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Sample records for ribosomal peptide deregulated

  1. RPL41, a Small Ribosomal Peptide Deregulated in Tumors, Is Essential for Mitosis and Centrosome Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal large subunit protein RPL41 is a basic (positively charged peptide consisting of only 25 amino acids. An antisense-based functional screening revealed that the down-regulation of RPL41 led to an anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells in soft agar plates. RPL41 depletion with gene-specific small interfering RNA also resulted in malignant transformation of NIH3T3 cells including increased tumor growth in mice. RPL41 deletion was detected in 59% of tumor cell lines by fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses and RPL41 down-regulation in 75% of primary breast cancers by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. These studies suggest a tumor suppression role for RPL41. By mass spectrometry, RPL41 was associated with several cytoskeleton components including tubulin β, γ, and myosin IIA, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis on both cellular lysis and individually in vitro-expressed proteins. RPL41 also bound directly to polymerized tubulins. Cells overexpressing a GFP-RPL41 were resistant to nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization. A synthetic RPL41 induced cellular α-tubulin acetylation and G2/M cell cycle arrest. These results indicate a stabilizing role of RPL41 on microtubule. Microtubule spindles are essential for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Cells with RPL41 knock-down showed abnormal spindles, frequent failure of cytokinesis, and formation of polynuclear cells. In interphase cells, RPL41-depleted cells had premature splitting of centrosome. Our results provide evidence that RPL41 is a microtubule-associated protein essential for functional spindles and for the integrity of centrosome and that the abnormal mitosis and disrupted centrosome associated with the RPL41 down-regulation may be related to malignant transformation.

  2. Synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate for 60S ribosomal protein kinase from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Gasior, E; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic studies on the 60S protein kinase were conducted with synthetic peptides and ribosomal proteins as substrate. Peptide RRREEESDDD proved to be the best synthetic substrate for this enzyme. The peptide has a sequence of amino acids which most closely resembles the structure of potential...... phosphorylation sites in natural substrates, i.e., acidic ribosomal proteins. The superiority of certain kinetic parameters for 60S kinase obtained with the native whole 80S ribosomes over those of the isolated fraction of acidic ribosomal proteins indicates that the affinity of 60S kinase to the specific protein...

  3. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L.; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides whose members target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed by three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here, we describe the detailed structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases, MdnC and MdnB, interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein/protein interactions key to the chemistry, suggest an origin of the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds. PMID:27669417

  4. Structural basis for precursor protein-directed ribosomal peptide macrocyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Condurso, Heather L; Li, Gengnan; Ding, Yousong; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    Macrocyclization is a common feature of natural product biosynthetic pathways including the diverse family of ribosomal peptides. Microviridins are architecturally complex cyanobacterial ribosomal peptides that target proteases with potent reversible inhibition. The product structure is constructed via three macrocyclizations catalyzed sequentially by two members of the ATP-grasp family, a unique strategy for ribosomal peptide macrocyclization. Here we describe in detail the structural basis for the enzyme-catalyzed macrocyclizations in the microviridin J pathway of Microcystis aeruginosa. The macrocyclases MdnC and MdnB interact with a conserved α-helix of the precursor peptide using a novel precursor-peptide recognition mechanism. The results provide insight into the unique protein-protein interactions that are key to the chemistry, suggest an origin for the natural combinatorial synthesis of microviridin peptides, and provide a framework for future engineering efforts to generate designed compounds.

  5. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    suggested the dynamic movement of ribosomal proteins. The L2 protein (a .... Such kinds of interactions are important in elucidating the evolution of RNA .... Tamura K 2009 Molecular handedness of life: significance of RNA aminoacylation.

  6. Ribosome-catalyzed formation of an abnormal peptide analogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesser, J.R.; Chorghade, M.S.; Hecht, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The peptidyl-tRNA analogue N-(chloracetyl) phenylalanyl-tRNA/sup Phe/ was prepared by chemical aminoacylation and prebound to the P site of Escherichia coli ribosomes in response to poly(uridylic acid). Admixture of phenylalanyl-tRNA/sup Phe/ to the A site resulted in the formation of two dipeptides, one of which was found by displacement of chloride ion from the peptidyl-tRNA. This constitutes the first example of ribosome-mediated formation of a peptide of altered connectivity and suggests a need for revision of the current model of peptide bond formation. Also suggested by the present finding is the feasibility of utilizing tRNAs to prepare polypeptides of altered connectivity in an in vitro protein biosynthesizing system. [ 32 P]-oligo(rA), [ 3 H]- and [ 14 C] phenylalanines were used in the assay of the peptidye-tRNA analogue

  7. Automated genome mining of ribosomal peptide natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Kersten, Roland; Liu, Wei; Wang, Mingxun; Purvine, Samuel O.; Wu, Si; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Bandeira, Nuno; Moore, Bradley S.; Pevzner, Pavel A.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-07-31

    Ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs), especially from microbial sources, are a large group of bioactive natural products that are a promising source of new (bio)chemistry and bioactivity (1). In light of exponentially increasing microbial genome databases and improved mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomic platforms, there is a need for computational tools that connect natural product genotypes predicted from microbial genome sequences with their corresponding chemotypes from metabolomic datasets. Here, we introduce RiPPquest, a tandem mass spectrometry database search tool for identification of microbial RiPPs and apply it for lanthipeptide discovery. RiPPquest uses genomics to limit search space to the vicinity of RiPP biosynthetic genes and proteomics to analyze extensive peptide modifications and compute p-values of peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs). We highlight RiPPquest by connection of multiple RiPPs from extracts of Streptomyces to their gene clusters and by the discovery of a new class III lanthipeptide, informatipeptin, from Streptomyces viridochromogenes DSM 40736 as the first natural product to be identified in an automated fashion by genome mining. The presented tool is available at cy-clo.ucsd.edu.

  8. Is there a channel in the ribosome for nascent peptide. Labellimg of translating ribosomes with atomar tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, V A; Kammer, A A; Spirin, A S

    1987-01-01

    The method of tritium bombardment was applied to investigate exposure of growing peptide on the surface of ribsome E.coli. Distribution of radioactivity by fractions is presented. Tritium inclusion in all the aminoacid residues of heteropeptide testifies to its exposure on the surface of the ribosome.

  9. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  10. De novo design and engineering of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhüyük, Kenan A. J.; Fleischhacker, Florian; Linck, Annabell; Wesche, Frank; Tietze, Andreas; Niesert, Claus-Peter; Bode, Helge B.

    2018-03-01

    Peptides derived from non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) represent an important class of pharmaceutically relevant drugs. Methods to generate novel non-ribosomal peptides or to modify peptide natural products in an easy and predictable way are therefore of great interest. However, although the overall modular structure of NRPSs suggests the possibility of adjusting domain specificity and selectivity, only a few examples have been reported and these usually show a severe drop in production titre. Here we report a new strategy for the modification of NRPSs that uses defined exchange units (XUs) and not modules as functional units. XUs are fused at specific positions that connect the condensation and adenylation domains and respect the original specificity of the downstream module to enable the production of the desired peptides. We also present the use of internal condensation domains as an alternative to other peptide-chain-releasing domains for the production of cyclic peptides.

  11. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    , of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site...... on an archaeal ribosome and suggest that a similar binding site is present on the E.coli ribosome....

  12. Implementation of communication-mediating domains for non-ribosomal peptide production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; San-Bento, Rita; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has in several cases been proven to be a suitable host for the production of natural products and was recently exploited for the production of non-ribosomal peptides. Synthesis of non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs) is mediated by NRP synthetases (NRPSs), modular enzymes, which...... are often organized in enzyme complexes. In these complexes, partner NRPSs interact via communication-mediating domains (COM domains). In order to test whether functional interaction between separate NRPS modules is possible in yeast we constructed a yeast strain expressing two modules with compatible COM...

  13. Computational discovery of specificity-conferring sites in non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Michael; Søndergaard, Dan Ariel; Tofting-Olesen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: By using a class of large modular enzymes known as Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetases (NRPS), bacteria and fungi are capable of synthesizing a large variety of secondary metabolites, many of which are bioactive and have potential, pharmaceutical applications as e.g.~antibiotics. There ...

  14. p53- and ERK7-dependent ribosome surveillance response regulates Drosophila insulin-like peptide secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Hasygar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like signalling is a conserved mechanism that coordinates animal growth and metabolism with nutrient status. In Drosophila, insulin-producing median neurosecretory cells (IPCs regulate larval growth by secreting insulin-like peptides (dILPs in a diet-dependent manner. Previous studies have shown that nutrition affects dILP secretion through humoral signals derived from the fat body. Here we uncover a novel mechanism that operates cell autonomously in the IPCs to regulate dILP secretion. We observed that impairment of ribosome biogenesis specifically in the IPCs strongly inhibits dILP secretion, which consequently leads to reduced body size and a delay in larval development. This response is dependent on p53, a known surveillance factor for ribosome biogenesis. A downstream effector of this growth inhibitory response is an atypical MAP kinase ERK7 (ERK8/MAPK15, which is upregulated in the IPCs following impaired ribosome biogenesis as well as starvation. We show that ERK7 is sufficient and essential to inhibit dILP secretion upon impaired ribosome biogenesis, and it acts epistatically to p53. Moreover, we provide evidence that p53 and ERK7 contribute to the inhibition of dILP secretion upon starvation. Thus, we conclude that a cell autonomous ribosome surveillance response, which leads to upregulation of ERK7, inhibits dILP secretion to impede tissue growth under limiting dietary conditions.

  15. Post-translational modification of ribosomally synthesized peptides by a radical SAM epimerase in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjdia, Alhosna; Guillot, Alain; Ruffié, Pauline; Leprince, Jérôme; Berteau, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are built out of L-amino acids, whereas D-amino acids are generally the hallmark of non-ribosomal synthetic processes. Here we show that the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis is able to produce a novel type of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide that contains D-amino acids, and which we propose to call epipeptides. We demonstrate that a two [4Fe-4S]-cluster radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) enzyme converts L-amino acids into their D-counterparts by catalysing Cα-hydrogen-atom abstraction and using a critical cysteine residue as the hydrogen-atom donor. Unexpectedly, these D-amino acid residues proved to be essential for the activity of a peptide that induces the expression of LiaRS, a major component of the bacterial cell envelope stress-response system. Present in B. subtilis and in several members of the human microbiome, these epipeptides and radical SAM epimerases broaden the landscape of peptidyl structures accessible to living organisms.

  16. Klebsazolicin inhibits 70S ribosome by obstructing the peptide exit tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metelev, Mikhail; Osterman, Ilya A.; Ghilarov, Dmitry; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Yakimov, Alexander; Shabalin, Konstantin; Utkina, Irina; Travin, Dmitry Y.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Serebryakova, Marina; Artamonova, Tatyana; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Severinov, Konstantin; Polikanov, Yury S.

    2017-08-28

    Whereas screening of the small-molecule metabolites produced by most cultivatable microorganisms often results in the rediscovery of known compounds, genome-mining programs allow researchers to harness much greater chemical diversity, and result in the discovery of new molecular scaffolds. Here we report the genome-guided identification of a new antibiotic, klebsazolicin (KLB), from Klebsiella pneumoniae that inhibits the growth of sensitive cells by targeting ribosomes. A ribosomally synthesized post-translationally modified peptide (RiPP), KLB is characterized by the presence of a unique N-terminal amidine ring that is essential for its activity. Biochemical in vitro studies indicate that KLB inhibits ribosomes by interfering with translation elongation. Structural analysis of the ribosome–KLB complex showed that the compound binds in the peptide exit tunnel overlapping with the binding sites of macrolides or streptogramin-B. KLB adopts a compact conformation and largely obstructs the tunnel. Engineered KLB fragments were observed to retain in vitro activity, and thus have the potential to serve as a starting point for the development of new bioactive compounds.

  17. A 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase mediates non-ribosomal peptide synthetase activation in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Claire; Murphy, Alan; Kavanagh, Kevin; Doyle, Sean

    2005-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a significant human pathogen. Non-ribosomal peptide (NRP) synthesis is thought to be responsible for a significant proportion of toxin and siderophore production in the organism. Furthermore, it has been shown that 4'-phosphopantetheinylation is required for the activation of key enzymes involved in non-ribosomal peptide synthesis in other species. Here we report the cloning, recombinant expression and functional characterisation of a 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase from A. fumigatus and the identification of an atypical NRP synthetase (Afpes1), spanning 14.3 kb. Phylogenetic analysis has shown that the NRP synthetase exhibits greatest identity to NRP synthetases from Metarhizium anisolpiae (PesA) and Alternaria brassicae (AbrePsy1). Northern hybridisation and RT-PCR analysis have confirmed that both genes are expressed in A. fumigatus. A 120 kDa fragment of the A. fumigatus NRP synthetase, containing a putative thiolation domain, was cloned and expressed in the baculovirus expression system. Detection of a 4'-phosphopantetheinylated peptide (SFSAMK) from this protein, by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis after coincubation of the 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase with the recombinant NRP synthetase fragment and acetyl CoA, confirms that it is competent to play a role in NRP synthetase activation in A. fumigatus. The 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase also activates, by 4'-phosphopantetheinylation, recombinant alpha-aminoadipate reductase (Lys2p) from Candida albicans, a key enzyme involved in lysine biosynthesis.

  18. Post-translational Introduction of D-Alanine into Ribosomally Synthesized Peptides by the Dehydroalanine Reductase NpnJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2015-10-07

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides are generally limited to L-amino acid building blocks. Given the advantageous properties of peptides containing D-amino acids such as stabilization of certain turns and against proteolytic degradation, methods to introduce D-stereocenters are valuable. Here we report the first in vitro reconstitution and characterization of a dehydrogenase that carries out the asymmetric reduction of dehydroalanine. NpnJA reduces dehydroalanine to D-Ala using NAPDH as cosubstrate. The enzyme displays high substrate tolerance allowing introduction of D-Ala into a range of non-native substrates. In addition to the in vitro reactions, we describe five examples of using Escherichia coli as biosynthetic host for D-alanine introduction into ribosomal peptides. A deuterium-label-based coupled-enzyme assay was used to rapidly determine the stereochemistry of the newly installed alanine.

  19. Radical SAM Enzymes in the Biosynthesis of Ribosomally Synthesized and Post-translationally Modified Peptides (RiPPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhosna Benjdia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomally-synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs are a large and diverse family of natural products. They possess interesting biological properties such as antibiotic or anticancer activities, making them attractive for therapeutic applications. In contrast to polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides, RiPPs derive from ribosomal peptides and are post-translationally modified by diverse enzyme families. Among them, the emerging superfamily of radical SAM enzymes has been shown to play a major role. These enzymes catalyze the formation of a wide range of post-translational modifications some of them having no counterparts in living systems or synthetic chemistry. The investigation of radical SAM enzymes has not only illuminated unprecedented strategies used by living systems to tailor peptides into complex natural products but has also allowed to uncover novel RiPP families. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on radical SAM enzymes catalyzing RiPP post-translational modifications and discuss their mechanisms and growing importance notably in the context of the human microbiota.

  20. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ribosomally Synthesized and Post-translationally Modified Peptide Natural Products: New Insights Into the Role of Leader and Core Peptides During Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a major class of natural products with a high degree of structural diversity and a wide variety of bioactivities. Understanding the biosynthetic machinery of these RiPPs will benefit the discovery and development of new molecules with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this review, we discuss the features of the biosynthetic pathways to different RiPP classes, and propose mechanisms regarding recognition of the precursor peptide by the posttranslational modification enzymes. We propose that the leader peptides function as allosteric regulators that bind the active form of the biosynthetic enzymes in a conformational selection process. We also speculate how enzymes that generate polycyclic products of defined topologies may have been selected for during evolution. PMID:23666908

  2. The expression of selected non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in Aspergillus fumigatus is controlled by the availability of free iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiber, Kathrin; Reeves, Emer P; Neville, Claire M; Winkler, Robert; Gebhardt, Peter; Kavanagh, Kevin; Doyle, Sean

    2005-07-01

    Three non-ribosomal peptide synthetase genes, termed sidD, sidC and sidE, have been identified in Aspergillus fumigatus. Gene expression analysis by RT-PCR confirms that expression of both sidD and C was reduced by up to 90% under iron-replete conditions indicative of a likely role in siderophore biosynthesis. SidE expression was less sensitive to iron levels. In addition, two proteins purified from mycelia grown under iron-limiting conditions corresponded to SidD ( approximately 200 kDa) and SidC (496 kDa) as determined by MALDI ToF peptide mass fingerprinting and MALDI LIFT-ToF/ToF. Siderophore synthetases are unique in bacteria and fungi and represent an attractive target for antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  3. Critical 23S rRNA interactions for macrolide-dependent ribosome stalling on the ErmCL nascent peptide chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Miriam; Willi, Jessica; Pradère, Ugo; Hall, Jonathan; Polacek, Norbert

    2017-06-20

    The nascent peptide exit tunnel has recently been identified as a functional region of ribosomes contributing to translation regulation and co-translational protein folding. Inducible expression of the erm resistance genes depends on ribosome stalling at specific codons of an upstream open reading frame in the presence of an exit tunnel-bound macrolide antibiotic. The molecular basis for this translation arrest is still not fully understood. Here, we used a nucleotide analog interference approach to unravel important functional groups on 23S rRNA residues in the ribosomal exit tunnel for ribosome stalling on the ErmC leader peptide. By replacing single nucleobase functional groups or even single atoms we were able to demonstrate the importance of A2062, A2503 and U2586 for drug-dependent ribosome stalling. Our data show that the universally conserved A2062 and A2503 are capable of forming a non-Watson-Crick base pair that is critical for sensing and transmitting the stalling signal from the exit tunnel back to the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nucleobases of A2062, A2503 as well as U2586 do not contribute significantly to the overall mechanism of protein biosynthesis, yet their elaborate role for co-translational monitoring of nascent peptide chains inside the exit tunnel can explain their evolutionary conservation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Differential scanning calorimetry of whole Escherichia coli treated with the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 indicate a multi-hit mechanism with ribosomes as a novel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Brannan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC of intact Escherichia coli (E. coli was used to identify non-lipidic targets of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP MSI-78. The DSC thermograms revealed that, in addition to its known lytic properties, MSI-78 also has a striking effect on ribosomes. MSI-78’s effect on DSC scans of bacteria was similar to that of kanamycin, an antibiotic drug known to target the 30S small ribosomal subunit. An in vitro transcription/translation assay helped confirm MSI-78’s targeting of ribosomes. The scrambled version of MSI-78 also affected the ribosome peak of the DSC scans, but required greater amounts of peptide to cause a similar effect to the unscrambled peptide. Furthermore, the effect of the scrambled peptide was not specific to the ribosomes; other regions of the DSC thermogram were also affected. These results suggest that MSI-78’s effects on E. coli are at least somewhat dependent on its particular structural features, rather than a sole function of its overall charge and hydrophobicity. When considered along with earlier work detailing MSI-78’s membrane lytic properties, it appears that MSI-78 operates via a multi-hit mechanism with multiple targets.

  5. Genetic selection of peptide aptamers that interact and inhibit both Small protein B and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4

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    Peng Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus,the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti

  6. Genetic Selection of Peptide Aptamers That Interact and Inhibit Both Small Protein B and Alternative Ribosome-Rescue Factor A of Aeromonas veronii C4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yong; Wang, Dan; Tang, Yanqiong; Tang, Hongqian; Song, Haichao; Sun, Qun; Zhang, Yueling; Liu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii is a pathogenic gram-negative bacterium, which infects a variety of animals and results in mass mortality. The stalled-ribosome rescues are reported to ensure viability and virulence under stress conditions, of which primarily include trans-translation and alternative ribosome-rescue factor A (ArfA) in A. veronii. For identification of specific peptides that interact and inhibit the stalled-ribosome rescues, peptide aptamer library (pTRG-SN-peptides) was constructed using pTRG as vector and Staphylococcus aureus nuclease (SN) as scaffold protein, in which 16 random amino acids were introduced to form an exposed surface loop. In the meantime both Small Protein B (SmpB) which acts as one of the key components in trans-translation, and ArfA were inserted to pBT to constitute pBT-SmpB and pBT-ArfA, respectively. The peptide aptamer PA-2 was selected from pTRG-SN-peptides by bacterial two-hybrid system (B2H) employing pBT-SmpB or pBT-ArfA as baits. The conserved sites G133K134 and D138K139R140 of C-terminal SmpB were identified by interacting with N-terminal SN, and concurrently the residue K62 of ArfA was recognized by interacting with the surface loop of the specific peptide aptamer PA-2. The expression plasmids pN-SN or pN-PA-2, which combined the duplication origin of pRE112 with the neokanamycin promoter expressing SN or PA-2, were created and transformed into A. veronii C4, separately. The engineered A. veronii C4 which endowing SN or PA-2 expression impaired growth capabilities under stress conditions including temperatures, sucrose, glucose, potassium chloride (KCl) and antibiotics, and the stress-related genes rpoS and nhaP were down-regulated significantly by Quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) when treating in 2.0% KCl. Thus, the engineered A. veronii C4 conferring PA-2 expression might be potentially attenuated vaccine, and also the peptide aptamer PA-2 could develop as anti-microbial drugs targeted to the ribosome rescued factors in A

  7. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  8. Electrical deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.

    2001-01-01

    Deregulation in the electricity sector took effect on January 1, 2001 in Alberta. Business consumers discovered that their electricity rates had almost doubled in a one-month period. The government argued that it was the case of short term pain for long term gain. The intent of the deregulation is the lowering of prices through competition. This principle applies when the supply meets the demand, but when the demand exceeds the supply, prices increase. When initial plans were made for the deregulation of the sector, utilities did not invest huge amounts of capital to build new generation plants, as it was not known how they would fare in the deregulated environment. This situation was compounded by the fact that there was an economic boom around the same time in Alberta, adding to the demands made on the existing generation infrastructure (approximately 4 per cent per year over the past decade). At the moment, some resource developers such as Syncrude, Amoco, and Daishowa produce their own electricity and export their excess capacity to the provincial grid for general use. The rules of the deregulated market have been clarified and a number of utilities are planning new generation plants and facilities. TransAlta, EPCOR, and Enmax Corp. have announced plans to expand or build new coal-fired plants. Alberta has an estimated 35 billion tonnes of recoverable coal, and 25 million tonnes of coal were used in 1999 to produce 75 per cent of the electricity required in Alberta. Over the next ten years, 4,000 megawatts of new capacity is planned, representing a 50 per cent increase over current levels. AES Corporation, a Virginia power giant, has also announced plans to build a generator in Alberta

  9. Telecommunications Deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jerry A. Hausman; William E. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    From Fred Kahn's writings and experiences as a telecommunications regulator and commenter, we draw the following conclusions: prices must be informed by costs; costs are actual incremental costs; costs and prices are an outcome of a Schumpeterian competitive process, not the starting point; excluding incumbents from markets is fundamentally anticompetitive; and a regulatory transition to deregulation entails propensities to micromanage the process to generate preferred outcomes, visible compe...

