WorldWideScience

Sample records for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase

  1. Assay of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, C.; Berry, J.

    1987-01-01

    Assays of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) can be used to illustrate many properties of photosynthetic systems. Many different leaves have been assayed with this standard procedure. The tissue is ground with a mortar and pestle in extraction buffer. The supernatant after centrifugation is used as the source of enzyme. Buffer, RuBP, [ 14 C]-NaHCO 3 , and enzyme are combined in a scintillation vial; the reaction is run for 1 min at 30 0 . The acid-stable products are counted. Reproducibility in student experiments has been excellent. The assay data can be combined with analyses of leaf properties such as fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll and protein content, etc. Students have done projects such as the response of enzyme to temperature and to various inhibitors. They also report on the use of a transition state analog, carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate, to titrate the molar concentration of rubisco molecules (active sites) in an enzyme sample. Thus, using crude extracts the catalytic activity of a sample can be compared to the absolute quantity of enzyme or to the turnover number

  2. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, R.M.B. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia]|[Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal). Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N. [Universidade Tecnica, Lisbon (Portugal). Inst. Superior de Agronomia

    1996-08-15

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of {sup 35}S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author).

  3. Covalent dimerization of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase subunits by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, R.M.B.; Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras; Franco, E.; Teixeira, A.R.N.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of UV radiation (UV-A, UV-B and UV-C) on ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from a variety of plant species was examined. The exposition of plant leaves or the pure enzyme to UV radiation produced a UV-dependent accumulation of a 65 kDa polypeptide (P65). Different approaches were utilized to elucidate the origin and structure of P65: electrophoretic and fluorographic analyses of 35 S-labelled ribulose biphosphate carboxylase exposed to UV radiation and immunological experiments using antibodies specific for P65, for the large and small subunits of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase and for high-molecular-mass aggregates of the enzyme. These studies revealed that P65 is a dimer, formed by the covalent, non-disulphide linkage of one small subunit with one large subunit of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. For short periods of time (<1 h), the amount of P65 formed increased with the duration of the exposure to the UV radiation and with the energy of the radiation applied. Prolonged exposure to UV radiation (1-6 h) resulted in the formation of high-molecular-mass aggregates of ribulose biphosphate carboxylase. Formation of P65 was shown to depend on the native state of the protein, was stimulated by inhibitors of enzyme activity, and was inhibited by activators of enzyme activity. A UV-independent accumulation of P65 was also achieved by the in vitro incubation of plant crude extracts. However, the UV-dependent and the UV-independent formation of P65 seemed to occur by distinct molecular mechanisms. The UV-dependent accumulation of P65 was immunologically detected in all species examined, including Lemna minor, Arum italicum, Brassica oleracea, Triticum aestivum, Zea mays, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris, suggesting that it may constitute a universal response to UV radiation, common to all photosynthetic tissues. (Author)

  4. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase synthesis during heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierling, E.; Key, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) was chosen as a model protein to study how heat shock (HS) affects both chloroplast protein synthesis and the nuclear-chloroplast interaction in production of chloroplast proteins. Experiments were performed using highly chlorophyllous, soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. var Corsoy) cell suspension cultures active in chloroplast protein synthesis. Synthesis of RuBPCase large (L) and small (S) subunits was followed by in vivo labeling, and corresponding mRNA levels were examined by Northern and dot hybridization analyses. Results demonstrate that L and S synthesis declines with increasing HS temperatures (33-40 0 C) and reaches minimum levels (20-30% of control) at temperatures of maximum HS protein synthesis (39-40 0 C). Recovery of L and S synthesis following a 2-hour HS at 38 or 40 0 C was also studied. The changes in S synthesis during HS and recovery correlate with the steady state levels of S mRNA. In contrast, changes in L synthesis show little relationship to the corresponding mRNA levels; levels of L mRNA remain relatively unchanged by HS. The authors conclude that chloroplast protein synthesis shows no greater sensitivity to HS than is observed for cytoplasmic protein synthesis and that transport of proteins into the chloroplast (e.g.,S subunit) continues during HS. Furthermore, there is no apparent coordination of L and S subunit mNRA levels under the conditions examined

  5. Immunochemical localization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in the symbiont-containing gills of Solemya velum (Bivalvia : Mollusca)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavanaugh, Colleen M.; Abbott, Marilyn S.; Veenhuis, Marten

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RbuP2Case; EC 4.1.1.39) was examined by using two immunological methods in tissues of Solemya velum, an Atlantic coast bivalve containing putative chemoautotrophic symbionts. Antibodies elicited by the purified large

  6. Identification of Interactions between Abscisic Acid and Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M Galka

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid ((+-ABA is a phytohormone involved in the modulation of developmental processes and stress responses in plants. A chemical proteomics approach using an ABA mimetic probe was combined with in vitro assays, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, x-ray crystallography and in silico modelling to identify putative (+-ABA binding-proteins in crude extracts of Arabidopsis thaliana. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco was identified as a putative ABA-binding protein. Radiolabelled-binding assays yielded a Kd of 47 nM for (+-ABA binding to spinach Rubisco, which was validated by ITC, and found to be similar to reported and experimentally derived values for the native ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP substrate. Functionally, (+-ABA caused only weak inhibition of Rubisco catalytic activity (Ki of 2.1 mM, but more potent inhibition of Rubisco activation (Ki of ~ 130 μM. Comparative structural analysis of Rubisco in the presence of (+-ABA with RuBP in the active site revealed only a putative low occupancy (+-ABA binding site on the surface of the large subunit at a location distal from the active site. However, subtle distortions in electron density in the binding pocket and in silico docking support the possibility of a higher affinity (+-ABA binding site in the RuBP binding pocket. Overall we conclude that (+-ABA interacts with Rubisco. While the low occupancy (+-ABA binding site and weak non-competitive inhibition of catalysis may not be relevant, the high affinity site may allow ABA to act as a negative effector of Rubisco activation.

  7. Evidence for allosterism in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from comfrey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.D.; Bolden, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence has been obtained suggesting that ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is an allosteric enzyme in the sense that it shows cooperative active site binding, cooperative interactions between the activation and active sites and significant binding of some metabolites at a second site. Investigation of the binding of a potent competitive inhibitor. 2-carboxymannitol-1,6-bisphosphate (CMBP) by 31 P-NMR indicated essentially 1:1 binding with the active sites of comfrey RuBisCo. Among the interactions of competitive inhibitors, as measured by difference UV spectroscopy, the binding curves for ortho-phosphate and ribose-5-phosphate were better fitted by a Monod-Wyman-Changeux model than by an independent site model, whereas the binding of CMBP and 2-phosphoglycolate were not. Difference UV methods also were used to study activation by CO 2 which at pH 7.9 in 10 mM MgCl 2 showed positive cooperativity with k = 100 +/- 3 μM (based on pK/sub a/ = 6.4 for the CO 2 -HCO 3 - equilibrium) and L = 3.5 +/- 0.7. Addition of saturating amounts of CMBP and lowering the MgCl 2 to 2 mM still gave a sigmoidal curve but it was shifted to higher CO 2 concentrations (k = 124 +/- 2 μM and L = 31 +/- 3). In the absence of CMBP the same conditions gave k = 26 +/- 2 μM for L = 3.5. Conversely, k was 0.96 +/- 0.08 μM for CMBP in 0.5 mM MgCl 2 without added NaHCO 3 but was 21 +/- 0.06 μM in 10 MgCl 2 and 2 mM NaHCO 3 , pH 7.3

  8. Regulation of Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase Activity by the Activase System in Lysed Spinach Chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Martin A. J.; Keys, Alfred J.; Foyer, Christine H.; Furbank, Robert T.; Walker, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase in lysed spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv virtuosa) chloroplasts that had been partly inactivated at low CO2 and Mg2+ by incubating in darkness with 4 millimolar partially purified RuBP was reactivated by light. If purified RuBP was used to inhibit dark activation of the enzyme, reactivation by light was not observed unless fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, ATP, or ADP plus inorganic phosphate were also added. Presumably, ADP plus inorganic phosphate acted as an ATP-generating system with a requirement for the generation of ΔpH across the thylakoid membrane. When the RuBP obtained from Sigma Chemical Co. was used, light did not reactivate the enzyme. There was no direct correlation between ΔpH and activation. Therefore, thylakoids are required in the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activase system largely to synthesize ATP. Inactivation of RuBP carboxylase in isolated chloroplasts or in the lysed chloroplast system was not promoted simply by a transition from light to dark conditions but was caused by low CO2 and Mg2+. PMID:16666184

  9. Evidence for allosterism in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from comfrey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, D.D.; Bolden, T.D.

    1986-05-01

    Evidence has been obtained suggesting that ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is an allosteric enzyme in the sense that it shows cooperative active site binding, cooperative interactions between the activation and active sites and significant binding of some metabolites at a second site. Investigation of the binding of a potent competitive inhibitor. 2-carboxymannitol-1,6-bisphosphate (CMBP) by /sup 31/P-NMR indicated essentially 1:1 binding with the active sites of comfrey RuBisCo. Among the interactions of competitive inhibitors, as measured by difference UV spectroscopy, the binding curves for ortho-phosphate and ribose-5-phosphate were better fitted by a Monod-Wyman-Changeux model than by an independent site model, whereas the binding of CMBP and 2-phosphoglycolate were not. Difference UV methods also were used to study activation by CO/sub 2/ which at pH 7.9 in 10 mM MgCl/sub 2/ showed positive cooperativity with k = 100 +/- 3 ..mu..M (based on pK/sub a/ = 6.4 for the CO/sub 2/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ equilibrium) and L = 3.5 +/- 0.7. Addition of saturating amounts of CMBP and lowering the MgCl/sub 2/ to 2 mM still gave a sigmoidal curve but it was shifted to higher CO/sub 2/ concentrations (k = 124 +/- 2 ..mu..M and L = 31 +/- 3). In the absence of CMBP the same conditions gave k = 26 +/- 2 ..mu..M for L = 3.5. Conversely, k was 0.96 +/- 0.08 ..mu..M for CMBP in 0.5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ without added NaHCO/sub 3/ but was 21 +/- 0.06 ..mu..M in 10 MgCl/sub 2/ and 2 mM NaHCO/sub 3/, pH 7.3.

  10. Electron microscopy of the complexes of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) and Rubisco subunit-binding protein from pea leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuprun, V.L.; Boekema, E.J.; Samsonidze, T.G.; Pushkin, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) subunit-binding protein and its interaction with pea leaf chloroplast Rubisco were studied by electron microscopy and image analysis. Electron-microscopic evidence for the association of Rubisco subunit-binding protein, consisting of

  11. Differential transcription and message stability of two genes encoding soybean ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, B.W.; Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Grandbastien, M.A.; Zurfluh, L.L.; Shah, D.M.; Meagher, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    The expression of two closely related soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (Rubisco ss) genes, SRS1 and SRS4, has been compared. These genes account for approximately 2-4% of the total transcription in light grown leaves, SRS4 being twice as transcriptionally active as SRS1. The transcription of these genes is reduced more than 30 fold after a pulse of far-red light or extended periods of darkness. When etiolated seedlings are shifted to the light the transcription of both genes increases 30-50 fold. Despite this 30-fold range in transcriptional expression the steady state mRNA levels in light and dark grown tissue differ by less than 8 fold. This suggests that the mRNAs are less stable in light grown tissue. 38 refs., 5 figs

  12. Immunochemical localization of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in the symbiont-containing gills of Solemya velum (Bivalvia: Mollusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, C M; Abbott, M S; Veenhuis, M

    1988-10-01

    The distribution of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RbuP(2)Case; EC 4.1.1.39) was examined by using two immunological methods in tissues of Solemya velum, an Atlantic coast bivalve containing putative chemoautotrophic symbionts. Antibodies elicited by the purified large subunit of RbuP(2)Case from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cross-reacted on immunoblots with a protein of similar molecular mass occurring in extracts of the symbiont-containing gill tissue of S. velum. No cross-reactivity was detected in symbiont-free tissue extracts. The antiserum also cross-reacted in immunoblots with proteins of Thiobacillus neapolitanus, a free-living sulfuroxidizing chemoautotroph whose RbuP(2)Case has been well characterized. In protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy studies, this antiserum consistently labeled the symbionts but not surrounding host gill tissue, indicating that the symbionts are responsible for the RbuP(2)Case activity.

  13. Identification of the large subunit of Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase as a substrate for transglutaminase in Medicageo sativa L. (alfalfa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margosiak, S.A.; Dharma, A.; Carver, M.R.B.; Gonzales, A.P.; Louie, D.; Kuehn, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    Extract prepared from floral meristematic tissue of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were investigated for expression of the enzyme transglutaminase in order to identify the major protein substrate for transglutaminase-directed modifications among plant proteins. The large polymorphic subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in alfalfa, with molecular weights of 52,700 and 57,600, are major substrates for transglutaminase in these extracts. This was established by: (a) covalent conjugation of monodansylcadaverine to the large subunit followed by fluorescent detection in SDS-polyacrylamide gels; (b) covalent conjugation of [ 14 C]putrescine to the large subunit with detection by autoradiography; (c) covalent conjugation of monodansylcadaverine to the large subunit and demonstration of immunocross-reactivity on nitrocellulose transblot of the modified large subunit with antibody prepared in rabbits against dansylated-ovalbumin; (d) demonstration of a direct dependence of the rate of transglutaminase-mediated, [ 14 C]putresciene incorporation upon the concentration of ribulose, 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from alfalfa or spinach; and (e) presumptive evidence from size exclusion chromatography that transglutaminase may cofractionate with native molecules of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in crude extracts

  14. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate dependent CO2 fixation in the halophilic archaebacterium, Halobacterium mediterranei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawal, N.; Kelkar, S.M.; Altekar, W.

    1988-01-01

    The cell extract of Halobacterium mediterranei catalyses incorporation of 14 CO 2 into 3-phosphoglycerate in the presence of ribulose bisphosphate suggesting the existence of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity in this halophilic archaebacterium

  15. Status of the substrate binding sites of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase as determined with 2-C-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate. [Spinacia oleracea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Genhai; Jensen, R.G. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The properties of the tight and specific binding of 2-C-carboxy-D-arabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate (CABP), which occurs only to reaction sites of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) that are activated by CO{sub 2} and Mg{sup 2+}, were studied. With fully active purified spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Rubisco the rate of tight binding of ({sup 14}C)CABP fit a multiple exponential rate equation with half of the sites binding with a rate constant of 40 per minute and the second half of the sites binding at 3.2 per minute. This suggests that after CABP binds to one site of a dimer of Rubisco large subunits, binding to the second site is considerably slower, indicating negative cooperativity as previously reported. The rate of CABP binding to partially activated Rubisco was complete within 2 to 5 minutes, with slower binding to inactive sites as they formed the carbamate and bound Mg{sup 2+}. Addition of ({sup 14}C)CABP and EDTA stopped binding of Mg{sup 2+} and allowed tight binding of the radiolabel only to sites which were CO{sub 2}/Mg{sup 2+}-activated at that moment. The rate of CO{sub 2} fixation was proportional to the CO{sub 2}/Mg{sup 2+}-activated sites. During light-dependent CO{sub 2} fixation with isolated spinach chloroplasts, the amount of carbamylation was proportional to Rubisco activity either initially upon lysis of the plastids or following total activation with Mg{sup 2+} and CO{sub 2}. Lysis of chloroplasts in media with ({sup 14}C)CABP plus EDTA estimated those carbamylated sites having Mg{sup 2+}. The loss of Rubisco activation during illumination was partially due to the lack of Mg{sup 2+} to stabilize the carbamylated sites.

  16. Silencing ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase expression does not disrupt nitrogen allocation to defense after simulated herbivory in Nicotiana attenuata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Mariana A; Ullmann-Zeunert, Lynn; Wielsch, Natalie; Bartram, Stefan; Svatoš, Aleš; Baldwin, Ian T; Groten, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/ oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant protein on the planet and in addition to its central role in photosynthesis it is thought to function as a nitrogen (N)-storage protein and a potential source of N for defense biosynthesis in plants. In a recent study in the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata, we showed that the decrease in absolute N invested in soluble proteins and RuBisCO elicited by simulated herbivory was much larger than the N-requirements of nicotine and phenolamide biosynthesis; (15)N flux studies revealed that N for defensive phenolamide synthesis originates from recently assimilated N rather than from RuBisCO turnover. Here we show that a transgenic line of N. attenuata silenced in the expression of RuBisCO (asRUB) invests similar or even larger amounts of N into phenolamide biosynthesis compared with wild type plants, consistent with our previous conclusion that recently assimilated N is channeled into phenolamide synthesis after elicitation. We suggest that the decrease in leaf proteins after simulated herbivory is a tolerance mechanism, rather than a consequence of N-demand for defense biosynthesis.

  17. S-nitrosylated proteins of a medicinal CAM plant Kalanchoe pinnata- ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity targeted for inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, Jasmeet K; Mattoo, Autar K; Deswal, Renu

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that affects a myriad of processes in plants. However, the mechanistic details are limited. NO post-translationally modifies proteins by S-nitrosylation of cysteines. The soluble S-nitrosoproteome of a medicinal, crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Kalanchoe pinnata, was purified using the biotin switch technique. Nineteen targets were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, including proteins associated with carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, the cytoskeleton, stress and photosynthesis. Some were similar to those previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, but kinesin-like protein, glycolate oxidase, putative UDP glucose 4-epimerase and putative DNA topoisomerase II had not been identified as targets previously for any organism. In vitro and in vivo nitrosylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), one of the targets, was confirmed by immunoblotting. Rubisco plays a central role in photosynthesis, and the effect of S-nitrosylation on its enzymatic activity was determined using NaH14CO3. The NO-releasing compound S-nitrosoglutathione inhibited its activity in a dose-dependent manner suggesting Rubisco inactivation by nitrosylation for the first time.

  18. Cinnamic acid-inhibited ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is mediated through decreased spermine and changes in the ratio of polyamines in cowpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xingxue; Bie, Zhilong

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of cinnamic acid (CA) on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) activity and the endogenous polyamine levels of cowpea leaves. The results show that 0.1 mM CA treatment decreased photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and RuBPC activity, but it did not affect the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), the actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (PhiPSII), intercellular CO(2) concentration (C(i)), and relative chlorophyll content. These suggest that the decrease in P(n) is at least partially attributed to a lowered RuBPC activity. In addition, 0.1 mM CA treatment increased the putrescine (Put) level, but decreased spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) levels, thereby reducing the (Spd+Spm)/Put (PAs) ratio in the leaves. The exogenous application of 1 mM Spd markedly reversed these CA-induced effects for polyamine and partially restored the PAs ratio and RuBPC activity in leaves. Methylglyoxal-bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), which is an inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), results in the inability of activated cells to synthesize Spd and exacerbates the negative effects induced by CA. The exogenous application of 1 mM D-arginine (D-Arg), which is an inhibitor of Put biosynthesis, decreased the levels of Put, but increased the PAs ratio and RuBPC activity in leaves. These results suggest that 0.1 mM CA inhibits RuBPC activity by decreasing the levels of endogenous free and perchloric acid soluble (PS) conjugated Spm, as well as the PAs ratio.

  19. Cysteine proteinases regulate chloroplast protein content and composition in tobacco leaves: a model for dynamic interactions with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) vesicular bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Anneke; van Heerden, Philippus D R; Olmos, Enrique; Kunert, Karl J; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-01-01

    The roles of cysteine proteinases (CP) in leaf protein accumulation and composition were investigated in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants expressing the rice cystatin, OC-1. The OC-1 protein was present in the cytosol, chloroplasts, and vacuole of the leaves of OC-1 expressing (OCE) plants. Changes in leaf protein composition and turnover caused by OC-1-dependent inhibition of CP activity were assessed in 8-week-old plants using proteomic analysis. Seven hundred and sixty-five soluble proteins were detected in the controls compared to 860 proteins in the OCE leaves. A cyclophilin, a histone, a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, and two ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase isoforms were markedly altered in abundance in the OCE leaves. The senescence-related decline in photosynthesis and Rubisco activity was delayed in the OCE leaves. Similarly, OCE leaves maintained higher leaf Rubisco activities and protein than controls following dark chilling. Immunogold labelling studies with specific antibodies showed that Rubisco was present in Rubisco vesicular bodies (RVB) as well as in the chloroplasts of leaves from 8-week-old control and OCE plants. Western blot analysis of plants at 14 weeks after both genotypes had flowered revealed large increases in the amount of Rubisco protein in the OCE leaves compared to controls. These results demonstrate that CPs are involved in Rubisco turnover in leaves under optimal and stress conditions and that extra-plastidic RVB bodies are present even in young source leaves. Furthermore, these data form the basis for a new model of Rubisco protein turnover involving CPs and RVBs.

  20. Isolation and characterization of cbbL and cbbS genes encoding form I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large and small subunits in Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Ryuichi; Kato, Junichi; Morita, Hiromu; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    2002-03-01

    The cbbL and cbbS genes encoding form I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) large and small subunits in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11 were cloned and sequenced. The deduced gene products, CbbL and CbbS, had 93 and 87% identity with Thiobacillus intermedius CbbL and Nitrobacter winogradskyi CbbS, respectively. Expression of cbbL and cbbS in Escherichia coli led to the detection of RubisCO activity in the presence of 0.1 mM isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). To our knowledge, this is the first paper to report the genes involved in the carbon fixation reaction in chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

  1. Antagonistic actions of boron against inhibitory effects of aluminum toxicity on growth, CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, and photosynthetic electron transport probed by the JIP-test, of Citrus grandis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Ning

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information is available on the amelioration of boron (B on aluminum (Al-induced photosynthesis inhibition. Sour pummelo (Citrus grandis seedlings were irrigated for 18 weeks with nutrient solution containing 4 B levels (2.5, 10, 25 and 50 μM H3BO3 × 2 Al levels (0 and 1.2 mM AlCl3·6H2O. The objectives of this study were to determine how B alleviates Al-induced growth inhibition and to test the hypothesis that Al-induced photosynthesis inhibition can be alleviated by B via preventing Al from getting into shoots. Results B had little effect on plant growth, root, stem and leaf Al, leaf chlorophyll (Chl, CO2 assimilation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, Chl a fluorescence (OJIP transient and related parameters without Al stress except that root, stem and leaf B increased with increasing B supply and that 50 μM B decreased slightly root dry weight. Al-treated roots, stems and leaves displayed a higher or similar B. B did not affect root Al under Al stress, but decreased stem and leaf Al level. Shoot growth is more sensitive to Al stress than root growth, CO2 assimilation, Chl, Rubisco, OJIP transient and most related parameters. Al-treated leaves showed decreased CO2 assimilation, but increased or similar intercellular CO2 concentration. Both initial and total Rubisco activity in Al-treated leaves decreased to a lesser extent than CO2 assimilation. Al decreased maximum quantum yield of primary photochemistry and total performance index, but increased minimum fluorescence, K-band, relative variable fluorescence at J- and I-steps. B could alleviate Al-induced increase or decrease for all these parameters. Generally speaking, the order of B effectiveness was 25 μM > 10 μM ≥ 50 μM (excess B > 2.5 μM. Conclusion We propose that Al-induced photosynthesis inhibition was mainly caused by impaired photosynthetic electron transport chain, which may be associated with growth inhibition. B

  2. Properties of ribulose diphosphate carboxylase immobilized on porous glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, J.; Hanson, C. L.; Lyding, J. M.; Reilly, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from spinach has been bound to arylamine porous glass with a diazo linkage and to alklamine porous glass with glutaraldehyde. Stability at elevated temperatures and responses to changes of pH and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate, Mg(2+), and dithiothreitol concentrations were not significantly different from the soluble enzyme, though stability at 4 C was somewhat improved.

  3. Quantification of growth-defense trade-offs in a common currency: nitrogen required for phenolamide biosynthesis is not derived from ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann-Zeunert, Lynn; Stanton, Mariana A; Wielsch, Nathalie; Bartram, Stefan; Hummert, Christian; Svatoš, Aleš; Baldwin, Ian T; Groten, Karin

    2013-08-01

    Induced defenses are thought to be economical: growth and fitness-limiting resources are only invested into defenses when needed. To date, this putative growth-defense trade-off has not been quantified in a common currency at the level of individual compounds. Here, a quantification method for ¹⁵N-labeled proteins enabled a direct comparison of nitrogen (N) allocation to proteins, specifically, ribulose-1,5-bisposphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), as proxy for growth, with that to small N-containing defense metabolites (nicotine and phenolamides), as proxies for defense after herbivory. After repeated simulated herbivory, total N decreased in the shoots of wild-type (WT) Nicotiana attenuata plants, but not in two transgenic lines impaired in jasmonate defense signaling (irLOX3) and phenolamide biosynthesis (irMYB8). N was reallocated among different compounds within elicited rosette leaves: in the WT, a strong decrease in total soluble protein (TSP) and RuBisCO was accompanied by an increase in defense metabolites, irLOX3 showed a similar, albeit attenuated, pattern, whereas irMYB8 rosette leaves were the least responsive to elicitation, with overall higher levels of RuBisCO. Induced defenses were higher in the older compared with the younger rosette leaves, supporting the hypothesis that tissue developmental stage influences defense investments. We propose that MYB8, probably by regulating the production of phenolamides, indirectly mediates protein pool sizes after herbivory. Although the decrease in absolute N invested in TSP and RuBisCO elicited by simulated herbivory was much larger than the N-requirements of nicotine and phenolamide biosynthesis, ¹⁵N flux studies revealed that N for phenolamide synthesis originates from recently assimilated N, rather than from RuBisCO turnover. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Isolation, identification, and synthesis of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate, a diurnal regulator of ribulase-bisphosphate carboxylase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Lorimer, G.H.; Pierce, J.; Seemann, J.R.; Meek, J.; Freas, S.

    1987-01-01

    The diurnal change in activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (Rbu-1,5-P 2 ) carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing); EC 4.1.1.39] of leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris is regulated (in part) by mechanisms that control the level of an endogenous inhibitor that binds tightly to the activated (carbamoylated) form of Rbu-1,5-P 2 carboxylase. This inhibitor was extracted from leaves and copurified with the Rbu-1,5-P 2 carboxylase of the leaves. Further purification by ion-exchange chromatography, adsorption to purified Rbu-1,5-P 2 carboxylase, barium precipitation, and HPLC separation yielded a phosphorylated compound that was a strong inhibitor of Rbu-1,5-P 2 carboxylase. The compound was analyzed by GC/MS, 13 C NMR, and 1 H NMR and shown to be 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate [(2-C-phosphohydroxymethyl)-D-ribonic acid]. The structure of the isolated compound differs from the Rbu-1,5-P 2 carboxylase transition-state analogue 2-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate only by the lack of the C-5 phosphate group. This difference results in a higher binding constant for the monophosphate compared with the bisphosphate. The less tightly bound compound acts in a light-dependent, reversible regulation of Rbu-1,5-P 2 carboxylase activity in vivo

  5. Photosynthesis and Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Concentrations in Intact Leaves of Xanthium strumarium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, K A; Jensen, R G; O'leary, J W; Berry, J A

    1984-12-01

    The interacting effects of the rate of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration and the rate of RuBP utilization as influenced by the amount and activation of RuBP carboxylase on photosynthesis and RuBP concentrations were resolved in experiments which examined the kinetics of the response of photosynthesis and RuBP concentrations after step changes from a rate-saturating to a rate-limiting light intensity in Xanthium strumarium. Because RuBP carboxylase requires several minutes to deactivate in vivo, it was possible to observe the effect of reducing the rate of RuBP regeneration on the RuBP concentration at constant enzyme activation state by sampling very soon after reducing the light intensity. Samples taken over longer time periods showed the effect of changes in enzyme activation at constant RuBP regeneration rate on RuBP concentration and photosynthetic rate. Within 15 s of lowering the light intensity from 1500 to 600 microEinsteins per square meter per second the RuBP concentration in the leaves dropped below the enzyme active site concentration, indicating that RuBP regeneration rate was limiting for photosynthesis. After longer intervals of time, the RuBP concentration in the leaf increased as the RuBP carboxylase assumed a new steady state activation level. No change in the rate of photosynthesis was observed during the interval that RuBP concentration increased. It is concluded that the rate of photosynthesis at the lower light intensity was limited by the rate of RuBP regeneration and that parallel changes in the activation of RuBP carboxylase occurred such that concentrations of RuBP at steady state were not altered by changes in light intensity.

  6. Photosynthesis and Ribulose 1,5-Bisphosphate Concentrations in Intact Leaves of Xanthium strumarium L. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Keith A.; Jensen, Richard G.; O'Leary, James W.; Berry, Joseph A.

    1984-01-01

    The interacting effects of the rate of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration and the rate of RuBP utilization as influenced by the amount and activation of RuBP carboxylase on photosynthesis and RuBP concentrations were resolved in experiments which examined the kinetics of the response of photosynthesis and RuBP concentrations after step changes from a rate-saturating to a rate-limiting light intensity in Xanthium strumarium. Because RuBP carboxylase requires several minutes to deactivate in vivo, it was possible to observe the effect of reducing the rate of RuBP regeneration on the RuBP concentration at constant enzyme activation state by sampling very soon after reducing the light intensity. Samples taken over longer time periods showed the effect of changes in enzyme activation at constant RuBP regeneration rate on RuBP concentration and photosynthetic rate. Within 15 s of lowering the light intensity from 1500 to 600 microEinsteins per square meter per second the RuBP concentration in the leaves dropped below the enzyme active site concentration, indicating that RuBP regeneration rate was limiting for photosynthesis. After longer intervals of time, the RuBP concentration in the leaf increased as the RuBP carboxylase assumed a new steady state activation level. No change in the rate of photosynthesis was observed during the interval that RuBP concentration increased. It is concluded that the rate of photosynthesis at the lower light intensity was limited by the rate of RuBP regeneration and that parallel changes in the activation of RuBP carboxylase occurred such that concentrations of RuBP at steady state were not altered by changes in light intensity. PMID:16663982

  7. Phytochrome control of gene expression in radish seedlings. 111. Evidence for a rapid control of the ribulose 1. 5 biphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene expression by red light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourcroy, P

    1986-01-01

    The effect of red and far-red light on the level of the mRNA encoding the small subunit (SSU) of ribulose, 1.5 bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO; EC 4.1.1.39) from radish cotyledons was investigated. Northern blot analysis of RNA with a cDNA probe showed that both long (12-36h) far-red irradiation and short (1-5 min) red irradiation brings about an increase in SSU mRNA concentraton which was prevented by a subsequent far-red light exposure. Far-red light was effective in reversing the red light effect provided that it was given soon after (<10 min) the red light pulse. The red light mediated increase in SSU mRNA level did not occur in presence of ..cap alpha..-amanitin. Our results suggest that phytochrome control of SSU gene expression is exerted at the transcriptional level. 34 refs.

  8. Effect of temperature and pH on the actiity of ribulose 1,5-diphosphate carboxylase from the thermophilic hydrogen bacterium Pseudomonas thermophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanova, A K; Emnova, E E; Zykalova, K A

    1980-01-01

    The activity of ribulose 1,5-diphosphate (RDP) carboxylase was found in the soluble fraction of the cytoplasm from sonicated Pseudomonas thermophila K-2 cells. The enzyme is relatively thermolabile and completey loses its activity at 80/sup 0/C. The activity of RDP carboxylase at 60/sup 0/C increases by 40% during the first 10 min of heating in the presence of Mg/sup 2 +/ ions, bicarbonate and dithiothreitol, and again decreases if the enzyme is heated over 20 min. The optimum temperature of the enzyme is 50 to 55/sup 0/C. The specific activity of the enzyme in fresh preparations under these conditions reaches 0.22 unit per 1 mg of protein in the extract. The calculated value of the activation energy for RDP carboxylase is 6.4 keal.mole/sup -1/, but 11.6 kcal.mole/sup -1/ in frozen preparations. The optimal pH is 7.0 to 7.3 depending on the buffer. The temperature optimum for the enzyme action does not depend on pH within the range of 7.3 to 8.8. Therefore, RDP carboxylase of Ps, thermophila K-2 differs from RDP carboxylases of mesophilic cultures studied earlier by a higher susceptibility to a decrease in temeprature (the enzyme activity is negligible at 30/sup 0/C), by a lower value of the activation energy at suboptimal temperatures, and by a lower pH optimum of the enzyme action.

  9. Effect of Nd3+ ion on carboxylation activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chao; Hong Fashui; Wu Kang; Ma, Hong-bing; Zhang Xueguang; Hong Chengjiao; Wu Cheng; Gao Fengqing; Yang Fan; Zheng Lei; Wang Xuefeng; Liu Tao; Xie Yaning; Xu Jianhua; Li Zhongrui

    2006-01-01

    Neodymium (Nd), as a member of rare earth elements, proved to enhance the photosynthesis rate and organic substance accumulation of spinach through the increase in carboxylation activity of Rubisco. Although the oxygenase activity of spinach Rubisco was slightly changed with the Nd 3+ treatment, the specific factor of Rubisco was greatly increased. It was partially due to the promotion of Rubisco activase (R-A) activity but mainly to the formation of Rubisco-Rubisco activase super-complex, a heavier molecular mass protein (about 1200 kD) comprising both Rubisco and Rubisco activase. This super-complex was found during the extraction procedure of Rubisco by the gel electrophoresis and Western-blot studies. The formation of Rubisco-R-A super-complex suggested that the secondary structure of the protein purified from the Nd 3+ -treated spinach was different from that of the control. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of the 'Rubisco' purified from the Nd 3+ -treated spinach revealed that Nd was bound with four oxygen atoms and two sulfur atoms of amino acid residues at the Nd-O and Nd-S bond lengths of 2.46 and 2.89 A, respectively

  10. Study of the properties of Ribulose 1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from maize (Zea mays) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) by incorporation of CO2 marking 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.D.; Saez, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    After a bibliografic review of the properties of RuBP-carboxylase/oxygenase, a methodology is described which allows the treatment of a large number of samples for the assay of the enzyme activity. 14 C O 3 HNa is used as a marker for the counting of the incorporated radioactivity as acid insoluble material. 14''CC 2 from the labeled sodium bicarbonate is the species used by the enzyme both as an activator as well as a substrate. The following experiments are described and its results given: Determination of the optimal conditions for the activation of the enzyme; study of the kinetics of the catalytic action; effect of the Mg 2 concentration and determination of the Km ( s) from CO 2 and ribulose 1,5-biphosphate; also determination of the optimum pH at different concentrations of CO 2 2 and Mg 2 . (Author) 64 refs

  11. UniProt search blastx result: AK288054 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288054 J075152E14 P16881|RBS_EUGGR Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains..., chloroplast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P3; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P4; Ribulose bisphosphate c...arboxylase small chain P5; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P6; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P7; Ribulo

  12. UniProt search blastx result: AK287599 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287599 J065050G24 P16881|RBS_EUGGR Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains..., chloroplast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P3; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P4; Ribulose bisphosphate c...arboxylase small chain P5; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P6; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P7; Ribulo

  13. UniProt search blastx result: AK288517 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288517 J090043B03 P16881|RBS_EUGGR Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains..., chloroplast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P3; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P4; Ribulose bisphosphate c...arboxylase small chain P5; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P6; Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P7; Ribulo

  14. Amino Acids Sequence Based in Silico Analysis of RuBisCO (Ribulose-1,5 Bisphosphate Carboxylase Oxygenase Proteins in Some Carthamus L. ssp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre SEVİNDİK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available RuBisCO is an important enzyme for plants to photosynthesize and balance carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study aimed to perform sequence, physicochemical, phylogenetic and 3D (three-dimensional comparative analyses of RuBisCO proteins in the Carthamus ssp. using various bioinformatics tools. The sequence lengths of the RuBisCO proteins were between 166 and 477 amino acids, with an average length of 411.8 amino acids. Their molecular weights (Mw ranged from 18711.47 to 52843.09 Da; the most acidic and basic protein sequences were detected in C. tinctorius (pI = 5.99 and in C. tenuis (pI = 6.92, respectively. The extinction coefficients of RuBisCO proteins at 280 nm ranged from 17,670 to 69,830 M-1 cm-1, the instability index (II values for RuBisCO proteins ranged from 33.31 to 39.39, while the GRAVY values of RuBisCO proteins ranged from -0.313 to -0.250. The most abundant amino acid in the RuBisCO protein was Gly (9.7%, while the least amino acid ratio was Trp (1.6 %. The putative phosphorylation sites of RuBisCO proteins were determined by NetPhos 2.0. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RuBisCO proteins formed two main clades. A RAMPAGE analysis revealed that 96.3%-97.6% of residues were located in the favoured region of RuBisCO proteins. To predict the three dimensional (3D structure of the RuBisCO proteins PyMOL was used. The results of the current study provide insights into fundamental characteristic of RuBisCO proteins in Carthamus ssp.

  15. Long-term effect of elevated CO2 on spatial differentiation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity in Norway spruce canopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrstka, M.; Urban, Otmar; Marek, Michal V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2005), s. 211-216 ISSN 0300-3604 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A141; GA MŽP(CZ) SM/640/18/03; GA MŠk(CZ) OC E21.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : down-regulation * photosynthesis * sun and shade needles * vertical profile Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.810, year: 2005

  16. SwissProt search result: AK068266 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068266 J013149A10 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chloro...plast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 1e-32 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK068555 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068555 J013156H12 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chloro...plast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 6e-34 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK070257 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070257 J023042N11 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chloro...plast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 5e-33 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK061611 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061611 001-032-F07 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chlor...oplast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 4e-33 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK099574 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099574 J013036G21 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chloro...plast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 8e-34 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK121444 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121444 J023141B14 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chloro...plast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 6e-33 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK119219 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119219 001-046-F11 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chlor...oplast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 4e-33 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK059909 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059909 006-209-C06 (P16881) Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chains, chlor...oplast precursor (EC 4.1.1.39) (RuBisCO small subunits) [Contains: Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P1; Ribulos...e bisphosphate carboxylase small chain P2; Ribulose bispho RBS_EUGGR 2e-33 ...

  4. Solar ultraviolet radiation affects the activity of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and the composition of photosynthetic and xanthophyll cycle pigments in the intertidal green alga Ulva lactuca L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischof, K; Krabs, G; Wiencke, C; Hanelt, D

    The effect of solar UV radiation on the physiology of the intertidal green macroalga Ulva lactuca L. was investigated. A natural Ulm community at the shore of Helgoland was covered with screening foils, excluding UV-B or UV-B + UV-A from the solar spectrum. In the sampled material, changes in the

  5. Characterization of Chloroplastic Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolases as Lysine-methylated Proteins in Plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mininno, Morgane; Brugière, Sabine; Pautre, Virginie; Gilgen, Annabelle; Ma, Sheng; Ferro, Myriam; Tardif, Marianne; Alban, Claude; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    In pea (Pisum sativum), the protein-lysine methyltransferase (PsLSMT) catalyzes the trimethylation of Lys-14 in the large subunit (LS) of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the enzyme catalyzing the CO2 fixation step during photosynthesis. Homologs of PsLSMT, herein referred to as LSMT-like enzymes, are found in all plant genomes, but methylation of LS Rubisco is not universal in the plant kingdom, suggesting a species-specific protein substrate specificity of the methyltransferase. In this study, we report the biochemical characterization of the LSMT-like enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtLSMT-L), with a focus on its substrate specificity. We show that, in Arabidopsis, LS Rubisco is not naturally methylated and that the physiological substrates of AtLSMT-L are chloroplastic fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase isoforms. These enzymes, which are involved in the assimilation of CO2 through the Calvin cycle and in chloroplastic glycolysis, are trimethylated at a conserved lysyl residue located close to the C terminus. Both AtLSMT-L and PsLSMT are able to methylate aldolases with similar kinetic parameters and product specificity. Thus, the divergent substrate specificity of LSMT-like enzymes from pea and Arabidopsis concerns only Rubisco. AtLSMT-L is able to interact with unmethylated Rubisco, but the complex is catalytically unproductive. Trimethylation does not modify the kinetic properties and tetrameric organization of aldolases in vitro. The identification of aldolases as methyl proteins in Arabidopsis and other species like pea suggests a role of protein lysine methylation in carbon metabolism in chloroplasts. PMID:22547063

  6. Study of the properties of Ribulose 1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from maize (Zea mays) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) by incorporation of 14{sub C}O2; Estudio de las propiedades de la Ribulosa-1,5-Difosfato Carboxilasa/Oxigenasa de maiz (Zea Mais) y de trigo (Triticum Aestivum), por incorporacion de CO{sub 2} marcado con 14{sub C}O2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M. D.; Saez, R. M.

    1982-07-01

    After a bibliographic review of the properties of RuBP-carboxylase/oxygenase, a methodology is described which allows the treatment of a large number of samples for the assay of the enzyme activity. 14{sup C}O{sub 3}HNa is used as a marker for the counting of the incorporated radioactivity as acid insoluble material. 14''CC{sub 2} from the labeled sodium bicarbonate is the species used by the enzyme both as an activator as well as a substrate. The following experiments are described and its results given: Determination of the optimal conditions for the activation of the enzyme; study of the kinetics of the catalytic action; effect of the Mg{sup 2} concentration and determination of the Km{sub (s)} from CO{sub 2} and ribulose 1,5-biphosphate; also determination of the optimum pH at different concentrations of CO{sub 2}2 and Mg{sup 2}. (Author) 64 refs.

  7. Study of the properties of Ribulose 1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from maize (Zea mays) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) by incorporation of 14{sub C}O2; Estudio de las propiedades de la Ribulosa-1,5-Difosfato Carboxilasa/Oxigenasa de maiz (Zea Mais) y de trigo (Triticum Aestivum), por incorporacion de CO{sub 2} marcado con 14{sub C}O2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M D; Saez, R M

    1982-07-01

    After a bibliographic review of the properties of RuBP-carboxylase/oxygenase, a methodology is described which allows the treatment of a large number of samples for the assay of the enzyme activity. 14{sup C}O{sub 3}HNa is used as a marker for the counting of the incorporated radioactivity as acid insoluble material. 14''CC{sub 2} from the labeled sodium bicarbonate is the species used by the enzyme both as an activator as well as a substrate. The following experiments are described and its results given: Determination of the optimal conditions for the activation of the enzyme; study of the kinetics of the catalytic action; effect of the Mg{sup 2} concentration and determination of the Km{sub (s)} from CO{sub 2} and ribulose 1,5-biphosphate; also determination of the optimum pH at different concentrations of CO{sub 2}2 and Mg{sup 2}. (Author) 64 refs.

  8. Effects of an inhibitor of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase on photosynthesis of the terrestrial forms of amphibious Eleocharis species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Osamu; Ishimaru, Ken

    2002-01-01

    The leafless amphibious sedge Eleocharis vivipara develops culms with C(4) traits and Kranz anatomy under terrestrial conditions, but develops culms with C(3) traits and non-Kranz anatomy under submerged conditions. The culms of the terrestrial form have high C(4) enzyme activities, while those of the submerged form have decreased C(4) enzyme activities. The culms accumulate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in the mesophyll cells (MC) and the bundle sheath cells. The Rubisco in the MC may be responsible for the operation of the C(3) pathway in the submerged form. To verify the presence of the C(3) cycle in the MC, we examined the effects of 3,3-dichloro-2-(dihydroxyphosphinoylmethyl) -propenoate (DCDP), an inhibitor of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), on photosynthesis in culms of the terrestrial forms of E. vivipara and related amphibious species, E. baldwinii and E. retroflexa ssp. chaetaria. When 1 mM DCDP was fed via the transpiration stream to excised leaves, photosynthesis was inhibited completely in Fimbristylis dichotoma (C(4) control), but by only 20% in potato (C(3) control). In the terrestrial Eleocharis plants, the degree of inhibition of photosynthesis by DCDP was intermediate between those of the C(4) and C(3) plants, at 58-81%. These results suggest that photosynthesis under DCDP treatment in the terrestrial Eleocharis plants is due mainly to fixation of atmospheric CO(2) by Rubisco and probably the C(3) cycle in the MC. These features are reminiscent of those in C(4)-like plants. Differential effects of DCDP on photosynthesis of the 3 Eleocharis species are discussed in relation to differences in the degree of Rubisco accumulation and C(3) activity in the MC.

  9. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mwirichia, Romano; Alam, Intikhab; Rashid, Mamoon; Vinu, Manikandan; Ba Alawi, Wail; Anthony Kamau, Allan; Ngugi, David; Gö ker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood

  10. Difference in photosynthetic performance among three peach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Difference in photosynthesis rate (Pn) and stoma morphology among ... At 80% PPFD, the variation pattern of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase ..... frequency and size during elongation of tsuga heterophylla needles.

  11. Identification of genes induced by salt stress from Medicago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among these protein, citrate synthase, ribulose- 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, chloroplast protein, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and chloroplast outer envelope protein are related to photosynthesis; DNA binding/transcription factor, putative AP2/EREBP transcription factor, Cab9 gene, photosystem II polypeptide and ...

  12. Studies of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    Carboxylase was studied in detergent solubilized rat liver microsomes, using the peptide substrate Phe-Leu-[γ- 3 H]-Glu-Glu-Leu. Cleavage of the γ-C-H bond in Glu was measured as the release of 3 H from this peptide to water, carboxylation was measured as the incorporation of H 14 CO 3 -into the peptide, and KO formation was measured by an HPLC assay. All three products could be measured simultaneously, and this system was used to examine the effects of cyanide, manganese, tetrachloropyridinol, and Boc-SerP-SerP-Leu-OMe on the separate steps of the carboxylase reaction. Vitamin K-epoxide formation was studied separately from the other reactions, and it was found that in the absence of a Glu-containing substrate, carboxylase catalyzed the uncoupled formation of KO from KH 2 and O 2 . The stoichiometry of product formation (GLa, KO, and γ-protons) was measured, and the results obtained were all in agreement with the values predicted from the proposed mechanism. When all of the substrates were saturating, the stoichiometry of γ-C-H bond cleavage, carboxylation, and KO formation was 1:1:1

  13. Structure of fructose bisphosphate aldolase from Bartonella henselae bound to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardberg, Anna; Abendroth, Jan; Bhandari, Janhavi; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart

    2011-01-01

    While other aldolases crystallize readily in the apo form, diffraction-quality crystals of B. henselae aldolase could only be obtained in the presence of the native substrate. The quaternary structure is tetrameric, as is typical of aldolases. Fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA) enzymes have been found in a broad range of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. FBPA catalyses the cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate into glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. The SSGCID has reported several FBPA structures from pathogenic sources, including the bacterium Brucella melitensis and the protozoan Babesia bovis. Bioinformatic analysis of the Bartonella henselae genome revealed an FBPA homolog. The B. henselae FBPA enzyme was recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzyme crystallized in the apo form but failed to diffract; however, well diffracting crystals could be obtained by cocrystallization in the presence of the native substrate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. A data set to 2.35 Å resolution was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 72.39, b = 127.71, c = 157.63 Å. The structure was refined to a final free R factor of 22.2%. The structure shares the typical barrel tertiary structure and tetrameric quaternary structure reported for previous FBPA structures and exhibits the same Schiff base in the active site

  14. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylases from non-hepatic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, C.; Hendrix, H.; Daemen, M.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase was investigated in the microsomal fraction of 20 different types of bovine tissue. Except for muscle, veins, lymphocytes and bone membrane, carboxylase was found in all these preparations, albeit in varying amounts. No differences could be detected

  15. Regulation of Photosystem II Electron transport by Bicarbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, van J.J.S.

    2012-01-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is fixed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and further reduced to carbohydrates. However, CO2, in the form of carbonate or bicarbonate, is also directly involved in the “light reactions” through structural and regulatory roles

  16. Photosynthetic behaviour of Arabidopsis thaliana (Pa-1 accession ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth reduction observed in many plants caused by salinity is often associated with a decrease in their photosynthetic capacity. This effect could be associated with the partial stomatal closure and/or the non-stomatal limitation which involves the decrease in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase ...

  17. Recycling carbon dioxide during xylose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we introduced the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) into an engineered S. cerevisiae (SR8) harboring the XR/XDH pathway and up-regulated PPP 10, to enable CO2 recycling through a synthetic rPPP during xylose fermentation (Fig. 1). ...

  18. Studies on Dasyaceae. 3. Towards a phylogeny of the Dasyaceae (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta), based on comparative rbcL gene sequences and morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Y.S D M; van der Wurff, A.W G; Stam, W.T.; Olsen, J.L.

    Phylogenetic analyses of the Dasyaceae based on sequence analysis of the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) and 42 morphological characters are presented. Comparative sequence analysis confirms the general view of the Ceramiaceae as a primitive, paraphyletic

  19. Differential effects of ocean acidification on carbon acquisition in two bloom-forming dinoflagellate species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eberlein, T.; Van de Waal, D.B.; Rost, B.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates represent a cosmopolitan group of phytoplankton with the ability to form harmful algal blooms. Featuring a Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) with very low CO2-affinities, photosynthesis of this group may be particularly prone to carbon limitation and thus

  20. Regulation of methanol oxidation and carbon dioxide fixation in Xanthobacter strain 25a grown in continuous culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, L.M.; Meijer, Wilhelmus; Dijkhuizen, L.

    The regulation of C1-metabolism in Xanthobacter strain 25a was studied during growth of the organism on acetate, formate and methanol in chemostat cultures. No activity of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH), formate dehydrogenase (FDS) or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O) could be

  1. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XV. Ribulose and Sedoheptulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Bassham, J. A.; Calvin, M.; Hall, A. G.; Hirsch, H.; Kawaguchi, S.; Lynch, V.; Tolbert, N. E.

    1952-01-01

    The intermediates of carbon dioxide reduction by plants include phosphorylated derivatives of hydroxy acids and sugars. Their identification became possible when the use of labeled carbon dioxide permitted discrimination between the earliest products and the many other components of photosynthetic tissues. A number of compounds were identified by virtue of the chemical and physical properties of the radioactive compounds in tracer amounts and by direct comparison of these properties with those of suspected known metabolic intermediates. It became apparent that several labeled compounds found in short exposures to radioactive carbon dioxide were not substances previously identified as metabolic intermediates. Two phosphate esters in particular were observed in the products of the first few seconds of steady-state photosynthesis by all the photosynthetic microorganisms and higher plants examined in this laboratory. These esters have been isolated by paper chromatography in tracer quantities and enzymatically hydrolyzed to give two sugars, ribulose and sedoheptulose. This paper contains a description of the chemical identification of these sugars and some observations and suggestions regarding the function of their esters. The general importance of these compounds in photosynthesis was summarized before their identification. The products of photosynthesis with C{sup 14}O{sub 2} by each plant included phosphate esters of the same two then unknown compounds in addition to those of the expected glucose, fructose, dihydroxyacetone and glyceric acid. As the time of steady-state photosynthesis in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} decreased, the fractions of total fixed radiocarbon in the esters of the two unidentified compounds increased.

  2. Exploring substrate binding and discrimination in fructose1, 6-bisphosphate and tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgiby, S M; Thomson, G J; Qamar, S; Berry, A

    2000-03-01

    Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase catalyses the reversible condensation of glycerone-P and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. A recent structure of the Escherichia coli Class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase [Hall, D.R., Leonard, G.A., Reed, C.D., Watt, C.I., Berry, A. & Hunter, W.N. (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 287, 383-394] in the presence of the transition state analogue phosphoglycolohydroxamate delineated the roles of individual amino acids in binding glycerone-P and in the initial proton abstraction steps of the mechanism. The X-ray structure has now been used, together with sequence alignments, site-directed mutagenesis and steady-state enzyme kinetics to extend these studies to map important residues in the binding of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. From these studies three residues (Asn35, Ser61 and Lys325) have been identified as important in catalysis. We show that mutation of Ser61 to alanine increases the Km value for fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate 16-fold and product inhibition studies indicate that this effect is manifested most strongly in the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate binding pocket of the active site, demonstrating that Ser61 is involved in binding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. In contrast a S61T mutant had no effect on catalysis emphasizing the importance of an hydroxyl group for this role. Mutation of Asn35 (N35A) resulted in an enzyme with only 1.5% of the activity of the wild-type enzyme and different partial reactions indicate that this residue effects the binding of both triose substrates. Finally, mutation of Lys325 has a greater effect on catalysis than on binding, however, given the magnitude of the effects it is likely that it plays an indirect role in maintaining other critical residues in a catalytically competent conformation. Interestingly, despite its proximity to the active site and high sequence conservation, replacement of a fourth residue, Gln59 (Q59A) had no significant effect on the function of the enzyme. In a

  3. Interaction Between the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Domain and the Biotin Carboxylase Domain in Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Menefee, Ann L.; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Attwood, Paul V.; Wallace, John C.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Maurice, Martin St.

    2011-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To effect catalysis, the tethered biotin of PC must gain access to active sites in both the biotin carboxylase domain and the carboxyl transferase domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mutation of threonine 882 to alanine in PC from Rhizobium etli renders the carboxyl transferase domain inactive and favors the positioning of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain. We report the 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Rhizobium etli PC T882A mutant which reveals the first high-resolution description of the domain interaction between the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain and the biotin carboxylase domain. The overall quaternary arrangement of Rhizobium etli PC remains highly asymmetrical and is independent of the presence of allosteric activator. While biotin is observed in the biotin carboxylase domain, its access to the active site is precluded by the interaction between Arg353 and Glu248, revealing a mechanism for regulating carboxybiotin access to the BC domain active site. The binding location for the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain demonstrates that tethered biotin cannot bind in the biotin carboxylase domain active site in the same orientation as free biotin, helping to explain the difference in catalysis observed between tethered biotin and free biotin substrates in biotin carboxylase enzymes. Electron density located in the biotin carboxylase domain active site is assigned to phosphonoacetate, offering a probable location for the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate formed during biotin carboxylation. The insights gained from the T882A Rhizobium etli PC crystal structure provide a new series of catalytic snapshots in PC and offer a revised perspective on catalysis in the biotin-dependent enzyme family. PMID:21958016

  4. Structure of Toxoplasma gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Lauren E.; Bosch, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The structure of T. gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, a glycolytic enzyme and structural component of the invasion machinery, was determined to a resolution of 2.0 Å. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii must invade host cells to continue its lifecycle. It invades different cell types using an actomyosin motor that is connected to extracellular adhesins via the bridging protein fructose-1,6-@@bisphosphate aldolase. During invasion, aldolase serves in the role of a structural bridging protein, as opposed to its normal enzymatic role in the glycolysis pathway. Crystal structures of the homologous Plasmodium falciparum fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been described previously. Here, T. gondii fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase has been crystallized in space group P22 1 2 1 , with the biologically relevant tetramer in the asymmetric unit, and the structure has been determined via molecular replacement to a resolution of 2.0 Å. An analysis of the quality of the model and of the differences between the four chains in the asymmetric unit and a comparison between the T. gondii and P. falciparum aldolase structures is presented

  5. Construction of genetically engineered Candida tropicalis for conversion of l-arabinose to l-ribulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, In-Seok; Shim, Woo-Yong; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2018-05-20

    For the biological production of l-ribulose, conversion by enzymes or resting cells has been investigated. However, expensive or concentrated substrates, an additional purification step to remove borate and the requirement for cell cultivation and harvest steps before utilization of resting cells make the production process complex and unfavorable. Microbial fermentation may help overcome these limitations. In this study, we constructed a genetically engineered Candida tropicalis strain to produce l-ribulose by fermentation with a glucose/l-arabinose mixture. For the uptake of l-arabinose as a substrate and conversion of l-arabinose to l-ribulose, two heterologous genes coding for l-arabinose transporter and l-arabinose isomerase, were constitutively expressed in C. tropicalis under the GAPDH promoter. The Arabidopsis thaliana-originated l-arabinose transporter gene (STP2)-expressing strain exhibited a high l-arabinose uptake rate of 0.103 g/g cell/h and the expression of l-arabinose isomerase from Lactobacillus sakei 23 K showed 30% of conversion (9 g/L) from 30 g/L of l-arabinose. This genetically engineered strain can be used for l-ribulose production by fermentation using mixed sugars of glucose and l-arabinose. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pyruvate carboxylase is expressed in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minet, Ariane D; Gaster, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyses the carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate thereby allowing supplementation of citric acid cycle intermediates. The presence of PC in skeletal muscle is controversial. We report here, that PC protein is easily detectable...

  7. LuxS-independent formation of AI-2 from ribulose-5-phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardie Kim R

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many bacteria, the signal molecule AI-2 is generated from its precursor S-ribosyl-L-homocysteine in a reaction catalysed by the enzyme LuxS. However, generation of AI-2-like activity has also been reported for organisms lacking the luxS gene and the existence of alternative pathways for AI-2 formation in Escherichia coli has recently been predicted by stochastic modelling. Here, we investigate the possibility that spontaneous conversion of ribulose-5-phosphate could be responsible for AI-2 generation in the absence of luxS. Results Buffered solutions of ribulose-5-phosphate, but not ribose-5-phosphate, were found to contain high levels of AI-2 activity following incubation at concentrations similar to those reported in vivo. To test whether this process contributes to AI-2 formation by bacterial cells in vivo, an improved Vibrio harveyi bioassay was used. In agreement with previous studies, culture supernatants of E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus luxS mutants were found not to contain detectable levels of AI-2 activity. However, low activities were detected in an E. coli pgi-eda-edd-luxS mutant, a strain which degrades glucose entirely via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, with ribulose-5-phosphate as an obligatory intermediate. Conclusion Our results suggest that LuxS-independent formation of AI-2, via spontaneous conversion of ribulose-5-phosphate, may indeed occur in vivo. It does not contribute to AI-2 formation in wildtype E. coli and S. aureus under the conditions tested, but may be responsible for the AI-2-like activities reported for other organisms lacking the luxS gene.

  8. Measurement of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate in plant leaves by isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.D.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The level of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) in leaves of 12 species was determined by an isotope dilution assay. 14 C-labeled standard was synthesized from [2- 14 C]carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate using acid phosphatase, and was added at the initial point of leaf extraction. Leaf CA1P was purified and its specific activity determined. CA1P was found in dark-treated leaves of all species examined, including spinach (Spinacea oleracea), wheat (Triticum aestivum), Arabidopsis thaliana, and maize (Zea mays). The highest amounts were found in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and petunia (Petunia hybrida), which had 1.5 to 1.8 moles CA1P per mole ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase catalytic sites. Most species had intermediate amounts of CA1P (0.2 to 0.8 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). Such intermediate to high levels of CA1P support the hypothesis that CA1P functions in many species as a light-dependent regulator of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and whole leaf photosynthetic CO 2 assimilation. However, CA1P levels in spinach, wheat, and A. thaliana were particularly low (less than 0.09 mole CA1P per mole catalytic sites). In such species, CA1P does not likely have a significant role in regulating ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but could have a different physiological role

  9. Structure of fructose bisphosphate aldolase from Encephalitozoon cuniculi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardberg, Anna; Sankaran, Banumathi; Davies, Doug; Bhandari, Janhavi; Staker, Bart; Stewart, Lance

    2011-01-01

    The eukaryotic parasite E. cuniculi expresses a fructose bisphosphate aldolase that crystallizes readily in the presence of the partial substrate analog phosphate. This aldolase–phosphate structure and that of the sugar-bound Schiff base are reported. E. cuniculi aldolase displays a dimeric structure rather than the expected tetrameric quaternary structure. Fructose bisphosphate aldolose (FBPA) enzymes have been found in a broad range of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. FBPA catalyses the cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate into glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. The SSGCID has reported several FBPA structures from pathogenic sources. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of the eukaryotic microsporidian parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi revealed an FBPA homolog. The structures of this enzyme in the presence of the native substrate FBP and also with the partial substrate analog phosphate are reported. The purified enzyme crystallized in 90 mM Bis-Tris propane pH 6.5, 18% PEG 3350, 18 mM NaKHPO 4 , 10 mM urea for the phosphate-bound form and 100 mM Bis-Tris propane pH 6.5, 20% PEG 3350, 20 mM fructose 1,6-bisphosphate for the FBP-bound form. In both cases protein was present at 25 mg ml −1 and the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method was used. For the FBP-bound form, a data set to 2.37 Å resolution was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 121.46, b = 135.82, c = 61.54 Å. The structure was refined to a final free R factor of 20.8%. For the phosphate-bound form, a data set was collected to 2.00 Å resolution. The space group was also C222 1 and the unit-cell parameters were a = 121.96, b = 137.61, c = 62.23 Å. The structure shares the typical barrel tertiary structure reported for previous FBPA structures and exhibits the same Schiff base in the active site. The quaternary structure is dimeric. This work provides a direct experimental

  10. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akana, J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common (β/α) 8 -barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn 2+ which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn 2+ and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn 2+ is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn 2+ ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn 2+ . The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn 2+ that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn 2+ and participate as acid/base catalysts are not conserved. We conclude that only the phosphate

  11. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akana,J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn{sup 2+} which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn{sup 2+} and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn{sup 2+} is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn{sup 2+} ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn{sup 2+} that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn{sup 2+} and participate as acid/base catalysts

  12. rbcL gene sequences provide evidence for the evolutionary lineages of leptosporangiate ferns.

    OpenAIRE

    Hasebe, M; Omori, T; Nakazawa, M; Sano, T; Kato, M; Iwatsuki, K

    1994-01-01

    Pteriodophytes have a longer evolutionary history than any other vascular land plant and, therefore, have endured greater loss of phylogenetically informative information. This factor has resulted in substantial disagreements in evaluating characters and, thus, controversy in establishing a stable classification. To compare competing classifications, we obtained DNA sequences of a chloroplast gene. The sequence of 1206 nt of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbc...

  13. Efficient in vitro import of a cytosolic heat shock protein into pea chloroplasts

    OpenAIRE

    Lubben, Thomas H.; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1986-01-01

    In order to further our understanding of the targeting of nuclear-encoded proteins into intracellular organelles, we have investigated the import of chimeric precursor proteins into pea chloroplasts. Two different chimeric precursor proteins were produced by in vitro expression of chimeric genes. One chimeric precursor contained the transit peptide of the small subunit of soybean ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and the mature peptide of the same protein from pea. The second contained th...

  14. Acclimation of photosynthesis, H2O2 content and antioxidants in maiza(Zea mays) grown at sub-optimal temperatures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingston-Smith, A.H.; Harbinson, J.; Foyer, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    Maize plants were grown at 14, 18 and 20 °C until the fourth leaf had emerged. Leaves from plants grown at 14 and 18 °C had less chlorophyll than those grown at 20 °C. Maximal extractable ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity was decreased at 14 °C compared with 20 °C,

  15. Expression of Pinellia pedatisecta Lectin Gene in Transgenic Wheat Enhances Resistance to Wheat Aphids

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoliang Duan; Qiling Hou; Guoyu Liu; Xiaomeng Pang; Zhenli Niu; Xiao Wang; Yufeng Zhang; Baoyun Li; Rongqi Liang

    2018-01-01

    Wheat aphids are major pests during the seed filling stage of wheat. Plant lectins are toxic to sap-sucking pests such as wheat aphids. In this study, Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (ppa), a gene encoding mannose binding lectin, was cloned, and it shared 92.69% nucleotide similarity and 94% amino acid similarity with Pinellia ternata agglutinin (pta). The ppa gene, driven by the constitutive and phloem-specific ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene (rbcs) promoter in pBAC-rbcs...

  16. Differences in the Sensitivity to UVB Radiation of Two Cultivars of Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Hidema; Hye-Sook, Kang; Tadashi, Kumagai; Institute of Genetic Ecology, Tohoku University; Institute of Genetic Ecology, Tohoku University; Institute of Genetic Ecology, Tohoku University

    1996-01-01

    The effects of UVB radiation on the growth of two cultivars of Japanese lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.), Sasanishiki and Norin 1, were examined in a phytotron. Supplementation of visible radiation with UVB radiation reduced plant length, tiller number, the fresh and dry weights of the aboveground parts of plants, and the amounts of total leaf nitrogen, chlorophyll, soluble protein and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in the eighth leaf, the youngest fully expanded leaf...

  17. The dynamic organization of fungal acetyl-CoA carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunkeler, Moritz; Stuttfeld, Edward; Hagmann, Anna; Imseng, Stefan; Maier, Timm

    2016-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) catalyse the committed step in fatty-acid biosynthesis: the ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA. They are important regulatory hubs for metabolic control and relevant drug targets for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome and cancer. Eukaryotic ACCs are single-chain multienzymes characterized by a large, non-catalytic central domain (CD), whose role in ACC regulation remains poorly characterized. Here we report the crystal structure of the yeast ACC CD, revealing a unique four-domain organization. A regulatory loop, which is phosphorylated at the key functional phosphorylation site of fungal ACC, wedges into a crevice between two domains of CD. Combining the yeast CD structure with intermediate and low-resolution data of larger fragments up to intact ACCs provides a comprehensive characterization of the dynamic fungal ACC architecture. In contrast to related carboxylases, large-scale conformational changes are required for substrate turnover, and are mediated by the CD under phosphorylation control.

  18. A Patient With Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency and Nemaline Rods on Muscle Biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unal, Ozlem; Orhan, Diclehan; Ostergaard, Elsebet

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline rods are the pathologic hallmark of nemaline myopathy, but they have also been described as a secondary phenomenon in a variety of other disorders. Nemaline rods have not been reported in pyruvate carboxylase deficiency before. Here we present a patient with pyruvate carboxylase deficiency...

  19. The moonlighting function of pyruvate carboxylase resides in the non-catalytic end of the TIM barrel.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, D.H.; Venselaar, H.; Vriend, G.; Veenhuis, M.; Klei, I.J. van der

    2010-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase is a highly conserved enzyme that functions in replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle with oxaloacetate. In the yeast Hansenulapolymorpha, the pyruvate carboxylase protein is also required for import and assembly of the peroxisomal enzyme alcohol oxidase. This additional

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate optical uncaging potentiates exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; Müller, Rainer; Tawfik, Bassam

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is essential for exocytosis. Classical ways of manipulating PI(4,5)P2 levels are slower than metabolism, making it difficult to distinguish effects of PI(4,5)P2 from those of its metabolites. We developed a membrane-permeant, photoactivatable PI(4......,5)P2, which is loaded into cells in an inactive form and activated by light, allowing sub-second increases in PI(4,5)P2 levels. By combining this compound with electrophysiological measurements in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells, we show that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging potentiates exocytosis and identify...... synaptotagmin-1 (the Ca(2+) sensor for exocytosis) and Munc13-2 (a vesicle priming protein) as the relevant effector proteins. PI(4,5)P2 activation of exocytosis did not depend on the PI(4,5)P2-binding CAPS-proteins, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 uncaging bypasses CAPS-function. Finally, PI(4,5)P2 uncaging...

  1. Competitive binding assay for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, H.; Uyeda, K.

    1986-01-01

    A new direct assay method for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate has been developed based on competitive binding of labeled and unlabeled fructose 2,6-P 2 to phosphofructokinase. Phosphofructokinase (0.5-1.3 pmol promoter) is incubated with saturating concentrations (5.0-5.5 pmol) of fructose 2,6[2- 32 P]P 2 and samples containing varying concentrations of fructose 2,6-P 2 . The resulting stable binary complex is retained on nitrocellulose filters with a binding efficiency of up to 70%. Standard curves obtained with this assay show strict linearity with varying fructose 2,6-P 2 in the range of 0.5 to 45 pmol, which exceeds the sensitivity of most of the previously described assay methods. Fructose 2,6-P 2 , ATP, and high concentrations of phosphate interfere with this assay. However, the extent of this inhibition is negligible since their tissue contents are one-half to one-tenth that examined. The new assay is simple, direct, rapid, and does not require pretreatment

  2. Anaplerotic roles of pyruvate carboxylase in mammalian tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitrapakdee, S; Vidal-Puig, A; Wallace, J C

    2006-04-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate. PC serves an anaplerotic role for the tricarboxylic acid cycle, when intermediates are removed for different biosynthetic purposes. In liver and kidney, PC provides oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis. In adipocytes PC is involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis and glyceroneogenesis, and is regulated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, suggesting that PC is involved in the metabolic switch controlling fuel partitioning toward lipogenesis. In islets, PC is necessary for glucose-induced insulin secretion by providing oxaloacetate to form malate that participates in the 'pyruvate/malate cycle' to shuttle 3C or 4C between mitochondria and cytoplasm. Hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia impair this cycle and affect glucose-stimulated insulin release. In astrocytes, PC is important for de novo synthesis of glutamate, an important excitatory neurotransmitter supplied to neurons. Transcriptional studies of the PC gene pinpoint some transcription factors that determine tissue-specific expression.

  3. Signification biogéographique des processus d'adaptation photosynthétiques : 1. L'exemple des Kalanchoe malgaches

    OpenAIRE

    Brulfert, J.; Ravelomanana, D.; Gehrig, H.; Kluge, M.

    1996-01-01

    Le Métabolisme Acide des Crassulacées (CAM) est un type de photosynthèse présenté par les plantes qui ont dans les conditions naturelles à faire face à une contrainte hydrique. Il est caractérisé par la capacité de fixer le CO2 externe pendant la nuit (via la phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, PEPC) mais aussi pendant le jour (via la ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygénase, Rubisco). Ces propriétés sont associées à un comportement particulier des stomates qui sont ouverts la nuit (favorisan...

  4. Mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase in fasted and alloxan diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman-Lopez, C.R.; Allred, J.B.

