the next big thing in x-ray astronomy. I will cover the basics and not-so-basic concepts of microcalorimeter designs and look at the future to see where this technology will go.

  9. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  10. Seizure clusters: characteristics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Sheryl R

    2015-04-01

    Many patients with epilepsy experience 'clusters' or flurries of seizures, also termed acute repetitive seizures (ARS). Seizure clustering has a significant impact on health and quality of life. This review summarizes recent advances in the definition and neurophysiologic understanding of clustering, the epidemiology and risk factors for clustering and both inpatient and outpatient clinical implications. New treatments for seizure clustering/ARS are perhaps the area of greatest recent progress. Efforts have focused on creating a uniform definition of a seizure cluster. In neurophysiologic studies of refractory epilepsy, seizures within a cluster appear to be self-triggering. Clinical progress has been achieved towards a more precise prevalence of clustering, and consensus guidelines for epilepsy monitoring unit safety. The greatest recent advances are in the study of nonintravenous route of benzodiazepines as rescue medications for seizure clusters/ARS. Rectal benzodiazepines have been very effective but barriers to use exist. New data on buccal, intramuscular and intranasal preparations are anticipated to lead to a greater number of approved treatments. Progesterone may be effective for women who experience catamenial clusters. Seizure clustering is common, particularly in the setting of medically refractory epilepsy. Clustering worsens health and quality of life, and the field requires greater focus on clarifying of definition and clinical implications. Progress towards the development of nonintravenous routes of benzodiazepines has the potential to improve care in this area.

  11. Privacy-preserving distributed clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Veugen, T.; Toft, T.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Clustering is a very important tool in data mining and is widely used in on-line services for medical, financial and social environments. The main goal in clustering is to create sets of similar objects in a data set. The data set to be used for clustering can be owned by a single entity, or in some

  12. Electron localization in water clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landman, U.; Barnett, R.N.; Cleveland, C.L.; Jortner, J.

    1987-01-01

    Electron attachment to water clusters was explored by the quantum path integral molecular dynamics method, demonstrating that the energetically favored localization mode involves a surface state of the excess electron, rather than the precursor of the hydrated electron. The cluster size dependence, the energetics and the charge distribution of these novel electron-cluster surface states are explored. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Observations of copper clustering in a 25Cr-7Ni super duplex stainless steel during low-temperature aging under load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuvander, M.; Zhou, J.; Odqvist, J.; Hertzman, S.; Hedström, P.

    2012-07-01

    Atom-probe tomography was used to investigate phase separation and copper (Cu) clustering in the ferrite phase of a 25Cr-7Ni super duplex stainless steel. The steel was subjected to a tensile load during aging at 325°C for 5800 h. The degree of phase separation into α (Fe-rich) and α‧ (Cr-rich) was small, but still, it was the highest in the steel subjected to the highest load. Cu was found to cluster, and the number density of clusters increased with increasing load. In the material subjected to the highest load, Cu was enriched in regions that were neither Fe-rich nor Cr-rich. These regions also had the highest number density of Cu clusters.

  14. Nonparametric Collective Spectral Density Estimation and Clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2017-04-12

    In this paper, we develop a method for the simultaneous estimation of spectral density functions (SDFs) for a collection of stationary time series that share some common features. Due to the similarities among the SDFs, the log-SDF can be represented using a common set of basis functions. The basis shared by the collection of the log-SDFs is estimated as a low-dimensional manifold of a large space spanned by a pre-specified rich basis. A collective estimation approach pools information and borrows strength across the SDFs to achieve better estimation efficiency. Also, each estimated spectral density has a concise representation using the coefficients of the basis expansion, and these coefficients can be used for visualization, clustering, and classification purposes. The Whittle pseudo-maximum likelihood approach is used to fit the model and an alternating blockwise Newton-type algorithm is developed for the computation. A web-based shiny App found at

  15. Nonparametric Collective Spectral Density Estimation and Clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Sun, Ying; Chen, Tianbo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a method for the simultaneous estimation of spectral density functions (SDFs) for a collection of stationary time series that share some common features. Due to the similarities among the SDFs, the log-SDF can be represented using a common set of basis functions. The basis shared by the collection of the log-SDFs is estimated as a low-dimensional manifold of a large space spanned by a pre-specified rich basis. A collective estimation approach pools information and borrows strength across the SDFs to achieve better estimation efficiency. Also, each estimated spectral density has a concise representation using the coefficients of the basis expansion, and these coefficients can be used for visualization, clustering, and classification purposes. The Whittle pseudo-maximum likelihood approach is used to fit the model and an alternating blockwise Newton-type algorithm is developed for the computation. A web-based shiny App found at

  16. Publisher Correction: Cluster richness-mass calibration with cosmic microwave background lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, James E.; Peacock, John A.