  10. Lassomycin, a ribosomally synthesized cyclic peptide, kills mycobacterium tuberculosis by targeting the ATP-dependent protease ClpC1P1P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrish, Ekaterina; Sit, Clarissa S; Cao, Shugeng; Kandror, Olga; Spoering, Amy; Peoples, Aaron; Ling, Losee; Fetterman, Ashley; Hughes, Dallas; Bissell, Anthony; Torrey, Heather; Akopian, Tatos; Mueller, Andreas; Epstein, Slava; Goldberg, Alfred; Clardy, Jon; Lewis, Kim

    2014-04-24

    Languishing antibiotic discovery and flourishing antibiotic resistance have prompted the development of alternative untapped sources for antibiotic discovery, including previously uncultured bacteria. Here, we screen extracts from uncultured species against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and identify lassomycin, an antibiotic that exhibits potent bactericidal activity against both growing and dormant mycobacteria, including drug-resistant forms of M. tuberculosis, but little activity against other bacteria or mammalian cells. Lassomycin is a highly basic, ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide with an unusual structural fold that only partially resembles that of other lasso peptides. We show that lassomycin binds to a highly acidic region of the ClpC1 ATPase complex and markedly stimulates its ATPase activity without stimulating ClpP1P2-catalyzed protein breakdown, which is essential for viability of mycobacteria. This mechanism, uncoupling ATPase from proteolytic activity, accounts for the bactericidal activity of lassomycin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inhibition of peptide bond formation by pleuromutilins: the structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with tiamulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünzen, Frank; Pyetan, Erez; Fucini, Paola; Yonath, Ada; Harms, Jörg M

    2004-12-01

    Tiamulin, a prominent member of the pleuromutilin class of antibiotics, is a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis in bacteria. Up to now the effect of pleuromutilins on the ribosome has not been determined on a molecular level. The 3.5 A structure of the 50S ribosomal subunit from Deinococcus radiodurans in complex with tiamulin provides for the first time a detailed picture of its interactions with the 23S rRNA, thus explaining the molecular mechanism of the antimicrobial activity of the pleuromutilin class of antibiotics. Our results show that tiamulin is located within the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of the 50S ribosomal subunit with its tricyclic mutilin core positioned in a tight pocket at the A-tRNA binding site. Also, the extension, which protrudes from its mutilin core, partially overlaps with the P-tRNA binding site. Thereby, tiamulin directly inhibits peptide bond formation. Comparison of the tiamulin binding site with other PTC targeting drugs, like chloramphenicol, clindamycin and streptogramins, may facilitate the design of modified or hybridized drugs that extend the applicability of this class of antibiotics.

  12. A ribosome without RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold S Bernhardt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It was Francis Crick who first asked why the ribosome contains so much RNA, and discussed the implications of this for the direct flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. Remarkable advances in our understanding of the ribosome and protein synthesis, including the recent publication of two mammalian mitochondrial ribosome structures, have shed new light on this intriguing aspect of evolution in molecular biology. We examine here whether RNA is indispensable for coded protein synthesis, or whether an all-protein ‘ribosome’ (or ‘synthosome’ might be possible, with a protein enzyme catalyzing peptide synthesis, and release factor-like protein adaptors able to read a message composed of deoxyribonucleotides. We also compare the RNA world hypothesis with the alternative ‘proteins first’ hypothesis in terms of their different understandings of the evolution of the ribosome, and whether this might have been preceded by an ancestral form of nonribosomal peptide synthesis catalyzed by protein enzymes.

  13. A theoretical model investigation of peptide bond formation involving two water molecules in ribosome supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We theoretical studied peptide bond formation reaction mechanism with two water molecules. • The first water molecule can decrease the reaction barriers by forming hydrogen bonds. • The water molecule mediated three-proton transfer mechanism is the favorable mechanism. • Our calculation supports the two-step and eight membered ring mechanism. - Abstract: The ribosome is the macromolecular machine that catalyzes protein synthesis. The kinetic isotope effect analysis reported by Strobel group supports the two-step mechanism. However, the destination of the proton originating from the nucleophilic amine is uncertain. A computational simulation of different mechanisms including water molecules is carried out using the same reaction model and theoretical level. Formation the tetrahedral intermediate with proton transfer from nucleophilic nitrogen, is the rate-limiting step when two water molecules participate in peptide bond formation. The first water molecule forming hydrogen bonds with O9′ and H15′ in the A site can decrease the reaction barriers. Combined with results of the solvent isotope effects analysis, we conclude that the three-proton transfer mechanism in which water molecule mediate the proton shuttle between amino and carbon oxygen in rate-limiting step is the favorable mechanism. Our results will shield light on a better understand the reaction mechanism of ribosome

  14. The Insect Pathogen Serratia marcescens Db10 Uses a Hybrid Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase-Polyketide Synthase to Produce the Antibiotic Althiomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, Gregory L.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2012-01-01

    There is a continuing need to discover new bioactive natural products, such as antibiotics, in genetically-amenable micro-organisms. We observed that the enteric insect pathogen, Serratia marcescens Db10, produced a diffusible compound that inhibited the growth of Bacillis subtilis and Staphyloccocus aureus. Mapping the genetic locus required for this activity revealed a putative natural product biosynthetic gene cluster, further defined to a six-gene operon named alb1–alb6. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteins encoded by alb1–6 predicted a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase (NRPS-PKS) assembly line (Alb4/5/6), tailoring enzymes (Alb2/3) and an export/resistance protein (Alb1), and suggested that the machinery assembled althiomycin or a related molecule. Althiomycin is a ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic whose biosynthetic machinery had been elusive for decades. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses confirmed that wild type S. marcescens produced althiomycin and that production was eliminated on disruption of the alb gene cluster. Construction of mutants with in-frame deletions of specific alb genes demonstrated that Alb2–Alb5 were essential for althiomycin production, whereas Alb6 was required for maximal production of the antibiotic. A phosphopantetheinyl transferase enzyme required for althiomycin biosynthesis was also identified. Expression of Alb1, a predicted major facilitator superfamily efflux pump, conferred althiomycin resistance on another, sensitive, strain of S. marcescens. This is the first report of althiomycin production outside of the Myxobacteria or Streptomyces and paves the way for future exploitation of the biosynthetic machinery, since S. marcescens represents a convenient and tractable producing organism. PMID:23028578

  15. Costs of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.K.; King, M.

    2006-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed efforts throughout the world to deregulate the electricity industry, with varied results. While there have been a few qualified success stories, many challenges of deregulation have come to light. These challenges can lead to negative, even disastrous, outcomes. Based on a comprehensive literature review, this paper catalogues problems experienced in various deregulation efforts, and considers the application of the lessons learned from this history to Israel, which is considering deregulation. Failings of deregulation are found to center around the following problems: high set-up cost; complicated market design; inevitable spot price volatility; market power abuse; inefficient investment; difficulty in reducing generation cost; dysfunctional input markets; stranded cost; unequal distribution of benefits. We find that many of these problems are exacerbated by the particular circumstances faced by Israel, and advise any country or region considering deregulation to carefully consider these obstacles to success. (author)

  16. Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-01-19

    Jan 19, 2017 ... knowledge of their gene cluster architecture and tailoring enzymes have helped in the in silico genetic ..... The predictive power of the bioinformatics sequence analy- .... identified these motifs manually, though NaPDoS, anti-.

  17. Virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity of novel analogue peptides based on the HP (2-20) derived from N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori Ribosomal Protein L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Eun-Rhan; Lee, Dong Gun; Chang, Young-Su; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2002-12-01

    HP (2-20) (AKKVFKRLEKLFSKIQNDK) is the antibacterial sequence derived from N-terminus of Helicobacter pylori Ribosomal Protein L1 (RPL1). It has a broad-spectrum microbicidal activity in vitro that is thought to be related to the membrane-disruptive properties of the peptide. Based on the putative membrane-targeted mode of action, we postulated that HP (2-20) might be possessed virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity. To develop the novel virus-cell fusion inhibitory peptides, several analogues with amino acid substitution were designed to increase or decrease only net hydrophobic region. In particular, substitution of Gln and Asp for hydrophobic amino acid, Trp at position 17 and 19 of HP (2-20) (Anal 3) caused a dramatic increase in virus-cell fusion inhibitory activity without hemolytic effect.

  18. Power deregulation in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMurchy, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    The impacts of deregulation of the electric power industry in Alberta from the perspective of the natural gas industry was presented with special focus on how the power market can be brought back into balance. The issue of what impacts the deregulated power market will have on natural gas consumption or prices was also reviewed. It was noted that deregulation of the electric power industry will have a definite impact on natural gas consumption but no significant impact on prices. It is estimated that in 1999/2000 gas demand will be 90 million cf/day for incremental electricity generation. However, as long as pipe capacity out of the province exits, this increase in natural gas demand in Alberta is not expected to affect gas prices

  19. Natural gas and deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, G.

    2001-01-01

    The gas market is progressively moving towards new organizations under the effect of the deregulation initiated in the United States, the United Kingdom and transposed to other countries, particularly in Europe, at least for the member countries of the European union. Within the framework provided by this overall trend, Cedigaz proposes this study in order to describe the main developments affecting these markets on account of deregulation. This report is structured on the basis of three main topics (market organization, marketing modes, pricing) which appear to be the most cogent in terms of deregulation. This grouping by major topics accordingly offers a relatively synthetic view of the main trends which could be observed on the European market, for example. Our analysis is largely based on the example of the American market and, to a lesser extent, on the British situation. Whenever possible, concrete examples are provided for a closer understanding of this complex subject. On the whole, deregulation is not a frozen process, but has to adapt permanently to developments in a market stage-managed by politics, the regulator and the industrial players. This obviously means a dynamic and constantly evolving process, making it a highly complex process. This report aims to shed some light on the subject. (author)

  20. Airline Deregulation and Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steven A.; Winston, Clifford

    1989-08-01

    An assessment of the effects of airline deregulation on travelers and carriers indicates that deregulation has provided travelers and carriers with 14.9 billion of annual benefits (1988 dollars). Airport congestion, airline safety, airline bankruptcy, and mergers are also analyzed and found in most cases to have reduced benefits. But, these costs should not be attributed to deregulation per se, but to failures by the government to pursue appropriate policies in these areas. Pursuit of policies that promote airline competition and efficient use of airport capacity would significantly increase the benefits from deregulation and would provide valuable guidance for other industries undergoing the transition to deregulation.

  1. Regulating deregulated energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2002-01-01

    The North American gas and electricity markets are fast evolving, and regulators are currently faced with a host of issues such as market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, and incentive regulation are surfacing as a result of deregulation. The regulatory environment in Ontario was reviewed by the author. Deregulated markets rule, from commodities to gas and electricity. Additionally, there is an evolution of traditional utility regulation. A look at deregulated markets revealed that there are regulations on boundary conditions on the deregulated market. Under the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), all generators, transmitters, distributors, and retailers of electricity must be licensed. The standard supply service (SSS) offered by electricity distributors and system gas which is still being sold by natural gas distributors continues to be regulated by OEB. One issue that was addressed was separation for revenues and costs of the utility's purchase and sale of gas business, at least for accounting purposes. The next issue discussed was cost of system gas and SSS, followed by timely signals and prudent incurred costs. Historical benefits were reviewed, such as historical commitments to low-cost electricity. Pooling transportation costs, transmission pricing continued, market-based rates, unbundling, stranded costs, open access, incentive regulation/ performance based regulation (PBR) were all discussed. Price cap on PBR, both partial and comprehensive were looked at. A requirement to review guidelines on cost of capital and an application to extend blanket approval provisions for gas storage were discussed, as they are amongst some of the challenges of the future. Other challenges include revised rules and practice and procedure; practice directions for cost awards, appeals, and other functions; confidentiality guidelines; and refinements to the role of and approaches to alternative dispute resolution. The future role of regulators was examined in light

  2. Electric deregulation in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    An outline of the electric power deregulation activities across Canada, particularly in Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario, was presented. A central element of the restructuring is creation of a power pool which acts as an open spot market, and a transmission administrator that provides access to the generators, distribution companies, importers and exporters. Load forecasts, average daily load profile and hourly pool prices for TransAlta Corporation were presented as an example. 22 figs

  3. Natural gas deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronchi, M.

    1993-01-01

    With the aim of establishing realistic options for deregulation in the natural gas industry, this paper first considers the structural evolution of this industry and evidences how it differs from the petroleum industry with which it exhibits some essential characteristics in common. This comparison is made in order to stress that, contrary to popular belief, that which is without doubt good for the petroleum industry is not necessarily so also for the natural gas industry. The paper concludes with separate analyses of the natural gas markets in the principal industrialized countries. Arguments are provided to show that the 'soft' deregulation option for the natural gas industry is not feasible, and that 'total' deregulation instead, backed by the passing of a suitable package of anti-trust laws 'unbundling' the industry's four major activities, i.e., production, storage, primary and secondary distribution, is the preferable option. The old concept of guaranteed supplies for minor users of natural gas should give way to the laws of supply and demand governing inter-fuel competition ensured through the strict supervision of vigilance committees

  4. A hybrid non-ribosomal peptide/polyketide synthetase containing fatty-acyl ligase (FAAL synthesizes the β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides puwainaphycins in the Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum alatosporum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mareš

    Full Text Available A putative operon encoding the biosynthetic pathway for the cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides puwainphycins was identified in Cylindrospermum alatosporum. Bioinformatics analysis enabled sequential prediction of puwainaphycin biosynthesis; this process is initiated by the activation of a fatty acid residue via fatty acyl-AMP ligase and continued by a multidomain non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements proved the production of puwainaphycin F/G congeners differing in FA chain length formed by either 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl dodecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahdoa or 3-amino-2-hydroxy-4-methyl tetradecanoic acid (4-methyl-Ahtea. Because only one puwainaphycin operon was recovered in the genome, we suggest that the fatty acyl-AMP ligase and one of the amino acid adenylation domains (Asn/Gln show extended substrate specificity. Our results provide the first insight into the biosynthesis of frequently occurring β-amino fatty acid lipopeptides in cyanobacteria, which may facilitate analytical assessment and development of monitoring tools for cytotoxic cyanobacterial lipopeptides.

  5. Genome Sequence of Dickeya solani, a New soft Rot Pathogen of Potato, Suggests its Emergence May Be Related to a Novel Combination of Non-Ribosomal Peptide/Polyketide Synthetase Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Garlant

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot Enterobacteria in the genera Pectobacterium and Dickeya cause rotting of many crop plants. A new Dickeya isolate has been suggested to form a separate species, given the name Dickeya solani. This bacterium is spreading fast and replacing the closely related, but less virulent, potato pathogens. The genome of D. solani isolate D s0432-1 shows highest similarity at the nucleotide level and in synteny to D. dadantii strain 3937, but it also contains three large polyketide/fatty acid/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase clusters that are not present in D. dadantii 3937. These gene clusters may be involved in the production of toxic secondary metabolites, such as oocydin and zeamine. Furthermore, the D. solani genome harbors several specific genes that are not present in other Dickeya and Pectobacterium species and that may confer advantages for adaptation to new environments. In conclusion, the fast spreading of D. solani may be related to the acquisition of new properties that affect its interaction with plants and other microbes in the potato ecosystem.

  6. Utility deregulation and AMR technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the effects of deregulation on other utilities and services and examines how the electric utilities can avoid the worst of these effects and capitalize of the best aspects of competition in achieving marketing excellence. The article presents deregulation as a customer service and underscores the need for utilities to learn to compete aggressively and intelligently and provide additional services available through technology such as automated meter reading

  7. The undertow of deregulation : reregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Alberta, Ontario and New Brunswick each initiated measures to deregulate their electric power industries in order to remain competitive with lower electricity rates in some U.S. states where the industry was also moving towards deregulation. This paper considers how the original sweep of deregulation policy goals succumbed to electricity reregulation policies. The decision by British Columbia to re-examine its deregulation plans in light of the experience in Canada's 3 other province's was also examined. The paper describes the electric power industry from 1900 to 1960s, before the deregulation wave hit the industry. It then proceeds to the 1970s which was marked by the oil embargo. The 1980s saw a new era of policy shifts towards deregulation and privatization activity which was intended to introduce competition into regulated industries. Alberta was the first Canadian province to introduce competition to its electricity industry in an effort to remain competitive with neighbouring U.S. jurisdictions. By the 1990s Ontario's vertically integrated electricity industry was in trouble and recommendations were made to dissolve Ontario's Hydro One monopoly, particularly in power generation. In 1999, New Brunswick restructured its electricity industry to remain competitive with New England's electricity industry. The paper describes the gradual pull back from deregulation by all 3 provinces and the measures taken to impose price controls. Both industry and consumers paid a price for major policy changes. Complete competition in New Brunswick never materialized. It was suggested that controlled competition will likely move the electricity industry in the future. 40 refs

  8. Environmental impact of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swisher, Joel N.; McAlpin, Maria C.

    2006-01-01

    Restructuring of electric utilities affects environmental quality primarily through its effect on airborne emissions. We examine emissions from 1993 to 2002 and discuss possible explanatory factors. Annual NOx and SO 2 emissions fell nationally, mostly due to decreases in emission limits driven by state and Federal regulations. CO 2 emissions have increased almost proportionately with increased generation. Generation increased more than it would have, partly due to energy efficiency spending reductions that accompanied deregulation. The fuel mix shifted slightly from coal to gas, offsetting some CO 2 emissions increases and contributing to SO 2 and NOx emissions decreases. While the percentage share of generation from renewable sources remained at about 2%, recent and expected future increases in wind generating capacity promise future emissions reductions. Although deregulation lacks clear environmental advantages, the deregulation process creates an opportunity for implementation of state policies to reduce emissions. Regulated and deregulated states with renewable portfolio standards (RPS) have a higher average percent of generation from renewable sources. Average energy efficiency savings are higher in regulated states, but slightly higher in deregulated states with a system benefits charge (SBC) than in regulated states without a SBC

  9. Deregulation - a source of crisis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haavardstein, Hilde; Sandsmark, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, deregulation has become widespread in many of the worlds power markets. When it is no longer the authorities, but the players in the market who are deciding on investments in new production capacity, on the basis of business economic estimates of profitability, it is important that the external conditions are worked out such that they provide incentives to investments of the right extent and to the right time. Examples from deregulated markets show that the formulation of such external frames has contributed to a tight power balance

  10. Deregulation and Macroeconomic Drivers Of Foreign Direct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deregulation and Macroeconomic Drivers Of Foreign Direct Investment In Nigerian Agriculture (1970 -2009): An Econometric Analysis. ... The study showed that foreign exchange and the economic deregulation policy of Nigerian government ...

  11. Energy deregulation: the Vattenfall experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1992, Sweden prepared itself for deregulation by transforming Vattenfall, the country's main supplier of energy, from a public utility into a limited liability company. Vattenfall was still 100% owned by the state, but began to operate as a commercial entity with a separate board of directors. On January 1, 1996, Sweden and Finland deregulated, and the three Nordic countries - Norway, Sweden and Denmark - became a completely open market. Beginning November 1, 1999, Sweden will introduce simplified metering, bringing competition directly to consumers, which represents the purest and most advanced form of electricity competition, forcing Vattenfall and its peers to fight for the loyalty of customers from the smallest retail household upwards. As a central participant in deregulation, Vattenfall was faced with some major challenges. In essence, Vattenfall had to evolve from a parochial Swedish public utility into a pan-European energy services company. The transition was successful and Vattenfall today represents about 20% of Scandinavia's generation capacity, with operations that are about 1/2 the size of those of Ontario Hydro. Vattenfall had to take a number of steps to get ready for a fully competitive retail market. First it established a market oriented group organization based on three units: Vattenfall Electricity Generation, Vattenfall Energy Market, and Vattenfall Electricity Networks and Services. Second it expanded its relationship with its customers. Third it adjusted to the fact that electricity deregulation led to an immediate generation surplus. The main lessons learned from the experience are summarized

  12. Deregulation of Lesotho's maize market

    OpenAIRE

    van Schalkwyk, Herman D.; van Zyl, Johan; Botha, P.W.; Bayley, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the past year, there have been major policy reforms in Lesotho and South Africa with respect to maize pricing and marketing. In Lesotho the impact of deregulation on producers, consumers and government revenues was substantially lower than it should have been, and as a result Lesotho was not able to reap the full benefits of these changes. This is partly because information on the changes to the maize marketing system did not reach the potential beneficiaries of the new system. Free an...

  13. Lowering electricity prices through deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Klitgaard; Rekha Reddy

    2000-01-01

    A wave of regulatory reform is now transforming the U.S. electricity industry. As state and federal authorities allow independent power producers to compete with utilities in supplying electricity, consumers are paying close attention to the effects of this change on their energy bills. Although deregulation poses significant structural challenges, the introduction of competitive pressures should ultimately lead to efficiency gains for the industry and cost savings for households and businesses.

  14. Deregulator: Judgment Day for microeconomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, S.

    2004-01-01

    The economic theory that motivated the deregulation and privatization of the US electricity industry is seriously flawed in three crucial ways. First, the Marshallian theory of the firm is based on two mathematical errors which, when amended, reverse the accepted welfare rankings of competitive and monopoly industry structures: on the grounds of corrected neoclassical theory, monopoly should be preferred to competition. Second, while proponents of deregulation expected market-clearing equilibrium prices to apply, it is well known that the equilibrium of a system of spot market prices is unstable. This implies that imposing spot market pricing on as basic an industry as electricity is likely to lead to the kind of volatility observed under the deregulation. Third, extensive empirical research has established that on the order of 95% of firms do not produce under conditions of rising marginal cost. Requiring electricity firms to price at marginal cost was therefore likely to lead to bankruptcies, as indeed occurred. The economic preference for marginal cost spot market pricing is therefore theoretically unsound, and it is no wonder that the actual deregulatory experience was as bad as it was. (author)

  15. Deregulator: Judgment Day for microeconomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, S. [University of Western Sydney, Penrith (Australia). School of Economics and Finance

    2004-09-01

    The economic theory that motivated the deregulation and privatization of the US electricity industry is seriously flawed in three crucial ways. First, the Marshallian theory of the firm is based on two mathematical errors which, when amended, reverse the accepted welfare rankings of competitive and monopoly industry structures: on the grounds of corrected neoclassical theory, monopoly should be preferred to competition. Second, while proponents of deregulation expected market-clearing equilibrium prices to apply, it is well known that the equilibrium of a system of spot market prices is unstable. This implies that imposing spot market pricing on as basic an industry as electricity is likely to lead to the kind of volatility observed under the deregulation. Third, extensive empirical research has established that on the order of 95% of firms do not produce under conditions of rising marginal cost. Requiring electricity firms to price at marginal cost was therefore likely to lead to bankruptcies, as indeed occurred. The economic preference for marginal cost spot market pricing is therefore theoretically unsound, and it is no wonder that the actual deregulatory experience was as bad as it was. (author)

  16. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  17. Expanding the ribosomal universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinman, Jonathan D; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2009-12-09

    In this issue of Structure, Taylor et al. (2009) present the most complete model of an eukaryotic ribosome to date. This achievement represents a critical milestone along the path to structurally defining the unique aspects of the eukaryotic protein synthetic machinery.

  18. Did Globalization Influence Credit Market Deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Eppinger, Peter; Potrafke, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether globalization influenced credit market deregulation over the period 1970-2010. Globalization is measured by the KOF indices of globalization. Credit market deregulation is measured by the credit market freedom indicators of the Fraser Institute. The results from both cross-sectional and panel regressions using ordinary least squares indicate a positive correlation between globalization and credit market deregulation. We account for reverse causality by using predicted t...

  19. Product Market Deregulation and Employment Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Senftleben-König, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the short- and medium-term effects of the deregulation of shopopening hours legislation on retail employment in Germany. In 2006, the legislative competence was shifted from the federal to the state level, leading to a gradual deregulation of shop opening restrictions in most of Germany’s sixteen federal states. The paper exploits regional variation in the legislation in order to identify the effect product market deregulation has on retail employment. We find robust e...