    1986-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured biotinyl proteins will bind [ 14 C]methyl avidin which remains bound through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The method has been used to demonstrate the presence of two high molecular weight subunit forms of acetyl CoA carboxylase in rat liver cytoplasm, both of which are precipitated by antibody to purifed rat liver acetyl CoA carboxylase prepared from sheep serum. Rat liver mitochondria contained five distinct biotinyl protein subunits, the two largest of which have been identified as acetyl CoA carboxylase subunits on the basis of precipitation by anti-acetyl CoA carboxylase antibody. The small quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase associated with rat liver microsomes could be attributed to cytoplasmic contamination. The binding of radioactive avidin is sufficiently tight to use as a measure of the quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase. The quantity and activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme was reduced in fasted and in alloxan diabetic rats compared to that in fed controls but the quantity of the enzyme associated with isolated mitochondria was not reduced. The results indicate that there is a mitochondrial storage form of acetyl CoA carboxylase

  5. Purification and characterization of acetone carboxylase from Xanthobacter strain Py2

    OpenAIRE

    Sluis, Miriam K.; Ensign, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Acetone metabolism in the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter strain Py2 proceeds by a carboxylation reaction forming acetoacetate as the first detectable product. In this study, acetone carboxylase, the enzyme catalyzing this reaction, has been purified to homogeneity and characterized. Acetone carboxylase was comprised of three polypeptides with molecular weights of 85,300, 78,300, and 19,600 arranged in an α2β2γ2 quaternary structure. The carboxylation of acetone was coupled to the hydrolysis o...

  6. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Two Genes for the Biotin Carboxylase and Carboxyltransferase Subunits of Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Myxococcus xanthus

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yoshio; Miyake, Rina; Tokumasu, Yushi; Sato, Masayuki

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned a DNA fragment from a genomic library of Myxococcus xanthus using an oligonucleotide probe representing conserved regions of biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylases. The fragment contained two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2), designated the accB and accA genes, capable of encoding a 538-amino-acid protein of 58.1 kDa and a 573-amino-acid protein of 61.5 kDa, respectively. The protein (AccA) encoded by the accA gene was strikingly similar t...

  7. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  8. Pyruvate carboxylase deficiency: An underestimated cause of lactic acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Habarou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pyruvate carboxylase (PC is a biotin-containing mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, thereby being involved in gluconeogenesis and in energy production through replenishment of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle with oxaloacetate. PC deficiency is a very rare metabolic disorder. We report on a new patient affected by the moderate form (the American type A. Diagnosis was nearly fortuitous, resulting from the revision of an initial diagnosis of mitochondrial complex IV (C IV defect. The patient presented with severe lactic acidosis and pronounced ketonuria, associated with lethargy at age 23 months. Intellectual disability was noted at this time. Amino acids in plasma and organic acids in urine did not show patterns of interest for the diagnostic work-up. In skin fibroblasts PC showed no detectable activity whereas biotinidase activity was normal. We had previously reported another patient with the severe form of PC deficiency and we show that she also had secondary C IV deficiency in fibroblasts. Different anaplerotic treatments in vivo and in vitro were tested using fibroblasts of both patients with 2 different types of PC deficiency, type A (patient 1 and type B (patient 2. Neither clinical nor biological effects in vivo and in vitro were observed using citrate, aspartate, oxoglutarate and bezafibrate. In conclusion, this case report suggests that the moderate form of PC deficiency may be underdiagnosed and illustrates the challenges raised by energetic disorders in terms of diagnostic work-up and therapeutical strategy even in a moderate form.

  9. Requirement of carbon dioxide for initial growth of facultative methylotroph, Acidomonas methanolica MB58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Ryoji; Katayama, Hiroko; Tanaka, Mitsuo

    2015-07-01

    The facultative methylotrophic bacterium Acidomonas methanolica MB58 can utilize C1 compounds via the ribulose monophosphate pathway. A large gene cluster comprising three components related to C1 metabolism was found in the genome. From upstream, the first was an mxa cluster encoding proteins for oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the second was the rmp cluster encoding enzymes for formaldehyde fixation; and the third was the cbb gene cluster encoding proteins for carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation. Examination of CO2 requirements for growth of A. methanolica MB58 cells demonstrated that it did not grow on any carbon source under CO2-free conditions. Measurement of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and RT-PCR analysis demonstrated enzymatic activity was detected in A. methanolica MB58 at growth phase, regardless of carbon sources. However, methanol dehydrogenase and 3-hexlose-6-phosphate synthase expression was regulated by methanol or formaldehyde; it were detected during growth and apparently differed from ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase expression. These results suggested that A. methanolica MB58 may be initially dependent on autotrophic growth and that carbon assimilation was subsequently coupled with the ribulose monophosphate pathway at early- to mid-log phases during methylotrophic growth. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Outer membrane-localised fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, United Kingdom. Accepted 6 June, 2012. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) is a classical cytoplasmic glycolytic enzyme which, despite lacking a predicted signal peptide, has been demonstrated to be expressed and transported to ...

  11. Genes encoding biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-CoA carboxylase from Brassica napus and parental species: cloning, expression patterns, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative genomics is a useful tool to investigate gene and genome evolution. Biotin carboxylase (BC), an important subunit of heteromeric ACCase that is a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid biosynthesis in dicots, catalyzes ATP, biotin-carboxyl-carrier protein and CO2 to form carboxybiotin-carbo...

  12. Photosynthetic plasticity in Flaveria brownii: Growth irradiance and the expression of C4 photosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Shuhua; Moore, B.D.; Wu, Jingrui; Edwards, G.E.; Ku, M.S.B.

    1989-01-01

    Photosynthesis was examined in leaves of Flaveria brownii A. M. Powell, grown under either 14% or 100% full sunlight. In leaves of high light grown plants, the CO 2 compensation point and the inhibition of photosynthesis by 21% O 2 were significantly lower, while activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and various C 4 cycle enzymes were considerably higher than those in leaves grown in low light. Both the CO 2 compensation point and the degree of O 2 inhibition of apparent photosynthesis were relatively insensitive to the light intensity used during measurements with plants from either growth conditions. Partitioning of atmospheric CO 2 between Rubisco of the C 3 pathway and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase of the C 4 cycle was determined by exposing leaves to 14 CO 2 for 3 to 16 seconds, and extrapolating the labeling curves of initial products to zero time. Results indicated that ∼94% of the CO 2 was fixed by the C 4 cycle in high light grown plants, versus ∼78% in low light grown plants. Consistent with the carbon partitioning patterns, photosynthetic enzyme activities (on a chlorophyll basis) in protoplasts from leaves of high light grown plants showed a more C 4 -like pattern of compartmentation. Pyruvate,Pi dikinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase were more enriched in the mesophyll cells, while NADP-malic enzyme and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were relatively more abundant in the bundle sheath cells of high light than of low light grown plants

  13. Heat inactivation of leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: Protection by aspartate and malate in C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnam, C K

    1978-01-01

    The activity of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase EC 4.1.1.31 in leaf extracts of Eleusine indica L. Gaertn., a C4 plant, exhibited a temperature optimum of 35-37° C with a complete loss of activity at 50° C. However, the enzyme was protected effectively from heat inactivation up to 55° C by L-aspartate. Activation energies (Ea) for the enzyme in the presence of aspartate were 2.5 times lower than that of the control enzyme. Arrhenius plots of PEP carboxylase activity (±aspartate) showed a break in the slope around 17-20° C with a 3-fold increase in the Ea below the break. The discontinuity in the slopes was abolished by treating the enzyme extracts with Triton X-100, suggesting that PEP carboxylase in C4 plants is associated with lipid and may be a membrane bound enzyme. Depending upon the species, the major C4 acid formed during photosynthesis (malate or aspartate) was found to be more protective than the minor C4 acid against the heat inactivation of their PEP carboxylase. Oxaloacetate, the reaction product, was less effective compared to malate or aspartate. Several allosteric inhibitors of PEP carboxylase were found to be moderately to highly effective in protecting the C4 enzyme while its activators showed no significant effect. PEP carboxylase from C3 species was not protected from thermal inactivation by the C4 acids. The physiological significance of these results is discussed in relation to the high temperature tolerance of C4 plants.

  14. The moonlighting function of pyruvate carboxylase resides in the non-catalytic end of the TIM barrel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huberts, Daphne H. E. W.; Venselaar, Hanka; Vriend, Gert; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    Pyruvate carboxylase is a highly conserved enzyme that functions in replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle with oxaloacetate. In the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, the pyruvate carboxylase protein is also required for import and assembly of the peroxisomal enzyme alcohol oxidase. This additional

  15. Biochemical signatures mimicking multiple carboxylase deficiency in children with mutations in MT-ATP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Austin A; Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Christodoulou, John; Burrage, Lindsay C; Marom, Ronit; Graham, Brett H; Diaz, George A; Glamuzina, Emma; Hauser, Natalie; Heese, Bryce; Horvath, Gabriella; Mattman, Andre; van Karnebeek, Clara; Lane Rutledge, S; Williamson, Amy; Estrella, Lissette; Van Hove, Johan K L; Weisfeld-Adams, James D

    2018-01-04

    Elevations of specific acylcarnitines in blood reflect carboxylase deficiencies, and have utility in newborn screening for life-threatening organic acidemias and other inherited metabolic diseases. In this report, we describe a newly-identified association of biochemical features of multiple carboxylase deficiency in individuals harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in MT-ATP6 and in whom organic acidemias and multiple carboxylase deficiencies were excluded. Using retrospective chart review, we identified eleven individuals with abnormally elevated propionylcarnitine (C3) or hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5OH) with mutations in MT-ATP6, most commonly m.8993T>G in high heteroplasmy or homoplasmy. Most patients were ascertained on newborn screening; most had normal enzymatic or molecular genetic testing to exclude biotinidase and holocarboxylase synthetase deficiencies. MT-ATP6 is associated with some cases of Leigh disease; clinical outcomes in our cohort ranged from death from neurodegenerative disease in early childhood to clinically and developmentally normal after several years of follow-up. These cases expand the biochemical phenotype associated with MT-ATP6 mutations, especially m.8993T>G, to include acylcarnitine abnormalities mimicking carboxylase deficiency states. Clinicians should be aware of this association and its implications for newborn screening, and consider mtDNA sequencing in patients exhibiting similar acylcarnitine abnormalities that are biotin-unresponsive and in whom other enzymatic deficiencies have been excluded. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  16. A unified molecular mechanism for the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jia; Zhang, Yixiao; Yu, Tai-Yuan; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Rudolph, Michael J; Amodeo, Gabriele A; Symington, Lorraine S; Walz, Thomas; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCs) are crucial metabolic enzymes and attractive targets for drug discovery. Eukaryotic acetyl-CoA carboxylases are 250 kDa single-chain, multi-domain enzymes and function as dimers and higher oligomers. Their catalytic activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation and other means. Here we show that yeast ACC is directly phosphorylated by the protein kinase SNF1 at residue Ser1157, which potently inhibits the enzyme. Crystal structure of three ACC central domains (AC3-AC5) shows that the phosphorylated Ser1157 is recognized by Arg1173, Arg1260, Tyr1113 and Ser1159. The R1173A/R1260A double mutant is insensitive to SNF1, confirming that this binding site is crucial for regulation. Electron microscopic studies reveal dramatic conformational changes in the holoenzyme upon phosphorylation, likely owing to the dissociation of the biotin carboxylase domain dimer. The observations support a unified molecular mechanism for the regulation of ACC by phosphorylation as well as by the natural product soraphen A, a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic ACC. These molecular insights enhance our understanding of acetyl-CoA carboxylase regulation and provide a basis for drug discovery.

  17. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from C4 leaves is selectively targeted for inhibition by anionic phospholipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monreal, J.A.; McLoughlin, F.; Echevarría, C.; García-Mauriño, S.; Testerink, C.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; EC 4.1.1.31) is an enzyme playing a crucial role in photosynthesis of C4 plants. Here, we identify anionic phospholipids as novel regulators that inhibit C4 PEPC activity and provide evidence that the enzyme partially localizes to membranes.

  18. Induction of Cytosolic Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase in Pea Leaves by Ultraviolet-B Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Tomokazu, Konishi; Takahiro, Kamoi; Ryuichi, Matsuno; Yukiko, Sasaki; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University:(Present)Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Biotechnology Institute, Akita Prefectural College of Agriculture; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University; Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University:(Present)Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology, School of Agricultural Sciences, Nagoya University

    1996-01-01

    Levels of subunits of two acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases were high in small leaves of Pisum sativum, decreased with growth, and remained constant in fully expanded leaves. Irradiation of fully expanded leaves induced the cytosolic isozyme only. This result suggests a key role for the cytosolic enzyme in protection against UV-B.

  19. Characterization of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from mature maize seeds: Properties of phosphorylated and dephosphorylated forms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, M.; Doubnerová, V.; Müller, Karel; Ryšlavá, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 10 (2010), s. 1362-1370 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase * Phosphorylation * Seed Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 3.787, year: 2010

  20. Differential expression of rubisco in sporophytes and gametophytes of some marine macroalgae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rubisco (ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, a key enzyme of photosynthetic CO(2 fixation, is one of the most abundant proteins in both higher plants and algae. In this study, the differential expression of Rubisco in sporophytes and gametophytes of four seaweed species--Porphyra yezoensis, P. haitanensis, Bangia fuscopurpurea (Rhodophyte and Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae--was studied in terms of the levels of transcription, translation and enzyme activity. Results indicated that both the Rubisco content and the initial carboxylase activity were notably higher in algal gametophytes than in the sporophytes, which suggested that the Rubisco content and the initial carboxylase activity were related to the ploidy of the generations of the four algal species.

  1. Computational redesign of bacterial biotin carboxylase inhibitors using structure-based virtual screening of combinatorial libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal; Waldrop, Grover L

    2014-04-02

    As the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria steadily increases, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial agents. Because fatty acid synthesis is only used for membrane biogenesis in bacteria, the enzymes in this pathway are attractive targets for antibacterial agent development. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the committed and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three distinct protein components: biotin carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and carboxyltransferase. Fragment-based screening revealed that amino-oxazole inhibits biotin carboxylase activity and also exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram-negative organisms. In this report, we redesigned previously identified lead inhibitors to expand the spectrum of bacteria sensitive to the amino-oxazole derivatives by including Gram-positive species. Using 9,411 small organic building blocks, we constructed a diverse combinatorial library of 1.2×10⁸ amino-oxazole derivatives. A subset of 9×10⁶ of these compounds were subjected to structure-based virtual screening against seven biotin carboxylase isoforms using similarity-based docking by eSimDock. Potentially broad-spectrum antibiotic candidates were selected based on the consensus ranking by several scoring functions including non-linear statistical models implemented in eSimDock and traditional molecular mechanics force fields. The analysis of binding poses of the top-ranked compounds docked to biotin carboxylase isoforms suggests that: (1) binding of the amino-oxazole anchor is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds to residues 201, 202 and 204; (2) halogenated aromatic moieties attached to the amino-oxazole scaffold enhance interactions with a hydrophobic pocket formed by residues 157, 169, 171 and 203; and (3) larger substituents reach deeper into the binding pocket to form additional hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues 209 and 233. These structural insights into drug

  2. Calcium Directly Regulates Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Headgroup Conformation and Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilkova, Eva; Pleskot, Roman; Rissanen, Sami

    2017-01-01

    ), is completely inhibited in the presence of Ca2+, while Mg2+ has no effect with 100 nm liposomes and modest effect with giant unilamellar vesicles. Consistent with biochemical data, vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal how Ca2+ binding to the PI(4,5)P2...... phosphoinositide clustering, little is known about the molecular basis for this or its significance in cellular signaling. Here, we study the direct interaction of Ca2+ with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), the main lipid marker of the plasma membrane. Electrokinetic potential measurements of PI...

  3. Structure of a Class I Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate Aldolase - Investigation into an Apparent Loss of Stereospecificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LowKam, C.; Liotard, B; Sygusch, J

    2010-01-01

    Tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from Streptococcus pyogenes is a class I aldolase that exhibits a remarkable lack of chiral discrimination with respect to the configuration of hydroxyl groups at both C3 and C4 positions. The enzyme catalyzes the reversible cleavage of four diastereoisomers (fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), psicose 1,6-bisphosphate, sorbose 1,6-bisphosphate, and tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate with high catalytic efficiency. To investigate its enzymatic mechanism, high resolution crystal structures were determined of both native enzyme and native enzyme in complex with dihydroxyacetone-P. The electron density map revealed a ({alpha}/{beta}){sub 8} fold in each dimeric subunit. Flash-cooled crystals of native enzyme soaked with dihydroxyacetone phosphate trapped a covalent intermediate with carbanionic character at Lys{sup 205}, different from the enamine mesomer bound in stereospecific class I FBP aldolase. Structural analysis indicates extensive active site conservation with respect to class I FBP aldolases, including conserved conformational responses to DHAP binding and conserved stereospecific proton transfer at the DHAP C3 carbon mediated by a proximal water molecule. Exchange reactions with tritiated water and tritium-labeled DHAP at C3 hydrogen were carried out in both solution and crystalline state to assess stereochemical control at C3. The kinetic studies show labeling at both pro-R and pro-S C3 positions of DHAP yet detritiation only at the C3 pro-S-labeled position. Detritiation of the C3 pro-R label was not detected and is consistent with preferential cis-trans isomerism about the C2-C3 bond in the carbanion as the mechanism responsible for C3 epimerization in tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase.

  4. Reaction of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase with (Z)-3-bromophosphoenolpyruvate and (Z)-3-fluorophosphoenolpyruvate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, E.; O'Laughlin, J.T.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    (Z)-3-Bromophosphoenolpyruvate inactivates phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase from maize in the presence of HCO 3 - and either Mg 2+ or Mn 2+ . The inactivation rate follows saturation kinetics. Inactivation is slower in the presence of phospholactate or epoxymaleate, both of which are inhibitors of the enzyme, or dithiothreitol. Inactivation is completely prevented by the presence of lactate dehydrogenase and NADH, and 3-bromolactate is formed during this treatment. If the reaction is conducted by using HC 18 O 3 - , the inorganic phosphate produced contains 18 O. This and other evidence indicate that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase catalyzes conversion of bromophosphoenolpyruvate into bromopyruvate by way of the usual carboxyphosphate-enolate intermediate, and bromopyruvate is the species responsible for enzyme inactivation. (Z)-3-fluorophosphoenolpyruvate is transformed by the enzyme into a 6:1 mixture of 3-fluoropyruvate and 3-fluorooxalacetate, presumably by the same mechanism. The enzyme is not inactivated during this treatment

  5. Expression, purification and crystallization of an archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Kraszewski, Jessica L.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Dunten, Pete W.

    2009-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary diffraction analysis of an archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase are described. Complete highly redundant X-ray data have been measured from a crystal diffracting to 3.13 Å resolution. An archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PepcA) from Clostridium perfringens has been expressed in Escherichia coli in a soluble form with an amino-terminal His tag. The recombinant protein is enzymatically active and two crystal forms have been obtained. Complete diffraction data extending to 3.13 Å resolution have been measured from a crystal soaked in KAu(CN) 2 , using radiation at a wavelength just above the Au L III edge. The asymmetric unit contains two tetramers of PepcA

  6. Insect acetyl-CoA carboxylase: activity during the larval, pupal and adult stages of insect development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, J P; Read, J S

    1993-12-01

    1. The activity of the lipogenic enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, was investigated in four insect species; Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera), Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera), Glossina morsitans and Sarcophaga nodosa (Diptera). 2. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity in larval, pupal and adult forms was compared with the saponifiable lipid mass at each stage of the life-cycle, and found to follow similar patterns except for Tenebrio molitor. 3. The results are examined in relation to known metabolic requirements for each insect.

  7. Genome sequence of carboxylesterase, carboxylase and xylose isomerase producing alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Haloterrigena turkmenica WANU15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Selim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report draft genome sequence of Haloterrigena turkmenica strain WANU15, isolated from Soda Lake. The draft genome size is 2,950,899 bp with a G + C content of 64% and contains 49 RNA sequence. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LKCV00000000. Keywords: Soda Lake, Haloterrigena turkmenica, Carboxylesterase, Carboxylase, Xylose isomerase, Whole genome sequencing

  8. Crystal structure of the 500-kDa yeast acetyl-CoA carboxylase holoenzyme dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jia; Tong, Liang

    2015-10-12

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) has crucial roles in fatty acid metabolism and is an attractive target for drug discovery against diabetes, cancer and other diseases1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ACC (ScACC) is crucial for the production of very-long-chain fatty acids and the maintenance of the nuclear envelope7, 8. ACC contains biotin carboxylase (BC) and carboxyltransferase (CT) activities, and its biotin is linked covalently to the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). Most eukaryotic ACCs are 250-kilodalton (kDa), multi-domain enzymes and function as homodimers and higher oligomers. They contain a unique, 80-kDa central region that shares no homology with other proteins. Although the structures of the BC, CT and BCCP domains and other biotin-dependent carboxylase holoenzymes are known1, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, there is currently no structural information on the ACC holoenzyme. Here we report the crystal structure of the full-length, 500-kDa holoenzyme dimer of ScACC. The structure is remarkably different from that of the other biotin-dependent carboxylases. The central region contains five domains and is important for positioning the BC and CT domains for catalysis. The structure unexpectedly reveals a dimer of the BC domain and extensive conformational differences compared to the structure of the BC domain alone, which is a monomer. These structural changes reveal why the BC domain alone is catalytically inactive and define the molecular mechanism for the inhibition of eukaryotic ACC by the natural product soraphen A15, 16 and by phosphorylation of a Ser residue just before the BC domain core in mammalian ACC. The BC and CT active sites are separated by 80 Å, and the entire BCCP domain must translocate during catalysis.

  9. Purification and Characterization of the Acetone Carboxylase of Cupriavidus metallidurans Strain CH34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosier, Caroline; Leys, Natalie; Henoumont, Céline; Mergeay, Max

    2012-01-01

    Acetone carboxylase (Acx) is a key enzyme involved in the biodegradation of acetone by bacteria. Except for the Helicobacteraceae family, genome analyses revealed that bacteria that possess an Acx, such as Cupriavidus metallidurans strain CH34, are associated with soil. The Acx of CH34 forms the heterohexameric complex α2β2γ2 and can carboxylate only acetone and 2-butanone in an ATP-dependent reaction to acetoacetate and 3-keto-2-methylbutyrate, respectively. PMID:22492439

  10. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and its phosphorothioate analogue. Comparison of their hydrolysis and action on glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rider, M H; Kuntz, D A; Hue, L

    1988-01-01

    Purified chicken liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose 2,6-bisphosphatase was phosphorylated either from fructose 2,6-bis[2-32P]phosphate or fructose 2-phosphoro[35S]thioate 6-phosphate. The turnover of the thiophosphorylated enzyme intermediate as well as the overall phosphatase reaction was four times faster than with authentic fructose 2,6-bisphosphate. Fructose 2-phosphorothioate 6-phosphate was 10-100-fold less potent than authentic fructose 2,6-bisphosphate in stimulating 6-phosphofru...

  11. Light-stimulated accumulation of transcripts of nuclear and chloroplast genes for ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S M; Ellis, R J

    1981-01-01

    The chloroplast enzyme, ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase, consists of large subunit polypeptides encoded in the chloroplast genome and small subunit polypeptides encoded in the nuclear genome. Cloned DNA complementary to the small subunit mRNA hybridizes to a single RNA species of 900-1000 nucleotides in both total and poly(A)-containing RNA from leaves of Pisum sativum, but does not hybridize to chloroplast RNA. Small subunit cDNA hybridizes to at least three RNA species from nuclei, two of which are of higher molecular weight than the mature mRNA. A cloned large subunit DNA sequence hybridizes to a single species of Pisum chloroplast RNA containing approximately 1700 nucleotides, but does not hybridize to nuclear RNA. The light-stimulation of carboxylase accumulation reflects increases in the amounts of transcripts for both subunits in total leaf RNA. Transcripts of the small subunit gene are more abundant in nuclear RNA from light-grown leaves than in that from dark-grown leaves. These results suggest that the stimulation of carboxylase accumulation by light is mediated at the level of either transcription or RNA turnover in both nucleus and chloroplast.

  12. Nitrosomonas communis strain YNSRA, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, isolated from the reed rhizoplane in an aquaponics plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuyama, Tatsuaki; Mine, Atsusi; Kamiyama, Kaoru; Yabe, Ryuichi; Satoh, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hirotoshi; Takahashi, Reiji; Itonaga, Koji

    2004-01-01

    An ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (strain YNSRA) was isolated from the rhizoplane of the reed (Phragmites communis) used in an aquaponics plant which is a wastewater treatment plant. Strain YNSRA was identified as Nitrosomonas communis by taxonomic studies. The hydroxylamine-cytochrome c reductase (HCR) of strain YNSRA was found to have a higher activity (25.60 u/mg) than that of Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC25978T (8.94 u/mg). Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) activity was detected at very low levels in strain YNSRA, whereas strain ATCC25978T had definite activity.

  13. Ectomycorrhizal association of three Lactarius species with Carpinus and Quercus trees in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamus, Valentina; Montoya, Leticia; Aguilar, Carlos J; Bandala, Victor M; Ramos, David

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are being monitored in the Santuario del Bosque de Niebla in the central region of Veracruz (eastern Mexico). Based on the comparison of DNA sequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips, we discovered the EM symbiosis of Lactarius indigo, L. areolatus and L. strigosipes with Carpinus caroliniana, Quercus xalapensis and Quercus spp. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). Descriptions coupled with photographs of ectomycorrhizas and basidiomes are presented.

  14. Effect of salicylic acid on the growth photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism in salt stressed maize plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, H.R.; Khodary, S.E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of salicylic acid as a spray to Na CI-treated corn (Zea mays L,) significantly increased the growth of shoots and roots as measured after seven days of treatment. Spraying of salicylic acid caused significant increases in the activity of both ribulose 1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) enzyme and photosynthetic pigments. Moreover, salicylic acid treatment induced high values of soluble carbohydrate fractions in salt stressed plants as compared with salicylic acid treated samples. These data suggest that salicylic acid might improve the growth pattern of NaCl-treated maize plants via increasing the rate of photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism

  15. Over-expression of ascorbate oxidase in the apoplast of transgenic tobacco results in altered ascorbate and glutathione redox states and increased sensitivity to ozone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanmartin, Maite; Drogoudi, Pavlina D.; Lyons, Tom

    2003-01-01

    overexpressing plants exposed to 100 nmol mol-1 ozone for 7 h day-1 exhibited a substantial increase in foliar injury, and a greater pollutant-induced reduction in both the light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation and the maximum in vivo rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase carboxylation......Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) plants expressing cucumber ascorbate oxidase (EC.1.10.3.3) were used to examine the role of extracellular ascorbic acid in mediating tolerance to the ubiquitous air pollutant, ozone (O3). Three homozygous transgenic lines, chosen on the basis...

  16. Nonenzymatic gluconeogenesis-like formation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Christoph B; Driscoll, Paul C; Piedrafita, Gabriel; De Volder, Michael F L; Ralser, Markus

    2017-07-11

    The evolutionary origins of metabolism, in particular the emergence of the sugar phosphates that constitute glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the RNA and DNA backbone, are largely unknown. In cells, a major source of glucose and the large sugar phosphates is gluconeogenesis. This ancient anabolic pathway (re-)builds carbon bonds as cleaved in glycolysis in an aldol condensation of the unstable catabolites glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate, forming the much more stable fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. We here report the discovery of a nonenzymatic counterpart to this reaction. The in-ice nonenzymatic aldol addition leads to the continuous accumulation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in a permanently frozen solution as followed over months. Moreover, the in-ice reaction is accelerated by simple amino acids, in particular glycine and lysine. Revealing that gluconeogenesis may be of nonenzymatic origin, our results shed light on how glucose anabolism could have emerged in early life forms. Furthermore, the amino acid acceleration of a key cellular anabolic reaction may indicate a link between prebiotic chemistry and the nature of the first metabolic enzymes.

  17. STRUCTURAL INSIGHTS INTO SUBSTRATE BINDING AND STEREOSELECTIVITY OF GIARDIA FRUCTOSE-1,6-BISPHOSPHATE ALDOLASE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, Andrey; Li, Zhimin; Li, Ling; Kulakova, Liudmila; Pal, Lipika R.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Herzberg, Osnat

    2009-01-01

    Giardia lamblia fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA)1 is a member of the Class II zinc-dependent aldolase family that catalyzes the cleavage of D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) into dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P). In addition to the active site zinc, the catalytic apparatus of FBPA employs an aspartic acid, Asp83 in the G. lamblia enzyme, which when replaced by an alanine residue renders the enzyme inactive. A comparison of the crystal structures of the D83A FBPA in complex with FBP and of the wild-type FBPA in the unbound state revealed a substrate induced conformational transition of loops in the vicinity of the active site and a shift in the location of Zn2+. Upon FBP binding, the Zn2+ shifts up to 4.6 Å towards the catalytic Asp83, which brings the metal within coordination distance to the Asp83 carboxylate group. In addition, the structure of wild-type FBPA was determined in complex with the competitive inhibitor D-tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate (TBP), a FBP stereoisomer. In this structure, the zinc binds in a site close to that previously seen in the structure of FBPA in complex with phosphoglycolohydroxamate, an analog of the postulated DHAP ene-diolate intermediate. Together, the ensemble of structures suggests that the zinc mobility is necessary to orient the Asp83 side chain and to polarize the substrate for proton transfer from the FBP C(4) hydroxyl group to the Asp83 carboxyl group. In the absence of FBP, the alternative zinc position is too remote for coordinating the Asp83. We propose a modification of the catalytic mechanism that incorporates the novel features observed in the FBPA/FBP structure. The mechanism invokes coordination and co-planarity of the Zn2+ with the FBP’s O-C(3)-C(4)-O concomitant with coordination of Asp83 carboxylic group. Catalysis is accompanied by movement of Zn2+ to a site co-planar with the O-C(2)-C(3)-O of the DHAP. glFBPA exhibit strict substrate specificity towards FBP and

  18. Structure of a rabbit muscle fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase A dimer variant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherawat, Manashi [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118-2394 (United States); Tolan, Dean R., E-mail: tolan@bu.edu [Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington Street, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Allen, Karen N., E-mail: tolan@bu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118-2394 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of a dimer variant of fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase demonstrates a stable oligomer that mirrors half of the native tetramer. The presence of product demonstrates that this is an active form. Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase) is an essential enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. In addition to this primary function, aldolase is also known to bind to a variety of other proteins, a property that may allow it to perform ‘moonlighting’ roles in the cell. Although monomeric and dimeric aldolases possess full catalytic activity, the enzyme occurs as an unusually stable tetramer, suggesting a possible link between the oligomeric state and these noncatalytic cellular roles. Here, the first high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of rabbit muscle D128V aldolase, a dimeric form of aldolase mimicking the clinically important D128G mutation in humans associated with hemolytic anemia, is presented. The structure of the dimer was determined to 1.7 Å resolution with the product DHAP bound in the active site. The turnover of substrate to produce the product ligand demonstrates the retention of catalytic activity by the dimeric aldolase. The D128V mutation causes aldolase to lose intermolecular contacts with the neighboring subunit at one of the two interfaces of the tetramer. The tertiary structure of the dimer does not significantly differ from the structure of half of the tetramer. Analytical ultracentrifugation confirms the occurrence of the enzyme as a dimer in solution. The highly stable structure of aldolase with an independent active site is consistent with a model in which aldolase has evolved as a multimeric scaffold to perform other noncatalytic functions.

  19. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Analysis of Acetyl-CoA Activation of Staphylococcus aureus Pyruvate Carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhold, Lauren E; Bridges, Lance C; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Zeczycki, Tonya N

    2017-07-11

    Allosteric regulation of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) activity is pivotal to maintaining metabolic homeostasis. In contrast, dysregulated PC activity contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, rendering PC a possible target for allosteric therapeutic development. Recent research efforts have focused on demarcating the role of acetyl-CoA, one of the most potent activators of PC, in coordinating catalytic events within the multifunctional enzyme. Herein, we report a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of acetyl-CoA activation of the Staphylococcus aureus PC (SaPC)-catalyzed carboxylation of pyruvate to identify novel means by which acetyl-CoA synchronizes catalytic events within the PC tetramer. Kinetic and linked-function analysis, or thermodynamic linkage analysis, indicates that the substrates of the biotin carboxylase and carboxyl transferase domain are energetically coupled in the presence of acetyl-CoA. In contrast, both kinetic and energetic coupling between the two domains is lost in the absence of acetyl-CoA, suggesting a functional role for acetyl-CoA in facilitating the long-range transmission of substrate-induced conformational changes within the PC tetramer. Interestingly, thermodynamic activation parameters for the SaPC-catalyzed carboxylation of pyruvate are largely independent of acetyl-CoA. Our results also reveal the possibility that global conformational changes give rise to observed species-specific thermodynamic activation parameters. Taken together, our kinetic and thermodynamic results provide a possible allosteric mechanism by which acetyl-CoA coordinates catalysis within the PC tetramer.

  20. Molecular and biochemical characterizations of three fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolases from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Bian, Meng; Wang, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xueqing; Xie, Zhizhi; Sun, Hengchang; Jia, Feifei; Liang, Pei; Zhou, Chenhui; He, Lei; Mao, Qiang; Huang, Bo; Liang, Chi; Wu, Zhongdao; Li, Xuerong; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FbA) is a ubiquitous enzyme in glycolysis. In the present study, we screened out three distinct genes encoding FbA isozymes (CsFbAs, CsFbA-1/2/3) from Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) and characterized their sequences and structures profiles as well as biochemical properties. The amino acid sequences of CsFbAs shared homology with those of Class I FbAs from other species. The putative quaternary structures revealed that CsFbA-2 and CsFbA-3 were tetramers, while CsFbA-1 was dimer. Recombinant CsFbA-2 and CsFbA-3 (rCsFbA-2/3) were confirmed to be Class I FbAs for their stable enzymatic activities in the presence of EDTA or metal ions. However, recombinant CsFbA-1 (rCsFbA-1) did not show the catalytic activity, which might be due to the inappropriate fold and interaction between its subunits. Both rCsFbA-2 and rCsFbA-3 showed similar enzymatic properties such as optimal temperatures and broad pH ranges that similar to human FbA isozymes. They showed relatively higher affinities for fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) than fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P). Their kcat ratios of FBP to F-1-P were in accordance with those of human FbA-A or C. In addition, CsFbAs were differentially transcribed in the developmental stages of C. sinensis, suggesting their essential roles throughout the life stages. Extensive distribution of CsFbAs in adult worms indicated that ubiquitous activities of CsFbAs took place in these organs. Collectively, these results suggested that long-term parasitic environment might adapt these isozymes similar to host FbAs for metabolic requirement. Our study will provide new insight into CsFbAs in the glycometabolism of C. sinensis and relationship between the host and the parasite. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure, kinetic characterization and subcellular localization of the two ribulose 5-phosphate epimerase isoenzymes from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Natalia Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP ribulose-5-phosphate-epimerase (RPE is encoded by two genes present in the genome of Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener clone: TcRPE1 and TcRPE2. Despite high sequence similarity at the amino acid residue level, the recombinant isoenzymes show a strikingly different kinetics. Whereas TcRPE2 follows a typical michaelian behavior, TcRPE1 shows a complex kinetic pattern, displaying a biphasic curve, suggesting the coexistence of -at least- two kinetically different molecular forms. Regarding the subcellular localization in epimastigotes, whereas TcRPE1 is a cytosolic enzyme, TcRPE2 is localized in glycosomes. To our knowledge, TcRPE2 is the first PPP isoenzyme that is exclusively localized in glycosomes. Over-expression of TcRPE1, but not of TcRPE2, significantly reduces the parasite doubling time in vitro, as compared with wild type epimastigotes. Both TcRPEs represent single domain proteins exhibiting the classical α/β TIM-barrel fold, as expected for enzymes with this activity. With regard to the architecture of the active site, all the important amino acid residues for catalysis -with the exception of M58- are also present in both TcRPEs models. The superimposition of the binding pocket of both isoenzyme models shows that they adopt essentially identical positions in the active site with a residue specific RMSD < 2Å, with the sole exception of S12, which displays a large deviation (residue specific RMSD: 11.07 Å. Studies on the quaternary arrangement of these isoenzymes reveal that both are present in a mixture of various oligomeric species made up of an even number of molecules, probably pointing to the dimer as their minimal functional unit. This multiplicity of oligomeric species has not been reported for any of the other RPEs studied so far and it might bear implications for the regulation of TcRPEs activity, although further investigation will be necessary to unravel the physiological

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation by thermophilic phototrophic sulfur bacteria: evidence for autotrophic growth in natural populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, M. T.; Takigiku, R.; Lee, R. G.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Purple phototrophic bacteria of the genus Chromatium can grow as either photoautotrophs or photoheterotrophs. To determine the growth mode of the thermophilic Chromatium species, Chromatium tepidum, under in situ conditions, we have examined the carbon isotope fractionation patterns in laboratory cultures of this organism and in mats of C. tepidum which develop in sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Isotopic analysis (13C/12C) of total carbon, carotenoid pigments, and bacteriochlorophyll from photoautotrophically grown cultures of C. tepidum yielded 13C fractionation factors near -20%. Cells of C. tepidum grown on excess acetate, wherein synthesis of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase) was greatly repressed, were isotopically heavier, fractionation factors of ca. -7% being observed. Fractionation factors determined by isotopic analyses of cells and pigment fractions of natural populations of C. tepidum growing in three different sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park were approximately -20%, indicating that this purple sulfur bacterium grows as a photoautotroph in nature.

  3. Identification and functional verification of archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, a missing link in archaeal central carbohydrate metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, T.J.G.; Makarova, K.S.; Jellema, G.L.; Gierman, H.J.; Koonin, E.V.; Huynen, M.A.; Vos, W.M. de; Oost, J. van der

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity has been measured and in some cases even purified from some Archaea, the gene responsible for this activity has not been elucidated. Using sensitive sequence comparison methods, we detected a highly conserved, uncharacterized

  4. Identification and functional verification of Archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, a missing link in Archaeal central carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, T.J.G.; Makarova, K.S.; Jellema, G.L.; Gierman, H.J.; Koonin, E.V.; Huynen, M.A.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity has been measured and in some cases even purified from some Archaea, the gene responsible for this activity has not been elucidated. Using sensitive sequence comparison methods, we detected a highly conserved, uncharacterized

  5. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylase: Minimized escape of CO2 from solution may prolong linearity of the reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soute, B.A.; Bude, R.; Buitenhuis, H.; Vermeer, C.

    1989-01-01

    Escape of 14 CO 2 from the reaction mixture into the gas phase may seriously affect the accuracy of in vitro measurement of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase activity (and probably that of other carboxylases as well). In this paper we describe the effect of (a) the volume of the test tubes in which the reaction is performed, (b) the addition of an excess of NaH 12 CO 3 in parallel with standard amounts of NaH 14 CO 3 , and (c) the incubation temperature. In this way optimal conditions are defined and used for the carboxylation of various peptide and protein substrates. It is shown that both a prosequence and an internal recognition site contribute to the effective recognition of a substrate by carboxylase. The maximal efficiency of carboxylation was 1-2% with substrates lacking both signals and 20-50% if only one was present. This indicates the need for developing peptide substrates containing both recognition signals for vitamin K-dependent carboxylase

  6. Biotin carboxylases in mitochondria and the cytosol from skeletal and cardiac muscle as detected by avidin binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkeby, S.; Moe, D.; Bøg-Hansen, T. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Biotin carboxylases in mammalian cells are regulatory enzymes in lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. In this study, endogenous biotin in skeletal and cardiac muscle was detected using avidin conjugated with alkaline phosphatase and applied in high concentrations to muscle sections. The avidin binding

  7. Loss of endocytic clathrin-coated pits upon acute depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoncu, Roberto; Perera, Rushika M; Sebastian, Rafael; Nakatsu, Fubito; Chen, Hong; Balla, Tamas; Ayala, Guillermo; Toomre, Derek; De Camilli, Pietro V

    2007-03-06

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)], a phosphoinositide concentrated predominantly in the plasma membrane, binds endocytic clathrin adaptors, many of their accessory factors, and a variety of actin-regulatory proteins. Here we have used fluorescent fusion proteins and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to investigate the effect of acute PI(4,5)P(2) breakdown on the dynamics of endocytic clathrin-coated pit components and of the actin regulatory complex, Arp2/3. PI(4,5)P(2) breakdown was achieved by the inducible recruitment to the plasma membrane of an inositol 5-phosphatase module through the rapamycin/FRB/FKBP system or by treatment with ionomycin. PI(4,5)P(2) depletion resulted in a dramatic loss of clathrin puncta, which correlated with a massive dissociation of endocytic adaptors from the plasma membrane. Remaining clathrin spots at the cell surface had only weak fluorescence and were static over time. Dynamin and the p20 subunit of the Arp2/3 actin regulatory complex, which were concentrated at late-stage clathrin-coated pits and in lamellipodia, also dissociated from the plasma membrane, and these changes correlated with an arrest of motility at the cell edge. These findings demonstrate the critical importance of PI(4,5)P(2) in clathrin coat dynamics and Arp2/3-dependent actin regulation.

  8. Two class II D-tagatose-bisphosphate aldolases from enteric bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkkötter, Andreas; Shakeri-Garakani, Ansiah; Lengeler, Joseph W

    2002-05-01

    Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Klebsiella pneumoniaeand Klebsiella oxytocawere found to contain two D-tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate (TagBP)-specific aldolases involved in catabolism of galactitol (genes gatY gatZ) and of N-acetyl-galactosamine and D-galactosamine (genes kbaY kbaZ,also called agaY agaZ). The two aldolases were closely related (> or = 53.8% identical amino acids) and could substitute for each other in vivo. The catalytic subunits GatY or KbaY alone were sufficient to show aldolase activity. Although substantially shorter than other aldolases (285 amino acids, instead of 358 and 349 amino acids), these subunits contained most or all of the residues that have been identified as essential in substrate/product recognition and catalysis for class II aldolases. In contrast to these, both aldolases required subunits GatZ or KbaZ (420 amino acids) for full activity and for good in vivo and in vitro stability. The Z subunits alone did not show any aldolase activity. Close relatives of these new TagBP aldolases were found in several gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, e.g., Streptomyces coelicolor.

  9. Direct regulation of the Akt proto-oncogene product by phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, T F; Kaplan, D R; Cantley, L C; Toker, A

    1997-01-31

    The regulation of the serine-threonine kinase Akt by lipid products of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) was investigated. Akt activity was found to correlate with the amount of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4-P2) in vivo, and synthetic PtdIns-3,4-P2 activated Akt both in vitro and in vivo. Binding of PtdIns-3,4-P2 occurred within the Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and facilitated dimerization of Akt. Akt mutated in the PH domain was not activated by PI 3-kinase in vivo or by PtdIns-3, 4-P2 in vitro, and it was impaired in binding to PtdIns-3,4-P2. Examination of the binding to other phosphoinositides revealed that they bound to the Akt PH domain with much lower affinity than did PtdIns-3,4-P2 and failed to increase Akt activity. Thus, Akt is apparently regulated by the direct interaction of PtdIns-3,4-P2 with the Akt PH domain.

  10. Legionella phosphatase hydrolyzes phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and inosital triphosphate in human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, J.N.; Saha, A.K.; Glew, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Legionella are facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens which multiply in host phagocytes. L. micdadei cells contain an acid phosphatase (ACP) that blocks superoxide anion production by human neutrophils stimulated with the formylated peptide, fMLP. The possibility that ACP acts by interefering with polyphosphoinositide metabolism and the production of the intracellular second messenger, inositol triphosphate (IP 3 ) was explored. When neutrophil phosphoinositides were labeled with 32 P, incubation of the cells with ACP caused an 85% loss of the labeled phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) over 2 h. Treatment of [ 3 H]inositol-labeled neutrophils with ACP for 30 min resulted in a 20% decrease of labeled PIP 2 . Following fMLP stimulation, the fractional reduction in PIP 2 and the fractional increase in IP 3 was the same in ACP-treated and untreated neutrophils, but the total quantity of IP 3 was reduced by ACP pre-treatment. The reduction in IP 3 generated following fMLP stimulation seems to be due primarily to the decreased amount of PIP 2 available for hydrolysis. However, some loss of IP 3 due to direct hydrolysis by ACP cannot be ruled out. The Legionella phosphatase may compromise neutrophil response to the bacteria by hydrolyzing PIP 2 , the prognitor of IP 3 , and by hydrolyzing IP 3 itself

  11. The ML1Nx2 Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-Bisphosphate Probe Shows Poor Selectivity in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Gerald R V; Takasuga, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Takehiko; Balla, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (3,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2) is a quantitatively minor phospholipid in eukaryotic cells that plays a fundamental role in regulating endocytic membrane traffic. Despite its clear importance for cellular function and organism physiology, mechanistic details of its biology have so far not been fully elucidated. In part, this is due to a lack of experimental tools that specifically probe for PtdIns(3,5)P2 in cells to unambiguously identify its dynamics and site(s) of action. In this study, we have evaluated a recently reported PtdIns(3,5)P2 biosensor, GFP-ML1Nx2, for its veracity as such a probe. We report that, in live cells, the localization of this biosensor to sub-cellular compartments is largely independent of PtdIns(3,5)P2, as assessed after pharmacological, chemical genetic or genomic interventions that block the lipid's synthesis. We therefore conclude that it is unwise to interpret the localization of ML1Nx2 as a true and unbiased biosensor for PtdIns(3,5)P2.

  12. Intracellular zinc activates KCNQ channels by reducing their dependence on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haixia; Boillat, Aurélien; Huang, Dongyang; Liang, Ce; Peers, Chris; Gamper, Nikita

    2017-08-01

    M-type (Kv7, KCNQ) potassium channels are proteins that control the excitability of neurons and muscle cells. Many physiological and pathological mechanisms of excitation operate via the suppression of M channel activity or expression. Conversely, pharmacological augmentation of M channel activity is a recognized strategy for the treatment of hyperexcitability disorders such as pain and epilepsy. However, physiological mechanisms resulting in M channel potentiation are rare. Here we report that intracellular free zinc directly and reversibly augments the activity of recombinant and native M channels. This effect is mechanistically distinct from the known redox-dependent KCNQ channel potentiation. Interestingly, the effect of zinc cannot be attributed to a single histidine- or cysteine-containing zinc-binding site within KCNQ channels. Instead, zinc dramatically reduces KCNQ channel dependence on its obligatory physiological activator, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). We hypothesize that zinc facilitates interactions of the lipid-facing interface of a KCNQ protein with the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in a way similar to that promoted by PIP 2 Because zinc is increasingly recognized as a ubiquitous intracellular second messenger, this discovery might represent a hitherto unknown native pathway of M channel modulation and provide a fresh strategy for the design of M channel activators for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Effect of abscisic acid and blue radiation on photosynthesis and growth of pea plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedlecka, M.; Romanowska, E.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on the net photosynthetic rate (PN), the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activities, the chlorophyll (Chl) content and growth of pea plants (Pisum sativum) grown under ''white'' (WR) or blue radiation (BR), were investigated. BR as compared to WR enhanced PN, the activities of examined enzymes, and Chl content. In spite of higher PN of the plants grown under BR, dry matter of their shoots was lower in comparison with WR. ABA-treated plants grown under both WR and BR showed reduction in PN. ABA had no effect on the activities of both RuBPC and PEPC and the Chl content. Independent on the radiation quality, ABA reduced stem elongation, but did not affect the biomass of whole shoots

  14. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun Lee

    Full Text Available Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2 regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1, a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses.

  15. Novel Mutations in the PC Gene in Patients with Type B Pyruvate Carboxylase Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Duno, Morten; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated seven patients with the type B form of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) deficiency. Mutation analysis revealed eight mutations, all novel. In a patient with exon skipping on cDNA analysis, we identified a homozygous mutation located in a potential branch point sequence, the first...... possible branch point mutation in PC. Two patients were homozygous for missense mutations (with normal protein amounts on western blot analysis), and two patients were homozygous for nonsense mutations. In addition, a duplication of one base pair was found in a patient who also harboured a splice site...... mutation. Another splice site mutation led to the activation of a cryptic splice site, shown by cDNA analysis.All patients reported until now with at least one missense mutation have had the milder type A form of PC deficiency. We thus report for the first time two patients with homozygous missense...

  16. Inhibition of E. coli P-enolpyruvate carboxylase by P-enol-3-bromopyruvate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asem, K.; Smith, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    The generality of the mechanism based inhibition of P-enolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCase) by P-enol-3-bromopyruvate (BrPEP) was tested by measuring its effects on the allosterically regulated enzyme from E. coli. In the presence of 1mM Mn 2+ , BrPEP appears to be a competitive inhibitor (K/sub i/ = 0.0087mM) of PEPCase. Incubation of 0.005mM PEPCase with 0.5mM (or 1.0mM)BrPEP along with H 14 CO 3 - and Mn 2+ , yielded, upon reduction with NaBH 4 , a protein containing radioactivity in an amount approximately proportional to that expected from the loss of catalytic activity. At both a 25- and a 50-fold excess (0.5mM and 1.0mM, respectively) of BrPEP to PEPCase subunits, first order loss of activity occurred with k values of 5.24 x 10 -3 min -1 and 1.03 x 10 -2 min -1 , respectively. At the lower concentration of BrPEP the inactivation process appeared to be reversible after 40 min with no further inhibition occurring even up to two hours of incubation. At the higher concentration of BrPEP, the rate of inhibition slowed dramatically after 50 min and appeared insignificant over the next hour. These data suggest that BrPEP irreversibly inactivates the E. coli PEP carboxylase, but that there may be considerable dissociation of the product, Br-oxaloacetate, before irreversible binding occurs, and that the reduced rate of inactivation may be due to depletion of BrPEP

  17. Evidence against translational repression by the carboxyltransferase component of Escherichia coli acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander C; Cronan, John E

    2014-11-01

    In Escherichia coli, synthesis of the malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) required for membrane lipid synthesis is catalyzed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a large complex composed of four subunits. The subunit proteins are needed in a defined stoichiometry, and it remains unclear how such production is achieved since the proteins are encoded at three different loci. Meades and coworkers (G. Meades, Jr., B. K. Benson, A. Grove, and G. L. Waldrop, Nucleic Acids Res. 38:1217-1227, 2010, doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkp1079) reported that coordinated production of the AccA and AccD subunits is due to a translational repression mechanism exerted by the proteins themselves. The AccA and AccD subunits form the carboxyltransferase (CT) heterotetramer that catalyzes the second partial reaction of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Meades et al. reported that CT tetramers bind the central portions of the accA and accD mRNAs and block their translation in vitro. However, long mRNA molecules (500 to 600 bases) were required for CT binding, but such long mRNA molecules devoid of ribosomes seemed unlikely to exist in vivo. This, plus problematical aspects of the data reported by Meades and coworkers, led us to perform in vivo experiments to test CT tetramer-mediated translational repression of the accA and accD mRNAs. We report that increased levels of CT tetramer have no detectable effect on translation of the CT subunit mRNAs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Light- and GTP-activated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in squid photoreceptor membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, K.M.; Saibil, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Light stimulates the hydrolysis of exogenous, [ 3 H]inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PtdInsP2) added to squid photoreceptor membranes, releasing inositol trisphosphate (InsP3). At free calcium levels of 0.05 microM or greater, hydrolysis of the labeled lipid is stimulated up to 4-fold by GTP and light together, but not separately. This activity is the biochemical counterpart of observations on intact retina showing that a rhodopsin-activated GTP-binding protein is involved in visual transduction in invertebrates, and that InsP3 release is correlated with visual excitation and adaptation. Using an in vitro assay, we investigated the calcium and GTP dependence of the phospholipase activity. At calcium concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 microM, some hydrolysis occurs independently of GTP and light, with a light- and GTP-activated component superimposed. At 1 microM calcium there is no background activity, and hydrolysis absolutely requires both GTP and light. Ion exchange chromatography on Dowex 1 (formate form) of the water-soluble products released at 1 microM calcium reveals that the product is almost entirely InsP3. Invertebrate rhodopsin is homologous in sequence and function to vertebrate visual pigment, which modulates the concentration of cyclic GMP through the mediation of the GTP-binding protein transducin. While there is some evidence that light also modulates PtdInsP2 content in vertebrate photoreceptors, the case for its involvement in phototransduction is stronger for the invertebrate systems. The results reported here support the scheme of rhodopsin----GTP-binding protein----phospholipase C activation in invertebrate photoreceptors

  19. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traynor-Kaplan, A.E.; Thompson, B.L.; Harris, A.L.; Taylor, P.; Omann, G.M.; Sklar, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation

  20. Signal-dependent Hydrolysis of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate without Activation of Phospholipase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Shaya; Katz, Ben; Tzarfaty, Vered; Minke, Baruch

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila, a phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated signaling cascade, couples photo-excitation of rhodopsin to the opening of the transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) channels. A lipid product of PLC, diacylglycerol (DAG), and its metabolites, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may function as second messengers of channel activation. However, how can one separate between the increase in putative second messengers, change in pH, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) depletion when exploring the TRPL gating mechanism? To answer this question we co-expressed the TRPL channels together with the muscarinic (M1) receptor, enabling the openings of TRPL channels via G-protein activation of PLC. To dissect PLC activation of TRPL into its molecular components, we used a powerful method that reduced plasma membrane-associated PI(4,5)P2 in HEK cells within seconds without activating PLC. Upon the addition of a dimerizing drug, PI(4,5)P2 was selectively hydrolyzed in the cell membrane without producing DAG, inositol trisphosphate, or calcium signals. We show that PI(4,5)P2 is not an inhibitor of TRPL channel activation. PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis combined with either acidification or application of DAG analogs failed to activate the channels, whereas PUFA did activate the channels. Moreover, a reduction in PI(4,5)P2 levels or inhibition of DAG lipase during PLC activity suppressed the PLC-activated TRPL current. This suggests that PI(4,5)P2 is a crucial substrate for PLC-mediated activation of the channels, whereas PUFA may function as the channel activator. Together, this study defines a narrow range of possible mechanisms for TRPL gating. PMID:22065576

  1. Role of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in regulating EHD2 plasma membrane localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Simone

    Full Text Available The four mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHD1-EHD4 play pivotal roles in endocytic membrane trafficking. While EHD1, EHD3 and EHD4 associate with intracellular tubular/vesicular membranes, EHD2 localizes to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Currently, little is known about the regulation of EHD2. Thus, we sought to define the factors responsible for EHD2's association with the plasma membrane. The subcellular localization of endogenous EHD2 was examined in HeLa cells using confocal microscopy. Although EHD partner proteins typically mediate EHD membrane recruitment, EHD2 was targeted to the plasma membrane independent of two well-characterized binding proteins, syndapin2 and EHBP1. Additionally, the EH domain of EHD2, which facilitates canonical EHD protein interactions, was not required to direct overexpressed EHD2 to the cell surface. On the other hand, several lines of evidence indicate that the plasma membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 plays a crucial role in regulating EHD2 subcellular localization. Pharmacologic perturbation of PIP2 metabolism altered PIP2 plasma membrane distribution (as assessed by confocal microscopy, and caused EHD2 to redistribute away from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpressed EHD2 localized to PIP2-enriched vacuoles generated by active Arf6. Finally, we show that although cytochalasin D caused actin microfilaments to collapse, EHD2 was nevertheless maintained at the plasma membrane. Intriguingly, cytochalasin D induced relocalization of both PIP2 and EHD2 to actin aggregates, supporting a role of PIP2 in controlling EHD2 subcellular localization. Altogether, these studies emphasize the significance of membrane lipid composition for EHD2 subcellular distribution and offer new insights into the regulation of this important endocytic protein.

  2. Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate: A Summary of Its Cytoprotective Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Norma; Alva, Ronald; Carbonell, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    In clinical and experimental settings, a great deal of effort is being made to protect cells and tissues against harmful conditions and to facilitate metabolic recovery following these insults. Much of the recent attention has focused on the protective role of a natural form of sugar, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F16bP). F16bP is a high-energy glycolytic intermediate that has been shown to exert a protective action in different cell types and tissues (including the brain, kidney, intestine, liver and heart) against various harmful conditions. For example, there is much evidence that it prevents neuronal damage due to hypoxia and ischemia. Furthermore, the cytoprotective effects of F16bP have been documented in lesions caused by chemicals or cold storage, in a decrease in mortality during sepsis shock and even in the prevention of bone loss in experimental osteoporosis. Intriguingly, protection in such a variety of targets and animal models suggests that the mechanisms induced by F16bP are complex and involve different pathways. In this review we will discuss the most recent theories concerning the molecular model of action of F16bP inside cells. These include its incorporation as an energy substrate, the mechanism for the improvement of ATP availability, and for preservation of organelle membrane stability and functionality. In addition we will present new evidences regarding the capacity of F16bP to decrease oxidative stress by limiting free radical production and improving antioxidant systems, including the role of nitric oxide in the protective mechanism induced by F16bP. Finally we will review the proposed mechanisms for explaining its anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and neuroprotective properties.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-Bisphosphate-Rich Membrane Domains in Endosomes and Lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Sho; Tatematsu, Tsuyako; Cheng, Jinglei; Matsumoto, Jun; Akano, Takuya; Fujimoto, Toyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2 ) has critical functions in endosomes and lysosomes. We developed a method to define nanoscale distribution of PtdIns(3,5)P2 using freeze-fracture electron microscopy. GST-ATG18-4×FLAG was used to label PtdIns(3,5)P2 and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) was blocked by an excess of the p40(phox) PX domain. In yeast exposed to hyperosmotic stress, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was concentrated in intramembrane particle (IMP)-deficient domains in the vacuolar membrane, which made close contact with adjacent membranes. The IMP-deficient domain was also enriched with PtdIns(3)P, but was deficient in Vph1p, a liquid-disordered domain marker. In yeast lacking either PtdIns(3,5)P2 or its effector, Atg18p, the IMP-deficient, PtdIns(3)P-rich membranes were folded tightly to make abnormal tubular structures, thus showing where the vacuolar fragmentation process is arrested when PtdIns(3,5)P2 metabolism is defective. In HeLa cells, PtdIns(3,5)P2 was significantly enriched in the vesicular domain of RAB5- and RAB7-positive endosome/lysosomes of the tubulo-vesicular morphology. This biased distribution of PtdIns(3,5)P2 was also observed using fluorescence microscopy, which further showed enrichment of a retromer component, VPS35, in the tubular domain. This is the first report to show segregation of PtdIns(3,5)P2 -rich and -deficient domains in endosome/lysosomes, which should be important for endosome/lysosome functionality. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Metabolism of phospholipids in peripheral nerve from rats with chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetes: increased turnover of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, M E; Peterson, R G; Eichberg, J

    1982-07-01

    The effect of chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetes on phospholipid metabolism in rat sciatic nerve in vitro was investigated. In normal nerve incubated for 2 h in Krebs-Ringer-bicarbonate buffer containing (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, radioactivity was primarily incorporated into phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylcholine. Smaller amounts were present in phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid. As compared to controls, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate in nerves from animals made diabetic 2, 10, and 20 weeks earlier accounted for 30-46% more of the isotope, expressed as a percentage, incorporated into all phospholipids. In contrast, the proportion of radioactivity in phosphatidylcholine decreased by 10-25%. When the results were expressed as the quantity of phosphorus incorporated into phospholipid, only phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate displayed a change. The amount of isotope which entered this lipid increased 60% and 67% for 2- and 10-week diabetic animals, respectively. Increased phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate labeling was observed when epineurial-free preparations were used or when the composition of the incubation medium was varied. Sciatic and caudal nerve conduction velocities were decreased after 10 and 20 weeks but were unchanged after 2 weeks. Researchers conclude that an increase in the turnover of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate in sciatic nerve from streptozotocin-diabetic rats appears relatively early and persists throughout the course of the disease. This metabolic alteration may be related to a primary defect responsible for the accompanying deficient peripheral nerve function.

  5. Studies on enzymes of C-4 pathway : Part V - Comparative studies of RUP2 carboxylase/oxygenase from maize and spinach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, J.; Bhagwat, A.S.; Sane, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    RuP 2 carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) isolated from maize, a C-4 plant possessed oxygenase activity. The ratio of carboxylase/oxygenase in the case of maize enzyme was more than 2-fold as compared to that of spinach. Fructose-1 6-diphosphate preferentially inhibited oxygenase function of the RuP 2 carboxylase/oxygenase in both the species when both the activities were assayed under identical conditions of pH, temperature, MgCl 2 , O 2 and RuP 2 concentration. Frutose-1, 6-diphosphate showed a fully competitive inhibition with respect to RuP 2 in the case of spinach, however the maize enzyme was inhibited seminoncompetitively. ( 14 C)-HCO 3 was used in the carboxylase assay. (author)

  6. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the binding of riboflavin, riboflavin 5'-phosphate and riboflavin 3',5'-bisphosphate by apoflavodoxins.

    OpenAIRE

    Pueyo, J J; Curley, G P; Mayhew, S G

    1996-01-01

    The reactions of excess apoflavodoxin from Desulfovibrio vulgaris, Anabaena variabilis and Azotobacter vinelandii with ribo- flavin 5«-phosphate (FMN), riboflavin 3«,5«-bisphosphate and riboflavin are pseudo-first-order. The rates increase with decreasing pH in the range pH 5-8, and, in general, they increase with increasing ionic strength to approach a maximum at an ionic strength greater than 0.4 M. The rate of FMN binding in phosphate at high pH increases to a maximum ...

  7. Increased expression of pyruvate carboxylase and biotin protein ligase increases lysine production in a biotin prototrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhihao; Moslehi-Jenabian, Soloomeh; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    , and achieved biotin prototrophy. We found that AHP-3, containing pBIO, was able to produce lysine in a medium lacking biotin and that the lysine yield on glucose was similar to what is obtained when using a medium containing biotin. However, there was a decrease in specific growth rate of 20% when the strain...... pimeloyl-Acyl Carrier Protein [ACP]) formation. Pyruvate carboxylase (pycA), a biotin-dependent enzyme needed for lysine biosynthesis and biotin ligase (birA), which is responsible for attaching biotin to pyruvate carboxylase, were overexpressed by replacing the native promoters with the strong superoxide...... dismutase (sod) promoter, to see whether growth could be restored. Neither pycA nor birA overexpression, whether alone or in combination, had an effect on specific growth rate, but they did have a positive effect on lysine yield, which increased by 55% in the strain overexpressing both enzymes....

  8. Nitrate-Dependent Degradation of Acetone by Alicycliphilus and Paracoccus Strains and Comparison of Acetone Carboxylase Enzymes ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullius, Carlos Henrique; Chen, Ching-Yuan; Schink, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    A novel acetone-degrading, nitrate-reducing bacterium, strain KN Bun08, was isolated from an enrichment culture with butanone and nitrate as the sole sources of carbon and energy. The cells were motile short rods, 0.5 to 1 by 1 to 2 μm in size, which gave Gram-positive staining results in the exponential growth phase and Gram-negative staining results in the stationary-growth phase. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate was assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. Besides butanone and acetone, the strain used numerous fatty acids as substrates. An ATP-dependent acetone-carboxylating enzyme was enriched from cell extracts of this bacterium and of Alicycliphilus denitrificans K601T by two subsequent DEAE Sepharose column procedures. For comparison, acetone carboxylases were enriched from two additional nitrate-reducing bacterial species, Paracoccus denitrificans and P. pantotrophus. The products of the carboxylase reaction were acetoacetate and AMP rather than ADP. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of cell extracts and of the various enzyme preparations revealed bands corresponding to molecular masses of 85, 78, and 20 kDa, suggesting similarities to the acetone carboxylase enzymes described in detail for the aerobic bacterium Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 (85.3, 78.3, and 19.6 kDa) and the phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Protein bands were excised and compared by mass spectrometry with those of acetone carboxylases of aerobic bacteria. The results document the finding that the nitrate-reducing bacteria studied here use acetone-carboxylating enzymes similar to those of aerobic and phototrophic bacteria. PMID:21841031

  9. Acetone and Butanone Metabolism of the Denitrifying Bacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” Demonstrates Novel Biochemical Properties of an ATP-Dependent Aliphatic Ketone Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Karola

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of acetone and butanone in the betaproteobacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” is initiated by their ATP-dependent carboxylation to acetoacetate and 3-oxopentanoic acid, respectively. Both reactions are catalyzed by the same enzyme, acetone carboxylase, which was purified and characterized. Acetone carboxylase is highly induced under growth on acetone or butanone and accounts for at least 5.5% of total cell protein. The enzyme consists of three subunits of 85, 75, and 20 kDa, respectively, in a (αβγ)2 composition and contains 1 Zn and 2 Fe per heterohexamer but no organic cofactors. Chromatographic analysis of the ATP hydrolysis products indicated that ATP was exclusively cleaved to AMP and 2 Pi. The stoichiometry was determined to be 2 ATP consumed per acetone carboxylated. Purified acetone carboxylase from A. aromaticum catalyzes the carboxylation of acetone and butanone as the only substrates. However, the enzyme shows induced (uncoupled) ATPase activity with many other substrates that were not carboxylated. Acetone carboxylase is a member of a protein family that also contains acetone carboxylases of various other organisms, acetophenone carboxylase of A. aromaticum, and ATP-dependent hydantoinases/oxoprolinases. While the members of this family share several characteristic features, they differ with respect to the products of ATP hydrolysis, subunit composition, and metal content. PMID:22020645

  10. Characterization of the mycobacterial acyl-CoA carboxylase holo complexes reveals their functional expansion into amino acid catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias T Ehebauer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biotin-mediated carboxylation of short-chain fatty acid coenzyme A esters is a key step in lipid biosynthesis that is carried out by multienzyme complexes to extend fatty acids by one methylene group. Pathogenic mycobacteria have an unusually high redundancy of carboxyltransferase genes and biotin carboxylase genes, creating multiple combinations of protein/protein complexes of unknown overall composition and functional readout. By combining pull-down assays with mass spectrometry, we identified nine binary protein/protein interactions and four validated holo acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. We investigated one of these--the AccD1-AccA1 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis with hitherto unknown physiological function. Using genetics, metabolomics and biochemistry we found that this complex is involved in branched amino-acid catabolism with methylcrotonyl coenzyme A as the substrate. We then determined its overall architecture by electron microscopy and found it to be a four-layered dodecameric arrangement that matches the overall dimensions of a distantly related methylcrotonyl coenzyme A holo complex. Our data argue in favor of distinct structural requirements for biotin-mediated γ-carboxylation of α-β unsaturated acid esters and will advance the categorization of acyl-coenzyme A carboxylase complexes. Knowledge about the underlying structural/functional relationships will be crucial to make the target category amenable for future biomedical applications.

  11. Breast Cancer-Derived Lung Metastases Show Increased Pyruvate Carboxylase-Dependent Anaplerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Christen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular proliferation depends on refilling the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle to support biomass production (anaplerosis. The two major anaplerotic pathways in cells are pyruvate conversion to oxaloacetate via pyruvate carboxylase (PC and glutamine conversion to α-ketoglutarate. Cancers often show an organ-specific reliance on either pathway. However, it remains unknown whether they adapt their mode of anaplerosis when metastasizing to a distant organ. We measured PC-dependent anaplerosis in breast-cancer-derived lung metastases compared to their primary cancers using in vivo 13C tracer analysis. We discovered that lung metastases have higher PC-dependent anaplerosis compared to primary breast cancers. Based on in vitro analysis and a mathematical model for the determination of compartment-specific metabolite concentrations, we found that mitochondrial pyruvate concentrations can promote PC-dependent anaplerosis via enzyme kinetics. In conclusion, we show that breast cancer cells proliferating as lung metastases activate PC-dependent anaplerosis in response to the lung microenvironment.

  12. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase-a as a novel target for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Rajput, Sandeep; Watabe, Kounosuke; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACC) are rate-limiting enzymes in de novo fatty acid synthesis, catalyzing ATP-dependent carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. Malonyl-CoA is a critical bi-functional molecule, i.e., a substrate of fatty acid synthase (FAS) for acyl chain elongation (fatty acid synthesis) and an inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-I) for fatty acid beta-oxidation. Two ACC isoforms have been identified in mammals, i.e. ACC-alpha (ACCA, also termed ACC1) and ACC-beta (ACCB, also designated ACC2). ACC has long been used as a target for the management of metabolic diseases, such as obesity and metabolic syndrome, and various inhibitors have been developed in clinical trials. Recently, ACCA up-regulation has been recognized in multiple human cancers, promoting lipogenesis to meet the need of cancer cells for rapid growth and proliferation. Therefore, ACCA might be effective as a potent target for cancer intervention, and the inhibitors developed for the treatment of metabolic diseases would be potential therapeutic agents for cancer therapy. This review summarizes our recent findings and updates the current understanding of the ACCA with focus on cancer research.

  13. Cell cycle regulation of the BRCA1/acetyl-CoA-carboxylase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, H; Suau, F; Vincent, A; Dalla Venezia, N

    2009-01-16

    Germ-line alterations in BRCA1 are associated with an increased susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. The BRCA1 protein has been implicated in multiple cellular functions. We have recently demonstrated that BRCA1 reduces acetyl-CoA-carboxylase alpha (ACCA) activity through its phospho-dependent binding to ACCA, and further established that the phosphorylation of the Ser1263 of ACCA is required for this interaction. Here, to gain more insight into the cellular conditions that trigger the BRCA1/ACCA interaction, we designed an anti-pSer1263 antibody and demonstrated that the Ser1263 of ACCA is phosphorylated in vivo, in a cell cycle-dependent manner. We further showed that the interaction between BRCA1 and ACCA is regulated during cell cycle progression. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism of regulation of ACCA distinct from the previously described phosphorylation of Ser79, and provide new insights into the control of lipogenesis through the cell cycle.