    2018-03-01

    Owing to a technical error, the `Additional information' section of the originally published PDF version of this Letter incorrectly gave J.A.P. as the corresponding author; it should have read J.E.G. This has now been corrected. The HTML version is correct.

  17. Celiac lesion T cells recognize epitopes that cluster in regions of gliadins rich in proline residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentz-Hansen, Helene; McAdam, Stephen N; Molberg, Øyvind

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Celiac disease is a gluten-induced enteropathy that shows a strong association with HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8. Gluten-specific T cells, invariably restricted by DQ2 or DQ8, can be isolated from celiac lesions. Such gut-derived T cells have a preference for recognition of gluten that has...

  18. Support Policies in Clusters: Prioritization of Support Needs by Cluster Members According to Cluster Life Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulcin Salıngan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Economic development has always been a moving target. Both the national and local governments have been facing the challenge of implementing the effective and efficient economic policy and program in order to best utilize their limited resources. One of the recent approaches in this area is called cluster-based economic analysis and strategy development. This study reviews key literature and some of the cluster based economic policies adopted by different governments. Based on this review, it proposes “the cluster life cycle” as a determining factor to identify the support requirements of clusters. A survey, designed based on literature review of International Cluster support programs, was conducted with 30 participants from 3 clusters with different maturity stage. This paper discusses the results of this study conducted among the cluster members in Eskişehir- Bilecik-Kütahya Region in Turkey on the requirement of the support to foster the development of related clusters.

  19. Electronic structure of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertheim, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of valence electrons in metal clusters, together with threshold ionization potential measurements, provide a coherent picture of the development of the electronic structure from the isolated atom to the large metallic cluster. An insulator-metal transition occurs at an intermediate cluster size, which serves to define the boundary between small and large clusters. Although the outer electrons may be delocalized over the entire cluster, a small cluster remains insulating until the density of states near the Fermi level exceeds 1/kT. In large clusters, with increasing cluster size, the band structure approaches that of the bulk metal. However, the bands remain significantly narrowed even in a 1000-atom cluster, giving an indication of the importance of long-range order. The core-electron binding-energy shifts of supported metal clusters depend on changes in the band structure in the initial state, as well as on various final-state effects, including changes in core hole screening and the coulomb energy of the final-state charge. For cluster supported on amorphous carbon, this macroscopic coulomb shift is often dominant, as evidenced by the parallel shifts of the core-electron binding energy and the Fermi edge. Auger data confirm that final-state effects dominate in cluster of Sn and some other metals. Surface atom core-level shifts provide a valuable guide to the contributions of initial-state changes in band structure to cluster core-electron binding energy shifts, especially for Au and Pt. The available data indicate that the shift observed in supported, metallic clusters arise largely from the charge left on the cluster by photoemission. As the metal-insulator transition is approached from above, metallic screening is suppressed and the shift is determined by the local environment. (orig.)

  20. Relics in galaxy clusters at high radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdorf, M.; Beck, R.; Hoeft, M.; Klein, U.; van Weeren, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.

    2017-04-01

    fronts that are observed edge-on. The polarization degrees correspond to Mach numbers of >2.2. Polarized emission is also detected in the radio relics in ZwCl 0008+52 and, for the first time, in Abell 1612. The smaller sizes and lower degrees of polarizations of the latter relics indicate a weaker shock and/or an inclination between the relic and the sky plane. Abell 1612 shows a complex X-ray surface brightness distribution, indicating a recent major merger and supporting the classification of the radio emission as a radio relic. In our cluster sample, no wavelength-dependent Faraday depolarization is detected between 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz, except for one component of the Toothbrush relic. Faraday depolarization between 1.38 GHz and 8.35 GHz varies with distance from the center of the host cluster 1RXS 06+42, which can be explained by a decrease in electron density and/or in strength of a turbulent (or tangled) magnetic field. Faraday rotation measures show large-scale gradients along the relics, which cannot be explained by variations in the Milky Way foreground. Conclusions: Single-dish telescopes are ideal tools to confirm relic candidates and search for new relic candidates. Measurement of the wavelength-dependent depolarization along the Toothbrush relic shows that the electron density of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and strength of the tangled magnetic field decrease with distance from the center of the foreground cluster. Large-scale regular fields appear to be present in intergalactic space around galaxy clusters. Based on observations with the 100-m telescope at Effelsberg, operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR) on behalf of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft.The reduced Stokes parameter images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A18