  20. Deregulation, a challenge for regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Augustin

    2001-01-01

    Deregulation and competitiveness in the electricity market invites the plant owner/operator to reduce operating cost with a potential reduction in maintenance, degradation of investment in safety, reduction of operating staff and a downgrading in research and development. On the other side, deregulation and competitiveness brings the social and industrial benefit of reducing the electricity cost. Regulatory organisations have to watch that the safety level of the plant does not go beyond the established level, while recognising the benefits of the new situation; therefore they have the moral responsibility of regulating nuclear energy effectively and efficiently and in eliminating unnecessary regulatory burdens. Regulation has evolved with time and in accordance with the knowledge gained from research and the analysis of operating experience. The knowledge gained has made it possible to follow the path of other modern advanced technologies, where risk is quantified and the system approved when the risk becomes lower than an accepted level. The regulatory use of this advanced tool is being now developed by the most advanced regulatory organisations, under the name of risk informed regulation, where the reference level is the expected frequency of core damage. Deregulation and competitiveness will not change the basis of the already well established procedure to verify compliance. Nevertheless, the contents of Safety Analysis Reports and other regulatory documents, such as Technical Specifications for Operation, offer room for improvement in the sense of being more to the roots of the matter and becoming more efficient tools in the verification process. The contents of these documents have been evolving along the time and they have become unnecessary voluminous and rather burdensome. Much work has been done to improve the efficiency of regulatory inspections by concentrating on basic aspects. As a partial application of the already mentioned risk-informed regulation

  1. Deregulation impacts AMR business cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, M.; Fauth, G.

    2001-09-01

    Meter reading strategy is being affected in fundamental ways by deregulation. For the utilities attempting to cope with meter reading unbundling, the processes, insights and general rules that had been developed prior to 2000 in the field of Automatic Meter Reading can no longer be relied upon to provide useful lessons. The fundamental impact on Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) business case drivers and the increasing complexity of building the business case model result from deregulation and unbundling. More and more, management has come to rely on rigorous business case analysis to compensate for the magnitude of AMR projects on the utility and the scarcity of financial resources. One can now expect the Chief Financial Officer and the Vice President Finance to become active players on AMR project teams in the fields of business case scrutiny and approval. Increasingly, the normal expertise of AMR personnel does not suffice to build a business case acceptable to finance. The financial and economic analysis skills required are ever more complex.

  2. Power Buying: Planning For Your Deregulated Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Wayne K.

    1997-01-01

    Colleges and universities can benefit from the coming deregulation of utilities. Deregulation creates opportunity for facility managers to aggressively negotiate agreements, implement changes to the physical plant to make the institution a more attractive customer, and explore new, less expensive energy supply options and alternatives. Some action…

  3. Economic and Environmental Effects of Airline Deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, Youdi; Rietveld, Piet

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the issue of regulatory reform in the airline industry, in connection with environmental externalities. Deregulation has led to shorter routes, higher frequencies, probably larger aircraft sizes and more intense peak traffic at airports. In addition, deregulation has led to

  4. Deregulation: Implications for Community College Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Louis W.

    1986-01-01

    Looks at the ways in which the deregulation of business and industry may affect community colleges in the years ahead, using the banking industry as an illustration. Argues that the deregulation of higher education requires that community college leadership programs examine past assumptions and develop new strategies. (LAL)

  5. In vitro degradation of ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, G; Rivas, A

    1976-12-01

    The cytoplasmic ribosomes from Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris are found to be of two types taking into consideration their stability "in vitro". In the group of unstable ribosomes the large subunit is degraded. The other group apparently does not suffer any degradation under the conditions described. However the RNAs extracted from both types of ribosomes are degraded during sucrose density gradients. The degradation of the largest RNA species has been reported previously, but no comment has been made about the stability of the ribosome itself.

  6. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  7. Energy deregulation: lessons from the American experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiam, L.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents a brief history of US energy regulation, considers some of the important issues arising from the US experience and finally, suggests some lessons which Australia might draw from the US deregulation of energy industries. 5 refs

  8. Power system deregulation and the Balkan countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glamochanin, Vlastimir; Stojkovska, Biljana; Cherepnalkoski, Trajche

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to show the current state and planned activities of the Power System deregulation and privatization in the following Balkan countries: Macedonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Greece, Croatia, Slovenia and Turkey

  9. Banking deregulation and corporate tax avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill B. Francis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate whether tax avoidance substitutes for external financing. We exploit interstate banking deregulation as a quasi-external shock to examine whether firms engage in less tax avoidance after banking deregulation, because of cheaper and easier access to credit from banks. We find no empirical evidence to support this substitutive relation, even for firms with higher financial constraints or firms with higher external financing dependence.

  10. Implications of U.S. electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, D.A.

    1997-01-01

    This article is a concise summary of the potential impacts of electric utility deregulation, including the resolution of stranded costs, impact on electricity rates, reformation of utilities, and reshuffling of the nation's fuel portfolio. The national and state implications of the deregulation of the electricity industry are monumental and overwhelming. The implications occur on many fronts, including monetary, quality, reliability, and environmental issues. Many significant changes will occur as a result--some will be positive and others may be more disturbing

  11. The primary structure of rat liver ribosomal protein L37. Homology with yeast and bacterial ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A; McNally, J; Wool, I G

    1983-09-10

    The covalent structure of the rat liver 60 S ribosomal subunit protein L37 was determined. Twenty-four tryptic peptides were purified and the sequence of each was established; they accounted for all 111 residues of L37. The sequence of the first 30 residues of L37, obtained previously by automated Edman degradation of the intact protein, provided the alignment of the first 9 tryptic peptides. Three peptides (CN1, CN2, and CN3) were produced by cleavage of protein L37 with cyanogen bromide. The sequence of CN1 (65 residues) was established from the sequence of secondary peptides resulting from cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin. The sequence of CN1 in turn served to order tryptic peptides 1 through 14. The sequence of CN2 (15 residues) was determined entirely by a micromanual procedure and allowed the alignment of tryptic peptides 14 through 18. The sequence of the NH2-terminal 28 amino acids of CN3 (31 residues) was determined; in addition the complete sequences of the secondary tryptic and chymotryptic peptides were done. The sequence of CN3 provided the order of tryptic peptides 18 through 24. Thus the sequence of the three cyanogen bromide peptides also accounted for the 111 residues of protein L37. The carboxyl-terminal amino acids were identified after carboxypeptidase A treatment. There is a disulfide bridge between half-cystinyl residues at positions 40 and 69. Rat liver ribosomal protein L37 is homologous with yeast YP55 and with Escherichia coli L34. Moreover, there is a segment of 17 residues in rat L37 that occurs, albeit with modifications, in yeast YP55 and in E. coli S4, L20, and L34.

  12. Consequences of electricity deregulation on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podjavorsek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of deregulation of electricity market started a couple of years ago and has not been finished yet. Deregulation causes increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This presents a new challenge to regulatory bodies. They have to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the deregulation. Today's trend is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe and also in Slovenia due to tough competition in the electricity market. The electricity price has decreased after the introduction of the deregulated market in most countries. This has been also the main reason for less investment to new generating capacities since the price has been lower than the generation costs. Investment problems are also present for the existing units, because of danger of inappropriate maintenance and reduction of the number of staff and their qualifications below the desired level that leads to loss of institutional memory. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of competition in electricity prices and consequential pressure to reduce the cost. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points are discussed in this paper such as the need to cut costs of companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and /or outsourcing of activities, power station operating regime, safety culture, grid reliability, reliability and safety of operation, increased number of transients, ageing of components, outage duration, extended cycle and response of nuclear regulators. From a regulatory point of view the impact of deregulation on nuclear safety is an important issue. This paper also discusses analyses and evaluations of this impact and proposes some measures how to

  13. Deregulating electricity in the American states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbush, Thomas Lee

    This dissertation develops nine stylized facts that summarize the major consequences of deregulation and tests these against recent experience in the electric utility industry. The experience of the electric utility industry matches the predictions of the stylized facts, except in one instance: although real electricity prices fell between 1982 and 1999, real prices fell less in states that deregulated. This dissertation presents three possible explanations for this discrepancy. First, through dynamic efficiency, consumers may benefit in the long run through lower rates and better service in the electricity market, or deregulation may be a public good that benefits electricity consumers through economy-wide improvements in efficiency. Second, higher prices may be a long-run outcome as predicted by the theory of the second best. Or third, both regulators and utilities may use deregulation to generate new rents. Because the original rents from regulation had dissipated, new rents could be generated under deregulation by making consumers pay off the utilities and then creating more new rents through re-regulation of the industry. Close examination tends to support the first and third explanations, although the second-best explanation cannot yet be ruled out completely. Higher prices appear to be a transitional phenomenon, resulting from a short-term payoff from consumers to incumbent utilities that was required to move deregulation forward. This payoff occurs as residential and commercial consumers bear relatively higher rates over three to five years to compensate utilities for stranded costs, investments thought to be unrecoverable under full competition. All states are benefiting from deregulation, but states that are deregulating are benefiting less while stranded costs are being recovered. This dissertation also examines California electricity deregulation and finds that the experience in California conforms with to the stylized facts, and that certain structural

  14. Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Li; Flynn, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price, and in particular its daily and average weekday vs. weekend pattern of change, for 14 deregulated markets. Power price in deregulated markets shows fundamentally different patterns. North American markets show a monotonic diurnal weekday price pattern, while all other markets studied show more than one price peak. Deregulated power markets differ in maximum vs. minimum daily average price and in average weekday to weekend price, in turn creating a different incentive for a consumer to time shift power consuming activities. Markets differ in the extent to which a small fraction of the days shapes the average diurnal pattern and value of price. Deregulated markets show a wide variation in the correlation between load and price. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent, and hence that can encourage a customer to shape consumption behaviors. Other markets, for example South Australia, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to escape risk through hedging mechanisms. (Author)

  15. Deregulated power prices: comparison of diurnal patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Flynn, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price, and in particular its daily and average weekday vs. weekend pattern of change, for 14 deregulated markets. Power price in deregulated markets shows fundamentally different patterns. North American markets show a monotonic diurnal weekday price pattern, while all other markets studied show more than one price peak. Deregulated power markets differ in maximum vs. minimum daily average price and in average weekday to weekend price, in turn creating a different incentive for a consumer to time shift power consuming activities. Markets differ in the extent to which a small fraction of the days shapes the average diurnal pattern and value of price. Deregulated markets show a wide variation in the correlation between load and price. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent, and hence that can encourage a customer to shape consumption behaviors. Other markets, for example South Australia, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to escape risk through hedging mechanisms

  16. Transmission planning in a deregulated environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhao

    2006-01-01

    The worldwide trend for the deregulation of the electricity generation and transmission industries has led to dramatic changes in system operation and planning procedures. The optimum approach to transmission-expansion planning in a deregulated environment is an open problem especially when the r...... electricity market grid are performed. In addition, the proposed method is compared with a traditional planning method to further verify its effectiveness....... the responsibilities of the organisations carrying out the planning work need to be addressed. To date there is a consensus that the system operator and network manager perform the expansion planning work in a centralised way. However, with an increasing input from the electricity market, the objectives, constraints...... and approaches toward transmission planning should be carefully designed to ensure system reliability as well as meeting the market requirements. A market-oriented approach for transmission planning in a deregulated environment is proposed. Case studies using the IEEE 14-bus system and the Australian national...

  17. Electricity deregulation roundup : Ontario prepares for electricity deregulation and anxiously watches impact elsewhere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, R.

    2000-01-01

    As the time for deregulation of Ontario's electric power industry approaches, consumers are watching other Canadian and American jurisdictions to see what deregulation will mean in terms of energy costs. Albertans have expressed serious concerns about the impact of deregulating their electric power industry. They found that in the four years since deregulation in their province, electricity prices increased when markets opened to competition. The proposed start date for deregulation in Ontario is November 1, 2000. This paper suggests that if investors don't put out significant resources, problems such as power shortages and brownouts could occur, as was the case in Alberta. Potential investors in the Ontario electricity market are already sceptical because the Ontario government, in an effort to protect consumers from unreasonable price increases, has tabled legislation that restricts the efforts of municipal utility companies to raise distribution rates. One step that will inspire some confidence is the recently finalized deal between Ontario Power Generation and British Energy to operate the Bruce Nuclear Power Station. Independent consultants have warned that electricity prices will continue to increase with deregulation for a least the next few years. Industrial customers will be the hardest hit. In California, America's first deregulated electricity market, the power grid is strained and prices have doubled or tripled in one year

  18. Deregulation of Interferon Signaling in Malignant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas C. Platanias

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are a family of cytokines with potent antiproliferative, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties. Much has been learned about IFNs and IFN-activated signaling cascades over the last 50 years. Due to their potent antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo, recombinant IFNs have been used extensively over the years, alone or in combination with other drugs, for the treatment of various malignancies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on IFN signaling components and pathways that are deregulated in human malignancies. The relevance of deregulation of IFN signaling pathways in defective innate immune surveillance and tumorigenesis are discussed.

  19. A law enforcement perspective of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Ira

    2006-01-01

    In April 2004, the California Attorney General's (AG) office issued a white paper that provided a 'law enforcement perspective of the California energy crisis.' To complete this special issue's coverage, I summarize three aspects of that paper: notably, the deficiencies in market oversight and enforcement that left the deregulated market prone to potential abuse, the principal modus operandi that some market agents used to exploit those deficiencies without fear of retribution, and the AG's 'recommendations for improving enforcement and protecting consumers in deregulated energy markets.'. (author)

  20. A law enforcement perspective of electricity deregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Ira [Warrington College of Business, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-7169 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    In April 2004, the California Attorney General's (AG) office issued a white paper that provided a 'law enforcement perspective of the California energy crisis.' To complete this special issue's coverage, I summarize three aspects of that paper: notably, the deficiencies in market oversight and enforcement that left the deregulated market prone to potential abuse, the principal modus operandi that some market agents used to exploit those deficiencies without fear of retribution, and the AG's 'recommendations for improving enforcement and protecting consumers in deregulated energy markets.'. (author)

  1. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Ashley A.; Randall, R. Lor; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12). This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered. PMID:21052502

  2. Cell Cycle Deregulation in Ewing's Sarcoma Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Kowalewski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma is a highly aggressive pediatric tumor of bone that usually contains the characteristic chromosomal translocation t(11;22(q24;q12. This translocation encodes the oncogenic fusion protein EWS/FLI, which acts as an aberrant transcription factor to deregulate target genes necessary for oncogenesis. One key feature of oncogenic transformation is dysregulation of cell cycle control. It is therefore likely that EWS/FLI and other cooperating mutations in Ewing's sarcoma modulate the cell cycle to facilitate tumorigenesis. This paper will summarize current published data associated with deregulation of the cell cycle in Ewing's sarcoma and highlight important questions that remain to be answered.

  3. The primary structures of ribosomal proteins S14 and S16 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui. Comparison with eubacterial and eukaryotic ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, J; Kimura, M

    1987-09-05

    The amino acid sequences of two ribosomal proteins, S14 and S16, from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui have been determined. Sequence data were obtained by the manual and solid-phase sequencing of peptides derived from enzymatic digestions with trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and Staphylococcus aureus protease as well as by chemical cleavage with cyanogen bromide. Proteins S14 and S16 contain 109 and 126 amino acid residues and have Mr values of 11,964 and 13,515, respectively. Comparison of the sequences with those of ribosomal proteins from other organisms demonstrates that S14 has a significant homology with the rat liver ribosomal protein S11 (36% identity) as well as with the Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S17 (37%), and that S16 is related to the yeast ribosomal protein YS22 (40%) and proteins S8 from E. coli (28%) and Bacillus stearothermophilus (30%). A comparison of the amino acid residues in the homologous regions of halophilic and nonhalophilic ribosomal proteins reveals that halophilic proteins have more glutamic acids, asparatic acids, prolines, and alanines, and less lysines, arginines, and isoleucines than their nonhalophilic counterparts. These amino acid substitutions probably contribute to the structural stability of halophilic ribosomal proteins.

  4. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  5. Neuron-Like Networks Between Ribosomal Proteins Within the Ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, Olivier; Timsit, Youri

    2016-05-01

    From brain to the World Wide Web, information-processing networks share common scale invariant properties. Here, we reveal the existence of neural-like networks at a molecular scale within the ribosome. We show that with their extensions, ribosomal proteins form complex assortative interaction networks through which they communicate through tiny interfaces. The analysis of the crystal structures of 50S eubacterial particles reveals that most of these interfaces involve key phylogenetically conserved residues. The systematic observation of interactions between basic and aromatic amino acids at the interfaces and along the extension provides new structural insights that may contribute to decipher the molecular mechanisms of signal transmission within or between the ribosomal proteins. Similar to neurons interacting through “molecular synapses”, ribosomal proteins form a network that suggest an analogy with a simple molecular brain in which the “sensory-proteins” innervate the functional ribosomal sites, while the “inter-proteins” interconnect them into circuits suitable to process the information flow that circulates during protein synthesis. It is likely that these circuits have evolved to coordinate both the complex macromolecular motions and the binding of the multiple factors during translation. This opens new perspectives on nanoscale information transfer and processing.

  6. Dual binding mode of the nascent polypeptide-associated complex reveals a novel universal adapter site on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Markus; Spreter, Thomas; Beckmann, Roland; Beatrix, Birgitta

    2010-06-18

    Nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) was identified in eukaryotes as the first cytosolic factor that contacts the nascent polypeptide chain emerging from the ribosome. NAC is present as a homodimer in archaea and as a highly conserved heterodimer in eukaryotes. Mutations in NAC cause severe embryonically lethal phenotypes in mice, Drosophila melanogaster, and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NAC is quantitatively associated with ribosomes. Here we show that NAC contacts several ribosomal proteins. The N terminus of betaNAC, however, specifically contacts near the tunnel exit ribosomal protein Rpl31, which is unique to eukaryotes and archaea. Moreover, the first 23 amino acids of betaNAC are sufficient to direct an otherwise non-associated protein to the ribosome. In contrast, alphaNAC (Egd2p) contacts Rpl17, the direct neighbor of Rpl31 at the ribosomal tunnel exit site. Rpl31 was also recently identified as a contact site for the SRP receptor and the ribosome-associated complex. Furthermore, in Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF) interacts with the corresponding surface area on the eubacterial ribosome. In addition to the previously identified universal adapter site represented by Rpl25/Rpl35, we therefore refer to Rpl31/Rpl17 as a novel universal docking site for ribosome-associated factors on the eukaryotic ribosome.

  7. Electricity utility deregulation in Great Britain: economic and industrial consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we analyze in the first part how was made the deregulation of the public electric utilities in Great Britain and in the second the logic and the contradictions of this deregulation in an industrial point of view

  8. Industrial consumers and electricity sector deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jukic, A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the electricity sector deregulation from the point of view of major industrial consumers (MIC). Possibilities and limitations of MIC's impact on the introduction and development of an open power market in some European countries, the USA and Croatia are discussed. (author)

  9. IMPACT OF DEREGULATION ON FINANCIAL SECTOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the efficiency in the allocation of the society's resources, which were not ... financial system so as to make the system operate on the basis of the market ..... cases, the null hypothesis that financial sector deregulation does not granger .... Financial Sector Development and Growth: Evidence from Malaysia, Brookings.

  10. Deregulation of natural gas in Georgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Natural Gas Competition and Deregulation Act of 1997 in Georgia is discussed. New legislation passed the Natural Gas Consumer Relief Act in 2002 legislative session to provide additional protection and increase competition. This Act and its impacts are discussed in detail. Additional commission responsibilities are summarized. (R.P.)

  11. Regulatory concern about economic deregulation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virolainen, R.; Koutaniemi, P.

    2002-01-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market may cause an increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This makes a new challenge to the regulatory body to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the economic deregulation. This paper is to discuss the current situation in Finland with regard to the economic deregulation of the electricity market and the experiences so far. A common view today is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe because of tough competition in the electricity market. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of tough competition in electricity prices and the consequential pressure to reduce costs. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points have been discussed in this paper such as change of ownership of power companies due to the economic pressure, the need to cut costs of the companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and/or outsourcing of activities. The need to pursue reduction or delay of planned investments in safety upgrades are discussed as well. (author)

  12. Regulatory concern about economic deregulation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virolainen, R.; Koutaniemi, P.

    2001-01-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market may cause an increased pressure to reduce the costs of electricity generation. This makes a new challenge to the regulatory body to assess the impact of these changes on the safety of nuclear power plants. Accordingly, it is important to identify the risks to the nuclear power industry resulting from the economic deregulation. This paper is to discuss the current situation in Finland with regard to the economic deregulation of the electricity market and the experiences so far. A common view today is that the number of electricity generating power companies will be reduced in Europe because of tough competition in the electricity market. It is expected that only the biggest companies can stand the consequences of tough competition in electricity prices and the consequential pressure to reduce costs. In order to review the impact of deregulation of the electricity market some relevant points have been discussed in this paper, such as change of ownership of power companies due to the economic pressure, the need to cut costs of the companies by reducing the number of their activities and increasing the efficiency in the remaining activities and/or outsourcing of activities. The need to pursue reduction or delay of planned investments in safety upgrades are discussed as well. (author)

  13. Wind power in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravn, Hans F.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes organisational and economic elements related to wind power in a deregulated market, it describes physical and technical characteristics of wind power and it describes how wind power is handled in daily operation as well as on the market. (author)

  14. Energy and the deregulated marketplace 1998 survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    In this comprehensive survey of the energy and deregulated marketplace, 911 respondents indicate how deregulation will impact their business. Well organized for easy reference this published survey report provides answers on how companies will procure electricity and natural gas, and what criteria will be used in their decision process. The results presented also illustrate effect of real time pricing on the procurement of energy equipment. Readers will be able to see whether companies are delaying the purchase of energy efficiency equipment as a result of deregulation, as well as what current trends are developing in the use of energy services and performance contracting. The performance and overall cost effectiveness of various types of energy efficient equipment is also rated by respondents, and the results of existing installations is reported. Responses are broken down and can be assessed by respondent categories, including utility, energy supplier, energy user, power marketer, ESCO, equipment supplier, and consultant. This survey report offers a valuable tool for all companies whose business and marketing strategies are impacted by deregulation

  15. Design of reactive power procurement in deregulated electricity market

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reactive power management is different in the deregulated electricity market of various countries. In this paper, a novel reactive power procurement model is proposed, which ensure secure and reliable operation of deregulated electricity market. Various issues of reactive power management in the deregulated electricity ...

  16. Deregulation and competition in the electric utility marketplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the impact of deregulation and competition in the electric utility marketplace as an extension of the deregulation of the airlines, and natural gas, telephone and trucking industries. The topics of the paper include the events and circumstances leading to deregulation, those involved in the competition, and a scenario for how the industry will develop over the next 20 years

  17. Structure of the quaternary complex between SRP, SR, and translocon bound to the translating ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Ahmad; Fu, Yu-Hsien Hwang; Boehringer, Daniel; Leibundgut, Marc; Shan, Shu-Ou; Ban, Nenad

    2017-05-19

    During co-translational protein targeting, the signal recognition particle (SRP) binds to the translating ribosome displaying the signal sequence to deliver it to the SRP receptor (SR) on the membrane, where the signal peptide is transferred to the translocon. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we have determined the structure of a quaternary complex of the translating Escherichia coli ribosome, the SRP-SR in the 'activated' state and the translocon. Our structure, supported by biochemical experiments, reveals that the SRP RNA adopts a kinked and untwisted conformation to allow repositioning of the 'activated' SRP-SR complex on the ribosome. In addition, we observe the translocon positioned through interactions with the SR in the vicinity of the ribosome exit tunnel where the signal sequence is extending beyond its hydrophobic binding groove of the SRP M domain towards the translocon. Our study provides new insights into the mechanism of signal sequence transfer from the SRP to the translocon.

  18. Dynamic enzyme docking to the ribosome coordinates N-terminal processing with polypeptide folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandikci, Arzu; Gloge, Felix; Martinez, Michael; Mayer, Matthias P; Wade, Rebecca; Bukau, Bernd; Kramer, Günter

    2013-07-01

    Newly synthesized polypeptides undergo various cotranslational maturation steps, including N-terminal enzymatic processing, chaperone-assisted folding and membrane targeting, but the spatial and temporal coordination of these steps is unclear. We show that Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) associates with ribosomes through a charged loop that is crucial for nascent-chain processing and cell viability. MAP competes with peptide deformylase (PDF), the first enzyme to act on nascent chains, for binding sites at the ribosomal tunnel exit. PDF has extremely fast association and dissociation kinetics, which allows it to frequently sample ribosomes and ensure the processing of nascent chains after their emergence. Premature recruitment of the chaperone trigger factor, or polypeptide folding, negatively affect processing efficiency. Thus, the fast ribosome association kinetics of PDF and MAP are crucial for the temporal separation of nascent-chain processing from later maturation events, including chaperone recruitment and folding.