  14. Cloning and expression analysis of carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase from Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wu-Wei; Gao, Shun; Wang, Sheng-Hua; Zhu, Jin-Qiu; Xu, Ying; Tang, Lin; Chen, Fang

    2010-01-01

    A full-length cDNA of the carboxyltransferase (accA) gene of acetyl-coenzym A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase from Jatropha curcas was cloned and sequenced. The gene with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1149 bp encodes a polypeptide of 383 amino acids, with a molecular mass of 41.9 kDa. Utilizing fluorogenic real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the expression levels of the accA gene in leaves and fruits at early, middle and late stages under pH 7.0/8.0 and light/darkness stress were investigated. The expression levels of the accA gene in leaves at early, middle and late stages increased significantly under pH 8.0 stress compared to pH 7.0. Similarly, the expression levels in fruits showed a significant increase under darkness condition compared to the control. Under light stress, the expression levels in the fruits at early, middle and late stages showed the largest fluctuations compared to those of the control. These findings suggested that the expression levels of the accA gene are closely related to the growth conditions and developmental stages in the leaves and fruits of Jatropha curcas.

  15. BRCA1 affects lipid synthesis through its interaction with acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Karen; Dizin, Eva; Ray, Hind; Luquain, Céline; Lefai, Etienne; Foufelle, Fabienne; Billaud, Marc; Lenoir, Gilbert M; Venezia, Nicole Dalla

    2006-02-10

    Germ line alterations in BRCA1 (breast cancer susceptibility gene 1) are associated with an increased susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. BRCA1 acts as a scaffold protein implicated in multiple cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA repair, and ubiquitination. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumorigenesis are not yet fully understood. We have recently demonstrated that BRCA1 interacts in vivo with acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCA) through its tandem of BRCA1 C terminus (BRCT) domains. To understand the biological function of the BRCA1.ACCA complex, we sought to determine whether BRCA1 is a regulator of lipogenesis through its interaction with ACCA. We showed here that RNA inhibition-mediated down-regulation of BRCA1 expression induced a marked increase in the fatty acid synthesis. We then delineated the biochemical characteristics of the complex and found that BRCA1 interacts solely with the phosphorylated and inactive form of ACCA (P-ACCA). Finally, we demonstrated that BRCA1 affects lipid synthesis by preventing P-ACCA dephosphorylation. These results suggest that BRCA1 affects lipogenesis through binding to P-ACCA, providing a new mechanism by which BRCA1 may exert a tumor suppressor function.

  16. Pyruvate carboxylase is required for glutamine-independent growth of tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tzuling; Sudderth, Jessica; Yang, Chendong; Mullen, Andrew R.; Jin, Eunsook S.; Matés, José M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells require a constant supply of macromolecular precursors, and interrupting this supply has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in cancer. Precursors for lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins are generated in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and removed from the mitochondria to participate in biosynthetic reactions. Refilling the pool of precursor molecules (anaplerosis) is therefore crucial to maintain cell growth. Many tumor cells use glutamine to feed anaplerosis. Here we studied how “glutamine-addicted” cells react to interruptions of glutamine metabolism. Silencing of glutaminase (GLS), which catalyzes the first step in glutamine-dependent anaplerosis, suppressed but did not eliminate the growth of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo. Profiling metabolic fluxes in GLS-suppressed cells revealed induction of a compensatory anaplerotic mechanism catalyzed by pyruvate carboxylase (PC), allowing the cells to use glucose-derived pyruvate rather than glutamine for anaplerosis. Although PC was dispensable when glutamine was available, forcing cells to adapt to low-glutamine conditions rendered them absolutely dependent on PC for growth. Furthermore, in other cell lines, measuring PC activity in nutrient-replete conditions predicted dependence on specific anaplerotic enzymes. Cells with high PC activity were resistant to GLS silencing and did not require glutamine for survival or growth, but displayed suppressed growth when PC was silenced. Thus, PC-mediated, glucose-dependent anaplerosis allows cells to achieve glutamine independence. Induction of PC during chronic suppression of glutamine metabolism may prove to be a mechanism of resistance to therapies targeting glutaminolysis. PMID:21555572

  17. Control of biotin biosynthesis in mycobacteria by a pyruvate carboxylase dependent metabolic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Nathaniel; Fay, Allison; Nandakumar, Madhumitha; Boyle, Kerry E; Xavier, Joao; Rhee, Kyu; Glickman, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    Biotin is an essential cofactor utilized by all domains of life, but only synthesized by bacteria, fungi and plants, making biotin biosynthesis a target for antimicrobial development. To understand biotin biosynthesis in mycobacteria, we executed a genetic screen in Mycobacterium smegmatis for biotin auxotrophs and identified pyruvate carboxylase (Pyc) as required for biotin biosynthesis. The biotin auxotrophy of the pyc::tn strain is due to failure to transcriptionally induce late stage biotin biosynthetic genes in low biotin conditions. Loss of bioQ, the repressor of biotin biosynthesis, in the pyc::tn strain reverted biotin auxotrophy, as did reconstituting the last step of the pathway through heterologous expression of BioB and provision of its substrate DTB. The role of Pyc in biotin regulation required its catalytic activities and could be supported by M. tuberculosis Pyc. Quantitation of the kinetics of depletion of biotinylated proteins after biotin withdrawal revealed that Pyc is the most rapidly depleted biotinylated protein and metabolomics revealed a broad metabolic shift in wild type cells upon biotin withdrawal which was blunted in cell lacking Pyc. Our data indicate that mycobacterial cells monitor biotin sufficiency through a metabolic signal generated by dysfunction of a biotinylated protein of central metabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase-α Inhibitor TOFA Induces Human Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Xu, Canxin; Sun, Mingwei; Luo, Dixian; Liao, Duan-fang; Cao, Deliang

    2009-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase-α (ACCA) is a rate-limiting enzyme in long chain fatty acid synthesis, playing a critical role in cellular energy storage and lipid synthesis. ACCA is upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and small interfering RNA-mediated ACCA silencing in human breast and prostate cancer cells results in oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study reports for the first time that TOFA (5-tetradecyloxy-2-furoic acid), an allosteric inhibitor of ACCA, is cytotoxic to lung cancer cells NCI-H460 and colon carcinoma cells HCT-8 and HCT-15, with an IC50 at approximately 5.0, 5.0, and 4.5 μg/ml, respectively. TOFA at 1.0–20.0 μg/ml effectively blocked fatty acid synthesis and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The cell death was characterized with PARP cleavage, DNA fragmentation, and annexin-V staining, all of which are the features of the apoptosis. Supplementing simultaneously the cells with palmitic acids (100 μM), the end-products of the fatty acid synthesis pathway, prevented the apoptosis induced by TOFA. Taken together, these data suggest that TOFA is a potent cytotoxic agent to lung and colon cancer cells, inducing apoptosis through disturbing their fatty acid synthesis. PMID:19450551

  19. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha inhibitor TOFA induces human cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun; Xu, Canxin; Sun, Mingwei; Luo, Dixian; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2009-07-31

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase-alpha (ACCA) is a rate-limiting enzyme in long chain fatty acid synthesis, playing a critical role in cellular energy storage and lipid synthesis. ACCA is upregulated in multiple types of human cancers and small interfering RNA-mediated ACCA silencing in human breast and prostate cancer cells results in oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study reports for the first time that TOFA (5-tetradecyloxy-2-furoic acid), an allosteric inhibitor of ACCA, is cytotoxic to lung cancer cells NCI-H460 and colon carcinoma cells HCT-8 and HCT-15, with an IC(50) at approximately 5.0, 5.0, and 4.5 microg/ml, respectively. TOFA at 1.0-20.0 microg/ml effectively blocked fatty acid synthesis and induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The cell death was characterized with PARP cleavage, DNA fragmentation, and annexin-V staining, all of which are the features of the apoptosis. Supplementing simultaneously the cells with palmitic acids (100 microM), the end-products of the fatty acid synthesis pathway, prevented the apoptosis induced by TOFA. Taken together, these data suggest that TOFA is a potent cytotoxic agent to lung and colon cancer cells, inducing apoptosis through disturbing their fatty acid synthesis.

  20. Visualization of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in the plasma membrane of suspension-cultured tobacco BY-2 cells and whole Arabidopsis seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van W.; Vermeer, J.E.M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Munnik, T.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P-2] is an important signalling lipid in mammalian cells, where it functions as a second-messenger precursor in response to agonist-dependent activation of phospholipase C (PLC) but also operates as a signalling molecule on its own. Much of the

  1. BRCA1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase: the metabolic syndrome of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Joan; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Colomer, Ramon; Graña-Suarez, Begoña; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer-associated mutations affecting the highly-conserved C-terminal BRCT domains of the tumor suppressor gene breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) fully disrupt the ability of BRCA1 to interact with acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase alpha (ACCA), the rate-limiting enzyme catalyzing de novo fatty acid biogenesis. Specifically, BRCA1 interacts solely with the phosphorylated (inactive) form of ACCA (P-ACCA), and the formation of the BRCA1/P-ACCA complex interferes with ACCA activity by preventing P-ACCA dephosphorylation. One of the hallmarks of aggressive cancer cells is a high rate of energy-consuming anabolic processes driving the synthesis of lipids, proteins, and DNA (all of which are regulated by the energy status of the cell). The ability of BRCA1 to stabilize the phosphorylated/inactive form of ACCA strongly suggests that the tumor suppressive function of BRCA1 closely depends on its ability to mimic a cellular-low-energy status, which is known to block tumor cell anabolism and suppress the malignant phenotype. Interestingly, physical exercise and lack of obesity in adolescence have been associated with significantly delayed breast cancer onset for Ashkenazi Jewish women carrying BRCA1 gene mutations. Further clinical work may explore a chemopreventative role of "low-energy-mimickers" deactivating the ACCA-driven "lipogenic phenotype" in women with inherited mutations in BRCA1. This goal might be obtained with current therapeutic approaches useful in treating the metabolic syndrome and associated disorders in humans (e.g., type 2 diabetes and obesity), including metformin, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), calorie deprivation, and exercise. Alternatively, new forthcoming ACCA inhibitors may be relevant in the management of BRCA1-dependent breast cancer susceptibility and development. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Effects of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase desensitization on glutamic acid production in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masaru; Sawada, Kazunori; Ogura, Kotaro; Shimono, Yuta; Hagiwara, Takuya; Sugimoto, Masakazu; Onuki, Akiko; Yokota, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC13032, a glutamic-acid producing actinobacterium, is subject to feedback inhibition by metabolic intermediates such as aspartic acid and 2-oxoglutaric acid, which implies the importance of PEPC in replenishing oxaloacetic acid into the TCA cycle. Here, we investigated the effects of feedback-insensitive PEPC on glutamic acid production. A single amino-acid substitution in PEPC, D299N, was found to relieve the feedback control by aspartic acid, but not by 2-oxoglutaric acid. A simple mutant, strain R1, having the D299N substitution in PEPC was constructed from ATCC 13032 using the double-crossover chromosome replacement technique. Strain R1 produced glutamic acid at a concentration of 31.0 g/L from 100 g/L glucose in a jar fermentor culture under biotin-limited conditions, which was significantly higher than that of the parent, 26.0 g/L (1.19-fold), indicative of the positive effect of desensitized PEPC on glutamic acid production. Another mutant, strain DR1, having both desensitized PEPC and PYK-gene deleted mutations, was constructed in a similar manner using strain D1 with a PYK-gene deleted mutation as the parent. This mutation had been shown to enhance glutamic acid production in our previous study. Although marginal, strain D1 produced higher glutamic acid, 28.8 g/L, than ATCC13032 (1.11-fold). In contrast, glutamic acid production by strain DR-1 was elevated up to 36.9 g/L, which was 1.42-fold higher than ATCC13032 and significantly higher than the other three strains. The results showed a synergistic effect of these two mutations on glutamic acid production in C. glutamicum. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Physical exercise reduces pyruvate carboxylase (PCB) and contributes to hyperglycemia reduction in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Vitor Rosetto; Gaspar, Rafael Calais; Crisol, Barbara Moreira; Formigari, Guilherme Pedron; Sant'Ana, Marcella Ramos; Botezelli, José Diego; Gaspar, Rodrigo Stellzer; da Silva, Adelino S R; Cintra, Dennys Esper; de Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo

    2018-07-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of exercise training on pyruvate carboxylase protein (PCB) levels in hepatic tissue and glucose homeostasis control in obese mice. Swiss mice were distributed into three groups: control mice (CTL), fed a standard rodent chow; diet-induced obesity (DIO), fed an obesity-inducing diet; and a third group, which also received an obesity-inducing diet, but was subjected to an exercise training protocol (DIO + EXE). Protocol training was carried out for 1 h/d, 5 d/wk, for 8 weeks, performed at an intensity of 60% of exhaustion velocity. An insulin tolerance test (ITT) was performed in the last experimental week. Twenty-four hours after the last physical exercise session, the animals were euthanized and the liver was harvested for molecular analysis. Firstly, DIO mice showed increased epididymal fat and serum glucose and these results were accompanied by increased PCB and decreased p-Akt in hepatic tissue. On the other hand, physical exercise was able to increase the performance of the mice and attenuate PCB levels and hyperglycemia in DIO + EXE mice. The above findings show that physical exercise seems to be able to regulate hyperglycemia in obese mice, suggesting the participation of PCB, which was enhanced in the obese condition and attenuated after a treadmill running protocol. This is the first study to be aimed at the role of exercise training in hepatic PCB levels, which may be a novel mechanism that can collaborate to reduce the development of hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes in DIO mice.

  4. Characterization of the distal promoter of the human pyruvate carboxylase gene in pancreatic beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansaya Thonpho

    Full Text Available Pyruvate carboxylase (PC is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in many biosynthetic pathways in various tissues including glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In the present study, we identify promoter usage of the human PC gene in pancreatic beta cells. The data show that in the human, two alternative promoters, proximal and distal, are responsible for the production of multiple mRNA isoforms as in the rat and mouse. RT-PCR analysis performed with cDNA prepared from human liver and islets showed that the distal promoter, but not the proximal promoter, of the human PC gene is active in pancreatic beta cells. A 1108 bp fragment of the human PC distal promoter was cloned and analyzed. It contains no TATA box but possesses two CCAAT boxes, and other putative transcription factor binding sites, similar to those of the distal promoter of rat PC gene. To localize the positive regulatory region in the human PC distal promoter, 5'-truncated and the 25-bp and 15-bp internal deletion mutants of the human PC distal promoter were generated and used in transient transfections in INS-1 832/13 insulinoma and HEK293T (kidney cell lines. The results indicated that positions -340 to -315 of the human PC distal promoter serve as (an activator element(s for cell-specific transcription factor, while the CCAAT box at -71/-67, a binding site for nuclear factor Y (NF-Y, as well as a GC box at -54/-39 of the human PC distal promoter act as activator sequences for basal transcription.

  5. The secreted fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase as a broad spectrum vaccine candidate against pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongyang; Shen, Binbing; Wu, Haizhen; Zhou, Xiangyu; Wang, Qiyao; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-10-01

    The development of aquaculture has been hampered by different aquatic pathogens that can cause edwardsiellosis, vibriosis, or other diseases. Therefore, developing a broad spectrum vaccine against different fish diseases is necessary. In this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA), a conserved enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, was demonstrated to be located in the non-cytoplasmic components of five aquatic pathogenic bacteria and exhibited remarkable protection and cross-protection against these pathogens in turbot and zebrafish. Further analysis revealed that sera sampled from vaccinated turbot had a high level of specific antibody and bactericidal activity against these pathogens. Meanwhile, the increased expressions of immune response-related genes associated with antigen recognition and presentation indicated that the adaptive immune response was effectively aroused. Taken together, our results suggest that FBA can be utilized as a broad-spectrum vaccine against various pathogenic bacteria of aquaculture in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Solution structure of a syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, D; Oh, E S; Woods, A

    1998-01-01

    Syndecan-4, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a coreceptor with integrins in cell adhesion. It has been suggested to form a ternary signaling complex with protein kinase Calpha and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Syndecans each have a unique, central, and variable (V......) region in their cytoplasmic domains, and that of syndecan-4 is critical to its interaction with protein kinase C and PIP2. Two oligopeptides corresponding to the variable region (4V) and whole domain (4L) of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain were synthesized for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Data...... and dynamical simulated annealing calculations. The 4V peptide in the presence of PIP2 formed a compact dimer with two twisted strands packed parallel to each other and the exposed surface of the dimer consisted of highly charged and polar residues. The overall three-dimensional structure in solution exhibits...

  7. Active Site Loop Dynamics of a Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegan, Scott D. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States); Rukseree, Kamolchanok [National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), Tha Khlong (Thailand); Capodagli, Glenn C. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States); Baker, Erica A. [Univ. of Denver, CO (United States); Krasnykh, Olga [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Franzblau, Scott G. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Mesecar, Andrew D. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2013-01-08

    The class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprises one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation–deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA–PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation–protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Furthermore, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  8. Molecular biology of C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase: Structure, regulation and genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, A V; Devi, M T; Raghavendra, A S

    1994-02-01

    Three to four families of nuclear genes encode different isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC): C4-specific, C3 or etiolated, CAM and root forms. C4 leaf PEPC is encoded by a single gene (ppc) in sorghum and maize, but multiple genes in the C4-dicot Flaveria trinervia. Selective expression of ppc in only C4-mesophyll cells is proposed to be due to nuclear factors, DNA methylation and a distinct gene promoter. Deduced amino acid sequences of C4-PEPC pinpoint the phosphorylatable serine near the N-terminus, C4-specific valine and serine residues near the C-terminus, conserved cysteine, lysine and histidine residues and PEP binding/catalytic sites. During the PEPC reaction, PEP and bicarbonate are first converted into carboxyphosphate and the enolate of pyruvate. Carboxyphosphate decomposes within the active site into Pi and CO2, the latter combining with the enolate to form oxalacetate. Besides carboxylation, PEPC catalyzes a HCO3 (-)-dependent hydrolysis of PEP to yield pyruvate and Pi. Post-translational regulation of PEPC occurs by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cascade in vivo and by reversible enzyme oligomerization in vitro. The interrelation between phosphorylation and oligomerization of the enzyme is not clear. PEPC-protein kinase (PEPC-PK), the enzyme responsible for phosphorylation of PEPC, has been studied extensively while only limited information is available on the protein phosphatase 2A capable of dephosphorylating PEPC. The C4 ppc was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as well as tobacco. The transformed E. coli produced a functional/phosphorylatable C4 PEPC and the transgenic tobacco plants expressed both C3 and C4 isoforms. Site-directed mutagenesis of ppc indicates the importance of His(138), His(579) and Arg(587) in catalysis and/or substrate-binding by the E. coli enzyme, Ser(8) in the regulation of sorghum PEPC. Important areas for further research on C4 PEPC are: mechanism of transduction of light signal during

  9. Effect of biotin on activity and gene expression of biotin-dependent carboxylases in the liver of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, G; Weiss, W P

    2007-03-01

    Biotin is a cofactor of the gluconeogenic enzymes pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and propionyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (PCC). We hypothesized that biotin supplementation increases the activity and gene expression of PC and PCC and the gene expression of phosphoenol-pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver of lactating dairy cows. Eight multiparous Holstein cows (40 +/- 2 kg/d of milk yield and 162 +/- 35 d in milk) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 diet sequences in a crossover design with two 22-d periods. Treatments consisted of a basal diet (60% concentrate) containing 0 or 0.96 mg/kg of supplemental biotin. On d 21 of each period, liver tissue was collected by percutaneous liver biopsy. Activities of PC and PCC were determined by measuring the fixation of [14C]O2 in liver homogenates. Abundance of mRNA for PCC, PC, and PEPCK was determined by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Biotin supplementation did not affect milk production or composition. Biotin supplementation increased the activity of PC but had no effect on PCC activity. Biotin supplementation did not affect the gene expression of PC, PCC, and PEPCK. The increased activity of PC without changes in mRNA abundance may have been caused by increased activation of the apoenzymes by holocarboxylase synthetase. In conclusion, biotin supplementation affected the activity of PC in the liver of lactating dairy cows, but whether biotin supplementation increases glucose production in the liver remains to be determined.

  10. Diffusive and Metabolic Constraints to Photosynthesis in Quinoa during Drought and Salt Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Killi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd. has been proposed as a hardy alternative to traditional grain crops in areas with warm-to-hot climates that are likely to experience increased drought and salt stress in the future. We characterised the diffusive and metabolic limitations to photosynthesis in quinoa exposed to drought and salt stress in isolation and combination. Drought-induced pronounced stomatal and mesophyll limitations to CO2 transport, but quinoa retained photosynthetic capacity and photosystem II (PSII performance. Saline water (300 mmol NaCl-equivalent to 60% of the salinity of sea-water supplied in identical volumes to the irrigation received by the control and drought treatments induced similar reductions in stomatal and mesophyll conductance, but also reduced carboxylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, regeneration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate, increased non-photochemical dissipation of energy as heat and impaired PSII electron transport. This suggests that ion toxicity reduced PN via interference with photosynthetic enzymes and degradation of pigment–protein complexes within the thylakoid membranes. The results of this study demonstrate that the photosynthetic physiology of quinoa is resistant to the effects of drought, but quinoa may not be a suitable crop for areas subject to strong salt stress or irrigation with a concentration of saline water equivalent to a 300 mmol NaCl solution.

  11. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR - nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second 14 CO 2 pulse, the total 14 C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20 5 of that of the control. The 14 C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second 14 CO 2 pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO 2 , 14 C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus

  12. Consequence of absence of nitrate reductase activity on photosynthesis in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saux, C.; Lemoine, Y.; Marion-Poll, A.; Valadier, M.H.; Deng, M.; Morot-Gaudry, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    Chlorate-resistant Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (cv Viviani) mutants were found to be deficient in the nitrate reductase apoprotein (NR/sup -/ nia). Because they could not grow with nitrate as sole nitrogen source, they were cultivated as graftings on wild-type Nicotiana tabacum plants. The grafts of mutant plants were chlorotic compared to the grafts of wild type. Mutant leaves did not accumulate nitrogen but contained less malate and more glutamine than wild leaves. They exhibited a slight increase of the proportion of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes and a lowering of the efficiency of energy transfer between these complexes and the active centers. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse, the total /sup 14/C incorporation of the mutant leaves was approximately 20/sup 5/ of that of the control. The /sup 14/C was essentially recovered in ribulose bisphosphate in these plants. It was consistent with a decline of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity observed in the mutant. After a 3 second /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse followed by a 60 second chase with normal CO/sub 2/, /sup 14/C was mainly accumulated in starch which was labeled more in the mutant than in the wild type. These results confirm the observation that in the nitrate reductase deficient leaves, chloroplasts were loaded with large starch inclusions preceding disorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  13. Rubisco Activases: AAA+ Chaperones Adapted to Enzyme Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Javaid Y; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Hartl, F Ulrich; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit

    2017-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the key enzyme of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle of photosynthesis, requires conformational repair by Rubisco activase for efficient function. Rubisco mediates the fixation of atmospheric CO 2 by catalyzing the carboxylation of the five-carbon sugar ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). It is a remarkably inefficient enzyme, and efforts to increase crop yields by bioengineering Rubisco remain unsuccessful. This is due in part to the complex cellular machinery required for Rubisco biogenesis and metabolic maintenance. To function, Rubisco must undergo an activation process that involves carboxylation of an active site lysine by a non-substrate CO 2 molecule and binding of a Mg 2+ ion. Premature binding of the substrate RuBP results in an inactive enzyme. Moreover, Rubisco can also be inhibited by a range of sugar phosphates, some of which are "misfire" products of its multistep catalytic reaction. The release of the inhibitory sugar molecule is mediated by the AAA+ protein Rubisco activase (Rca), which couples hydrolysis of ATP to the structural remodeling of Rubisco. Rca enzymes are found in the vast majority of photosynthetic organisms, from bacteria to higher plants. They share a canonical AAA+ domain architecture and form six-membered ring complexes but are diverse in sequence and mechanism, suggesting their convergent evolution. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the structure and function of this important group of client-specific AAA+ proteins.

  14. Diffusive and Metabolic Constraints to Photosynthesis in Quinoa during Drought and Salt Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killi, Dilek; Haworth, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) has been proposed as a hardy alternative to traditional grain crops in areas with warm-to-hot climates that are likely to experience increased drought and salt stress in the future. We characterised the diffusive and metabolic limitations to photosynthesis in quinoa exposed to drought and salt stress in isolation and combination. Drought-induced pronounced stomatal and mesophyll limitations to CO2 transport, but quinoa retained photosynthetic capacity and photosystem II (PSII) performance. Saline water (300 mmol NaCl-equivalent to 60% of the salinity of sea-water) supplied in identical volumes to the irrigation received by the control and drought treatments induced similar reductions in stomatal and mesophyll conductance, but also reduced carboxylation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, regeneration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate, increased non-photochemical dissipation of energy as heat and impaired PSII electron transport. This suggests that ion toxicity reduced PN via interference with photosynthetic enzymes and degradation of pigment–protein complexes within the thylakoid membranes. The results of this study demonstrate that the photosynthetic physiology of quinoa is resistant to the effects of drought, but quinoa may not be a suitable crop for areas subject to strong salt stress or irrigation with a concentration of saline water equivalent to a 300 mmol NaCl solution. PMID:29039809

  15. Photosynthetic carbon fixation characteristics of fruiting structures of Brassica campestris L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singal, H.R.; Sheoran, I.S.; Singh, R.

    1987-01-01

    Activities of key enzymes of the Calvin cycle and C 4 metabolism, rates of CO 2 fixation, and the initial products of photosynthetic 14 CO 2 fixation were determined in the podwall, seed coat (fruiting structures), and the subtending leaf (leaf below a receme) of Brassica campestris L. cv Toria. Compared to activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and other Calvin cycle enzymes, e.g. NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, the activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and other enzymes of C 4 metabolism, viz. NADP-malate dehydrogenase, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, were generally much higher in seed than in podwall and leaf. Podwall and leaf were comparable to each other. Pulse-chase experiments showed that in seed the major product of 14 CO 2 assimilation was malate (in short time), whereas in podwall and leaf, the label initially appeared in 3-PGA. With time, the label moved to sucrose. In contrast to legumes, Brassica pods were able to fix net CO 2 during light. However, respiratory losses were very high during the dark period

  16. A preliminary X-ray study of d,d-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase from Burkholderia thailandensis E264

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Shin, Dong Hae

    2010-01-01

    In this study, d,d-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. d,d-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase (GmhB), which is involved in the third step of the NDP-heptose biosynthesis pathway, converts d,d-heptose-1,7-bisphosphate to d,d-heptose-1-phosphate. This biosynthesis pathway is a target for new antibiotics or antibiotic adjuvants for Gram-negative pathogens. Burkholderia thailandensis is a useful surrogate organism for studying the pathogenicity of melioidosis owing to its extensive genomic similarity to B. pseudomallei. Melioidosis caused by B. pseudomallei is a serious invasive disease of animals and humans in tropical and subtropical areas. In this study, GmhB has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray data have also been collected to 2.50 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = 243.2, b = 243.2, c = 41.1 Å

  17. The MDM2-p53-pyruvate carboxylase signalling axis couples mitochondrial metabolism to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaomu; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Liu, Zhuohao

    2016-01-01

    deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its negative regulator MDM2, impairs GSIS, leading to glucose intolerance in mice. Mechanistically, p53 activation represses the expression of the mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC), resulting in diminished production of the TCA cycle intermediates...

  18. 3-Methylcrotonyl-coenzyme A carboxylase deficiency in Amish/Mennonite adults identified by detection of increased acylcarnitines in blood spots of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, K M; Bennett, M J; Naylor, E W; Morton, D H

    1998-03-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl coenzyme A carboxylase (MCC) deficiency was documented in four adult women from the Amish/Mennonite population of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Metabolic and enzymatic investigations in these individuals were instituted after the detection of abnormal acylcarnitine profiles in blood spots obtained from their newborn children, in whom MCC activity was normal.

  19. Daily rhythm of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants : Immunological evidence for the absence of a rhythm in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O

    1982-11-01

    Immunotitration of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) extracted from leaves of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. cv. Tom Thumb. It was established that at different times of the day-night cycle the daily rhythm of enzyme capacity does not result from a rhythm in protein synthesis, but rather from changes in the specific activity of the enzyme.

  20. Inositol bisphosphate and inositol trisphosphate inhibit cell-to-cell passage of carboxyfluorescein in staminal hairs ofSetcreasea purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, E B

    1988-06-01

    pH-buffered carboxyfluorescein (Buffered-CF) alone (control), or Buffered-CF solutions containing one of the following: (1)D-myo-inositol (I); (2)D-myo-inositol 2-monophosphate (IP1); (3)D-myo-inositol 1,4-bisphosphate (IP2); (4)D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3); (5)D-fructose 2,6-diphosphate (F-2,6P2) were microinjected into the terminal cells of staminal hairs ofSetcreasea purpurea Boom. Passage of the CF from this terminal cell along the chain of cells towards the filament was monitored for 5 min using fluorescence microscopy and quantified using computer-assisted fluorescence-intensity video analysis. Cell-to-cell transport of CF in hairs microinjected with Buffered-CF containing either I, IP1 or F-2,6P2 was similar to that in hairs microinjected with Buffered-CF only. On the other hand, cell-to-cell transport of CF in hairs microinjected with Buffered-CF containing either IP2 or IP3 was inhibited. These results indicate that polyphosphoinositols may be involved in the regulation of intercellular transport of low-molecular-weight, hydrophilic molecules in plants.

  1. Sonochemical synthesis of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate dicalcium porous microspheres and their application in promotion of osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chao; Zhou, Ding; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Sun, Tuan-Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-08-01

    Human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) have the ability to differentiate into bone and cartilage for clinical bone regeneration. Biomaterials with an innate ability to stimulate osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs into bone and cartilage are considered attractive candidates for the applications in bone tissue engineering and regeneration. In this paper, we synthesized fructose 1,6-bisphosphate dicalcium (Ca 2 FBP) porous microspheres by the sonochemical method, and investigated the ability of Ca 2 FBP for the promotion of the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. After the hBMSCs were co-cultured with the sterilized powder of Ca 2 FBP porous microspheres for different times, the cell proliferation assay, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were performed to investigate the bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation performance of the as-prepared product. Compared with hydroxyapatite nanorods, Ca 2 FBP porous microspheres show a superior bioactivity and osteoinductive potential, and can promote the cell differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro, thus, they are promising for applications in the tissue engineering field such as dental and bone defect repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of ploidy level and isolation of genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase in Japanese Foxtail (Alopecurus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongle Xu

    Full Text Available Ploidy level is important in biodiversity studies and in developing strategies for isolating important plant genes. Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but our understanding of these polyploid weeds is limited. Japanese foxtail, a noxious agricultural grass weed, has evolved herbicide resistance. However, most studies on this weed have ignored the fact that there are multiple copies of target genes. This may complicate the study of resistance mechanisms. Japanese foxtail was found to be a tetraploid by flow cytometer and chromosome counting, two commonly used methods in the determination of ploidy levels. We found that there are two copies of the gene encoding plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase in Japanese foxtail and all the homologous genes are expressed. Additionally, no difference in ploidy levels or ACCase gene copy numbers was observed between an ACCase-inhibiting herbicide-resistant and a herbicide-sensitive population in this study.

  3. Determination of the quantity of acetyl CoA carboxylase by [14C]methyl avidin binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman-Lopez, C.R.; Goodson, J.; Allred, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Conditions are described under which monomeric [ 14 C]methyl avidin binds to SDS-denatured biotin enzymes and remains bound through polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The location of radioactive proteins on the dried gel was determined by fluorography and their identity was established by subunit molecular weight. The relative quantity of bound radioactive avidin, stoichiometrically equivalent to the molar quantity of biotin protein, can be determined by scanning the fluorograph with a soft laser densitometer. To determine the absolute quantity of biotin protein, the radioactive areas of the dried gel were cut out, resolubilized, and assayed for radioactivity. Since the specific radioactivity of the [ 14 C]methyl avidin was known, the quantity of avidin bound and therefore the quantity of biotin enzyme could be calculated. The method is illustrated by the analysis of purified acetyl CoA carboxylase and is applied to the analysis of biotin enzymes in isolated rat liver mitochondria

  4. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process as a probable mechanism for the diurnal regulatory changes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in CAM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Le Marechal, P; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O; Kluge, M; Kruger, I

    1986-04-14

    Day and night forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) (PEPC) were extracted from leaves of the CAM plants Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. tubiflora and K. blossfeldiana previously fed with [32P] labelled phosphate solution. A one-step immunochemical purification followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed that, in all species, the night form of the enzyme was phosphorylated and not the day form. Limited acid hydrolysis of the night form and two-dimensional separation identified predominantly labelled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. In vitro addition of exogenous acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) to desalted night form-containing extracts resulted within 30 min in a shift in PEPC enzymic properties similar to the in vivo changes from night to day form. It is suggested that phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the enzyme could be the primary in vivo process which might explain the observed rhythmicity of enzymic properties.

  5. The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has a potential acetone carboxylase that enhances its ability to colonize mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinberg Michael V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and is the etiological agent of peptic ulcer disease. All three H. pylori strains that have been sequenced to date contain a potential operon whose products share homology with the subunits of acetone carboxylase (encoded by acxABC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 and Rhodobacter capsulatus strain B10. Acetone carboxylase catalyzes the conversion of acetone to acetoacetate. Genes upstream of the putative acxABC operon encode enzymes that convert acetoacetate to acetoacetyl-CoA, which is metabolized further to generate two molecules of acetyl-CoA. Results To determine if the H. pylori acxABC operon has a role in host colonization the acxB homolog in the mouse-adapted H. pylori SS1 strain was inactivated with a chloramphenicol-resistance (cat cassette. In mouse colonization studies the numbers of H. pylori recovered from mice inoculated with the acxB:cat mutant were generally one to two orders of magnitude lower than those recovered from mice inoculated with the parental strain. A statistical analysis of the data using a Wilcoxin Rank test indicated the differences in the numbers of H. pylori isolated from mice inoculated with the two strains were significant at the 99% confidence level. Levels of acetone associated with gastric tissue removed from uninfected mice were measured and found to range from 10–110 μmols per gram wet weight tissue. Conclusion The colonization defect of the acxB:cat mutant suggests a role for the acxABC operon in survival of the bacterium in the stomach. Products of the H. pylori acxABC operon may function primarily in acetone utilization or may catalyze a related reaction that is important for survival or growth in the host. H. pylori encounters significant levels of acetone in the stomach which it could use as a potential electron donor for microaerobic respiration.

  6. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boguslaw Stec

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCOfrom the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystalforms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form beingobtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization,preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phasetransition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzymebelongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8 with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa.The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a singlehexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phasetransition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  7. Protein import into chloroplasts requires a chloroplast ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, D.; Blobel, G.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the [ 35 S]methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H + , K + , Na + , or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requires a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors

  8. Characterization of photorespiration and photosynthesis in soybean cotyledons during seedling development, cotyledon senescence and rejuvenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    We measured light and dark carbon dioxide exchange rates (CER) in germinating, presenescent, and senescing soybean cotyledons and in cotyledons rejuvenated by epicotyl removal on different days after planting. In other aspects of cotyledon physiology, we observed significant differences between rejuvenated and presenescent soybean cotyledons. Rejuvenated cotyledons accumulated chlorophyll to levels greater than the maximal amount measured in presenescent cotyledons. A second difference was the observation that during rejuvenation, the post-illumination outburst of CO 2 (the PIB), a qualitative indication of photorespiration, appeared to recover more slowly than light CER when compared with presenescent but equivalent light CERs. To investigate the relationship between the PIB and light CER, we labelled cotyledons with 14 CO 2 during photosynthesis. We measured the amount of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RubisCO) in the cotyledons by rocket immunoelectrophoresis

  9. A short history of RubisCO: the rise and fall (?) of Nature's predominant CO2 fixing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Tobias J; Zarzycki, Jan

    2018-02-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is arguably one of the most abundant proteins in the biosphere and a key enzyme in the global carbon cycle. Although RubisCO has been intensively studied, its evolutionary origins and rise as Nature's most dominant carbon dioxide (CO 2 )-fixing enzyme still remain in the dark. In this review we will bring together biochemical, structural, physiological, microbiological, as well as phylogenetic data to speculate on the evolutionary roots of the CO 2 -fixation reaction of RubisCO, the emergence of RubisCO-based autotrophic CO 2 -fixation in the context of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, and the further evolution of RubisCO into the 'RubisCOsome', a complex of various proteins assembling and interacting with the enzyme to improve its operational capacity (functionality) under different biological and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. An Examination of the Plastid DNA of Hypohaploid Nicotiana plumbaginifolia Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Gordon C.; Van, K. Tran Thanh; Heinhorst, Sabine; Trinh, T. H.; Weissbach, Arthur

    1989-01-01

    DNA was extracted from different morphological types of hypohaploid Nicotiana plumbaginifolia plants. The cellular levels of chloroplast DNA (expressed as percent of total DNA) were found to be approximately two- to threefold higher in two albino hypohaploids than in a green hypohaploid. The level of chloroplast DNA in the green hypohaploid was not significantly different from either in vitro or in vivo grown haploid N. plumbaginifolia plants. Molecular hybridization with DNA probes for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase from spinach and with Pvull fragments representing the entire Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast genome revealed no gross qualitative differences in the chloroplast DNAs of hypohaploid plants. Based on these observations we have concluded that the lack of chloroplast function observed in the albino forms of hypohaploid N. plumbaginifolia plants is not due to changes in the chloroplast genome. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16666781

  11. An easy and efficient permeabilization protocol for in vivo enzyme activity assays in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Randi Engelberth; Erstad, Simon Matthé; Ramos Martinez, Erick Miguel

    2016-01-01

    microbial cell factories. Better understanding of the activities of enzymes involved in the central carbon metabolism would lead to increasing product yields. Currently cell-free lysates are the most widely used method for determination of intracellular enzyme activities. However, due to thick cell walls...... used directly in the assays, the permeabilized cells exhibited the enzyme activities that are comparable or even higher than those detected for cell-free lysates. Moreover, the permeabilized cells could be stored at -20 °C without losing the enzyme activities. The permeabilization process...... for permeabilization of the cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and determination of two intracellular enzymes, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/decarboxylase (Rubisco) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), that play pivotal roles in the central carbon metabolism...

  12. Impeded Carbohydrate Metabolism in Rice Plants under Submergence Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Kumar ADAK

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The detrimental effects of submergence on physiological performances of some rice varieties with special references to carbohydrate metabolisms and their allied enzymes during post-flowering stages have been documented and clarified in the present investigation. It was found that photosynthetic rate and concomitant translocation of sugars into the panicles were both related to the yield. The detrimental effects of the complete submergence were recorded in generation of sucrose, starch, sucrose phosphate synthase and phosphorylase activity in the developing panicles of the plants as compared to those under normal or control (i.e. non-submerged condition. The accumulation of starch was significantly lower in plants under submergence and that was correlated with ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. Photosynthetic rate was most affected under submergence in varying days of post-flowering and was also related to the down regulation of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. However, under normal or control condition, there recorded a steady maintenance of photosynthetic rate at the post-flowering stages and significantly higher values of Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase activity. Still, photosynthetic rate of the plants under both control and submerged conditions had hardly any significant correlation with sugar accumulation and other enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism like invertase with grain yield. Finally, plants under submergence suffered significant loss of yield by poor grain filling which was related to impeded carbohydrate metabolism in the tissues. It is evident that loss of yield under submergence is attributed both by lower sink size or sink capacity (number of panicles, in this case as well as subdued carbohydrate metabolism in plants and its subsequent partitioning into the grains.

  13. Uptake and expression of bacterial and cyanobacterial genes by isolated cucumber etioplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniell, H.; McFadden, B.A.

    1987-09-01

    The uptake and expression by plastids isolated from dark-grown cucumber cotyledons (etioplasts) of two pUC derivatives, pCS75 and pUC9-CM, respectively carrying genes for the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase of Anacystis nidulans or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, is reported. Untreated etioplasts take up only 3% as much DNA as that taken up by EDTA-washed etioplasts after 2 hr of incubation with nick-translated (/sup 32/P)-pCS75. The presence or absence of light does not affect DNA uptake, binding, or breakdown by etioplasts. Calcium or magnesium ions inhibit DNA uptake by 86% but enhance binding and breakdown of donor DNA by EDTA-treated etioplasts. Uncouplers that abolish membrane potential, transmembrane proton gradient, or both do not affect DNA uptake, binding, or breakdown by etioplasts. However, both DNA uptake and binding are severely inhibited by ATP. After the incubation of EDTA-treated etioplasts with pCS75, immunoprecipitation using antiserum to the small subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from A. nidulans reveals the synthesis of small subunits. Treatment of etioplasts with 10 mM EDTA shows a 10-min duration to be optimal for the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase encoded by pUC9-CM. A progressive increase in the expression of this enzyme is observed with an increase in the concentration of pUC9-CM in the DNA uptake medium. The plasmid-dependent incorporation of (/sup 35/S) methionine by EDTA-treated organelles declines markedly during cotyledon greening in vivo.

  14. Molecular And 3D-Structural Characterization Of Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase Derived From Metroxylon Sagu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairul Azman Roslan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBAld is an enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of D-fructose-1,6-phosphate (FBP to D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP, and plays vital role in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. However, molecular characterization and functional roles of FBAld remain unknown in sago palm. Here we report a modified CTAB-RNA extraction method was developed for the isolation of good quality RNA (RIN>8 from sago leaves and the isolation of FBAld cDNA from sago palm. The isolated sago FBAld (msFBAld cDNA has total length of 1288 bp with an open reading frame of 1020 bp and a predicted to encode for a protein of 340 amino acid resides. The predicted protein shared a high degree of homology with Class-I FBAld from other plants. Meanwhile, the msFBAld gene spanned 2322 bp and consisted of five exons. Conserved domain search identified fifteen catalytically important amino acids at the active site and phylogenetic tree revealed localization of msFBAld in the chloroplast. A molecular 3D-structure of msFBAld was generated by homology modeling and a Ramachandran plot with 86.7% of the residues in the core region, 13.4% in the allowed region with no residues in the disallowed region. The modeled structure is a homotetramer containing an (/(-TIM-barrel at the center. Superimposition of the model with Class-I aldolases identified a catalytic dyad, Lys209-Glu167, which could be involved in the Schiff's base formation and aldol condensation. Apart from that, overproduction of the recombinant msFBAld in Escherichia coli resulted in increased tolerance towards salinity.

  15. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate is required for KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel function but not anterograde trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A Royal

    Full Text Available The slow delayed-rectifier potassium current (IKs is crucial for human cardiac action potential repolarization. The formation of IKs requires co-assembly of the KCNQ1 α-subunit and KCNE1 β-subunit, and mutations in either of these subunits can lead to hereditary long QT syndrome types 1 and 5, respectively. It is widely recognised that the KCNQ1/KCNE1 (Q1/E1 channel requires phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 binding for function. We previously identified a cluster of basic residues in the proximal C-terminus of KCNQ1 that form a PIP2/phosphoinositide binding site. Upon charge neutralisation of these residues we found that the channel became more retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, which raised the possibility that channel-phosphoinositide interactions could play a role in channel trafficking. To explore this further we used a chemically induced dimerization (CID system to selectively deplete PIP2 and/or phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI(4P at the plasma membrane (PM or Golgi, and we subsequently monitored the effects on both channel trafficking and function. The depletion of PIP2 and/or PI(4P at either the PM or Golgi did not alter channel cell-surface expression levels. However, channel function was extremely sensitive to the depletion of PIP2 at the PM, which is in contrast to the response of other cardiac potassium channels tested (Kir2.1 and Kv11.1. Surprisingly, when using the CID system IKs was dramatically reduced even before dimerization was induced, highlighting limitations regarding the utility of this system when studying processes highly sensitive to PIP2 depletion. In conclusion, we identify that the Q1/E1 channel does not require PIP2 or PI(4P for anterograde trafficking, but is heavily reliant on PIP2 for channel function once at the PM.

  16. Characterization of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase during anoxia in the tolerant turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans: an assessment of enzyme activity, expression and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal J Dawson

    Full Text Available One of the most adaptive facultative anaerobes among vertebrates is the freshwater turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans. Upon a decrease in oxygen supply and oxidative phosphorylation, these turtles are able to reduce their metabolic rate and recruit anaerobic glycolysis to meet newly established ATP demands. Within the glycolytic pathway, aldolase enzymes cleave fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to triose phosphates facilitating an increase in anaerobic production of ATP. Importantly, this enzyme exists primarily as tissue-specific homotetramers of aldolase A, B or C located in skeletal muscle, liver and brain tissue, respectively. The present study characterizes aldolase activity and structure in the liver tissue of a turtle whose survival greatly depends on increased glycolytic output during anoxia. Immunoblot and mass spectrometry analysis verified the presence of both aldolase A and B in turtle liver tissue, and results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that in the turtle aldolase proteins may exist as an uncommon heterotetramer. Expression levels of aldolase A protein increased significantly in liver tissue to 1.59±0.11-fold after 20 h anoxia, when compared to normoxic control values (P<0.05. A similar increase was seen for aldolase B expression. The overall kinetic properties of aldolase, when using fructose-1,6-bisphosphate as substrate, were similar to that of a previously studied aldolase A and aldolase B heterotetramer, with a Km of 240 and 180 nM (for normoxic and anoxic turtle liver, respectively. Ligand docking of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to the active site of aldolase A and B demonstrated minor differences in both protein:ligand interactions compared to rabbit models. It is likely that the turtle is unique in its ability to regulate a heterotetramer of aldolase A and B, with a higher overall enzymatic activity, to achieve greater rates of glycolytic output and support anoxia survival.

  17. Characterization of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase during anoxia in the tolerant turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans: an assessment of enzyme activity, expression and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Neal J; Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2013-01-01

    One of the most adaptive facultative anaerobes among vertebrates is the freshwater turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans. Upon a decrease in oxygen supply and oxidative phosphorylation, these turtles are able to reduce their metabolic rate and recruit anaerobic glycolysis to meet newly established ATP demands. Within the glycolytic pathway, aldolase enzymes cleave fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to triose phosphates facilitating an increase in anaerobic production of ATP. Importantly, this enzyme exists primarily as tissue-specific homotetramers of aldolase A, B or C located in skeletal muscle, liver and brain tissue, respectively. The present study characterizes aldolase activity and structure in the liver tissue of a turtle whose survival greatly depends on increased glycolytic output during anoxia. Immunoblot and mass spectrometry analysis verified the presence of both aldolase A and B in turtle liver tissue, and results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that in the turtle aldolase proteins may exist as an uncommon heterotetramer. Expression levels of aldolase A protein increased significantly in liver tissue to 1.59±0.11-fold after 20 h anoxia, when compared to normoxic control values (P<0.05). A similar increase was seen for aldolase B expression. The overall kinetic properties of aldolase, when using fructose-1,6-bisphosphate as substrate, were similar to that of a previously studied aldolase A and aldolase B heterotetramer, with a Km of 240 and 180 nM (for normoxic and anoxic turtle liver, respectively). Ligand docking of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate to the active site of aldolase A and B demonstrated minor differences in both protein:ligand interactions compared to rabbit models. It is likely that the turtle is unique in its ability to regulate a heterotetramer of aldolase A and B, with a higher overall enzymatic activity, to achieve greater rates of glycolytic output and support anoxia survival.

  18. Plasma membrane associated phospholipase C from human platelets: Synergistic stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis by thrombin and guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldassare, J.J.; Henderson, P.A.; Fisher, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thrombin and GTPγS on the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides by membrane-associated phospholipase C (PLC) from human platelets were examined with endogenous [ 3 H]inositol-labeled membranes or with lipid vesicles containing either [ 3 H]phosphatidylinositol or [ 3 H]phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. GTPγS (1 μM) or thrombin (1 unit/mL) did not stimulate release of inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ), inositol bisphosphate (IP 2 ), or inositol phosphate (IP) from [ 3 H]inositol-labeled membranes. IP 2 and IP 3 , but not IP, from [ 3 H]inositol-labeled membranes were, however, stimulated 3-fold by GTPγS (1 μM) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). A higher concentration of GTPγS (100 μM) alone also stimulated IP 2 and IP 3 , but not IP, release. In the presence of 1 mM calcium, release of IP 2 and IP 3 was increased 6-fold over basal levels; however, formation of IP was not observed. At submicromolar calcium concentration, hydrolysis of exogenous phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) by platelet membrane associated PLC was also markedly enhanced by GTPγS (100 μM) or GTPγS (1 μM) plus thrombin (1 unit/mL). Under identical conditions, exogenous phosphatidylinositol (PI) was not hydrolyzed. The same substrate specificity was observed when the membrane-associated PLC was activated with 1 mM calcium. Thrombin-induced hydrolysis of PIP 2 was inhibited by treatment of the membranes with pertussis toxin or pretreatment of intact platelets with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA) prior to preparation of membranes. Pertussis toxin did not inhibit GTPγS (100 μM) or calcium (1 mM) dependent PIP 2 breakdown, while TPA inhibited GTPγS-dependent but not calcium-dependent phospholipase C activity

  19. The dynamics of CO2 fixation in the Southern Ocean as indicated by carboxylase activities and organic carbon isotopic ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontugne, M.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a direct relationship between the dissolved CO 2 concentration and carbon isotopic composition of phytoplankton in surface ocean. Thus, measurement of δ 13 C of planktonic organic matter in deep-sea ocean cores can potentially yield a record of the past atmospheric CO 2 variations. However, results are presented from 3 cruises in Indian and Atlantic sectors of the Southern Ocean (between 40-66degS) in which biochemical and physiological factors associated with photosynthetic processes lead to carbon isotopic fractionation by phytoplankton which cannot be directly related to variations within the mineral carbon pool. Simultaneous measurements of the carboxylase activities in the 13 C/ 12 C ratio of particulate organic carbon show that there is a large variability in phytoplankton carbon metabolism, especially on a seasonal scale, in spite of a relative uniformity of the environmental conditions. Phytoplankton carbon metabolism is clearly a main factor governing variations in the stable isotopic composition of organic matter in the euphotic layer. Interrelationships between light, Rubiso activity and δ 13 C are clearly shown by the data. Heterotrophic processes may also influence the carbon isotope mass balance, especially during the break-up of the ice pack. In addition to the influence of photosynthetic metabolism, the effect of the meridoneal temperature gradient is also verified by the data set. (author). 24 refs.; 5 figs

  20. Identification and functional verification of archaeal-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, a missing link in archaeal central carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Thijs J G; Makarova, Kira S; Jellema, Gera L; Gierman, Hinco J; Koonin, Eugene V; Huynen, Martijn A; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2004-11-01

    Despite the fact that phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activity has been measured and in some cases even purified from some Archaea, the gene responsible for this activity has not been elucidated. Using sensitive sequence comparison methods, we detected a highly conserved, uncharacterized archaeal gene family that is distantly related to the catalytic core of the canonical PEPC. To verify the predicted function of this archaeal gene family, we cloned a representative from the hyperthermophilic acidophile Sulfolobus solfataricus and functionally produced the corresponding enzyme as a fusion with the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein. The purified fusion protein indeed displayed highly thermostable PEPC activity. The structural and biochemical properties of the characterized archaeal-type PEPC (atPEPC) from S. solfataricus are in good agreement with previously reported biochemical analyses of other archaeal PEPC enzymes. The newly identified atPEPC, with its distinct properties, constitutes yet another example of the versatility of the enzymes of the central carbon metabolic pathways in the archaeal domain.

  1. Drought tolerance and proteomics studies of transgenic wheat containing the maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Na; Xu, Weigang; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Wang, Huiwei; Qi, Xueli; Fang, Yuhui; Hua, Xia

    2016-11-01

    Enhancing drought tolerance of crops has been a great challenge in crop improvement. Here, we report the maize phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene was able to confer drought tolerance and increase grain yield in transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plants. The improved of drought tolerance was associated with higher levels of proline, soluble sugar, soluble protein, and higher water use efficiency. The transgenic wheat plants had also a more extensive root system as well as increased photosynthetic capacity during stress treatments. The increased grain yield of the transgenic wheat was contributed by improved biomass, larger spike and grain numbers, and heavier 1000-grain weight under drought-stress conditions. Under non-stressed conditions, there were no significant increases in these of the measured traits except for photosynthetic rate when compared with parental wheat. Proteomic research showed that the expression levels of some proteins, including chlorophyll A-B binding protein and pyruvate, phosphate dikinase, which are related to photosynthesis, PAP fibrillin, which is involved in cytoskeleton synthesis, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, which catalyzes methionine synthesis, were induced in the transgenic wheat under drought stress. Additionally, the expression of glutamine synthetase, which is involved in ammonia assimilation, was induced by drought stress in the wheat. Our study shows that PEPC can improve both stress tolerance and grain yield in wheat, demonstrating the efficacy of PEPC in crop improvement.

  2. Recombinant yeast screen for new inhibitors of human acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 identifies potential drugs to treat obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Jasmina; Chalupska, Dominika; Patenode, Caroline; Coster, Adam; Arnold, Evan; Ye, Alice; Anesi, George; Lu, Ying; Okun, Ilya; Tkachenko, Sergey; Haselkorn, Robert; Gornicki, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is a key enzyme of fatty acid metabolism with multiple isozymes often expressed in different eukaryotic cellular compartments. ACC-made malonyl-CoA serves as a precursor for fatty acids; it also regulates fatty acid oxidation and feeding behavior in animals. ACC provides an important target for new drugs to treat human diseases. We have developed an inexpensive nonradioactive high-throughput screening system to identify new ACC inhibitors. The screen uses yeast gene-replacement strains depending for growth on cloned human ACC1 and ACC2. In “proof of concept” experiments, growth of such strains was inhibited by compounds known to target human ACCs. The screen is sensitive and robust. Medium-size chemical libraries yielded new specific inhibitors of human ACC2. The target of the best of these inhibitors was confirmed with in vitro enzymatic assays. This compound is a new drug chemotype inhibiting human ACC2 with 2.8 μM IC50 and having no effect on human ACC1 at 100 μM. PMID:20439761

  3. Activation of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase is involved in Taxol-induced ovarian cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Ji, Fang; DI, Wen; Chen, Hongduo; Wan, Yinsheng

    2011-05-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) is an attractive target for research into the treatment of a variety of human diseases, including diabetes, obesity and cancer. Mounting evidence suggests that the inhibition of ACC induced of cancer cell apoptosis. However, whether the inhibition of ACC regulates apoptosis in CaOV3 cancer cells has yet to be addressed. This study investigated the cytotoxic mechanism of action of ACC inhibition. Results showed that 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA), an ACC inhibitor, enhanced Taxol-induced CaOV3 human ovarian cancer cell apoptosis. Notably, when TOFA was administered as a monotherapy, it induced CaOV3 cell apoptosis. Pre-treatment with the EGFR inhibitor PD153035 was found to markedly enhance ACC phosphorylation, whereas AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator AICAR was found to marginally enhance ACC phosphorylation. Taken together, the data showed ACC is a potential novel molecular target of Taxol. Additionally, ACC inhibition partially contributed to the cytotoxic effect of Taxol in ovarian cancer cells.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)bisphosphate inhibits K+-efflux channel activity in NT1 tobacco cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohong; Shor, Oded; Diminshtein, Sofia; Yu, Ling; Im, Yang Ju; Perera, Imara; Lomax, Aaron; Boss, Wendy F; Moran, Nava

    2009-02-01

    In the animal world, the regulation of ion channels by phosphoinositides (PIs) has been investigated extensively, demonstrating a wide range of channels controlled by phosphatidylinositol (4,5)bisphosphate (PtdInsP2). To understand PI regulation of plant ion channels, we examined the in planta effect of PtdInsP2 on the K+-efflux channel of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), NtORK (outward-rectifying K channel). We applied a patch clamp in the whole-cell configuration (with fixed "cytosolic" Ca2+ concentration and pH) to protoplasts isolated from cultured tobacco cells with genetically manipulated plasma membrane levels of PtdInsP2 and cellular inositol (1,4,5)trisphosphate: "Low PIs" had depressed levels of these PIs, and "High PIs" had elevated levels relative to controls. In all of these cells, K channel activity, reflected in the net, steady-state outward K+ currents (IK), was inversely related to the plasma membrane PtdInsP2 level. Consistent with this, short-term manipulations decreasing PtdInsP2 levels in the High PIs, such as pretreatment with the phytohormone abscisic acid (25 microM) or neutralizing the bath solution from pH 5.6 to pH 7, increased IK (i.e. NtORK activity). Moreover, increasing PtdInsP2 levels in controls or in abscisic acid-treated high-PI cells, using the specific PI-phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (2.5-4 microM), decreased NtORK activity. In all cases, IK decreases stemmed largely from decreased maximum attainable NtORK channel conductance and partly from shifted voltage dependence of channel gating to more positive potentials, making it more difficult to activate the channels. These results are consistent with NtORK inhibition by the negatively charged PtdInsP2 in the internal plasma membrane leaflet. Such effects are likely to underlie PI signaling in intact plant cells.

  5. A genetically encoded tool kit for manipulating and monitoring membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, Fabian; Switalski, Agathe; Mintert-Jancke, Elisa; Karavassilidou, Katharina; Bender, Kirsten; Pott, Lutz; Kienitz, Marie-Cécile

    2011-01-01

    Most ion channels are regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P(2)) in the cell membrane by diverse mechanisms. Important molecular tools to study ion channel regulation by PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in living cells have been developed in the past. These include fluorescent PH-domains as sensors for Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), to monitor changes in plasma membrane(.) For controlled and reversible depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P(2), voltage-sensing phosphoinositide phosphatases (VSD) have been demonstrated as a superior tool, since they are independent of cellular signaling pathways. Combining these methods in intact cells requires multiple transfections. We used self-cleaving viral 2A-peptide sequences for adenovirus driven expression of the PH-domain of phospholipase-Cδ1 (PLCδ1) fused to ECFP and EYFP respectively and Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP), from a single open reading frame (ORF) in adult rat cardiac myocytes. Expression and correct targeting of ECFP-PH-PLCδ1(,) EYFP-PH-PLCδ1, and Ci-VSP from a single tricistronic vector containing 2A-peptide sequences first was demonstrated in HEK293 cells by voltage-controlled FRET measurements and Western blotting. Adult rat cardiac myocytes expressed Ci-VSP and the two fluorescent PH-domains within 4 days after gene transfer using the vector integrated into an adenoviral construct. Activation of Ci-VSP by depolarization resulted in rapid changes in FRET ratio indicating depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) in the plasma membrane. This was paralleled by inhibition of endogenous G protein activated K(+) (GIRK) current. By comparing changes in FRET and current, a component of GIRK inhibition by adrenergic receptors unrelated to depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) was identified. Expression of a FRET sensor pair and Ci-VSP from a single ORF provides a useful approach to study regulation of ion channels by phosphoinositides in cell lines and transfection-resistant postmitotic cells. Generally, adenoviral

  6. A genetically encoded tool kit for manipulating and monitoring membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in intact cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Hertel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most ion channels are regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5P(2 in the cell membrane by diverse mechanisms. Important molecular tools to study ion channel regulation by PtdIns(4,5P(2 in living cells have been developed in the past. These include fluorescent PH-domains as sensors for Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET, to monitor changes in plasma membrane(. For controlled and reversible depletion of PtdIns(4,5P(2, voltage-sensing phosphoinositide phosphatases (VSD have been demonstrated as a superior tool, since they are independent of cellular signaling pathways. Combining these methods in intact cells requires multiple transfections. We used self-cleaving viral 2A-peptide sequences for adenovirus driven expression of the PH-domain of phospholipase-Cδ1 (PLCδ1 fused to ECFP and EYFP respectively and Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP, from a single open reading frame (ORF in adult rat cardiac myocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Expression and correct targeting of ECFP-PH-PLCδ1(, EYFP-PH-PLCδ1, and Ci-VSP from a single tricistronic vector containing 2A-peptide sequences first was demonstrated in HEK293 cells by voltage-controlled FRET measurements and Western blotting. Adult rat cardiac myocytes expressed Ci-VSP and the two fluorescent PH-domains within 4 days after gene transfer using the vector integrated into an adenoviral construct. Activation of Ci-VSP by depolarization resulted in rapid changes in FRET ratio indicating depletion of PtdIns(4,5P(2 in the plasma membrane. This was paralleled by inhibition of endogenous G protein activated K(+ (GIRK current. By comparing changes in FRET and current, a component of GIRK inhibition by adrenergic receptors unrelated to depletion of PtdIns(4,5P(2 was identified. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of a FRET sensor pair and Ci-VSP from a single ORF provides a useful approach to study regulation of ion channels by phosphoinositides in cell lines and transfection

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    KAUST Repository

    Huerlimann, Roger

    2015-07-01

    The understanding of algal phylogeny is being impeded by an unknown number of events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and primary and secondary/tertiary endosymbiosis. Through these events, previously heterotrophic eukaryotes developed photosynthesis and acquired new biochemical pathways. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) is a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis and elongation pathways in algae, where ACCase exists in two locations (cytosol and plastid) and in two forms (homomeric and heteromeric). All algae contain nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase in the cytosol, independent of the origin of the plastid. Nucleus-encoded homomeric ACCase is also found in plastids of algae that arose from a secondary/tertiary endosymbiotic event. In contrast, plastids of algae that arose from a primary endosymbiotic event contain heteromeric ACCase, which consists of three nucleus-encoded and one plastid-encoded subunits. These properties of ACCase provide the potential to inform on the phylogenetic relationships of hosts and their plastids, allowing different hypothesis of endosymbiotic events to be tested. Alveolata (Dinoflagellata and Apicomplexa) and Chromista (Stramenopiles, Haptophyta and Cryptophyta) have traditionally been grouped together as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases were isolated from Isochrysis aff. galbana (TISO), Chromera velia and Nannochloropsis oculata, representing three taxonomic groups for which sequences were lacking. Phylogenetic analyses show that cytosolic ACCase strongly supports the SAR grouping. Conversely, plastidial ACCase groups the SAR with the Haptophyta, Cryptophyta and Prasinophyceae (Chlorophyta). These two ACCase based, phylogenetic relationships suggest that the plastidial homomeric ACCase was acquired by the

  8. Insights into the carboxyltransferase reaction of pyruvate carboxylase from the structures of bound product and intermediate analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the MgATP- and bicarbonate-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in central metabolism. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of PC catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from carboxybiotin to the accepting substrate, pyruvate. It has been hypothesized that the reactive enolpyruvate intermediate is stabilized through a bidentate interaction with the metal ion in the CT domain active site. Whereas bidentate ligands are commonly observed in enzymes catalyzing reactions proceeding through an enolpyruvate intermediate, no bidentate interaction has yet been observed in the CT domain of PC. Here, we report three X-ray crystal structures of the Rhizobium etli PC CT domain with the bound inhibitors oxalate, 3-hydroxypyruvate, and 3-bromopyruvate. Oxalate, a stereoelectronic mimic of the enolpyruvate intermediate, does not interact directly with the metal ion. Instead, oxalate is buried in a pocket formed by several positively charged amino acid residues and the metal ion. Furthermore, both 3-hydroxypyruvate and 3-bromopyruvate, analogs of the reaction product oxaloacetate, bind in an identical manner to oxalate suggesting that the substrate maintains its orientation in the active site throughout catalysis. Together, these structures indicate that the substrates, products and intermediates in the PC-catalyzed reaction are not oriented in the active site as previously assumed. The absence of a bidentate interaction with the active site metal appears to be a unique mechanistic feature among the small group of biotin-dependent enzymes that act on α-keto acid substrates. PMID:24157795

  9. H2S-induced S-sulfhydration of pyruvate carboxylase contributes to gluconeogenesis in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, YoungJun; Untereiner, Ashley; Wu, Lingyun; Yang, Guangdong

    2015-11-01

    Cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE)-derived hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) possesses diverse roles in the liver, affecting lipoprotein synthesis, insulin sensitivity, and mitochondrial biogenesis. H(2)S S-sulfhydration is now proposed as a major mechanism for H(2)S-mediated signaling. Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is an important enzyme for gluconeogenesis. S-sulfhydration regulation of PC by H(2)S and its implication in gluconeogenesis in the liver have been unknown. Gene expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR and western blotting, and protein S-sulfhydration was assessed by both modified biotin switch assay and tag switch assay. Glucose production and PC activity was measured with coupled enzyme assays, respectively. Exogenously applied H(2)S stimulates PC activity and gluconeogenesis in both HepG2 cells and mouse primary liver cells. CSE overexpression enhanced but CSE knockout reduced PC activity and gluconeogenesis in liver cells, and blockage of PC activity abolished H(2)S-induced gluconeogenesis. H(2)S had no effect on the expressions of PC mRNA and protein, while H(2)S S-sulfhydrated PC in a dithiothreitol-sensitive way. PC S-sulfhydration was significantly strengthened by CSE overexpression but attenuated by CSE knockout, suggesting that H(2)S enhances glucose production through S-sulfhydrating PC. Mutation of cysteine 265 in human PC diminished H(2)S-induced PC S-sulfhydration and activity. In addition, high-fat diet feeding of mice decreased both CSE expression and PC S-sulfhydration in the liver, while glucose deprivation of HepG2 cells stimulated CSE expression. CSE/H(2)S pathway plays an important role in the regulation of glucose production through S-sulfhydrating PC in the liver. Tissue-specific regulation of CSE/H(2)S pathway might be a promising therapeutic target of diabetes and other metabolic syndromes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Stevioside improves pancreatic beta-cell function during glucotoxicity via regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianguo; Jeppesen, Per Bendix; Nordentoft, Iver; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2007-06-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia is detrimental to pancreatic beta-cells, causing impaired insulin secretion and beta-cell turnover. The characteristic secretory defects are increased basal insulin secretion (BIS) and a selective loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Several recent studies support the view that the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) plays a pivotal role for GSIS. We have shown that stevioside (SVS) enhances insulin secretion and ACC gene expression. Whether glucotoxicity influences ACC and whether this action can be counteracted by SVS are not known. To investigate this, we exposed isolated mouse islets as well as clonal INS-1E beta-cells for 48 h to 27 or 16.7 mM glucose, respectively. We found that 48-h exposure to high glucose impairs GSIS from mouse islets and INS-1E cells, an effect that is partly counteracted by SVS. The ACC dephosphorylation inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA, 10(-8) M), and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR, 10(-4) M), an activator of 5'-AMP protein kinase that phosphorylates ACC, eliminated the beneficial effect of SVS. 5-Tetrade-cyloxy-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA), the specific ACC inhibitor, blocked the effect of SVS as well. During glucotoxity, ACC gene expression, ACC protein, and phosphorylated ACC protein were increased in INS-1E beta-cells. SVS pretreatment further increased ACC gene expression with strikingly elevated ACC activity and increased glucose uptake accompanied by enhanced GSIS. Our studies show that glucose is a potent stimulator of ACC and that SVS to some extent counteracts glucotoxicity via increased ACC activity. SVS possesses the potential to alleviate negative effects of glucotoxicity in beta-cells via a unique mechanism of action.

  11. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase in Reuber hepatoma cells: variation in enzyme activity, insulin regulation, and cellular lipid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, A; Evans, J L; Nordlund, A C; Watts, T D; Witters, L A

    1992-01-01

    Reuber hepatoma cells are useful cultured lines for the study of insulin action, lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, and the regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid biosynthesis. During investigations in different clonal lines of these cells, we have uncovered marked intercellular variability in the activity, enzyme content, and insulin regulation of ACC paralleled by differences in cellular neutral lipid (triglyceride) content. Two contrasting clonal lines, Fao and H356A-1, have been studied in detail. Several features distinguish these two lines, including differences in ACC activity and enzyme kinetics, the content of the two major hepatic ACC isozymes (Mr 280,000 and 265,000 Da) and their heteroisozymic complex, the extent of ACC phosphorylation, and the ability of ACC to be activated on stimulation by insulin and insulinomimetic agonists. As studied by Nile Red staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting, these two lines also display marked differences in neutral lipid content, which correlates with both basal levels of ACC activity and inhibition of ACC by the fatty acid analog, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA). These results emphasize the importance of characterization of any particular clonal line of Reuber cells for studies of enzyme regulation, substrate metabolism, and hormone action. With respect to ACC, studies in contrasting clonal lines of Reuber cells could provide valuable clues to understanding both the complex mechanisms of intracellular ACC regulation in the absence and presence of hormones and its regulatory role(s) in overall hepatic lipid metabolism.