  19. Reactor decommissioning in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverridge, George; Cooper, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Deregulation of the electricity markets in North America and Western Europe has had many profound effects on the electric utilities and the nuclear industry. Deregulation has led to cost transparency, increased competition, and a drive by the utilities to reduce costs in order to maintain market share and margins. In the context of this more competitive and dynamic market having a clear picture of decommissioning liabilities and their successful discharge has a material impact on the financial performance of a utility. This paper will summarise BNFL Environmental Services' experience with regard to its experience in both the planning and implementation phases of a reactor decommissioning project. In particular it will demonstrate how commercial projects in crucial areas of strategy development, project implementation and site restoration, can be combined with an approach that is both commercial and innovative to reduce the risks to a utility. This paper sets out to demonstrate this viewpoint. (author)

  20. Deregulation of Electricity Supply Industry in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed S. Al-Maghderi

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the opportunities available and the conditions needed for the deregulation of the Electricity Supply Industry (ESI, with particular reference to the Sultanate of Oman. The paper highlights the general issues of regulation required to encourage competition in the ESI.  After that, the discussion focuses on regulation methods in the privatized ESI by describing the regulators control through price caps setting for regulatees, the conduct regulation process, the rate of return regulation setting, and the spot market (the pool contract. Finally, the prospects of restructuring and privatizing the ESI in the Sultanate of Oman are examined by reviewing the current structure of the industry and government objectives in deregulation of the electricity sector as well as the regulation framework.

  1. Utilities' ''obligation to serve'' under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    The utility no longer has protected status, and the traditional franchise concept is under attack. Exclusive rights once conveyed to the utilities are being denied and not just in the area of gas sales. Exclusive rights once conveyed to utilities will be denied in more areas. State by state, the utilities' franchise is being examined to see which, if any, of its provisions are necessary in a deregulated environment. Can the free market provide everything that's been provided for many years under monopolistic arrangements? Some of the most critical and difficult of these provisions concern the obligation to serve, which utilities, in most states, have assumed as part of their franchise agreement. Regulators, courts, utilities, marketers and others are busy sorting through these issues, but resolution could take years. The paper discusses deregulation, universal service fee, representation without taxation, suppliers and marketer restrictions

  2. Gas directive. Which deregulation for France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    This study deals with the following aspects of natural gas market: deregulation of the French market; status and perspectives of the gas market: overview of the gas supplies in Europe at the 2010/2015 vista; situation of regulations: status of the gas directive at the European level and impact on member states market, transposition of the gas directive in France: present day legislation, main stakes and situation of the dialogue with the actors; consequences and actors' strategy: testimony of suppliers, past and future situation, development of new activities in the gas/power industry, possible contractual evolutions, position of the supplier; testimony of clients: new suppliers, new contracts, new risks; legal stakes for the clients: impact of deregulation on contracts, future contractual organization of the market, evolution of 'take or pay' contracts, impairment of contracts obligations, negotiation of supply contracts. (J.S.)

  3. Network industries deregulation and energy industries reorganization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaporte, P.; Chevalier, J.M.; Bourdaire, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The electric power distribution systems deregulation is going to change the economical and institutional scenery. The empowerment term can be anything but a happy change for the customer by giving him the free choice. But this evolution calls the public power in question again. Meanwhile the government has to remain vigilant and watch over the safety in terms of cartel and environment risk. (A.L.B.)

  4. Energy subsidies in California's electricity market deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschel, Alexander; Smestad, G.P.

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation and re-regulation of California's electricity market not only failed in terms of anticipated cost reductions, improved customer service and higher competition, it also led to the introduction of various additional energy subsidies. This paper analyzes California's electricity market deregulation process from a subsidy viewpoint. Under deregulation in California, investor-owned utilities were not allowed to pass their energy procurement costs fully on to their customers, and therefore subsequently, and inevitably, ran into severe financial problems. Such retail price regulation is an energy subsidy that is both economically and environmentally unfavorable, because it veils true price signals to electricity consumers and, in this way, discourages energy conservation. Other policies implemented in California that represent perverse energy subsidies are the purchase of power by the state of California, the suspension of retail competition, and the potential misuse of money from the recovery of stranded costs. Many interventions implemented by the state to smooth out the impacts of the energy crisis insulated electricity consumers from market realities, supported the existing structure of California's electricity market, which is predominantly based on fossil fuels, and suppressed market incentives to improve energy conservation

  5. Deregulated power prices: comparison of volatility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ying; Flynn, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    We examine electrical power price variability for 14 deregulated markets. Power price volatility is measured by price velocity, the daily average of the absolute value of price change per hour. Deregulated markets show a wide variability in price velocity. Some price velocity is expected and arises from the daily diurnal price pattern, which differs significantly between markets. Even when the expected daily variability in price is removed, the residual unexpected variability differs between markets. Some deregulated markets, most notably Britain and Spain, show patterns that are predictable and consistent and have low values of unexpected price velocity. These markets create a climate conducive to consumers facing the market through real time pricing and shaping consumption behaviors in response to price changes. Other markets, for example, South Australia and Alberta, have patterns that are inconsistent and irregular, and hence are hard for a customer to interpret; a customer in such a market will have a higher incentive to avoid demand side management and escape risk through hedging mechanisms

  6. Gas and electricity 2000: energy deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulot, J.C.; Charbit, N.; Tuot, Th.

    2000-11-01

    This document brings together 17 testimonies of experts about the deregulation of the gas and electricity markets. Content: 1 - the new rules controlling the market: schedule and regulatory evolutions, the new legal framework, the new regulation, the missions and competences of the Commission of Electricity Regulation; 2 - the new commercial practices: the question of electricity transport and of the network independence, the development of trading, the stock exchanges and the forecasting of Paris market, the correlations with the environment (eco-taxes and climate change); 3 - the proposals of new actors: the contribution of a deregulated market like Spain, the comparison with a fully open market like Germany, an internal out-sourcing example to create an energy entity as a whole, the role of a bank in the risk management and the derived markets, the contribution of new technologies from service suppliers; 4 - the consumers attitude with respect to new offers: the historical gas and electricity utilities at the service of French and European clients, the new opportunities offered by the deregulation, the contribution of an independent supplier to consumers, the expectations of big companies and eligible consumers. (J.S.)

  7. Structure based hypothesis of a mitochondrial ribosome rescue mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huynen Martijn A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background mtRF1 is a vertebrate mitochondrial protein with an unknown function that arose from a duplication of the mitochondrial release factor mtRF1a. To elucidate the function of mtRF1, we determined the positions that are conserved among mtRF1 sequences but that are different in their mtRF1a paralogs. We subsequently modeled the 3D structure of mtRF1a and mtRF1 bound to the ribosome, highlighting the structural implications of these differences to derive a hypothesis for the function of mtRF1. Results Our model predicts, in agreement with the experimental data, that the 3D structure of mtRF1a allows it to recognize the stop codons UAA and UAG in the A-site of the ribosome. In contrast, we show that mtRF1 likely can only bind the ribosome when the A-site is devoid of mRNA. Furthermore, while mtRF1a will adopt its catalytic conformation, in which it functions as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in the ribosome, only upon binding of a stop codon in the A-site, mtRF1 appears specifically adapted to assume this extended, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolyzing conformation in the absence of mRNA in the A-site. Conclusions We predict that mtRF1 specifically recognizes ribosomes with an empty A-site and is able to function as a peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase in those situations. Stalled ribosomes with empty A-sites that still contain a tRNA bound to a peptide chain can result from the translation of truncated, stop-codon less mRNAs. We hypothesize that mtRF1 recycles such stalled ribosomes, performing a function that is analogous to that of tmRNA in bacteria. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr. Eugene Koonin, Prof. Knud H. Nierhaus (nominated by Dr. Sarah Teichmann and Dr. Shamil Sunyaev.

  8. Structure of Ribosomal Silencing Factor Bound to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Sun, Qingan; Jiang, Cai; Yang, Kailu; Hung, Li-Wei; Zhang, Junjie; Sacchettini, James C

    2015-10-06

    The ribosomal silencing factor RsfS slows cell growth by inhibiting protein synthesis during periods of diminished nutrient availability. The crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) RsfS, together with the cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structure of the large subunit 50S of Mtb ribosome, reveals how inhibition of protein synthesis by RsfS occurs. RsfS binds to the 50S at L14, which, when occupied, blocks the association of the small subunit 30S. Although Mtb RsfS is a dimer in solution, only a single subunit binds to 50S. The overlap between the dimer interface and the L14 binding interface confirms that the RsfS dimer must first dissociate to a monomer in order to bind to L14. RsfS interacts primarily through electrostatic and hydrogen bonding to L14. The EM structure shows extended rRNA density that it is not found in the Escherichia coli ribosome, the most striking of these being the extended RNA helix of H54a. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  10. The Potential of Targeting Ribosome Biogenesis in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunfei Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall survival for patients with ovarian cancer (OC has shown little improvement for decades meaning new therapeutic options are critical. OC comprises multiple histological subtypes, of which the most common and aggressive subtype is high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC. HGSOC is characterized by genomic structural variations with relatively few recurrent somatic mutations or dominantly acting oncogenes that can be targeted for the development of novel therapies. However, deregulation of pathways controlling homologous recombination (HR and ribosome biogenesis has been observed in a high proportion of HGSOC, raising the possibility that targeting these basic cellular processes may provide improved patient outcomes. The poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor olaparib has been approved to treat women with defects in HR due to germline BRCA mutations. Recent evidence demonstrated the efficacy of targeting ribosome biogenesis with the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis, CX-5461 in v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC-driven haematological and prostate cancers. CX-5461 has now progressed to a phase I clinical trial in patients with haematological malignancies and phase I/II trial in breast cancer. Here we review the currently available targeted therapies for HGSOC and discuss the potential of targeting ribosome biogenesis as a novel therapeutic approach against HGSOC.

  11. Deregulated gas in 1985 seen costly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, P.

    1980-05-05

    Deregulation of natural gas wellhead prices will mean higher prices for nonboiler industrial users, according to an Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc. (EEA) study. The price increases of high-sulfur residual fuel oil will exceed inflation rates, but low-sulfur residual oil and distillate oil will have smaller increases because of upgraded refineries. Te economc imact analysis is broken down by region and includes estimates of gas, high-sulfur coal, and low-sulfur coal prices thrugh 1995. Free copies of the report are available from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Office of Public Information. (DCK)

  12. Immunological Deregulation in Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandra; Vetro, Calogero; Caocci, Giovanni; Greco, Marianna; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Di Raimondo, Francesco; La Nasa, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma (cHL) has a unique histology since only a few neoplastic cells are surrounded by inflammatory accessory cells that in the last years have emerged as crucial players in sustaining the course of disease. In addition, recent studies suggest that the abnormal activity of these inflammatory cells (such as deregulation in regulatory T cells signaling, expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells, HLA-G signaling and natural killer cells dysfunction) may have prognostic significance. This review is focused on summarizing recent advanced in immunological defects in cHL with translational implications. PMID:24959336

  13. Controversies about gas industry deregulation in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, J.

    1992-01-01

    The E.E.C. Commission wishes to introduce more competition into the European gas industry; abolish import public monopolies, resort to competitive bidding for distribution concessions, and to the common carrier system in the transport field. This deregulation policy may induce adverse effects in the long run. This may compromise supply security, and delay the development of new gas fields. This may particularly induce subsidies among users and lead to a reinforcement of regulation if we want the Third Party Access system to respect equality conditions for all users. This paper analyzes arguments for and against this common carrier system. 15 refs., 2 figs

  14. Electric deregulation in Texas : the next steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, R.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation provided a look at the deregulated market in Texas and provided some statistics and facts about the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) which monitors the reliability of 37,000 miles of power transmission lines and 77,000 MW of generation. The governance adopted by ERCOT was described along with market design and wholesale operation in terms of open access to transmission and distribution systems, reliability, timely conveyance of information needed to support customer choice, and accurate accountability for electricity production and delivery. Transmission has been one the greatest challenges facing ERCOT, but retail operations are progressing well despite initial start-up problems. tabs., figs

  15. sORFs.org: a repository of small ORFs identified by ribosome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olexiouk, Volodimir; Crappé, Jeroen; Verbruggen, Steven; Verhegen, Kenneth; Martens, Lennart; Menschaert, Gerben

    2016-01-04

    With the advent of ribosome profiling, a next generation sequencing technique providing a "snap-shot'' of translated mRNA in a cell, many short open reading frames (sORFs) with ribosomal activity were identified. Follow-up studies revealed the existence of functional peptides, so-called micropeptides, translated from these 'sORFs', indicating a new class of bio-active peptides. Over the last few years, several micropeptides exhibiting important cellular functions were discovered. However, ribosome occupancy does not necessarily imply an actual function of the translated peptide, leading to the development of various tools assessing the coding potential of sORFs. Here, we introduce sORFs.org (http://www.sorfs.org), a novel database for sORFs identified using ribosome profiling. Starting from ribosome profiling, sORFs.org identifies sORFs, incorporates state-of-the-art tools and metrics and stores results in a public database. Two query interfaces are provided, a default one enabling quick lookup of sORFs and a BioMart interface providing advanced query and export possibilities. At present, sORFs.org harbors 263 354 sORFs that demonstrate ribosome occupancy, originating from three different cell lines: HCT116 (human), E14_mESC (mouse) and S2 (fruit fly). sORFs.org aims to provide an extensive sORFs database accessible to researchers with limited bioinformatics knowledge, thus enabling easy integration into personal projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Evidence for rRNA 2'-O-methylation plasticity: Control of intrinsic translational capabilities of human ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erales, Jenny; Marchand, Virginie; Panthu, Baptiste; Gillot, Sandra; Belin, Stéphane; Ghayad, Sandra E; Garcia, Maxime; Laforêts, Florian; Marcel, Virginie; Baudin-Baillieu, Agnès; Bertin, Pierre; Couté, Yohann; Adrait, Annie; Meyer, Mélanie; Therizols, Gabriel; Yusupov, Marat; Namy, Olivier; Ohlmann, Théophile; Motorin, Yuri; Catez, Frédéric; Diaz, Jean-Jacques

    2017-12-05

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are main effectors of messenger RNA (mRNA) decoding, peptide-bond formation, and ribosome dynamics during translation. Ribose 2'-O-methylation (2'-O-Me) is the most abundant rRNA chemical modification, and displays a complex pattern in rRNA. 2'-O-Me was shown to be essential for accurate and efficient protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. However, whether rRNA 2'-O-Me is an adjustable feature of the human ribosome and a means of regulating ribosome function remains to be determined. Here we challenged rRNA 2'-O-Me globally by inhibiting the rRNA methyl-transferase fibrillarin in human cells. Using RiboMethSeq, a nonbiased quantitative mapping of 2'-O-Me, we identified a repertoire of 2'-O-Me sites subjected to variation and demonstrate that functional domains of ribosomes are targets of 2'-O-Me plasticity. Using the cricket paralysis virus internal ribosome entry site element, coupled to in vitro translation, we show that the intrinsic capability of ribosomes to translate mRNAs is modulated through a 2'-O-Me pattern and not by nonribosomal actors of the translational machinery. Our data establish rRNA 2'-O-Me plasticity as a mechanism providing functional specificity to human ribosomes.

  17. Could a Proto-Ribosome Emerge Spontaneously in the Prebiotic World?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana C. Agmon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An indispensable prerequisite for establishing a scenario of life emerging by natural processes is the requirement that the first simple proto-molecules could have had a realistic probability of self-assembly from random molecular polymers in the prebiotic world. The vestige of the proto-ribosome, which is believed to be still embedded in the contemporary ribosome, is used to assess the feasibility of such spontaneous emergence. Three concentric structural elements of different magnitudes, having a dimeric nature derived from the symmetrical region of the ribosomal large subunit, were suggested to constitute the vestige of the proto-ribosome. It is assumed to have materialized spontaneously in the prebiotic world, catalyzing non-coded peptide bond formation and simple elongation. Probabilistic and energetic considerations are applied in order to evaluate the suitability of the three contenders for being the initial proto-ribosome. The analysis points to the simplest proto-ribosome, comprised of a dimer of tRNA-like molecules presently embedded in the core of the symmetrical region, as the only one having a realistic statistical likelihood of spontaneous emergence from random RNA chains. Hence it offers a feasible starting point for a continuous evolutionary path from the prebiotic matter, through natural processes, into the intricate modern translation system.

  18. Deregulation, privatization and the Ontario power failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) has examined the history of deregulation of the electricity industry in the United States and presents lessons that could be learned from the California electricity crisis, the collapse of Enron, and the massive blackout that occurred in August 2003 across Ontario and northeastern United States. Unlike the United States, Canada's electricity system is mostly publicly owned and operated. This report emphasized that the need for public investment in the electricity system is greater than ever, and offers suggestions on how to strengthen the Canadian electricity system. It examines the attempts made to deregulate and privatize the electricity system in Ontario, Alberta, New Brunswick and British Columbia and exposes the reality of price caps and the debt of public utilities. It demonstrates that privatization has failed to provide a safe, reliable, affordable and adequate supply of electricity. The report claims that profit-seeking power producers want to keep supply and demand in their favour to sell electricity at the highest possible price. In addition to emphasizing the need for public investment in the electricity system, this report emphasizes the need for Canadian electricity cooperation, with particular mention of the large energy supplies in Manitoba and Quebec. 37 refs

  19. Zap... Alberta is jolted by electric deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Of all Canadian provinces, Alberta has travelled the furthest along the electric deregulation road. On January 1, 2001, full retail competition came into effect. Wholesale electricity prices are set by the province through an auction process. The bids from purchasers are made through the Power Pool of Alberta against supply offers. Power prices increased from being amongst the lowest in the world to being amongst the highest in North America as a result of deregulation. Changes to the Electric Utilities Act were made recently by the Alberta government to try to mitigate the factors affecting power price increases. RBC Dominion Securities is of the opinion that the changes will not significantly impact the Alberta Pool Price. It is expected that the trend for power price increases to continue, despite some relief from relatively low-cost electricity being felt by other Canadian provinces as a result of the energy crisis in North America. Based on the Electric Competition Unfolds in Alberta report dated June 2, 2001 prepared by RBC Dominion Securities, this document examines the factors at play in electric price increases, assess the sustainability of current power prices in Alberta, and identify Canadian companies believed to be best positioned in the pipeline and gas and electric sectors to benefit from the high power prices in Alberta. Those companies were ATCO, Canadian Utilities, Westcoast Energy and TransCanada PipeLines, and TransAlta. 5 tabs., 5 figs

  20. Selling power : marketing energy under deregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, J.; Hanna, F.

    2001-07-01

    This book discussed the marketing of energy in a deregulated environment. Experience from long distance telephone service providers has shown that historical dominance is not a guarantee for future success. As new brands are introduced and as consumer choice increases, so does the ability to change from one provider to another. Price is only one of the factors prompting that change. Old rules and practices do not bind new competitors who must face the challenge of open competition and must be aware of the ever-changing face of business. It was recommended that the strategic solution would be to build a brand and to develop significant market shares and create effective customer retention programs. This book focused on the elements that energy marketing professionals must use to maintain and increase share without product differentiation. It also explained how energy providers can effectively attract and retain customers over the long term while keeping marketing and service delivery costs down. It was suggested that small players can compete with the growing strength of regional providers by creating new alliances between larger energy conglomerates. The chapters of the book were entitled: (1) Introduction, (2) The Goals of Deregulation, (3) Strategic Marketing Choices, (4) Relationship Marketing, (5) The Role of Customer Service, (6) The Question of Outsourcing, and (7) Final Thoughts and Observations. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Competing in a fully deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, A.; Schoen, G.; Johansson, B.

    1999-01-01

    Vattenfall, Sweden's largest utility, has provided competitively priced nuclear electricity to a price-conscious market for several decades. As Sweden is an exporting country, the cost of products must be kept as low as possible to meet tough European competition. Since Sweden relies almost exclusively on electricity for energy, electric prices must be low to keep Swedish products competitive. Because of the available hydropower in Sweden and Norway, nuclear power plants have been forced to operate with high availability and low cost. From the first years after nuclear plants began operation, there has been a continuous development of organization, management, and work practices to sustain low-cost production. Now, the European electricity market is undergoing deregulation and open competition. This is taking place in a situation where the increase in demand is relatively weak and where the availability of generation capacity is good. Sweden is at the forefront of the competition. According to the well-known law of supply and demand, this entails the risk of squeezed prices, but the situation also offers many opportunities for those making the right decisions. The availability of electricity at competitive prices has great significance for the competitiveness of the industry in general and for the electricity-intensive industry in particular. If the customer then, in a deregulated market is free to choose the supplier, the focus definitely is on the customer

  2. Deregulation : unlocking value : the Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, F.

    2002-01-01

    Macquarie is a global investment bank based in Australia whose international focus is on niche markets such as infrastructure and utilities. A corporate review of Macquarie is presented along with a review of the evolution of the utility industry from the stages of an integrated utility to fully unbundled entities. In the first stage, the utility is vertically integrated and owned by government, or it is highly regulated. The second stage of evolution involves the unbundling of the utility into separate generation, transmission and distribution companies, each preparing for competition. The third stage involves the introduction of competition to power generation and retail sectors. Transmission and distribution remains regulated in the third stage. The fourth stage involves down-sizing in response to competition and benchmarking. It is also a period of convergence between electricity and gas. The fifth and final stage is for deriving value. Deregulation results in major structural changes and utility managers have to decide how the utility can best deliver value to the shareholders in the new environment. The author discusses how these lessons can be applied to the case of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta

  3. Energy service unbundling: where deregulation is heading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croft, M.

    2002-01-01

    The workings of the natural gas market is provided by the speaker at the beginning of the presentation, and covers pre-regulation, early regulation and deregulation. The pre-regulation era provided no customer choice, and the early regulation period saw industrial customers with some degree of choice (mid-1980s). The advent of deregulation created core market customer choice (around 1996). At Coral Energy, there is choice of energy supplier, choice of price structure, and choice of transportation and distribution. A forecast of North American gas demand is provided, along with the natural gas supply and the North American gas supply basins. For the period January 1996 to May 2000, a comparison of annualized volatility is discussed. The author discusses the strategies for purchasing gas: 1) to know yourself and your risk tolerance, flexibility, and load profile; 2) switching gas supply provider. It is important to choose a three year term, combination pricing, and storage position. The risk management options are reviewed: limit exposure to price volatility, mitigate price/volume volatility, and enhance bottom line by capturing market opportunities. figs

  4. Selling power : marketing energy under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drummond, J.; Hanna, F.

    2001-01-01

    This book discussed the marketing of energy in a deregulated environment. Experience from long distance telephone service providers has shown that historical dominance is not a guarantee for future success. As new brands are introduced and as consumer choice increases, so does the ability to change from one provider to another. Price is only one of the factors prompting that change. Old rules and practices do not bind new competitors who must face the challenge of open competition and must be aware of the ever-changing face of business. It was recommended that the strategic solution would be to build a brand and to develop significant market shares and create effective customer retention programs. This book focused on the elements that energy marketing professionals must use to maintain and increase share without product differentiation. It also explained how energy providers can effectively attract and retain customers over the long term while keeping marketing and service delivery costs down. It was suggested that small players can compete with the growing strength of regional providers by creating new alliances between larger energy conglomerates. The chapters of the book were entitled: (1) Introduction, (2) The Goals of Deregulation, (3) Strategic Marketing Choices, (4) Relationship Marketing, (5) The Role of Customer Service, (6) The Question of Outsourcing, and (7) Final Thoughts and Observations. 24 refs., 3 figs

  5. Transmission management in the deregulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.D.; Wollenberg, B.F.; Wangensteen, I.

    2000-01-01

    Three very different methods of accomplishing the same task--managing the operation of the transmission system in the deregulated power system operating environment--have been implemented as deregulated market structures have been created around the world. They are first, the optimal power flow (OPF) model found in various implementations in the United Kingdom, parts of the United States, and in Australia and New Zealand. Second, the point tariff, price area congestion control model used in the Nordpool market area in Norway and Sweden. Third, the US transaction-based model. All are pragmatic solutions implemented in advance of complete theoretical understanding. Each has strengths and flaws, and there are some surprising inter-relationships. Each maintains power system security but differs in its impact on the economics of the energy market. No clearly superior method has so far emerged. In the future, methods of combining decentralized market solutions with operational use of optimal power flow may provide better solutions to existing and emerging problems

  6. Low level genome mistranslations deregulate the transcriptome and translatome and generate proteotoxic stress in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paredes João A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organisms use highly accurate molecular processes to transcribe their genes and a variety of mRNA quality control and ribosome proofreading mechanisms to maintain intact the fidelity of genetic information flow. Despite this, low level gene translational errors induced by mutations and environmental factors cause neurodegeneration and premature death in mice and mitochondrial disorders in humans. Paradoxically, such errors can generate advantageous phenotypic diversity in fungi and bacteria through poorly understood molecular processes. Results In order to clarify the biological relevance of gene translational errors we have engineered codon misreading in yeast and used profiling of total and polysome-associated mRNAs, molecular and biochemical tools to characterize the recombinant cells. We demonstrate here that gene translational errors, which have negligible impact on yeast growth rate down-regulate protein synthesis, activate the unfolded protein response and environmental stress response pathways, and down-regulate chaperones linked to ribosomes. Conclusions We provide the first global view of transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to global gene translational errors and we postulate that they cause gradual cell degeneration through synergistic effects of overloading protein quality control systems and deregulation of protein synthesis, but generate adaptive phenotypes in unicellular organisms through activation of stress cross-protection. We conclude that these genome wide gene translational infidelities can be degenerative or adaptive depending on cellular context and physiological condition.

  7. Structural and functional implications in the eubacterial ribosome as revealed by protein-rRNA and antibiotic contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann-Liebold, B; Uhlein, M; Urlaub, H; Müller, E C; Otto, A; Bischof, O

    1995-01-01

    Contact sites between protein and rRNA in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus were investigated at the molecular level using UV and 2-iminothiolane as cross-linkers. Thirteen ribosomal proteins (S3, S4, S7, S14, S17, L2, L4, L6, L14, L27, L28, L29, and L36) from these organisms were cross-linked in direct contact with the RNAs, and the peptide stretches as well as amino acids involved were identified. Further, the binding sites of puromycin and spiramycin were established at the peptide level in several proteins that were found to constitute the antibiotic-binding sites. Peptide stretches of puromycin binding were identified from proteins S7, S14, S18, L18, AND L29; those of spiramycin attachment were derived from proteins S12, S14, L17, L18, L27, and L35. Comparison of the RNA-peptide contact sites with the peptides identified for antibiotic binding and with those altered in antibiotic-resistant mutants clearly showed identical peptide areas to be involved and, hence, demonstrated the functional importance of these peptides. Further evidence for a functional implication of ribosomal proteins in the translational process came from complementation experiments in which protein L2 from Halobacterium marismortui was incorporated into the E. coli ribosomes that were active. The incorporated protein was present in 50S subunits and 70S particles, in disomes, and in higher polysomes. These results clearly demonstrate the functional implication of protein L2 in protein biosynthesis. Incorporation studies with a mutant of HmaL2 with a replacement of histidine-229 by glycine completely abolished the functional activity of the ribosome. Accordingly, protein L2 with histidine-229 is a crucial element of the translational machinery.

  8. Detection of deregulated modules using deregulatory linked path.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxuan Hu

    Full Text Available The identification of deregulated modules (such as induced by oncogenes is a crucial step for exploring the pathogenic process of complex diseases. Most of the existing methods focus on deregulation of genes rather than the links of the path among them. In this study, we emphasize on the detection of deregulated links, and develop a novel and effective regulatory path-based approach in finding deregulated modules. Observing that a regulatory pathway between two genes might involve in multiple rather than a single path, we identify condition-specific core regulatory path (CCRP to detect the significant deregulation of regulatory links. Using time-series gene expression, we define the regulatory strength within each gene pair based on statistical dependence analysis. The CCRPs in regulatory networks can then be identified using the shortest path algorithm. Finally, we derive the deregulated modules by integrating the differential edges (as deregulated links of the CCRPs between the case and the control group. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we apply the method to expression data associated with different states of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2. The experimental results show that the genes as well as the links in the deregulated modules are significantly enriched in multiple KEGG pathways and GO biological processes, most of which can be validated to suffer from impact of this oncogene based on previous studies. Additionally, we find the regulatory mechanism associated with the crucial gene SNAI1 significantly deregulated resulting from the activation of HER2. Hence, our method provides not only a strategy for detecting the deregulated links in regulatory networks, but also a way to identify concerning deregulated modules, thus contributing to the target selection of edgetic drugs.

  9. Control of ribosome formation in rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Diabetes of 9 days duration produced a 17% diminution in the rate of total protein synthesis in rat hearts perfused as Langendorff preparations supplied with glucose, plasma levels of amino acids, and 400 μU/ml insulin. This reduction was attributable to a decrease in efficiency of protein synthesis and total RNA content. Total messenger RNA content decreased in diabetic hearts in proportion to the reduction in total RNA. Diabetes also resulted in diminished ribosome content as reflected by the induction in total RNA. Ribosome production was investigated by monitoring incorporation of [ 3 H]phenylalanine into the proteins of cytoplasmic ribosomes. Rates of ribosome formation in diabetic hearts were as fast as control rates in the presence of insulin, and were faster than control rates in the absence of the hormone. These results indicated that ribosome content fell in diabetic hearts despite unchanged or faster rates of ribosome formation

  10. The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wen, Jin-Der; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2011-07-06

    The ribosome translates the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA into protein. Folded structures in the coding region of an mRNA represent a kinetic barrier that lowers the peptide elongation rate, as the ribosome must disrupt structures it encounters in the mRNA at its entry site to allow translocation to the next codon. Such structures are exploited by the cell to create diverse strategies for translation regulation, such as programmed frameshifting, the modulation of protein expression levels, ribosome localization and co-translational protein folding. Although strand separation activity is inherent to the ribosome, requiring no exogenous helicases, its mechanism is still unknown. Here, using a single-molecule optical tweezers assay on mRNA hairpins, we find that the translation rate of identical codons at the decoding centre is greatly influenced by the GC content of folded structures at the mRNA entry site. Furthermore, force applied to the ends of the hairpin to favour its unfolding significantly speeds translation. Quantitative analysis of the force dependence of its helicase activity reveals that the ribosome, unlike previously studied helicases, uses two distinct active mechanisms to unwind mRNA structure: it destabilizes the helical junction at the mRNA entry site by biasing its thermal fluctuations towards the open state, increasing the probability of the ribosome translocating unhindered; and it mechanically pulls apart the mRNA single strands of the closed junction during the conformational changes that accompany ribosome translocation. The second of these mechanisms ensures a minimal basal rate of translation in the cell; specialized, mechanically stable structures are required to stall the ribosome temporarily. Our results establish a quantitative mechanical basis for understanding the mechanism of regulation of the elongation rate of translation by structured mRNAs. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  11. An exit cavity was crucial to the polymerase activity of the early ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, George E; Tran, Quyen; Yonath, Ada

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of an RNA entity capable of synthesizing peptides was a key prebiotic development. It is hypothesized that a precursor of the modern ribosomal exit tunnel was associated with this RNA entity (e.g., "protoribosome" or "bonding entity") from the earliest time and played an essential role. Various compounds that can bind and activate amino acids, including extremely short RNA chains carrying amino acids, and possibly di- or tripeptides, would have associated with the internal cavity of the protoribosome. This cavity hosts the site for peptide bond formation and adjacent to it a relatively elongated feature that could have evolved to the modern ribosomal exit tunnel, as it is wide enough to allow passage of an oligopeptide. When two of the compounds carrying amino acids or di- or tripeptides (to which we refer, for simplicity, as small aminoacylated RNAs) were in proximity within the heart of the protoribosome, a peptide bond could form spontaneously. The growing peptide would enter the nearby cavity and would not disrupt the attachment of the substrates to the protoribosome or interfere with the subsequent attachment of additional small aminoacylated RNAs. Additionally, the presence of the peptide in the cavity would increase the lifetime of the oligopeptide in the protoribosome. Thus, subsequent addition of another amino acid would be more likely than detachment from the protoribosome, and synthesis could continue. The early ability to synthesize peptides may have resulted in an abbreviated RNA World.

  12. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Deregulation in environmental policy. Aufsaetze zur Wirtschaftspolitik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, J

    1983-01-01

    In the USA the attempt is being made for the first time to leave the solution of the apparent conflict between economy and ecology to a considerable extent to the powers of the market. The framework conditions and rules for that market are characterized by the new approaches of 'deregulation': 'They create a market in which business can make a profit by producing clean air and water.' The aim of the volume is to present that new strategy, with regard to the sector of air pollution, in its individual components, explain their mode of function and briefly indicate associated problems. However, before dealing with the new approaches based on free enterprise, the publication provides some basic information current legislation in the USA regarding air pollution.

  14. Regulatory trends : deregulation, where in the world is it working?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofield, J.

    2001-01-01

    The issue of electricity deregulation was the focus of this Power-Point presentation, which discussed what deregulation entails, what it is meant to achieve and whether there is only one right answer. Different approaches and performance results were presented with reference to international experiences in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and California. The main objective of deregulation is introduce competition to give customers a choice between suppliers and products, to allow market forces to set prices with the hope that they will be lower, and to encourage industry efficiency, reduce costs, improve productivity, and ensure that the right investments are made. The underlying agenda is to raise billions of dollars to reduce government debt and to transfer the risks and investment requirements to the investors and away from the government/taxpayers and ratepayers. Deregulation entails restructuring, privatization and unbundling of monopolies. It also entails a set of market rules and new systems processes to enable retail competition. The author emphasized that there are different characteristics to deregulation in each jurisdiction and that the state of the pre-deregulation industry plays a significant role in the eventual success of deregulation. The lessons learned from international experience is that open, non-discriminatory access is essential for both transmission and distribution and that political will for restructuring is essential. It was also determined that partial deregulation will not work, since wholesale and retail markets are connected. It was concluded that deregulation can work to different degrees under different designs. Progress so far has been slow and customers have yet to see the full benefits of deregulation. tabs

  15. Deregulation experiences in Alberta and Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axford, D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief introduction of Nexen Chemicals, one of the largest producers of sodium chlorate in the world, was offered, and a map displaying its locations throughout the world was displayed. Nexen is one of Canada's largest independent oil and gas producers, while Nexen Marketing is involved in the marketing of natural gas in North America. In January 2001, the deregulated market opened in Alberta. High natural gas prices, generation shortages, high prices in California and an upcoming provincial election all combined to complicate the situation. A high degree of volatility characterized the market. A chart displaying weekly average Alberta power and gas prices from Jan 2002 to 13 Oct 2002 was shown. In Ontario, the market opened in May 2002, and the demand growth rate was in the 1 to 2 per cent range. The author indicated that approximately 20 per cent of homeowners in Ontario have signed deals with retailers, contrary to Alberta where very few have done so. A similar chart displaying weekly average Ontario power prices was presented. The issues in Ontario are: consistency in policy, increase market transparency, transmission / distribution price flexibility, overall transmission / distribution to industrial consumers high, and increasing costs of the system operator. In Alberta, the issues are: government intent, congestion management issues, and billing settlement errors that continue. The opportunities offered by a deregulated market include process responsiveness which is rewarded, the ability to look in forward prices when prices fit margin requirement, and gives companies the opportunity to participate in the development of the market. Various charts were also displayed to further illustrate the market in both Alberta and Ontario. figs

  16. The primary structures of ribosomal proteins L16, L23 and L33 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, T; Hatakeyama, T; Kimura, M

    1988-11-21

    The complete amino acid sequences of ribosomal proteins L16, L23 and L33 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui were determined. The sequences were established by manual sequencing of peptides produced with several proteases as well as by cleavage with dilute HCl. Proteins L16, L23 and L33 consist of 119, 154 and 69 amino acid residues, and their molecular masses are 13,538, 16,812 and 7620 Da, respectively. The comparison of their sequences with those of ribosomal proteins from other organisms revealed that L23 and L33 are related to eubacterial ribosomal proteins from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus, while protein L16 was found to be homologous to a eukaryotic ribosomal protein from yeast. These results provide information about the special phylogenetic position of archaebacteria.

  17. Trapping the ribosome to control gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2007-09-21

    Protein synthesis is often regulated by structured mRNAs that interact with ribosomes. In this issue of Cell, Marzi et al. (2007) provide insights into the autoregulation of protein S15 by visualizing the folded repressor mRNA on the ribosome stalled in the preinitiation state. These results have implications for our understanding of the mechanism of translation initiation in general.

  18. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Slavov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs, some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptide Production and Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Srinivas; Field, Des; Barron, Niall

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural defense compounds which are synthesized as ribosomal gene-encoded pre-peptides and produced by all living organisms. AMPs are small peptides, usually cationic and typically have hydrophobic residues which interact with cell membranes and have either a narrow or broad spectrum of biological activity. AMPs are isolated from the natural host or heterologously expressed in other hosts such as Escherichia coli. The proto-typical lantibiotic Nisin is a widely used AMP that is produced by the food-grade organism Lactococcus lactis. Although AMP production and purification procedures require optimization for individual AMPs, the Nisin production and purification protocol outlined in this chapter can be easily applied with minor modifications for the production and purification of other lantibiotics or AMPs. While Nisin is produced and secreted into the supernatant, steps to recover Nisin from both cell-free supernatant and cell pellet are outlined in detail.

  20. Electric utility deregulation - A nuclear opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMella, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    The implications of electric deregulation are and will continue to be pervasive and significant. Not only will the fundamental monopoly regulatory concepts of managing electric utilities change but deregulation will have a profound and dramatic impact on the way electric generating plants are managed and operated. In the past, under the various approaches to financial regulation, the economic benefits normally attributed to competition or that would have otherwise been derived from competitive or open market forces, were assumed to be embodied in and inherent to the various processes, methods and principles of financial oversight of utility companies by regional, state and municipal regulatory authorities. Traditionally, under the various forms of regulated monopolies, a utility company, in exchange for an exclusive franchise to produce and sell electricity in a particular region, was obligated to provide an adequate supply to all consumers wanting it, at a price that was 'just and reasonable'. The determination of adequate supply and reasonable price was a matter of interpretation by utility companies and their regulators. In essence, the ultimate economic benefits, normally attributed to price equilibrium, in balance with supply, demand and other market forces, were expected to be achieved through a complex, political process of financial regulatory oversight, in which utility companies were usually reimbursed for all annual expenses or their 'cost of service' and additionally allowed to earn a 'reasonable' rate of return on plant investments. The result was often escalating electric prices, over supplies of electric capacity, by justifying unnecessarily high reserve margins based on long planning horizons (typically 20 years or greater) with extrapolated demand requirements that were generally in excess of what actually occurred over time. Although the regulatory process varied from country or country and region-to-region, the fundamental principles, which

  1. Nuclear communications and deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruuskanen, Antti

    1998-01-01

    The electricity market a over the world is facing the most profound change ever. The market is to be deregulated, competition will be increased and companies privatised. The boom started from the UK but today the Nordic market is the most liberalised in the world. Nordic market consists of annual power sales around 350 TWh and only a modest growth potential of 12 percent per year. All fuels and all technologies meet in the marketplace. Nuclear has its good one fourth share of the production there. Nuclear is clearly for base-load with low marginal costs next to hydro electric power. There are four major players in the Nordic market. Swedish Vattenfall, IVO Group and Swedish Sydkraft are the three biggest in that order, and all of them have nuclear assets. The market is characterised by lowest power prices in Europe, two electricity exchanges and continuous power trade across the borders. The described market change from national and less open utility driven sector has clear impacts to companies strategies and consequently also to communications. All these circumstances demand, New target groups from corporate communications' point of view; new communications language to change to more business-like; new insider rules and new information practices; new business orientated journalists against a new reference group. This all opens new challenges and possibilities to re-build nuclear image. Market economy in electricity will also ease governmental nationally oriented energy policies and let market forces to decide whether investments are viable or not. This is positive for nuclear - again if and only if the power plants are managed in an economically viable way. Deregulation may open the market from political deadlock to new nuclear investments in case the above mentioned requirements are correct. All in all, market change comes sooner or later to regions not yet liberalised. It will challenge nuclear companies and their communications. The change always creates

  2. Self-interest, deregulation and trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvör Nordal

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will discuss Milton Friedman’s thesis that the social responsibilityof business is to maximize the shareholders’ profit. I examine the underlyingassumption of self-interest and argue, contrary to the neoliberal thesis ofderegulation, that the profit motive must be constrained by strong state regulations.Furthermore it facilitates keeping the division between business andgovernment intact. The financial crisis shows that the emphasis on a profitmotive without the external constraints of tight regulations has serious implicationsfor the trustworthiness of business. In the latter part of the paper I willdiscuss trust in relation to self-interest. The overemphasis on self-interest isparticularly unfortunate in connection with business, and not least the financialsector, as this institution is grounded in trust, without which it cannot survive.Seen from this angle, it can be claimed that a business model, celebratingprimarily self-interest, profit-motive and deregulation, is not going to be sustainablein the long run.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v3i2.1719

  3. The deregulation of Taiwan electricity supply industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Taiwan is on the brink of embarking on an ambitious reform in the electricity sector. The future electricity market of Taiwan will be operated under the framework set out in the Electricity Act Amendment. Independent system operator (ISO) will be the core body of the future market operations and its establishment will therefore be the key to the liberalization. This paper presents the proposed implementation plan based on diverse factors considered by the officials. A three steps phased introduction of Taiwan ISO is discussed. During the proposed Phase I interim market arrangements, Taipower's System Operation Department will assume the role of System Operator for the market. The dispatch rules are largely based on the existing Taipower internal procedure. As competition increases, the need for increased transparency will necessitate the establishment of a fully independent ISO in Phase II to provide the real time dispatch services. This will be completed within 2 years after the passage of the Electricity Act Amendment Bill. In the last phase of the deregulation process a multilateral market arrangement for managing energy imbalance and transmission constraints will result in better outcomes in relation to the policy objectives of security and economic efficiency. The 2-year timeframe stipulated in the Electricity Act Amendment Bill is a challenge for the Government and the industry. However, a smoothly functioning Taiwan ISO will bring benefits to the industry and the country in general

  4. Deregulation and Nuclear Training: Cost Effective Alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard P. Coe; Patricia A. Lake

    2000-01-01

    Training is crucial to the success of any organization. It is also expensive, with some estimates exceeding $50 billion annually spent on training by U.S. corporations. Nuclear training, like that of many other highly technical organizations, is both crucial and costly. It is unlikely that the amount of training can be significantly reduced. If anything, current trends indicate that training needs will probably increase as the industry and workforce ages and changes. With the advent of energy deregulation in the United States, greater pressures will surface to make the costs of energy more cost-competitive. This in turn will drive businesses to more closely examine existing costs and find ways to do things in a more cost-effective way. The commercial nuclear industry will be no exception, and nuclear training will be equally affected. It is time for nuclear training and indeed the entire nuclear industry to begin using more aggressive techniques to reduce costs. This includes the need for nuclear training to find alternatives to traditional methods for the delivery of cost-effective high-quality training that meets regulatory requirements and produces well-qualified personnel capable of working in an efficient and safe manner. Computer-based and/or Web-based training are leading emerging technologies

  5. Coal marketability: Effects of deregulation and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attanasi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical utility deregulation will force power plants to compete for sales because they will not longer have captive markets. Market uncertainty and uncertainty about future environmental regulations have encouraged power plants to shift to low sulfur coal and/or to use emissions allowances to comply with Phase 2 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Mines in Northern and Central Appalachia and the Illinois Basin shipped 240 million tons of non-compliance coal to power plants without scrubbers in 1997. Under Phase 2, this coal will be replaced by low sulfur coal and/or be used with emission permits. It is possible that Powder River Basin coal production will have to increase by over 200 million tons/year to meet new demand. The prices of emissions permits will impose penalties on non-compliance coal that will probably drive out marginal coal producers. For example, if the cost of an emission permit is $200, coal from the Pittsburgh bed could bear a sulfur penalty of $6.55 per ton and similarly, coal from the Herrinbed could bear a penalty of $8.64 per ton

  6. Electricity deregulation - impact on gas users and markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeppel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Various scenarios for the natural gas market as a function a electricity deregulation were predicted. One scenario was the formation of an integrated market where sellers would offer a broad spectrum of energy products. This diversification would expand into the retail sector across North America. The second effect of electricity deregulation was energy cost reduction. The consumers have already been experiencing this benefit of deregulation. Cost reduction has also stimulated competition among energy suppliers, and improved suppliers' response to consumers'demands. The eventual shake-out of energy suppliers was predicted. Smaller companies that could not survive the competition would give up the market to larger companies that understood and met the customers' needs. It was concluded that deregulation of the electricity industry would have an enormous impact on the natural gas industry and that there would be opportunities for gain among buyers and sellers

  7. Efficiency and deregulation of the electricity market in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngho Chang; Tuan Hin Tay

    2006-01-01

    This study examines production efficiency of electricity generation in the New Electricity Market of Singapore (NEMS), where deregulation is currently proceeding. Singapore is reliant on foreign direct investments and exports so competition from countries with lower costs such as China and India is exerting pressure on the government to reduce the costs of doing business here. Electricity cost is one of these. Deregulation is believed to be able to bring about lower electricity costs due to the various efficiency gains possible. This study concerns itself mainly with production efficiency and attempts to calculate possible production efficiency gains by using linear programming model. Production-efficiency gains are quantified by the base case scenario of continued regulation versus four counterfactual deregulation scenarios. The results indicate that cost gains could be about eight per cent of current production cost, and this is possibly a lower-bound estimate. However, whether the purported efficiency gains are realized is to be seen as the deregulation proceeds. (author)

  8. Efficiency and deregulation of the electricity market in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Youngho; Hin Tay, Tuan

    2006-01-01

    This study examines production efficiency of electricity generation in the New Electricity Market of Singapore (NEMS), where deregulation is currently proceeding. Singapore is reliant on foreign direct investments and exports so competition from countries with lower costs such as China and India is exerting pressure on the government to reduce the costs of doing business here. Electricity cost is one of these. Deregulation is believed to be able to bring about lower electricity costs due to the various efficiency gains possible. This study concerns itself mainly with production efficiency and attempts to calculate possible production efficiency gains by using linear programming model. Production-efficiency gains are quantified by the base case scenario of continued regulation versus four counterfactual deregulation scenarios. The results indicate that cost gains could be about eight per cent of current production cost, and this is possibly a lower-bound estimate. However, whether the purported efficiency gains are realized is to be seen as the deregulation proceeds

  9. European energy markets deregulation observatory. Winter 2002/2003 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Launched in 2002, the European energy markets deregulation observatory (EEMDO/OELME) aims at actualizing the main energy market indicators and at observing the advance of deregulation within the European countries. While for most of these markets, the deregulation of electricity has preceded the deregulation of gas, the natural gas market is at the evidence a key-market in Europe. For this reason, the 4. edition of the observatory (October 2003) takes into consideration for the first time the specific elements of gas markets, in addition to those of electricity markets. This article presents some excerpts of this last edition, published by Cap Gemini Ernst and Young, and synthesizes the present day situation of gas supplies and the conditions of network access by third parties. The informations reported in the EEMDO come from organizations like UCTE, Nordel, Eurelectric or from energy stock exchanges. (J.S.)

  10. Deregulation of the electric utility industry - implications for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.Rose

    2000-01-01

    The deregulation movement sweeping the international electric utility community represents a dramatic shift om the traditional business model of utilities. This paper will focus on deregulation in thc United States and the new challenges for nuclear power plant operators. An overview of the new operating models being implemented in the US will lead into a discussion on new economic and operating concerns for nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  11. Deregulation of the electric utility industry - implications for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    The deregulation movement sweeping the international electric utility community represents a dramatic shift from the traditional utility business model. This paper will focus on deregulation in the United States and the new challenges for nuclear power plant operators. An overview of the new operating models being implemented in the US will lead into a discussion on new economic and operating concerns for nuclear power plant operators. (author)

  12. Deregulating the Norwegian railway: a survey of empirical experiences abroad

    OpenAIRE

    Røstadli, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Portraying implications of deregulation, this thesis presents an extensive review of deregulation in the European railway. It targets various decision variables concerning the introduction of competitive tendering in the rail industry. This thesis attempts to take a pragmatic stand offering an improved understanding vis-à-vis on decisions that have yet to be made, concentrating on possible competition forms, auction designs and contract designs. It offers learning points and tr...