  12. Trans-specific gene silencing of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in a root-parasitic plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C G; Yoder, John I

    2013-05-01

    Parasitic species of the family Orobanchaceae are devastating agricultural pests in many parts of the world. The control of weedy Orobanchaceae spp. is challenging, particularly due to the highly coordinated life cycles of the parasite and host plants. Although host genetic resistance often provides the foundation of plant pathogen management, few genes that confer resistance to root parasites have been identified and incorporated into crop species. Members of the family Orobanchaceae acquire water, nutrients, macromolecules, and oligonucleotides from host plants through haustoria that connect parasite and host plant roots. We are evaluating a resistance strategy based on using interfering RNA (RNAi) that is made in the host but inhibitory in the parasite as a parasite-derived oligonucleotide toxin. Sequences from the cytosolic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) gene from Triphysaria versicolor were cloned in hairpin conformation and introduced into Medicago truncatula roots by Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation. Transgenic roots were recovered for four of five ACCase constructions and infected with T. versicolor against parasitic weeds. In all cases, Triphysaria root viability was reduced up to 80% when parasitizing a host root bearing the hairpin ACCase. Triphysaria root growth was recovered by exogenous application of malonate. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that ACCase transcript levels were dramatically decreased in Triphysaria spp. parasitizing transgenic Medicago roots. Northern blot analysis identified a 21-nucleotide, ACCase-specific RNA in transgenic M. truncatula and in T. versicolor attached to them. One hairpin ACCase construction was lethal to Medicago spp. unless grown in media supplemented with malonate. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the Medicago ACCase was inhibited by the Triphysaria ACCase RNAi. This work shows that ACCase is an effective target for inactivation in parasitic plants by trans-specific gene

  13. Synthesis of 4-thiouridine, 6-thioinosine, and 6-thioguanosine 3',5'-O-bisphosphates as donor molecules for RNA ligation and their application to the synthesis of photoactivatable TMG-capped U1 snRNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadokura, M; Wada, T; Seio, K; Sekine, M

    2000-08-25

    4-Thiouridine, 6-thioguanosine, and 6-thioinosine 3',5'-bisphosphates (9, 20, and 28) were synthesized in good yields by considerably improved methods. In the former two compounds, uridine and 2-N-phenylacetylguanosine were converted via transient O-trimethylsilylation to the corresponding 4- and 6-O-benzenesulfonyl intermediates (2 and 13), which, in turn, were allowed to react with 2-cyanoethanethiol in the presence of N-methylpyrrolidine to give 4-thiouridine (3) and 2-N-phenylacetyl-6-thioguanosine derivatives (14), respectively. In situ dimethoxytritylation of these thionucleoside derivatives gave the 5'-masked products 4 and 15 in high overall yields from 1 and 11. 6-S-(2-Cyanoethyl)-5'-O-(4,4'-dimethoxytrityl)-6-thioinosine (23) was synthesized via substitution of the 5'-O-tritylated 6-chloropurine riboside derivative 22 with 2-cyanoethanethiol. These S-(2-cyanoethyl)thionucleosides were converted to the 2'-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)ribonucleoside 3'-phosphoramidite derivatives 7, 18, and 26 or 3',5'-bisphosphate derivatives 8, 19, and 27. Treatment of 8, 19, and 27 with DBU gave thionucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphate derivatives 9, 20, and 28, which were found to be substrates of T4 RNA ligase. These thionucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates were examined as donors for ligation with m3(2,2,7) G5'pppAmUmA, i.e., the 5'-terminal tetranucleotide fragment of U1 snRNA, The 4-thiouridine 3',5'-bisphosphate derivative 9 was found to serve as the most active substrate of T4 RNA ligase with a reaction efficiency of 96%.

  14. Abundance and distribution of archaeal acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes indicative for putatively chemoautotrophic Archaea in the tropical Atlantic's interior

    OpenAIRE

    Bergauer, Kristin; Sintes, Eva; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Witte, Harry; Herndl, Gerhard J; Lueders, Tillmann

    2013-01-01

    Recently, evidence suggests that dark CO2 fixation in the pelagic realm of the ocean does not only occur in the suboxic and anoxic water bodies but also in the oxygenated meso- and bathypelagic waters of the North Atlantic. To elucidate the significance and phylogeny of the key organisms mediating dark CO2 fixation in the tropical Atlantic, we quantified functional genes indicative for CO2 fixation. We used a Q-PCR-based assay targeting the bifunctional acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase (a...

  15. AMPK activation represses the human gene promoter of the cardiac isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase: Role of nuclear respiratory factor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Tasneem; Opie, Lionel H. [Hatter Cardiovascular Research Institute, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Observatory 7925 (South Africa); Essop, M. Faadiel, E-mail: mfessop@sun.ac.za [Cardio-Metabolic Research Group (CMRG), Department of Physiological Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch 7600 (South Africa)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} AMPK inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta gene promoter activity. {yields} Nuclear respiratory factor-1 inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta promoter activity. {yields} AMPK regulates acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: The cardiac-enriched isoform of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC{beta}) produces malonyl-CoA, a potent inhibitor of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. AMPK inhibits ACC{beta} activity, lowering malonyl-CoA levels and promoting mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation. Previously, AMPK increased promoter binding of nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), a pivotal transcriptional modulator controlling gene expression of mitochondrial proteins. We therefore hypothesized that NRF-1 inhibits myocardial ACC{beta} promoter activity via AMPK activation. A human ACC{beta} promoter-luciferase construct was transiently transfected into neonatal cardiomyocytes {+-} a NRF-1 expression construct. NRF-1 overexpression decreased ACC{beta} gene promoter activity by 71 {+-} 4.6% (p < 0.001 vs. control). Transfections with 5'-end serial promoter deletions revealed that NRF-1-mediated repression of ACC{beta} was abolished with a pPII{beta}-18/+65-Luc deletion construct. AMPK activation dose-dependently reduced ACC{beta} promoter activity, while NRF-1 addition did not further decrease it. We also investigated NRF-1 inhibition in the presence of upstream stimulatory factor 1 (USF1), a known transactivator of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter. Here NRF-1 blunted USF1-dependent induction of ACC{beta} promoter activity by 58 {+-} 7.5% (p < 0.001 vs. control), reversed with a dominant negative NRF-1 construct. NRF-1 also suppressed endogenous USF1 transcriptional activity by 55 {+-} 6.2% (p < 0.001 vs. control). This study demonstrates that NRF-1 is a novel transcriptional inhibitor of the human ACC{beta} gene promoter in the mammalian heart. Our data extends AMPK regulation of ACC{beta} to the transcriptional level.

  16. Protein phosphatases active on acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylated by casein kinase I, casein kinase II and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witters, L.A.; Bacon, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    The protein phosphatases in rat liver cytosol, active on rat liver acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylated by casein kinase I, casein kinase II and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, have been partially purified by anion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The major phosphatase activities against all three substrates copurify through fractionation and appear to be identical to protein phosphatases 2A1 and 2A2. No unique protein phosphatase active on 32 P-ACC phosphorylated by the casein kinases was identified

  17. 3' Phosphatase activity toward phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2] by voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Takasuga, Shunsuke; Sakata, Souhei; Yamaguchi, Shinji; Horie, Shigeo; Homma, Koichi J; Sasaki, Takehiko; Okamura, Yasushi

    2012-06-19

    Voltage-sensing phosphatases (VSPs) consist of a voltage-sensor domain and a cytoplasmic region with remarkable sequence similarity to phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), a tumor suppressor phosphatase. VSPs dephosphorylate the 5' position of the inositol ring of both phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P(3)] and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] upon voltage depolarization. However, it is unclear whether VSPs also have 3' phosphatase activity. To gain insights into this question, we performed in vitro assays of phosphatase activities of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP) and transmembrane phosphatase with tensin homology (TPTE) and PTEN homologous inositol lipid phosphatase (TPIP; one human ortholog of VSP) with radiolabeled PI(3,4,5)P(3). TLC assay showed that the 3' phosphate of PI(3,4,5)P(3) was not dephosphorylated, whereas that of phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P(2)] was removed by VSPs. Monitoring of PI(3,4)P(2) levels with the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain from tandem PH domain-containing protein (TAPP1) fused with GFP (PH(TAPP1)-GFP) by confocal microscopy in amphibian oocytes showed an increase of fluorescence intensity during depolarization to 0 mV, consistent with 5' phosphatase activity of VSP toward PI(3,4,5)P(3). However, depolarization to 60 mV showed a transient increase of GFP fluorescence followed by a decrease, indicating that, after PI(3,4,5)P(3) is dephosphorylated at the 5' position, PI(3,4)P(2) is then dephosphorylated at the 3' position. These results suggest that substrate specificity of the VSP changes with membrane potential.

  18. Effect of glycolate on the activity of ribulosediphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases in C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ plants at different O/sub 2/ concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, L; Dimitrova, O [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. po Fiziologiya na Rasteniyata

    1981-01-01

    The experiments are carried out with pisum and maize plants grown in a chamber under controlled conditions. The activity of the two enzymes is recorded by the amount of fixed H/sup 14/CO/sub 3/ in acid-stable products of the reactions. The effect of glycolate on the activity of the carboxylating enzymes is largely related to the effect of O/sub 2/ on the activity of the RuDP and PEP carboxylases. The stimulating effect of glucolate on the activity of the carboxylating enzymes is probably of a regulatory significance. An essential conclusion is that O/sub 2/ attacks C/sub 4/ photosynthesis not only on inhibiting the RuDP carboxylase in bundle sheath cells, but it also inhibits the activity of the main carboxylating enzyme in C/sub 4/ plants-the PEP carboxylase.

  19. The effect of energy substrates on PHB accumulation of Acidiphilium cryptum DX1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-ling; Xia, Jin-lan; Song, Zhi-wen; Jiang, Peng; Xia, Yan; Wan, Min-xi; Zhang, Rui-yong; Yang, Yi; Liu, Ke-ke

    2013-09-01

    The effect of glucose and elemental sulfur on the growth and PHB accumulation of Acidiphilium cryptum DX1-1 was investigated. Meanwhile, the differential expressions of 19 genes related with PHB accumulation, sulfur metabolism and carbon fixed in heterotrophy, phytotrophy and mixotrophy were studied by RT-qPCR. The results showed that strain DX1-1 could accumulate PHB with sulfur as the energy substance and atmospheric CO2 as carbon resource. Glucose could improve the growth of strain DX1-1 cultured in medium with sulfur as the energy substance, and almost all the key enzyme-encoding genes related with PHB, sulfur metabolism and carbon fixed were basically up-regulated. PHB polymerase (Arcy_3030), ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (Acry_0825), ribulose-phosphate-epimerase (Acry_0022), and cysteine synthase A (Acry_2560) played important role in PHB accumulation, the modified expression of which could influence the PHB yield. With CO2 as carbon resource, the main initial substance of PHB accumulation for strain DX1-1 was acetyl-CoA, instead of acetate with the glucose as the carbon resource. Because of accumulating PHB by fixed atmospheric CO2 while independent of light, A. cryptum DX1-1 may have specifically potential in production of PHB.

  20. Influence of the nitrate concentration and source in the incorporation of 14CO2 by the RuBP-carboxylase from wheat (triticum aestivum) and maize (zea mays)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez Angulo, R.M.; Gines Diaz, M.J.; Garcia Pineda, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the concentration and source of nitrogen in the culture media has been studied regarding its influence in the activity of the RuBP-carboxylase from wheat and maize during the first month of development. Wheat and maize has been chosen as plants representatives of two different types of CO 2 assimilation: C3 and M- respectively. Plants have been grown in hydroponic media and under temperature, humidity and nutrient salts control. A negative effect of NH 4 has been observed in the enzymatic activity of wheat seedlings, being this effect more remarkable as NH 4 concentration increases and as long the time of treatment. In our experimental conditions the most favorable source of nitrogen has been N0 3 NH 4 . The specific activity of the enzyme from wheat is about four times higher than in maize, even it decreases with time. This decreasing has not been observed in maize, with the exception of total absence of nitrogen in the media. We have not seen significant differences between the two photo periods which have been tested. Also, no differences have been found in the enzyme activities at the different NO 3 NH 4 concentrations assayed, and it seems that RuBP-carboxylase metabolism is only affected in the case of absolute stress. (Author) 20 refs

  1. Carbon dioxide diffusion across stomata and mesophyll and photo-biochemical processes as affected by growth CO2 and phosphorus nutrition in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shardendu K; Badgujar, Girish; Reddy, Vangimalla R; Fleisher, David H; Bunce, James A

    2013-06-15

    Nutrients such as phosphorus may exert a major control over plant response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2), which is projected to double by the end of the 21st century. Elevated CO2 may overcome the diffusional limitations to photosynthesis posed by stomata and mesophyll and alter the photo-biochemical limitations resulting from phosphorus deficiency. To evaluate these ideas, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) was grown in controlled environment growth chambers with three levels of phosphate (Pi) supply (0.2, 0.05 and 0.01mM) and two levels of CO2 concentration (ambient 400 and elevated 800μmolmol(-1)) under optimum temperature and irrigation. Phosphate deficiency drastically inhibited photosynthetic characteristics and decreased cotton growth for both CO2 treatments. Under Pi stress, an apparent limitation to the photosynthetic potential was evident by CO2 diffusion through stomata and mesophyll, impairment of photosystem functioning and inhibition of biochemical process including the carboxylation efficiency of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxyganase and the rate of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration. The diffusional limitation posed by mesophyll was up to 58% greater than the limitation due to stomatal conductance (gs) under Pi stress. As expected, elevated CO2 reduced these diffusional limitations to photosynthesis across Pi levels; however, it failed to reduce the photo-biochemical limitations to photosynthesis in phosphorus deficient plants. Acclimation/down regulation of photosynthetic capacity was evident under elevated CO2 across Pi treatments. Despite a decrease in phosphorus, nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations in leaf tissue and reduced stomatal conductance at elevated CO2, the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf area when measured at the growth CO2 concentration tended to be higher for all except the lowest Pi treatment. Nevertheless, plant biomass increased at elevated CO2 across Pi nutrition with taller plants

  2. A thirty percent increase in UV-B has no impact on photosynthesis in well-watered and droughted pea plants in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, D.J.; Nogues, S.; Morison, J.I.L.; Greenslade, P.D.; McLeod, A.R.; Baker, N.R.

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that field experiments which increase UV-B irradiation by a fixed amount irrespective of ambient light conditions (‘square-wave’), may overestimate the response of photosynthesis to UV-B irradiation. In this study, pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants were grown in the field and subjected to a modulated 30% increase in ambient UK summer UV-B radiation (weighted with an erythemal action spectrum) and a mild drought treatment. UV-A and ambient UV control treatments were also studied. There were no significant effects of the UV-B treatment on the in situ CO 2 assimilation rate throughout the day or on the light-saturated steady-state photosynthesis. This was confirmed by an absence of UV-B effects on the major components contributing to CO 2 assimilation; photosystem II electron transport, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate regeneration, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase carboxylation, and stomatal conductance. In addition to the absence of an effect on photosynthetic activities, UV-B had no significant impact on plant biomass, leaf area or partitioning. UV-B exposure increased leaf flavonoid content. The UV-A treatment had no observable effect on photosynthesis or productivity. Mild drought resulted in reduced biomass, a change in partitioning away from shoots to roots whilst maintaining leaf area, but had no observable effect on photosynthetic competence. No UV-B and drought treatment interactions were observed on photosynthesis or plant biomass. In conclusion, a 30% increase in UV-B had no effects on photosynthetic performance or productivity in well-watered or droughted pea plants in the field. (author)

  3. Bottle gourd rootstock-grafting promotes photosynthesis by regulating the stomata and non-stomata performances in leaves of watermelon seedlings under NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanjuan; Yu, Li; Wang, Liping; Guo, Shirong

    2015-08-15

    Previously, we found that the amelioration of photosynthetic capacity by bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria Standl.) rootstock in watermelon seedlings (Citrullus lanatus [Thunb.] Mansf.) with salt treatment might be closely related to the enzymes in Calvin cycle such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Yang et al., 2012). We confirmed this and showed more details in this study that improved photosynthesis of watermelon plants by bottle gourd rootstock was associated with the decreased stomata resistance and the increased photochemical activity and photosynthetic metabolism with or without 100mM NaCl stress for 3 days. The analysis of gas exchange parameters showed that self-grafted plants suffered serious non-stomatal limitation to photosynthesis under salt stress while rootstock-grafted plants were mainly affected by stomata limitation in stress conditions. Further, results showed that NaCl stress markedly reduced the chlorophyll content, damaged the structure of photosynthetic apparatus, and inhibited photochemical activity and CO2 assimilation in self-grafted plants. In contrast, rootstock-grafting increased the chlorophyll content, especially chlorophyll b, and minimized the harmful effects on photosystem II (PSII) reaction center and the thylakoids structure induced by NaCl stress. Furthermore, rootstock-grafting enhanced the content and activity of Rubisco and thus elevated carbon fixation in the leaves of watermelon scions under salt stress. The gene expressions of enzymes related to ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) regeneration were also up-regulated by rootstock and this probably guaranteed the sufficient supply of RuBP for the operation of Calvin cycle in watermelon scions under salt stress. Thus, bottle gourd rootstock promoted photosynthesis by the activation of stomatal and non-stomatal abilities, especially the regulation of a variety of photosynthetic enzymes, including Rubisco in grafted watermelon plants under NaCl stress

  4. Adaxial/abaxial specification in the regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal opening with respect to light orientation and growth with CO2 enrichment in the C4 species Paspalum dilatatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Sofia; Driscoll, Simon P; Olmos, Enrique; Harbinson, Jeremy; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste; Foyer, Christine H

    2008-01-01

    Whole-plant morphology, leaf structure and composition were studied together with the effects of light orientation on the dorso-ventral regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in Paspalum dilatatum cv. Raki plants grown for 6 wk at either 350 or 700 microl l(-1) CO(2). Plant biomass was doubled as a result of growth at high CO(2) and the shoot:root ratio was decreased. Stomatal density was increased in the leaves of the high CO(2)-grown plants, which had greater numbers of smaller stomata and more epidermal cells on the abaxial surface. An asymmetric surface-specific regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was observed with respect to light orientation. This was not caused by dorso-ventral variations in leaf structure, the distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) proteins or light absorptance, transmittance or reflectance. Adaxial/abaxial specification in the regulation of photosynthesis results from differential sensitivity of stomatal opening to light orientation and fixed gradients of enzyme activation across the leaf.

  5. Improved analysis of C4 and C3 photosynthesis via refined in vitro assays of their carbon fixation biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharwood, Robert E.; Sonawane, Balasaheb V.; Ghannoum, Oula; Whitney, Spencer M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants operating C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways exhibit differences in leaf anatomy and photosynthetic carbon fixation biochemistry. Fully understanding this underpinning biochemical variation is requisite to identifying solutions for improving photosynthetic efficiency and growth. Here we refine assay methods for accurately measuring the carboxylase and decarboxylase activities in C3 and C4 plant soluble protein. We show that differences in plant extract preparation and assay conditions are required to measure NADP-malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pH 8, Mg2+, 22 °C) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pH 7, >2mM Mn2+, no Mg2+) maximal activities accurately. We validate how the omission of MgCl2 during leaf protein extraction, lengthy (>1min) centrifugation times, and the use of non-pure ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) significantly underestimate Rubisco activation status. We show how Rubisco activation status varies with leaf ontogeny and is generally lower in mature C4 monocot leaves (45–60% activation) relative to C3 monocots (55–90% activation). Consistent with their >3-fold lower Rubisco contents, full Rubisco activation in soluble protein from C4 leaves (<5min) was faster than in C3 plant samples (<10min), with addition of Rubisco activase not required for full activation. We conclude that Rubisco inactivation in illuminated leaves primarily stems from RuBP binding to non-carbamylated enzyme, a state readily reversible by dilution during cellular protein extraction. PMID:27122573

  6. Bacterial microcompartments as metabolic modules for plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Esquer, C Raul; Newnham, Sarah E; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are megadalton-sized protein assemblies that enclose segments of metabolic pathways within cells. They increase the catalytic efficiency of the encapsulated enzymes while sequestering volatile or toxic intermediates from the bulk cytosol. The first BMCs discovered were the carboxysomes of cyanobacteria. Carboxysomes compartmentalize the enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) with carbonic anhydrase. They enhance the carboxylase activity of RuBisCO by increasing the local concentration of CO2 in the vicinity of the enzyme's active site. As a metabolic module for carbon fixation, carboxysomes could be transferred to eukaryotic organisms (e.g. plants) to increase photosynthetic efficiency. Within the scope of synthetic biology, carboxysomes and other BMCs hold even greater potential when considered a source of building blocks for the development of nanoreactors or three-dimensional scaffolds to increase the efficiency of either native or heterologously expressed enzymes. The carboxysome serves as an ideal model system for testing approaches to engineering BMCs because their expression in cyanobacteria provides a sensitive screen for form (appearance of polyhedral bodies) and function (ability to grow on air). We recount recent progress in the re-engineering of the carboxysome shell and core to offer a conceptual framework for the development of BMC-based architectures for applications in plant synthetic biology. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Characterization of C₃--C₄ intermediate species in the genus Heliotropium L. (Boraginaceae): anatomy, ultrastructure and enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhaidat, Riyadh; Sage, Tammy L; Frohlich, Michael W; Dengler, Nancy G; Sage, Rowan F

    2011-10-01

    Photosynthetic pathway characteristics were studied in nine species of Heliotropium (sensu lato, including Euploca), using assessments of leaf anatomy and ultrastructure, activities of PEP carboxylase and C₄ acid decarboxylases, and immunolocalization of ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the P-subunit of glycine decarboxylase (GDC). Heliotropium europaeum, Heliotropium calcicola and Heliotropium tenellum are C₃ plants, while Heliotropium texanum and Heliotropium polyphyllum are C₄ species. Heliotropium procumbens and Heliotropium karwinskyi are functionally C₃, but exhibit 'proto-Kranz' anatomy where bundle sheath (BS) cells are enlarged and mitochondria primarily occur along the centripetal (inner) wall of the BS cells; GDC is present throughout the leaf. Heliotropium convolvulaceum and Heliotropium greggii are C₃--C₄ intermediates, with Kranz-like enlargement of the BS cells, localization of mitochondria along the inner BS wall and a loss of GDC in the mesophyll (M) tissue. These C₃--C₄ species of Heliotropium probably shuttle photorespiratory glycine from the M to the BS tissue for decarboxylation. Heliotropium represents an important new model for studying C₄ evolution. Where existing models such as Flaveria emphasize diversification of C₃--C₄ intermediates, Heliotropium has numerous C₃ species expressing proto-Kranz traits that could represent a critical initial phase in the evolutionary origin of C₄ photosynthesis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Occurrence of a number of enzymes involved in either gluconeogenesis or other processes in the pericarp of three cultivars of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famiani, Franco; Moscatello, Stefano; Ferradini, Nicoletta; Gardi, Tiziano; Battistelli, Alberto; Walker, Robert P

    2014-11-01

    It is uncertain whether the enzymes pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) or isocitrate lyase (ICL) are present in the pericarp of grape, in which they could function in gluconeogenesis. The occurrence of these and other enzymes was investigated in the pericarp of three cultivars of grape (Vitis vinifera L.). In particular, the abundance of the enzymes aldolase, glutamine synthase (GS), acid invertase, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), PPDK and ICL were determined during the development of the pericarp of the cultivars Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay and Zibibbo. PPDK and ICL were not detected at any stage of development. Each of the other enzymes showed different changes in abundance during development. However, for a given enzyme its changes in abundance were similar in each cultivar. In the ripe pericarp of Cabernet Sauvignon, PEPC, cytosolic GS and aldolase were equally distributed between the vasculature and parenchyma cells of the flesh and skin. The absence or very low abundance of PPDK provides strong evidence that any gluconeogenesis from malate utilises phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). The absence or very low abundance of ICL in the pericarp precludes any gluconeogenesis from ethanol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Fe deficiency induced changes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwen; Xu, Chao; Li, Kang; Cai, Xiaojie; Wu, Min; Chen, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important abiotic stress that limits productivity of crops all over the world. We selected a hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.), LYPJ, which is super high-yield and widely cultured in China, to investigate changes in the components and structure of thylakoid membranes and photosynthetic performance in response to iron deficiency. Our results demonstrated that photosystem I (PSI) is the primary target for iron deficiency, while the changes in photosystem II (PSII) are important for rebuilding a balance in disrupted energy utilization and dissipation caused by differential degradation of photosynthetic components. The result of immunoblot analysis suggested that the core subunit PsaA declined drastically, while PsbA remained relatively stable. Furthermore, several organizational changes of the photosynthetic apparatus were found by BN-PAGE, including a marked decrease in the PSI core complexes, the Cytb 6 /f complex, and the trimeric form of the LHCII antenna, consistent with the observed unstacking grana. The fluorescence induction analysis indicated a descending PSII activity with energy dissipation enhanced markedly. In addition, we proposed that the crippled CO 2 assimilation could be compensated by the enhanced of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which is suggested by the decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and photosynthetic efficiency.

  10. Elevated CO{sub 2} does not ameliorate effects of ozone on carbon allocation in Pinus halepensis and Betula pendula in symbiosis with Paxillus involutus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kytoeviita, M.M. [Oulu Univ., Dept. of Biology, Oulu (Finland); Pelloux, J.; Fontaine, V.; Botton, B.; Dizengremel, P. [Univ. Henri Poincare-Nancy, Lab. de Biologie Forestiere Associe INRA, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1999-07-01

    The effect of 700 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1}, 200 nmol ozone mol{sup -1} and a combination of the two on carbon allocation was examined in Pinus halepensis co-cultured with Betula pendula in symbiosis with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus. The results show that under low nutrient and ozone levels, elevated CO{sub 2} has no effect on the growth of B. pendula or P. halepensis seedlings nor on net carbon partitioning between plant parts. Elevated CO{sub 2} did not enhance the growth of the fungus in symbiosis with the birch. On the other hand, ozone had a strong negative effect on the growth of the birch, which corresponded with the significantly reduced growth rates of the fungus. Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} did not ameliorate the negative effects of ozone on birch; in contrast, it acted as an additional stress factor. Neither ozone nor CO{sub 2} had significant effects on biomass accumulation in the pine seedlings. Ozone stimulated the spread of mycorrhizal infection from the birch seedlings to neighbouring pines and had no statistically significant effects on phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activity in the pine needles or on PEPC activity in pine roots. (au)

  11. Recombinant micro-organism for use in method with increased product yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Maris, A.J.A.; Pronk, J.T.; Guadalupe Medina, V.G.; Wisselink, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    The invention relates to a recombinant yeast cell, in particular a transgenic yeast cell, functionally expressing one or more recombinant, in particular heterologous, nucleic acid sequences encoding ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK). The invention

  12. FGF21 does not require adipocyte AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) to mediate improvements in whole-body glucose homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottillo, Emilio P; Desjardins, Eric M; Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel

    2017-01-01

    1β2AKO) and littermate controls were fed a high fat diet (HFD) and treated with native FGF21 or saline for two weeks. Additionally, HFD-fed mice with knock-in mutations on the AMPK phosphorylation sites of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)1 and ACC2 (DKI mice) along with wild-type (WT) controls received...

  13. Photoperiodism and crassulacean acid metabolism : I. Immunological and kinetic evidences for different patterns of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoforms in photoperiodically inducible and non-inducible Crassulacean acid metabolism plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulfert, J; Müller, D; Kluge, M; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Plants of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb and Sedum morganianum E. Walth. were grown under controlled photoperiodic conditions under either short or long days. Gaz exchange measurements confirmed that in K. blossfeldiana Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) was photoperiodically inducible and that S. morganianum performed CAM independently of photoperiod. With K. blossfeldiana, a comparison of catalytic and regulatory properties of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) from short-day and long-day grown plants showed differences, but not with S. morganianum. Ouchterlony double diffusion tests and immunotitration experiments (using a S. morganianum PEPC antibody) established that CAM is induced in K. blossfeldiana-but not in S. morganianum-through the synthesis of a new PEPC isoform; this form shows an immunological behavior different from that prevailing under non-inductive conditions and can be considered as specific for CAM performance.

  14. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  15. Photoperiodism and Crassulacean acid metabolism : III. Different characteristics of the photoperiod-sensitive and non-sensitive isoforms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and Crassulacean acid metabolism operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulfert, J; Queiroz, O

    1982-05-01

    Sensitivity to glucose-6-P, inorganic phosphate and malate, Km phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and the effect of pH were comparatively investigated for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) extracted along the day-night cycle from leaves of Kalanchoe blossfeldiana v. Poelln. Tom Thumb, grown under different photoperiodic conditions. Under long days, sensitivity to effectors is weak and varies only slightly during the 24h cycle, together with small variations of Km (PEP), ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 mM. The response-curve to pH shows two peaks for pH 7.4 and 8.4. Transfer of the plants to short days established an increase in the sensitivity of the enzyme to the effectors together with the appearance of a day-night variation of this effect, maximum during the day. A clear diurnal oscillation of Km (PEP) is observed from 3.1 mM at the beginning of day (09.00 h) to 0.9 mM at midnight (00.00 h), at pH 7.4. These results complement previous electrophoretic and immunological data by affording enzyme kinetic evidence that short days induce a PEP carboxylase form responsible for full-Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) operation which is kinetically different from the photoperiod-sensitive, C3-like form prevailing in young leaves under long days. The results indicate that diurnal enzymic rhythms would improve the efficiency of the metabolic regulatory mechanisms and act as a coordinating factor for the daily and seasonal adaptive operation of CAM.

  16. Role of an Essential Acyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase in the Primary and Secondary Metabolism of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E.; Banchio, C.; Diacovich, L.; Bibb, M. J.; Gramajo, H.

    2001-01-01

    Two genes, accB and accE, that form part of the same operon, were cloned from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). AccB is homologous to the carboxyl transferase domain of several propionyl coezyme A (CoA) carboxylases and acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) of actinomycete origin, while AccE shows no significant homology to any known protein. Expression of accB and accE in Escherichia coli and subsequent in vitro reconstitution of enzyme activity in the presence of the biotinylated protein AccA1 or AccA2 confirmed that AccB was the carboxyl transferase subunit of an ACCase. The additional presence of AccE considerably enhanced the activity of the enzyme complex, suggesting that this small polypeptide is a functional component of the ACCase. The impossibility of obtaining an accB null mutant and the thiostrepton growth dependency of a tipAp accB conditional mutant confirmed that AccB is essential for S. coelicolor viability. Normal growth phenotype in the absence of the inducer was restored in the conditional mutant by the addition of exogenous long-chain fatty acids in the medium, indicating that the inducer-dependent phenotype was specifically related to a conditional block in fatty acid biosynthesis. Thus, AccB, together with AccA2, which is also an essential protein (E. Rodriguez and H. Gramajo, Microbiology 143:3109–3119, 1999), are the most likely components of an ACCase whose main physiological role is the synthesis of malonyl-CoA, the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis. Although normal growth of the conditional mutant was restored by fatty acids, the cultures did not produce actinorhodin or undecylprodigiosin, suggesting a direct participation of this enzyme complex in the supply of malonyl-CoA for the synthesis of these secondary metabolites. PMID:11526020

  17. Phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate underlies agmatine-induced suppression of N-type Ca2+ channel in rat celiac ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Jeong, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Duck-Sun; Chung, Seungsoo

    2017-03-04

    Agmatine suppresses peripheral sympathetic tone by modulating Cav2.2 channels in peripheral sympathetic neurons. However, the detailed cellular signaling mechanism underlying the agmatine-induced Cav2.2 inhibition remains unclear. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the electrophysiological mechanism for the agmatine-induced inhibition of Cav2.2 current (I Cav2.2 ) in rat celiac ganglion (CG) neurons. Consistent with previous reports, agmatine inhibited I Cav2.2 in a VI manner. The agmatine-induced inhibition of the I Cav2.2 current was also almost completely hindered by the blockade of the imidazoline I 2 receptor (IR 2 ), and an IR 2 agonist mimicked the inhibitory effect of agmatine on I Cav2.2 , implying involvement of IR 2 . The agmatine-induced I Cav2.2 inhibition was significantly hampered by the blockade of G protein or phospholipase C (PLC), but not by the pretreatment with pertussis toxin. In addition, diC8-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) dialysis nearly completely hampered agmatine-induced inhibition, which became irreversible when PIP 2 resynthesis was blocked. These results suggest that in rat peripheral sympathetic neurons, agmatine-induced IR 2 activation suppresses Cav2.2 channel voltage-independently, and that the PLC-dependent PIP 2 hydrolysis is responsible for the agmatine-induced suppression of the Cav2.2 channel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein and the role of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate in its membrane binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prchal, Jan; Srb, Pavel; Hunter, Eric; Ruml, Tomáš; Hrabal, Richard

    2012-10-26

    We determined the solution structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein by NMR spectroscopy. The myristoyl group is buried inside the protein and causes a slight reorientation of the helices. This reorientation leads to the creation of a binding site for phosphatidylinositols. The interaction between the matrix protein and phosphatidylinositols carrying C(8) fatty acid chains was monitored by observation of concentration-dependent chemical shift changes of the affected amino acid residues, a saturation transfer difference experiment and changes in (31)P chemical shifts. No differences in the binding mode or affinity were observed with differently phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols. The structure of the matrix protein-phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] complex was then calculated with HADDOCK software based on the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement contacts between the ligand and the matrix protein obtained from a (13)C-filtered/(13)C-edited nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiment. PI(4,5)P(2) binding was not strong enough for triggering of the myristoyl-switch. The structural changes of the myristoylated matrix protein were also found to result in a drop in the oligomerization capacity of the protein. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) Specifically Induces Membrane Penetration and Deformation by Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) Domains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Youngdae; Zhang, Xiuqi; Cho, Wonhwa

    2012-01-01

    Cellular proteins containing Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domains play a key role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Despite extensive structural and functional studies of BAR domains, it is still unknown how exactly these domains interact with the plasma membrane containing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) and whether they function by a universal mechanism or by different mechanisms. Here we report that PtdIns(4,5)P2 specifically induces partial membrane penetration of the N-terminal amphiphilic α-helix (H0) of two representative N-BAR domains from Drosophila amphiphysin (dAmp-BAR) and rat endophilin A1 (EndoA1-BAR). Our quantitative fluorescence imaging analysis shows that PtdIns(4,5)P2-dependent membrane penetration of H0 is important for self-association of membrane-bound dAmp-BAR and EndoA1-BAR and their membrane deformation activity. EndoA1-BAR behaves differently from dAmp-BAR because the former has an additional amphiphilic α-helix that penetrates the membrane in a PtdIns(4,5)P2-independent manner. Depletion of PtdIns(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells abrogated the membrane deforming activity of EndoA1-BAR and dAmp-BAR. Collectively, these studies suggest that the local PtdIns(4,5)P2 concentration in the plasma membrane may regulate the membrane interaction and deformation by N-BAR domain-containing proteins during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:22888025

  20. Signal-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate without activation of phospholipase C: implications on gating of Drosophila TRPL (transient receptor potential-like) channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Shaya; Katz, Ben; Tzarfaty, Vered; Minke, Baruch

    2012-01-06

    In Drosophila, a phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated signaling cascade, couples photo-excitation of rhodopsin to the opening of the transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) channels. A lipid product of PLC, diacylglycerol (DAG), and its metabolites, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may function as second messengers of channel activation. However, how can one separate between the increase in putative second messengers, change in pH, and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) depletion when exploring the TRPL gating mechanism? To answer this question we co-expressed the TRPL channels together with the muscarinic (M1) receptor, enabling the openings of TRPL channels via G-protein activation of PLC. To dissect PLC activation of TRPL into its molecular components, we used a powerful method that reduced plasma membrane-associated PI(4,5)P(2) in HEK cells within seconds without activating PLC. Upon the addition of a dimerizing drug, PI(4,5)P(2) was selectively hydrolyzed in the cell membrane without producing DAG, inositol trisphosphate, or calcium signals. We show that PI(4,5)P(2) is not an inhibitor of TRPL channel activation. PI(4,5)P(2) hydrolysis combined with either acidification or application of DAG analogs failed to activate the channels, whereas PUFA did activate the channels. Moreover, a reduction in PI(4,5)P(2) levels or inhibition of DAG lipase during PLC activity suppressed the PLC-activated TRPL current. This suggests that PI(4,5)P(2) is a crucial substrate for PLC-mediated activation of the channels, whereas PUFA may function as the channel activator. Together, this study defines a narrow range of possible mechanisms for TRPL gating.

  1. Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by a reduced sensitivity of Kv7.2 potassium channels to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Ambrosino, Paolo; Mosca, Ilaria; De Maria, Michela; Moretto, Edoardo; Miceli, Francesco; Alaimo, Alessandro; Iraci, Nunzio; Manocchio, Laura; Medoro, Alessandro; Passafaro, Maria; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 subunits underlie the M-current, a neuronal K + current characterized by an absolute functional requirement for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). Kv7.2 gene mutations cause early-onset neonatal seizures with heterogeneous clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting benign familial neonatal seizures to severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (Kv7.2-EE). In this study, the biochemical and functional consequences prompted by a recurrent variant (R325G) found independently in four individuals with severe forms of neonatal-onset EE have been investigated. Upon heterologous expression, homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channels were non-functional, despite biotin-capture in Western blots revealed normal plasma membrane subunit expression. Mutant subunits exerted dominant-negative effects when incorporated into heteromeric channels with Kv7.2 and/or Kv7.3 subunits. Increasing cellular PIP 2 levels by co-expression of type 1γ PI(4)P5-kinase (PIP5K) partially recovered homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channel function. Currents carried by heteromeric channels incorporating Kv7.2 R325G subunits were more readily inhibited than wild-type channels upon activation of a voltage-sensitive phosphatase (VSP), and recovered more slowly upon VSP switch-off. These results reveal for the first time that a mutation-induced decrease in current sensitivity to PIP 2 is the primary molecular defect responsible for Kv7.2-EE in individuals carrying the R325G variant, further expanding the range of pathogenetic mechanisms exploitable for personalized treatment of Kv7.2-related epilepsies.

  2. Phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase Fig 4p is required for both acute rise and subsequent fall in stress-induced phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duex, Jason E; Nau, Johnathan J; Kauffman, Emily J; Weisman, Lois S

    2006-04-01

    Phosphoinositide lipids regulate complex events via the recruitment of proteins to a specialized region of the membrane at a specific time. Precise control of both the synthesis and turnover of phosphoinositide lipids is integral to membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Little is known about the acute regulation of the levels of these signaling lipids. When Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are treated with hyperosmotic medium the levels of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI3,5P(2)) increase 20-fold. Here we show that this 20-fold increase is rapid and occurs within 5 min. Surprisingly, these elevated levels are transient. Fifteen minutes following hyperosmotic shock they decrease at a rapid rate, even though the cells remain in hyperosmotic medium. In parallel with the rapid increase in the levels of PI3,5P(2), vacuole volume decreases rapidly. Furthermore, concomitant with a return to basal levels of PI3,5P(2) vacuole volume is restored. We show that Fig 4p, consistent with its proposed role as a PI3,5P(2) 5-phosphatase, is required in vivo for this rapid return to basal levels of PI3,5P(2). Surprisingly, we find that Fig 4p is also required for the hyperosmotic shock-induced increase in PI3,5P(2) levels. These findings demonstrate that following hyperosmotic shock, large, transient changes occur in the levels of PI3,5P(2) and further suggest that Fig 4p is important in regulating both the acute rise and subsequent fall in PI3,5P(2) levels.

  3. Plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate is required for internalization of foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Vázquez-Calvo

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, PI(4,5P(2, is a phospholipid which plays important roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. To investigate the possible role of this lipid on viral entry, two viruses important for animal health were selected: the enveloped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV - which uses a well characterized clathrin mediated endocytic route - and two different variants of the non-enveloped foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV with distinct receptor specificities. The expression of a dominant negative dynamin, a PI(4,5P(2 effector protein, inhibited the internalization and infection of VSV and both FMDV isolates. Depletion of PI(4,5P(2 from plasma membrane using ionomycin or an inducible system, and inhibition of its de novo synthesis with 1-butanol revealed that VSV as well as FMDV C-S8c1, which uses integrins as receptor, displayed a high dependence on PI(4,5P(2 for internalization. Expression of a kinase dead mutant (KD of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase Iα (PIP5K-Iα, an enzyme responsible for PI(4,5P(2 synthesis that regulates clathrin-dependent endocytosis, also impaired entry and infection of VSV and FMDV C-S8c1. Interestingly FMDV MARLS variant that uses receptors other than integrins for cell entry was less sensitive to PI(4,5P(2 depletion, and was not inhibited by the expression of the KD PIP5K-Iα mutant suggesting the involvement of endocytic routes other than the clathrin-mediated on its entry. These results highlight the role of PI(4,5P(2 and PIP5K-Iα on clathrin-mediated viral entry.

  4. Differential Response of Floating and Submerged Leaves of Longleaf Pondweed to Silver Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Shabnam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have investigated variations in the potential of floating and submerged leaves of longleaf pondweed (Potamogeton nodosus to withstand silver ion (Ag+-toxicity. Both floating and submerged leaves changed clear colorless AgNO3 solutions to colloidal brown in the presence of light. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of distinct crystalline Ag-nanoparticles (Ag-NPs in these brown solutions. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern showed that Ag-NPs were composed of Ag0 and Ag2O. Photosystem (PS II efficiency of leaves declined upon exposure to Ag+ with a significantly higher decline in the submerged leaves than in the floating leaves. Similarly, Ag+ treatment caused a significant reduction in the carboxylase activity of the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in leaves. The reduction in this carboxylase activity was significantly higher in the submerged than in the floating leaves. Ag+ treatment also resulted in a significant decline in the levels of non-enzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants; the decline was significantly lower in the floating than in submerged leaves. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the presence of Ag2O in these leaves. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis revealed a three-fold higher Ag content in the submerged than in floating leaves. Our study demonstrates that floating leaves of longleaf pondweed have a superior potential to counter Ag+-toxicity compared with submerged leaves, which could be due to superior potential of floating leaves to reduce Ag+ to less/non-toxic Ag0/Ag2O-nanoparticles/nanocomplexes. We suggest that modulating the genotype of longleaf pondweed to bear higher proportion of floating leaves would help in cleaning fresh water bodies contaminated with ionic forms of heavy metals.

  5. An unusual insertion/deletion in the gene encoding the β-subunit of propionyl-CoA carboxylase is a frequent mutation in Caucasian propionic acidemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, T.; Kraus, J.P.; Rosenberg, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inherited disorder of organic acid metabolism that is caused by deficiency of propionly-CoA carboxylase. Affected patients fall into two complementation groups, pccA and pccBC (subgroups B, C, and BC), resulting from deficiency of the nonidentical α and β subunits of PCC, respectively. The authors have detected an unusual insertion/deletion in the DNA of patients from the pccBC and pccC subgroups that replaces 14 nucleotides in the coding sequence of the β subunit with 12 nucleotides unrelated to this region of the gene. Among 14 unrelated Caucasian patients in the pccBc complementation group, this unique mutation was found in 8 of 28 mutant alleles examined. Mutant allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization to amplified genomic DNAs revealed that the inserted 12 nucleotides do not originate in an ∼1000-bp region around the mutation. In the course of the investigation, they identified another mutation in the same exon: a 3-bp in-frame deletion that eliminates one of two isoleucine codons immediately preceding the Msp I site. Two unrelated patients were compound heterozygotes for this single-codon deletion and for the insertion/deletion described above. They conclude that either there is a propensity for the PCC β-subunit gene to undergo mutations of this sort at this position or, more likely, the mutations in all of the involved Caucasian patients have a common origin in preceding generations

  6. Decreasing the Rate of Metabolic Ketone Reduction in the Discovery of a Clinical Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, David A. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kung, Daniel W. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Esler, William P. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Amor, Paul A. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bagley, Scott W. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Beysen, Carine [KineMed Inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Carvajal-Gonzalez, Santos [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Doran, Shawn D. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Limberakis, Chris [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Mathiowetz, Alan M. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); McPherson, Kirk [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Price, David A. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ravussin, Eric [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Sonnenberg, Gabriele E. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Southers, James A. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Sweet, Laurel J. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States); Turner, Scott M. [KineMed Inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Vajdos, Felix F. [Pfizer Worldwide Research and Development, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-12-26

    We found that Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) inhibitors offer significant potential for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hepatic steatosis, and cancer. However, the identification of tool compounds suitable to test the hypothesis in human trials has been challenging. An advanced series of spirocyclic ketone-containing ACC inhibitors recently reported by Pfizer were metabolized in vivo by ketone reduction, which complicated human pharmacology projections. Here, we disclose that this metabolic reduction can be greatly attenuated through introduction of steric hindrance adjacent to the ketone carbonyl. Incorporation of weakly basic functionality improved solubility and led to the identification of 9 as a clinical candidate for the treatment of T2DM. Phase I clinical studies demonstrated dose-proportional increases in exposure, single-dose inhibition of de novo lipogenesis (DNL), and changes in indirect calorimetry consistent with increased whole-body fatty acid oxidation. This demonstration of target engagement validates the use of compound 9 to evaluate the role of DNL in human disease.

  7. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Inhibition Reduces Hepatic Steatosis but Elevates Plasma Triglycerides in Mice and Humans: A Bedside to Bench Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chai-Wan; Addy, Carol; Kusunoki, Jun; Anderson, Norma N; Deja, Stanislaw; Fu, Xiaorong; Burgess, Shawn C; Li, Cai; Ruddy, Marcie; Chakravarthy, Manu; Previs, Steve; Milstein, Stuart; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Kelley, David E; Horton, Jay D

    2017-08-01

    Inhibiting lipogenesis prevents hepatic steatosis in rodents with insulin resistance. To determine if reducing lipogenesis functions similarly in humans, we developed MK-4074, a liver-specific inhibitor of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) and (ACC2), enzymes that produce malonyl-CoA for fatty acid synthesis. MK-4074 administered to subjects with hepatic steatosis for 1 month lowered lipogenesis, increased ketones, and reduced liver triglycerides by 36%. Unexpectedly, MK-4074 increased plasma triglycerides by 200%. To further investigate, mice that lack ACC1 and ACC2 in hepatocytes (ACC dLKO) were generated. Deletion of ACCs decreased polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) concentrations in liver due to reduced malonyl-CoA, which is required for elongation of essential fatty acids. PUFA deficiency induced SREBP-1c, which increased GPAT1 expression and VLDL secretion. PUFA supplementation or siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPAT1 normalized plasma triglycerides. Thus, inhibiting lipogenesis in humans reduced hepatic steatosis, but inhibiting ACC resulted in hypertriglyceridemia due to activation of SREBP-1c and increased VLDL secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear-cytoplasmic conflict in pea (Pisum sativum L. is associated with nuclear and plastidic candidate genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera S Bogdanova

    Full Text Available In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L., nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized.

  9. Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Conflict in Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Is Associated with Nuclear and Plastidic Candidate Genes Encoding Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, Vera S.; Zaytseva, Olga O.; Mglinets, Anatoliy V.; Shatskaya, Natalia V.; Kosterin, Oleg E.; Vasiliev, Gennadiy V.

    2015-01-01

    In crosses of wild and cultivated peas (Pisum sativum L.), nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility frequently occurs manifested as decreased pollen fertility, male gametophyte lethality, sporophyte lethality. High-throughput sequencing of plastid genomes of one cultivated and four wild pea accessions differing in cross-compatibility was performed. Candidate genes for involvement in the nuclear-plastid conflict were searched in the reconstructed plastid genomes. In the annotated Medicago truncatula genome, nuclear candidate genes were searched in the portion syntenic to the pea chromosome region known to harbor a locus involved in the conflict. In the plastid genomes, a substantial variability of the accD locus represented by nucleotide substitutions and indels was found to correspond to the pattern of cross-compatibility among the accessions analyzed. Amino acid substitutions in the polypeptides encoded by the alleles of a nuclear locus, designated as Bccp3, with a complementary function to accD, fitted the compatibility pattern. The accD locus in the plastid genome encoding beta subunit of the carboxyltransferase of acetyl-coA carboxylase and the nuclear locus Bccp3 encoding biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the same multi-subunit enzyme were nominated as candidate genes for main contribution to nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility in peas. Existence of another nuclear locus involved in the accD-mediated conflict is hypothesized. PMID:25789472

  10. Chromium downregulates the expression of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 gene in lipogenic tissues of domestic goats: a potential strategy for meat quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Zali, Abolfazl; Moradi-Shahrebabak, Hossein; Mousapour, Hojatollah

    2014-06-15

    Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carboxylation of Acetyl CoA to form Malonyl CoA, the key intermediate metabolite in fatty acid synthesis. In this study, the mRNA expression of the ACC1 gene was evaluated in four different tissues (liver, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and longissimus muscle) of the domestic goat (Capra hircus) kids feeding on four different levels of trivalent chromium (0, 0.5, 1, and 1.5mg/day) as food supplementation. RT-qPCR technique was used for expression analyses and heat shock protein 90 gene (HSP-90) was considered as reference gene for data normalization. Our results revealed that 1.5mg/day chromium significantly reduced the expression of the ACC1 gene in liver, visceral fat, and subcutaneous fat tissues, but not in longissimus muscles (Pmeat quality in domestic animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening Phosphorylation Site Mutations in Yeast Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase Using Malonyl-CoA Sensor to Improve Malonyl-CoA-Derived Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2018-01-01

    Malonyl-coenzyme A (malonyl-CoA) is a critical precursor for the biosynthesis of a variety of biochemicals. It is synthesized by the catalysis of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc1p), which was demonstrated to be deactivated by the phosphorylation of Snf1 protein kinase in yeast. In this study, we designed a synthetic malonyl-CoA biosensor and used it to screen phosphorylation site mutations of Acc1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Thirteen phosphorylation sites were mutated, and a combination of three site mutations in Acc1p, S686A, S659A, and S1157A, was found to increase malonyl-CoA availability. ACC1 S686AS659AS1157A expression also improved the production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid, a malonyl-CoA-derived chemical, compared to both wild type and the previously reported ACC1 S659AS1157A mutation. This mutation will also be beneficial for other malonyl-CoA-derived products.

  12. Maternal obesity reduces milk lipid production in lactating mice by inhibiting acetyl-CoA carboxylase and impairing fatty acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saben, Jessica L; Bales, Elise S; Jackman, Matthew R; Orlicky, David; MacLean, Paul S; McManaman, James L

    2014-01-01

    Maternal metabolic and nutrient trafficking adaptations to lactation differ among lean and obese mice fed a high fat (HF) diet. Obesity is thought to impair milk lipid production, in part, by decreasing trafficking of dietary and de novo synthesized lipids to the mammary gland. Here, we report that de novo lipogenesis regulatory mechanisms are disrupted in mammary glands of lactating HF-fed obese (HF-Ob) mice. HF feeding decreased the total levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC), and this effect was exacerbated in obese mice. The relative levels of phosphorylated (inactive) ACC, were elevated in the epithelium, and decreased in the adipose stroma, of mammary tissue from HF-Ob mice compared to those of HF-fed lean (HF-Ln) mice. Mammary gland levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which catalyzes formation of inactive ACC, were also selectively elevated in mammary glands of HF-Ob relative to HF-Ln dams or to low fat fed dams. These responses correlated with evidence of increased lipid retention in mammary adipose, and decreased lipid levels in mammary epithelial cells, of HF-Ob dams. Collectively, our data suggests that maternal obesity impairs milk lipid production, in part, by disrupting the balance of de novo lipid synthesis in the epithelial and adipose stromal compartments of mammary tissue through processes that appear to be related to increased mammary gland AMPK activity, ACC inhibition, and decreased fatty acid synthesis.

  13. Biotin augments acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 gene expression in the hypothalamus, leading to the suppression of food intake in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Hideyuki; Kamiyama, Shin; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Fujino, Kaho; Kubo, Shizuka; Miyazawa, Masami; Shirato, Saya; Hiroi, Yuka; Shiozawa, Kota

    2016-07-29

    It is known that biotin prevents the development of diabetes by increasing the functions of pancreatic beta-cells and improving insulin sensitivity in the periphery. However, its anti-obesity effects such as anorectic effects remain to be clarified. Acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), a biotin-dependent enzyme, has two isoforms (ACC1 and ACC2) and serves to catalyze the reaction of acetyl CoA to malonyl CoA. In the hypothalamus, ACC2 increases the production of malonyl CoA, which acts as a satiety signal. In this study, we investigated whether biotin increases the gene expression of ACC2 in the hypothalamus and suppresses food intake in mice administered excessive biotin. Food intake was significantly decreased by biotin, but plasma regulators of appetite, including glucose, ghrelin, and leptin, were not affected. On the other hand, biotin notably accumulated in the hypothalamus and enhanced ACC2 gene expression there, but it did not change the gene expression of ACC1, malonyl CoA decarboxylase (a malonyl CoA-degrading enzyme), and AMP-activated protein kinase α-2 (an ACC-inhibitory enzyme). These findings strongly suggest that biotin potentiates the suppression of appetite by upregulating ACC2 gene expression in the hypothalamus. This effect of biotin may contribute to the prevention of diabetes by biotin treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Subunits of Heteromeric Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase in Gossypium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinping Hua

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acetyl-CoA carboxylase is an important enzyme, which catalyzes acetyl-CoA’s carboxylation to produce malonyl-CoA and to serve as a committed step for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in plastids. In this study, 24 putative cotton BCCP genes were identified based on the lately published genome data in Gossypium. Among them, 4, 4, 8, and 8 BCCP homologs were identified in Gossypium raimondii, G. arboreum, G. hirsutum, and G. barbadense, respectively. These genes were divided into two classes based on a phylogenetic analysis. In each class, these homologs were relatively conserved in gene structure and motifs. The chromosomal distribution pattern revealed that all the BCCP genes were distributed equally on corresponding chromosomes or scaffold in the four cotton species. Segmental duplication was a predominant duplication event in both of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. The analysis of the expression profile showed that 8 GhBCCP genes expressed in all the tested tissues with changed expression levels, and GhBCCP genes belonging to class II were predominantly expressed in developing ovules. Meanwhile, the expression analysis for the 16 cotton BCCP genes from G. raimondii, G. arboreum and G. hirsutum showed that they were induced or suppressed by cold or salt stress, and their expression patterns varied among different tissues. These findings will help to determine the functional and evolutionary characteristics of the BCCP genes in Gossypium species.

  15. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase rewires cancer metabolism to allow cancer cells to survive inhibition of the Warburg effect by cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jingtao; Hong, Yun; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Zhang, Lun; Wang, Xudong; Li, Qiang; Fan, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Cetuximab inhibits HIF-1-regulated glycolysis in cancer cells, thereby reversing the Warburg effect and leading to inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated after cetuximab treatment, and a sustained AMPK activity is a mechanism contributing to cetuximab resistance. Here, we investigated how acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK, rewires cancer metabolism in response to cetuximab treatment. We found that introduction of experimental ACC mutants lacking the AMPK phosphorylation sites (ACC1_S79A and ACC2_S212A) into head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells protected HNSCC cells from cetuximab-induced growth inhibition. HNSCC cells with acquired cetuximab resistance contained not only high levels of T172-phosphorylated AMPK and S79-phosphorylated ACC1 but also an increased level of total ACC. These findings were corroborated in tumor specimens of HNSCC patients treated with cetuximab. Cetuximab plus TOFA (an allosteric inhibitor of ACC) achieved remarkable growth inhibition of cetuximab-resistant HNSCC xenografts. Our data suggest a novel paradigm in which cetuximab-mediated activation of AMPK and subsequent phosphorylation and inhibition of ACC is followed by a compensatory increase in total ACC, which rewires cancer metabolism from glycolysis-dependent to lipogenesis-dependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The glossyhead1 allele of acc1 reveals a principal role for multidomain acetyl-coenzyme a carboxylase in the biosynthesis of cuticular waxes by Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Shiyou

    2011-09-23

    A novel mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), having highly glossy inflorescence stems, postgenital fusion in floral organs, and reduced fertility, was isolated from an ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized population and designated glossyhead1 (gsd1). The gsd1 locus was mapped to chromosome 1, and the causal gene was identified as a new allele of Acetyl-Coenzyme A Carboxylase1 (ACC1), a gene encoding the main enzyme in cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A synthesis. This, to our knowledge, is the first mutant allele of ACC1 that does not cause lethality at the seed or early germination stage, allowing for the first time a detailed analysis of ACC1 function in mature tissues. Broad lipid profiling of mature gsd1 organs revealed a primary role for ACC1 in the biosynthesis of the very-long-chain fatty acids (C 20:0 or longer) associated with cuticular waxes and triacylglycerols. Unexpectedly, transcriptome analysis revealed that gsd1 has limited impact on any lipid metabolic networks but instead has a large effect on environmental stress-responsive pathways, especially senescence and ethylene synthesis determinants, indicating a possible role for the cytosolic malonyl-coenzyme A-derived lipids in stress response signaling. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. The metabolism of [3-(13)C]lactate in the rat brain is specific of a pyruvate carboxylase-deprived compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzier, A K; Thiaudiere, E; Biran, M; Rouland, R; Canioni, P; Merle, M

    2000-08-01

    Lactate metabolism in the adult rat brain was investigated in relation with the concept of lactate trafficking between astrocytes and neurons. Wistar rats were infused intravenously with a solution containing either [3-(13)C]lactate (534 mM) or both glucose (750 mM) and [3-(13)C]lactate (534 mM). The time courses of both the concentration and (13)C enrichment of blood glucose and lactate were determined. The data indicated the occurrence of [3-(13)C]lactate recycling through liver gluconeogenesis. The yield of glucose labeling was, however, reduced when using the glucose-containing infusate. After a 20-min or 1-h infusion, perchloric acid extracts of the brain tissue were prepared and subsequently analyzed by (13)C- and (1)H-observed/(13)C-edited NMR spectroscopy. The (13)C labeling of amino acids indicated that [3-(13)C]lactate was metabolized in the brain. Based on the alanine C3 enrichment, lactate contribution to brain metabolism amounted to 35% under the most favorable conditions used. By contrast with what happens with [1-(13)C]glucose metabolism, no difference in glutamine C2 and C3 labeling was evidenced, indicating that lactate was metabolized in a compartment deprived of pyruvate carboxylase activity. This result confirms, for the first time from an in vivo study, that lactate is more specifically a neuronal substrate.

  18. Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)Bisphosphate Inhibits K+-Efflux Channel Activity in NT1 Tobacco Cultured Cells1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaohong; Shor, Oded; Diminshtein, Sofia; Yu, Ling; Im, Yang Ju; Perera, Imara; Lomax, Aaron; Boss, Wendy F.; Moran, Nava

    2009-01-01

    In the animal world, the regulation of ion channels by phosphoinositides (PIs) has been investigated extensively, demonstrating a wide range of channels controlled by phosphatidylinositol (4,5)bisphosphate (PtdInsP2). To understand PI regulation of plant ion channels, we examined the in planta effect of PtdInsP2 on the K+-efflux channel of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), NtORK (outward-rectifying K channel). We applied a patch clamp in the whole-cell configuration (with fixed “cytosolic” Ca2+ concentration and pH) to protoplasts isolated from cultured tobacco cells with genetically manipulated plasma membrane levels of PtdInsP2 and cellular inositol (1,4,5)trisphosphate: “Low PIs” had depressed levels of these PIs, and “High PIs” had elevated levels relative to controls. In all of these cells, K channel activity, reflected in the net, steady-state outward K+ currents (IK), was inversely related to the plasma membrane PtdInsP2 level. Consistent with this, short-term manipulations decreasing PtdInsP2 levels in the High PIs, such as pretreatment with the phytohormone abscisic acid (25 μm) or neutralizing the bath solution from pH 5.6 to pH 7, increased IK (i.e. NtORK activity). Moreover, increasing PtdInsP2 levels in controls or in abscisic acid-treated high-PI cells, using the specific PI-phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (2.5–4 μm), decreased NtORK activity. In all cases, IK decreases stemmed largely from decreased maximum attainable NtORK channel conductance and partly from shifted voltage dependence of channel gating to more positive potentials, making it more difficult to activate the channels. These results are consistent with NtORK inhibition by the negatively charged PtdInsP2 in the internal plasma membrane leaflet. Such effects are likely to underlie PI signaling in intact plant cells. PMID:19052153

  19. Multiple sources of 1,2-diacylglycerol in isolated rat pancreatic acini stimulated by cholecystokinin. Involvement of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozaki, T.; Williams, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in the cellular content of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) in isolated rat pancreatic acini in response to agonist stimulation were studied using a sensitive mass assay. When acini were stimulated by 10 nM COOH-terminal cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK8), the increase in DAG was biphasic, consisting of an early peak at 5 s and a second, larger, gradual increase that was maximal by 15 min. The basal level of DAG in acini was 1.04 nmol/mg of protein, which was increased to 1.24 nmol/mg of protein at 5 s and 2.76 nmol/mg of protein at 30 min. In comparison, the increase in DAG stimulated by 30 pM CCK8, a submaximal concentration for amylase release, was monophasic, increasing without an early peak but sustained to 60 min. Other Ca2+-mobilizing secretagogues such as carbamylcholine and bombesin increased DAG in acini, whereas vasoactive intestinal peptide, which acts to increase cAMP, had no effect. Phorbol ester and Ca2+ ionophore also stimulated DAG production. Analysis of the mass level of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (1,4,5-IP3) showed that the generation of 1,4,5-IP3 stimulated by 10 nM CCK8 peaked at 5 s, a finding consistent with the early peak of DAG. The basal level was 4.7 pmol/mg of protein, which was increased to 144.6 pmol/mg of protein at 5 s by 10 nM CCK8. The levels of 1,4,5-IP3 then returned toward basal in contrast to the gradual and sustained increase of DAG. The dose dependencies of 1,4,5-IP3 and DAG formation at 5 s with respect to CCK8 were almost identical. This suggests that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis is a major source of the early increase in DAG but not of the sustained increase in DAG. Therefore, a possible contribution of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis to DAG formation was examined utilizing acini prelabeled with [3H]choline. CCK8 (1 nM) maximally increased [3H]choline metabolite release by 133% of control at 30 min

  20. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, cholesterol, and fatty acids modulate the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A (ANO1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; Espino-Saldaña, Ángeles E; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Qu, Zhiqiang; Hartzell, H Criss; Corral-Fernandez, Nancy E; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia; Arreola, Jorge

    2018-03-01

    The TMEM16A-mediated Ca 2+ -activated Cl - current drives several important physiological functions. Membrane lipids regulate ion channels and transporters but their influence on members of the TMEM16 family is poorly understood. Here we have studied the regulation of TMEM16A by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2), cholesterol, and fatty acids using patch clamp, biochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. We found that depletion of membrane PI(4,5)P2 causes a decline in TMEM16A current that is independent of cytoskeleton, but is partially prevented by removing intracellular Ca 2+ . On the other hand, supplying PI(4,5)P2 to inside-out patches attenuated channel rundown and/or partially rescued activity after channel rundown. Also, depletion (with methyl-β-cyclodextrin M-βCD) or restoration (with M-βCD+cholesterol) of membrane cholesterol slows down the current decay observed after reduction of PI(4,5)P2. Neither depletion nor restoration of cholesterol change PI(4,5)P2 content. However, M-βCD alone transiently increases TMEM16A activity and dampens rundown whereas M-βCD+cholesterol increases channel rundown. Thus, PI(4,5)P2 is required for TMEM16A function while cholesterol directly and indirectly via a PI(4,5)P2-independent mechanism regulate channel function. Stearic, arachidonic, oleic, docosahexaenoic, and eicosapentaenoic fatty acids as well as methyl stearate inhibit TMEM16A in a dose- and voltage-dependent manner. Phosphatidylserine, a phospholipid whose hydrocarbon tails contain stearic and oleic acids also inhibits TMEM16A. Finally, we show that TMEM16A remains in the plasma membrane after treatment with M-βCD, M-βCD+cholesterol, oleic, or docosahexaenoic acids. Thus, we propose that lipids and fatty acids regulate TMEM16A channels through a membrane-delimited protein-lipid interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Glycolytic Metabolite, Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, Blocks Epileptiform Bursts by Attenuating Voltage-Activated Calcium Currents in Hippocampal Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Shao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of metabolic pathways (e.g., ketogenic diet (KD, glycolytic inhibition alters neural excitability and represents a novel strategy for treatment of drug-refractory seizures. We have previously shown that inhibition of glycolysis suppresses epileptiform activity in hippocampal slices. In the present study, we aimed to examine the role of a “branching” metabolic pathway stemming off glycolysis (i.e., the pentose-phosphate pathway, PPP in regulating seizure activity, by using a potent PPP stimulator and glycolytic intermediate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F1,6BP. Employing electrophysiological approaches, we investigated the action of F1,6BP on epileptiform population bursts, intrinsic neuronal firing, glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic transmission and voltage-activated calcium currents (ICa in the CA3 area of hippocampal slices. Bath application of F1,6BP (2.5–5 mM blocked epileptiform population bursts induced in Mg2+-free medium containing 4-aminopyridine, in ~2/3 of the slices. The blockade occurred relatively rapidly (~4 min, suggesting an extracellular mechanism. However, F1,6BP did not block spontaneous intrinsic firing of the CA3 neurons (when synaptic transmission was eliminated with DNQX, AP-5 and SR95531, nor did it significantly reduce AMPA or NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCAMPA and EPSCNMDA. In contrast, F1,6BP caused moderate reduction (~50% in GABAA receptor-mediated current, suggesting it affects excitatory and inhibitory synapses differently. Finally and unexpectedly, F1,6BP consistently attenuated ICa by ~40% without altering channel activation or inactivation kinetics, which may explain its anticonvulsant action, at least in this in vitro seizure model. Consistent with these results, epileptiform population bursts in CA3 were readily blocked by the nonspecific Ca2+ channel blocker, CdCl2 (20 μM, suggesting that these bursts are calcium dependent. Altogether, these data

  2. Abundance and distribution of archaeal acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase genes indicative for putatively chemoautotrophic Archaea in the tropical Atlantic's interior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergauer, Kristin; Sintes, Eva; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Witte, Harry; Herndl, Gerhard J

    2013-06-01

    Recently, evidence suggests that dark CO2 fixation in the pelagic realm of the ocean does not only occur in the suboxic and anoxic water bodies but also in the oxygenated meso- and bathypelagic waters of the North Atlantic. To elucidate the significance and phylogeny of the key organisms mediating dark CO2 fixation in the tropical Atlantic, we quantified functional genes indicative for CO2 fixation. We used a Q-PCR-based assay targeting the bifunctional acetyl-CoA/propionyl-CoA carboxylase (accA subunit), a key enzyme powering inter alia the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HP/HB) and the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA). Quantification of accA-like genes revealed a consistent depth profile in the upper mesopelagial with increasing gene abundances from subsurface layers towards the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), coinciding with an increase in archaeal amoA gene abundance. Gene abundance profiles of metabolic marker genes (accA, amoA) were correlated with thaumarchaeal 16S rRNA gene abundances as well as CO2 fixation rates to link the genetic potential to actual rate measurements. AccA gene abundances correlated with archaeal amoA gene abundance throughout the water column (r(2)  = 0.309, P < 0.0001). Overall, a substantial genetic predisposition of CO2 fixation was present in the dark realm of the tropical Atlantic in both Archaea and Bacteria. Hence, dark ocean CO2 fixation might be more widespread among prokaryotes inhabiting the oxygenated water column of the ocean's interior than hitherto assumed. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzymological evidence for the function of a plastid-located pyruvate carboxylase in the Haptophyte alga Emiliania huxleyi: a novel pathway for the production of C4 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2012-06-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PYC) catalyzes the β-carboxylation of pyruvate to yield oxaloacetate (OAA). We previously isolated a cDNA encoding a putative PYC (EhPYC1) from the haptophyte alga Emiliania huxleyi and then proposed that EhPYC1 contributes to active anaplerotic β-carboxylation during photosynthesis although PYC activity was not detected in the cell extracts. Involvement of PYC in photosynthetic carbon metabolism is unique, since PYC generally functions in non-photosynthetic organisms. In the present study, we demonstrate that EhPYC1 is highly sensitive to endogenous proteases and therefore is easily degraded in cell extracts. By avoiding proteolytic degradation, PYC activity can be detected in the cell extracts of E. huxleyi. The activity of a recombinant His-tagged EhPYC1 expressed in Streptomyces lividans was inhibited by l-malate in a mixed non-competitive manner. Immunofluorescence labeling showed that EhPYC1 is located in the plastid. This result agrees with the prediction that a bipartite plastid-targeting signal is present that functions to deliver proteins into the four-membrane plastid of haptophyte algae. This is the first finding of a plastid-located PYC. These results indicate that E. huxleyi possesses a unique pathway to produce OAA catalyzed by PYC, and the pathway may provide carbon skeletons for amino acid biosynthesis in the plastid. A database search indicates that PYC genes are widespread in green algae, diatoms and brown algae, suggesting the crucial role of PYC in various aquatic phototrophs.

  4. Pyramiding expression of maize genes encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) synergistically improve the photosynthetic characteristics of transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, HuiFang; Xu, WeiGang; Wang, HuiWei; Hu, Lin; Li, Yan; Qi, XueLi; Zhang, Lei; Li, ChunXin; Hua, Xia

    2014-09-01

    Using particle bombardment transformation, we introduced maize pepc cDNA encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ppdk cDNA encoding pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK) into the C3 crop wheat to generate transgenic wheat lines carrying cDNA of pepc (PC lines), ppdk (PK lines) or both (PKC lines). The integration, transcription, and expression of the foreign genes were confirmed by Southern blot, Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (Q-RT-PCR), and Western blot analysis. Q-RT-PCR results indicated that the average relative expression levels of pepc and ppdk in the PKC lines reached 10 and 4.6, respectively, compared to their expressions in untransformed plants (set to 1). The enzyme activities of PEPC and PPDK in the PKC lines were 4.3- and 2.1-fold higher, respectively, than in the untransformed control. The maximum daily net photosynthetic rates of the PKC, PC, and PK lines were enhanced by 26.4, 13.3, and 4.5%, respectively, whereas the diurnal accumulations of photosynthesis were 21.3, 13.9, and 6.9%, respectively, higher than in the control. The Fv/Fm of the transgenic plants decreased less than in the control under high temperature and high light conditions (2 weeks after anthesis), suggesting that the transgenic wheat transports more absorbed light energy into a photochemical reaction. The exogenous maize C4-specific pepc gene was more effective than ppdk at improving the photosynthetic performance and yield characteristics of transgenic wheat, while the two genes showed a synergistic effect when they were transformed into the same genetic background, because the PKC lines exhibited improved photosynthetic and physiological traits.

  5. Physiological investigation of C4-phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxylase-introduced rice line shows that sucrose metabolism is involved in the improved drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Li, Xia; He, Yafei; Zhang, Jinfei; Yan, Ting; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-06-01

    We compared the drought tolerance of wild-type (WT) and transgenic rice plants (PC) over-expressing the maize C 4 PEPC gene, which encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) gene, and evaluated the roles of saccharide and sugar-related enzymes in the drought response. Pot-grown seedlings were subjected to real drought conditions outdoors, and the yield components were compared between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants. The stable yield from PC plants was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate under the real drought treatment. The physiological characters of WT and PC seedlings under a simulated drought treatment (25% (w/v) polyethylene glycol-6000 for 3 h; PEG 6000 treatment) were analyzed in detail for the early response of drought. The relative water content was higher in PC than in WT, and PEPC activity and the C 4 -PEPC transcript level in PC were elevated under the simulated drought conditions. The endogenous saccharide responses also differed between PC and WT under simulated drought stress. The higher sugar decomposition rate in PC than in WT under drought analog stress was related to the increased activities of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase, acid invertase, and neutral invertase, increased transcript levels of VIN1, CIN1, NIN1, SUT2, SUT4, and SUT5, and increased activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase in the leaves. The greater antioxidant defense capacity of PC and its relationship with saccharide metabolism was one of the reasons for the improved drought tolerance. In conclusion, PEPC effectively alleviated oxidative damage and enhanced the drought tolerance in rice plants, which were more related to the increase of the endogenous saccharide decomposition. These findings show that components of C 4 photosynthesis can be used to increase the yield of rice under drought conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Boosting Anaplerotic Reactions by Pyruvate Kinase Gene Deletion and Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Desensitization for Glutamic Acid and Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Atsushi; Sawada, Kazunori; Wada, Masaru

    In the 1980s, Shiio and coworkers demonstrated using random mutagenesis that the following three phenotypes were effective for boosting lysine production by Corynebacterium glutamicum: (1) low-activity-level citrate synthase (CS L ), (2) phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) resistant to feedback inhibition by aspartic acid (PEPC R ), and (3) pyruvate kinase (PYK) deficiency. Here, we reevaluated these phenotypes and their interrelationship in lysine production using recombinant DNA techniques.The pyk deletion and PEPC R (D299N in ppc) independently showed marginal effects on lysine production, but both phenotypes synergistically increased lysine yield, demonstrating the importance of PEPC as an anaplerotic enzyme in lysine production. Similar effects were also found for glutamic acid production. CS L (S252C in gltA) further increased lysine yield. Thus, using molecular techniques, the combination of these three phenotypes was reconfirmed to be effective for lysine production. However, a simple CS L mutant showed instabilities in growth and lysine yield.Surprisingly, the pyk deletion was found to increase biomass production in wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032 under biotin-sufficient conditions. The mutant showed a 37% increase in growth (based on OD 660 ) compared with the ATCC13032 strain in a complex medium containing 100 g/L glucose. Metabolome analysis revealed the intracellular accumulation of excess precursor metabolites. Thus, their conversion into biomass was considered to relieve the metabolic distortion in the pyk-deleted mutant. Detailed physiological studies of various pyk-deleted mutants also suggested that malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO) is important to control both the intracellular oxaloacetic acid (OAA) level and respiration rate. These findings may facilitate the rational use of C. glutamicum in fermentation industries.

  7. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Leigh-Like Syndrome Due to Homoplasmic m.8993T>G Variant with Hypocitrullinemia and Unusual Biochemical Features Suggestive of Multiple Carboxylase Deficiency (MCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Lewis, B; Mock, D M; Said, H M; Tarailo-Graovac, M; Mattman, A; van Karnebeek, C D; Thorburn, D R; Rodenburg, R J; Christodoulou, J

    2017-01-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS), or subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy, is a genetically heterogeneous, relentlessly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative disorder that usually presents in infancy or early childhood. A diagnosis of Leigh-like syndrome may be considered in individuals who do not fulfil the stringent diagnostic criteria but have features resembling Leigh syndrome.We describe a unique presentation of Leigh-like syndrome in a 3-year-old boy with elevated 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C5-OH) on newborn screening (NBS). Subsequent persistent plasma elevations of C5-OH and propionylcarnitine (C3) as well as fluctuating urinary markers were suggestive of multiple carboxylase deficiency (MCD). Normal enzymology and mutational analysis of genes encoding holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) and biotinidase (BTD) excluded MCD. Biotin uptake studies were normal excluding biotin transporter deficiency. His clinical features at 13 months of age comprised psychomotor delay, central hypotonia, myopathy, failure to thrive, hypocitrullinemia, recurrent episodes of decompensation with metabolic keto-lactic acidosis and an episode of hyperammonemia. Biotin treatment from 13 months of age was associated with increased patient activity, alertness, and attainment of new developmental milestones, despite lack of biochemical improvements. Whole exome sequencing (WES) analysis failed to identify any other variants which could likely contribute to the observed phenotype, apart from the homoplasmic (100%) m.8993T>G variant initially detected by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing.Hypocitrullinemia has been reported in patients with the m.8993T>G variant and other mitochondrial disorders. However, persistent plasma elevations of C3 and C5-OH have previously only been reported in one other patient with this homoplasmic mutation. We suggest considering the m.8993T>G variant early in the diagnostic evaluation of MCD-like biochemical disturbances, particularly when associated with

  9. Modification of the Host Cell Lipid Metabolism Induced by Hypolipidemic Drugs Targeting the Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Impairs West Nile Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Ramos, Teresa; Vázquez-Calvo, Ángela; Casas, Josefina; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus transmitted by the bite of mosquitoes that causes meningitis and encephalitis in humans, horses, and birds. Several studies have highlighted that flavivirus infection is highly dependent on cellular lipids for virus replication and infectious particle biogenesis. The first steps of lipid synthesis involve the carboxylation of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to malonyl-CoA that is catalyzed by the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). This makes ACC a key enzyme of lipid synthesis that is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic target for different disorders, including cancers, obesity, diabetes, and viral infections. We have analyzed the effect of the ACC inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) on infection by WNV. Lipidomic analysis of TOFA-treated cells confirmed that this drug reduced the cellular content of multiple lipids, including those directly implicated in the flavivirus life cycle (glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids, and cholesterol). Treatment with TOFA significantly inhibited the multiplication of WNV in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the antiviral effect of this drug showed that the inhibitory effect was related to a reduction of viral replication. Furthermore, treatment with another ACC inhibitor, 3,3,14,14-tetramethylhexadecanedioic acid (MEDICA 16), also inhibited WNV infection. Interestingly, TOFA and MEDICA 16 also reduced the multiplication of Usutu virus (USUV), a WNV-related flavivirus. These results point to the ACC as a druggable cellular target suitable for antiviral development against WNV and other flaviviruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Chronic suppression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 in beta-cells impairs insulin secretion via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnebaum, Sarah M; Joseph, Jamie W; Ilkayeva, Olga; Burgess, Shawn C; Lu, Danhong; Becker, Thomas C; Sherry, A Dean; Newgard, Christopher B

    2008-05-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) currently is being investigated as a target for treatment of obesity-associated dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the effects of ACC1 inhibition on insulin secretion, three small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes targeting ACC1 (siACC1) were transfected into the INS-1-derived cell line, 832/13; the most efficacious duplex was also cloned into an adenovirus and used to transduce isolated rat islets. Delivery of the siACC1 duplexes decreased ACC1 mRNA by 60-80% in 832/13 cells and islets and enzyme activity by 46% compared with cells treated with a non-targeted siRNA. Delivery of siACC1 decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by 70% in 832/13 cells and by 33% in islets. Surprisingly, siACC1 treatment decreased glucose oxidation by 49%, and the ATP:ADP ratio by 52%, accompanied by clear decreases in pyruvate cycling activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Exposure of siACC1-treated cells to the pyruvate cycling substrate dimethylmalate restored GSIS to normal without recovery of the depressed ATP:ADP ratio. In siACC1-treated cells, glucokinase protein levels were decreased by 25%, which correlated with a 36% decrease in glycogen synthesis and a 33% decrease in glycolytic flux. Furthermore, acute addition of the ACC1 inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) to beta-cells suppressed [(14)C]glucose incorporation into lipids but had no effect on GSIS, whereas chronic TOFA administration suppressed GSIS and glucose metabolism. In sum, chronic, but not acute, suppression of ACC1 activity impairs GSIS via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism. These findings raise concerns about the use of ACC inhibitors for diabetes therapy.

  11. Chronic Suppression of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 in β-Cells Impairs Insulin Secretion via Inhibition of Glucose Rather Than Lipid Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Joseph, Jamie W.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Burgess, Shawn C.; Lu, Danhong; Becker, Thomas C.; Sherry, A. Dean; Newgard, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) currently is being investigated as a target for treatment of obesity-associated dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the effects of ACC1 inhibition on insulin secretion, three small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes targeting ACC1 (siACC1) were transfected into the INS-1-derived cell line, 832/13; the most efficacious duplex was also cloned into an adenovirus and used to transduce isolated rat islets. Delivery of the siACC1 duplexes decreased ACC1 mRNA by 60–80% in 832/13 cells and islets and enzyme activity by 46% compared with cells treated with a non-targeted siRNA. Delivery of siACC1 decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by 70% in 832/13 cells and by 33% in islets. Surprisingly, siACC1 treatment decreased glucose oxidation by 49%, and the ATP:ADP ratio by 52%, accompanied by clear decreases in pyruvate cycling activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Exposure of siACC1-treated cells to the pyruvate cycling substrate dimethylmalate restored GSIS to normal without recovery of the depressed ATP:ADP ratio. In siACC1-treated cells, glucokinase protein levels were decreased by 25%, which correlated with a 36% decrease in glycogen synthesis and a 33% decrease in glycolytic flux. Furthermore, acute addition of the ACC1 inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) to β-cells suppressed [14C]glucose incorporation into lipids but had no effect on GSIS, whereas chronic TOFA administration suppressed GSIS and glucose metabolism. In sum, chronic, but not acute, suppression of ACC1 activity impairs GSIS via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism. These findings raise concerns about the use of ACC inhibitors for diabetes therapy. PMID:18381287

  12. Discrimination in the Dark. Resolving the Interplay between Metabolic and Physical Constraints to Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase Activity during the Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Cycle1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Howard; Cousins, Asaph B.; Badger, Murray R.; von Caemmerer, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    A model defining carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) for crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants was experimentally validated using Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and instantaneous CO2 discrimination (for 13C and 18O) were made from late photoperiod (phase IV of CAM), throughout the dark period (phase I), and into the light (phase II). Measurements of CO2 response curves throughout the dark period revealed changing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) capacity. These systematic changes in PEPC capacity were tracked by net CO2 uptake, stomatal conductance, and online Δ13C signal; all declined at the start of the dark period, then increased to a maximum 2 h before dawn. Measurements of Δ13C were higher than predicted from the ratio of intercellular to external CO2 (pi/pa) and fractionation associated with CO2 hydration and PEPC carboxylations alone, such that the dark period mesophyll conductance, gi, was 0.044 mol m−2 s−1 bar−1. A higher estimate of gi (0.085 mol m−2 s−1 bar−1) was needed to account for the modeled and measured Δ18O discrimination throughout the dark period. The differences in estimates of gi from the two isotope measurements, and an offset of −5.5‰ between the 18O content of source and transpired water, suggest spatial variations in either CO2 diffusion path length and/or carbonic anhydrase activity, either within individual cells or across a succulent leaf. Our measurements support the model predictions to show that internal CO2 diffusion limitations within CAM leaves increase Δ13C discrimination during nighttime CO2 fixation while reducing Δ13C during phase IV. When evaluating the phylogenetic distribution of CAM, carbon isotope composition will reflect these diffusive limitations as well as relative contributions from C3 and C4 biochemistry. PMID:17142488

  13. Regulatory Phosphorylation of Bacterial-Type PEP Carboxylase by the Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase RcCDPK1 in Developing Castor Oil Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Sheng; Hill, Allyson T; Pyc, Michal; Anderson, Erin M; Snedden, Wayne A; Mullen, Robert T; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William C

    2017-06-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled cytosolic enzyme situated at a crucial branch point of central plant metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds ( Ricinus communis ) a novel, allosterically desensitized 910-kD Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex, arises from a tight interaction between 107-kD plant-type PEPC and 118-kD bacterial-type (BTPC) subunits. The native Ca 2+ -dependent protein kinase (CDPK) responsible for in vivo inhibitory phosphorylation of Class-2 PEPC's BTPC subunit's at Ser-451 was highly purified from COS and identified as RcCDPK1 (XP_002526815) by mass spectrometry. Heterologously expressed RcCDPK1 catalyzed Ca 2+ -dependent, inhibitory phosphorylation of BTPC at Ser-451 while exhibiting: ( i ) a pair of Ca 2+ binding sites with identical dissociation constants of 5.03 μM, ( ii ) a Ca 2+ -dependent electrophoretic mobility shift, and ( iii ) a marked Ca 2+ -independent hydrophobicity. Pull-down experiments established the Ca 2+ -dependent interaction of N-terminal GST-tagged RcCDPK1 with BTPC. RcCDPK1-Cherry localized to the cytosol and nucleus of tobacco bright yellow-2 cells, but colocalized with mitochondrial-surface associated BTPC-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein when both fusion proteins were coexpressed. Deletion analyses demonstrated that although its N-terminal variable domain plays an essential role in optimizing Ca 2+ -dependent RcCDPK1 autophosphorylation and BTPC transphosphorylation activity, it is not critical for in vitro or in vivo target recognition. Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) CPK4 and soybean ( Glycine max ) CDPKβ are RcCDPK1 orthologs that effectively phosphorylated castor BTPC at Ser-451. Overall, the results highlight a potential link between cytosolic Ca 2+ signaling and the posttranslational control of respiratory CO 2 refixation and anaplerotic photosynthate partitioning in support of storage oil and protein biosynthesis in developing COS. © 2017 American Society of Plant

  14. Regulatory Phosphorylation of Bacterial-Type PEP Carboxylase by the Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinase RcCDPK1 in Developing Castor Oil Seeds1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Allyson T.; Anderson, Erin M.; She, Yi-Min

    2017-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a tightly controlled cytosolic enzyme situated at a crucial branch point of central plant metabolism. In developing castor oil seeds (Ricinus communis) a novel, allosterically desensitized 910-kD Class-2 PEPC hetero-octameric complex, arises from a tight interaction between 107-kD plant-type PEPC and 118-kD bacterial-type (BTPC) subunits. The native Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) responsible for in vivo inhibitory phosphorylation of Class-2 PEPC’s BTPC subunit’s at Ser-451 was highly purified from COS and identified as RcCDPK1 (XP_002526815) by mass spectrometry. Heterologously expressed RcCDPK1 catalyzed Ca2+-dependent, inhibitory phosphorylation of BTPC at Ser-451 while exhibiting: (i) a pair of Ca2+ binding sites with identical dissociation constants of 5.03 μM, (ii) a Ca2+-dependent electrophoretic mobility shift, and (iii) a marked Ca2+-independent hydrophobicity. Pull-down experiments established the Ca2+-dependent interaction of N-terminal GST-tagged RcCDPK1 with BTPC. RcCDPK1-Cherry localized to the cytosol and nucleus of tobacco bright yellow-2 cells, but colocalized with mitochondrial-surface associated BTPC-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein when both fusion proteins were coexpressed. Deletion analyses demonstrated that although its N-terminal variable domain plays an essential role in optimizing Ca2+-dependent RcCDPK1 autophosphorylation and BTPC transphosphorylation activity, it is not critical for in vitro or in vivo target recognition. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CPK4 and soybean (Glycine max) CDPKβ are RcCDPK1 orthologs that effectively phosphorylated castor BTPC at Ser-451. Overall, the results highlight a potential link between cytosolic Ca2+ signaling and the posttranslational control of respiratory CO2 refixation and anaplerotic photosynthate partitioning in support of storage oil and protein biosynthesis in developing COS. PMID:28363991

  15. Tissue-specific expression and post-translational modifications of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Leary, Brendan; Fedosejevs, Eric T.; Hill, Allyson T.; Bettridge, James; Park, Joonho; Rao, Srinath K.; Leach, Craig A.; Plaxton, William C.

    2011-01-01

    This study employs transcript profiling together with immunoblotting and co-immunopurification to assess the tissue-specific expression, protein:protein interactions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) isozymes (PTPC and BTPC, respectively) in the castor plant, Ricinus communis. Previous studies established that the Class-1 PEPC (PTPC homotetramer) of castor oil seeds (COS) is activated by phosphorylation at Ser-11 and inhibited by monoubiquitination at Lys-628 during endosperm development and germination, respectively. Elimination of photosynthate supply to developing COS by depodding caused the PTPC of the endosperm and cotyledon to be dephosphorylated, and then subsequently monoubiquitinated in vivo. PTPC monoubiquitination rather than phosphorylation is widespread throughout the castor plant and appears to be the predominant PTM of Class-1 PEPC that occurs in planta. The distinctive developmental patterns of PTPC phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination indicates that these two PTMs are mutually exclusive. By contrast, the BTPC: (i) is abundant in the inner integument, cotyledon, and endosperm of developing COS, but occurs at low levels in roots and cotyledons of germinated COS, (ii) shows a unique developmental pattern in leaves such that it is present in leaf buds and young expanding leaves, but undetectable in fully expanded leaves, and (iii) tightly interacts with co-expressed PTPC to form the novel and allosterically-desensitized Class-2 PEPC heteromeric complex. BTPC and thus Class-2 PEPC up-regulation appears to be a distinctive feature of rapidly growing and/or biosynthetically active tissues that require a large anaplerotic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons being withdrawn for anabolism. PMID:21841182

  16. A single nucleotide polymorphism within the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase beta gene is associated with proteinuria in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Maeda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that genetic susceptibility plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. A large-scale genotyping analysis of gene-based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes identified the gene encoding acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase beta (ACACB as a candidate for a susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy; the landmark SNP was found in the intron 18 of ACACB (rs2268388: intron 18 +4139 C > T, p = 1.4x10(-6, odds ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33-1.96. The association of this SNP with diabetic nephropathy was examined in 9 independent studies (4 from Japan including the original study, one Singaporean, one Korean, and two European with type 2 diabetes. One case-control study involving European patients with type 1 diabetes was included. The frequency of the T allele for SNP rs2268388 was consistently higher among patients with type 2 diabetes and proteinuria. A meta-analysis revealed that rs2268388 was significantly associated with proteinuria in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes (p = 5.35 x 10(-8, odds ratio = 1.61, 95% Cl: 1.35-1.91. Rs2268388 was also associated with type 2 diabetes-associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD in European Americans (p = 6 x 10(-4, odds ratio = 1.61, 95% Cl: 1.22-2.13. Significant association was not detected between this SNP and nephropathy in those with type 1 diabetes. A subsequent in vitro functional analysis revealed that a 29-bp DNA fragment, including rs2268388, had significant enhancer activity in cultured human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Fragments corresponding to the disease susceptibility allele (T had higher enhancer activity than those of the major allele. These results suggest that ACACB is a strong candidate for conferring susceptibility for proteinuria in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  17. Lysine 356 is a critical residue for binding the C-6 phospho group of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate to the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Lin, K; Correia, J J; Pilkis, S J

    1992-08-15

    Lysine 356 has been implicated by protein modification studies as a fructose-2,6-bisphosphate binding site residue in the 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (Kitajima, S., Thomas, H., and Uyeda, K. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 13995-14002). However, Lys-356 is found in the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain (Bazan, F., Fletterick, R., and Pilkis, S. J. (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646). In order to ascertain whether Lys-356 is involved in fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase catalysis and/or domain/domain interactions of the bifunctional enzyme, Lys-356 was mutated to Ala, expressed in Escherichia coli, and then purified to homogeneity. Circular dichroism experiments indicated that the secondary structure of the Lys-356-Ala mutant was not significantly different from that of the wild-type enzyme. The Km for fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and the Ki for the noncompetitive inhibitor, fructose 6-phosphate, for the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase of the Lys-356-Ala mutant were 2700- and 2200-fold higher, respectively, than those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the maximal velocity and the Ki for the competitive product inhibitor, inorganic phosphate, were unchanged compared to the corresponding values of the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, in contrast to the wild-type enzyme, which exhibits substrate inhibition, there was no inhibition by substrate of the Lys-356-Ala mutant. In the presence of saturating substrate, inorganic phosphate, which acts by relieving fructose-6-phosphate and substrate inhibition, is an activator of the bisphosphatase. The Ka for inorganic phosphate of the Lys-356-Ala mutant was 1300-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. The kinetic properties of the 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase of the Lys-356-Ala mutant were essentially identical with that of the wild-type enzyme. The results demonstrate that: 1) Lys-356 is a critical residue in fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase for binding the 6

  18. Photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta): Evidence for the predominant operation of the c3 cycle and the contribution of {beta}-carboxylases to the active anaplerotic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2009-02-01

    The coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) is a representative and unique marine phytoplankton species that fixes inorganic carbon by photosynthesis and calci-fication. We examined the initial process of photosynthetic carbon assimilation by analyses of metabolites, enzymes and genes. When the cells were incubated with a radioactive substrate (2.3 mM NaH(14)CO(3)) for 10 s under illumination, 70% of the (14)C was incorporated into the 80% methanol-soluble fraction. Eighty-five and 15% of (14)C in the soluble fraction was incorporated into phosphate esters (P-esters), including the C(3) cycle intermediates and a C(4) compound, aspartate, respectively. A pulse-chase experiment showed that (14)C in P-esters was mainly transferred into lipids, while [(14)C]aspartate, [(14)C]alanine and [(14)C]glutamate levels remained almost constant. These results indicate that the C(3) cycle functions as the initial pathway of carbon assimilation and that beta-carboxylation contributes to the production of amino acids in subsequent metabolism. Transcriptional analysis of beta-carboxylases such as pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) revealed that PYC and PEPC transcripts were greatly increased under illumination, whereas the PEPCK transcript decreased remarkably. PEPC activity was higher in light-grown cells than in dark-adapted cells. PYC activity was detected in isolated chloroplasts of light-grown cells. According to analysis of their deduced N-terminal sequence, PYC and PEPC are predicted to be located in the chloroplasts and mitochondria, respectively. These results suggest that E. huxleyi possesses unique carbon assimila-tion mechanisms in which beta-carboxylation by both PYC and PEPC plays important roles in different organelles.

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-dependent Oligomerization of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) Triggers the Formation of a Lipidic Membrane Pore Implicated in Unconventional Secretion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steringer, Julia P.; Bleicken, Stephanie; Andreas, Helena; Zacherl, Sonja; Laussmann, Mareike; Temmerman, Koen; Contreras, F. Xabier; Bharat, Tanmay A. M.; Lechner, Johannes; Müller, Hans-Michael; Briggs, John A. G.; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Nickel, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a critical mitogen with a central role in specific steps of tumor-induced angiogenesis. It is known to be secreted by unconventional means bypassing the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway. However, the mechanism of FGF2 membrane translocation into the extracellular space has remained elusive. Here, we show that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-dependent membrane recruitment causes FGF2 to oligomerize, which in turn triggers the formation of a lipidic membrane pore with a putative toroidal structure. This process is strongly up-regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of FGF2. Our findings explain key requirements of FGF2 secretion from living cells and suggest a novel self-sustained mechanism of protein translocation across membranes with a lipidic membrane pore being a transient translocation intermediate. PMID:22730382

  20. Roles of the redox-active disulfide and histidine residues forming a catalytic dyad in reactions catalyzed by 2-ketopropyl coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Melissa A; Wampler, David A; Pandey, Arti S; Peters, John W; Ensign, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    NADPH:2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase (2-KPCC), an atypical member of the disulfide oxidoreductase (DSOR) family of enzymes, catalyzes the reductive cleavage and carboxylation of 2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M [2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate; 2-KPC] to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M (CoM) in the bacterial pathway of propylene metabolism. Structural studies of 2-KPCC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 have revealed a distinctive active-site architecture that includes a putative catalytic triad consisting of two histidine residues that are hydrogen bonded to an ordered water molecule proposed to stabilize enolacetone formed from dithiol-mediated 2-KPC thioether bond cleavage. Site-directed mutants of 2-KPCC were constructed to test the tenets of the mechanism proposed from studies of the native enzyme. Mutagenesis of the interchange thiol of 2-KPCC (C82A) abolished all redox-dependent reactions of 2-KPCC (2-KPC carboxylation or protonation). The air-oxidized C82A mutant, as well as wild-type 2-KPCC, exhibited the characteristic charge transfer absorbance seen in site-directed variants of other DSOR enzymes but with a pK(a) value for C87 (8.8) four units higher (i.e., four orders of magnitude less acidic) than that for the flavin thiol of canonical DSOR enzymes. The same higher pK(a) value was observed in native 2-KPCC when the interchange thiol was alkylated by the CoM analog 2-bromoethanesulfonate. Mutagenesis of the flavin thiol (C87A) also resulted in an inactive enzyme for steady-state redox-dependent reactions, but this variant catalyzed a single-turnover reaction producing a 0.8:1 ratio of product to enzyme. Mutagenesis of the histidine proximal to the ordered water (H137A) led to nearly complete loss of redox-dependent 2-KPCC reactions, while mutagenesis of the distal histidine (H84A) reduced these activities by 58 to 76%. A redox-independent reaction of 2-KPCC (acetoacetate decarboxylation) was not decreased for any of the

  1. Enhanced functional recombinant factor VII production by HEK 293 cells stably transfected with VKORC1 where the gamma-carboxylase inhibitor calumenin is stably suppressed by shRNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajih, Nadeem; Owen, John; Wallin, Reidar

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant members of the vitamin K-dependent protein family (factors IX and VII and protein C) have become important pharmaceuticals in treatment of bleeding disorders and sepsis. However, because the in vivo gamma-carboxylation system in stable cell lines used for transfection has a limited capacity of post translational gamma-carboxylation, the recovery of fully gamma-carboxylated and functional proteins is low. In this work we have engineered recombinant factor VII producing HEK 293 cells to stably overexpress VKORC1, the reduced vitamin K gamma-carboxylase cofactor and in addition stably silenced the gamma-carboxylase inhibitory protein calumenin. Stable cell lines transfected with only a factor VII cDNA had a 9% production of functional recombinant factor VII. On the other hand, these recombinant factor VII producing cells when engineered to overexpress VKORC1 and having calumenin stably suppressed more than 80% by shRNA expression, produced 68% functional factor VII. The technology presented should be applicable to all vertebrae members of the vitamin K-dependent protein family and should lower the production cost of the clinically used factors VII, IX and protein C.

  2. Acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana to long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment and nitrogen supply is basically a matter of growth rate adjustment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocquin, P.; Ormenese, S.; Pieltain, A.; Detry, N.; Bernier, G.; Perilleux, C. [Univ. of Liege, Dept. of Life Sciences, Lab. of Plant Physiology, Liege (Belgium)

    2006-12-15

    The long-term response of Arabidopsis thaliana to increasing CO{sub 2} was evaluated in plants grown in 800 {mu}l l{sup -1} CO{sub 2} from sowing and maintained, in hydroponics, on three nitrogen supplies: 'low', 'medium' and 'high'. The global response to high CO{sub 2} and N-supply was evaluated by measuring growth parameters in parallel with photosynthetic activity, leaf carbohydrates, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) messenger RNA and protein, stomatal conductance (g-s) and density. CO{sub 2} enrichment was found to stimulate biomass production, whatever the N-supply. This stimulation was transient on low N-supply and persisted throughout the whole vegetative growth only in high N-supply. Acclimation on low N-high C0{sub 2} was not associated with carbohydrate accumulation or with a strong reduction in Rubisco amount or activity. At high N-supply, growth stimulation by high CO{sub 2} was mainly because of the acceleration of leaf production and expansion while other parameters such as specific leaf area, root/shoot ratio and g{sub s} appeared to be correlated with total leaf area. Our results thus suggest that, in strictly controlled and stable growing conditions, acclimation of A. thaliana to long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment is mostly controlled by growth rate adjustment. (au)

  3. FY 2000 report on the promotion projects by Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth. Proceedings of the international seminar (Reports on photosynthetic CO2-assimilating enzymes by the international workshops); 2000 nendo chikyu kankyo sangyo gijutsu kaihatsu suishin jigyo kokusai seminar jigyo shiryo. Kogosei CO2 kotei koso kokusai workshop hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Described herein are the reports on photosynthetic CO2-assimilating enzymes, presented to the international symposium. These enzymes are important for assimilating CO2 in air, maintaining the environments and production of foods. For genes and proteins, the topics include diversification and function evolution of the RuBisCO (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in the natural environments, in particular in microorganisms. For activity regulation of PEPC, the topics include three-dimensional structures of PEPC and phosphorylation mechanisms and activity regulation therefor. For activity regulation of RuBisCO, the topics include post-translational activity of the enzymes (e.g., methylated enzyme); molecular regulation mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and decomposition of RuBisCO; and activity regulation mechanisms in the chloroplast. For leaf photosynthesis and RuBisCO, the topics include importance of enzymes and involved in-vivo reaction steps for leaf photosynthesis CO2 assimilation reactions. For function of PEPC, the topics include the biochemically and molecular biologically necessary and sufficient conditions for the C4 mechanism as the special photosynthesis mechanism. For transgenic approaches, the topics include procedure for allowing the RuBisCO gene of a dissimilar organism to function in the tobacco chloroplast, and introduction of enzymes involved in the C4 photosynthesis pathway in C3 plants. (NEDO)

  4. rbcL gene sequences provide evidence for the evolutionary lineages of leptosporangiate ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, M; Omori, T; Nakazawa, M; Sano, T; Kato, M; Iwatsuki, K

    1994-06-07

    Pteriodophytes have a longer evolutionary history than any other vascular land plant and, therefore, have endured greater loss of phylogenetically informative information. This factor has resulted in substantial disagreements in evaluating characters and, thus, controversy in establishing a stable classification. To compare competing classifications, we obtained DNA sequences of a chloroplast gene. The sequence of 1206 nt of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL) was determined from 58 species, representing almost all families of leptosporangiate ferns. Phlogenetic trees were inferred by the neighbor-joining and the parsimony methods. The two methods produced almost identical phylogenetic trees that provided insights concerning major general evolutionary trends in the leptosporangiate ferns. Interesting findings were as follows: (i) two morphologically distinct heterosporous water ferns, Marsilea and Salvinia, are sister genera; (ii) the tree ferns (Cyatheaceae, Dicksoniaceae, and Metaxyaceae) are monophyletic; and (iii) polypodioids are distantly related to the gleichenioids in spite of the similarity of their exindusiate soral morphology and are close to the higher indusiate ferns. In addition, the affinities of several "problematic genera" were assessed.

  5. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushnik, J.C.; Demaree, R.S.; Flory, W.B.; Bauer, S.M. [California State Univ. at Chico, Chico, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Houpis, J.L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, P.D. [Forest Service Lab., Rhinelander, WI (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The impact of increasing atmospheric C0{sub 2} has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinusponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased C0{sub 2} conditions for 6 months. These trees exhibit morphological, physiological, and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls. Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no significant effect to the root to shoot ratios, however needles subjected to elevated C0{sub 2} exhibited an increased overall specific needle mass and a decreased total needle area. Morphological changes at the needle level included decreased mesophyll to vascular tissue 91 ratio and variations in starch storage in chloroplasts. The elevated CO{sub 2} increased internal CO{sub 2} concentrations and assimilation of carbon. Biochemical assays revealed that ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase specific activities increased on per unit area basis with C0{sub 2} treatment levels. Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activities exhibited an increase of 55% in the 700 uL L{sup {minus}1} treatment. These results indicate that the sink-source relationships of these trees have shifted carbon allocation toward above ground growth, possibly due to transport limitations.

  6. Protein import into chloroplasts requires a chloroplast ATPase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pain, D.; Blobel, G.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have transcribed mRNA from a cDNA clone coding for pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, translated the mRNA in a wheat germ cell-free system, and studied the energy requirement for posttranslational import of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein into the stroma of pea chloroplasts. They found that import depends on ATP hydrolysis within the stroma. Import is not inhibited when H/sup +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, or divalent cation gradients across the chloroplast membranes are dissipated by ionophores, as long as exogenously added ATP is also present during the import reaction. The data suggest that protein import into the chloroplast stroma requires a chloroplast ATPase that does not function to generate a membrane potential for driving the import reaction but that exerts its effect in another, yet-to-be-determined, mode. They have carried out a preliminary characterization of this ATPase regarding its nucleotide specificity and the effects of various ATPase inhibitors.

  7. Biosynthesis of sucrose and mannitol as a function of leaf age in celery (Apium graveolens L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.M.; Fellman, J.K.; Loescher, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    In celery (Apium graveolens L.), the two major translocated carbohydrates are sucrose and the acyclic polyol mannitol. Their metabolism, however, is different and their specific functions are uncertain. To compare their roles in carbon partitioning and sink-source transitions, developmental changes in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ labeling, pool sizes, and key enzyme activities in leaf tissues were examined. The proportion of label in mannitol increased dramatically with leaf maturation whereas that in sucrose remained fairly constant. Mannitol content, however, was high in all leaves and sucrose content increased as leaves developed. Activities of mannose-6-P reductase, cytoplasmic and chloroplastic fructose-1,6-bis-phosphatases, sucrose phosphate synthase, and sucrose synthase increased with leaf maturation and decreased as leaves senesced. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and nonreversible glyceraldehyde-3-P dehydrogenase activities rose as leaves developed but did not decrease. Thus, sucrose is produced in all photosynthetically active leaves whereas mannitol is synthesized primarily in mature leaves and stored in all leaves. Onset of sucrose export in celery may result from sucrose accumulation in expanding leaves, but mannitol export is clearly unrelated to mannitol concentration. Mannitol export, however, appears to coincide with increased mannitol biosynthesis. Although mannitol and sucrose arise from a common precursor in celery, subsequent metabolism and transport must be regulated separately.

  8. Comparative analysis of cells and proteins of pumpkin plants for the control of fruit size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Yumiko; Taniguchi, Go; Takazaki, Shinya; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Miyahara, Kohji; Ohshima, Yasumi

    2012-09-01

    Common pumpkin plants (Cucurbita maxima) produce fruits of 1-2 kg size on the average, while special varieties of the same species called Atlantic Giant are known to produce a huge fruit up to several hundred kilograms. As an approach to determine the factors controlling the fruit size in C. maxima, we cultivated both AG and control common plants, and found that both the cell number and cell sizes were increased in a large fruit while DNA content of the cell did not change significantly. We also compared protein patterns in the leaves, stems, ripe and young fruits by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, and identified those differentially expressed between them with mass spectroscopy. Based on these results, we suggest that factors in photosynthesis such as ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase, glycolysis pathway enzymes, heat-shock proteins and ATP synthase play positive or negative roles in the growth of a pumpkin fruit. These results provide a step toward the development of plant biotechnology to control fruit size in the future. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Metabolic traits of an uncultured archaeal lineage -MSBL1- from brine pools of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mwirichia, Romano

    2016-01-13

    The candidate Division MSBL1 (Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes 1) comprises a monophyletic group of uncultured archaea found in different hypersaline environments. Previous studies propose methanogenesis as the main metabolism. Here, we describe a metabolic reconstruction of MSBL1 based on 32 single-cell amplified genomes from Brine Pools of the Red Sea (Atlantis II, Discovery, Nereus, Erba and Kebrit). Phylogeny based on rRNA genes as well as conserved single copy genes delineates the group as a putative novel lineage of archaea. Our analysis shows that MSBL1 may ferment glucose via the Embden–Meyerhof–Parnas pathway. However, in the absence of organic carbon, carbon dioxide may be fixed via the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, Wood-Ljungdahl pathway or reductive TCA cycle. Therefore, based on the occurrence of genes for glycolysis, absence of the core genes found in genomes of all sequenced methanogens and the phylogenetic position, we hypothesize that the MSBL1 are not methanogens, but probably sugar-fermenting organisms capable of autotrophic growth. Such a mixotrophic lifestyle would confer survival advantage (or possibly provide a unique narrow niche) when glucose and other fermentable sugars are not available.

  10. Vacuolar Localization of Endoproteinases EP(1) and EP(2) in Barley Mesophyll Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, S S; Huffaker, R C

    1984-05-01

    The localization of two previously characterized endoproteinases (EP(1) and EP(2)) that comprise more than 95% of the protease activity in primary Hordeum vulgare L. var Numar leaves was determined. Intact vacuoles released from washed mesophyll protoplasts by gentle osmotic shock and increase in pH, were purified by flotation through a four-step Ficoll gradient. These vacuoles contained endoproteinases that rapidly degraded purified barley ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase) substrate. Breakdown products and extent of digestion of RuBPCase were determined using 12% polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Coomassie brilliant blue- or silver-stained gels were scanned, and the peaks were integrated to provide quantitative information. The characteristics of the vacuolar endoproteinases (e.g. sensitivity to various inhibitors and activators, and the molecular weights of the breakdown products, i.e. peptide maps) closely resembled those of purified EP(1) and partially purified EP(2). It is therefore concluded that EP(1) and EP(2) are localized in the vacuoles of mesophyll cells.

  11. The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushnik, J.C.; Demaree, R.S.; Flory, W.B.; Bauer, S.M.; Anderson, P.D.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of increasing atmospheric C0 2 has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinusponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased C0 2 conditions for 6 months. These trees exhibit morphological, physiological, and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls. Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no significant effect to the root to shoot ratios, however needles subjected to elevated C0 2 exhibited an increased overall specific needle mass and a decreased total needle area. Morphological changes at the needle level included decreased mesophyll to vascular tissue 91 ratio and variations in starch storage in chloroplasts. The elevated CO 2 increased internal CO 2 concentrations and assimilation of carbon. Biochemical assays revealed that ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase specific activities increased on per unit area basis with C0 2 treatment levels. Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activities exhibited an increase of 55% in the 700 uL L -1 treatment. These results indicate that the sink-source relationships of these trees have shifted carbon allocation toward above ground growth, possibly due to transport limitations

  12. Differential Responses of Two Lactuca sativa Varieties to Bicarbonate-Induced Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Chebbi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron chlorosis induced by bicarbonate is very common in calcareous soils, where bicarbonate (HCO3- ions are present at high concentrations. In this study, morpho-physiological and biochemical responses of two Lactuca sativa varieties (Romaine and Vista to bicarbonate induced iron deficiency were investigated. The culture was conducted on nutrient solution containing 5 µM Fe and 10 mM NaHCO3, in a growth chamber with controlled conditions. After 14 days of bicarbonate treatment, the two varieties seedling showed a slight yellowing of young leaves associated with a significant decline of plant biomass, leaf number and area. Furthermore, the concentrations of the nutrient elements (potassium, magnesium, iron and calcium in leaves and roots of two lettuce varieties were modified. In roots of bicarbonate treated plants, the Fe-chelate reductase activity was increased as compared to control in both varieties. PEPC activity was enhanced only in Vista variety. Moreover, Fe deficiency induced a small change in the photosynthetic parameters and chlorophyll fluorescence, especially in Romaine variety. These changes are accompanied by decreases in ribulose 1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco activity. These findings indicated that Vista variety could survive at low iron supply.

  13. Reduced grain chalkiness and its possible physiological mechanism in transgenic rice overexpressing l-GalLDH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Yu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chalkiness is one of the key factors determining rice quality and price. Ascorbic acid (Asc is a major plant antioxidant that performs many functions in plants. l-Galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (l-GalLDH, EC1.3.2.3 is an enzyme that catalyzes the final step of Asc biosynthesis in plants. Here we show that the l-GalLDH-overexpressing transgenic rice, GO-2, which has constitutively higher leaf Asc content than wild-type (WT plants, exhibits significantly reduced grain chalkiness. Higher foliar ascorbate/dehydroascorbate (Asc/DHA ratios at 40, 60, 80, and 100 days of plant age were observed in GO-2. Further investigation showed that the enhanced level of Asc resulted in a significantly higher ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco protein level in GO-2 at 80 days. In addition, levels of abscisic acid (ABA and jasmonic acid (JA were lower in GO-2 at 60, 80, and 100 days. The results we present here indicate that the enhanced level of Asc is likely responsible for changing redox homeostasis in key developmental stages associated with grain filling and alters grain chalkiness in the l-GalLDH-overexpressing transgenic by maintaining photosynthetic function and affecting phytohormones associated with grain filling.

  14. Long-distance transport of mRNA via parenchyma cells and phloem across the host-parasite junction in Cuscuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Runo, Steven; Townsley, Brad; Machuka, Jesse; Sinha, Neelima

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that the parasitic plant dodder (Cuscuta pentagona) establishes a continuous vascular system through which water and nutrients are drawn. Along with solutes, viruses and proteins, mRNA transcripts are transported from the host to the parasite. The path of the transcripts and their stability in the parasite have yet to be revealed. To discover the route of mRNA transportation, the in situ reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique was used to locally amplify host transcript within parasitic tissue. The stability of host mRNA molecules was also checked by monitoring specific transcripts along the growing dodder thread. Four mRNAs, alpha and beta subunits of PYROPHOSPHATE (PPi)-DEPENDENT PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE (LePFP), the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), and GIBBERELLIC ACID INSENSITIVE (LeGAI), were found to move from host (tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)) to dodder. LePFP mRNA was localized to the dodder parenchyma cells and to the phloem. LePFP transcripts were found in the growing dodder stem up to 30 cm from the tomato-dodder connection. These results suggest that mRNA molecules are transferred from host to parasite via symplastic connections between parenchyma cells, move towards the phloem, and are stable for a long distance in the parasite. This may allow developmental coordination between the parasite and its host.

  15. Hidden diversity revealed by genome-resolved metagenomics of iron-oxidizing microbial mats from Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Heather; Hager, Kevin W; McAllister, Sean M; Moyer, Craig L

    2017-08-01

    The Zetaproteobacteria are ubiquitous in marine environments, yet this class of Proteobacteria is only represented by a few closely-related cultured isolates. In high-iron environments, such as diffuse hydrothermal vents, the Zetaproteobacteria are important members of the community driving its structure. Biogeography of Zetaproteobacteria has shown two ubiquitous operational taxonomic units (OTUs), yet much is unknown about their genomic diversity. Genome-resolved metagenomics allows for the specific binning of microbial genomes based on genomic signatures present in composite metagenome assemblies. This resulted in the recovery of 93 genome bins, of which 34 were classified as Zetaproteobacteria. Form II ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase genes were recovered from nearly all the Zetaproteobacteria genome bins. In addition, the Zetaproteobacteria genome bins contain genes for uptake and utilization of bioavailable nitrogen, detoxification of arsenic, and a terminal electron acceptor adapted for low oxygen concentration. Our results also support the hypothesis of a Cyc2-like protein as the site for iron oxidation, now detected across a majority of the Zetaproteobacteria genome bins. Whole genome comparisons showed a high genomic diversity across the Zetaproteobacteria OTUs and genome bins that were previously unidentified by SSU rRNA gene analysis. A single lineage of cosmopolitan Zetaproteobacteria (zOTU 2) was found to be monophyletic, based on cluster analysis of average nucleotide identity and average amino acid identity comparisons. From these data, we can begin to pinpoint genomic adaptations of the more ecologically ubiquitous Zetaproteobacteria, and further understand their environmental constraints and metabolic potential.

  16. Effects of thermal stress of protein synthesis and gene expression in Brassica napus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halle, J.R.; Ghosh, S.; Dumbroff, E.B.; Heikkila, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf segments of Brassica napus were exposed to 22 degrees, 35 degrees, 38 degrees or 40 degrees C for up to 4 h. Analysis of radiolabelled proteins by 2-D SDS-PAGE and fluorography revealed two major groups of heat shock proteins (HSPs). One group comprised HSPs, 70, 76 and 87, with pIs ranging from 5.7 to 6.1, whereas the second group had molecular weights ranging from 23 to 16 kD and pIs from 5.6 to 6.9. Immunoblot analysis using antibodies directed against the large (RLSU) and small (RSSU) subunits of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RUBISCO) showed that increasing temperatures from 35 degrees to 38 degrees or 40 degrees C or the duration of thermal stress from 1 to 5 h did not affect levels of the RSSU (15 kd) whereas levels of the RLSU (52 kD) fell sharply. Nevertheless, RUBISCO activity was not adversely affected at 38 degree C for periods of up to 5 h. The increase observed in HSP 70 during heat shock was transcriptionally regulated, but the decrease in the RLSU was not accompanied by any detectable change in levels of its mRNA

  17. Protein methylation in pea chloroplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemi, K.J.; Adler, J.; Selman, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The methylation of chloroplast proteins has been investigated by incubating intact pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplasts with [ 3 H-methyl]-S-adenosylmethionine. Incubation in the light increases the amount of methylation in both the thylakoid and stromal fractions. Numerous thylakoid proteins serve as substrates for the methyltransfer reactions. Three of these thylakoid proteins are methylated to a significantly greater extent in the light than in the dark. The primary stromal polypeptide methylated is the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. One other stromal polypeptide is also methylated much more in the light than in the dark. Two distinct types of protein methylation occur. One methylinkage is stable to basic conditions whereas a second type is base labile. The base-stable linkage is indicative of N-methylation of amino acid residues while base-lability is suggestive of carboxymethylation of amino acid residues. Labeling in the light increases the percentage of methylation that is base labile in the thylakoid fraction while no difference is observed in the amount of base-labile methylations in light-labeled and dark-labeled stromal proteins. Also suggestive of carboxymethylation is the detection of volatile [ 3 H]methyl radioactivity which increases during the labeling period and is greater in chloroplasts labeled in the light as opposed to being labeled in the dark; this implies in vivo turnover of the [ 3 H]methyl group

  18. Genus-Specific Real-Time PCR and HRM Assays to Distinguish Liriope from Ophiopogon Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Eva; Banik, Dipanwita; Abson, John; Greene, Paul; Slater, Adrian; Sgamma, Tiziana

    2017-10-26

    Liriope and Ophiopogon species have a long history of use as traditional medicines across East Asia. They have also become widely used around the world for ornamental and landscaping purposes. The morphological similarities between Liriope and Ophiopogon taxa have made the taxonomy of the two genera problematic and caused confusion about the identification of individual specimens. Molecular approaches could be a useful tool for the discrimination of these two genera in combination with traditional methods. Seventy-five Liriope and Ophiopogon samples from the UK National Plant Collections of Ophiopogon and Liriope were analyzed. The 5' end of the DNA barcode region of the gene for the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ( rbcLa ) was used for the discrimination of the two genera. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) between the two genera allowed the development of discriminatory tests for genus-level identification based on specific PCR and high-resolution melt curve (HRM) assays. The study highlights the advantage of incorporating DNA barcoding methods into plant identification protocols and provides simple assays that could be used for the quality assurance of commercially traded plants and herbal drugs.

  19. Determination of proteins induced in response to jasmonic acid and salicylic acid in resistant and susceptible cultivars of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Amber; Khan, Muhammad Rashid; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2010-07-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) are signaling molecules that play key roles in the regulation of metabolic processes, reproduction, and defense against pathogens. The proteomics approach was used to identify proteins that are induced by JA and SA in the tomato cultivars Roma and Pant Bahr, which are susceptible and resistant to bacterial wilt, respectively. Threonine deaminase and leucine amino peptidase were upregulated, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small chain was downregulated by time-course application of JA. Translationally controlled tumor protein was upregulated by time-course application of SA. Protein disulfide isomerase was upregulated by application of either JA or SA. Proteins related to defense, energy, and protein destination/storage are suspected to be responsible for the susceptibility or resistance of the cultivars. Furthermore, in Roma, iron ABC transporter was upregulated by JA and down-regulated by SA. Iron ABC transporter plays a part in the signal transduction of both JA and SA in cultivars of tomato that are resistant to bacterial wilt.

  20. An Excel tool for deriving key photosynthetic parameters from combined gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellasio, Chandra; Beerling, David J; Griffiths, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Combined photosynthetic gas exchange and modulated fluorometres are widely used to evaluate physiological characteristics associated with phenotypic and genotypic variation, whether in response to genetic manipulation or resource limitation in natural vegetation or crops. After describing relatively simple experimental procedures, we present the theoretical background to the derivation of photosynthetic parameters, and provide a freely available Excel-based fitting tool (EFT) that will be of use to specialists and non-specialists alike. We use data acquired in concurrent variable fluorescence-gas exchange experiments, where A/Ci and light-response curves have been measured under ambient and low oxygen. From these data, the EFT derives light respiration, initial PSII (photosystem II) photochemical yield, initial quantum yield for CO2 fixation, fraction of incident light harvested by PSII, initial quantum yield for electron transport, electron transport rate, rate of photorespiration, stomatal limitation, Rubisco (ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) rate of carboxylation and oxygenation, Rubisco specificity factor, mesophyll conductance to CO2 diffusion, light and CO2 compensation point, Rubisco apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, and Rubisco CO2 -saturated carboxylation rate. As an example, a complete analysis of gas exchange data on tobacco plants is provided. We also discuss potential measurement problems and pitfalls, and suggest how such empirical data could subsequently be used to parameterize predictive photosynthetic models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Photosynthetic characteristics and mycosporine-like amino acids under UV radiation: a competitive advantage of Mastocarpus stellatus over Chondrus crispus at the Helgoland shoreline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, K.; Kräbs, G.; Hanelt, D.; Wiencke, C.

    2000-05-01

    Chondrus crispus and Mastocarpus stellatus both inhabit the intertidal and upper sublittoral zone of Helgoland, but with C. crispus generally taking a lower position. Measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence, activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), and content and composition of UV absorbing mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) were conducted in the laboratory, to test whether susceptibility to UV radiation may play a role in the vertical distribution of these two species. Effective and maximal quantum yield of photochemistry as well as maximal electron transport rate (ETRmax) in C. crispus were more strongly affected by UV-B radiation than in M. stellatus. In both species, no negative effects of the respective radiation conditions were found on total activity of RubisCO. Total MAA content in M. stellatus was up to 6-fold higher than in C. crispus and the composition of MAAs in the two species was different. The results indicate that, among others, UV-B sensitivity may be a factor restricting C. crispus to the lower intertidal and upper sublittoral zone, whereas M. stellatus is better adapted to UV radiation and is therefore more competitive in the upper intertidal zone.

  2. Photosynthetic characteristics of an amphibious plant, Eleocharis vivipara: Expression of C4 and C3 modes in contrasting environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Osamu; Samejima, Muneaki; Muto, Shoshi; Miyachi, Shigetoh

    1988-01-01

    Eleocharis vivipara Link, a freshwater amphibious leafless plant belonging to the Cyperaceae can grow in both terrestrial and submersed aquatic conditions. Two forms of E. vivipara obtained from these contrasting environments were examined for the characteristics associated with C 4 and C 3 photosynthesis. In the terrestrial form, the culms, which are photosynthetic organs, possess a Kranz-type anatomy typical of C 4 plants, and well-developed bundle-sheath cells contain numerous large chloroplasts. In the submersed form, the culms possess anatomical features characteristic of submersed aquatic plants, and the reduced bundle-sheath cells contain only a few small chloroplasts. 14 C pulse- 12 C chase experiments showed that the terrestrial form and the submersed form fix carbon by way of the C 4 pathway, with aspartate (40%) and malate (35%) as the main primary products, and by way of the C 3 pathway, with 3-phosphoglyceric acid (53%) and sugar phosphates (14%) as the main primary products, respectively. The terrestrial form showed photosynthetic enzyme activities typical of the NAD-malic enzyme-C 4 subtype, whereas the submersed form showed decreased activities of key C 4 enzymes and an increased ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity. These data suggest that this species can differentiate into the C 4 mode under terrestrial conditions and into the C 3 mode under submersed conditions

  3. Enhanced Thermostability of Arabidopsis Rubisco Activase Improves Photosynthesis and Growth Rates under Moderate Heat Stress[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Itzhak; Chang, Thom Kai; Bertain, Sean M.; Madrigal, Alfredo; Liu, Lu; Lassner, Michael W.; Zhu, Genhai

    2007-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis declines when the temperature exceeds its optimum range. Recent evidence indicates that the reduction in photosynthesis is linked to ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) deactivation due to the inhibition of Rubisco activase (RCA) under moderately elevated temperatures. To test the hypothesis that thermostable RCA can improve photosynthesis under elevated temperatures, we used gene shuffling technology to generate several Arabidopsis thaliana RCA1 (short isoform) variants exhibiting improved thermostability. Wild-type RCA1 and selected thermostable RCA1 variants were introduced into an Arabidopsis RCA deletion (Δrca) line. In a long-term growth test at either constant 26°C or daily 4-h 30°C exposure, the transgenic lines with the thermostable RCA1 variants exhibited higher photosynthetic rates, improved development patterns, higher biomass, and increased seed yields compared with the lines expressing wild-type RCA1 and a slight improvement compared with untransformed Arabidopsis plants. These results provide clear evidence that RCA is a major limiting factor in plant photosynthesis under moderately elevated temperatures and a potential target for genetic manipulation to improve crop plants productivity under heat stress conditions. PMID:17933901

  4. Enhanced Thermostability of Arabidopsis Rubisco activase improves photosynthesis and growth rates under moderate heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Itzhak; Chang, Thom Kai; Bertain, Sean M; Madrigal, Alfredo; Liu, Lu; Lassner, Michael W; Zhu, Genhai

    2007-10-01

    Plant photosynthesis declines when the temperature exceeds its optimum range. Recent evidence indicates that the reduction in photosynthesis is linked to ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) deactivation due to the inhibition of Rubisco activase (RCA) under moderately elevated temperatures. To test the hypothesis that thermostable RCA can improve photosynthesis under elevated temperatures, we used gene shuffling technology to generate several Arabidopsis thaliana RCA1 (short isoform) variants exhibiting improved thermostability. Wild-type RCA1 and selected thermostable RCA1 variants were introduced into an Arabidopsis RCA deletion (Deltarca) line. In a long-term growth test at either constant 26 degrees C or daily 4-h 30 degrees C exposure, the transgenic lines with the thermostable RCA1 variants exhibited higher photosynthetic rates, improved development patterns, higher biomass, and increased seed yields compared with the lines expressing wild-type RCA1 and a slight improvement compared with untransformed Arabidopsis plants. These results provide clear evidence that RCA is a major limiting factor in plant photosynthesis under moderately elevated temperatures and a potential target for genetic manipulation to improve crop plants productivity under heat stress conditions.

  5. The Arabidopsis ppi1 Mutant Is Specifically Defective in the Expression, Chloroplast Import, and Accumulation of Photosynthetic ProteinsW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Sybille; Baldwin, Amy; Patel, Ramesh; Razzaq, Azam; Dupree, Paul; Lilley, Kathryn; Kurth, Joachim; Leister, Dario; Jarvis, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The import of nucleus-encoded proteins into chloroplasts is mediated by translocon complexes in the envelope membranes. A component of the translocon in the outer envelope membrane, Toc34, is encoded in Arabidopsis by two homologous genes, atTOC33 and atTOC34. Whereas atTOC34 displays relatively uniform expression throughout development, atTOC33 is strongly upregulated in rapidly growing, photosynthetic tissues. To understand the reason for the existence of these two related genes, we characterized the atTOC33 knockout mutant ppi1. Immunoblotting and proteomics revealed that components of the photosynthetic apparatus are deficient in ppi1 chloroplasts and that nonphotosynthetic chloroplast proteins are unchanged or enriched slightly. Furthermore, DNA array analysis of 3292 transcripts revealed that photosynthetic genes are moderately, but specifically, downregulated in ppi1. Proteome differences in ppi1 could be correlated with protein import rates: ppi1 chloroplasts imported the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase small subunit and 33-kD oxygen-evolving complex precursors at significantly reduced rates, but the import of a 50S ribosomal subunit precursor was largely unaffected. The ppi1 import defect occurred at the level of preprotein binding, which is consistent with a role for atToc33 during preprotein recognition. The data suggest that atToc33 is involved preferentially in the import of photosynthetic proteins and, by extension, that atToc34 is involved in the import of nonphotosynthetic chloroplast proteins. PMID:12897258

  6. Phytotoxicities of fluoranthene and phenanthrene deposited on needle surfaces of the evergreen conifer, Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et Zucc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntimehin, Ilemobayo; Nakatani, Nobutake; Sakugawa, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been widely studied with respect to their carcinogenic and mutagenic effects on animals and human cells. Phenanthrene (PHE) and fluoranthene (FLU) effects on the needle photosynthetic traits of 2-year-old Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora Sieb. et. Zucc.) seedlings were investigated. Three months after fumigation of foliage with solutions containing these PAHs (10 μM each), FLU had negative effects on net photosynthesis at near-saturating irradiance, stomatal conductance, initial chlorophyll fluorescence, and the contents of total chlorophyll, magnesium, and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) of current-year needles. PHE had similar negative effects to FLU but in lesser magnitude. The effects of the PAHs were mitigated by the addition of an OH-radical scavenger (mannitol) into the PAH solutions. PAHs deposited on the surface of pine needles may induce the generation of reactive oxygen species in the photosynthetic apparatus, a manner closely resembling the action of the herbicide paraquat. - Fluoranthene and phenanthrene caused negative effects on the needles of Japanese red pine

  7. Cytonuclear Coordination Is Not Immediate upon Allopolyploid Formation in Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae) Allopolyploids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrish, Tina; Symonds, V. Vaughan; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Tate, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Allopolyploids, formed by hybridization and chromosome doubling, face the immediate challenge of having duplicated nuclear genomes that interact with the haploid and maternally inherited cytoplasmic (plastid and mitochondrial) genomes. Most of our knowledge of the genomic consequences of allopolyploidy has focused on the fate of the duplicated nuclear genes without regard to their potential interactions with cytoplasmic genomes. As a step toward understanding the fates of nuclear-encoded subunits that are plastid-targeted, here we examine the retention and expression of the gene encoding the small subunit of Ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; rbcS) in multiple populations of allotetraploid Tragopogon miscellus (Asteraceae). These polyploids formed recently (~80 years ago) and repeatedly from T. dubius and T. pratensis in the northwestern United States. Examination of 79 T. miscellus individuals from 10 natural populations, as well as 25 synthetic allotetraploids, including reciprocally formed plants, revealed a low percentage of naturally occurring individuals that show a bias in either gene (homeolog) loss (12%) or expression (16%), usually toward maintaining the maternal nuclear copy of rbcS. For individuals showing loss, seven retained the maternally derived rbcS homeolog only, while three had the paternally derived copy. All of the synthetic polyploid individuals examined (S0 and S1 generations) retained and expressed both parental homeologs. These results demonstrate that cytonuclear coordination does not happen immediately upon polyploid formation in Tragopogon miscellus. PMID:26646761

  8. Growth rate analysis and protein identification of Kappaphycus alvarezii (Rhodophyta, Gigartinales under pH induced stress culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Zi Tee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental pH is one of the factors contributing to abiotic stress which in turn influences the growth and development of macroalgae. This study was conducted in order to assess the growth and physiological changes in Kappaphycus alvarezii under different pH conditions: pHs 6, ∼8.4 (control and 9. K. alvarezii explants exhibited a difference in the daily growth rate (DGR among the different pH treatments (p ≤ 0.05. The highest DGR was observed in control culture with pH ∼8.4 followed by alkaline (pH 9 and acidic (pH 6 induced stress cultures. Protein expression profile was generated from different pH induced K. alvarezii cultures using sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE followed by protein identification and analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS and Mascot software. Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco large chain was identified to be up-regulated under acidic (pH 6 condition during the second and fourth week of culture. The findings indicated that Rubisco can be employed as a biomarker for pH induced abiotic stress. Further study on the association between the expression levels of Rubisco large chain and their underlying mechanisms under pH stress conditions is recommended.

  9. Molecular phylogenies support taxonomic revision of three species of Laurencia (Rhodomelaceae, Rhodophyta, with the description of a new genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Rousseau

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The systematics of the Laurencia complex was investigated using a taxon-rich data set including the chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL gene only and a character-rich data set combining mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI-5P, the rbcL marker, and the nuclear large subunit of the ribosomal operon (LSU. Bayesian and ML analyses of these data sets showed that three species hitherto placed in the genus Laurencia J.V.Lamour. were not closely related to Laurencia s. str. Laurencia caspica Zinova & Zaberzhinskaya was the sister group of the remaining Osmundea Stackh. species, L. crustiformans McDermid joined Palisada and L. flexilis Setch. consisted of an independent lineage. In light of these results a new genus, Ohelopapa F.Rousseau, Martin-Lescanne, Payri & L.Le Gall gen. nov., is proposed to accommodate L. flexilis. This new genus is morphologically characterized by four pericentral cells in each vegetative axial segment; however, it lacks ‘corps en cerise’ in cortical cells and secondary pit connections between cortical cells, which are characteristic of Laurencia. Three novel combinations are proposed to render the classification closer to a natural system: Ohelopapa flexilis (Setch. F.Rousseau, Martin-Lescanne, Payri & L.Le Gall comb. nov., Osmundea caspica (Zinova & Zaberzhinskaya Maggs & L.M.McIvor comb. nov. and Palisada crustiformans (McDermid A.R.Sherwood, A.Kurihara & K.W.Nam comb. nov.

  10. Manipulation of the hypocotyl sink activity by reciprocal grafting of two Raphanus sativus varieties: its effects on morphological and physiological traits of source leaves and whole-plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Daisuke; Betsuyaku, Eriko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    To reveal whether hypocotyl sink activities are regulated by the aboveground parts, and whether physiology and morphology of source leaves are affected by the hypocotyl sink activities, we conducted grafting experiments using two Raphanus sativus varieties with different hypocotyl sink activities. Comet (C) and Leafy (L) varieties with high and low hypocotyl sink activities were reciprocally grafted and resultant plants were called by their scion and stock such as CC, LC, CL and LL. Growth, leaf mass per area (LMA), total non-structural carbohydrates (TNCs) and photosynthetic characteristics were compared among them. Comet hypocotyls in CC and LC grew well regardless of the scions, whereas Leafy hypocotyls in CL and LL did not. Relative growth rate was highest in LL and lowest in CC. Photosynthetic capacity was correlated with Rubisco (ribulose 1·5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) content but unaffected by TNC. High C/N ratio and accumulation of TNC led to high LMA and structural LMA. These results showed that the hypocotyl sink activity was autonomously regulated by hypocotyl and that the down-regulation of photosynthesis was not induced by TNC. We conclude that the change in the sink activity alters whole-plant growth through the changes in both biomass allocation and leaf morphological characteristics in R. sativus. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Bioinformatic analysis of the distribution of inorganic carbon transporters and prospective targets for bioengineering to increase Ci uptake by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudana, Sandeep B; Zarzycki, Jan; Moparthi, Vamsi K; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved a carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) which has enabled them to inhabit diverse environments encompassing a range of inorganic carbon (Ci: [Formula: see text] and CO2) concentrations. Several uptake systems facilitate inorganic carbon accumulation in the cell, which can in turn be fixed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Here we survey the distribution of genes encoding known Ci uptake systems in cyanobacterial genomes and, using a pfam- and gene context-based approach, identify in the marine (alpha) cyanobacteria a heretofore unrecognized number of putative counterparts to the well-known Ci transporters of beta cyanobacteria. In addition, our analysis shows that there is a huge repertoire of transport systems in cyanobacteria of unknown function, many with homology to characterized Ci transporters. These can be viewed as prospective targets for conversion into ancillary Ci transporters through bioengineering. Increasing intracellular Ci concentration coupled with efforts to increase carbon fixation will be beneficial for the downstream conversion of fixed carbon into value-added products including biofuels. In addition to CCM transporter homologs, we also survey the occurrence of rhodopsin homologs in cyanobacteria, including bacteriorhodopsin, a class of retinal-binding, light-activated proton pumps. Because they are light driven and because of the apparent ease of altering their ion selectivity, we use this as an example of re-purposing an endogenous transporter for the augmentation of Ci uptake by cyanobacteria and potentially chloroplasts.

  12. Structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Rubisco activase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, Dirk; Larsson, Anna M; Andersson, Inger

    2015-04-01

    The CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is inactivated by the formation of dead-end complexes with inhibitory sugar phosphates. In plants and green algae, the ATP-dependent motor protein Rubisco activase restores catalytic competence by facilitating conformational changes in Rubisco that promote the release of the inhibitory compounds from the active site. Here, the crystal structure of Rubisco activase from Arabidopsis thaliana is presented at 2.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals an AAA+ two-domain structure. More than 100 residues in the protein were not visible in the electron-density map owing to conformational disorder, but were verified to be present in the crystal by mass spectrometry. Two sulfate ions were found in the structure. One was bound in the loop formed by the Walker A motif at the interface of the domains. A second sulfate ion was bound at the N-terminal end of the first helix of the C-terminal domain. The protein packs in a helical fashion in the crystal, as observed previously for Rubisco activase, but differences in the helical pitch indicate flexibility in the packing of the protein.

  13. Evaluation of proteome alterations induced by cadmium stress in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Júnior, Cícero Alves; Barbosa, Herbert de Sousa; Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Ferreira Koolen, Hector Henrique; Gozzo, Fábio Cesar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2015-09-01

    The present study evaluates, at a proteomic level, changes in protein abundance in sunflower leaves in the absence or presence (at 50 or 700mg) of cadmium (as CdCl2). At the end of the cultivation period (45 days), proteins are extracted from leaves with phenol, separated by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE), and excised from the gels. The differential protein abundances (for proteins differing by more than 1.8 fold, which corresponds to 90% variation) are characterized using nESI-LC-MS/MS. The protein content decreases by approximately 41% in plants treated with 700mg Cd compared with control plants. By comparing all groups of plants evaluated in this study (Control vs. Cd-lower, Control vs. Cd-higher and Cd-lower vs. Cd-higher), 39 proteins are found differential and 18 accurately identified; the control vs. Cd-higher treatment is that presenting the most differential proteins. From identified proteins, those involved in energy and disease/defense (including stress), are the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large chain, transketolase, and heat shock proteins are the most differential abundant proteins. Thus, at the present study, photosynthesis is the main process affected by Cd in sunflowers, although these plants are highly tolerant to Cd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of Pinellia pedatisecta Lectin Gene in Transgenic Wheat Enhances Resistance to Wheat Aphids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Duan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Wheat aphids are major pests during the seed filling stage of wheat. Plant lectins are toxic to sap-sucking pests such as wheat aphids. In this study, Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (ppa, a gene encoding mannose binding lectin, was cloned, and it shared 92.69% nucleotide similarity and 94% amino acid similarity with Pinellia ternata agglutinin (pta. The ppa gene, driven by the constitutive and phloem-specific ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit gene (rbcs promoter in pBAC-rbcs-ppa expression vector, was transferred into the wheat cultivar Baofeng104 (BF104 by particle bombardment transformation. Fifty-four T0 transgenic plants were generated. The inheritance and expression of the ppa gene were confirmed by PCR and RT-PCR analysis respectively, and seven homozygous transgenic lines were obtained. An aphid bioassay on detached leaf segments revealed that seven ppa transgenic wheat lines had lower aphid growth rates and higher inhibition rates than BF104. Furthermore, two-year aphid bioassays in isolated fields showed that aphid numbers per tiller of transgenic lines were significantly decreased, compared with wild type BF104. Therefore, ppa could be a strong biotechnological candidate to produce aphid-resistant wheat.

  15. Genetic Engineering of Crypthecodinium cohnii to Increase Growth and Lipid Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjin Diao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated suitable selected markers and optimized transformation protocols to develop a new genetic transformation methodology for DHA-producing Crypthecodinium cohnii. Additionally, ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, potentially involved in CO2 fixation under autotrophic conditions, was selected as the target for construction of a gene knockdown mutant. Our results show that the constructs were successfully inserted into the C. cohnii chromosome by homologous recombination. Comparative analysis showed that deletion of the RuBisCO gene promoted cell growth and increased the lipid content of C. cohnii under heterotrophic conditions compared with those of the wild-type. The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS based metabolomic analysis showed that the metabolites involved in energy metabolism were upregulated, suggesting that the deletion of the RuBisCO gene may contribute to the re-direction of more carbon or energy toward growth and lipid accumulation under heterotrophic conditions.

  16. Protein changes in Lepidium sativum L. exposed to Hg during soil phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska, Beata; Szczodrowska, Agnieszka; Leszczynska, Joanna

    2017-08-03

    Some investigations have been carried out in this study to find the best technique of soil reclamation in mercurypolluted soil. In this study, we examined Lepidium sativum L. as a plant useful for Hg phytoextraction. The simultaneous application of compost and thiosulfate was explored as a possible method of enhancing the process of phytoextraction. The results of the investigations of plant protein changes during assisted Hg phytoextraction were also provided. The results of the study show that combined use of compost and thiosulfate significantly increased both the total Hg accumulation and its translocation to aerial plant tissues. Plant protein analysis showed that L. sativum L. has the ability to respond to environmental stress condition by the activation of additional proteins. The additional proteins, like homocysteine methyltransferase, ribulose bisphosphate carboxylases (long and short chains), 14-3-3-like protein, and biosynthesis-related 40S ribosomal protein S15, were activated in plant shoots only in experiments carried out in Hg-polluted soil. There were no protein changes observed in plants exposed to compost and thiosulfate. It suggests that the combined use of compost and thiosulfate decreased Hg toxicity.