  13. Developing products and services for a deregulated market while regulated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haites, E.F.

    1997-01-01

    Products and services developed for a deregulated electric power industry were discussed. The wide-ranging discussion covered products created by unbundling existing services, new products and services related to energy use, products created by expansion into communications services, and the pricing of products and services. In addition to products and services, the discussion also covered strategies for a deregulated market and the challenges of raising equity capital in a regulated environment

  14. Dynamic Testing of Signal Transduction Deregulation During Breast Cancer Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Std. Z39.18 Victoria Seewaldt, M.D. Dynamic Testing of Signal Transduction Deregulation During Breast Cancer Initiation Duke University Durham...attomole- zeptomole range. Internal dilution curves insure a high-dynamic calibration range. DU -26 8L DU -26 6L DU -29 5R DU -22 9.2 L DU...3: Nanobiosensor technology is translated to test for pathway deregulation in RPFNA cytology obtained from 10 high-risk women with cytological

  15. Electricity market deregulation and its impact on the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Y.E.; Alfors, G.

    2000-01-01

    Electricity has traditionally been supplied in OECD countries by state-owned facilities, or state-protected monopolies with regulated pricing. More recently, however, several countries have deregulated their electricity markets, thus opening the door to competitive supply and pricing. Deregulation of electricity markets is a trend that is expected to be followed by many countries, and can have a significant impact on the future of nuclear power programmes. (authors)

  16. Deregulation of the European Banking Industry (1980-1991)

    OpenAIRE

    Gual, Jordi; Neven, Damien J

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the experience of deregulation in the banking sector of seven EC countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the UK) is analysed. Lessons are drawn for assessment of how the EC directives affecting this sector could further affect the industry. Our findings broadly confirm intuition: there is some evidence that firms in protected markets earn large rents, which are partly dissipated in excessive costs and captured by workers. Conduct deregulation seems...

  17. The potential role of ribosomal protein S5 on cell cycle arrest and initiation of murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matragkou, Christina N; Papachristou, Eleni T; Tezias, Sotirios S; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S; Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S

    2008-07-01

    Evidence now exists to indicate that some ribosomal proteins besides being structural components of the ribosomal subunits are involved in the regulation of cell differentiation and apoptosis. As we have shown earlier, initiation of erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells is associated with transcriptional inactivation of genes encoding ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins S5 (RPS5) and L35a. In this study, we extended these observations and investigated whether transfection of MEL cells with RPS5 cDNA affects the onset of initiation of erythroid maturation and their entrance in cell cycle arrest. Stably transfected MEL cloned cells (MEL-C14 and MEL-C56) were established and assessed for their capacity to produce RPS5 RNA transcript and its translated product. The impact of RPS5 cDNA transfection on the RPS5 gene expression patterns and the accumulation of RPS5 protein in inducible transfected MEL cells were correlated with their ability to: (a) initiate differentiation, (b) enter cell cycle arrest at G(1)/G(0) phase, and (c) modulate the level of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6. The data presented indicate that deregulation of RPS5 gene expression (constitutive expression) affects RPS5 protein level and delays both the onset of initiation of erythroid maturation and entrance in cell cycle arrest in inducer-treated MEL cells. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788 ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori; Takagi, Fumiko; Shimada, Takashi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2011-01-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We

  20. Is The Ribosome Targeted By Adaptive Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Fernandez, Alicia; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: RNA polymerase and ribosomes, composing the macromolecular synthesis machinery (MMSM), carry out the central processes of transcription and translation, but are usually seen as mechanical elements with no regulatory function. Extensive investigations of gene regulation and the high ...

  1. What Drives Deregulation? Economics and Politics of the Relaxation of Bank Branching Restrictions

    OpenAIRE

    Randall S. Kroszner; Philip E. Strahan

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the key forces behind deregulation in order to assess the relative importance of alternative theories of regulatory entry and exit. We focus on bank branching deregulation across the states which began a quarter century ago and cumulated in federal deregulation in 1994. The cross-sectional and time-series variation of branching deregulation allows us to develop a hazard model to explain the timing of deregulation across the states using proxies motivated by private-interes...

  2. Crystallization of ribosomes from Thermus thermophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpova, E.A.; Serdyuk, I.N.; Tarkhovskii, Yu.S.; Orlova, E.V.; Borovyagin, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    An understanding of the molecular bases of the process of protein biosynthesis on the ribosome requires a knowledge of its structure with high three-dimensional resolution involving the method of x-ray crystallographic analysis. The authors report on the production of crystals of the 70S ribosomes from a new source - the highly thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus. Ribosomes for crystallization were obtained from Th. thermophilus strain HB8 by two washings in buffer with high ionic strength. The ribosome preparation was investigated for homogeneity by the method of high-speed sedimentation in a buffer containing 15 mM MgCl 2 , 50 mM NH 4 Cl, and 10 MM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5. Analysis showed that the preparation if homogeneous. The same preparation was investigated for intactness of ribosomal RNA by the method of gel electrophoresis in 2.75% acrylamide 0.5% agarose gel in a buffer containing 30 mM Tris, 30 mM NaH 2 PO 4 , 10 mM EDTA, 1-2% SDS, and 6 M urea. Analysis showed that the preparation possesses intact 16S and 23S RNA. The latter did not degrade, at least in a week of exposure of the ribosomes in buffer solution at 5 0 C. The ribosome preparation had no appreciable RNase activity, which was verified by incubating 4.5 micrograms of ribosomes with 3 micrograms of 14 C-labeled 16S rRna (50 0 C, 90 min) in a buffer containing 10 mM MgCl 2 , 100 mM NH 4 Cl, and 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH/sub 20 0 / 7.5. The incubated nonhydrolyzed RNA was precipitated with 5% trichloroacetic acid and applied on a GF/C filter. The radioactivity was determined in a toluene scintillator on an LS-100C counter

  3. Trefoil factor family peptides--friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Maike; Dünker, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are a group of molecules bearing a characteristic three-loop trefoil domain. They are mainly secreted in mucous epithelia together with mucins but are also synthesized in the nervous system. For many years, TFF peptides were only known for their wound healing and protective function, e.g. in epithelial protection and restitution. However, experimental evidence has emerged supporting a pivotal role of TFF peptides in oncogenic transformation, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Deregulated expression of TFF peptides at the gene and protein level is obviously implicated in numerous cancers, and opposing functions as oncogenes and tumor suppressors have been described. With regard to the regulation of TFF expression, epigenetic mechanisms as well as the involvement of various miRNAs are new, promising aspects in the field of cancer research. This review will summarize current knowledge about the expression and regulation of TFF peptides and the involvement of TFF peptides in tumor biology and cancerogenesis.

  4. The undertow of de-regulation : re-regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Alberta, Ontario and New Brunswick each initiated steps to deregulate their electric power industries in order to remain competitive with lower electricity rates in certain American states where the industry was also moving towards deregulation. This paper considers how the original sweep of deregulation policy goals succumbed to electricity re regulation policies. The decision by British Columbia to re-examine its deregulation plans in light of the experience in Canada's 3 other province's was also examined. The paper describes the electric power industry from 1900 to 1960s, before the deregulation wave hit the industry and then proceeds to the 1970s which was marked by the oil embargo. The 1980s saw a new era of policy shifts towards deregulation and privatization activity which was intended to introduce competition into regulated industries. Technological advances were taking place in the electricity sector, improving the viability of small gas turbines and making cogeneration possible. In the 1990s, Alberta was the first Canadian province to introduce competition to its electricity industry in an effort to remain competitive with neighbouring U.S. jurisdictions. By the 1990s Ontario's vertically integrated electricity industry was in trouble and recommendations were made to dissolve Ontario's Hydro One monopoly, particularly in power generation. In 1999, New Brunswick restructured its electricity industry to remain competitive with New England's electricity industry. The paper describes the gradual pull back from deregulation by all three provinces and the measures taken to impose price controls. Both industry and consumers paid a price for major policy changes. Complete competition in New Brunswick never materialized. It was suggested that controlled competition will likely move the electricity industry in the future. 40 refs

  5. German energy policy in deregulated Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhnt, D.

    2000-01-01

    The author argues in favor of a more fact-oriented German energy policy: Firstly, German energy policy must accept the new European framework of a market economy. This means that German utilities must no longer be burdened with the implementation of political objectives. The German power industry needs a level playing field for competition on a European scale. Consequently, also the European partner countries should not limit themselves to the minimum conditions of the Single Market Directive in opening their markets. Secondly, German energy policy must develop new forms of cooperation with the power industry so as to maintain domestic employment and the addition of value despite considerably stronger competitive pressure. Also the conflicting targets of sustainability, continuity of supply, and economic viability must not only be discussed, but must be turned into productive approaches. Thirdly, this means that there must be no inadmissible solution in matters nuclear. If the German power industry is to remain strong, in the interest of domestic jobs and opportunities for the future, it must not lose any more domestic market share to other European companies. Fourthly, we need a new energy policy which takes cognizance of the results of market development in a more rational, less emotional way. In this respect, it should be limited henceforth to supporting renewable energies and technologies so as to enhance energy efficiency in line with market requirements. Fifthly, German energy policy must not commit the mistake of enforcing deregulation and, at the same time, exempting large segments of the market from competition. Thus, the planned expansion of renewable energies, and the increase in cogeneration to more than thirty percent of the German electricty generation, by way of quotas and revenues for electricity from these sources fed into the public grid, are incompatible with competition in Europe. The electricity tax within the framework of the eco tax, the

  6. New localization and function of calpain-2 in nucleoli of colorectal cancer cells in ribosomal biogenesis: effect of KRAS status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telechea-Fernández, Marcelino; Rodríguez-Fernández, Lucia; García, Concha; Zaragozá, Rosa; Viña, Juan; Cervantes, Andrés; García-Trevijano, Elena R

    2018-02-06

    Calpain-2 belongs to a family of pleiotropic Cys-proteases with modulatory rather than degradative functions. Calpain (CAPN) overexpression has been controversially correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the mechanisms of substrate-recognition, calpain-2 regulation/deregulation and specific functions in CRC remain elusive. Herein, calpain subcellular distribution was studied as a key event for substrate-recognition and consequently, for calpain-mediated function. We describe a new localization for calpain-2 in the nucleoli of CRC cells. Calpain-2 nucleolar distribution resulted dependent on its enzymatic activity and on the mutational status of KRAS. In KRASWT/- cells serum-starvation induced CAPN2 expression, nucleolar accumulation and increased binding to the rDNA-core promoter and intergenic spacer (IGS), concomitant with a reduction in pre-rRNA levels. Depletion of calpain-2 by specific siRNA prevented pre-rRNA down-regulation after serum removal. Conversely, ribosomal biogenesis proceeded in the absence of serum in unresponsive KRASG13D/- cells whose CAPN2 expression, nucleolar localization and rDNA-occupancy remained unchanged during the time-course of serum starvation. We propose here that nucleolar calpain-2 might be a KRAS-dependent sensor to repress ribosomal biogenesis in growth limiting conditions. Under constitutive activation of the pathway commonly found in CRC, calpain-2 is deregulated and tumor cells become insensitive to the extracellular microenvironment.

  7. NisC Binds the FxLx Motif of the Nisin Leader Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abts, Andre; Montalban-Lopez, Manuel; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Smits, Sander H.; Schmitt, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Nisin is a model system for lantibiotics, a class of peptides displaying antimicrobial activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. After ribosomal synthesis, the precursor peptide is modified in two steps, of which the last one involves consecutive cyclization reactions mediated by the cyclase

  8. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, N.

    1997-01-01

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ( 1 H) for deuterium ( 2 H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [de

  9. The ribosome can prevent aggregation of partially folded protein intermediates: studies using the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bani Kumar Pathak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular chaperones that support de novo folding of proteins under non stress condition are classified as chaperone 'foldases' that are distinct from chaperone' holdases' that provide high affinity binding platform for unfolded proteins and prevent their aggregation specifically under stress conditions. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine can act as a foldase chaperone that can bind unfolded proteins and release them in folding competent state. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC located in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli ribosome (bDV RNA is the chaperoning center of the ribosome. It has been proposed that via specific interactions between the RNA and refolding proteins, the chaperone provides information for the correct folding of unfolded polypeptide chains. RESULTS: We demonstrate using Escherichia coli ribosome and variants of its domain V RNA that the ribosome can bind to partially folded intermediates of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCAII and lysozyme and suppress aggregation during their refolding. Using mutants of domain V RNA we demonstrate that the time for which the chaperone retains the bound protein is an important factor in determining its ability to suppress aggregation and/or support reactivation of protein. CONCLUSION: The ribosome can behave like a 'holdase' chaperone and has the ability to bind and hold back partially folded intermediate states of proteins from participating in the aggregation process. Since the ribosome is an essential organelle that is present in large numbers in all living cells, this ability of the ribosome provides an energetically inexpensive way to suppress cellular aggregation. Further, this ability of the ribosome might also be crucial in the context that the ribosome is one of the first chaperones to be encountered by a large nascent polypeptide chains that have a tendency to form partially folded intermediates immediately following their synthesis.

  10. Transposable Elements in Human Cancer: Causes and Consequences of Deregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sumadi Lukman; Wulaningsih, Wahyu; Lehmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise nearly half of the human genome and play an essential role in the maintenance of genomic stability, chromosomal architecture, and transcriptional regulation. TEs are repetitive sequences consisting of RNA transposons, DNA transposons, and endogenous retroviruses that can invade the human genome with a substantial contribution in human evolution and genomic diversity. TEs are therefore firmly regulated from early embryonic development and during the entire course of human life by epigenetic mechanisms, in particular DNA methylation and histone modifications. The deregulation of TEs has been reported in some developmental diseases, as well as for different types of human cancers. To date, the role of TEs, the mechanisms underlying TE reactivation, and the interplay with DNA methylation in human cancers remain largely unexplained. We reviewed the loss of epigenetic regulation and subsequent genomic instability, chromosomal aberrations, transcriptional deregulation, oncogenic activation, and aberrations of non-coding RNAs as the potential mechanisms underlying TE deregulation in human cancers. PMID:28471386

  11. Transposable Elements in Human Cancer: Causes and Consequences of Deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumadi Lukman Anwar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs comprise nearly half of the human genome and play an essential role in the maintenance of genomic stability, chromosomal architecture, and transcriptional regulation. TEs are repetitive sequences consisting of RNA transposons, DNA transposons, and endogenous retroviruses that can invade the human genome with a substantial contribution in human evolution and genomic diversity. TEs are therefore firmly regulated from early embryonic development and during the entire course of human life by epigenetic mechanisms, in particular DNA methylation and histone modifications. The deregulation of TEs has been reported in some developmental diseases, as well as for different types of human cancers. To date, the role of TEs, the mechanisms underlying TE reactivation, and the interplay with DNA methylation in human cancers remain largely unexplained. We reviewed the loss of epigenetic regulation and subsequent genomic instability, chromosomal aberrations, transcriptional deregulation, oncogenic activation, and aberrations of non-coding RNAs as the potential mechanisms underlying TE deregulation in human cancers.

  12. Natural gas and deregulation in the European Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The gas market is progressively moving towards new organizations under the effect of deregulation initiated in the United States, the United Kingdom and transposed to other countries, particularly in Europe, at least for the member countries of the European Union. Within the framework provided by this overall trend, Cedigaz proposes a study titled 'Natural Gas and Deregulation' in order to describe the main developments affecting these markets on account of deregulation. This report is structured on the basis of three main topics (market organization, marketing modes, pricing) which appears to be the most cogent in terms of deregulation. This grouping by major topics accordingly offers a relatively synthetic view of the main trends which could be observed in the European market, for example. The analysis is largely based on the example of the American market and, to a lesser extent, on the British situation. Incidentally, it has adapted the terms 'regulated market' to define conventional markets and 'deregulated market' to define markets which have incorporated the principle of Third Party Access (TPA). This is obviously a mere convention, since in both cases, the gas market, a network market, is regulated either by the State or by an independent agency. Also noteworthy is the diversity of the regulation methods for the network markets. While an underlying principle prevails throughout, particularly the introduction of TPA, political and energy considerations alike are liable to condition strongly the final structure of a given market. The apparently comparable British and American experience thus display substantial differences. In other words, one should not imagine a sudden transposition of either case to the European market. The different States preserve considerable leeway to guide market developments in one direction or another. On the whole, deregulation is not a frozen process, but has to adapt permanently to developments in a market stage-managed by

  13. Deregulation of an imprinted gene network in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribarska, Teodora; Goering, Wolfgang; Droop, Johanna; Bastian, Klaus-Marius; Ingenwerth, Marc; Schulz, Wolfgang A

    2014-05-01

    Multiple epigenetic alterations contribute to prostate cancer progression by deregulating gene expression. Epigenetic mechanisms, especially differential DNA methylation at imprinting control regions (termed DMRs), normally ensure the exclusive expression of imprinted genes from one specific parental allele. We therefore wondered to which extent imprinted genes become deregulated in prostate cancer and, if so, whether deregulation is due to altered DNA methylation at DMRs. Therefore, we selected presumptive deregulated imprinted genes from a previously conducted in silico analysis and from the literature and analyzed their expression in prostate cancer tissues by qRT-PCR. We found significantly diminished expression of PLAGL1/ZAC1, MEG3, NDN, CDKN1C, IGF2, and H19, while LIT1 was significantly overexpressed. The PPP1R9A gene, which is imprinted in selected tissues only, was strongly overexpressed, but was expressed biallelically in benign and cancerous prostatic tissues. Expression of many of these genes was strongly correlated, suggesting co-regulation, as in an imprinted gene network (IGN) reported in mice. Deregulation of the network genes also correlated with EZH2 and HOXC6 overexpression. Pyrosequencing analysis of all relevant DMRs revealed generally stable DNA methylation between benign and cancerous prostatic tissues, but frequent hypo- and hyper-methylation was observed at the H19 DMR in both benign and cancerous tissues. Re-expression of the ZAC1 transcription factor induced H19, CDKN1C and IGF2, supporting its function as a nodal regulator of the IGN. Our results indicate that a group of imprinted genes are coordinately deregulated in prostate cancers, independently of DNA methylation changes.

  14. Deregulation, privatisation and marketisation of Nordic comprehensive education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovemark, Marianne; Kosunen, Sonja; Kauko, Jaakko

    2018-01-01

    economy. The aim of this article is to examine education in the five Nordic countries utilising three dimensions of political change: deregulation, marketisation and privatisation. We also analyse the parallel changes in relation to segregation and differentiation in education. The analysis shows...... that the themes related to deregulation seem to show fairly similar patterns and structures in all contexts. The emerging differences were discovered mainly in the themes of marketisation and privatisation. Institutional segregation emerges in all Nordic countries to different extents along the lines...

  15. Buying and selling green: deregulation and green power marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the increasing trend towards deregulation of electricity markets, and the driving forces for liberalisation in the EU and North America. The use of green tariffs offered by utilities to differentiate themselves from competitors and to gain and keep customers is reported, and the situation with regard to green energy within the deregulated electricity markets in Australia, the EU, Denmark, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden, the UK, Canada and the USA is outlined. Customers switching as a result of green tariffs, the growing role of renewables, and opportunities for the promotion of green tariffs are discussed. (UK)

  16. Detection and Quantification of Ribosome Inhibition by Aminoglycoside Antibiotics in Living Bacteria Using an Orthogonal Ribosome-Controlled Fluorescent Reporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shijie; Zhu, Xuechen; Melançon, Charles E

    2016-01-15

    The ribosome is the quintessential antibacterial drug target, with many structurally and mechanistically distinct classes of antibacterial agents acting by inhibiting ribosome function. Detecting and quantifying ribosome inhibition by small molecules and investigating their binding modes and mechanisms of action are critical to antibacterial drug discovery and development efforts. To develop a ribosome inhibition assay that is operationally simple, yet provides direct information on the drug target and the mechanism of action, we have developed engineered E. coli strains harboring an orthogonal ribosome-controlled green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter that produce fluorescent signal when the orthogonal ribosome is inhibited. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate that these strains, when coexpressing homogeneous populations of aminoglycoside resistant ribosomes, act as sensitive and quantitative detectors of ribosome inhibition by a set of 12 structurally diverse aminoglycoside antibiotics. We suggest that this strategy can be extended to quantifying ribosome inhibition by other drug classes.

  17. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B

    2001-01-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs...... centre and have been associated with binding of several antibiotics. Competitive footprinting shows that tiamulin and valnemulin can bind concurrently with the macrolide erythromycin but compete with the macrolide carbomycin, which is a peptidyl transferase inhibitor. We infer from these and previous...... results that tiamulin and valnemulin interact with the rRNA in the peptidyl transferase slot on the ribosomes in which they prevent the correct positioning of the CCA-ends of tRNAs for peptide transfer....

  18. Ribosomal protein mutations induce autophagy through S6 kinase inhibition of the insulin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry F Heijnen

    Full Text Available Mutations affecting the ribosome lead to several diseases known as ribosomopathies, with phenotypes that include growth defects, cytopenia, and bone marrow failure. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, for example, is a pure red cell aplasia linked to the mutation of ribosomal protein (RP genes. Here we show the knock-down of the DBA-linked RPS19 gene induces the cellular self-digestion process of autophagy, a pathway critical for proper hematopoiesis. We also observe an increase of autophagy in cells derived from DBA patients, in CD34+ erythrocyte progenitor cells with RPS19 knock down, in the red blood cells of zebrafish embryos with RP-deficiency, and in cells from patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS. The loss of RPs in all these models results in a marked increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation that we find is triggered by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. We show that this increase in S6 kinase phosphorylation inhibits the insulin pathway and AKT phosphorylation activity through a mechanism reminiscent of insulin resistance. While stimulating RP-deficient cells with insulin reduces autophagy, antioxidant treatment reduces S6 kinase phosphorylation, autophagy, and stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor. Our data suggest that RP loss promotes the aberrant activation of both S6 kinase and p53 by increasing intracellular ROS levels. The deregulation of these signaling pathways is likely playing a major role in the pathophysiology of ribosomopathies.

  19. A distributive peptide cyclase processes multiple microviridin core peptides within a single polypeptide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Kunhua; Yang, Guang; McBride, Joshua L; Bruner, Steven D; Ding, Yousong

    2018-05-03

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are an important family of natural products. Their biosynthesis follows a common scheme in which the leader peptide of a precursor peptide guides the modifications of a single core peptide. Here we describe biochemical studies of the processing of multiple core peptides within a precursor peptide, rare in RiPP biosynthesis. In a cyanobacterial microviridin pathway, an ATP-grasp ligase, AMdnC, installs up to two macrolactones on each of the three core peptides within AMdnA. The enzyme catalysis occurs in a distributive fashion and follows an unstrict N-to-C overall directionality, but a strict order in macrolactonizing each core peptide. Furthermore, AMdnC is catalytically versatile to process unnatural substrates carrying one to four core peptides, and kinetic studies provide insights into its catalytic properties. Collectively, our results reveal a distinct biosynthetic logic of RiPPs, opening up the possibility of modular production via synthetic biology approaches.

  20. 75 FR 68321 - Forage Genetics International; Supplemental Request for Partial Deregulation of Roundup Ready...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ...] Forage Genetics International; Supplemental Request for Partial Deregulation of Roundup Ready Alfalfa... Inspection Service has received a supplemental request for ``partial deregulation'' from Forage Genetics... affected persons of the availability of the documents submitted to the Agency from Forage Genetics...

  1. An Agent-based Application to Enable Deregulated Energy Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capodieci, Nicola; Cabri, Giacomo; Pagani, Giuliano Andrea; Aiello, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Private houses are more and more enabled with devices that can produce renewable energy, and the not so remote chance of selling the surplus energy makes them new players in the energy market. This market is likely to become deregulated since each energy home-producer can negotiate the energy price

  2. Gas prices deregulation: how to play the game well?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitot, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    At the instigation of the European Union and in a context of increasing deregulation, the end of regulated gas prices in France is coming soon. Suppliers and consumers concerned are actively preparing themselves to take the turn of gas market liberalization. This short paper reveals their strategies

  3. Structural Reforms and Growth : Product and Labor Market Deregulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Rossi, A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper focuses on labor and product market deregulations, as fundamental elements in the passage from an investment to an innovation-based economy.The approach undertaken is prominently empirical.After a very brief description of the regulatory levels on the two sides of the Atlantic, we take two

  4. Nuclear regulation on the electrical sector's deregulation horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindelan, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical sector is generally tending towards a deregulated system which will exert greater pressure on production costs. The author uses this article to reflect on the consequences this new conception will bring for nuclear energy and, particularly, for the activity of regulatory agencies and safety requirements. (Author)

  5. The European gaseous market deregulation and its consequences for Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finon, D.; Locatelli, C.

    2002-07-01

    Russia, the first world producer of gas in 2001 is also the main producer in the european gas market. In this framework the evolution of its gas exportations market is a major stake for the russian gas industry and for the country economy. The consequences of this gas market deregulation are analyzed in this document. (A.L.B.)

  6. Deregulation of the Nigerian economy: The theoretical milieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nureni Opeyemi Akintoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of Nigerian economy was the main thrust of the Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP introduced in the country in 1986 under the leadership of General Ibrahim Babandiga (1958-1993. Prior to that period the Nigerian economy was almost a command one with wide range of government control. Indeed, the introduction of SAP was said to be a final solution to the economic crisis faced by the Country. Unfortunately, SAP was introduced yet, the economy became more crunched. During the General Abach's regime (1993­1998, SAP was suspended out rightly. When General Abdulsalami Abubakar (1998-1999 took over, he continued pursuing the privatization programme which is a synonym of deregulation of the economy with the promulgation of another privatization decree. The civilian government led by President Obasanjo which took over from 1999 made deregulation the core with vigour. It is basked on this development that this paper intends to unravel the theoretical paradigm under which the deregulation of Nigerian economy could be explained. This includes capitalism, imperialism, colonialism particularly the incorporation of Nigerian into international capitalist system.

  7. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spearman, C. [Industrial Association of Southern Alberta, Lethbridge, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The government of Alberta deregulated its electric power industry to introduce industry structure and regulatory reforms that would promote competitive electricity prices. The objective was to ensure fairness for customers and generating facilities. A graph depicting power pool prices shows the reality of soaring prices at the onset of deregulation in Alberta. Today, there remains uncertainty in the development of retail choice, additional rate riders, new generation, transmission expansion, other jurisdictions and future prices. Consumers are still poorly equipped to make decisions and farmers have no means of protection from fluctuating electricity prices. They see deregulation as a complete failure because costs are up and benefits are nowhere to be seen. Ontario can learn from the Alberta experience by adopting the recommendations to set financial penalties for incompetence, financial compensation to customers for errors, and to be fully ready with systems tested ahead of deregulation. Anticipated customer benefits should be clearly identified in advance. The future electric power industry in Ontario needs vision, stability, a cohesive plan, and leadership devoid of complacency. 1 fig.

  8. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spearman, C.

    2002-01-01

    The government of Alberta deregulated its electric power industry to introduce industry structure and regulatory reforms that would promote competitive electricity prices. The objective was to ensure fairness for customers and generating facilities. A graph depicting power pool prices shows the reality of soaring prices at the onset of deregulation in Alberta. Today, there remains uncertainty in the development of retail choice, additional rate riders, new generation, transmission expansion, other jurisdictions and future prices. Consumers are still poorly equipped to make decisions and farmers have no means of protection from fluctuating electricity prices. They see deregulation as a complete failure because costs are up and benefits are nowhere to be seen. Ontario can learn from the Alberta experience by adopting the recommendations to set financial penalties for incompetence, financial compensation to customers for errors, and to be fully ready with systems tested ahead of deregulation. Anticipated customer benefits should be clearly identified in advance. The future electric power industry in Ontario needs vision, stability, a cohesive plan, and leadership devoid of complacency. 1 fig

  9. Electricity pricing model in thermal generating stations under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reji, P.; Ashok, S.; Moideenkutty, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    In regulated public utilities with competitive power markets, deregulation has replaced the monopoly. Under the deregulated power market, the electricity price primarily depends on market mechanism and power demand. In this market, generators generally follow marginal pricing. Each generator fixes the electricity price based on their pricing strategy and it leads to more price volatility. This paper proposed a model to determine the electricity price considering all operational constraints of the plant and economic variables that influenced the price, for a thermal generating station under deregulation. The purpose of the model was to assist existing stations, investors in the power sector, regulatory authorities, transmission utilities, and new power generators in decision-making. The model could accommodate price volatility in the market and was based on performance incentive/penalty considering plant load factor, availability of the plant and peak/ off peak demand. The model was applied as a case study to a typical thermal utility in India to determine the electricity price. It was concluded that the case study of a thermal generating station in a deregulated environment showed that the electricity price mainly depended on the gross calorific value (GCV) of fuel, mode of operation, price of the fuel, and operating charges. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  10. Deregulation and restructuring of the electricity sector in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francia, L.

    2000-01-01

    This economic analysis of the Electric Power industry and market in Spain shows how the electricity deregulation and liberalization in Spain have given rise to an electricity industry which not only complies in spirit and letter with the E.U. Directive on the internal energy market, but which in fact goes much further. (A.L.B.)

  11. Vulnerable Consumers in the Deregulated Dutch Health System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booltink, L.; Genugten, M.L. van; Lako, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Public service deregulation is favoured for motivating providers to offer consumers better price-quality services. Consequently, consumers are enabled to make informed choices and choose for the best service provider. However, recent publications reveal that consumers are not capable of exercising

  12. Insurance brokers market dynamics in Poland before deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Krajewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focus on insurance broker profession in connection with second part of professions deregulations. It briefly presents modifications in polish law in this domain. Next part concerns the insurance brokers market dynamics analysis. The results shows permanent increase in brokers quantity in spite of existing regulations. Presented paper makes start point to following analysis.

  13. Bactobolin resistance is conferred by mutations in the L2 ribosomal protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Josephine R; Truong, Thao T; Silva, Patricia M; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Carr, Gavin; Radey, Matthew; Jacobs, Michael A; Sims, Elizabeth H; Clardy, Jon; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-12-18

    Burkholderia thailandensis produces a family of polyketide-peptide molecules called bactobolins, some of which are potent antibiotics. We found that growth of B. thailandensis at 30°C versus that at 37°C resulted in increased production of bactobolins. We purified the three most abundant bactobolins and determined their activities against a battery of bacteria and mouse fibroblasts. Two of the three compounds showed strong activities against both bacteria and fibroblasts. The third analog was much less potent in both assays. These results suggested that the target of bactobolins might be conserved across bacteria and mammalian cells. To learn about the mechanism of bactobolin activity, we isolated four spontaneous bactobolin-resistant Bacillus subtilis mutants. We used genomic sequencing technology to show that each of the four resistant variants had mutations in rplB, which codes for the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein. Ectopic expression of a mutant rplB gene in wild-type B. subtilis conferred bactobolin resistance. Finally, the L2 mutations did not confer resistance to other antibiotics known to interfere with ribosome function. Our data indicate that bactobolins target the L2 protein or a nearby site and that this is not the target of other antibiotics. We presume that the mammalian target of bactobolins involves the eukaryotic homolog of L2 (L8e). Currently available antibiotics target surprisingly few cellular functions, and there is a need to identify novel antibiotic targets. We have been interested in the Burkholderia thailandensis bactobolins, and we sought to learn about the target of bactobolin activity by mapping spontaneous resistance mutations in the bactobolin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis. Our results indicate that the bactobolin target is the 50S ribosome-associated L2 protein or a region of the ribosome affected by L2. Bactobolin-resistant mutants are not resistant to other known ribosome inhibitors. Our evidence indicates that bactobolins

  14. Competitive positioning of power generation plants in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.

    1998-01-01

    As industrialized countries deregulate their electric power industries, there is a fundamental shift from guaranteed cost recovery to open market competition on a deregulated grid. Utilities generally competitively bid into a power exchange where the lowest cost power providers are dispatched first. Therefore, the competitiveness of utilities determines their profitability. This commercial structure compels power generators to seek out ways of improving their equipment and plant performance. The inevitability of this trend is demonstrated by a look at the installed base in the US where the move toward deregulation is gaining momentum. More than half of the generating plants in the US are over 20 years old. The average thermal efficiency nation-wide is 33%. In contrast, contemporary coal-and gas-fired plants can operate at efficiency levels up to 45 percent and 55 to 60%, respectfully. With new facilities coming on-line, existing plants will need to make improvements to be dispatched. When deregulation fully envelopes the US market, utilities will not all fit into one pattern; their strategies and actions will depend on a multiple set of factors. Their success will be based on their ability to change landscapes from guaranteed cost recovery to competitive bidding. This paper discussers technical and commercial options available to power producers to improve their competitive positions in a deregulated market as well as software for determining the competitiveness of specific power plants and the location-based market prices of electricity. Examples of the application of alternatives will be cited along with expected payback and impact on cents per kilowatt-hour production costs

  15. Complete amino acid sequences of the ribosomal proteins L25, L29 and L31 from the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, T; Kimura, M

    1988-03-15

    Ribosomal proteins were extracted from 50S ribosomal subunits of the archaebacterium Halobacterium marismortui by decreasing the concentration of Mg2+ and K+, and the proteins were separated and purified by ion-exchange column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. Ten proteins were purified to homogeneity and three of these proteins were subjected to sequence analysis. The complete amino acid sequences of the ribosomal proteins L25, L29 and L31 were established by analyses of the peptides obtained by enzymatic digestion with trypsin, Staphylococcus aureus protease, chymotrypsin and lysylendopeptidase. Proteins L25, L29 and L31 consist of 84, 115 and 95 amino acid residues with the molecular masses of 9472 Da, 12293 Da and 10418 Da respectively. A comparison of their sequences with those of other large-ribosomal-subunit proteins from other organisms revealed that protein L25 from H. marismortui is homologous to protein L23 from Escherichia coli (34.6%), Bacillus stearothermophilus (41.8%), and tobacco chloroplasts (16.3%) as well as to protein L25 from yeast (38.0%). Proteins L29 and L31 do not appear to be homologous to any other ribosomal proteins whose structures are so far known.

  16. Effect of primary and secondary radicals on chain breaks in ribosomal RNA in E. coli ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.; Bishop, J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown previously that, in dilute aerated solutions, ribosomes are inactivated by OH radicals and by secondary radicals produced from added alcohols (Singh and Vadasz 1983 a). In de-aerated solutions, both radicalH and e - sub(aq) also inactivate ribosomes (Singh and Vadasz 1983 b). The results of these studies and other on different systems (Adams et al. 1973, Aldrich and Cundall 1969, Dewey and Stein 1970, Masuda et al. 1971, Nabben et al. 1982, 1983, Samuni et al. 1980, Singh and Singh 1982) have shown that damage to biological systems occurs by diverse mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves chain breaks in RNA (Pollard and Weller 1967). The purpose of this study was to determine which of the primary and secondary radicals cause chain breaks in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) within the ribosomes. (author)

  17. Why Shops Close Again : An Evolutionary Perspective on the Deregulation of Shopping Hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosfeld, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a new perspective on the deregulation of shopping hours based on ideas from evolutionary game theory. We study a retail economy where shopping hours have been deregulated recently. It is argued that first, the deregulation leads to a coordination problem between store owners

  18. Antibodies to ribosomal P proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi in Chagas disease possess functional autoreactivity with heart tissue and differ from anti-P autoantibodies in lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D; Ferrari, I; Bergami, P L; Mahler, E; Levitus, G; Chiale, P; Hoebeke, J; Van Regenmortel, M H; Levin, M J

    1997-09-16

    Anti-P antibodies present in sera from patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (cChHD) recognize peptide R13, EEEDDDMGFGLFD, which encompasses the C-terminal region of the Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P1 and P2 proteins. This peptide shares homology with the C-terminal region (peptide H13 EESDDDMGFGLFD) of the human ribosomal P proteins, which is in turn the target of anti-P autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and with the acidic epitope, AESDE, of the second extracellular loop of the beta1-adrenergic receptor. Anti-P antibodies from chagasic patients showed a marked preference for recombinant parasite ribosomal P proteins and peptides, whereas anti-P autoantibodies from SLE reacted with human and parasite ribosomal P proteins and peptides to the same extent. A semi-quantitative estimation of the binding of cChHD anti-P antibodies to R13 and H13 using biosensor technology indicated that the average affinity constant was about 5 times higher for R13 than for H13. Competitive enzyme immunoassays demonstrated that cChHD anti-P antibodies bind to the acidic portions of peptide H13, as well as to peptide H26R, encompassing the second extracellular loop of the beta1 adrenoreceptor. Anti-P antibodies isolated from cChHD patients exert a positive chronotropic effect in vitro on cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats, which resembles closely that of anti-beta1 receptor antibodies isolated from the same patient. In contrast, SLE anti-P autoantibodies have no functional effect. Our results suggest that the adrenergic-stimulating activity of anti-P antibodies may be implicated in the induction of functional myocardial impairments observed in cChHD.

  19. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  20. Origins of the Mechanochemical Coupling of Peptide Bond Formation to Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritch, Benjamin; Kosolapov, Andrey; Hudson, Phillip; Nissley, Daniel A; Woodcock, H Lee; Deutsch, Carol; O'Brien, Edward P

    2018-04-18

    Mechanical forces acting on the ribosome can alter the speed of protein synthesis, indicating that mechanochemistry can contribute to translation control of gene expression. The naturally occurring sources of these mechanical forces, the mechanism by which they are transmitted 10 nm to the ribosome's catalytic core, and how they influence peptide bond formation rates are largely unknown. Here, we identify a new source of mechanical force acting on the ribosome by using in situ experimental measurements of changes in nascent-chain extension in the exit tunnel in conjunction with all-atom and coarse-grained computer simulations. We demonstrate that when the number of residues composing a nascent chain increases, its unstructured segments outside the ribosome exit tunnel generate piconewtons of force that are fully transmitted to the ribosome's P-site. The route of force transmission is shown to be through the nascent polypetide's backbone, not through the wall of the ribosome's exit tunnel. Utilizing quantum mechanical calculations we find that a consequence of such a pulling force is to decrease the transition state free energy barrier to peptide bond formation, indicating that the elongation of a nascent chain can accelerate translation. Since nascent protein segments can start out as largely unfolded structural ensembles, these results suggest a pulling force is present during protein synthesis that can modulate translation speed. The mechanism of force transmission we have identified and its consequences for peptide bond formation should be relevant regardless of the source of the pulling force.

  1. The effect of airline deregulation on automobile fatalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylow, L F; Savage, I

    1991-10-01

    This paper attempts to quantify the effects of airline deregulation in the United States on intercity automobile travel and consequently on the number of highway fatalities. A demand model is constructed for auto travel, which includes variables representing the price and availability of air service. A reduced form model of the airline market is then estimated. Finding that deregulation has decreased airfares and increased flights, it is estimated that auto travel has been reduced by 2.2% per year on average. Given assumptions on the characteristics of drivers switching modes and the types of roads they drove on, the number of automobile fatalities averted since 1978 is estimated to be in the range 200-300 per year.

  2. Deregulation of brain insulin signaling in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxing; Deng, Yanqiu; Zhang, Baorong; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-04-01

    Contrary to the previous belief that insulin does not act in the brain, studies in the last three decades have demonstrated important roles of insulin and insulin signal transduction in various functions of the central nervous system. Deregulated brain insulin signaling and its role in molecular pathogenesis have recently been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this article, we review the roles of brain insulin signaling in memory and cognition, the metabolism of amyloid β precursor protein, and tau phosphorylation. We further discuss deficiencies of brain insulin signaling and glucose metabolism, their roles in the development of AD, and recent studies that target the brain insulin signaling pathway for the treatment of AD. It is clear now that deregulation of brain insulin signaling plays an important role in the development of sporadic AD. The brain insulin signaling pathway also offers a promising therapeutic target for treating AD and probably other neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Economic theory and the failure of electricity deregulation in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, F.E.

    2004-01-01

    The deregulation of electricity has failed in Sweden. Since the beginning of the deregulation 'experiment', the trend price of electricity has increased much faster than the consumer price index, especially during recent years. More importantly, because of (1) the lack of investment in domestic generating (and perhaps transmission) facilities by Swedish power companies, (2) the questionable strategy employed by these firms to mange hydroelectric reserves, (3) increased and to some extent irrational energy taxes, and (4) the beginning of nuclear 'disengagement', households and businesses are vulnerable to a prolonged 'spike' in electricity prices. Everything considered, the recent history of the Swedish electricity sector - and particularly that of the overpraised Nordic Electric Exchange (i.e. Nord Pool) - should be considered a wake-up call instead of an example. (author)

  4. Customer choice: Purchasing energy in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumann, A.

    1999-01-01

    This book presents the detailed guidance on how to effectively purchase deregulated energy, based on first-hand reports from many of the nation's most knowledgeable experts. It is designed to provide the kind of practical advice needed by professionals who are responsible for making energy purchasing decisions. The book gives a ten-step program to guide building owners in purchasing decision making, a state-by-state retail competition update, and guidelines for buying electricity and natural gas over the worldwide web. Other topics include contract renegotiation strategies, an assessment of power pools, the role of aggregators in the energy market, real time pricing issues, where cogeneration fits within today's marketplace, and lessons learned from deregulation experiences in Scandinavia and England

  5. Revenue opportunities for gas plants arising from electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.C.

    1999-01-01

    A brief overview of deregulation in the electric power industry and an explanation of how these changes can be used to increase revenues of gas processing plants is provided. Deregulation in the electric power industry provides the potential to significantly reduce energy costs for the gas plant and allows technology to be applied to make a better use of a valuable commodity. Owners and operators of gas processing plants increase their operating income by taking advantage of co-generation systems which provide heat and electrical energy to the gas plant. Such an application has three revenue streams, the main one being the power sales to the gas plant, the second one heat sales, and the third increased revenues from the gas plant through a reduction of overall costs, not to mention significantly reduced downtime. Further savings are possible through diversion of excess energy produced to other facilities owned by the gas plant owner

  6. Current issues in Canadian electricity deregulation and competition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, A.J. [Calgary Univ., Calgary, AB (Canada). Canadian Inst. of Resources Law

    1998-03-30

    The deregulation of the electricity industry in Canada was the main focus of this paper. In most developed countries, industries formerly dominated by a monopoly service provider have already been significantly restructured through the introduction of competition. In Canada, such restructuring has taken place only in the airline, railway, natural gas and telephone industry. In most Canadian provinces, except Alberta, electricity generation, transmission and distribution is still owned and operated by provincial and municipal governments. This report examines the present situation in electricity deregulation in Alberta, provides a summary of analysis of London Economics Inc.`s proposals and Bill 27, and presents the author`s own conclusions. A broader perspective and context is provided by references to other regulations of other industries throughout the report.

  7. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-01-01

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium mo...

  8. Power system restructuring and deregulation: trading, performance and information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loi Lei Lai

    2001-09-01

    Representatives from several countries have contributed to a book addressing the deregulation and restructuring of the electric power industry. Articles covered include guidance on asset management, transmission balancing and meter management systems, tools for studying competitive power markets, environmental impacts, costs and benefits, and the new strategies and technology available for power generation, transmission and distribution. The book should be of interest to power systems engineers, system operators, managers, planners and policy makers in the electric power business

  9. Managing an evolution: Deregulation of the electric utility industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, S.K.

    1994-12-31

    The author discusses the emerging competitive situation in the electric power industry as deregulation of electric utilities looms on the horizon. The paper supports this change, and the competition it will bring, but urges caution as changes are instituted, and the regulatory bodies decide how and how much to free, and at what rates. The reason for his urge for caution comes from historical experience of other industries, which were smaller and had less direct impact on every American.

  10. Labor market deregulation and globalization: empirical evidence from OECD countries

    OpenAIRE

    Potrafke , Niklas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This paper empirically investigates the influence of globalization on various aspects of labor market deregulation. I employ the data set by Bassanini and Duval (2006) on labor market institutions in OECD countries and the KOF index of globalization. The data set covers 20 OECD countries in the 1982?2003 period. The results suggest that globalization did neither influence the unemployment replacement rate, the unemployment benefit length, public expenditures on ALMP, the t...