  17. A gene phylogeny of the red algae (Rhodophyta) based on plastid rbcL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freshwater, D W; Fredericq, S; Butler, B S; Hommersand, M H; Chase, M W

    1994-01-01

    A phylogeny for the Rhodophyta has been inferred by parsimony analysis of plastid rbcL sequences representing 81 species, 68 genera, 38 families, and 17 orders of red algae; rbcL encodes the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Levels of sequence divergence among species, genera, and families are high in red algae, typically much greater than those reported for flowering plants. The Rhodophyta traditionally consists of one class, Rhodophyceae, and two subclasses, Bangiophycidae and Florideophycidae. The Bangiophycidae with three orders (Porphyridiales, Compsopogonales, and Bangiales) appears to be polyphyletic, and the Florideophycidae with 17 orders is monophyletic in this study. The current classification of the Florideophycidae based on ultrastructure of pit connections is supported. With the exception of the Rhodogorgonales, which appears to be misplaced, orders with one or two pit-plug cap layers (Hildenbrandiales, Corallinales, Acrochaetiales, Palmanales, Batrachospermales, and Nemaliales) terminate long branches of basal position within Florideophycidae in the most parsimonious rbcL tree. Orders that lack typical cap layers but possess a cap membrane are resolved as a monophyletic clade sister to the Ahnfeltiales. The large order Gigartinales, which is distributed among five rbcL clades, is polyphyletic. Families that possess typical carrageenan in their cell walls are resolved as a terminal clade containing two family complexes centered around the Solieriaceae and Gigartinaceae. PMID:8041781

  18. Grateloupia ramosa Wang & Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta), a new species from China based on morphological evidence and comparative rbcL sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cuicui; Liu, Miao; Guo, Shaoru; Zhao, Dan; Luan, Rixiao; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Grateloupia ramosa Wang & Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) is newly described from Hainan Province, southern China. The organism has the following morphological features: (1) purplish red, cartilaginous and lubricous thalli 5-10 cm in height; (2) compressed percurrent axes bearing abundant branches with opposite arrangement; (3) claw-like apices on top, constricted to 2-4 cm at the base; (4) cortex consisting of 3-6 layers of elliptical or anomalous cells and a medulla covered by compact medullary filaments; (5) reproductive structures distributed throughout the thallus, especially centralized at the bottom of the end portion of the branches; and (6) 4-celled Carpogonial branches and 3-celled auxiliary-cell branches, both of the Grateloupia-type. The morphological diff erences were supported by molecular phylogenetics based on ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ( rbcL) gene sequence analysis. There was only a 1 bp divergence between specimens collected from Wenchang and Lingshui of Hainan province. The new species was embedded in the large Grateloupia clade of the Halymeniaceae. The pairwise distances between G. ramosa and other species within Grateloupia ranged from 26 to 105 bp, within pairwise distances of 13-111 bp between species of the large genus Grateloupia in Halymeniaceae. Thus, we propose this new species as G. ramosa Wang & Luan sp. nov.

  19. Production and characterization of biodiesel from carbon dioxide concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria, Serratia sp. ISTD04.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-02-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium, Serratia sp. ISTD04, enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was evaluated for potential of carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and biofuel production. CO2 sequestration efficiency of the bacterium was determined by enzymatic activity of carbonic anhydrase and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Further, Western blot analysis confirmed presence of RuBisCO. The bacterium produced 0.487 and 0.647mgmg(-1) per unit cell dry weight of hydrocarbons and lipids respectively. The hydrocarbons were within the range of C13-C24 making it equivalent to light oil. GC-MS analysis of lipids produced by the bacterium indicated presence of C15-C20 organic compounds that made it potential source of biodiesel after transesterification. GC-MS, FTIR and NMR spectroscopic characterization of the fatty acid methyl esters revealed the presence of 55% and 45% of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds respectively, thus making it a balanced biodiesel composition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  1. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  2. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Chloroplast DNA Supports DNA Barcoding of Plant Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Hitomi S; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Sugita, Ritsuko

    2016-03-01

    Species identification from extracted DNA is sometimes needed for botanical samples. DNA quantification is required for an accurate and effective examination. If a quantitative assay provides unreliable estimates, a higher quantity of DNA than the estimated amount may be used in additional analyses to avoid failure to analyze samples from which extracting DNA is difficult. Compared with conventional methods, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) requires a low amount of DNA and enables quantification of dilute DNA solutions accurately. The aim of this study was to develop a qPCR assay for quantification of chloroplast DNA from taxonomically diverse plant species. An absolute quantification method was developed using primers targeting the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) gene using SYBR Green I-based qPCR. The calibration curve was generated using the PCR amplicon as the template. DNA extracts from representatives of 13 plant families common in Japan. This demonstrates that qPCR analysis is an effective method for quantification of DNA from plant samples. The results of qPCR assist in the decision-making will determine the success or failure of DNA analysis, indicating the possibility of optimization of the procedure for downstream reactions.

  3. Purification of nitrate reductase from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia by affinity chromatography using 5'AMP-sepharose and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureaux, T; Leydecker, M T; Meyer, C

    1989-02-15

    Nitrate reductase was purified from leaves of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia using either 5'AMP-Sepharose chromatography or two steps of immunoaffinity chromatography involving monoclonal antibodies directed against nitrate reductase from maize and against ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from N. plumbaginifolia. Nitrate reductase obtained by the first method was purified 1000-fold to a specific activity of 9 units/mg protein. The second method produced an homogenous enzyme, purified 21,000-fold to a specific activity of 80 units/mg protein. SDS/PAGE of nitrate reductase always resulted in two bands of 107 and 99.5 kDa. The 107-kDa band was the nitrate reductase subunit of N. plumbaginifolia; the smaller one of 99.5 kDa is thought, as commonly reported, to result from proteolysis of the larger protein. The molecular mass of 107 kDa is close to the values calculated from the coding sequences of the two nitrate reductase genes recently cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi).

  4. A "footprint" of plant carbon fixation cycle functions during the development of a heterotrophic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Xueliang; Shen, Cuicui; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Hu, Zijin; Tang, Lihua; Tang, Liguang; Ding, Feng; Li, Kunfei; Wu, Song; Hu, Yanping; Luo, Lilian; Li, Yuanhao; Wang, Qihua; Li, Guoqing; Cheng, Jiasen

    2015-08-11

    Carbon fixation pathway of plants (CFPP) in photosynthesis converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. Intriguingly, a large number of heterotrophic fungi also possess enzymes functionally associated with CFPP, raising the questions about their roles in fungal development and in evolution. Here, we report on the presence of 17 CFPP associated enzymes (ten in Calvin-Benson-Basham reductive pentose phosphate pathway and seven in C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle) in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a heterotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, and only two unique enzymes: ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) were absent. This data suggested an incomplete CFPP-like pathway (CLP) in fungi. Functional profile analysis demonstrated that the activity of the incomplete CLP was dramatically regulated during different developmental stages of S. sclerotiorum. Subsequent experiments confirmed that many of them were essential to the virulence and/or sclerotial formation. Most of the CLP associated genes are conserved in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of them have undergone gene duplication, gene acquisition or loss and functional diversification in evolutionary history. These findings showed an evolutionary links in the carbon fixation processes of autotrophs and heterotrophs and implicated the functions of related genes were in course of continuous change in different organisms in evolution.

  5. Characterization of herbaspirillum- and limnobacter-related strains isolated from young volcanic deposits in miyake-jima island, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongsheng; Fujimura, Reiko; Sato, Yoshinori; Nanba, Kenji; Kamijo, Takashi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    The role of microbes in the early development of ecosystems on new volcanic materials seems to be crucial to primary plant succession but is not well characterized. Here we analyzed the bacterial community colonizing 22-year-old volcanic deposits of the Miyake-jima Island (Japan) using culture-based and 16S rRNA gene clone library methods. The majority of 91 bacterial isolates were placed phylogenetically in two clusters (A and B) of the Betaproteobacteria. Cluster A (82% of isolates) was related to the genus Limnobacter and Cluster B (9%) was affiliated with the Herbaspirillum clade. The clone library analysis supported the predominance of Cluster B rather than Cluster A. Strain KP1-50 of Cluster B was able to grow on a mineral medium under an atmosphere of H(2), O(2), and CO(2) (85:5:10), and characterized by its large-subunit gene of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcL) and nitrogenase reductase gene (nifH). In contrast, strains of Cluster A did not grow chemolithoautotrophically with H(2), O(2), and CO(2) but increased their cell biomass with the addition of thiosulfate to the succinate medium, suggesting the use of thiosulfate as an energy source. From phenotypic characterization, it was suggested that the Cluster A and B strains were novel species in the genus Limnobacter and Herbaspirillum, respectively.

  6. Protein profiling of single epidermal cell types from Arabidopsis thaliana using surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Berit; Melle, Christian; Lieckfeldt, Elke; Zöller, Daniela; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Fisahn, Joachim

    2008-08-25

    Here, we describe a novel approach for investigating differential protein expression within three epidermal cell types. In particular, 3000 single pavement, basal, and trichome cells from leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana were harvested by glass micro-capillaries. Subsequently, these single cell samples were joined to form pools of 100 individual cells and analyzed using the ProteinChip technology; SELDI: surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization. As a result, numerous protein signals that were differentially expressed in the three epidermal cell types could be detected. One of these proteins was characterized by tryptical digestion and subsequent identification via tandem quadrupole-time of flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry. Down regulation of this sequenced small subunit precursor of ribulose-1,5 bisphosphate carboxylase(C) oxygenase(O) (RuBisCo) in trichome and basal cells indicates the sink status of these cell types that are located on the surface of A. thaliana source leaves. Based on the obtained protein profiles, we suggest a close functional relationship between basal and trichome cells at the protein level.

  7. Spatial variation of phytoplankton community structure in Daya Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Wang, You-Shao; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Fei, Jiao

    2015-10-01

    Daya Bay is one of the largest and most important gulfs in the southern coast of China, in the northern part of the South China Sea. The phylogenetic diversity and spatial distribution of phytoplankton from the Daya Bay surface water and the relationship with the in situ water environment were investigated by the clone library of the large subunit of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL) gene. The dominant species of phytoplankton were diatoms and eustigmatophytes, which accounted for 81.9 % of all the clones of the rbcL genes. Prymnesiophytes were widely spread and wide varieties lived in Daya Bay, whereas the quantity was limited. The community structure of phytoplankton was shaped by pH and salinity and the concentration of silicate, phosphorus and nitrite. The phytoplankton biomass was significantly positively affected by phosphorus and nitrite but negatively by salinity and pH. Therefore, the phytoplankton distribution and biomass from Daya Bay were doubly affected by anthropic activities and natural factors.

  8. From milk to diet: feed recognition for milk authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, E; Gianì, S; Mastromauro, F; Breviario, D

    2009-11-01

    The presence of plastidial DNA fragments of plant origin in animal milk samples has been confirmed. An experimental plan was arranged with 4 groups of goats, each provided with a different monophytic diet: 3 fresh forages (oats, ryegrass, and X-triticosecale) and one 2-wk-old silage (X-triticosecale). Feed-derived rubisco (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase, rbcL) DNA fragments were detected in 100% of the analyzed goat milk samples, and the nucleotide sequence of the PCR-amplified fragments was found to be 100% identical to the corresponding fragments amplified from the plant species consumed in the diet. Two additional chloroplast-based molecular markers were used to set up an assay for distinctiveness, conveniently based on a simple PCR. In one case, differences in single nucleotides occurring within the gene encoding for plant maturase K (matK) were exploited. In the other, plant species recognition was based on the difference in the length of the intron present within the transfer RNA leucine (trnL) gene. The presence of plastidial plant DNA, ascertained by the PCR-based amplification of the rbcL fragment, was also assessed in raw cow milk samples collected directly from stock farms or taken from milk sold on the commercial market. In this case, the nucleotide sequence of the amplified DNA fragments reflected the multiple forages present in the diet fed to the animals.

  9. Acclimation of the summer annual species, lolium temulentum, to CO(2) enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis; Peratoner; Cairns; Causton; Foyer

    1999-11-01

    Lolium temulentum L. Ba 3081 was grown hydroponically in air (350 &mgr;mol mol(-1) CO(2)) and elevated CO(2) (700 &mgr;mol mol(-1) CO(2)) at two irradiances (150 and 500 &mgr;mol m(-2) s(-1)) for 35 days at which point the plants were harvested. Elevated CO(2) did not modify relative growth rate or biomass at either irradiance. Foliar carbon-to-nitrogen ratios were decreased at elevated CO(2) and plants had a greater number of shorter tillers, particularly at the lower growth irradiance. Both light-limited and light-saturated rates of photosynthesis were stimulated. The amount of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) protein was increased at elevated CO(2), but maximum extractable Rubisco activities were not significantly increased. A pronounced decrease in the Rubisco activation state was found with CO(2) enrichment, particularly at the higher growth irradiance. Elevated-CO(2)-induced changes in leaf carbohydrate composition were small in comparison to those caused by changes in irradiance. No CO(2)-dependent effects on fructan biosynthesis were observed. Leaf respiration rates were increased by 68% in plants grown with CO(2) enrichment and low light. We conclude that high CO(2) will only result in increased biomass if total light input favourably increases the photosynthesis-to-respiration ratio. At low irradiances, biomass is more limited by increased rates of respiration than by CO(2)-induced enhancement of photosynthesis.

  10. Differences in the sensitivity to UVB radiation of two cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidema, J.; Kang, H.S.; Kumagai, T.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of UVB radiation on the growth of two cultivars of Japanese lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.), Sasanishiki and Norin 1, were examined in a phytotron. Supplementation of visible radiation with UVB radiation reduced plant length, tiller number, the fresh and dry weights of the aboveground parts of plants, an the amounts of total leaf nitrogen, chlorophyll, soluble protein and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in the eight leaf, the youngest fully expanded leaf. By contrast, UVB radiation significantly increased the accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds. There was a difference between the two cultivars in the resistance to the effects of UVB radiation. The reduction in the amounts of Rubisco was smaller in Sasanishiki, while the increase in the accumulation of UV-absorbing compounds was greater in Sasanishiki. Parameters of plant growth, with the exception of the amount of Rubisco, decreased in direct proportion to decreases in total leaf nitrogen in plants grown under lower or the Rubisco content of Norin 1 grown under a high dose of UVB radiation was exceptionally marked, and was not observed similarly in Sasanishiki. The results suggest that the remarkable reduction in rubisco content in NOrin 1 might have been due to the specific effects of UVB radiation. It is also suggested that the difference between cultivars in the resistance to UVB radiation might be due to the differences in the levels of Rubisco and in UV-absorbing compounds that are induced by UVB radiation

  11. Rubisco Activase Is Also a Multiple Responder to Abiotic Stresses in Rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Chen

    Full Text Available Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase (RCA is a nuclear gene that encodes a chloroplast protein that plays an important role in photosynthesis. Some reports have indicated that it may play a role in acclimation to different abiotic stresses. In this paper, we analyzed the stress-responsive elements in the 2.0 kb 5'-upstream regions of the RCA gene promoter and the primary, secondary and tertiary structure of the protein. We identified some cis-elements of multiple stress-related components in the RCA promoter. Amino acid and evolution analyses showed that the RCA protein had conserved regions between different species; however, the size and type varied. The secondary structures, binding sites and tertiary structures of the RCA proteins were also different. This might reflect the differences in the transcription and translation levels of the two RCA isoforms during adaptation to different abiotic stresses. Although both the transcription and translation levels of RCA isoforms in the rice leaves increased under various stresses, the large isoform was increased more significantly in the chloroplast stroma and thylakoid. It can be concluded that RCA, especially RCAL, is also a multiple responder to abiotic stresses in rice, which provides new insights into RCA functions.

  12. Understanding the molecular basis of plant growth promotional effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on rice through protein profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Saveetha; Loganathan, Karthiba; Muthuraj, Raveendran; Duraisamy, Saravanakumar; Seetharaman, Suresh; Thiruvengadam, Raguchander; Ponnusamy, Balasubramanian; Ramasamy, Samiyappan

    2009-12-24

    Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KH-1 was found to exhibit plant growth promotional activity in rice under both in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. But the mechanism underlying such promotional activity of P. fluorescens is not yet understood clearly. In this study, efforts were made to elucidate the molecular responses of rice plants to P. fluorescens treatment through protein profiling. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis strategy was adopted to identify the PGPR responsive proteins and the differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Priming of P. fluorescens, 23 different proteins found to be differentially expressed in rice leaf sheaths and MS analysis revealed the differential expression of some important proteins namely putative p23 co-chaperone, Thioredoxin h- rice, Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large chain precursor, Nucleotide diPhosphate kinase, Proteosome sub unit protein and putative glutathione S-transferase protein. Functional analyses of the differential proteins were reported to be directly or indirectly involved in growth promotion in plants. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of PGPR strain KH-1 in rice plant growth promotion.

  13. Understanding the molecular basis of plant growth promotional effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on rice through protein profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruvengadam Raguchander

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KH-1 was found to exhibit plant growth promotional activity in rice under both in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. But the mechanism underlying such promotional activity of P. fluorescens is not yet understood clearly. In this study, efforts were made to elucidate the molecular responses of rice plants to P. fluorescens treatment through protein profiling. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis strategy was adopted to identify the PGPR responsive proteins and the differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Results Priming of P. fluorescens, 23 different proteins found to be differentially expressed in rice leaf sheaths and MS analysis revealed the differential expression of some important proteins namely putative p23 co-chaperone, Thioredoxin h- rice, Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large chain precursor, Nucleotide diPhosphate kinase, Proteosome sub unit protein and putative glutathione S-transferase protein. Conclusion Functional analyses of the differential proteins were reported to be directly or indirectly involved in growth promotion in plants. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of PGPR strain KH-1 in rice plant growth promotion.

  14. An update on the microRNAs and their targets in unicellular red alga porphyridium cruentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barozai, M.Y.K.

    2018-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding and regulatory RNAs about approx 21 nucleotides in length. The miRNAs are reported in large number of higher eukaryotic plant species. But very little data of miRNAs in algae is available. Porphyridium cruentum is unicellular red alga famous as a source for polyunsaturated fatty acids, proteins and polysaccharide contents. The present study is aimed to update the microRNAs and their targets in this important algal species. A comparative genomics approach was applied to update the miRNAs in P. cruentum. This effort resulted in a total of 49 miRNAs belonging to 46 families in P. cruentum. Their precursor-miRNAs were observed with a range of 40 to 351 nucleotides (nt). The mature miRNA sequences showed a range of 17-24 nts. The minimum free energies by stem loop structures of these miRNAs are found with an average of -32 Kcalmol-1. A total of 13 targets, including important proteins like; Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase, Light-harvesting complex I, Oxygen-evolving enhancer protein, Phycobiliproteins, Granule-bound starch synthase and Carbonic anhydrase were also predicted for these miRNAs. (author)

  15. Analysis of early bacterial communities on volcanic deposits on the island of Miyake (Miyake-jima), Japan: a 6-year study at a fixed site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Reiko; Sato, Yoshinori; Nishizawa, Tomoyasu; Nanba, Kenji; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kamijo, Takashi; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Microbial colonization on new terrestrial substrates represents the initiation of new soil ecosystem formation. In this study, we analyzed early bacterial communities growing on volcanic ash deposits derived from the 2000 Mount Oyama eruption on the island of Miyake (Miyake-jima), Japan. A site was established in an unvegetated area near the summit and investigated over a 6-year period from 2003 to 2009. Collected samples were acidic (pH 3.0-3.6), did not utilize any organic substrates in ECO microplate assays (Biolog), and harbored around 106 cells (g dry weight)(-1) of autotrophic Fe(II) oxidizers by most-probable-number (MPN) counts. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and the Leptospirillum groups I, II and III were found to be abundant in the deposits by clone library analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The numerical dominance of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was also supported by analysis of the gene coding for the large subunit of the form I ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). Comparing the 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from samples differing in age, shifts in Fe(II)-oxidizing populations seemed to occur with deposit aging. The detection of known 16S rRNA gene sequences from Fe(III)-reducing acidophiles promoted us to propose the acidity-driven iron cycle for the early microbial ecosystem on the deposit.

  16. Understanding the physiological roles of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 under aerobic chemoheterotrophic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narancic, Tanja; Scollica, Elisa; Kenny, Shane T; Gibbons, Helena; Carr, Eibhlin; Brennan, Lorraine; Cagney, Gerard; Wynne, Kieran; Murphy, Cormac; Raberg, Matthias; Heinrich, Daniel; Steinbüchel, Alexander; O'Connor, Kevin E

    2016-10-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is an important biopolymer accumulated by bacteria and associated with cell survival and stress response. Here, we make two surprising findings in the PHB-accumulating species Rhodospirillum rubrum S1. We first show that the presence of PHB promotes the increased assimilation of acetate preferentially into biomass rather than PHB. When R. rubrum is supplied with (13)C-acetate as a PHB precursor, 83.5 % of the carbon in PHB comes from acetate. However, only 15 % of the acetate ends up in PHB with the remainder assimilated as bacterial biomass. The PHB-negative mutant of R. rubrum assimilates 2-fold less acetate into biomass compared to the wild-type strain. Acetate assimilation proceeds via the ethylmalonyl-CoA pathway with (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate as a common intermediate with the PHB pathway. Secondly, we show that R. rubrum cells accumulating PHB have reduced ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) activity. RuBisCO activity reduces 5-fold over a 36-h period after the onset of PHB. In contrast, a PHB-negative mutant maintains the same level of RuBisCO activity over the growth period. Since RuBisCO controls the redox potential in R. rubrum, PHB likely replaces RuBisCO in this role. R. rubrum is the first bacterium found to express RuBisCO under aerobic chemoheterotrophic conditions.

  17. The bacterial carbon-fixing organelle is formed by shell envelopment of preassembled cargo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna H Chen

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. In Synechococcuselongatus, the carbon-fixing enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO is concentrated into polyhedral, proteinaceous compartments called carboxysomes.Using live cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that carboxysomes are first detected as small seeds of RuBisCO that colocalize with existing carboxysomes. These seeds contain little or no shell protein, but increase in RuBisCO content over several hours, during which time they are exposed to the solvent. The maturing seed is then enclosed by shell proteins, a rapid process that seals RuBisCO from the cytosol to establish a distinct, solvent-protected microenvironment that is oxidizing relative to the cytosol. These closure events can be spatially and temporally coincident with the appearance of a nascent daughter RuBisCO seed.Carboxysomes assemble in a stepwise fashion, inside-to-outside, revealing that cargo is the principle organizer of this compartment's biogenesis. Our observations of the spatial relationship of seeds to previously formed carboxysomes lead us to propose a model for carboxysome replication via sequential fission, polymerization, and encapsulation of their internal cargo.

  18. Advances in Understanding Carboxysome Assembly in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus Implicate CsoS2 as a Critical Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The marine Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus are the numerically dominant cyanobacteria in the ocean and important in global carbon fixation. They have evolved a CO2-concentrating-mechanism, of which the central component is the carboxysome, a self-assembling proteinaceous organelle. Two types of carboxysome, α and β, encapsulating form IA and form IB d-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, respectively, differ in gene organization and associated proteins. In contrast to the β-carboxysome, the assembly process of the α-carboxysome is enigmatic. Moreover, an absolutely conserved α-carboxysome protein, CsoS2, is of unknown function and has proven recalcitrant to crystallization. Here, we present studies on the CsoS2 protein in three model organisms and show that CsoS2 is vital for α-carboxysome biogenesis. The primary structure of CsoS2 appears tripartite, composed of an N-terminal, middle (M-, and C-terminal region. Repetitive motifs can be identified in the N- and M-regions. Multiple lines of evidence suggest CsoS2 is highly flexible, possibly an intrinsically disordered protein. Based on our results from bioinformatic, biophysical, genetic and biochemical approaches, including peptide array scanning for protein-protein interactions, we propose a model for CsoS2 function and its spatial location in the α-carboxysome. Analogies between the pathway for β-carboxysome biogenesis and our model for α-carboxysome assembly are discussed.

  19. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Leaf Response to Cadmium-Induced Stress in Poplar (Populus yunnanensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqiang Yang

    Full Text Available Excess amounts of heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with significant ecological and nutritional effects. Cdmium (Cd is of particular concern because of its widespread occurrence and high toxicity. We conducted physiological and proteomic analyses to improve our understanding of the responses of Populus yunnanensis to Cd stress. The plantlets experienced two apparent stages in their response to Cd stress. During the first stage, transiently induced defense-response molecules, photosynthesis- and energy-associated proteins, antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs accumulated to enhance protein stability and establish a new cellular homeostasis. This activity explains why plant photosynthetic capability during this period barely changed. During the second stage, a decline of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO and HSP levels led to imbalance of the plant photosynthetic system. Additionally, the expression of Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3, Mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6 and a homeobox-leucine zipper protein was higher in the second stage. Higher expression of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT may regulate plant cell wall synthesis for greater Cd storage. These genes may be candidates for further research and use in genetic manipulation of poplar tolerance to Cd stress.

  20. Effects of soil strength on the relation of water-use efficiency and growth to carbon isotope discrimination in wheat seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masle, J.; Farquhar, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    The ratio of carbon accumulation to transpiration, W, of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings increased with increasing soil strength, measured as soil penetrometer resistance, and this was already apparent at the two leaf stage. The ratio was negatively correlated with carbon isotope discrimination, in accord with theory. This means that decrease in intercellular partial pressure of CO 2 accounted for an important part of the increase in W with increasing soil strength. Despite a lower CO 2 concentration in the leaves at high soil strength, assimilation rate per unit leaf area was enhanced. Greater ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity confirmed that photosynthetic capacity was actually increased. This pattern of opposite variation of assimilation rate and of stomatal conductance is unusual. The ratio of plant carbon mass to leaf area increased markedly with increasing soil strength, mainly because of a greater investment of carbon into roots than into shoots. A strong negative correlation was found between this ratio and carbon isotope discrimination. For a given increase in discrimination, decrease in carbon mass per leaf area was proportionally larger than decrease in assimilation rate, so that relative growth rate was positively correlated to carbon isotope discrimination

  1. The Role of Gamma Irradiation on Growth and Some Metabolic Activities of Spirulina platensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, H.R.; El-Shaer, E.A.; Ismaiel, M.M.S.; Shabana, E.F.; Gabr, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Spirulina platensis cells were exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation 0.0; (control), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 Kilo Gray (kGy) using Co 60 as a gamma source at the Cyclotron Unit, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority. After which, the cells were cultivated on Zarrouk medium for 14 days (the exponential phase of growth). The optimum growth of Spirulina platensis was recorded at 2.0 kGy as compared to the control after the 14th day of incubation. All of the following analyses were done after 10 days of growth. The results of pigments analysis revealed that the chlorophyll a and carotenoid contents of Spirulina platensis were reached their maximum rate at a dose of 2.0 kGy, Which induces the same trend for phycobiliproteins fractions. The photosynthetic activity and total carbohydrate content of the irradiated Spirulina cells increased with elevating the doses of gamma irradiation and reached a maximum value at a dose of 2.0 kGy as compared to the control. The activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) was increased up to irradiation dose of 2.0 kGy. whereas, the maximum activity of the phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (PEPCASE) was recorded at the irradiation dose of 1.0 kGy Spirulina platensis cells were exposed to different doses of gamma irradiation 0.0; (control), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 Kilo Gray (kGy) using Co 60 as a gamma source at the Cyclotron Unit, Nuclear Research Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority. After which, the cells were cultivated on Zarrouk medium for 14 days (the exponential phase of growth). The optimum growth of Spirulina platensis was recorded at 2.0 kGy as compared to the control after the 14th day of incubation. All of the following analyses were done after 10 days of growth. The results of pigments analysis revealed that the chlorophyll a and carotenoid contents of Spirulina platensis were reached their maximum rate at a dose of 2.0 kGy, Which induces the same

  2. Comparison of spectrophotometric and radioisotopic methods for the assay of Rubisco in ozone-treated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, C.D.; Tissue, D.T.; Fiscus, E.L.; Strain, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopic and spectrophotometric assays for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) initial and final activities and Rubisco content were compared in plants chronically exposed to ozone (O 3 ) in a greenhouse and the field. In a greenhouse experiment, Glycine max was treated in exposure chambers with either charcoal-filtered air (CF air) or 100 nl O 3 l -1 for 6 h daily during vegetative growth. Samples were collected after 7 days of exposure. In a field experiment, G. max was treated in open-top chambers with either CF air or non-filtered air with O 3 added at 1.5 times ambient O 3 for 12 h daily. Average daily O 3 concentrations were 21 and 92 nl l -1 in the CF and O 3 treatments, respectively. Samples were collected during vegetative and reproductive growth. Both assays generally yielded comparable Rubisco initial and final activities for greenhouse-grown plants regardless of the O 3 treatment. However for field-grown plants, Rubisco initial and final activities average 15 and 23% lower when assayed by the spectrophotometric rather than the radioisotopic method. For Rubisco content estimated by the spectrophotometric method, lower values for the regression of Rubisco activity vs concentration of carboxyarabinitol-1.5-bisphosphate were observed in O 3- than in CF-treated plants. Both assays yielded comparable Rubisco contents in the greenhouse and in the field although the variation was larger with the spectrophotometric method in field-grown plants. Growth conditions, field vs greenhouse, were more critical to the spectrophotometric assay performance than the O 3 treatments for measurement of Rubisco activity and content. (au) 40 refs

  3. Hydrogen sulphide improves adaptation of Zea mays seedlings to iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Shang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Liu, Xiang; Shangguan, Zhou-Ping; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is emerging as a potential molecule involved in physiological regulation in plants. However, whether H2S regulates iron-shortage responses in plants is largely unknown. Here, the role of H2S in modulating iron availability in maize (Zea mays L. cv Canner) seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution is reported. The main results are as follows: Firstly, NaHS, a donor of H2S, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient culture solution. Secondly, electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize seedlings revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. On the contrary, mesophyll chloroplasts appeared completely developed in H2S-treated maize seedlings. Thirdly, H2S treatment increased iron accumulation in maize seedlings by changing the expression levels of iron homeostasis- and sulphur metabolism-related genes. Fourthly, phytosiderophore (PS) accumulation and secretion were enhanced by H2S treatment in seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. Indeed, the gene expression of ferric-phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) was specifically induced by iron deficiency in maize leaves and roots, whereas their abundance was decreased by NaHS treatment. Lastly, H2S significantly enhanced photosynthesis through promoting the protein expression of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (RuBISCO LSU) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and the expression of genes encoding RuBISCO large subunit (RBCL), small subunit (RBCS), D1 protein (psbA), and PEPC in maize seedlings grown in iron-deficient solution. These results indicate that H2S is closely related to iron uptake, transport, and accumulation, and consequently increases chlorophyll biosynthesis, chloroplast development, and photosynthesis in plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Photosynthesis-related characteristics of the midrib and the interveinal lamina in leaves of the C3-CAM intermediate plant Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Kornas, Andrzej; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej; Rozpądek, Piotr; Nosek, Michał; Kocurek, Maciej; Zellnig, Günther; Müller, Maria; Miszalski, Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    Leaf veins are usually encircled by specialized bundle sheath cells. In C4 plants, they play an important role in CO2 assimilation, and the photosynthetic activity is compartmentalized between the mesophyll and the bundle sheath. In C3 and CAM (Crassulacean acid metabolism) plants, the photosynthetic activity is generally attributed to the leaf mesophyll cells, and the vascular parenchymal cells are rarely considered for their role in photosynthesis. Recent studies demonstrate that enzymes required for C4 photosynthesis are also active in the veins of C3 plants, and their vascular system contains photosynthetically competent parenchyma cells. However, our understanding of photosynthesis in veins of C3 and CAM plants still remains insufficient. Here spatial analysis of photosynthesis-related properties were applied to the midrib and the interveinal lamina cells in leaves of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, a C3-CAM intermediate plant. The midrib anatomy as well as chloroplast structure and chlorophyll fluorescence, diurnal gas exchange profiles, the immunoblot patterns of PEPC (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) and RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), H2O2 localization and antioxidant enzyme activities were compared in the midrib and in the interveinal mesophyll cells in leaves of C3 and CAM plants. Leaf midribs were structurally competent to perform photosynthesis in C3 and CAM plants. The midrib chloroplasts resembled those in the bundle sheath cells of C4 plants and were characterized by limited photosynthetic activity. The metabolic roles of midrib chloroplasts differ in C3 and CAM plants. It is suggested that in leaves of C3 plants the midrib chloroplasts could be involved in the supply of CO2 for carboxylation, and in CAM plants they could provide malate to different metabolic processes and mediate H2O2 signalling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For

  5. Functions, Compositions, and Evolution of the Two Types of Carboxysomes: Polyhedral Microcompartments That Facilitate CO2 Fixation in Cyanobacteria and Some Proteobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Benjamin D.; Long, Benedict M.; Badger, Murray R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyanobacteria are the globally dominant photoautotrophic lineage. Their success is dependent on a set of adaptations collectively termed the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM). The purpose of the CCM is to support effective CO2 fixation by enhancing the chemical conditions in the vicinity of the primary CO2-fixing enzyme, d-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), to promote the carboxylase reaction and suppress the oxygenase reaction. In cyanobacteria and some proteobacteria, this is achieved by encapsulation of RubisCO within carboxysomes, which are examples of a group of proteinaceous bodies called bacterial microcompartments. Carboxysomes encapsulate the CO2-fixing enzyme within the selectively permeable protein shell and simultaneously encapsulate a carbonic anhydrase enzyme for CO2 supply from a cytoplasmic bicarbonate pool. These bodies appear to have arisen twice and undergone a process of convergent evolution. While the gross structures of all known carboxysomes are ostensibly very similar, with shared gross features such as a selectively permeable shell layer, each type of carboxysome encapsulates a phyletically distinct form of RubisCO enzyme. Furthermore, the specific proteins forming structures such as the protein shell or the inner RubisCO matrix are not identical between carboxysome types. Each type has evolutionarily distinct forms of the same proteins, as well as proteins that are entirely unrelated to one another. In light of recent developments in the study of carboxysome structure and function, we present this review to summarize the knowledge of the structure and function of both types of carboxysome. We also endeavor to cast light on differing evolutionary trajectories which may have led to the differences observed in extant carboxysomes. PMID:24006469

  6. Physiological responses of the CAM epiphyte Tillandsia usneoides L. (Bromeliaceae) to variations in light and water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Richard; Borland, Anne; Maxwell, Kate; Griffiths, Howard

    2003-06-01

    In an effort to understand the mechanisms that sustain rootless atmospheric plants, the modulation of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in response to variations in irradiance and water supply was investigated in the epiphyte Tillandsia usneoides. Plants were acclimated to three light regimes, i.e. high, intermediate and low, with integrated photon flux densities (PFD) of 14.40, 8.64 and 4.32 mol m-2 d-1 equivalent to an instantaneous PFD of 200, 100, and 50 mumol m-2 s-1, respectively. Daily watering was then withdrawn from half of the plants at each PFD for 7 d prior to sampling. In response to the three PFD treatments, chlorophyll content increased in plants acclimated to lower irradiances. Light response curves using non-invasive measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence demonstrated that photosystem II efficiency (phi PSII) was maintained in high PFD acclimated plants, as they exhibited a larger capacity for non-photochemical dissipation (NPQ) of excess light energy than low PFD acclimated plants. Net CO2 uptake increased in response to higher PFD, reflecting enhanced carboxylation capacity in terms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activities. After water was withdrawn, nocturnal net CO2 uptake and accumulated levels of acidity declined in all PFD treatments, concomitant with increased respiratory recycling of malate. Examining the strategies employed by epiphytes such as T. usneodies to tolerate extreme light and water regimes has demonstrated the importance of physiological mechanisms that allow flexible carboxylation capacity and continued carbon cycling to maintain photosynthetic integrity.

  7. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in the submerged aquatic angiosperm Scirpus subterminalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, S; Wetzel, R G

    1981-01-01

    Scirpus subterminalis Torr., a submerged angiosperm abundant in many hardwater lakes of the Great Lakes region, was investigated for various photosynthetic carbon fixation properties in relation to available inorganic carbon and levels of carbon fixing enzymes. Photosynthetic experiments were CO/sub 2/ and HCO/sub 3//sup -/ were supplied at various concentrations showed that Scirpus was able to utilize HCO/sub 3//sup -/ at those concentrations close to natural conditions. However, when CO/sub 2/ concentrations were increased above ambient, photosynthetic rates increased markedly. It was concluded that the photosynthetic potential of this plant in many natural situations may be limited by inorganic carbon uptake in the light. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPcase)/ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (ruBPcase) ratios of the leaves varied between 0.5 and 0.9 depending on substrate concentration during assay. The significance of PEP-mediated carbon fixation of Scirpus (basically a C/sub 3/ plant) in the dark was investigated. Malate accumulated in the leaves during the dark period of a 24-h cycle and malate levels decreased significantly during the following light period. The accumulation was not due to transport of malate from the roots. Carbon uptake rates in the dark by the leaves of Scirpus were lower than malate accumulation rates. Therefore, part of the malate was likely derived from respired CO/sub 2/. Carbon uptake rates in the light were much higher than malate turnover rates. It was estimated that carbon fixation via malate could contribute up to 12% to net photosynthetic rates. The ecological significance of this type of metabolism in submerged aquatics is discussed.

  8. Contribution of carbon fixed by Rubisco and PEPC to phloem export in the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Birgit; Wanek, Wolfgang; Postl, Wolfgang; Richter, Andreas

    2010-03-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants exhibit a complex interplay between CO(2) fixation by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), and carbon demand for CAM maintenance and growth. This study investigated the flux of carbon from PEPC and direct Rubisco fixation to different leaf carbon pools and to phloem sap over the diurnal cycle. Concentrations and carbon isotope compositions of starch, soluble sugars, and organic acids were determined in leaves and phloem exudates of Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perr., and related to CO(2) fixation by PEPC and Rubisco. Three types of leaf carbon pools could be distinguished. (i) Starch and malate pools were dominant and showed a pattern of reciprocal mobilization and accumulation (85/54 and 13/48 mg C g(-1) DW, respective, at the beginning/end of phase I). The carbon isotope composition of these pools was compatible with predominant PEPC fixation (delta(13)C values of -13 and -11 per thousand for starch and malate compared to -11 per thousand of PEPC fixed carbon). (ii) Isotopic composition (-17 per thousand and -14 per thousand) and concentration of glucose and fructose (2 and 3 mg C g(-1) DW, respectively) were not affected by diurnal metabolism, suggesting a low turnover. (iii) Sucrose (1-3 mg C g(-1) DW), in contrast, exhibited large diurnal changes in delta(13)C values (from -17 per thousand in the evening to -12 per thousand in the morning), which were not matched by net changes in sucrose concentration. This suggests a high sucrose turnover, fed by nocturnal starch degradation and direct Rubisco fixation during the day. A detailed dissection of the carbon fixation and mobilization pattern in K. daigremontiana revealed that direct fixation of Rubisco during the light accounted for 30% of phloem sucrose, but only 15% of fixed carbon, indicating that carbon from direct Rubisco fixation was preferentially used for leaf export.

  9. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  10. Comparative toxicity of four chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and their mixture. Pt. 2. Structure-activity relationships with inhibition of hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, pyruvate carboxylase, and [gamma]-glutamyl transpeptidase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, L.W.D.; Stahl, B.U.; Rozman, K. (Kansas Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, Kansas City, KS (United States) GSF, Inst. fuer Toxikologie, Neuherberg (Germany)); Lebofsky, M. (Kansas Univ. Medical Center, Dept. of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, Kansas City, KS (United States)); Kettrup, A. (GSF, Inst. fuer Oekologische Chemie, Neuherberg (Germany))

    1992-08-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with an LD[sub 20], LD[sub 50] and LD[sub 80] respectively, of tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-CDD and a mixture of the four CDDs, all carrying chlorine substituents in the biologically crucial 2,3,7, and 8 positions. Specific activities of two key enzymes of gluconeogenesis, viz, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylkinase (PEPCK) and pyruvate carboxylase (PC), as well as the activity of the preneoplastic marker enzyme [gamma]-glutamyl transpeptidase ([gamma]-GT), were determined in livers of CDD-treated and ad libitum-fed control animals. PEPCK activity showed evidence for dose-related inhibition on the second day after dosing; PC activity was slightly reduced, whereas [gamma]-GT activity was dose-dependently inhibited. By 8 days after dosing PEPCK activities were dose-dependently decreased after administration of all four CDDs and their mixture. PC activities were significantly reduced, but no dose-response was evident. The activity of [gamma]-GT was dose-dependently inhibited, but only to a value of 25% below control activities. It is concluded that CDDs share a common mechanism of acute toxicity, viz, inhibition of glucocorticoid-dependent enzymes which results in a derailment of intermediary metabolism not compatible with survival of the animals. (orig.).

  11. Insight into the molecular mechanism of yeast acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase mutants F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R resistant to soraphen A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Chen, Qingqing; Zhang, Ling; Huang, Tonghui

    2018-02-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACCs) is the first committed enzyme of fatty acid synthesis pathway. The inhibition of ACC is thought to be beneficial not only for diseases related to metabolism, such as type-2 diabetes, but also for infectious disease like bacterial infection disease. Soraphen A, a potent allosteric inhibitor of BC domain of yeast ACC, exhibit lower binding affinities to several yeast ACC mutants and the corresponding drug resistance mechanisms are still unknown. We report here a theoretical study of binding of soraphen A to wild type and yeast ACC mutants (including F510I, N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R) via molecular dynamic simulation and molecular mechanics/generalized Born surface area free energy calculations methods. The calculated binding free energies of soraphen A to yeast ACC mutants are weaker than to wild type, which is highly consistent with the experimental results. The mutant F510I weakens the binding affinity of soraphen A to yeast ACC mainly by decreasing the van der Waals contributions, while the weaker binding affinities of Soraphen A to other yeast ACC mutants including N485G, I69E, E477R, and K73R are largely attributed to the decreased net electrostatic (ΔE ele + ΔG GB) interactions. Our simulation results could provide important insights for the development of more potent ACC inhibitors.

  12. Regulation of carbon dioxide fixation in facultatively autotrophic bacteria. A phisiological and genetical study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Wilhelmus Gerhardus

    1990-01-01

    Autotrophic bactcria are capable of CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle, emplofng energy derived from the oxidation of anorganic substrates (e.g. Hz), simple organic substrates (one-carbon compounds, e.g. methanol, formate), or from light. Ribulose-1,5-bisphospbate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisC/O),

  13. Prebiotic Fiber Increases Hepatic Acetyl CoA Carboxylase Phosphorylation and Suppresses Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide Secretion More Effectively When Used with Metformin in Obese Rats1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyra, Kim A.; Saha, Dolan C.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2013-01-01

    Independently, metformin (MET) and the prebiotic, oligofructose (OFS), have been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) secretion. Our objective was to determine whether using OFS as an adjunct with MET augments GLP-1 secretion in obese rats. Male, diet-induced obese Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to: 1) high-fat/-sucrose diet [HFHS; control (C); 20% fat, 50% sucrose wt:wt]; 2) HFHS+10% OFS (OFS); 3) HFHS + MET [300 mg/kg/d (MET)]; 4) HFHS+10% OFS+MET (OFS +MET). Body composition, glycemia, satiety hormones, and mechanisms related to dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity in plasma, hepatic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Western blots), and gut microbiota (qPCR) were examined. Direct effects of MET and SCFA were examined in human enteroendocrine cells. The interaction between OFS and MET affected fat mass, hepatic TG, secretion of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and leptin, and AMPKα2 mRNA and phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase (pACC) levels (P < 0.05). Combined, OFS and MET reduced GIP secretion to a greater extent than either treatment alone (P < 0.05). The hepatic pACC level was increased by OFS+MET by at least 50% above all other treatments, which did not differ from each other (P < 0.05). OFS decreased plasma DPP4 activity (P < 0.001). Cecal Bifidobacteria (P < 0.001) were markedly increased and C. leptum decreased (P < 0.001) with OFS consumption. In human enteroendocrine cells, the interaction between MET and SCFA affected GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.04) but was not associated with higher GLP-1 than the highest individual doses. In conclusion, the combined actions of OFS and MET were associated with important interaction effects that have the potential to improve metabolic outcomes associated with obesity. PMID:22223580

  14. Translational control of human acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 mRNA is mediated by an internal ribosome entry site in response to ER stress, serum deprivation or hypoxia mimetic CoCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Fabrizio; Testini, Mariangela; Tocci, Romina; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Siculella, Luisa

    2018-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a cytosolic enzyme catalyzing the rate limiting step in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis. There is mounting evidence showing that ACC1 is susceptible to dysregulation and that it is over-expressed in liver diseases associated with lipid accumulation and in several cancers. In the present study, ACC1 regulation at the translational level is reported. Using several experimental approaches, the presence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) has been established in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the ACC1 mRNA. Transfection experiments with the ACC1 5' UTR inserted in a dicistronic reporter vector show a remarkable increase in the downstream cistron translation, through a cap-independent mechanism. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress condition and the related unfolded protein response (UPR), triggered by treatment with thapsigargin and tunicamycin, cause an increase of the cap-independent translation of ACC1 mRNA in HepG2 cells, despite the overall reduction in global protein synthesis. Other stress conditions, such as serum starvation and incubation with hypoxia mimetic agent CoCl 2 , up-regulate ACC1 expression in HepG2 cells at the translational level. Overall, these findings indicate that the presence of an IRES in the ACC1 5' UTR allows ACC1 mRNA translation in conditions that are inhibitory to cap-dependent translation. A potential involvement of the cap-independent translation of ACC1 in several pathologies, such as obesity and cancer, has been discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tissue Characterization of Lemna gibba rbcS Promoter%浮萍rbcS启动子组织特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄凤珍; 李倩; 王友如

    2015-01-01

    A new rbcS (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit) promoter with the size of 1 438 bp (named SSU5C promoter) was cloned from Lemna gibba. SSU5C promoter was fused with the GUS reporter gene to construct a plant binary vector (pSSU5C-IGUS), and introduced into duckweed by agrogacterium-mediated trans-formation. The transgenic plantlets were generated. This study was focused on the tissue characterization of SSU5C promoter. GUS staining showed that SSU5C promoter drove GUS to express in the green tissue in leaf, stem and petiole of T1 tobacco, whereas no GUS activity was observed in root. In reproductive organs, the GUS activity was observed in corolla lobes, anther and stigma, no GUS activity was observed in other parts. It was obvious that rbcS promoter can not only express in the green tissue, but also can express in reproductive organs. The results lay a good doundation for the application of SSU5C in plant genetic engineering.%SSU5C启动子(全长1438 bp)是从浮萍基因组中新克隆的一个rb c S (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carbo-xylase small subunit)启动子。本研究将 SSU5C 启动子与GUS基因融合,成功构建植物双元表达载p SSU5C-IGUS,并利用农杆菌介导法转化烟草,获得转基因植株,探究SSU5C启动子在烟草中的组织表达特点。GUS检测结果表明:在T1烟草的营养器官中,SSU5C启动子主要驱动GUS基因在烟草叶片和叶柄、茎等绿色组织中表达,而在根部不表达;在生殖器官中,GUS基因主要在花冠裂片以及花药和柱头中表达。本研究首次发现浮萍rb c S启动子不仅在绿色组织中表达,而且在生殖器官中的花冠裂片以及花药和柱头中表达,这一发现可为SSU5C启动子在植物基因工程中的应用奠定基础。

  16. N-acetylcysteine and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate: immunomodulatory effects on mononuclear cell culture N-acetilcisteína e frutose-1,6-bisfosfato: efeito imunomodulador em cultura de células mononucleares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Obalski de Mello

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sepsis is a complex syndrome caused by an uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response. Inflammatory cytokines play a pivotal role in septic shock pathogenesis. Therapeutic strategies have been tested in order to modulate the excessive generation or function of sepsis mediators. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC and its association with fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP on T-lymphocytes proliferation, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples were isolated from healthy individuals. T-lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin for 96 hours and submitted to different concentrations of NAC or NAC associated with FBP. RESULTS: NAC (10 and 15 mM and NAC (15 mM associated with FBP reduced T-lymphocytes proliferation. IL-1β levels rose in the presence of both NAC (15 mM and NAC with FBP (1.25 mM. MCP-1 levels were reduced only by NAC (15 mM associated with FBP (1.25 mM. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that both NAC itself and NAC associated with FBP inhibit cellular proliferation, acting as potent immunomodulatory agents, which corroborates its use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.INTRODUÇÃO: A sepse é uma síndrome complexa causada pela resposta inflamatória sistêmica descontrolada. As citocinas inflamatórias representam papel central na patogênese do choque séptico. Têm sido testadas estratégias terapêuticas a fim de modular a geração ou a função excessiva de mediadores na sepse. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar o efeito terapêutico da N-acetilcisteína (NAC e sua associação com a frutose-1,6-bisfosfato (FBP sobre a proliferação de linfócitos T e a geração de interleucina-1β (IL-1β e proteína quimiotática de monócitos 1 (MCP-1 em cultura celular. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Foram isoladas células mononucleares de

  17. Photosynthetic characteristics and distribution of 14C assimilates in the winter wheat of late growing period in dry land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing Huimin; Yu Guohua; Yin Xisheng; Zhan Shumin; Liu Xin

    1999-01-01

    The photosynthetic characteristics and distribution of 14 C assimilates of winter wheat in late growing period in the field of natural drought condition was studied. The results showed that photosynthetic rate of flag leaves was up to 14.24 μmol CO 2 ·m -2 ·s -1 , the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RUBpCase) activity of flag leaves in late growing period in field drought treatment was about 20∼23 μmol CO 2 ·min -1 ·g -1 dw when the water potential of flag leaves was about -1.8∼-2.1 MPa. The photosynthetic rate of flag leaves of control was 15.15 μmol CO 2 ·m -2 ·s -1 . The RUBpCase activity was about 22∼25 μmol CO 2 ·min -1 · -1 ·g -1 dw in the field of irrigated condition when the water potential of flag leaves was about -1.65∼-1.8 MPa, indicating that the RUBpCase activity of flag leaves in drought condition was not a major limiting factor. The total distribution rate of 14 C assimilates of flag leaves, flag leaf sheath, flag leaf node and awn to grain in drought treatment was about 44.8%, and that of control was about 40.2%. The results also showed that in late growing period the proportion of 14 C assimilates to roots in the both drought and control treatment was similar, about 2.0%. But the amount of 14 C assimilates in the roots in the soil layer of 120∼200 cm was up to 8.34% of the total 14 C assimilates in the roots, however, that of control was only about 3.6%

  18. Faba bean drought responsive gene identification and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megahed H. Ammar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to identify drought-responsive genes in a drought tolerant faba bean variety (Hassawi 2 using a suppressive subtraction hybridization approach (SSH. A total of 913 differentially expressed clones were sequenced from a differential cDNA library that resulted in a total of 225 differentially expressed ESTs. The genes of mitochondrial and chloroplast origin were removed, and the remaining 137 EST sequences were submitted to the gene bank EST database (LIBEST_028448. A sequence analysis identified 35 potentially drought stress-related ESTs that regulate ion channels, kinases, and energy production and utilization and transcription factors. Quantitative PCR on Hassawi 2 genotype confirmed that more than 65% of selected drought-responsive genes were drought-related. Among these induced genes, the expression levels of eight highly up-regulated unigenes were further analyzed across 38 selected faba bean genotypes that differ in their drought tolerance levels. These unigenes included ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL gene, non-LTR retroelement reverse related, probable cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel, polyubiquitin, potassium channel, calcium-dependent protein kinase and putative respiratory burst oxidase-like protein C and a novel unigene. The expression patterns of these unigenes were variable across 38 genotypes however, it was found to be very high in tolerant genotype. The up-regulation of these unigenes in majority of tolerant genotypes suggests their possible role in drought tolerance. The identification of possible drought responsive candidate genes in Vicia faba reported here is an important step toward the development of drought-tolerant genotypes that can cope with arid environments.

  19. Genome Sequence of Rhodoferax antarcticus ANT.BRT; A Psychrophilic Purple Nonsulfur Bacterium from an Antarctic Microbial Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Baker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rhodoferax antarcticus is an Antarctic purple nonsulfur bacterium and the only characterized anoxygenic phototroph that grows best below 20 °C. We present here a high-quality draft genome of Rfx. antarcticus strain ANT.BRT, isolated from an Antarctic microbial mat. The circular chromosome (3.8 Mbp of Rfx. antarcticus has a 59.1% guanine + cytosine (GC content and contains 4036 open reading frames. In addition, the bacterium contains a sizable plasmid (198.6 kbp, 48.4% GC with 226 open reading frames that comprises about 5% of the total genetic content. Surprisingly, genes encoding light-harvesting complexes 1 and 3 (LH1 and LH3, but not light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2, were identified in the photosynthesis gene cluster of the Rfx. antarcticus genome, a feature that is unique among purple phototrophs. Consistent with physiological studies that showed a strong capacity for nitrogen fixation in Rfx. antarcticus, a nitrogen fixation gene cluster encoding a molybdenum-type nitrogenase was present, but no alternative nitrogenases were identified despite the cold-active phenotype of this phototroph. Genes encoding two forms of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were present in the Rfx. antarcticus genome, a feature that likely provides autotrophic flexibility under varying environmental conditions. Lastly, genes for assembly of both type IV pili and flagella are present, with the latter showing an unusual degree of clustering. This report represents the first genomic analysis of a psychrophilic anoxygenic phototroph and provides a glimpse of the genetic basis for maintaining a phototrophic lifestyle in a permanently cold, yet highly variable, environment.

  20. Contrasting diversity and host association of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes versus root-associated ascomycetes in a dipterocarp rainforest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotoshi Sato

    Full Text Available Root-associated fungi, including ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi, are among the most diverse and important belowground plant symbionts in dipterocarp rainforests. Our study aimed to reveal the biodiversity, host association, and community structure of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota and root-associated Ascomycota (including root-endophytic Ascomycota in a lowland dipterocarp rainforest in Southeast Asia. The host plant chloroplast ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL region and fungal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 region were sequenced using tag-encoded, massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing to identify host plant and root-associated fungal taxa in root samples. In total, 1245 ascomycetous and 127 putative ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetous taxa were detected from 442 root samples. The putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota were likely to be associated with closely related dipterocarp taxa to greater or lesser extents, whereas host association patterns of the root-associated Ascomycota were much less distinct. The community structure of the putative ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota was possibly more influenced by host genetic distances than was that of the root-associated Ascomycota. This study also indicated that in dipterocarp rainforests, root-associated Ascomycota were characterized by high biodiversity and indistinct host association patterns, whereas ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota showed less biodiversity and a strong host phylogenetic preference for dipterocarp trees. Our findings lead to the working hypothesis that root-associated Ascomycota, which might be mainly represented by root-endophytic fungi, have biodiversity hotspots in the tropics, whereas biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota increases with host genetic diversity.

  1. The fixABCX genes in Rhodospirillum rubrum encode a putative membrane complex participating in electron transfer to nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgren, Tomas; Nordlund, Stefan

    2004-04-01

    In our efforts to identify the components participating in electron transport to nitrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum, we used mini-Tn5 mutagenesis followed by metronidazole selection. One of the mutants isolated, SNT-1, exhibited a decreased growth rate and about 25% of the in vivo nitrogenase activity compared to the wild-type values. The in vitro nitrogenase activity was essentially wild type, indicating that the mutation affects electron transport to nitrogenase. Sequencing showed that the Tn5 insertion is located in a region with a high level of similarity to fixC, and extended sequencing revealed additional putative fix genes, in the order fixABCX. Complementation of SNT-1 with the whole fix gene cluster in trans restored wild-type nitrogenase activity and growth. Using Western blotting, we demonstrated that expression of fixA and fixB occurs only under conditions under which nitrogenase also is expressed. SNT-1 was further shown to produce larger amounts of both ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and polyhydroxy alkanoates than the wild type, indicating that the redox status is affected in this mutant. Using Western blotting, we found that FixA and FixB are soluble proteins, whereas FixC most likely is a transmembrane protein. We propose that the fixABCX genes encode a membrane protein complex that plays a central role in electron transfer to nitrogenase in R. rubrum. Furthermore, we suggest that FixC is the link between nitrogen fixation and the proton motive force generated in the photosynthetic reactions.

  2. Effects of temperature on growth and photosynthesis in the seedling stage of the sheath blight-resistant rice genotype 32R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynh Van Kiet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The 32R rice genotype is resistant to sheath blight disease (ShB, with a high-yield potential. We examined effects of temperature on the plant responses of 32R in comparison with those of the ShB-susceptible rice genotype (29S and Nipponbare (Nb, a Japonica standard cultivar. The seedlings at the 4th leaf stage of rice genotypes were exposed to 14/14, 19/14, 25/20, 31/26, 37/32 and 37/37 °C (day/night for 5, 10 and 15 days. The dry weight, leaf area, photosynthesis, contents of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco and chlorophyll contents were examined. The dry weight showed lower in 32R than in 29S and Nb at a low temperature, and total dry weight correlated strongly with root dry weight and leaf area. The relative growth rate (RGR correlated strongly with the net assimilation rate (NAR. Rubisco, chlorophyll contents and the photosynthetic rates were limited at a low temperature and showed lower in 32R than in 29S and Nb. The strong correlations between Rubisco and the rates of maximum photosynthesis and initial slope were found in 32R, but not found in 29S and Nb. In addition, RGR and NAR of 32R correlated positively with Rubisco. These suggest that 32R contains traits of cold-sensitive genotypes that are related to limiting Rubisco at a low temperature, thus diminishing photosynthesis and limiting plant growth. Differences of growth among 32R, 29S and Nb were discussed in the relation of genotypes.

  3. Evidence for a Role for NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase in Concentration of CO2 in the Bundle Sheath Cell of Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard B; Schultes, Neil P; McHale, Neil A; Zelitch, Israel

    2016-05-01

    Prior studies with Nicotiana and Arabidopsis described failed assembly of the chloroplastic NDH [NAD(P)H dehydrogenase] supercomplex by serial mutation of several subunit genes. We examined the properties of Zea mays leaves containing Mu and Ds insertions into nuclear gene exons encoding the critical o- and n-subunits of NDH, respectively. In vivo reduction of plastoquinone in the dark was sharply diminished in maize homozygous mutant compared to normal leaves but not to the extreme degree observed for the corresponding lesions in Arabidopsis. The net carbon assimilation rate (A) at high irradiance and saturating CO2 levels was reduced by one-half due to NDH mutation in maize although no genotypic effect was evident at very low CO2 levels. Simultaneous assessment of chlorophyll fluorescence and A in maize at low (2% by volume) and high (21%) O2 levels indicated the presence of a small, yet detectable, O2-dependent component of total linear photosynthetic electron transport in 21% O2 This O2-dependent component decreased with increasing CO2 level indicative of photorespiration. Photorespiration was generally elevated in maize mutant compared to normal leaves. Quantification of the proportion of total electron transport supporting photorespiration enabled estimation of the bundle sheath cell CO2 concentration (Cb) using a simple kinetic model of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase function. The A versus Cb relationships overlapped for normal and mutant lines consistent with occurrence of strictly CO2-limited photosynthesis in the mutant bundle sheath cell. The results are discussed in terms of a previously reported CO2 concentration model [Laisk A, Edwards GE (2000) Photosynth Res 66: 199-224]. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Dorsoventral variations in dark chilling effects on photosynthesis and stomatal function in Paspalum dilatatum leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Cordeiro, Ana Sofia; Driscoll, Simon P; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-01-01

    The effects of dark chilling on the leaf-side-specific regulation of photosynthesis were characterized in the C(4) grass Paspalum dilatatum. CO(2)- and light-response curves for photosynthesis and associated parameters were measured on whole leaves and on each leaf side independently under adaxial and abaxial illumination before and after plants were exposed to dark chilling for one or two consecutive nights. The stomata closed on the adaxial sides of the leaves under abaxial illumination and no CO(2) uptake could be detected on this surface. However, high rates of whole leaf photosynthesis were still observed because CO(2) assimilation rates were increased on the abaxial sides of the leaves under abaxial illumination. Under adaxial illumination both leaf surfaces contributed to the inhibition of whole leaf photosynthesis observed after one night of chilling. After two nights of chilling photosynthesis remained inhibited on the abaxial side of the leaf but the adaxial side had recovered, an effect related to increased maximal ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation rates (V(cmax)) and enhanced maximal electron transport rates (J(max)). Under abaxial illumination, whole leaf photosynthesis was decreased only after the second night of chilling. The chilling-dependent inhibition of photosynthesis was located largely on the abaxial side of the leaf and was related to decreased V(cmax) and J(max), but not to the maximal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase carboxylation rate (V(pmax)). Each side of the leaf therefore exhibits a unique sensitivity to stress and recovery. Side-specific responses to stress are related to differences in the control of enzyme and photosynthetic electron transport activities.

  5. Chloroplast Chaperonin: An Intricate Protein Folding Machine for Photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Group I chaperonins are large cylindrical-shaped nano-machines that function as a central hub in the protein quality control system in the bacterial cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. In chloroplasts, proteins newly synthesized by chloroplast ribosomes, unfolded by diverse stresses, or translocated from the cytosol run the risk of aberrant folding and aggregation. The chloroplast chaperonin system assists these proteins in folding into their native states. A widely known protein folded by chloroplast chaperonin is the large subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, an enzyme responsible for the fixation of inorganic CO2 into organic carbohydrates during photosynthesis. Chloroplast chaperonin was initially identified as a Rubisco-binding protein. All photosynthetic eucaryotes genomes encode multiple chaperonin genes which can be divided into α and β subtypes. Unlike the homo-oligomeric chaperonins from bacteria and mitochondria, chloroplast chaperonins are more complex and exists as intricate hetero-oligomers containing both subtypes. The Group I chaperonin requires proper interaction with a detachable lid-like co-chaperonin in the presence of ATP and Mg2+ for substrate encapsulation and conformational transition. Besides the typical Cpn10-like co-chaperonin, a unique co-chaperonin consisting of two tandem Cpn10-like domains joined head-to-tail exists in chloroplasts. Since chloroplasts were proposed as sensors to various environmental stresses, this diversified chloroplast chaperonin system has the potential to adapt to complex conditions by accommodating specific substrates or through regulation at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels. In this review, we discuss recent progress on the unique structure and function of the chloroplast chaperonin system based on model organisms Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. Knowledge of the chloroplast chaperonin system may ultimately lead

  6. Arabidopsis thaliana ggt1 photorespiratory mutants maintain leaf carbon/nitrogen balance by reducing RuBisCO content and plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellero, Younès; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Jossier, Mathieu; Hodges, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic and physiological analyses of glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (GGT1) mutants were performed at the global leaf scale to elucidate the mechanisms involved in their photorespiratory growth phenotype. Air-grown ggt1 mutants showed retarded growth and development, that was not observed at high CO2 (3000 μL L(-1) ). When compared to wild-type (WT) plants, air-grown ggt1 plants exhibited glyoxylate accumulation, global changes in amino acid amounts including a decrease in serine content, lower organic acid levels, and modified ATP/ADP and NADP(+) /NADPH ratios. When compared to WT plants, their net CO2 assimilation rates (An ) were 50% lower and this mirrored decreases in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) contents. High CO2 -grown ggt1 plants transferred to air revealed a rapid decrease of An and photosynthetic electron transfer rate while maintaining a high energetic state. Short-term (a night period and 4 h of light) transferred ggt1 leaves accumulated glyoxylate and exhibited low serine contents, while other amino acid levels were not modified. RuBisCO content, activity and activation state were not altered after a short-term transfer while the ATP/ADP ratio was lowered in ggt1 rosettes. However, plant growth and RuBisCO levels were both reduced in ggt1 leaves after a long-term (12 days) acclimation to air from high CO2 when compared to WT plants. The data are discussed with respect to a reduced photorespiratory carbon recycling in the mutants. It is proposed that the low An limits nitrogen-assimilation, this decreases leaf RuBisCO content until plants attain a new homeostatic state that maintains a constant C/N balance and leads to smaller, slower growing plants. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Whole-plant growth and N utilization in transgenic rice plants with increased or decreased Rubisco content under different CO2 partial pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Emi; Suzuki, Yuji; Makino, Amane

    2014-11-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) strongly limits photosynthesis at lower CO2 concentration [CO2] whereas [corrected] Rubisco limitation is cancelled by elevated [CO2]. Therefore, increase or reduction in Rubisco content by transformation with a sense or an antisense RBCS construct are expected to alter the biomass production under different CO2 levels. RBCS-sense (125% Rubisco of wild-type) and -antisense (35% Rubisco of wild-type) rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were grown for 63 days at three different CO2 levels: low [CO2] (28 Pa), normal [CO2] (40 Pa) and elevated [CO2] (120 Pa). The biomass of RBCS-sense plants was 32% and 15% greater at low [CO2] and normal [CO2] than that of the wild-type plants, respectively, but did not differ at elevated [CO2]. Conversely, the biomass of RBCS-antisense plants was the smallest at low [CO2]. Thus, overproduction of Rubisco was effective for biomass production at low [CO2]. Greater biomass production at low [CO2] in RBCS-sense plants was caused by an increase in the net assimilation rate, and associated with an increase in the amount of N uptake. Furthermore, Rubisco overproduction in RBCS-sense plants was also promoted at low [CO2]. Although it seems that low [CO2]-growth additionally stimulates the effect of RBCS overexpression, such a phenomenon observed at low [CO2] was mediated through an increase in total leaf N content. Thus, the dependence of the growth improvement in RBCS-sense rice on growth [CO2] was closely related to the degree of Rubisco overproduction which was accompanied not only by leaf N content but also by whole plant N content. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Enhancement of growth, photosynthetic performance and yield by exclusion of ambient UV components in C3 and C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Sunita; Guruprasad, K N; Ahuja, Sumedha; Singh, Bupinder

    2013-10-05

    A field experiment was conducted under tropical climate for assessing the effect of ambient UV-B and UV-A by exclusion of UV components on the growth, photosynthetic performance and yield of C3 (cotton, wheat) and C4 (amaranthus, sorghum) plants. The plants were grown in specially designed UV exclusion chambers, wrapped with filters that excluded UV-B (plant species responded to UV exclusion by a significant increase in plant height, leaf area, leaf biomass, total biomass accumulation and yield. Measurements of the chlorophyll, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, gas exchange parameters and the activity of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) by fixation of (14)CO2 indicated a direct relationship between enhanced rate of photosynthesis and yield of the plants. Quantum yield of electron transport was enhanced by the exclusion of UV indicating better utilization of PAR assimilation and enhancement in reducing power in all the four plant species. Exclusion of UV-B in particular significantly enhanced the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and activity of Rubisco. Additional fixation of carbon due to exclusion of ambient UV-B was channeled towards yield as there was a decrease in the level of UV-B absorbing substances and an increase in soluble proteins in all the four plant species. The magnitude of the promotion in all the parameters studied was higher in dicots (cotton, amaranthus) compared to monocots (wheat, sorghum) after UV exclusion. The results indicated a suppressive action of ambient UV-B on growth and photosynthesis; dicots were more sensitive than monocots in this suppression while no great difference in sensitivity was found between C3 and C4 plants. Experiments indicated the suppressive action of ambient UV on carbon fixation and yield of C3 and C4 plants. Exclusion of solar UV-B will have agricultural benefits in both C3 and C4 plants under tropical climate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of oil sands effluent on cattail and clover: photosynthesis and the level of stress proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, A.U.; Han, B.; Kermode, A.R.; Bendell-Young, L.I.; Plant, A.L. [Simon Fraser University, Burnaby (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2001-07-01

    The oil sands industry located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, generates large volumes of effluent characterized by a high level of dissolved ions and naphthenic acids. The dikes used to store the effluent seep, creating wetlands which are subsequently invaded by obligate wetland flora such as cattail (Typha latifolia L.). The appearance of these wetlands prompted the oil sands industry to consider wetlands as part of their reclamation strategy. However, to ensure long-term viability of such wetlands, the response of the flora to the industrial effluent needed to be determined. To this end, apparent photosynthesis (APS), the level of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCo) large subunit, dehydrin-related polypeptides, and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) were evaluated in cattail and alsike clover plants (Trifolium hybridum L.) exposed to the oil sands effluent. APS measured in plants impacted by oil sands effluent was significantly higher than that of plants in the non-impacted off-site location. Among the on-site locations, plants growing in the natural wetlands site had higher APS compared to all other sites. The level of RuBisCo was not increased in cattail or clover growing in effluent-contaminated sites indicating that enhanced photosynthesis was not due to greater levels of this enzyme. Dehydrin-related polypeptides were detected only in the roots of cattail and were absent in clover. The polypeptide profile was altered in cattail exposed to oil sands effluent indicating that they were responding to an osmotic stress. The level of PDI was unaffected in the leaves of cattail regardless of the nature of the effluent to which they were exposed. Overall, the data indicate that cattail and clover are adapted to the oil sands effluent, although further studies are needed to assess their long-term ability to survive in the presence of this anthropogenic stress. (Author)

  10. NDH-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow Around Photosystem I is Crucial for C4 Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Noriko; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Noguchi, Ko; Tazoe, Youshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Sato, Fumihiko; Endo, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    C 4 photosynthesis exhibits efficient CO 2 assimilation in ambient air by concentrating CO 2 around ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) through a metabolic pathway called the C 4 cycle. It has been suggested that cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI mediated by chloroplast NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH), an alternative pathway of photosynthetic electron transport (PET), plays a crucial role in C 4 photosynthesis, although the contribution of NDH-mediated CEF is small in C 3 photosynthesis. Here, we generated NDH-suppressed transformants of a C 4 plant, Flaveria bidentis, and showed that the NDH-suppressed plants grow poorly, especially under low-light conditions. CO 2 assimilation rates were consistently decreased in the NDH-suppressed plants under low and medium light intensities. Measurements of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Chl fluorescence, the oxidation state of the reaction center of PSI (P700) and the electrochromic shift (ECS) of pigment absorbance indicated that proton translocation across the thylakoid membrane is impaired in the NDH-suppressed plants. Since proton translocation across the thylakoid membrane induces ATP production, these results suggest that NDH-mediated CEF plays a role in the supply of ATP which is required for C 4 photosynthesis. Such a role is more crucial when the light that is available for photosynthesis is limited and the energy production by PET becomes rate-determining for C 4 photosynthesis. Our results demonstrate that the physiological contribution of NDH-mediated CEF is greater in C 4 photosynthesis than in C 3 photosynthesis, suggesting that the mechanism of PET in C 4 photosynthesis has changed from that in C 3 photosynthesis accompanying the changes in the mechanism of CO 2 assimilation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Mechanisms of inorganic-carbon acquisition in marine phytoplankton and their implications for the use of other resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raven, J.A.; Johnston, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    Most of the marine phytoplankton species for which data are available are rate saturated for photosynthesis and probably for growth with inorganic C at normal seawater concentrations; 2 of the 17 species are not saturated. Photosynthesis in these two species can probably be explained by the 17 species not saturated. Photosynthesis in these two species can probably be explained by assuming that CO 2 reaches the site of its reaction with RUBISCO (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase) by passive diffusion. The kinetics of CO 2 fixation by intact cells are explicable by RUBISCO kinetics typical of algae, and a CO 2 -saturated in vivo RUBISCO activity not more than twice the in vivo light- and inorganic-C-saturated rate of photosynthesis. For the other species, the high affinity in vivo for inorganic C could be other species, the high affinity in vivo for inorganic C could be explained by postulating active influx of inorganic C yielding a higher concentration of CO 2 available to RUBISCO during steady state photosynthesis than in the medium. Although such a higher concentration of internal CO 2 in cells with high affinity for inorganic C is found at low levels of external inorganic C, the situation is more equivocal at normal seawater concentrations. In theory, the occurrence of a CO 2 -concentrating mechanism rather than passive CO 2 entry could reduce the photon, N, Fe, Mn, and Mo costs of growth, but increase the Zn and Se costs. Thus far, data on costs are available only for photons and N; these data generally agree with the predicted lower costs for cells with high affinity for inorganic C

  12. Adaptation to high temperature mitigates the impact of water deficit during combined heat and drought stress in C3 sunflower and C4 maize varieties with contrasting drought tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killi, Dilek; Bussotti, Filippo; Raschi, Antonio; Haworth, Matthew

    2017-02-01

    Heat and drought stress frequently occur together, however, their impact on plant growth and photosynthesis (P N ) is unclear. The frequency, duration and severity of heat and drought stress events are predicted to increase in the future, having severe implications for agricultural productivity and food security. To assess the impact on plant gas exchange, physiology and morphology we grew drought tolerant and sensitive varieties of C3 sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and C4 maize (Zea mays) under conditions of elevated temperature for 4 weeks prior to the imposition of water deficit. The negative impact of temperature on P N was most apparent in sunflower. The drought tolerant sunflower retained ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity under heat stress to a greater extent than its drought sensitive counterpart. Maize exhibited no varietal difference in response to increased temperature. In contrast to previous studies, where a sudden rise in temperature induced an increase in stomatal conductance (G s ), we observed no change or a reduction in G s with elevated temperature, which alongside lower leaf area mitigated the impact of drought at the higher temperature. The drought tolerant sunflower and maize varieties exhibited greater investment in root-systems, allowing greater uptake of the available soil water. Elevated temperatures associated with heat-waves will have profound negative impacts on crop growth in both sunflower and maize, but the deleterious effect on P N was less apparent in the drought tolerant sunflower and both maize varieties. As C4 plants generally exhibit water use efficiency (WUE) and resistance to heat stress, selection on the basis of tolerance to heat and drought stress would be more beneficial to the yields of C3 crops cultivated in drought prone semi-arid regions. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. Photorespiratory Bypasses Lead to Increased Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana: Are Predictions Consistent with Experimental Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Georg; Küken, Anika; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Arguably, the biggest challenge of modern plant systems biology lies in predicting the performance of plant species, and crops in particular, upon different intracellular and external perturbations. Recently, an increased growth of Arabidopsis thaliana plants was achieved by introducing two different photorespiratory bypasses via metabolic engineering. Here, we investigate the extent to which these findings match the predictions from constraint-based modeling. To determine the effect of the employed metabolic network model on the predictions, we perform a comparative analysis involving three state-of-the-art metabolic reconstructions of A. thaliana. In addition, we investigate three scenarios with respect to experimental findings on the ratios of the carboxylation and oxygenation reactions of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). We demonstrate that the condition-dependent growth phenotypes of one of the engineered bypasses can be qualitatively reproduced by each reconstruction, particularly upon considering the additional constraints with respect to the ratio of fluxes for the RuBisCO reactions. Moreover, our results lend support for the hypothesis of a reduced photorespiration in the engineered plants, and indicate that specific changes in CO2 exchange as well as in the proxies for co-factor turnover are associated with the predicted growth increase in the engineered plants. We discuss our findings with respect to the structure of the used models, the modeling approaches taken, and the available experimental evidence. Our study sets the ground for investigating other strategies for increase of plant biomass by insertion of synthetic reactions. PMID:27092301

  14. Photosynthetic characteristics of an amphibious plant, Eleocharis vivipara: Expression of C4 and C3 modes in contrasting environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Osamu; Samejima, Muneaki; Muto, Shoshi; Miyachi, Shigetoh

    1988-01-01

    Eleocharis vivipara Link, a freshwater amphibious leafless plant belonging to the Cyperaceae can grow in both terrestrial and submersed aquatic conditions. Two forms of E. vivipara obtained from these contrasting environments were examined for the characteristics associated with C4 and C3 photosynthesis. In the terrestrial form (δ 13C values = -13.5 to -15.4‰, where ‰ is parts per thousand), the culms, which are photosynthetic organs, possess a Kranz-type anatomy typical of C4 plants, and well-developed bundle-sheath cells contain numerous large chloroplasts. In the submersed form (δ 13C value = -25.9‰), the culms possess anatomical features characteristic of submersed aquatic plants, and the reduced bundle-sheath cells contain only a few small chloroplasts. 14C pulse-12C chase experiments showed that the terrestrial form and the submersed form fix carbon by way of the C4 pathway, with aspartate (40%) and malate (35%) as the main primary products, and by way of the C3 pathway, with 3-phosphoglyceric acid (53%) and sugar phosphates (14%) as the main primary products, respectively. The terrestrial form showed photosynthetic enzyme activities typical of the NAD-malic enzyme-C4 subtype, whereas the submersed form showed decreased activities of key C4 enzymes and an increased ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) activity. These data suggest that this species can differentiate into the C4 mode under terrestrial conditions and into the C3 mode under submersed conditions. Images PMID:16593980

  15. Diversity and distribution of autotrophic microbial community along environmental gradients in grassland soils on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guangxia; Kong, Weidong; Liu, Jinbo; Zhao, Jingxue; Du, Haodong; Zhang, Xianzhou; Xia, Pinhua

    2015-10-01

    Soil microbial autotrophs play a significant role in CO2 fixation in terrestrial ecosystem, particularly in vegetation-constrained ecosystems with environmental stresses, such as the Tibetan Plateau characterized by low temperature and high UV. However, soil microbial autotrophic communities and their driving factors remain less appreciated. We investigated the structure and shift of microbial autotrophic communities and their driving factors along an elevation gradient (4400-5100 m above sea level) in alpine grassland soils on the Tibetan Plateau. The autotrophic microbial communities were characterized by quantitative PCR, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and cloning/sequencing of cbbL genes, encoding the large subunit for the CO2 fixation protein ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO). High cbbL gene abundance and high RubisCO enzyme activity were observed and both significantly increased with increasing elevations. Path analysis identified that soil RubisCO enzyme causally originated from microbial autotrophs, and its activity was indirectly driven by soil water content, temperature, and NH4 (+) content. Soil autotrophic microbial community structure dramatically shifted along the elevation and was jointly driven by soil temperature, water content, nutrients, and plant types. The autotrophic microbial communities were dominated by bacterial autotrophs, which were affiliated with Rhizobiales, Burkholderiales, and Actinomycetales. These autotrophs have been well documented to degrade organic matters; thus, metabolic versatility could be a key strategy for microbial autotrophs to survive in the harsh environments. Our results demonstrated high abundance of microbial autotrophs and high CO2 fixation potential in alpine grassland soils and provided a novel model to identify dominant drivers of soil microbial communities and their ecological functions.

  16. Hydrogen production by Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: an elaborate interplay of electron sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemschemeier, A; Happe, T.; Fouchard, S; Cournac, L; Peltier, G.

    2008-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses a [FeFe]-hydrogenase HydA1 (EC 1.12.7.2), which is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Large amounts of H 2 are produced in a light-dependent reaction for several days when C. reinhardtii cells are deprived of sulfur. Under these conditions, the cells drastically change their physiology from aerobic photosynthetic growth to an anaerobic resting state. The understanding of the underlying physiological processes is not only important for getting further insights into the adaptability of photosynthesis, but will help to optimize the biotechnological application of algae as H 2 producers. Two of the still most disputed questions regarding H 2 generation by C. reinhardtii concern the electron source for H 2 evolution and the competition of the hydrogenase with alternative electron sinks. We analyzed the H 2 metabolism of S-depleted C. reinhardtii cultures utilizing a special mass spectrometer setup and investigated the influence of photosystem II (PSII)- or ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco)-deficiency. We show that electrons for H 2 -production are provided both by PSII activity and by a non-photochemical plastoquinone reduction pathway, which is dependent on previous PSII activity. In a Rubisco-deficient strain, which produces H 2 also in the presence of sulfur, H 2 generation seems to be the only significant electron sink for PSII activity and rescues this strain at least partially from a light-sensitive phenotype.The latter indicates that the down-regulation of assimilatory pathways in S-deprived C. reinhardtii cells is one of the important prerequisites for a sustained H 2 evolution. (authors)

  17. Characterization of Cannabis sativa allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajay P; Green, Brett J; Sussman, Gordon; Berlin, Noam; Lata, Hemant; Chandra, Suman; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Hettick, Justin M; Beezhold, Donald H

    2013-07-01

    Allergic sensitization to Cannabis sativa is rarely reported, but the increasing consumption of marijuana has resulted in an increase in the number of individuals who become sensitized. To date, little is known about the causal allergens associated with C sativa. To characterize marijuana allergens in different components of the C sativa plant using serum IgE from marijuana sensitized patients. Serum samples from 23 patients with a positive skin prick test result to a crude C sativa extract were evaluated. IgE reactivity was variable between patients and C sativa extracts. IgE reactivity to C sativa proteins in Western blots was heterogeneous and ranged from 10 to 70 kDa. Putative allergens derived from 2-dimensional gels were identified. Prominent IgE reactive bands included a 23-kDa oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2 and a 50-kDa protein identified to be the photosynthetic enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Additional proteins were identified in the proteomic analysis, including those from adenosine triphosphate synthase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and luminal binding protein (heat shock protein 70), suggesting these proteins are potential allergens. Deglycosylation studies helped refine protein allergen identification and demonstrated significant IgE antibodies against plant oligosaccharides that could help explain cross-reactivity. Identification and characterization of allergens from C sativa may be helpful in further understanding allergic sensitization to this plant species. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. BioDry: An Inexpensive, Low-Power Method to Preserve Aquatic Microbial Biomass at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuorto, Steven J; Brown, Chris M; Bidle, Kay D; McGuinness, Lora R; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2015-01-01

    This report describes BioDry (patent pending), a method for reliably preserving the biomolecules associated with aquatic microbial biomass samples, without the need of hazardous materials (e.g. liquid nitrogen, preservatives, etc.), freezing, or bulky storage/sampling equipment. Gel electrophoresis analysis of nucleic acid extracts from samples treated in the lab with the BioDry method indicated that molecular integrity was protected in samples stored at room temperature for up to 30 days. Analysis of 16S/18S rRNA genes for presence/absence and relative abundance of microorganisms using both 454-pyrosequencing and TRFLP profiling revealed statistically indistinguishable communities from control samples that were frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately after collection. Seawater and river water biomass samples collected with a portable BioDry "field unit", constructed from off-the-shelf materials and a battery-operated pumping system, also displayed high levels of community rRNA preservation, despite a slight decrease in nucleic acid recovery over the course of storage for 30 days. Functional mRNA and protein pools from the field samples were also effectively conserved with BioDry, as assessed by respective RT-PCR amplification and western blot of ribulose-1-5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BioDry can adequately preserve a suite of biomolecules from aquatic biomass at ambient temperatures for up to a month, giving it great potential for high resolution sampling in remote locations or on autonomous platforms where space and power are limited.

  19. Microbial communities in dark oligotrophic volcanic ice cave ecosystems of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley M. Tebo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s crust hosts a subsurface, dark, and oligotrophic biosphere that is poorly understood in terms of the energy supporting its biomass production and impact on food webs at the Earth’s surface. Dark oligotrophic volcanic ecosystems (DOVEs are good environments for investigations of life in the absence of sunlight as they are poor in organics, rich in chemical reactants and well known for chemical exchange with Earth’s surface systems. Ice caves near the summit of Mt. Erebus (Antarctica offer DOVEs in a polar alpine environment that is starved in organics and with oxygenated hydrothermal circulation in highly reducing host rock. We surveyed the microbial communities using PCR, cloning, sequencing and analysis of the small subunit (16S ribosomal and Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (RubisCO genes in sediment samples from three different caves, two that are completely dark and one that receives snow-filtered sunlight seasonally. The microbial communities in all three caves are composed primarily of Bacteria and fungi; Archaea were not detected. The bacterial communities from these ice caves display low phylogenetic diversity, but with a remarkable diversity of RubisCO genes including new deeply branching Form I clades, implicating the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle as a pathway of CO2 fixation. The microbial communities in one of the dark caves, Warren Cave, which has a remarkably low phylogenetic diversity, were analyzed in more detail to gain a possible perspective on the energetic basis of the microbial ecosystem in the cave. Atmospheric carbon (CO2 and CO, including from volcanic emissions, likely supplies carbon and/or some of the energy requirements of chemoautotrophic microbial communities in Warren Cave and probably other Mt. Erebus ice caves. Our work casts a first glimpse at Mt. Erebus ice caves as natural laboratories for exploring carbon, energy and nutrient sources in the subsurface biosphere and the

  20. [Regulation of alternative CO{sub 2} fixation pathways in procaryotic and eucaryotic photosynthetic organisms]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    The major goal of this project is to determine how microorganisms regulate the assimilation of CO{sup 2} via pathways alternative to the usual Calvin reductive pentose phosphate scheme. In particular, we are interest in the molecular basis for switches in CO{sub 2} metabolic paths. Several earlier studies had indicated that purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria assimilate significant amounts of CO{sub 2} via alternative non-Calvin routes. We have deleted the gene that encodes. RubisCo (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in both the Rhodobacter sphaeroids and Rhodospirillum rubrum. The R. sphaeroides RubisCO deletion strain (strain 16) could not grow under photoheterotrophic conditions with malate as electron donor and CO{sub 2} as the electron acceptor; however the R. rub RubisCO deletion strain (strain I-19) could. Over the past year we have sought to physiologically characterize strain 16PHC. We found that, 16PHC exhibited rates of whole-cell CO{sub 2} fixation which were significantly higher than strain 16. Strain 16PHC could not grow photolithoautotrophically in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere; however, CO{sub 2} fixation catalyzed by photoheterotrophically grown 16PHC was repressed by the addition of DMSO. Likewise, we found that cells initially grown in the presence of DMSO could induce the CO{sub 2} fixation system when DMSO was removed. Thus, these results suggested that both PHC and I-19 could be used to study alternative CO{sub 2} fixation reactions and their significance in R. sphaexoides and R. rubrum.

  1. [Regulation of alternative CO[sub 2] fixation pathways in procaryotic and eucaryotic photosynthetic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to determine how microorganisms regulate the assimilation of CO[sup 2] via pathways alternative to the usual Calvin reductive pentose phosphate scheme. In particular, we are interest in the molecular basis for switches in CO[sub 2] metabolic paths. Several earlier studies had indicated that purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria assimilate significant amounts of CO[sub 2] via alternative non-Calvin routes. We have deleted the gene that encodes. RubisCo (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in both the Rhodobacter sphaeroids and Rhodospirillum rubrum. The R. sphaeroides RubisCO deletion strain (strain 16) could not grow under photoheterotrophic conditions with malate as electron donor and CO[sub 2] as the electron acceptor; however the R. rub RubisCO deletion strain (strain I-19) could. Over the past year we have sought to physiologically characterize strain 16PHC. We found that, 16PHC exhibited rates of whole-cell CO[sub 2] fixation which were significantly higher than strain 16. Strain 16PHC could not grow photolithoautotrophically in a CO[sub 2] atmosphere; however, CO[sub 2] fixation catalyzed by photoheterotrophically grown 16PHC was repressed by the addition of DMSO. Likewise, we found that cells initially grown in the presence of DMSO could induce the CO[sub 2] fixation system when DMSO was removed. Thus, these results suggested that both PHC and I-19 could be used to study alternative CO[sub 2] fixation reactions and their significance in R. sphaexoides and R. rubrum.

  2. A function-based screen for seeking RubisCO active clones from metagenomes: novel enzymes influencing RubisCO activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnke, Stefanie; Perner, Mirjam

    2015-03-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a key enzyme of the Calvin cycle, which is responsible for most of Earth's primary production. Although research on RubisCO genes and enzymes in plants, cyanobacteria and bacteria has been ongoing for years, still little is understood about its regulation and activation in bacteria. Even more so, hardly any information exists about the function of metagenomic RubisCOs and the role of the enzymes encoded on the flanking DNA owing to the lack of available function-based screens for seeking active RubisCOs from the environment. Here we present the first solely activity-based approach for identifying RubisCO active fosmid clones from a metagenomic library. We constructed a metagenomic library from hydrothermal vent fluids and screened 1056 fosmid clones. Twelve clones exhibited RubisCO activity and the metagenomic fragments resembled genes from Thiomicrospira crunogena. One of these clones was further analyzed. It contained a 35.2 kb metagenomic insert carrying the RubisCO gene cluster and flanking DNA regions. Knockouts of twelve genes and two intergenic regions on this metagenomic fragment demonstrated that the RubisCO activity was significantly impaired and was attributed to deletions in genes encoding putative transcriptional regulators and those believed to be vital for RubisCO activation. Our new technique revealed a novel link between a poorly characterized gene and RubisCO activity. This screen opens the door to directly investigating RubisCO genes and respective enzymes from environmental samples.

  3. Analyzing pepsin degradation assay conditions used for allergenicity assessments to ensure that pepsin susceptible and pepsin resistant dietary proteins are distinguishable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Wang

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of a dietary protein to proteolytic degradation by digestive enzymes, such as gastric pepsin, provides information on the likelihood of systemic exposure to a structurally intact and biologically active macromolecule, thus informing on the safety of proteins for human and animal consumption. Therefore, the purpose of standardized in vitro degradation studies that are performed during protein safety assessments is to distinguish whether proteins of interest are susceptible or resistant to pepsin degradation via a study design that enables study-to-study comparison. Attempting to assess pepsin degradation under a wide-range of possible physiological conditions poses a problem because of the lack of robust and consistent data collected under a large-range of sub-optimal conditions, which undermines the needs to harmonize in vitro degradation conditions. This report systematically compares the effects of pH, incubation time, and pepsin-to-substrate protein ratio on the relative degradation of five dietary proteins: three pepsin susceptible proteins [ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, hemoglobin (Hb], and two pepsin resistant proteins [lipid transfer protein (LTP and soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI]. The results indicate that proteins susceptible to pepsin degradation are readily distinguishable from pepsin-resistant proteins when the reaction conditions are within the well-characterized optima for pepsin. The current standardized in vitro pepsin resistant assay with low pH and high pepsin-to-substrate ratio fits this purpose. Using non-optimal pH and/or pepsin-to-substrate protein ratios resulted in susceptible proteins no longer being reliably degraded by this stomach enzyme, which compromises the ability of this in vitro assay to distinguish between resistant and susceptible proteins and, therefore, no longer providing useful data to an overall weight-of-evidence approach to

  4. DNA sequencing, anatomy, and calcification patterns support a monophyletic, subarctic, carbonate reef-forming Clathromorphum (Hapalidiaceae, Corallinales, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adey, Walter H; Hernandez-Kantun, Jazmin J; Johnson, Gabriel; Gabrielson, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    For the first time, morpho-anatomical characters that were congruent with DNA sequence data were used to characterize several genera in Hapalidiaceae-the major eco-engineers of Subarctic carbonate ecosystems. DNA sequencing of three genes (SSU, rbcL, ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit gene and psbA, photosystem II D1 protein gene), along with patterns of cell division, cell elongation, and calcification supported a monophyletic Clathromorphum. Two characters were diagnostic for this genus: (i) cell division, elongation, and primary calcification occurred only in intercalary meristematic cells and in a narrow vertical band (1-2 μm wide) resulting in a "meristem split" and (ii) a secondary calcification of interfilament crystals was also produced. Neopolyporolithon was resurrected for N. reclinatum, the generitype, and Clathromorphum loculosum was transferred to this genus. Like Clathromorphum, cell division, elongation, and calcification occurred only in intercalary meristematic cells, but in a wider vertical band (over 10-20 μm), and a "meristem split" was absent. Callilithophytum gen. nov. was proposed to accommodate Clathromorphum parcum, the obligate epiphyte of the northeast Pacific endemic geniculate coralline, Calliarthron. Diagnostic for this genus were epithallial cells terminating all cell filaments (no dorsi-ventrality was present), and a distinct "foot" was embedded in the host. Leptophytum, based on its generitype, L. laeve, was shown to be a distinct genus more closely related to Clathromorphum than to Phymatolithon. All names of treated species were applied unequivocally by linking partial rbcL sequences from holotype, isotype, or epitype specimens with field-collected material. Variation in rbcL and psbA sequences suggested that multiple species may be passing under each currently recognized species of Clathromorphum and Neopolyporolithon. © 2014 Phycological Society of America.

  5. Highly conserved small subunit residues influence rubisco large subunit catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkov, Todor; Spreitzer, Robert J

    2009-10-30

    The chloroplast enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. With a deeper understanding of its structure-function relationships and competitive inhibition by O(2), it may be possible to engineer an increase in agricultural productivity and renewable energy. The chloroplast-encoded large subunits form the active site, but the nuclear-encoded small subunits can also influence catalytic efficiency and CO(2)/O(2) specificity. To further define the role of the small subunit in Rubisco function, the 10 most conserved residues in all small subunits were substituted with alanine by transformation of a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant that lacks the small subunit gene family. All the mutant strains were able to grow photosynthetically, indicating that none of the residues is essential for function. Three of the substitutions have little or no effect (S16A, P19A, and E92A), one primarily affects holoenzyme stability (L18A), and the remainder affect catalysis with or without some level of associated structural instability (Y32A, E43A, W73A, L78A, P79A, and F81A). Y32A and E43A cause decreases in CO(2)/O(2) specificity. Based on the x-ray crystal structure of Chlamydomonas Rubisco, all but one (Glu-92) of the conserved residues are in contact with large subunits and cluster near the amino- or carboxyl-terminal ends of large subunit alpha-helix 8, which is a structural element of the alpha/beta-barrel active site. Small subunit residues Glu-43 and Trp-73 identify a possible structural connection between active site alpha-helix 8 and the highly variable small subunit loop between beta-strands A and B, which can also influence Rubisco CO(2)/O(2) specificity.

  6. BioDry: An Inexpensive, Low-Power Method to Preserve Aquatic Microbial Biomass at Room Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Tuorto

    Full Text Available This report describes BioDry (patent pending, a method for reliably preserving the biomolecules associated with aquatic microbial biomass samples, without the need of hazardous materials (e.g. liquid nitrogen, preservatives, etc., freezing, or bulky storage/sampling equipment. Gel electrophoresis analysis of nucleic acid extracts from samples treated in the lab with the BioDry method indicated that molecular integrity was protected in samples stored at room temperature for up to 30 days. Analysis of 16S/18S rRNA genes for presence/absence and relative abundance of microorganisms using both 454-pyrosequencing and TRFLP profiling revealed statistically indistinguishable communities from control samples that were frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately after collection. Seawater and river water biomass samples collected with a portable BioDry "field unit", constructed from off-the-shelf materials and a battery-operated pumping system, also displayed high levels of community rRNA preservation, despite a slight decrease in nucleic acid recovery over the course of storage for 30 days. Functional mRNA and protein pools from the field samples were also effectively conserved with BioDry, as assessed by respective RT-PCR amplification and western blot of ribulose-1-5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. Collectively, these results demonstrate that BioDry can adequately preserve a suite of biomolecules from aquatic biomass at ambient temperatures for up to a month, giving it great potential for high resolution sampling in remote locations or on autonomous platforms where space and power are limited.

  7. Interaction of Sulfate Assimilation with Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Lemna minor1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Suter, Marianne; von Ballmoos, Peter; Hesse, Holger; Krähenbühl, Urs; Rennenberg, Heinz; Brunold, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Cysteine synthesis from sulfide and O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS) is a reaction interconnecting sulfate, nitrogen, and carbon assimilation. Using Lemna minor, we analyzed the effects of omission of CO2 from the atmosphere and simultaneous application of alternative carbon sources on adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) and nitrate reductase (NR), the key enzymes of sulfate and nitrate assimilation, respectively. Incubation in air without CO2 led to severe decrease in APR and NR activities and mRNA levels, but ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was not considerably affected. Simultaneous addition of sucrose (Suc) prevented the reduction in enzyme activities, but not in mRNA levels. OAS, a known regulator of sulfate assimilation, could also attenuate the effect of missing CO2 on APR, but did not affect NR. When the plants were subjected to normal air after a 24-h pretreatment in air without CO2, APR and NR activities and mRNA levels recovered within the next 24 h. The addition of Suc and glucose in air without CO2 also recovered both enzyme activities, with OAS again influenced only APR. 35SO42− feeding showed that treatment in air without CO2 severely inhibited sulfate uptake and the flux through sulfate assimilation. After a resupply of normal air or the addition of Suc, incorporation of 35S into proteins and glutathione greatly increased. OAS treatment resulted in high labeling of cysteine; the incorporation of 35S in proteins and glutathione was much less increased compared with treatment with normal air or Suc. These results corroborate the tight interconnection of sulfate, nitrate, and carbon assimilation. PMID:12428005

  8. Development of a gene silencing DNA vector derived from a broad host range geminivirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hancock Leandria C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing is proving to be a powerful tool for genetic, developmental, and physiological analyses. The use of viral induced gene silencing (VIGS offers advantages to transgenic approaches as it can be potentially applied to non-model systems for which transgenic techniques are not readily available. However, many VIGS vectors are derived from Gemini viruses that have limited host ranges. We present a new, unipartite vector that is derived from a curtovirus that has a broad host range and will be amenable to use in many non-model systems. Results The construction of a gene silencing vector derived from the geminivirus Beet curly top virus (BCTV, named pWSRi, is reported. Two versions of the vector have been developed to allow application by biolistic techniques or by agro-infiltration. We demonstrate its ability to silence nuclear genes including ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS, transketolase, the sulfur allele of magnesium chelatase (ChlI, and two homeotic transcription factors in spinach or tomato by generating gene-specific knock-down phenotypes. Onset of phenotypes occurred 3 to 12 weeks post-inoculation, depending on the target gene, in organs that developed after the application. The vector lacks movement genes and we found no evidence for significant spread from the site of inoculation. However, viral amplification in inoculated tissue was detected and is necessary for systemic silencing, suggesting that signals generated from active viral replicons are efficiently transported within the plant. Conclusion The unique properties of the pWSRi vector, the ability to silence genes in meristem tissue, the separation of virus and silencing phenotypes, and the broad natural host range of BCTV, suggest that it will have wide utility.

  9. Novel Insights into the Influence of Seed Sarcotesta Photosynthesis on Accumulation of Seed Dry Matter and Oil Content in Torreya grandis cv. “Merrillii”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed oil content is an important trait of nut seeds, and it is affected by the import of carbon from photosynthetic sources. Although green leaves are the main photosynthetic organs, seed sarcotesta photosynthesis also supplies assimilates to seed development. Understanding the relationship between seed photosynthesis and seed development has theoretical and practical significance in the cultivation of Torreya grandis cv. “Merrillii.” To assess the role of seed sarcotesta photosynthesis on the seed development, anatomical and physiological traits of sarcotesta were measured during two growing seasons in the field. Compared with the attached current-year leaves, the sarcotesta had higher gross photosynthetic rate at the first stage of seed development. At the late second stage of seed development, sarcotesta showed down-regulation of PSII activity, as indicated by significant decrease in the following chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: the maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm, the PSII quantum yield (ΦPSII, and the photosynthetic quenching coefficient (qP. The ribulose 1, 5—bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco activity, the total chlorophyll content (Chl(a+b and nitrogen content in the sarcotesta were also significantly decreased during that period. Treatment with DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea] preventing seed photosynthesis decreased the seed dry weight and the oil content by 25.4 and 25.5%, respectively. We conclude that seed photosynthesis plays an important role in the dry matter accumulation at the first growth stage. Our results also suggest that down-regulation of seed photosynthesis is a plant response to re-balance the source-sink ratio at the second growth stage. These results suggest that seed photosynthesis is important for biomass accumulation and oil synthesis of the Torreya seeds. The results will facilitate achieving higher yields and oil contents in nut trees by selection for higher seed photosynthesis cultivars.

  10. Regulatory components of carbon concentrating mechanisms in aquatic unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Vandana; Sidhu, Gurpreet Kaur; Nogia, Panchsheela; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Sandhya

    2017-11-01

    This review provides an insight into the regulation of the carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in lower organisms like cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and algae. CCMs evolved as a mechanism to concentrate CO 2 at the site of primary carboxylating enzyme Ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), so that the enzyme could overcome its affinity towards O 2 which leads to wasteful processes like photorespiration. A diverse set of CCMs exist in nature, i.e., carboxysomes in cyanobacteria and proteobacteria; pyrenoids in algae and diatoms, the C 4 system, and Crassulacean acid metabolism in higher plants. Prime regulators of CCM in most of the photosynthetic autotrophs belong to the LysR family of transcriptional regulators, which regulate the activity of the components of CCM depending upon the ambient CO 2 concentrations. Major targets of these regulators are carbonic anhydrase and inorganic carbon uptake systems (CO 2 and HCO 3 - transporters) whose activities are modulated either at transcriptional level or by changes in the levels of their co-regulatory metabolites. The article provides information on the localization of the CCM components as well as their function and participation in the development of an efficient CCM. Signal transduction cascades leading to activation/inactivation of inducible CCM components on perception of low/high CO 2 stimuli have also been brought into picture. A detailed study of the regulatory components can aid in identifying the unraveled aspects of these mechanisms and hence provide information on key molecules that need to be explored to further provide a clear understanding of the mechanism under study.

  11. Improved tolerance to post-anthesis drought stress by pre-drought priming at vegetative stages in drought-tolerant and -sensitive wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Muhammad; Tian, Zhongwei; Ata-Ul-Karim, Syed Tahir; Liu, Yang; Cui, Yakun; Zahoor, Rizwan; Jiang, Dong; Dai, Tingbo

    2016-09-01

    Wheat crop endures a considerable penalty of yield reduction to escape the drought events during post-anthesis period. Drought priming under a pre-drought stress can enhance the crop potential to tolerate the subsequent drought stress by triggering a faster and stronger defense mechanism. Towards these understandings, a set of controlled moderate drought stress at 55-60% field capacity (FC) was developed to prime the plants of two wheat cultivars namely Luhan-7 (drought tolerant) and Yangmai-16 (drought sensitive) during tillering (Feekes 2 stage) and jointing (Feekes 6 stage), respectively. The comparative response of primed and non-primed plants, cultivars and priming stages was evaluated by applying a subsequent severe drought stress at 7 days after anthesis. The results showed that primed plants of both cultivars showed higher potential to tolerate the post-anthesis drought stress through improved leaf water potential, more chlorophyll, and ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase contents, enhanced photosynthesis, better photoprotection and efficient enzymatic antioxidant system leading to less yield reductions. The primed plants of Luhan-7 showed higher capability to adapt the drought stress events than Yangmai-16. The positive effects of drought priming to sustain higher grain yield were pronounced in plants primed at tillering than those primed at jointing. In consequence, upregulated functioning of photosynthetic apparatus and efficient enzymatic antioxidant activities in primed plants indicated their superior potential to alleviate a subsequently occurring drought stress, which contributed to lower yield reductions than non-primed plants. However, genotypic and priming stages differences in response to drought stress also contributed to affect the capability of primed plants to tolerate the post-anthesis drought stress conditions in wheat. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Cyst(e)ine Is the Transport Metabolite of Assimilated Sulfur from Bundle-Sheath to Mesophyll Cells in Maize Leaves1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, Marta; Suter, Marianne; Jones, Stephanie; Brunold, Christian

    1998-01-01

    The intercellular distribution of the enzymes and metabolites of assimilatory sulfate reduction and glutathione synthesis was analyzed in maize (Zea mays L. cv LG 9) leaves. Mesophyll cells and strands of bundle-sheath cells from second leaves of 11-d-old maize seedlings were obtained by two different mechanical-isolation methods. Cross-contamination of cell preparations was determined using ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39) and nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) as marker enzymes for bundle-sheath and mesophyll cells, respectively. ATP sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.4) and adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase activities were detected almost exclusively in the bundle-sheath cells, whereas GSH synthetase (EC 6.3.2.3) and cyst(e)ine, γ-glutamylcysteine, and glutathione were located predominantly in the mesophyll cells. Feeding experiments using [35S]sulfate with intact leaves indicated that cyst(e)ine was the transport metabolite of reduced sulfur from bundle-sheath to mesophyll cells. This result was corroborated by tracer experiments, which showed that isolated bundle-sheath strands fed with [35S]sulfate secreted radioactive cyst(e)ine as the sole thiol into the resuspending medium. The results presented in this paper show that assimilatory sulfate reduction is restricted to the bundle-sheath cells, whereas the formation of glutathione takes place predominantly in the mesophyll cells, with cyst(e)ine functioning as a transport metabolite between the two cell types. PMID:9536048

  13. Large fractions of CO2-fixing microorganisms in pristine limestone aquifers appear to be involved in the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Martina; Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Schulze, Isabel; Opitz, Sebastian; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The traditional view of the dependency of subsurface environments on surface-derived allochthonous carbon inputs is challenged by increasing evidence for the role of lithoautotrophy in aquifer carbon flow. We linked information on autotrophy (Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle) with that from total microbial community analysis in groundwater at two superimposed—upper and lower—limestone groundwater reservoirs (aquifers). Quantitative PCR revealed that up to 17% of the microbial population had the genetic potential to fix CO2 via the Calvin cycle, with abundances of cbbM and cbbL genes, encoding RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) forms I and II, ranging from 1.14 × 103 to 6 × 106 genes liter−1 over a 2-year period. The structure of the active microbial communities based on 16S rRNA transcripts differed between the two aquifers, with a larger fraction of heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic, soil-related groups in the oxygen-deficient upper aquifer. Most identified CO2-assimilating phylogenetic groups appeared to be involved in the oxidation of sulfur or nitrogen compounds and harbored both RubisCO forms I and II, allowing efficient CO2 fixation in environments with strong oxygen and CO2 fluctuations. The genera Sulfuricellaand Nitrosomonas were represented by read fractions of up to 78 and 33%, respectively, within the cbbM and cbbL transcript pool and accounted for 5.6 and 3.8% of 16S rRNA sequence reads, respectively, in the lower aquifer. Our results indicate that a large fraction of bacteria in pristine limestone aquifers has the genetic potential for autotrophic CO2 fixation, with energy most likely provided by the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

  14. Nitrogen control of photosynthetic protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.W.

    1986-09-01

    Plant growth is severely affected by impaired photosynthesis resulting from nitrogen deficiency. The molecular aspects of this effect are being studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas grown in continuous culture systems. Photosynthetic membranes of nitrogen-limited cells are dramatically depleted in chlorophylls, xanthophylls and proteins of the light-harvesting complexes. In contrast, enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and electron transport chain complexes are reduced only 40 to 65% on a per cell basis comparison with nitrogen-sufficient cultures. From analyses of mRNA levels by in vitro translation and hybridization analyses with cloned DNA sequences for photosynthetic proteins, we have found there are rather minor effects of nitrogen deficiency on nuclear or chloroplast gene transcription. Maturation of a transcript of the nuclear-encoded small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase is inhibited in nitrogen-deficient cells and causes accumulation of large amounts of mRNA precursors. Most of the effects of nitrogen deficiency on photosynthetic proteins appear to result from posttranscriptional regulatory processes: light-harvesting protein synthesis may be sustained but their import into chloroplasts or translocation to photosynthetic membranes is impaired. Nitrogen-deficient cells lack violaxanthin, a pigment that is essential for the structure, function and biogenesis of the major antenna complexes. The absence of this pigment may be a causative factor for the deficiency of light harvesting complexes. Finally, the accumulation of massive amounts of starch and triglycerides in nitrogen-limited cells indicate there are some genes whose maximal expression is dependent upon nitrogen-limiting conditions. 10 refs.

  15. LCE: leaf carbon exchange data set for tropical, temperate, and boreal species of North and Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas G; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2017-11-01

    Leaf canopy carbon exchange processes, such as photosynthesis and respiration, are substantial components of the global carbon cycle. Climate models base their simulations of photosynthesis and respiration on an empirical understanding of the underlying biochemical processes, and the responses of those processes to environmental drivers. As such, data spanning large spatial scales are needed to evaluate and parameterize these models. Here, we present data on four important biochemical parameters defining leaf carbon exchange processes from 626 individuals of 98 species at 12 North and Central American sites spanning ~53° of latitude. The four parameters are the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (V cmax ), the maximum rate of electron transport for the regeneration of Ribulose-1,5,-bisphosphate (J max ), the maximum rate of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase carboxylation (V pmax ), and leaf dark respiration (R d ). The raw net photosynthesis by intercellular CO 2 (A/C i ) data used to calculate V cmax , J max , and V pmax rates are also presented. Data were gathered on the same leaf of each individual (one leaf per individual), allowing for the examination of each parameter relative to others. Additionally, the data set contains a number of covariates for the plants measured. Covariate data include (1) leaf-level traits (leaf mass, leaf area, leaf nitrogen and carbon content, predawn leaf water potential), (2) plant-level traits (plant height for herbaceous individuals and diameter at breast height for trees), (3) soil moisture at the time of measurement, (4) air temperature from nearby weather stations for the day of measurement and each of the 90 d prior to measurement, and (5) climate data (growing season mean temperature, precipitation, photosynthetically active radiation, vapor pressure deficit, and aridity index). We hope that the data will be useful for obtaining greater understanding of the abiotic and biotic determinants of these important biochemical

  16. Structural determinants of the outer shell of β-carboxysomes in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942: roles for CcmK2, K3-K4, CcmO, and CcmL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Rae

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial CO(2-fixation is supported by a CO(2-concentrating mechanism which improves photosynthesis by saturating the primary carboxylating enzyme, ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, with its preferred substrate CO(2. The site of CO(2-concentration is a protein bound micro-compartment called the carboxysome which contains most, if not all, of the cellular RuBisCO. The shell of β-type carboxysomes is thought to be composed of two functional layers, with the inner layer involved in RuBisCO scaffolding and bicarbonate dehydration, and the outer layer in selective permeability to dissolved solutes. Here, four genes (ccmK2-4, ccmO, whose products were predicted to function in the outer shell layer of β-carboxysomes from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, were investigated by analysis of defined genetic mutants. Deletion of the ccmK2 and ccmO genes resulted in severe high-CO(2-requiring mutants with aberrant carboxysomes, whilst deletion of ccmK3 or ccmK4 resulted in cells with wild-type physiology and normal ultrastructure. However, a tandem deletion of ccmK3-4 resulted in cells with wild-type carboxysome structure, but physiologically deficient at low CO(2 conditions. These results revealed the minimum structural determinants of the outer shell of β-carboxysomes from this strain: CcmK2, CcmO and CcmL. An accessory set of proteins was required to refine the function of the pre-existing shell: CcmK3 and CcmK4. These data suggested a model for the facet structure of β-carboxysomes with CcmL forming the vertices, CcmK2 forming the bulk facet, and CcmO, a "zipper protein," interfacing the edges of carboxysome facets.

  17. Polyadenylated mRNA from the photosynthetic procaryote Rhodospirillum rubrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, P.K.; McFadden, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Total cellular RNA extracted from Rhodospirillum rubrum cultured in butyrate-containing medium under strict photosynthetic conditions to the stationary phase of growth has been fractionated on an oligodeoxy-thymidylic acid-cellulose column into polyadenylated [poly(A) + ] RNA and poly(A) - RNA fractions. The poly(A) + fraction was 9 to 10% of the total bulk RNA isolated. Analysis of the poly(A) + RNA on a denaturing urea-polyacrylamide gel revealed four sharp bands of RNA distributed in heterodisperse fashion between 16S and 9S. Similar fractionation of the poly(A) - RNA resulted in the separation of 23, 16, and 5S rRNAs and 4S tRNA. Poly(A) + fragments isolated after combined digestion with pancreatic A and T 1 RNases and analysis by denaturing gel electrophoresis demonstrated two major components of 80 and 100 residues. Alkaline hydrolysis of the nuclease-resistant, purified residues showed AMP-rich nucleotides. Through the use of snake venom phosphodiesterase, poly(A) tracts were placed at the 3' end of poly(A) + RNA. Stimulation of [ 3 H]leucine incorporation into hot trichloroacetic acid-precipitable polypeptides in a cell-free system from wheat germ primed by the poly(A) + RNA mixture was found to be 220-fold higher than that for poly(A) - RNAs (on a unit mass basis), a finding which demonstrated that poly(A) + RNAs in R. rubrum are mRNAs. Gel electrophoretic analysis of the translation mixture revealed numerous 3 H-labeled products including a major band (M/sub r/, 52,000). The parent protein was precipitated by antibodies to ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and comprised 6.5% of the total translation products

  18. Photosynthesis and Rubisco kinetics in spring wheat and meadow fescue under conditions of simulated climate change with elevated CO2 and increased temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. HAKALA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.cv.Polkkaand meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Hudson cv. Kalevicwere grown in ambient and elevated (700 µl l -1 carbon dioxide concentration both at present ambient temperatures and at temperatures 3°C higher than at present simulating a future climate.The CO2 concentrations were elevated in large (3 m in diameteropen top chambers and the temperatures in a greenhouse built over the experimental field.The photosynthetic rate of both wheat and meadow fescue was 31 –37%higher in elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2 than in ambient CO 2 (aCO2 throughout the growing season.The enhancement in wheat photosynthesis in eCO2 declined 10 –13 days before yellow ripeness,at which point the rate of photosynthesis in both CO 2 treatments declined.The stomatal conductance of wheat and meadow fescue was 23–36% lower in eCO2 than in aCO2 .The amount and activity of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco in wheat were lower under conditions of eCO2 ,except at elevated temperatures in 1993 when there was a clear yield increase.There was no clear change in the amount and activity of Rubisco in meadow fescue under eCO2 at either elevated or ambient temperature.This suggests that adaptation to elevated CO2 at biochemical level occurs only when there is insufficient sink for photosynthetic products.While the sink size of wheat can be increased only by introducing new,more productive genotypes,the sink size of meadow fescue can be regulated by fitting the cutting schedule to growth.;

  19. Novel Insights into the Influence of Seed Sarcotesta Photosynthesis on Accumulation of Seed Dry Matter and Oil Content in Torreya grandis cv. “Merrillii”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yongling; Yu, Weiwu; Hänninen, Heikki; Song, Lili; Du, Xuhua; Zhang, Rui; Wu, Jiasheng

    2018-01-01

    Seed oil content is an important trait of nut seeds, and it is affected by the import of carbon from photosynthetic sources. Although green leaves are the main photosynthetic organs, seed sarcotesta photosynthesis also supplies assimilates to seed development. Understanding the relationship between seed photosynthesis and seed development has theoretical and practical significance in the cultivation of Torreya grandis cv. “Merrillii.” To assess the role of seed sarcotesta photosynthesis on the seed development, anatomical and physiological traits of sarcotesta were measured during two growing seasons in the field. Compared with the attached current-year leaves, the sarcotesta had higher gross photosynthetic rate at the first stage of seed development. At the late second stage of seed development, sarcotesta showed down-regulation of PSII activity, as indicated by significant decrease in the following chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: the maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm), the PSII quantum yield (ΦPSII), and the photosynthetic quenching coefficient (qP). The ribulose 1, 5—bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco) activity, the total chlorophyll content (Chl(a+b)) and nitrogen content in the sarcotesta were also significantly decreased during that period. Treatment with DCMU [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea] preventing seed photosynthesis decreased the seed dry weight and the oil content by 25.4 and 25.5%, respectively. We conclude that seed photosynthesis plays an important role in the dry matter accumulation at the first growth stage. Our results also suggest that down-regulation of seed photosynthesis is a plant response to re-balance the source-sink ratio at the second growth stage. These results suggest that seed photosynthesis is important for biomass accumulation and oil synthesis of the Torreya seeds. The results will facilitate achieving higher yields and oil contents in nut trees by selection for higher seed photosynthesis cultivars. PMID:29375592

  20. Effect of food deprivation and hormones of glucose homeostasis on the acetyl CoA carboxylase activity in mouse brain: a potential role of acc in the regulation of energy balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Amrita

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the regulation of brain acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC activity during food deprivation and under the influence of hormones of glucose homeostasis: glucagon and insulin. Mice were deprived of food and water for time periods of 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 hours and were then allowed to re-feed for 5, 30 and 60 minutes. Mice that were deprived for up to 6 h, and then re-fed for 60 min, consumed the same amount of food compared to the ad libitum (control animals. However, after 9 h of deprivation, mice consumed only 50% of food present even after 1 h of re-feeding, compared to the controls. The ACC activity was measured in the whole mouse brain of controls and after 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 h of food deprivation. Brain extracts assayed from control mice expressed an ACC activity of 0.988 ± 0.158 fmol/min/mg tissue without citrate and 0.941 ± 0.175 fmol/min/mg tissue with citrate. After 1 h of food deprivation, the total ACC activity without citrate decreased to 0.575 ± 0.087 fmol/min/mg and in the presence of citrate, 0.703 ± 0.036 fmol/min/mg activity was measured. The citrate-dependent ACC activity decreased over time, with only 0.478 ± 0.117 fmol/min/mg of activity remaining after 24 h. Intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of insulin, glucagon and phosphate buffered saline (PBS were performed and whole brain ACC activity measured. After hormone administration, there were no significant differences in ACC activity in the presence of citrate. However, in the absence of citrate, there was a significant 20% decrease in ACC activity with glucagon (1.36 ± 0.09 fmol/min/mg and a 33% increase with insulin (2.49 ± 0.11 fmol/min/mg injections compared to PBS controls (1.67 ± 0.08 fmol/min/mg. Neuropeptide Y (NPY levels of corresponding brain extracts were measured by ELISA (OD using anti-NPY antibody and showed an 18% decrease upon insulin injection (0.093 ± 0.019 and a 50% increase upon glucagon injection (0.226 ± 0.084 as compared to

  1. Combined Inoculation with Multiple Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Improves Growth, Nutrient Uptake and Photosynthesis in Cucumber Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangchen Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal inoculation stimulates growth, photosynthesis and nutrient uptake in a wide range of host plants. However, the ultimate effects of arbuscular mycorrhyzal (AM symbiosis vary with the plants and fungal species involved in the association. Therefore, identification of the appropriate combinations of AM fungi (AMF that interact synergistically to improve their benefits is of high significance. Here, three AM fungal compositions namely VT (Claroideoglomus sp., Funneliformis sp., Diversispora sp., Glomus sp., and Rhizophagus sp. and BF (Glomus intraradices, G. microageregatum BEG and G. Claroideum BEG 210, and Funneliformis mosseae (Fm were investigated with respect to the growth, gas exchange parameters, enzymes activities in Calvin cycles and related gene expression in cucumber seedlings. The results showed that VT, BF and Fm could successfully colonize cucumber root to a different degree with the colonization rates 82.38, 74.65, and 70.32% at 46 days post inoculation, respectively. The plant height, stem diameter, dry weight, root to shoot ratio of cucumber seedlings inoculated with AMF increased significantly compared with the non-inoculated control. Moreover, AMF colonization greatly increased the root activity, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, light saturated rate of the CO2 assimilation (Asat, maximum carboxylation rate (Vcmax and maximum ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate (RuBP regeneration rate (Jmax, which were increased by 52.81, 30.75, 58.76, 47.00, 69.15, and 65.53% when inoculated with VT, respectively. The activities of some key enzymes such RuBP carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO, D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase, D-fructose-6-phosphatase (F6P and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase (Ru5PK, and related gene expression involved in the Calvin cycle including RCA, FBPase, FBPA, SBPase, rbcS and rbcL were upregulated by AMF colonization. AMF inoculation also improved macro- and micro nutrient contents such as N, P, K, S, Ca, Cu

  2. Genetics Home Reference: pyruvate carboxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Kansas Medical Center: Metabolic Conditions United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation GeneReviews (1 ... Sources for This Page Carbone MA, MacKay N, Ling M, Cole DE, Douglas C, Rigat B, Feigenbaum A, Clarke ...

  3. Influence of the nitrate concentration and source in the incorporation of 14{sub C}O2 by the RuBP-carboxylase from wheat (triticum aestivum) and maize (zea mays); Influencia de la concentracion y fuente de nitrogeno en la incorporacion de 14{sub C}O2 por la RuBp-carboxilasa de trigo (triticum aewtivum) y maiz (zea mays)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez Angulo, R M; Gines Diaz, M J; Garcia Pineda, M D

    1982-07-01

    The effect of the concentration and source of nitrogen in the culture media has been studied regarding its influence in the activity of the RuBP-carboxylase from wheat and maize during the first month of development. Wheat and maize has been chosen as plants representatives of two different types of CO{sub 2} assimilation: C3 and M- respectively. Plants have been grown in hydroponic media and under temperature, humidity and nutrient salts control. A negative effect of NH{sub 4} has been observed in the enzymatic activity of wheat seedlings, being this effect more remarkable as NH{sub 4} concentration increases and as long the time of treatment. In our experimental conditions the most favorable source of nitrogen has been N0{sub 3}NH{sub 4}. The specific activity of the enzyme from wheat is about four times higher than in maize, even it decreases with time. This decreasing has not been observed in maize, with the exception of total absence of nitrogen in the media. We have not seen significant differences between the two photo periods which have been tested. Also, no differences have been found in the enzyme activities at the different NO{sub 3}NH{sub 4} concentrations assayed, and it seems that RuBP-carboxylase metabolism is only affected in the case of absolute stress. (Author) 20 refs.

  4. Stem juice production of the C4 sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) is enhanced by growth at double-ambient CO2 and high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Joseph C V; Allen, Leon H

    2009-07-15

    Two cultivars of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum cv. CP73-1547 and CP88-1508) were grown for 3 months in paired-companion, temperature-gradient, sunlit greenhouses under daytime [CO2] of 360 (ambient) and 720 (double ambient) micromol mol(-1) and at temperatures of 1.5 degrees C (near ambient) and 6.0 degrees C higher than outside ambient temperature. Leaf area and biomass, stem biomass and juice and CO2 exchange rate (CER) and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) of fully developed leaves were measured at harvest. On a main stem basis, leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume were increased by growth at doubled [CO2] or high temperature. Such increases were even greater under combination of doubled [CO2]/high temperature. Plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination averaged 50%, 26%, 84% and 124% greater in leaf area, leaf dry weight, stem dry weight and stem juice volume, respectively, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. In addition, plants grown at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination were 2-3-fold higher in stem soluble solids than those at ambient [CO2]/near-ambient temperature combination. Although midday CER of fully developed leaves was not affected by doubled [CO2] or high temperature, plants grown at doubled [CO2] were 41-43% less in leaf stomatal conductance and 69-79% greater in leaf water-use efficiency, compared with plants grown at ambient [CO2]. Activity of PEPC was down-regulated 23-32% at doubled [CO2], while high temperature did not have a significant impact on this enzyme. Activity of Rubisco was not affected by growth at doubled [CO2], but was reduced 15-28% at high temperature. The increases in stem juice production and stem juice soluble solids concentration for sugarcane grown at doubled [CO2] or high temperature, or at doubled [CO2]/high temperature combination, were partially

  5. Photosynthesis in Flaveria brownii, a C(4)-Like Species: Leaf Anatomy, Characteristics of CO(2) Exchange, Compartmentation of Photosynthetic Enzymes, and Metabolism of CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S H; Moore, B D; Edwards, G E; Ku, M S

    1988-08-01

    Light microscopic examination of leaf cross-sections showed that Flaveria brownii A. M. Powell exhibits Kranz anatomy, in which distinct, chloroplast-containing bundle sheath cells are surrounded by two types of mesophyll cells. Smaller mesophyll cells containing many chloroplasts are arranged around the bundle sheath cells. Larger, spongy mesophyll cells, having fewer chloroplasts, are located between the smaller mesophyll cells and the epidermis. F. brownii has very low CO(2) compensation points at different O(2) levels, which is typical of C(4) plants, yet it does show about 4% inhibition of net photosynthesis by 21% O(2) at 30 degrees C. Protoplasts of the three photosynthetic leaf cell types were isolated according to relative differences in their buoyant densities. On a chlorophyll basis, the activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and pyruvate, Pi dikinase (carboxylation phase of C(4) pathway) were highest in the larger mesophyll protoplasts, intermediate in the smaller mesophyll protoplasts, and lowest, but still present, in the bundle sheath protoplasts. In contrast, activities of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, other C(3) cycle enzymes, and NADP-malic enzyme showed a reverse gradation, although there were significant activities of these enzymes in mesophyll cells. As indicated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the banding pattern of certain polypeptides of the total soluble proteins from the three cell types also supported the distribution pattern obtained by activity assays of these enzymes. Analysis of initial (14)C products in whole leaves and extrapolation of pulse-labeling curves to zero time indicated that about 80% of the CO(2) is fixed into C(4) acids (malate and aspartate), whereas about 20% of the CO(2) directly enters the C(3) cycle. This is consistent with the high activity of enzymes for CO(2) fixation by the C(4) pathway and the substantial activity of enzymes of the C(3) cycle in the mesophyll cells

  6. Abscisic acid as a factor in regulation of photosynthetic carbon metabolism of pea seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Faltynowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of abscisic acid (ABA on carbon metabolism and the activity of ribulosebisphosphate (RuBP and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP carboxylases in 8-day-old pea seedlings was investigated. It was endeavoured to correlate the changes observed in metabolic processes with the endogenous ABA level. In plants treated with ABA incorporation of labeled carbon into sucrose, glucose, fructose and sugar phosphates was depressed, while 14C incorporation into starch, ribulose and malic acid was enhanced. The activity of RuBP carboxylase was considerably lowered, whereas that of PEP carboxylase was slightly increased. It is considered that inhibition of photosynthesis due to the action of ABA is caused to a great extent by the obstruction of the C-3 pathway and reduced activity of RuBP carboxylase, whereas (β-carboxylation was not blocked.

  7. Effects of water stress on photosynthetic electron transport, photophosphorylation, and metabolite levels of Xanthium strumarium mesophyll cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, T D; Badger, M R

    1982-12-01

    Several component processes of photosynthesis were measured in osmotically stressed mesophyll cells of Xanthium strumarium L. The ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration capacity was reduced by water stress. Photophoshorylation was sensitive to water stress but photosynthetic electron transport was unaffected by water potentials down to-40 bar (-4 MPa). The concentrations of several intermediates of the photosynthetic carbon-reduction cycle remained relatively constant and did not indicate that ATP supply was limiting photosynthesis in the water-stressed cells.

  8. Nitrogen Addition Exacerbates the Negative Effects of Low Temperature Stress on Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Moss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Yang Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Global environmental changes are leading to an increase in localized abnormally low temperatures and increasing nitrogen (N deposition is a phenomenon recognized worldwide. Both low temperature stress (LTS and excess N induce oxidative stress in plants, and excess N also reduces their resistance to LTS. Mosses are primitive plants that are generally more sensitive to alterations in environmental factors than vascular species. To study the combined effects of N deposition and LTS on carbon (C and N metabolism in moss, two moss species, Pogonatum cirratum subsp. fuscatum, and Hypnum plumaeforme, exposed to various concentrations of nitrate (KNO3 or ammonium (NH4Cl, were treated with or without LTS. C/N metabolism indices were then monitored, both immediately after the stress and after a short recovery period (10 days. LTS decreased the photosystem II (PSII performance index and inhibited non-cyclic photophosphorylation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, and glutamine synthetase activities, indicating damage to PSII and reductions in C/N assimilation in these mosses. LTS did not affect cyclic photophosphorylation, sucrose synthase, sucrose-phosphate synthase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting a certain level of energy and C skeleton generation were maintained in the mosses to combat LTS; however, LTS inhibited the activity of glycolate oxidase. As predicted, N supply increased the sensitivity of the mosses to LTS, resulting in greater damage to PSII and a sharper decrease in C/N assimilation. After the recovery period, the performance of PSII and C/N metabolism, which were inhibited by LTS increased significantly, and were generally higher than those of control samples not exposed to LTS, suggesting overcompensation effects; however, N application reduced the extent of compensation effects. Both C and N metabolism exhibited stronger compensation effects in H. plumaeforme than in P. cirratum subsp. fuscatum. The

  9. Physiological and molecular alterations in plants exposed to high [CO2] under phosphorus stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Renu; Zinta, Gaurav; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Ahmad, Altaf; Jain, Vanita; Janssens, Ivan A

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric [CO2] has increased substantially in recent decades and will continue to do so, whereas the availability of phosphorus (P) is limited and unlikely to increase in the future. P is a non-renewable resource, and it is essential to every form of life. P is a key plant nutrient controlling the responsiveness of photosynthesis to [CO2]. Increases in [CO2] typically results in increased biomass through stimulation of net photosynthesis, and hence enhance the demand for P uptake. However, most soils contain low concentrations of available P. Therefore, low P is one of the major growth-limiting factors for plants in many agricultural and natural ecosystems. The adaptive responses of plants to [CO2] and P availability encompass alterations at morphological, physiological, biochemical and molecular levels. In general low P reduces growth, whereas high [CO2] enhances it particularly in C3 plants. Photosynthetic capacity is often enhanced under high [CO2] with sufficient P supply through modulation of enzyme activities involved in carbon fixation such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). However, high [CO2] with low P availability results in enhanced dry matter partitioning towards roots. Alterations in below-ground processes including root morphology, exudation and mycorrhizal association are influenced by [CO2] and P availability. Under high P availability, elevated [CO2] improves the uptake of P from soil. In contrast, under low P availability, high [CO2] mainly improves the efficiency with which plants produce biomass per unit P. At molecular level, the spatio-temporal regulation of genes involved in plant adaptation to low P and high [CO2] has been studied individually in various plant species. Genome-wide expression profiling of high [CO2] grown plants revealed hormonal regulation of biomass accumulation through complex transcriptional networks. Similarly, differential transcriptional regulatory networks are involved in P

  10. Abundance and Diversity of CO2-Assimilating Bacteria and Algae Within Red Agricultural Soils Are Modulated by Changing Management Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongzhao; Ge, Tida; Chen, Xiangbi; Liu, Shoulong; Zhu, Zhenke; Wu, Xiaohong; Wei, Wenxue; Whiteley, Andrew Steven; Wu, Jinshui

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the biodiversity of CO(2)-assimilating bacterial and algal communities in soils is important for obtaining a mechanistic view of terrestrial carbon sinks operating at global scales. "Red" acidic soils (Orthic Acrisols) cover large geographic areas and are subject to a range of management practices, which may alter the balance between carbon dioxide production and assimilation through changes in microbial CO(2)-assimilating populations. Here, we determined the abundance and diversity of CO(2)-assimilating bacteria and algae in acidic soils using quantitative PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the cbbL gene, which encodes the key CO(2) assimilation enzyme (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in the Calvin cycle. Within the framework of a long-term experiment (Taoyuan Agro-ecosystem, subtropical China), paddy rice fields were converted in 1995 to four alternative land management regimes: natural forest (NF), paddy rice (PR), maize crops (CL), and tea plantations (TP). In 2012 (17 years after land use transformation), we collected and analyzed the soils from fields under the original and converted land management regimes. Our results indicated that fields under the PR soil management system harbored the greatest abundance of cbbL copies (4.33 × 10(8) copies g(-1) soil). More than a decade after converting PR soils to natural, rotation, and perennial management systems, a decline in both the diversity and abundance of cbbL-harboring bacteria and algae was recorded. The lowest abundance of bacteria (0.98 × 10(8) copies g(-1) soil) and algae (0.23 × 10(6) copies g(-1) soil) was observed for TP soils. When converting PR soil management to alternative management systems (i.e., NF, CL, and TP), soil edaphic factors (soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content) were the major determinants of bacterial autotrophic cbbL gene diversity. In contrast, soil phosphorus concentration was the major regulator

  11. Genes and pathways for CO2 fixation in the obligate, chemolithoautotrophic acidophile, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Carbon fixation in A. ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esparza Mario

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is chemolithoautotrophic γ-proteobacterium that thrives at extremely low pH (pH 1-2. Although a substantial amount of information is available regarding CO2 uptake and fixation in a variety of facultative autotrophs, less is known about the processes in obligate autotrophs, especially those living in extremely acidic conditions, prompting the present study. Results Four gene clusters (termed cbb1-4 in the A. ferrooxidans genome are predicted to encode enzymes and structural proteins involved in carbon assimilation via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB cycle including form I of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO, EC 4.1.1.39 and the CO2-concentrating carboxysomes. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that each gene cluster is a single transcriptional unit and thus is an operon. Operon cbb1 is divergently transcribed from a gene, cbbR, encoding the LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR that has been shown in many organisms to regulate the expression of RubisCO genes. Sigma70-like -10 and -35 promoter boxes and potential CbbR-binding sites (T-N11-A/TNA-N7TNA were predicted in the upstream regions of the four operons. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs confirmed that purified CbbR is able to bind to the upstream regions of the cbb1, cbb2 and cbb3 operons, demonstrating that the predicted CbbR-binding sites are functional in vitro. However, CbbR failed to bind the upstream region of the cbb4 operon that contains cbbP, encoding phosphoribulokinase (EC 2.7.1.19. Thus, other factors not present in the assay may be required for binding or the region lacks a functional CbbR-binding site. The cbb3 operon contains genes predicted to encode anthranilate synthase components I and II, catalyzing the formation of anthranilate and pyruvate from chorismate. This suggests a novel regulatory connection between CO2 fixation and tryptophan biosynthesis. The presence of a form II Rubis

  12. Identification and characterization of a carboxysomal γ-carbonic anhydrase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Charlotte; Arefeen, Dewan; Tadesse, Yohannes; Long, Benedict M; Price, G Dean; Rowlett, Roger S; Kimber, Matthew S; Espie, George S

    2014-09-01

    Carboxysomes are proteinaceous microcompartments that encapsulate carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco); carboxysomes, therefore, catalyze reversible HCO3 (-) dehydration and the subsequent fixation of CO2. The N- and C-terminal domains of the β-carboxysome scaffold protein CcmM participate in a network of protein-protein interactions that are essential for carboxysome biogenesis, organization, and function. The N-terminal domain of CcmM in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 is also a catalytically active, redox regulated γ-CA. To experimentally determine if CcmM from a mesophilic cyanobacterium is active, we cloned, expressed and purified recombinant, full-length CcmM from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 as well as the N-terminal 209 amino acid γ-CA-like domain. Both recombinant proteins displayed ethoxyzolamide-sensitive CA activity in mass spectrometric assays, as did the carboxysome-enriched TP fraction. NstCcmM209 was characterized as a moderately active and efficient γ-CA with a k cat of 2.0 × 10(4) s(-1) and k cat/K m of 4.1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C and pH 8, a pH optimum between 8 and 9.5 and a temperature optimum spanning 25-35 °C. NstCcmM209 also catalyzed the hydrolysis of the CO2 analog carbonyl sulfide. Circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence analysis demonstrated that NstCcmM209 was progressively and irreversibly denatured above 50 °C. NstCcmM209 activity was inhibited by the reducing agent tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine, an effect that was fully reversed by a molar excess of diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, consistent with oxidative activation being a universal regulatory mechanism of CcmM orthologs. Immunogold electron microscopy and Western blot analysis of TP pellets indicated that Rubisco and CcmM co-localize and are concentrated in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 carboxysomes.

  13. Identification and Isolation of Protein Markers Associated with Somatic Embryogenesis in Oil Palm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin Chiew Foan; Nguyen Thi Thuy Van

    2012-01-01

    Oil palm is an important oil bearing crop with the highest oil yield per hectare per year.About 90% of the world palm oil produced is used as vegetable oil while the remaining 10% is for non-food products such as oleochemicals and cosmetics.The high world demand for vegetable oil and increasingly the conversion of vegetable oil into biofuel,has prompted the oil palm industries to seek for high oil yielding seedlings.As oil palm has only a single meristem and full inbred lines were absent,propagation of elite oil palm through cutting or grafting is not possible.Clonal propagation through tissue culture offers a potential means for mass production of elite oil palm.Many oil palm laboratories have clonal propagated elite oil palm propagules through somatic embryogenesis.This study deployed 2DE coupled with LC MS/MS mass spectrometry to isolate protein markers associated with the initial stage of somatic embryogenesis i.e.callus proliferation.The isolated markers can then be used in early selection to screen for calli with high proliferation rate.Since amenability of explant is strongly correlated with maturity of the explants,proteomic analysis was focussed on isolating proteins associated with leaf maturity.Subsequently,comparisons were made on leaf with the same stage of maturity but with different callus proliferation rates.Quantitative analysis showed that there were a total of 67,77 and 4 protein spots to be present only in the young,medium and old leaves,respectively.While low and high proliferation leaves containing about the same amount of proteins,i.e.660 and 694 protein spots respectively.Interestingly,proteins with molecular weight of less than 25 kDa or had pl value lower than 5 were abundant only in leaves with high proliferation rate.Three spots with significant difference in expression by 2-fold among different growth stages were identified as protein subunits of ATP synthase (ATPE_LIRTU),Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (RBL_AMOTI) and a putative

  14. One crop breeding cycle from starvation? How engineering crop photosynthesis for rising CO2 and temperature could be one important route to alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromdijk, Johannes; Long, Stephen P

    2016-03-16

    Global climate change is likely to severely impact human food production. This comes at a time when predicted demand for primary foodstuffs by a growing human population and changing global diets is already outpacing a stagnating annual rate of increase in crop productivity. Additionally, the time required by crop breeding and bioengineering to release improved varieties to farmers is substantial, meaning that any crop improvements needed to mitigate food shortages in the 2040s would need to start now. In this perspective, the rationale for improvements in photosynthetic efficiency as a breeding objective for higher yields is outlined. Subsequently, using simple simulation models it is shown how predicted changes in temperature and atmospheric [CO2] affect leaf photosynthetic rates. The chloroplast accounts for the majority of leaf nitrogen in crops. Within the chloroplast about 25% of nitrogen is invested in the carboxylase, Rubisco, which catalyses the first step of CO2 assimilation. Most of the remaining nitrogen is invested in the apparatus to drive carbohydrate synthesis and regenerate ribulose-1:5-bisphosphate (RuBP), the CO2-acceptor molecule at Rubisco. At preindustrial [CO2], investment in these two aspects may have been balanced resulting in co-limitation. At today's [CO2], there appears to be over-investment in Rubisco, and despite the counter-active effects of rising temperature and [CO2], this imbalance is predicted to worsen with global climate change. By breeding or engineering restored optimality under future conditions increased productivity could be achieved in both tropical and temperate environments without additional nitrogen fertilizer. Given the magnitude of the potential shortfall, better storage conditions, improved crop management and better crop varieties will all be needed. With the short time-scale at which food demand is expected to outpace supplies, all available technologies to improve crop varieties, from classical crop breeding to

  15. Role of the Rubisco Small Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreitzer, Robert Joseph [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of CO2 fixation in photosynthesis. However, it is a slow enzyme, and O2 competes with CO2 at the active site. Oxygenation initiates the photorespiratory pathway, which also results in the loss of CO2. If carboxylation could be increased or oxygenation decreased, an increase in net CO2 fixation would be realized. Because Rubisco provides the primary means by which carbon enters all life on earth, there is much interest in engineering Rubisco to increase the production of food and renewable energy. Rubisco is located in the chloroplasts of plants, and it is comprised of two subunits. Much is known about the chloroplast-gene-encoded large subunit (rbcL gene), which contains the active site, but much less is known about the role of the nuclear-gene-encoded small subunit in Rubisco function (rbcS gene). Both subunits are coded by multiple genes in plants, which makes genetic engineering difficult. In the eukaryotic, green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it has been possible to eliminate all the Rubisco genes. These Rubisco-less mutants can be maintained by providing acetate as an alternative carbon source. In this project, focus has been placed on determining whether the small subunit might be a better genetic-engineering target for improving Rubisco. Analysis of a variable-loop structure (βA-βB loop) of the small subunit by genetic selection, directed mutagenesis, and construction of chimeras has shown that the small subunit can influence CO2/O2 specificity. X-ray crystal structures of engineered chimeric-loop enzymes have indicated that additional residues and regions of the small subunit may also contribute to Rubisco function. Structural dynamics of the small-subunit carboxyl terminus was also investigated. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the most-conserved small-subunit residues has identified a

  16. Variations in the stable carbon isotope compositions of individual lipids from the leaves of modern angiosperms: implications for the study of higher land plant-derived sedimentary organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockheart, M.J.; Bergen, P.F. van; Evershed, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    Seasonal changes in δ 13 C values for individual lipids from the leaves of several species of tree have been studied in order to provide essential background information for use in future investigations of the isotopic signatures of terrigenous sedimentary organic matter. The n-alkanes of Betula ermanii, Quercus castaneifolia and Fagus japonica revealed increased δ 13 C in autumn leaves compared with leaves sampled at the start of the growing season. Samples taken from Q. castaneifolia and F. sylvatica at monthly intervals showed gradual depletion of 13 C in bulk tissues and n-alkanes through the growing season. This may be a consequence of either recycling of depleted internal carbon in order to replace weathered waxes, or increased fractionation against 13 C by the enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase in response to increasing summer temperatures. Sitosterol exhibited similar isotopic trends as the n-alkanes in F. sylvatica, but showed the opposite behaviour in Q. castaneifolia. The effect of sunlight intensity on δ 13 C was investigated in foliage sampled at different compass positions around two trees, Q. robur and F. sylvatica. Bulk tissue and lipids from inner shade leaves were consistently more depleted in 13 C than those from the corresponding sun leaf. The leaves receiving the highest sunlight irradiance on average, i.e. southern foliage, exhibited the lowest δ 13 C in lipids and bulk tissues. The variability of δ 13 C values with irradiance level may be due to changes in photosynthetic assimilation rates and the adaptation of the leaf epidermis and stomata in response to its light environment. Lipids and bulk tissues from leaves of Quercus species were found to possess slightly more depleted δ 13 C values than those in Fagus species, although interspecies variability was quite large. This study has important implications for the study of terrestrially derived organic matter preserved in ancient sediments. The results demonstrate the

  17. Functional proteomic analysis of Ankaferd® Blood Stopper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Özel Demiralp

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ankaferd® Blood Stopper (ABS comprises a standardized mixture of the plants Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum, and Urtica dioica. The basic mechanism of action for ABS is the formation of an encapsulated protein network that provides focal points for vital erythrocyte aggregation. ABS–induced protein network formation with blood cells, particularly erythrocytes, covers the primary and secondary hemostatic system without disturbing individual coagulation factors. Materials and Methods: To understand the effect mechanisms of ABS on hemostasis, a proteomic analysis using 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometer was performed. Results: Proteins of plant origin in Ankaferd® were NADP-dependent-malic enzyme, ribulose bisphosphate-carboxylase-large chain, maturase K, ATP synthase subunit-beta, ATP synthase subunit-alpha, chalcone-flavanone isomerase-1, chalcone-flavanone isomerase-2, and actin-depolymerizing factor. Furthermore, functional proteomic studies revealed that proteins resembling human peptides have been detected within Ankaferd®, including ATP synthase, mucin-16 (CD164 sialomucin-like 2 protein, coiled-coil domain containing 141 hypothetical protein LOC283638 isoform 1, hypothetical protein LOC283638 isoform 2, dynactin 5, complex I intermediate-associated protein 30, mitochondrial, NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone 1 alpha subcomplex, TP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial actin binding 1 isoform, LIM domain and actin binding 1 isoform a, LIM domain and actin binding 1 isoform b, spectrin alpha non erythrocytic 1, prolactin releasing hormone receptor, utrophin, tet oncogene family member 2 isoform b, protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, NIMA (never in mitosis gene a-related kinase, ATP-binding cassette protein C12, Homo sapiens malic enzyme 1, mitochondrial NADP(+-dependent malic enzyme 3, ME2 protein, nuclear factor 1 B-type, abhydrolase domain-containing protein 12B, E

  18. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  19. Mechanisms of carbon dioxide acquisition and CO2 sensing in marine diatoms: a gateway to carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Hopkinson, Brian M; Nakajima, Kensuke; Dupont, Christopher L; Tsuji, Yoshinori

    2017-09-05

    Diatoms are one of the most successful marine eukaryotic algal groups, responsible for up to 20% of the annual global CO 2 fixation. The evolution of a CO 2 -concentrating mechanism (CCM) allowed diatoms to overcome a number of serious constraints on photosynthesis in the marine environment, particularly low [CO 2 ] aq in seawater relative to concentrations required by the CO 2 fixing enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), which is partly due to the slow diffusion rate of CO 2 in water and a limited CO 2 formation rate from [Formula: see text] in seawater. Diatoms use two alternative strategies to take up dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from the environment: one primarily relies on the direct uptake of [Formula: see text] through plasma-membrane type solute carrier (SLC) 4 family [Formula: see text] transporters and the other is more reliant on passive diffusion of CO 2 formed by an external carbonic anhydrase (CA). Bicarbonate taken up into the cytoplasm is most likely then actively transported into the chloroplast stroma by SLC4-type transporters on the chloroplast membrane system. Bicarbonate in the stroma is converted into CO 2 only in close proximity to RubisCO preventing unnecessary CO 2 leakage. CAs play significant roles in mobilizing DIC as it is progressively moved towards the site of fixation. However, the evolutionary types and subcellular locations of CAs are not conserved between different diatoms, strongly suggesting that this DIC mobilization strategy likely evolved multiple times with different origins. By contrast, the recent discovery of the thylakoid luminal θ-CA indicates that the strategy to supply CO 2 to RubisCO in the pyrenoid may be very similar to that of green algae, and strongly suggests convergent coevolution in CCM function of the thylakoid lumen not only among diatoms but among eukaryotic algae in general. In this review, both experimental and corresponding theoretical models of the diatom CCMs are

  20. Consequences of C4 differentiation for chloroplast membrane proteomes in maize mesophyll and bundle sheath cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeran, Wojciech; Zybailov, Boris; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Dunsmore, Jason; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2008-09-01

    Chloroplasts of maize leaves differentiate into specific bundle sheath (BS) and mesophyll (M) types to accommodate C(4) photosynthesis. Chloroplasts contain thylakoid and envelope membranes that contain the photosynthetic machineries and transporters but also proteins involved in e.g. protein homeostasis. These chloroplast membranes must be specialized within each cell type to accommodate C(4) photosynthesis and regulate metabolic fluxes and activities. This quantitative study determined the differentiated state of BS and M chloroplast thylakoid and envelope membrane proteomes and their oligomeric states using innovative gel-based and mass spectrometry-based protein quantifications. This included native gels, iTRAQ, and label-free quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap. Subunits of Photosystems I and II, the cytochrome b(6)f, and ATP synthase complexes showed average BS/M accumulation ratios of 1.6, 0.45, 1.0, and 1.33, respectively, whereas ratios for the light-harvesting complex I and II families were 1.72 and 0.68, respectively. A 1000-kDa BS-specific NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex with associated proteins of unknown function containing more than 15 proteins was observed; we speculate that this novel complex possibly functions in inorganic carbon concentration when carboxylation rates by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase are lower than decarboxylation rates by malic enzyme. Differential accumulation of thylakoid proteases (Egy and DegP), state transition kinases (STN7,8), and Photosystem I and II assembly factors was observed, suggesting that cell-specific photosynthetic electron transport depends on post-translational regulatory mechanisms. BS/M ratios for inner envelope transporters phosphoenolpyruvate/P(i) translocator, Dit1, Dit2, and Mex1 were determined and reflect metabolic fluxes in carbon metabolism. A wide variety of hundreds of other proteins showed differential BS/M accumulation. Mass spectral information and functional annotations are

  1. Lack of Detection of Bt Sugarcane Cry1Ab and NptII DNA and Proteins in Sugarcane Processing Products Including Raw Sugar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cheavegatti-Gianotto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the largest sugarcane producer and the main sugar exporter in the world. The industrial processes applied by Brazilian mills are very efficient in producing highly purified sugar and ethanol. Literature presents evidence of lack of DNA/protein in these products, regardless of the nature of sugarcane used as raw material. Recently CTNBio, the Brazilian biosafety authority, has approved the first biotechnology-derived sugarcane variety for cultivation, event CTC175-A, which expresses the Cry1Ab protein to control the sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis. The event also expresses neomycin-phosphotransferase type II (NptII protein used as selectable marker during the transformation process. Because of the high purity of sugar and ethanol produced from genetically modified sugarcane, these end-products should potentially be classified as “pure substances, chemically defined,” by Brazilian Biosafety Law No. 11.105. If this classification is to be adopted, these substances are not considered as “GMO derivatives” and fall out of the scope of Law No. 11.105. In order to assess sugar composition and quality, we evaluate Cry1Ab and NptII expression in several sugarcane tissues and in several fractions from laboratory-scale processing of event CTC175-A for the presence of these heterologous proteins as well as for the presence of traces of recombinant DNA. The results of these studies show that CTC175-A presents high expression of Cry1Ab in leaves and barely detectable expression of heterologous proteins in stalks. We also evaluated the presence of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein and DNA in the fractions of the industrial processing of conventional Brazilian sugarcane cultivars. Results from both laboratory and industrial processing were concordant, demonstrating that DNA and protein are not detected in the clarified juice and downstream processed fractions, including ethanol and raw sugar, indicating that protein

  2. Very low dose gamma irradiation stimulates gaseous exchange and carboxylation efficiency, but inhibits vascular sap flow in groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Sumedha; Singh, Bhupinder; Gupta, Vijay Kumar; Singhal, R K; Venu Babu, P

    2014-02-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of low dose gamma radiation on germination, plant growth, nitrogen and carbon fixation and carbon flow and release characteristics of groundnut. Dry seeds of groundnut variety Trombay groundnut 37A (TG 37A), a radio mutant type developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India, were subjected to the pre-sowing treatment of gamma radiation within low to high dose physiological range, i.e., 0.0, 0.0082, 0.0164. 0.0328, 0.0656, 0.1312, 5, 25, 100, 500 Gray (Gy) from a cobalt source ((60)Co). Observations were recorded for the radiation effect on percentage germination, vigour, gas exchange attributes such as photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, chlorophyll content, root exudation in terms of (14)C release, vascular sap flow rate and activities of rate defining carbon and nitrogen assimilating enzymes such as ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) and nitrate reductase (NR). Seed germination was increased by 10-25% at the lower doses up to 5 Gy while the improvement in plant vigour in the same dose range was much higher (22-84%) than the unirradiated control. For radiation exposure above 5 Gy, a dose-dependent decline in germination and plant vigour was measured. No significant effect was observed on the photosynthesis at radiation exposure below 5 Gy but above 5 Gy dose there was a decline in the photosynthetic rate. Stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, however, were only inhibited at a high dose of 500 Gy. Leaf rubisco activity and NR activities remained unaffected at all the investigated doses of gamma irradiation. Mean root exudation and sap flow rate of the irradiated plants, irrespective of the dose, was reduced over the unirradiated control more so in a dose-dependent manner. Results indicated that a very low dose of gamma radiation, in centigray to gray range, did not pose any threat and in fact stimulated metabolic functions in such a way to aid

  3. Assessing the Likelihood of Gene Flow From Sugarcane (Saccharum Hybrids to Wild Relatives in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy J. Snyman

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-commercialization studies on environmental biosafety of genetically modified (GM crops are necessary to evaluate the potential for sexual hybridization with related plant species that occur in the release area. The aim of the study was a preliminary assessment of factors that may contribute to gene flow from sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids to indigenous relatives in the sugarcane production regions of Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal provinces, South Africa. In the first instance, an assessment of Saccharum wild relatives was conducted based on existing phylogenies and literature surveys. The prevalence, spatial overlap, proximity, distribution potential, and flowering times of wild relatives in sugarcane production regions based on the above, and on herbaria records and field surveys were conducted for Imperata, Sorghum, Cleistachne, and Miscanthidium species. Eleven species were selected for spatial analyses based on their presence within the sugarcane cultivation region: four species in the Saccharinae and seven in the Sorghinae. Secondly, fragments of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions of the 5.8s ribosomal gene and two chloroplast genes, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL, and maturase K (matK were sequenced or assembled from short read data to confirm relatedness between Saccharum hybrids and its wild relatives. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS cassette showed that the closest wild relative species to commercial sugarcane were Miscanthidium capense, Miscanthidium junceum, and Narenga porphyrocoma. Sorghum was found to be more distantly related to Saccharum than previously described. Based on the phylogeny described in our study, the only species to highlight in terms of evolutionary divergence times from Saccharum are those within the genus Miscanthidium, most especially M. capense, and M. junceum which are only 3 million years divergent from Saccharum. Field assessment of pollen viability of 13 commercial sugarcane

  4. Assessing the Likelihood of Gene Flow From Sugarcane (Saccharum Hybrids) to Wild Relatives in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, Sandy J.; Komape, Dennis M.; Khanyi, Hlobisile; van den Berg, Johnnie; Cilliers, Dirk; Lloyd Evans, Dyfed; Barnard, Sandra; Siebert, Stefan J.

    2018-01-01

    Pre-commercialization studies on environmental biosafety of genetically modified (GM) crops are necessary to evaluate the potential for sexual hybridization with related plant species that occur in the release area. The aim of the study was a preliminary assessment of factors that may contribute to gene flow from sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids) to indigenous relatives in the sugarcane production regions of Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal provinces, South Africa. In the first instance, an assessment of Saccharum wild relatives was conducted based on existing phylogenies and literature surveys. The prevalence, spatial overlap, proximity, distribution potential, and flowering times of wild relatives in sugarcane production regions based on the above, and on herbaria records and field surveys were conducted for Imperata, Sorghum, Cleistachne, and Miscanthidium species. Eleven species were selected for spatial analyses based on their presence within the sugarcane cultivation region: four species in the Saccharinae and seven in the Sorghinae. Secondly, fragments of the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the 5.8s ribosomal gene and two chloroplast genes, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL), and maturase K (matK) were sequenced or assembled from short read data to confirm relatedness between Saccharum hybrids and its wild relatives. Phylogenetic analyses of the ITS cassette showed that the closest wild relative species to commercial sugarcane were Miscanthidium capense, Miscanthidium junceum, and Narenga porphyrocoma. Sorghum was found to be more distantly related to Saccharum than previously described. Based on the phylogeny described in our study, the only species to highlight in terms of evolutionary divergence times from Saccharum are those within the genus Miscanthidium, most especially M. capense, and M. junceum which are only 3 million years divergent from Saccharum. Field assessment of pollen viability of 13 commercial sugarcane cultivars using

  5. Construction of a self-cloning system in the unicellular green alga Pseudochoricystis ellipsoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Yuki; Oshima, Kohei; Ikeda, Fukiko; Abe, Jun; Yoshimitsu, Yuya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae have received considerable interest as a source of biofuel production. The unicellular green alga Pseudochoricystis ellipsoidea (non-validated scientific name) strain Obi appears to be suitable for large-scale cultivation in outdoor open ponds for biodiesel production because it accumulates lipids to more than 30 % of dry cell weight under nitrogen-depleted conditions. It also grows rapidly under acidic conditions at which most protozoan grazers of microalgae may not be tolerant. The lipid productivity of this alga could be improved using genetic engineering techniques; however, genetically modified organisms are the subject of regulation by specific laws. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a self-cloning-based positive selection system for the breeding of P. ellipsoidea. In this study, uracil auxotrophic mutants were isolated after the mutagenesis of P. ellipsoidea using either ultraviolet light or a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system. The cDNA of the uridine monophosphate synthase gene (PeUMPS) of P. ellipsoidea was cloned downstream of the promoter of either a beta-tubulin gene (PeTUBULIN1) or the gene for the small subunit of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (PeRBCS) to construct the pUT1 or pUT2 plasmid, respectively. These constructs were introduced into uracil auxotroph strains, and genetically complementary transformants were isolated successfully on minimal agar plates. Use of Noble agar as the solidifying agent was essential to avoid the development of false-positive colonies. It took more than 6 weeks for the formation of colonies of pUT1 transformants, whereas pUT2 transformants formed colonies in 2 weeks. Real-time PCR revealed that there were more PeUMPS transcripts in pUT2 transformants than in pUT1 transformants. Uracil synthesis (Ura(+)) transformants were also obtained using a gene cassette consisting solely of PeUMPS flanked by the PeRBCS promoter and terminator. A self

  6. Up-regulation of sucrose metabolizing enzymes in Oncidium goldiana grown under elevated carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Run Li; Sun, W.Q.; Choy Sin Hew [National Univ. of Singapore. dept. of Biological Sciences (Singapore)

    2001-07-01

    Experiments were conducted in controlled growth chambers to evaluate how increase in CO{sub 2} concentration affected sucrose metabolizing enzymes, especially sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and sucrose synthase (SS; EC 2.4.1.13), as well as carbon metabolism and partitioning in a tropical epiphytic orchid species (Oncidium goldiana). Response of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco; EC 4.1.1.39) to elevated CO{sub 2} was determined along with dry mass production, photosynthesis rate, chlorophyll content, total nitrogen and total soluble protein content. After 60 days of growth, there was a 80% and 150% increase in dry mass production in plants grown at 750 and 1100 {mu} l{sup -}1 CO{sub 2}, respectively, compared with those grown at ambient CO{sub 2} (about 370 {mu} l{sup -}1). A similar increase in photosynthesis rate was detected throughout the growth period when measured under growth CO{sub 2} conditions. Concomitantly, there was a decline in leaf Rubisco activity in plants in elevated CO{sub 2} after 10 days of growth. Over the growth period, leaf SPS and SS activities were up-regulated by an average of 20% and 40% for plants grown at 750 and 1100 {mu} l{sup -}1 CO{sub 2}, respectively. Leaf sucrose content and starch content were significantly higher throughout the growth period in plants grown at elevated CO{sub 2} than those at ambient CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of photosynthetically fixed carbon between sucrose and starch appeared to be unaffected by the 750 {mu} l{sup -}1 CO{sub 2} treatment, but it was favored into starch under the 1100 {mu} l{sup -}1 CO{sub 2} condition. The activities of SPS and SS in leaf extracts were closely associated with photosynthetic rates and with partitioning of carbon between starch and sucrose in leaves. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the up-regulation of leaf SPS and SS might be an acclimation response to optimize the utilization and export of organic carbon with the

  7. Phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate regulates intercellular coupling in cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Banach, Kathrin; Mollerup, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    that agonist-induced changes in PIP(2) can result in a reduction of the functional coupling of cardiomyocytes and, consequently, in changes in conduction velocity. Intercellular coupling was measured by Lucifer Yellow dye transfer in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Conduction velocity was measured...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PubMed Baumgartner MR, Almashanu S, Suormala T, Obie C, Cole RN, Packman S, Baumgartner ER, Valle D. The molecular ... medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Lyme disease Fibromyalgia White-Sutton syndrome All New & Updated Pages ...

  9. [Effect of DNA-damaging agents on the aerobic methylobacteria capable and incapable of utilizing dichloromethane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsova, Iu E; Torgonskaia, M L; Doronina, N V; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2005-01-01

    Methylobacterium dichloromethanicum DM4, a degrader of dichloromethane (DCM), was more tolerant to the effect of H2O2 and UV irradiation than Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, which does not consume DCM. Addition of CH2Cl2 to methylobacteria with active serine, ribulose monophosphate, and ribulose bisphosphate pathways of C1 metabolism, grown on methanol, resulted in a 1.1- to 2.5-fold increase in the incorporation of [alpha-32P]dATP into DNA Klenow fragment (exo-). As DCM dehalogenase was not induced in this process, the increase in total lengths of DNA gaps resulted from the action of DCM rather than S-chloromethylglutathione (intermediate of primary dehalogenation). The degree of DNA damage in the presence of CH2Cl2 was lower in DCM degraders than methylobacteria incapable of degrading this pollutant. This suggests that DCM degraders possess a more efficient mechanism of DNA repair.

  10. Enzymatic regulation of photosynthetic and light-independent carbon fixation in Laminaria setchellii (Phaeophyta, Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta and Iridaea cordata (Rhodophyta Regulación enzimática de la fotosíntesis y la fijación de carbono en obscuridad por Laminaria setchellii (Phaeophyta, Ulva lactuca (Chlorophyta e Iridaea cordata (Rhodophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEJANDRO CABELLO-PASINI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon is acquired through photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic processes in marine algae. However, little is known about the biochemical regulation of these metabolic pathways along the thallus of seaweeds. Consequently, the objective of this study was to assess the distribution of in vivo carboxylation pathways and to relate them to the in vitro activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC in the Phaeophyte Laminaria setchellii, the Chlorophyte Ulva lactuca, and the Rhodophyte Iridaea cordata. Chlorophyll-a levels did not vary in U. lactuca and I. cordata. However, pigment levels were significantly lower in the meristematic region of L. setchellii probably as a result of a lack of differentiation of the chloroplasts in this region. Similarly, net photosynthesis did not vary in the thallus of U. lactuca and I. cordata, while it increased from the stipe and meristem towards the lamina of L. setchellii. In contrast to photosynthesis, light-independent carbon fixation rates were significantly greater in the meristematic region of L. setchellii suggesting a compensating mechanism for carbon incorporation in photosynthetically limited tissue. The activity of RUBISCO and PEPCK followed a pattern similar to that of in vivo carboxylation processes indicating that in vivo carbon assimilation is regulated by the activity of the carboxylating enzymes throughout the thallus of L. setchelliiLa incorporación de carbono en algas marinas se lleva a cabo mediante procesos fotosintéticos y no-fotosintéticos. Sin embargo, poco se sabe sobre la regulación bioquímica de estas rutas metabólicas en el tejido de algas marinas. En consecuencia, el objetivo de este estudio fue el de evaluar la distribución de la carboxilación in vivo y relacionarlas a la actividad in vitro de ribulosa 1,5-bisfosfato carboxilasa/oxigenasa (RUBISCO, fosfoenolpiruvato

  11. Analysis of methylated patterns and quality-related genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Junna; Jia, Yanlong; Lv, Zhuangwei; Sun, Chuanfei; Gao, Lijie; Yan, Xiaoxiao; Cui, Liusu; Tang, Zongxiang; Yan, Benju

    2014-08-01

    Methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism was used in this study to investigate epigenetic information of four tobacco cultivars: Yunyan 85, NC89, K326, and Yunyan 87. The DNA fragments with methylated information were cloned by reamplified PCR and sequenced. The results of Blast alignments showed that the genes with methylation information included chitinase, nitrate reductase, chloroplast DNA, mitochondrial DNA, ornithine decarboxylase, ribulose carboxylase, and promoter sequences. Homologous comparison in three cloned gene sequences (nitrate reductase, ornithine decarboxylase, and ribulose decarboxylase) indicated that geographic factors had significant influence on the whole genome methylation. Introns also contained different information in different tobacco cultivars. These findings suggest that synthetic mechanisms for tobacco aromatic components could be affected by different environmental factors leading to variation of noncoding regions in the genome, which finally results in different fragrance and taste in different tobacco cultivars.

  12. Evolution of RLSB, a nuclear-encoded S1 domain RNA binding protein associated with post-transcriptional regulation of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Stata, Matt; Siford, Rebecca; Sage, Tammy L; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Albert, Victor A; Berry, James O

    2016-06-29

    RLSB, an S-1 domain RNA binding protein of Arabidopsis, selectively binds rbcL mRNA and co-localizes with Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) within chloroplasts of C3 and C4 plants. Previous studies using both Arabidopsis (C3) and maize (C4) suggest RLSB homologs are post-transcriptional regulators of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA. While RLSB accumulates in all Arabidopsis leaf chlorenchyma cells, in C4 leaves RLSB-like proteins accumulate only within Rubisco-containing bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type species, and only within central compartment chloroplasts in the single cell C4 plant Bienertia. Our recent evidence implicates this mRNA binding protein as a primary determinant of rbcL expression, cellular localization/compartmentalization, and photosynthetic function in all multicellular green plants. This study addresses the hypothesis that RLSB is a highly conserved Rubisco regulatory factor that occurs in the chloroplasts all higher plants. Phylogenetic analysis has identified RLSB orthologs and paralogs in all major plant groups, from ancient liverworts to recent angiosperms. RLSB homologs were also identified in algae of the division Charophyta, a lineage closely related to land plants. RLSB-like sequences were not identified in any other algae, suggesting that it may be specific to the evolutionary line leading to land plants. The RLSB family occurs in single copy across most angiosperms, although a few species with two copies were identified, seemingly randomly distributed throughout the various taxa, although perhaps correlating in some cases with known ancient whole genome duplications. Monocots of the order Poales (Poaceae and Cyperaceae) were found to contain two copies, designated here as RLSB-a and RLSB-b, with only RLSB-a implicated in the regulation of rbcL across the maize developmental gradient. Analysis of microsynteny in angiosperms revealed high levels of conservation across eudicot species and for both paralogs in

  13. Targeting Autotrophic and Lithotrophic Microorganisms from Fumarolic Ice Caves of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitori, R.; Davis, R.; Connell, L.; Kelley, M.; Staudigel, H.; Tebo, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic volcanic oligotrophic environments can host microorganisms that obtain their energy from reduced inorganic chemicals present in volcanic rocks and soils. We sampled basaltic rock from terrestrial Dark Oligotrophic Volcanic Ecosystems (DOVEs) located in two fumarole ice caves, Warren and Warren West, located near the summit of Mt. Erebus, Antarctica. For reference, we sampled a similar cave, Harry's Dream, which receives continuous light during the Austral summer. We report here culturing data for bacterial and eukaryotic microbes from rocky soils in these caves when targeting lithotrophic organisms using media containing reduced inorganic compounds (Mn2+, Fe2+, NH4+). In addition, to test for the possible presence of inorganic carbon fixation, we screened samples for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) gene. Culturing of soil samples on media targeting both autotrophs and heterotrophs yielded a diverse collection of generally slow-growing colonies of bacteria (majority), fungi and non-fungal eukaryotes. Manganese(II)-oxidizing colonies were identified in Warren and Harry's Dream, and these exhibited two colony morphotypes upon subculturing. Sequencing of the PCR amplified 16S rRNA gene identified a bacterium distantly related to Pseudonocardia sp., a genus with known manganese oxidizers. Other bacteria enriched included members of the Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. There was a low diversity in cultured eukaryotes representing several potential undescribed species (Geomyces sp., Penicillium sp.) and isolates that may represent alternate, previously undescribed habitats and forms (Psilolechia leprosa, Alternaria alternata). One Warren isolate was a 99% 16S rRNA match to the N2 fixer Bradyrhizobium sp.; when inoculated into liquid medium specific for N2 fixers, growth was maintained upon subculture. Putative iron oxidizers were also enriched from the two DOVE caves, using slush agar iron

  14. Calcium Directly Regulates Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Headgroup Conformation and Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilkova, E.; Pleskot, Roman; Rissanen, S.; Sun, S.; Czogalla, A.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Róg, T.; Vattulainen, I.; Cremer, P. S.; Jungwirth, P.; Coskun, U.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 11 (2017), s. 4019-4024 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19073S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : membrane * calcium ions * PIP2 * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  15. Calcium Directly Regulates Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Headgroup Conformation and Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bilkova, E.; Pleskot, Roman; Rissanen, S.; Sun, S.; Czogalla, A.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Róg, T.; Vattulainen, I.; Cremer, P. S.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Coskun, U.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 11 (2017), s. 4019-4024 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-01074S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : membrane * calcium ions * PIP2 * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/jacs.6b11760

  16. Our FABulous VACation: a decade of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Stephen K; Johnson, Zoë E

    2007-01-01

    PtdIns(3,5)P2 was discovered about a decade ago and much of the machinery that makes, degrades and senses it has been uncovered. Despite this, we still lack a complete understanding of how the pieces fit together but some patterns are beginning to emerge. Molecular functions for PtdIns(3,5)P2 are also elusive, but the identification of effectors offers a way into some of these processes. An examination of the defects associated with loss of synthesis of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in lower and higher eukaryotes begins to suggest a unifying theme; this lipid regulates membrane retrieval via retrograde trafficking from distal compartments to organelles that are more proximal in the endocytic/lysosomal system. Another unifying theme is stress signalling to organelles, possibly both to change their morphology in response to external insults and to maintain the lumenal pH or membrane potential of organelles. The next few years seem likely to uncover details of the molecular mechanisms underlying the biology of this fascinating lipid. This review also highlights some areas where further research is needed.

  17. Involvement of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in RNA polymerase I transcription

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yildirim, Sukriye; Castano, Enrique; Sobol, Margaryta; Philimonenko, Vlada; Dzijak, Rastislav; Venit, Tomáš; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 12 (2013), s. 2730-2739 ISSN 0021-9533 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084; GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Grant - others:CONACYT(MX) 176598 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nucleolus * transcription * PIP2 * UBF * fibrillarin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.325, year: 2013

  18. Regulation of connexin43 gap junctional communication by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeijl, Leonie; Ponsioen, Bas; Giepmans, Ben N G; Ariaens, Aafke; Postma, Friso R; Várnai, Péter; Balla, Tamas; Divecha, Nullin; Jalink, Kees; Moolenaar, Wouter H

    2007-01-01

    Cell-cell communication through connexin43 (Cx43)-based gap junction channels is rapidly inhibited upon activation of various G protein coupled receptors; however, the mechanism is unknown. We show that Cx43-based cell-cell communication is inhibited by depletion of phosphatidylinositol

  19. Possible role for abscisic acid in regulation of photosynthetic and photorespiratory carbon metabolism in barley leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, L.P.; Tsonev, T.D.; Vaklinova, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of abscisic acid (ABA) on carbon metabolism, rate of photorespiration, and the activity of the photorespiratory enzymes ribulose bisphosphate oxygenase and glycolate oxidase in 7-day-old barley seedlings (Hordeum vulgare L. var. Alfa) was investigated. Plants treated with ABA had enhanced incorporation of labeled carbon from 14 CO 2 into glycolic acid, glycine, and serine, while 14 C incorporation into 3-phosphoglyceric acid and sugarphosphate esters was depressed. Parallel with this effect, treated plants showed a rise in activity of RuBP oxygenase and glycolic acid oxidase. The rate of photorespiration was increased twofold by ABA treatment at IO -6 molar while the CO 2 -compensation point increased 46% and stomatal resistance increased more than twofold over control plants

  20. Role of photophosphorylation in SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ inhibition of photosynthesis in isolated chloroplasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerovic, Z G; Kalezic, R; Plesnicar, M

    1982-01-01

    Sulphur dioxide inhibits noncyclic photophosphorylation in isolated envelope-free chloroplasts. This inhibition was shown to be reversible and competitive with phosphate, with an inhibitor constant of K/sub i/ = 0.8 mM. The same inhibition characteristics were observed when phosphoglycerate (PGA)- or ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP)- dependent oxygen evolution was examined in a reconstituted chloroplast system in the presence of SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/. Using an ATP-regenerating system (phosphocreatine-creatine kinase), it was demonstrated that the inhibition of PGA-dependent oxygen evolution is solely the result of inhibited photophosphorylation. It is concluded that at low SO/sub 2/ and SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ concentrations the inhibition of photophosphorylation is responsible for the inhibition of photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

  1. Biotechnological storage and utilization of entrapped solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumana; Schiavone, Marc; Nayak, Amiya; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-03-01

    Our laboratory has recently developed a device employing immobilized F0F1 adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that allows synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine 5'-diphosphate and inorganic phosphate using solar energy. We present estimates of total solar energy received by Earth's land area and demonstrate that its efficient capture may allow conversion of solar energy and storage into bonds of biochemicals using devices harboring either immobilized ATPase or NADH dehydrogenase. Capture and storage of solar energy into biochemicals may also enable fixation of CO2 emanating from polluting units. The cofactors ATP and NADH synthesized using solar energy could be used for regeneration of acceptor D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate from 3-phosphoglycerate formed during CO2 fixation.

  2. Is L-Carnitine Supplementation Beneficial in 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA Carboxylase Deficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jákup Andreas; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Olesen, Jess Have

    2015-01-01

    suffered from self-reported fatigue with some alleviation after L-carnitine supplementation. Conclusion: 3-MCCd is common in the Faroe Islands. Some symptomatic 3-MCCd patients may benefit biochemically and clinically from L-carnitine supplementation, a more general recommendation cannot be given....... and muscle tissue with and without L-carnitine supplementation to evaluate the current treatment strategy of not recommending L-carnitine supplementation to Faroese 3-MCCd patients. Methods: Blood and urine samples and muscle biopsies were collected from patients at inclusion and at 3 months. Eight patients...... received L-carnitine supplementation when recruited; five did not. Included patients who received supplementation were asked to stop L-carnitine, the others were asked to initiate L-carnitine supplementation during the study. Symptoms were determined by review of hospital medical records and questionnaires...

  3. Biotin deficiency in the rat as a model for reduced pyruvate carboxylase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, Jacobus

    1978-01-01

    The investigations described in this thesis are a contribution to the study of Leigh's disease (Subacute Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy, SNE). SNE resembles in neuropathology Wernicke's encephalopathy, which is caused by thiamine deficiency. The scope and the purpose of the present study is given

  4. Evidence for an Inducible Nucleotide-Dependent Acetone Carboxylase in Rhodococcus rhodochrous B276

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Daniel D.; Ensign, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The metabolism of acetone was investigated in the actinomycete Rhodococcus rhodochrous (formerly Nocardia corallina) B276. Suspensions of acetone- and isopropanol-grown R. rhodochrous readily metabolized acetone. In contrast, R. rhodochrous cells cultured with glucose as the carbon source lacked the ability to metabolize acetone at the onset of the assay but gained the ability to do so in a time-dependent fashion. Chloramphenicol and rifampin prevented the time-dependent increase in this acti...

  5. Brain Glycogenolysis, Adrenoceptors, Pyruvate Carboxylase, Na+,K+-ATPase and Marie E. Gibbs’ Pioneering Learning Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of glycogenolysis, occurring in astrocytes but not in neurons, in learning is undisputed (Duran et al., JCBFM, in press. According to one school of thought the role of astrocytes for learning is restricted to supply of substrate for neuronal oxidative metabolism. The present ‘perspective’ suggests a more comprehensive and complex role, made possible by lack of glycogen degradation, unless specifically induced by either i activation of astrocytic receptors, perhaps especially beta-adrenergic, or ii even small increases in extracellular K+ concentration above its normal resting level. It discusses i the known importance of glycogenolysis for glutamate formation, requiring pyruvate carboxylation; ii the established role of K+-stimulated glycogenolysis for K+ uptake in cultured astrocytes, which probably indicates that astrocytes are an integral part of cellular K+ homeostasis in the brain in vivo; and iii the plausible role of transmitter-induced glycogenolysis, stimulating Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 activity and thereby contributing both to the post-excitatory undershoot in extracellular K+ concentration and the memory-enhancing effect of transmitter-mediated reduction of slow neuronal afterhyperpolarization (sAHP.

  6. Overexpression of a foxtail millet Acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... form, usually located in the cytoplasm, is a “eukaryotic- type” multifunctional enzyme. In the grass family ... 25°C, after which they were transferred to resting medium (D basal medium, 20 gl–1 Suc, 10 gl–1 Glc, 0.85 ... Total RNA of the transgenic and untransformed plants was extracted according to the Trizol ...

  7. Effects of Foliar Application of Nano Zinc Chelate and Zinc Sulfate on Zinc Content, Pigments and Photosynthetic Indices of Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum(

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Moghimi pour

    2017-02-01

    photosynthesis may be due to higher photosynthesis pigments and also stomata conductance and CO2 under stomata. In the other hand, zinc is an essential micronutrient that acts either as a metal component of various enzymes or as a functional, structural, or regulatory cofactor such as carbonic anhydrase, ribulose 1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate, and is thus associated with saccharide metabolism and photosynthesis. Conclusion: Although the highest amount of most measured traits was obtained in plants that treated with 1.5 g.l-1 nano zinc chelate, there were no significant difference between 1 and 1.5 g.l-1 nano zinc chelate and 1.5 g.l-1 zinc sulfate treatments for zinc content, stomata conductance, CO2 under stomata, transpiration rate, net photosynthesis, water use efficiency and light use efficiency. Therefore, in order to increase zinc content and photosynthetic traits of holy basil, foliar application of with 1.5 g.l-1 zinc sulfate is recommended.

  8. Determination of carbon-reduction-cycle intermediates in leaves of Arbutus unedo L. suffering depressions in photosynthesis after application of abscisic acid or exposure to dry air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loske, D; Raschke, K

    1988-02-01

    Gas exchange and contents of photosynthetic intermediates of leaves of Arbutus unedo L. were determined with the aim of recognizing the mechanisms of inhibition that were responsible for the "midday depression" of photosynthesis following exposure to dry air, and the decline in photosynthetic capacity following application of abscisic acid (ABA). Rapidly killed (<0.1 s) leaf samples were taken when gas analysis showed reduced CO2 assimilation. Determination of the contents of 3-phosphoglyceric acid (PGA), ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), triose phosphates, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and hexose phosphates in the samples showed that significant variation occurred only in the level of PGA. As a result, the ratio PGA/RuBP decreased with increasing inhibition of photosynthesis, particularly when application of ABA had been the cause. A comparison of metabolite patterns did not bring out qualitative differences that would have indicated that effects of ABA and of dry air had been caused by separate mechanisms. Depression of photosynthesis occurred in the presence of sufficient RuBP which indicated that the carboxylation reaction of the carbon-reduction-cycle was inhibited after application of ABA or exposure to dry air.

  9. Evidence of coexistence of C₃ and C₄ photosynthetic pathways in a green-tide-forming alga, Ulva prolifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Xu

    Full Text Available Ulva prolifera, a typical green-tide-forming alga, can accumulate a large biomass in a relatively short time period, suggesting that photosynthesis in this organism, particularly its carbon fixation pathway, must be very efficient. Green algae are known to generally perform C₃ photosynthesis, but recent metabolic labeling and genome sequencing data suggest that they may also perform C₄ photosynthesis, so C₄ photosynthesis might be more wide-spread than previously anticipated. Both C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis genes were found in U. prolifera by transcriptome sequencing. We also discovered the key enzymes of C₄ metabolism based on functional analysis, such as pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK. To investigate whether the alga operates a C₄-like pathway, the expression of rbcL and PPDK and their enzyme activities were measured under various forms and intensities of stress (differing levels of salinity, light intensity, and temperature. The expression of rbcL and PPDK and their enzyme activities were higher under adverse circumstances. However, under conditions of desiccation, the expression of rbcL and ribulose-1, 5-biphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase activity was lower, whereas that of PPDK was higher. These results suggest that elevated PPDK activity may alter carbon metabolism and lead to a partial operation of C₄-type carbon metabolism in U. prolifera, probably contributing to its wide distribution and massive, repeated blooms in the Yellow Sea.

  10. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate triggers activation of focal adhesion kinase by inducing clustering and conformational changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goñi, Guillermina M; Epifano, Carolina; Boskovic, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (NRTK) with key roles in integrating growth and cell matrix adhesion signals, and FAK is a major driver of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Cell adhesion via integrin receptors is well known to trigger FAK signaling, and many of the p...

  11. UBF complexes with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in nucleolar organizer regions regardless of ongoing RNA polymerase I activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobol, Margaryta; Yildirim, Sukriye; Philimonenko, Vlada; Marášek, Pavel; Castano, Enrique; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 6 (2013), 478–486 ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA MŠk LD12063; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : PIP2 * mitosis * transcription * nucleolus * RNA polymerase I * UBF * fibrillarin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.148, year: 2013

  12. Ethanol inhibits cold-menthol receptor TRPM8 by modulating its interactio with membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benedikt, Jan; Teisinger, Jan; Vyklický st., Ladislav; Vlachová, Viktorie

    ISBN 0-916110-40-0. [Neuroscince 2006. Annual meeting /36./. 14.10.2006-18.10.2006, Atlanta] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) 305/06/0319; GA AV ČR(CZ) 309/04/0496; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0517; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : TRPV1, receptor , capsaicin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  13. Ethanol inhibits cold-menthol receptor TRPM8 by modulating its interaction with membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benedikt, Jan; Teisinger, Jan; Vyklický st., Ladislav; Vlachová, Viktorie

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 1 (2007), s. 211-224 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/06/0319; GA ČR GA309/04/0496; GA MŠk 1M0517; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Cold /menthol receptor * ethanol * phosphatidylinositol Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.451, year: 2007

  14. A Neurotoxic Glycerophosphocholine Impacts PtdIns-4, 5-Bisphosphate and TORC2 Signaling by Altering Ceramide Biosynthesis in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Michael A.; Gable, Kenneth; Niewola-Staszkowska, Karolina; Abreu, Susana; Johnston, Anne; Harris, Linda J.; Reggiori, Fulvio; Loewith, Robbie; Dunn, Teresa; Bennett, Steffany A. L.; Baetz, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Unbiased lipidomic approaches have identified impairments in glycerophosphocholine second messenger metabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, we have shown that amyloid-β42 signals the intraneuronal accumulation of PC(O-16:0/2:0) which is associated with neurotoxicity. Similar to neuronal cells, intracellular accumulation of PC(O-16:0/2:0) is also toxic to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making yeast an excellent model to decipher the pathological effects of this lipid. We prev...

  15. Profilin binding to sub-micellar concentrations of phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5) trisphosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moens, Pierre D J; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2007-01-01

    Profilin is a small (12-15 kDa) actin binding protein which promotes filament turnover. Profilin is also involved in the signaling pathway linking receptors in the cell membrane to the microfilament system within the cell. Profilin is thought to play critical roles in this signaling pathway throu...

  16. Novel Kv7.1-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate interaction sites uncovered by charge neutralization scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckey, Karina; Wrobel, Eva; Strutz-Seebohm, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Kv7.1 to Kv7.5 α-subunits belong to the family of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv). Assembled with the β-subunit KCNE1, Kv7.1 conducts the slowly activating potassium current IKs, which is one of the major currents underlying repolarization of the cardiac action potential. A known regulator...... of corresponding long QT syndrome mutants suggested impaired PIP2 regulation as the cause for channel dysfunction. To clarify the underlying structural mechanism of PIP2 binding, molecular dynamics simulations of Kv7.1/KCNE1 complexes containing two PIP2 molecules in each subunit at specific sites were performed...

  17. Effects of acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE) on phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) turnover in rabbit cornea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, R.A.; Abdel-Latif, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic and α 1 -adrenergic agonists provoke hydrolysis of PIP 2 into diacylglycerol (DG) and inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ) in a wide variety of tissue. Recently, IP 3 has been shown to mobilize Ca 2+ from ER in several permeabilized tissue preparations. Although rabbit cornea is enriched in ACh and NE, the physiological function of these neurotransmitters is unclear. The present studies were initiated to determine the effects of cholinergic and adrenergic agonists on PIP 2 turnover in the cornea. Addition of ACh or NE (50 μM each) to the 32 P-labeled corneas for 10 min decreased the radioactivity in PIP 2 by 33 and 36%, and increased the radioactivity in phosphatidic acid by 72 and 52%, respectively. When the corneas were labeled with myo-[ 3 H]inositol, ACh and NE increased the accumulation of IP 3 by 92 and 48%, respectively. The effects of ACh and NE on phospholipid labeling and IP 3 accumulation were specifically inhibited by atropine (10 μM) and prazosin (10 μM), respectively. The data suggest the presence of muscarinic cholinergic and α 1 -adrenergic receptors in the rabbit cornea. Furthermore, activation of these receptors leads to cleavage of PIP 2 into DG and IP 3 which may function as second messengers in this tissue

  18. Role of Phospho enol pyruvate Carboxylase in the Adaptation of a Tropical Forage Grass to Low-Phosphorus Acid Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Hasna Hena; Osaki, Mitsuru; Nanamori, Masahito; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Shinano, Takuro; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2006-01-01

    As Brachiaria hybrid cv. 'Mulato' has adapted to acid soils with extremely low phosphorus (P) contents, its low-P-tolerance mechanisms were investigated and compared with those of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. 'Kitaake'). Among the three plant species, the highest P-use efficiency (PUE) in low-P soil was recorded in the Brachiaria hybrid, which increased remarkably under P-deficiency and soil acidity, while P-deficiency had less effect on the PUE of wheat and rice...

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Nucleus-Encoded Acetyl-CoA Carboxylases Targeted at the Cytosol and Plastid of Algae.

    KAUST Repository

    Huerlimann, Roger; Zenger, Kyall R; Jerry, Dean R; Heimann, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    as Chromalveolata, forming the red lineage. However, recent genetic evidence groups the Stramenopiles, Alveolata and green plastid containing Rhizaria as SAR, excluding Haptophyta and Cryptophyta. Sequences coding for plastid and cytosol targeted homomeric ACCases

  20. Physiological characteristics and metabolomics of transgenic wheat containing the maize C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene under high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xueli; Xu, Weigang; Zhang, Jianzhou; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Mingzhong; Hu, Lin; Wang, Huiwei; Dong, Haibin; Li, Yan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, two transgenic wheat lines, PC27 and PC51, containing the maize PEPC gene and its wild-type (WT) were used as experimental material to study the effects of high temperature on their photosynthetic physiological characteristics and metabolome. The results showed that transgenic wheat lines had higher photosynthetic rate (P n ) than WT under non-stress treatment (NT) and high temperature stress treatment (HT), and more significantly under HT. The change trends of F v /F m , Ф PSII , and q P were similar to P n , whereas that of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was the opposite. Compared with WT, no differences in chlorophyll content between the transgenic wheat and WT were observed under NT, but two transgenic lines had relatively higher contents than WT under HT. The change trends of Chlorophyll a/b radio, the decreased values of F m , W k , and V j , and the activity of the antioxidant enzyme were consistent with the chlorophyll content. Compared with WT, transgenic wheat lines exhibited lower rate of superoxide anion production, H 2 O 2 and malondialdehyde content under HT, and no significant differences were observed under NT. The expression pattern of the ZmPEPC gene and wheat endogenous photosynthesis-related genes were in agreement with that of P n . Compared with WT, about 13 different metabolites including one organic acid, six amino acids, four sugars, and two polyols were identified under NT; 25 different metabolites including six organic acids, 12 amino acids, four sugars, and three polyols were identified under HT. Collectively, our results indicate that ZmPEPC gene can enhance photochemical and antioxidant enzyme activity, upregulate the expression of photosynthesis-related genes, delay degradation of chlorophyll, change contents of proline and other metabolites in wheat, and ultimately improves its heat tolerance.

  1. Cloning, Sequencing, and Expression of the Pyruvate Carboxylase Gene in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2†

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.; O'Sullivan, D. J.; Baldwin, K. A.; McKay, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    A functional pyc gene was isolated from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 and was found to complement a Pyc defect in L. lactis KB4. The deduced lactococcal Pyc protein was highly homologous to Pyc sequences of other bacteria. The pyc gene was also detected in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains.

  2. Application of HB17, an Arabidopsis class II homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factor, to regulate chloroplast number and photosynthetic capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymus, Graham J; Cai, Suqin; Kohl, Elizabeth A; Holtan, Hans E; Marion, Colleen M; Tiwari, Shiv; Maszle, Don R; Lundgren, Marjorie R; Hong, Melissa C; Channa, Namitha; Loida, Paul; Thompson, Rebecca; Taylor, J Philip; Rice, Elena; Repetti, Peter P; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Reuber, T Lynne; Creelman, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Transcription factors are proposed as suitable targets for the control of traits such as yield or food quality in plants. This study reports the results of a functional genomics research effort that identified ATHB17, a transcription factor from the homeodomain-leucine zipper class II family, as a novel target for the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity. It was shown that ATHB17 is expressed natively in the root quiescent centre (QC) from Arabidopsis embryos and seedlings. Analysis of the functional composition of genes differentially expressed in the QC from a knockout mutant (athb17-1) compared with its wild-type sibling revealed the over-representation of genes involved in auxin stimulus, embryo development, axis polarity specification, and plastid-related processes. While no other phenotypes were observed in athb17-1 plants, overexpression of ATHB17 produced a number of phenotypes in Arabidopsis including enhanced chlorophyll content. Image analysis of isolated mesophyll cells of 35S::ATHB17 lines revealed an increase in the number of chloroplasts per unit cell size, which is probably due to an increase in the number of proplastids per meristematic cell. Leaf physiological measurements provided evidence of improved photosynthetic capacity in 35S::ATHB17 lines on a per unit leaf area basis. Estimates of the capacity for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-saturated and -limited photosynthesis were significantly higher in 35S::ATHB17 lines.

  3. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on photosynthesis, dark res-piration and RuBPcase activity of three species seedlings in Changbai Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two-year-old seedlings of Pinus koraiensis, Pinus sylvestriformis and Fraxinus mandshurica were treated in open-top chambers with elevated CO2 concentrations (700 μL·L-1, 500 μL·L-1) and ambient CO2 concentrations (350 μL·L-1) in Changbai Mountain from June to Sept. in 1999 and 2001. The net photosynthetic rate, dark respiration rate, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxlase (RuBPcase) activity, and chlorophyll content were analyzed. The results indicated the RuBPcase activity of the three species seedlings increased at elevated CO2 concentrations. The elevated CO2 concentrations stimulated the net photosynthetic rates of three tree species except P. sylvestriformis grown under 500 μL·L-1 CO2 concentration. The dark respiration rates of P. koraiensis and P. sylvestriformis increased under concentration of 700 μL·L-1 CO2, but that of F. mandshurica decreased under both concentrations 700 μL·L-1 and 500 μL·L-1 CO2. The seedlings of F. mandshurica decreased in chlorophyll contents at elevat-ed CO2 concentrations.

  4. Proteomic analysis of the salt-responsive leaf and root proteins in the anticancer plant Andrographis paniculata Nees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryush Talei

    Full Text Available Separation of proteins based on the physicochemical properties with different molecular weight and isoelectric points would be more accurate. In the current research, the 45-day-old seedlings were treated with 0 (control and 12 dS m(-1 of sodium chloride in the hydroponic system. After 15 days of salt exposure, the total protein of the fresh leaves and roots was extracted and analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis system (2-DE. The analysis led to the detection of 32 induced proteins (19 proteins in leaf and 13 proteins in the root as well as 12 upregulated proteins (four proteins in leaf and eight proteins in the root in the salt-treated plants. Of the 44 detected proteins, 12 were sequenced, and three of them matched with superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate oxygenase whereas the rest remained unknown. The three known proteins associate with plants response to environmental stresses and could represent the general stress proteins in the present study too. In addition, the proteomic feedback of different accessions of A. paniculata to salt stress can potentially be used to breed salt-tolerant varieties of the herb.

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Salt-Responsive Leaf and Root Proteins in the Anticancer Plant Andrographis paniculata Nees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Maziah, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Separation of proteins based on the physicochemical properties with different molecular weight and isoelectric points would be more accurate. In the current research, the 45-day-old seedlings were treated with 0 (control) and 12 dS m−1 of sodium chloride in the hydroponic system. After 15 days of salt exposure, the total protein of the fresh leaves and roots was extracted and analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis system (2-DE). The analysis led to the detection of 32 induced proteins (19 proteins in leaf and 13 proteins in the root) as well as 12 upregulated proteins (four proteins in leaf and eight proteins in the root) in the salt-treated plants. Of the 44 detected proteins, 12 were sequenced, and three of them matched with superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate oxygenase whereas the rest remained unknown. The three known proteins associate with plants response to environmental stresses and could represent the general stress proteins in the present study too. In addition, the proteomic feedback of different accessions of A. paniculata to salt stress can potentially be used to breed salt-tolerant varieties of the herb. PMID:25423252

  6. [Advenella kashmirensis subsp. methylica PK1, a facultative methylotroph from carex rhizosphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroshina, M N; Doronina, N V; Kaparullina, E N; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2015-01-01

    A strain (PK1) of facultative methylobacteria growing on methanol as a carbon and energy source was isolated from carex rhizosphere (Pamukkale National Park, Turkey). The cells were nonmotile gram-negative rods propagating by binary fission. The organism was a strict anaerobe, oxidase- and catalase-positive. Optimal growth occurred at 29°C, pH 8.0-8.5, and 0.5% NaCl; no growth occurred at 2% NaCl. The organism used the ribulose bisphosphate pathway of C1 assimilation. Predominant fatty acids were 11-octodecenoic (18:1ω7) and cis-hexadecenoic (16:1ω7c). Phosphatidylethanolamine and diphosphatidylglycerol were the dominant phospholipids. Q8 was the main ubiquinone. DNA G+C content was 55.4 mol % (mp). Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that strain PK1 belonged to the genus Advenella with 98.8 and 99.2% similarity to the type strains A. incenata CCUG 45225T and A. kashmirensis WT001T, respectively. DNA-DNA homology of strain PK1 and A. kashmirensis WT001T was 70%. While MALDI analysis confirmed their close clusterization, RAPD analysis revealed the differences between strain PKI and other Advenella strains. Based on its geno- and phenotypic properties, the isolate PK1 was classified as A. kashmirensis subsp. methylica PK1 (VKM-B 2850 = DSM 27514), the first known methylotroph of the genus Advenella.

  7. Albibacter methylovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel aerobic, facultatively autotrophic and methylotrophic bacterium that utilizes dichloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina, N V; Trotsenko, Y A; Tourova, T P; Kuznetsov, B B; Leisinger, T

    2001-05-01

    A novel genus, Albibacter, with one species, Albibacter methylovorans sp. nov., is proposed for a facultatively chemolithotrophic and methylotrophic bacterium (strain DM10T) with the ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) pathway of C1 assimilation. The bacterium is a Gram-negative, aerobic, asporogenous, nonmotile, colourless rod that multiplies by binary fission. The organism utilizes dichloromethane, methanol, methylamine, formate and CO2/H2, as well as a variety of polycarbon compounds, as carbon and energy sources. It is neutrophilic and mesophilic. The major cellular fatty acids are straight-chain unsaturated C18:1, saturated C16:0 and cyclopropane C19:0 acids. The main ubiquinone is Q-10. The dominant phospholipids are phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl choline and cardiolipin. The DNA G+C content is 66.7 mol%. Strain DM10T has a very low degree of DNA-DNA hybridization (4-7%) with the type species of the genera Paracoccus, Xanthobacter, Blastobacter, Angulomicrobium, Ancylobacter and Ralstonia of RuBP pathway methylobacteria. Another approach, involving comparative 16S rDNA analysis, has shown that the novel isolate represents a separate branch within the alpha-2 subgroup of the Proteobacteria. The type species of the new genus is Albibacter methylovorans sp. nov.; the type strain is DM10T (= VKM B-2236T = DSM 13819T).

  8. A tribute to Ulrich Heber (1930-2016) for his contribution to photosynthesis research: understanding the interplay between photosynthetic primary reactions, metabolism and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Krause, G Heinrich; Siebke, Katharina; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2018-07-01

    The dynamic and efficient coordination of primary photosynthetic reactions with leaf energization and metabolism under a wide range of environmental conditions is a fundamental property of plants involving processes at all functional levels. The present historical perspective covers 60 years of research aiming to understand the underlying mechanisms, linking major breakthroughs to current progress. It centers on the contributions of Ulrich Heber who had pioneered novel concepts, fundamental methods, and mechanistic understanding of photosynthesis. An important first step was the development of non-aqueous preparation of chloroplasts allowing the investigation of chloroplast metabolites ex vivo (meaning that the obtained results reflect the in vivo situation). Later on, intact chloroplasts, retaining their functional envelope membranes, were isolated in aqueous media to investigate compartmentation and exchange of metabolites between chloroplasts and external medium. These studies elucidated metabolic interaction between chloroplasts and cytoplasm during photosynthesis. Experiments with isolated intact chloroplasts clarified that oxygenation of ribulose-1.5-bisphosphate generates glycolate in photorespiration. The development of non-invasive optical methods enabled researchers identifying mechanisms that balance electron flow in the photosynthetic electron transport system avoiding its over-reduction. Recording chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence allowed one to monitor, among other parameters, thermal energy dissipation by means of 'nonphotochemical quenching' of the excited state of Chl a. Furthermore, studies both in vivo and in vitro led to basic understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of freezing damage and frost tolerance of plant leaves, to SO 2 tolerance of tree leaves and dehydrating lichens and mosses.

  9. Possibilities and scope of the double isotope effect method in the elucidation of mechanisms of enzyme catalyzed reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H L; Medina, R [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Freising (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl fuer Allgemeine Chemie und Biochemie

    1991-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects on enzyme catalyzed reactions are indicative for the first irreversible in a sequence of individual steps. Hints on the relative velocities of other steps can only be obtained from the partitioning factor R and its dependence on external reaction conditions. In general, the experimental data needed are obtained from isotope abundance measurements in a defined position of the substrate or product as a function of turnover. This method does not reveal events dealing with neighbour atoms or preceding the main isotope sensitive step. In the method presented here, the analytical measurement is extended to the second atom involved in a bond fission of formation (Double Isotope Effect Method). It is shown that the additional results obtained support the identification of the main isotopically sensitive step and its relative contribution to the overall reaction rate, the identification of other kinetically significant steps and the differentiation between stepwise and concerted reaction mechanisms. The method and its advantages are demonstrated on reactions comprising C-N-bond splitting (urease and arginase reaction), C-C-bound fission (reactions catalyzed by pyruvate-dehydrogenase, pyruvate-formiate-lyase and lactate-oxidase), C-O-bound formation (ribulose-bisphosphate-oxygenase reaction), and N-O-bond fission (nitrate- and nitrite-reductase reactions). (orig.).

  10. Steady-state room temperature fluorescence and CO/sub 2/ assimilation rates in intact leaves. [Phaseolus vulgaris; Xanthium strumarium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharkey, T D

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state room temperature variable fluorescence from leaves was measured as a function of CO/sub 2/ pressure in Xanthium strumarium L. and Phaseolus vulgaris L. Measurements were made in a range of light intensities, at normal and low O/sub 2/ partial pressure and over a range of temperatures. At low CO/sub 2/ pressure fluorescence increased with increasing CO/sub 2/. At higher CO/sub 2/ pressure fluorescence usually decreased with increasing CO/sub 2/ but occasionally increased slightly. The transition CO/sub 2/ pressure between the responses could be changed by changing light, O/sub 2/ pressure, or temperature. This breakpoint in the fluorescence-CO/sub 2/ curve was a reliable indicator of the transition between ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) saturated assimilation and RuBP regeneration limited assimilation. The fluorescence signal was not a reliable indicator of O/sub 2/-insensitive assimilation in these C/sub 3/ species. 21 references, 8 figures.

  11. Phakopsora euvitis Causes Unusual Damage to Leaves and Modifies Carbohydrate Metabolism in Grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio F. Nogueira Júnior

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Asian grapevine rust (Phakopsora euvitis is a serious disease, which causes severe leaf necrosis and early plant defoliation. These symptoms are unusual for a strict biotrophic pathogen. This work was performed to quantify the effects of P. euvitis on photosynthesis, carbohydrates, and biomass accumulation of grapevine. The reduction in photosynthetic efficiency of the green leaf tissue surrounding the lesions was quantified using the virtual lesion concept (β parameter. Gas exchange and responses of CO2 assimilation to increasing intercellular CO2 concentration were analyzed. Histopathological analyses and quantification of starch were also performed on diseased leaves. Biomass and carbohydrate accumulation were quantified in different organs of diseased and healthy plants. Rust reduced the photosynthetic rate, and β was estimated at 5.78, indicating a large virtual lesion. Mesophyll conductance, maximum rubisco carboxylation rate, and regeneration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate dependent on electron transport rate were reduced, causing diffusive and biochemical limitations to photosynthesis. Hypertrophy, chloroplast degeneration of mesophyll cells, and starch accumulation in cells close to lesions were observed. Root carbohydrate concentration was reduced, even at low rust severity. Asian grapevine rust dramatically reduced photosynthesis and altered the dynamics of production and accumulation of carbohydrates, unlike strict biotrophic pathogens. The reduction in carbohydrate reserves in roots would support polyetic damage on grapevine, caused by a polycyclic disease.

  12. Selection Finder (SelFi: A computational metabolic engineering tool to enable directed evolution of enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Hassanpour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Directed evolution of enzymes consists of an iterative process of creating mutant libraries and choosing desired phenotypes through screening or selection until the enzymatic activity reaches a desired goal. The biggest challenge in directed enzyme evolution is identifying high-throughput screens or selections to isolate the variant(s with the desired property. We present in this paper a computational metabolic engineering framework, Selection Finder (SelFi, to construct a selection pathway from a desired enzymatic product to a cellular host and to couple the pathway with cell survival. We applied SelFi to construct selection pathways for four enzymes and their desired enzymatic products xylitol, D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate, methanol, and aniline. Two of the selection pathways identified by SelFi were previously experimentally validated for engineering Xylose Reductase and RuBisCO. Importantly, SelFi advances directed evolution of enzymes as there is currently no known generalized strategies or computational techniques for identifying high-throughput selections for engineering enzymes.

  13. Glucose Synthesis in a Protein-Based Artificial Photosynthesis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Yuan, Wenqiao; Zhou, Jack; Chong, Parkson Lee-Gau

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to understand glucose synthesis of a protein-based artificial photosynthesis system affected by operating conditions, including the concentrations of reactants, reaction temperature, and illumination. Results from non-vesicle-based glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and glucose synthesis showed that the initial concentrations of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), lighting source, and temperature significantly affected glucose synthesis. Higher initial concentrations of RuBP and ATP significantly enhanced GAP synthesis, which was linearly correlated to glucose synthesis, confirming the proper functions of all catalyzing enzymes in the system. White fluorescent light inhibited artificial photosynthesis and reduced glucose synthesis by 79.2 % compared to in the dark. The reaction temperature of 40 °C was optimum, whereas lower or higher temperature reduced glucose synthesis. Glucose synthesis in the vesicle-based artificial photosynthesis system reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin, F 0 F 1 ATP synthase, and polydimethylsiloxane-methyloxazoline-polydimethylsiloxane triblock copolymer was successfully demonstrated. This system efficiently utilized light-induced ATP to drive glucose synthesis, and 5.2 μg ml(-1) glucose was synthesized in 0.78-ml reaction buffer in 7 h. Light-dependent reactions were found to be the bottleneck of the studied artificial photosynthesis system.

  14. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in nonstationary metabolic flux analysis: The case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eHeise

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014. Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labelling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from nonstationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  15. Limitations to soybean photosynthesis at elevated carbon dioxide in free-air enrichment and open top chamber systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, James A

    2014-09-01

    It has been suggested that the stimulation of soybean photosynthesis by elevated CO2 was less in free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems than in open top chambers (OTC), which might explain smaller yield increases at elevated CO2 in FACE systems. However, this has not been tested using the same cultivars grown in the same location. I tested whether soybean photosynthesis at high light and elevated CO2 (ambient+180 μmol mol(-1)) was limited by electron transport (J) in FACE systems but by ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylation capacity (VCmax) in OTC. FACE systems with daytime and continuous CO2 enrichment were also compared. The results indicated that in both cultivars examined, midday photosynthesis at high light was always limited by VCmax, both in the FACE and in the OTC systems. Daytime only CO2 enrichment did not affect photosynthetic parameters or limitations, but did result in significantly smaller yields in both cultivars than continuous elevation. Photosynthesis measured at low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) was not higher at elevated than at ambient CO2, because of an acclimation to elevated CO2 which was only evident at low measurement PPFDs. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Role of the Rubisco small subunit. Final report for period May 1, 1997--April 30,2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spreitzer, Robert J.

    2000-10-04

    CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} are mutually competitive at the active site of ribulose-1,5-biphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Rubisco contains two subunits, each present in eight copies. The 15-kD small subunit is coded by a family of nuclear RbcS genes. Until now, the role of the small subunit in Rubisco structure or catalytic efficiency is not known. Because of other work in eliminating the two RbcS genes in the green algo Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, it is now possible to address questions about the structure-function relationships of the eukaryotic small subunit. There are three specific aims in this project: (1) Alanine scanning mutagenesis is being used to dissect the importance of the {beta}A/{beta}B loop, a feature unique to the eukaryotic small subunit. (2) Random mutagenesis is being used to identify additional residues or regions of the small subunit that are important for holoenzyme assembly and function. (3) Attempts are being made to express foreign small subunits in Chlamydomonas to examine the contribution of small subunits to holoenzyme assembly, catalytic efficiency, and CO{sub 2}/O{sub 2} specificity.

  17. DNA barcode for the identification of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis plant feeding preferences in a tropical urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Leonardo H G de M; Mesquita, Marcelo R; Skrip, Laura; de Souza Freitas, Moisés T; Silva, Vladimir C; Kirstein, Oscar D; Abassi, Ibrahim; Warburg, Alon; Balbino, Valdir de Q; Costa, Carlos H N

    2016-07-20

    Little is known about the feeding behavior of hematophagous insects that require plant sugar to complete their life cycles. We studied plant feeding of Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies, known vectors of Leishmania infantum/chagasi parasites, in a Brazilian city endemic with visceral leishmaniasis. The DNA barcode technique was applied to identify plant food source of wild-caught L. longipalpis using specific primers for a locus from the chloroplast genome, ribulose diphosphate carboxylase. DNA from all trees or shrubs within a 100-meter radius from the trap were collected to build a barcode reference library. While plants from the Anacardiaceae and Meliaceae families were the most abundant at the sampling site (25.4% and 12.7% of the local plant population, respectively), DNA from these plant families was found in few flies; in contrast, despite its low abundance (2.9%), DNA from the Fabaceae family was detected in 94.7% of the sand flies. The proportion of sand flies testing positive for DNA from a given plant family was not significantly associated with abundance, distance from the trap, or average crown expansion of plants from that family. The data suggest that there may indeed be a feeding preference of L. longipalpis for plants in the Fabaceae family.

  18. Tobacco as a production platform for biofuel: overexpression of Arabidopsis DGAT and LEC2 genes increases accumulation and shifts the composition of lipids in green biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Vyacheslav; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Pogrebnyak, Natalia; Brinker, Anita; Dixon, Joseph; Spitsin, Sergei; Flynn, John; Matyszczuk, Paulina; Andryszak, Karolina; Laurelli, Marilyn; Golovkin, Maxim; Koprowski, Hilary

    2010-04-01

    When grown for energy production instead for smoking, tobacco can generate a large amount of inexpensive biomass more efficiently than almost any other agricultural crop. Tobacco possesses potent oil biosynthesis machinery and can accumulate up to 40% of seed weight in oil. In this work, we explored two metabolic engineering approaches to enhance the oil content in tobacco green tissues for potential biofuel production. First, an Arabidopsis thaliana gene diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) coding for a key enzyme in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis, was expressed in tobacco under the control of a strong ribulose-biphosphate carboxylase small subunit promoter. This modification led to up to a 20-fold increase in TAG accumulation in tobacco leaves and translated into an overall of about a twofold increase in extracted fatty acids (FA) up to 5.8% of dry biomass in Nicotiana tabacum cv Wisconsin, and up to 6% in high-sugar tobacco variety NC-55. Modified tobacco plants also contained elevated amounts of phospholipids. This increase in lipids was accompanied by a shift in the FA composition favourable for their utilization as biodiesel. Second, we expressed in tobacco Arabidopsis gene LEAFY COTYLEDON 2 (LEC2), a master regulator of seed maturation and seed oil storage under the control of an inducible Alc promoter. Stimulation of LEC2 expression in mature tobacco plants by acetaldehyde led to the accumulation of up to 6.8% per dry weight of total extracted FA. The obtained data reveal the potential of metabolically modified plant biomass for the production of biofuel.

  19. Compensation processes of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis Mill.) to ozone exposure and drought stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inclan, R.; Gimeno, B.S.; Dizengremel, P.; Sanchez, M.

    2005-01-01

    A long-term experiment was performed to study the effects of O 3 and drought-stress (DS) on Aleppo pine seedlings (Pinus halepensis Mill.) exposed in open-top chambers. Ozone reduced gas exchange rates, ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity (Rubisco), aboveground C and needle N concentrations and C/N ratio and Ca concentrations of the twigs under 3 mm (twigs Pd ), C/N ratio, twigs<3 Ca, plant growth, aerial biomass and increased N, twigs with a diameter above 3 mm P and Mg concentrations. The combined exposure to both stresses increased N concentrations of twigs<3 and roots and aboveground biomass K content and decreased root C, maximum daily assimilation rate and instantaneous water use efficiency. The sensitivity of Aleppo pine to both stresses is determined by plant internal resource allocation and compensation mechanisms to cope with stress. - Ozone and drought stress induce the activation of similar processes related to C and N metabolism

  20. Photosynthetic CO2 fixation in guard cells (GC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotow, K.; Taylor, S.; Zeiger, E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that carbon metabolism in GC is modulated by light quality. The fate of 14 CO 2 supplied to highly purified Vicia GC protoplasts irradiated with red light was investigated. The suspension was stirred at 25 0 C and dark-adapted for 5 min. After 5 min. in red light, 4.8 uCi of NaH 14 CO 3 was added (final concentration: 100 uM). Metabolism was quenched after 30 s with boiling ethanol. Anionic compounds were separated by 2D PC and TLC, and quantified. Rates of CO 2 fixation were 5- to 8-fold higher in the light. In the dark, malate and aspartate had 90% of the total label; in the light, 3-PGA, sugar monophosphates (SMP) and sugar diophosphates (SDP) had up to 60% of the label. Phosphates treatment and rechromatography of labelled SDP showed the presence of ribulose, a specific PCRP metabolite. In time-course experiments, labelled 3-PGA was detected within 5 s. With time, the percentage of label in 3-PGA decreased and that in SMP increased. The authors conclude that 3-PGA is a primary carboxylation product of the PCRP in GC and that the activity of the PCRP and PEP-