  11. Competitive nuclear production on the nordic deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Nordic electricity market has been partly deregulated since 1994. Today only Denmark follows the timetable recommended by the European Union, while Sweden, Norway and Finland are completely deregulated. As in most countries, the production of electricity is deregulated while the distribution is still a monopoly. This deregulation of the electricity market has created a new situation for plant life management. In order to be competitive on the market it is important to cut cost down a level when the nuclear power companies earn money again. All means to cut cost have to be used while still maintaining safety and the possibilities for operation over at least 40+ years. The possibilities to invest in modernization are limited to the absolutely necessary modifications. All investments must be very thoroughly questioned and the money can only be spent where most benefit is gained. This means new prerequisites for the absolute necessary long-strategic planning. New safety requirements from the authorities have to be discussed between the industry and the authority. The requirement cost must be compared to the benefit to safety. The authority is today requested to carry out such analyses and do so in most cases. Since the electricity market is international the requirements of the authorities must be harmonized on the whole market. The political threat against nuclear power is serious in many countries and it is important to continue working with public acceptance and lobbying. Especially in Sweden a lot of effort is spent on trying to change the taxation of nuclear power. In the near future increasing electricity demand will make the prices go up to a level when nuclear power companies earn money again. The very serious worries about climate change will also strengthen the competitiveness of nuclear power. (author)

  12. Generation capacity expansion planning in deregulated electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak

    With increasing demand of electric power in the context of deregulated electricity markets, a good strategic planning for the growth of the power system is critical for our tomorrow. There is a need to build new resources in the form of generation plants and transmission lines while considering the effects of these new resources on power system operations, market economics and the long-term dynamics of the economy. In deregulation, the exercise of generation planning has undergone a paradigm shift. The first stage of generation planning is now undertaken by the individual investors. These investors see investments in generation capacity as an increasing business opportunity because of the increasing market prices. Therefore, the main objective of such a planning exercise, carried out by individual investors, is typically that of long-term profit maximization. This thesis presents some modeling frameworks for generation capacity expansion planning applicable to independent investor firms in the context of power industry deregulation. These modeling frameworks include various technical and financing issues within the process of power system planning. The proposed modeling frameworks consider the long-term decision making process of investor firms, the discrete nature of generation capacity addition and incorporates transmission network modeling. Studies have been carried out to examine the impact of the optimal investment plans on transmission network loadings in the long-run by integrating the generation capacity expansion planning framework within a modified IEEE 30-bus transmission system network. The work assesses the importance of arriving at an optimal IRR at which the firm's profit maximization objective attains an extremum value. The mathematical model is further improved to incorporate binary variables while considering discrete unit sizes, and subsequently to include the detailed transmission network representation. The proposed models are novel in the

  13. Ribosomal frameshifting and transcriptional slippage: From genetic steganography and cryptography to adventitious use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, John F; Loughran, Gary; Bhatt, Pramod R; Firth, Andrew E; Baranov, Pavel V

    2016-09-06

    Genetic decoding is not 'frozen' as was earlier thought, but dynamic. One facet of this is frameshifting that often results in synthesis of a C-terminal region encoded by a new frame. Ribosomal frameshifting is utilized for the synthesis of additional products, for regulatory purposes and for translational 'correction' of problem or 'savior' indels. Utilization for synthesis of additional products occurs prominently in the decoding of mobile chromosomal element and viral genomes. One class of regulatory frameshifting of stable chromosomal genes governs cellular polyamine levels from yeasts to humans. In many cases of productively utilized frameshifting, the proportion of ribosomes that frameshift at a shift-prone site is enhanced by specific nascent peptide or mRNA context features. Such mRNA signals, which can be 5' or 3' of the shift site or both, can act by pairing with ribosomal RNA or as stem loops or pseudoknots even with one component being 4 kb 3' from the shift site. Transcriptional realignment at slippage-prone sequences also generates productively utilized products encoded trans-frame with respect to the genomic sequence. This too can be enhanced by nucleic acid structure. Together with dynamic codon redefinition, frameshifting is one of the forms of recoding that enriches gene expression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Accounting for gas in a de-regulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawalykut, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the natural gas industry was deregulated, the method of buying, selling and moving gas has changed significantly. Post-deregulation, the pipeline company moves the gas but does not acquire ownership. The full impact of deregulation is seen in opening up the market for buying and selling gas. Tracking of gas has become critical. The service customer is now buying and moving gas. The end-use customer nominates to the distribution company a quantity of gas to be transported. Responsibility is placed on the customer to estimate loads as accurately as possible to avoid possible charges. The distribution company passes the end-user nomination to the upstream transmission company, which in turn passes it along, a process that is repeated until the nomination reaches the production company. Authorizations for gas follow a similar path. The major difference between sales and service gas is the accounting and tracking. As the customer will not consume the exact amount nominated, there will be an imblance between what was nominated and metered. There will also be imbalances between what the producer places into the pipeline and what was nominated. These processes can cause administrative problems, and many customers are moving from sales to service

  15. Analysis of deregulation models; Denryoku shijo jiyuka model no bunseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yajima, M. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    Trends toward power market deregulation were investigated in Japan and 16 other countries, and various deregulation models were examined and evaluated for their merits and demerits. There are four basic models, that is, franchise bidding model, competitive bidding in power generation model, wholesale wheeling or retail wheeling model, and mandatory pool or voluntary pool model. Power market deregulation has been a global tendency since the second half of the 1970s, with various models adopted by different countries. Out of the above-said models, it is the retail wheeling model and pool models (open access models) that allow the final customer to select power suppliers, and the number of countries adopting these models is increasing. The said models are characterized in that the disintegration of the vertical transmission-distribution integration (separation of distribution service and retail supply service) and the liberation of the retail market are simultaneously accomplished. The pool models, in particular, are enjoying favor because conditions for fair competition have already been prepared and because it is believed high in efficiency. In Japan and France, where importance is attached to atomic power generation, the competitive bidding model is adopted as a means to harmonize the introduction of competition into the source development and power generation sectors. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets - Reasons for concern?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bye, Torstein; Bruvoll, Annegrete; Aune, Finn Roar [Research Department, Statistics Norway, P.O. Box 8131 Dep., 0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2008-07-15

    In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply. (author)

  17. Inflow shortages in deregulated power markets - Reasons for concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bye, Torstein; Bruvoll, Annegrete; Aune, Finn Roar

    2008-01-01

    In many countries hydropower constitutes a large share of the electricity producing capacity. In the earlier regulated electricity markets, production capacities exceeded demand due to security of supply concerns. The present deregulated markets base investments upon profitability alone, and security of supply issues are claimed to be less important. Market operators trust the pricing mechanism in competitive markets to clear. Then low inflow constitutes a less problem. Several markets, both under regulated and deregulated regimes, have faced serious droughts. Some of them have experienced problems with market clearance (Chile, Brazil, California) while other markets functioned well (The Nordic market). Important features to the market response are the flexibility of demand, the pattern of inflow shortage, the storage capacities, the possibility of trade between regions with different production technologies, and the market design and concentration. We apply an empirical based market model to simulate the effects under two inflow shortage scenarios in an international market with combined hydro and thermal capacities and restricted transmission capacities. We compare the scenarios with actual events and show that the model and the real market outcome are comparable. The simulations do not reveal any problems with the functioning of the market, which should calm down the anxiousness about security of supply in deregulated markets with stochastic energy supply

  18. Retail experience in the de-regulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the experience gained to date in the de-regulated electricity market through an examination of the commercial market. In 2001, chaos provided opportunity, while in 2002 the emphasis was on operations. In 2003, the landscape reflected hyper-competition, selling second services, and a changing landscape. A discussion followed on the residential market with a look at market structure, economics, and uncertainty concerning the future. The following components were identified as working well: wholesale market, commercial market, market model/data, and innovation in offerings and green supply. Areas requiring further improvement were also identified. It was suggested that the residential de-regulated roadmap should be clarified and retail friendly transactions should be imposed. Other improvements involve education and operations/system capabilities. The author concluded that the deregulated electricity market is still an immature market, where progress is being made in the commercial market. The residential market is in a critical period, with a market model still evolving. figs

  19. Cycles in deregulated electricity markets: Empirical evidence from two decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arango, Santiago; Larsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the 'cycle hypothesis' in electricity generation, which states that the introduction of deregulation in an electricity system might lead to sustained fluctuations of over- and under-capacity. The occurrence of cycles is one of the major threats for electricity markets as it affects the security of supply, and creates uncertainty in both the profitability of electricity companies and in consumer prices. We discuss the background for these cycles using analogies with other capital-intensive industries, along with evidence from the analysis of behavioral simulation models as well as from experimental electricity markets. Using data from the oldest deregulated markets we find support for the hypothesis in the case of the English and Chilean markets, based on an autocorrelation analysis. Evidence from the Nordpool market is more ambiguous, although we might be observing the first half of a cycle in generation capacity. Comparing a simulation of the English market performed in 1992 with the actual performance we can observe that the qualitative behavior of the model is consistent with the actual evolution. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms for damping cycles in electricity generation, such as mothballing, capacity payments, and reliability markets. - Research highlights: → We explore the emergence of cycles in the electricity generation capacity after deregulation. → We discuss the reason for cycles in generation capacity and compare different theories. → Analysis of England and Chile data show strong indications that cycles have emerged.

  20. Choice of electricity provider in California after deregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keanini, Rasa Ilze

    Surveys often ask consumers how much they are willing to pay for certain goods and services, without requiring the consumer to actually pay for the good or service. Such surveys, termed stated preference studies, find that consumers value renewable electricity. This result is in contrast to actual experiences in recently deregulated electricity markets in several states, including California. When given the opportunity to choose in California, only one to two percent of the population opted for renewable electricity products. This dissertation used data from residential customers who chose an alternative electricity product in California's deregulated electricity market to determine the value placed on the renewable attribute of electricity products. This dissertation begins by taking a historical look at the electricity market of the nation and specifically California. From 1998 through 2001, California's electricity market was deregulated to include retail competition. This dissertation used data from electric service providers to reveal the factors influencing residential customer's choice of electricity product. Discrete choice models were used to determine the factors influencing electricity product choice. The results indicated that both price and renewable content had an effect on choice of product. Additionally, a more complicated model jointly estimating the discrete choice of electricity product with the continuous choice of electricity consumption (kWh) was specified and estimated.

  1. Kinetic pathway of 40S ribosomal subunit recruitment to hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Gabriele; Petrov, Alexey N; Marceau, Caleb D; Popov, Lauren M; Chen, Jin; O'Leary, Seán E; Wang, Richard; Carette, Jan E; Sarnow, Peter; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-01-13

    Translation initiation can occur by multiple pathways. To delineate these pathways by single-molecule methods, fluorescently labeled ribosomal subunits are required. Here, we labeled human 40S ribosomal subunits with a fluorescent SNAP-tag at ribosomal protein eS25 (RPS25). The resulting ribosomal subunits could be specifically labeled in living cells and in vitro. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between RPS25 and domain II of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES), we measured the rates of 40S subunit arrival to the HCV IRES. Our data support a single-step model of HCV IRES recruitment to 40S subunits, irreversible on the initiation time scale. We furthermore demonstrated that after binding, the 40S:HCV IRES complex is conformationally dynamic, undergoing slow large-scale rearrangements. Addition of translation extracts suppresses these fluctuations, funneling the complex into a single conformation on the 80S assembly pathway. These findings show that 40S:HCV IRES complex formation is accompanied by dynamic conformational rearrangements that may be modulated by initiation factors.

  2. Ribosomal history reveals origins of modern protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Harish

    Full Text Available The origin and evolution of the ribosome is central to our understanding of the cellular world. Most hypotheses posit that the ribosome originated in the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit. However, these proposals do not link protein synthesis to RNA recognition and do not use a phylogenetic comparative framework to study ribosomal evolution. Here we infer evolution of the structural components of the ribosome. Phylogenetic methods widely used in morphometrics are applied directly to RNA structures of thousands of molecules and to a census of protein structures in hundreds of genomes. We find that components of the small subunit involved in ribosomal processivity evolved earlier than the catalytic peptidyl transferase center responsible for protein synthesis. Remarkably, subunit RNA and proteins coevolved, starting with interactions between the oldest proteins (S12 and S17 and the oldest substructure (the ribosomal ratchet in the small subunit and ending with the rise of a modern multi-subunit ribosome. Ancestral ribonucleoprotein components show similarities to in vitro evolved RNA replicase ribozymes and protein structures in extant replication machinery. Our study therefore provides important clues about the chicken-or-egg dilemma associated with the central dogma of molecular biology by showing that ribosomal history is driven by the gradual structural accretion of protein and RNA structures. Most importantly, results suggest that functionally important and conserved regions of the ribosome were recruited and could be relics of an ancient ribonucleoprotein world.

  3. Deregulation strategies for local governments and the role/opportunities for energy efficiency services in the utility industry deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    As the future shape of the electric utility industry continues to unfold and as retail competition becomes a reality, local governments are faced with balancing the need for: (1) economic development; (2) and to avoid the potential impact of cost-shifting among residents and businesses, while ensuring reliable and universal energy services. Furthermore, local governments need to find ways to recoup potential loss of franchise and tax revenues, to ensure fair and adequate energy-efficiency programs, and to continue other social programs for low income families. This paper will address two important issues every local government in the US are facing: (1) the development of viable deregulation strategies before, during and after the promulgation of utility deregulation; (2) opportunities for energy efficiency services in the competitive markets to serve local governments, which typically constitutes the largest market segment in utility's service territory. This paper presents issues and challenges common to all local governments. It documents strategies that several local governments are utilizing to embrace the coming electric utility restructuring and competition challenge to the benefits of their respective communities. This paper presents the results on deregulation work by the City of Portland, Oregon, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, and Montgomery County, Maryland. The research by these local governments was sponsored by the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force and Public Technology, Inc

  4. Deregulation strategies for local governments and the role/opportunities for energy efficiency services in the utility industry deregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, P.C.

    1998-07-01

    As the future shape of the electric utility industry continues to unfold and as retail competition becomes a reality, local governments are faced with balancing the need for: (1) economic development; (2) and to avoid the potential impact of cost-shifting among residents and businesses, while ensuring reliable and universal energy services. Furthermore, local governments need to find ways to recoup potential loss of franchise and tax revenues, to ensure fair and adequate energy-efficiency programs, and to continue other social programs for low income families. This paper will address two important issues every local government in the US are facing: (1) the development of viable deregulation strategies before, during and after the promulgation of utility deregulation; (2) opportunities for energy efficiency services in the competitive markets to serve local governments, which typically constitutes the largest market segment in utility's service territory. This paper presents issues and challenges common to all local governments. It documents strategies that several local governments are utilizing to embrace the coming electric utility restructuring and competition challenge to the benefits of their respective communities. This paper presents the results on deregulation work by the City of Portland, Oregon, Barnstable County, Massachusetts, and Montgomery County, Maryland. The research by these local governments was sponsored by the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force and Public Technology, Inc.

  5. A study on the deregulation of the Finnish electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopsakangas-Savolainen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Governments have regarded the electricity industry as a leading industrial sector throughout the history. Because of its strategic importance to industrial development, its impacts on the social and environmental issues and its natural monopoly characteristics, it has been seen necessary to regulate electricity industry effectively. However, in the mid 1980s it was realised that even though transmission and distribution networks are natural monopolies, the scale economies in electricity production at the generating unit level had exhausted at a unit size of about 500 MW. This meant that supply and generation had become potentially competitive activities. In Finland the new Electricity Market Act (EMA) came into force in 1.11.1995. According to it the production and supply of electricity became deregulated and competition was introduced to the industry. The main aim of the law was to improve efficiency. This dissertation analyses, both theoretically and empirically, the impacts of deregulation to the Finnish electricity markets. In chapter two we discuss on the grounds and incentives of the deregulation processes that have been carried out in different countries. We also determine the crucial factors in order succeed in the deregulation process. According to our view the success depend on the number of active players in the wholesale market, the rules of the bidding procedure, the organisation of the demand side operation, the neutrality of transmission grid, the structure of production technologies and the ownership structure of the industry. In chapter three we theoretically model the profit maximising behaviour of the Finnish electricity companies based on different stages of vertical integration and on different stage of competition. According to our results the profit maximising pricing rules of distribution units is dependent on the stage of integration and on the stage of competition. The separated distribution company maximises profits by setting the

  6. Phosphorylation of acidic ribosomal proteins from rabbit reticulocytes by a ribosome-associated casein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1977-01-01

    Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryl......Two acidic proteins from 80-S ribosomes were isolated and purified to homogeneity. The purified acidic proteins could be phosphorylated by casein kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP and [gamma-32P]GTP as a phosphoryl donor. The proteins became phosphorylated in situ, too. Sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  7. The ribosomal protein Rpl22 controls ribosome composition by directly repressing expression of its own paralog, Rpl22l1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique N O'Leary

    Full Text Available Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22(-/- mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22(-/- mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1 expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog.

  8. Architecture of the large subunit of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Leitner, Alexander; Bieri, Philipp; Voigts-Hoffmann, Felix; Erzberger, Jan P; Leibundgut, Marc; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ban, Nenad

    2014-01-23

    Mitochondrial ribosomes synthesize a number of highly hydrophobic proteins encoded on the genome of mitochondria, the organelles in eukaryotic cells that are responsible for energy conversion by oxidative phosphorylation. The ribosomes in mammalian mitochondria have undergone massive structural changes throughout their evolution, including ribosomal RNA shortening and acquisition of mitochondria-specific ribosomal proteins. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of the 39S large subunit of the porcine mitochondrial ribosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy at 4.9 Å resolution. The structure, combined with data from chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry experiments, reveals the unique features of the 39S subunit at near-atomic resolution and provides detailed insight into the architecture of the polypeptide exit site. This region of the mitochondrial ribosome has been considerably remodelled compared to its bacterial counterpart, providing a specialized platform for the synthesis and membrane insertion of the highly hydrophobic protein components of the respiratory chain.

  9. TIF-IA-dependent regulation of ribosome synthesis in drosophila muscle is required to maintain systemic insulin signaling and larval growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Ghosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The conserved TOR kinase signaling network links nutrient availability to cell, tissue and body growth in animals. One important growth-regulatory target of TOR signaling is ribosome biogenesis. Studies in yeast and mammalian cell culture have described how TOR controls rRNA synthesis-a limiting step in ribosome biogenesis-via the RNA Polymerase I transcription factor TIF-IA. However, the contribution of TOR-dependent ribosome synthesis to tissue and body growth in animals is less clear. Here we show in Drosophila larvae that ribosome synthesis in muscle is required non-autonomously to maintain normal body growth and development. We find that amino acid starvation and TOR inhibition lead to reduced levels of TIF-IA, and decreased rRNA synthesis in larval muscle. When we mimic this decrease in muscle ribosome synthesis using RNAi-mediated knockdown of TIF-IA, we observe delayed larval development and reduced body growth. This reduction in growth is caused by lowered systemic insulin signaling via two endocrine responses: reduced expression of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs from the brain and increased expression of Imp-L2-a secreted factor that binds and inhibits dILP activity-from muscle. We also observed that maintaining TIF-IA levels in muscle could partially reverse the starvation-mediated suppression of systemic insulin signaling. Finally, we show that activation of TOR specifically in muscle can increase overall body size and this effect requires TIF-IA function. These data suggest that muscle ribosome synthesis functions as a nutrient-dependent checkpoint for overall body growth: in nutrient rich conditions, TOR is required to maintain levels of TIF-IA and ribosome synthesis to promote high levels of systemic insulin, but under conditions of starvation stress, reduced muscle ribosome synthesis triggers an endocrine response that limits systemic insulin signaling to restrict growth and maintain homeostasis.

  10. Placeholder factors in ribosome biogenesis: please, pave my way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Espinar-Marchena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of cytoplasmic eukaryotic ribosomes is an extraordinarily energy-demanding cellular activity that occurs progressively from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm. In the nucleolus, precursor rRNAs associate with a myriad of trans-acting factors and some ribosomal proteins to form pre-ribosomal particles. These factors include snoRNPs, nucleases, ATPases, GTPases, RNA helicases, and a vast list of proteins with no predicted enzymatic activity. Their coordinate activity orchestrates in a spatiotemporal manner the modification and processing of precursor rRNAs, the rearrangement reactions required for the formation of productive RNA folding intermediates, the ordered assembly of the ribosomal proteins, and the export of pre-ribosomal particles to the cytoplasm; thus, providing speed, directionality and accuracy to the overall process of formation of translation-competent ribosomes. Here, we review a particular class of trans-acting factors known as “placeholders”. Placeholder factors temporarily bind selected ribosomal sites until these have achieved a structural context that is appropriate for exchanging the placeholder with another site-specific binding factor. By this strategy, placeholders sterically prevent premature recruitment of subsequently binding factors, premature formation of structures, avoid possible folding traps, and act as molecular clocks that supervise the correct progression of pre-ribosomal particles into functional ribosomal subunits. We summarize the current understanding of those factors that delay the assembly of distinct ribosomal proteins or subsequently bind key sites in pre-ribosomal particles. We also discuss recurrent examples of RNA-protein and protein-protein mimicry between rRNAs and/or factors, which have clear functional implications for the ribosome biogenesis pathway.

  11. The architecture of mammalian ribosomal protein promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Robert P

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian ribosomes contain 79 different proteins encoded by widely scattered single copy genes. Coordinate expression of these genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is required to ensure a roughly equimolar accumulation of ribosomal proteins. To date, detailed studies of only a very few ribosomal protein (rp promoters have been made. To elucidate the general features of rp promoter architecture, I made a detailed sequence comparison of the promoter regions of the entire set of orthologous human and mouse rp genes. Results A striking evolutionarily conserved feature of most rp genes is the separation by an intron of the sequences involved in transcriptional and translational regulation from the sequences with protein encoding function. Another conserved feature is the polypyrimidine initiator, which conforms to the consensus (Y2C+1TY(T2(Y3. At least 60 % of the rp promoters contain a largely conserved TATA box or A/T-rich motif, which should theoretically have TBP-binding capability. A remarkably high proportion of the promoters contain conserved binding sites for transcription factors that were previously implicated in rp gene expression, namely upstream GABP and Sp1 sites and downstream YY1 sites. Over 80 % of human and mouse rp genes contain a transposable element residue within 900 bp of 5' flanking sequence; very little sequence identity between human and mouse orthologues was evident more than 200 bp upstream of the transcriptional start point. Conclusions This analysis has provided some valuable insights into the general architecture of mammalian rp promoters and has identified parameters that might coordinately regulate the transcriptional activity of certain subsets of rp genes.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of ribosome jam

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Shigenori

    2011-09-01

    We propose a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model of ribosome molecules to study the dependence of translation process on environmental parameters. We found the model exhibits traffic jam property, which is consistent with an ASEP model. We estimated the influence of the temperature and concentration of molecules on the hopping probability used in the ASEP model. Our model can also treat environmental effects on the translation process that cannot be explained by such cellular automaton models. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  14. Eukaryotic ribosome display with in situ DNA recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyue; Edwards, Bryan M; Kastelic, Damjana; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Ribosome display is a cell-free display technology for in vitro selection and optimisation of proteins from large diversified libraries. It operates through the formation of stable protein-ribosome-mRNA (PRM) complexes and selection of ligand-binding proteins, followed by DNA recovery from the selected genetic information. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosome display systems have been developed. In this chapter, we describe the eukaryotic rabbit reticulocyte method in which a distinct in situ single-primer RT-PCR procedure is used to recover DNA from the selected PRM complexes without the need for prior disruption of the ribosome.

  15. Parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Jullien

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In mammals and in plants, parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates embryo growth and might be involved in reproductive isolation between emerging new species. Increased dosage of maternal genomes represses growth while an increased dosage of paternal genomes has the opposite effect. These observations led to the discovery of imprinted genes, which are expressed by a single parental allele. It was further proposed in the frame of the parental conflict theory that parental genome imbalances are directly mirrored by antagonistic regulations of imprinted genes encoding maternal growth inhibitors and paternal growth enhancers. However these hypotheses were never tested directly. Here, we investigated the effect of parental genome imbalance on the expression of Arabidopsis imprinted genes FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2 and FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA controlled by DNA methylation, and MEDEA (MEA and PHERES1 (PHE1 controlled by histone methylation. Genome dosage imbalance deregulated the expression of FIS2 and PHE1 in an antagonistic manner. In addition increased dosage of inactive alleles caused a loss of imprinting of FIS2 and MEA. Although FIS2 controls histone methylation, which represses MEA and PHE1 expression, the changes of PHE1 and MEA expression could not be fully accounted for by the corresponding fluctuations of FIS2 expression. Our results show that parental genome dosage imbalance deregulates imprinting using mechanisms, which are independent from known regulators of imprinting. The complexity of the network of regulations between expressed and silenced alleles of imprinted genes activated in response to parental dosage imbalance does not support simple models derived from the parental conflict hypothesis.

  16. Bank CEO Pay-Performance Relations and the Effects of Deregulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Anthony J; Ezzell, John R; Miles, James A

    1995-01-01

    The authors test the deregulation hypothesis that posits that bank CEO compensation became more sensitive to performance as bank management became less regulated. They observe a significant increase in pay-performance sensitivities from their 1976-81 regulation subsample to their 1982-88 deregulation subsample. These increases in pay sensitivities after deregulation are observed for salary and bonus, stock options, and common stock holdings. The authors observe increases in the pay-performanc...

  17. Product Market Deregulation and Employment Outcomes: Evidence from the German Retail Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Senftleben-König

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the short- and medium-term effects of the deregulation of shopopening hours legislation on retail employment in Germany. In 2006, the legislative competence was shifted from the federal to the state level, leading to a gradual deregulation of shop opening restrictions in most of Germany’s sixteen federal states. The paper exploits regional variation in the legislation in order to identify the effect product market deregulation has on retail employment. We find robust...

  18. Why Shops Close Again : An Evolutionary Perspective on the Deregulation of Shopping Hours

    OpenAIRE

    Kosfeld, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a new perspective on the deregulation of shopping hours based on ideas from evolutionary game theory. We study a retail economy where shopping hours have been deregulated recently. It is argued that first, the deregulation leads to a coordination problem between store owners and customers, and second, the ‘solution’ to this problem depends on the specific cost structure of stores and the preferences of customers. In particular, it may happen that, even if extended shoppi...

  19. The German Political Economy Between Deregulation and Re-regulation: Party Discourses on Minimum Wage Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Dostal, Jörg Michael

    2012-01-01

    In the German political economy of the early 21st century, labor market policymaking has shifted toward deregulation and liberalization. In particular, the so-called Hartz labor market reforms of the Social Democratic Party and Green Party government, introduced in 2002 and 2003, pushed for employment growth in low-wage and deregulated employment sectors. This article focuses on one of the key debates triggered by Germany’s labor market deregulation after 2002, namely whethe...

  20. Power systems locational marginal pricing in deregulated markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Fung Francis

    Since the beginning of the 1990s, the electricity business is transforming from a vertical integrating business to a competitive market operations. The generation, transmission, distribution subsystem of an electricity utility are operated independently as Genco (generation subsystem), Transco (transmission subsystem), and Distco (distribution subsystem). This trend promotes more economical inter- and intra regional transactions to be made by the participating companies and the users of electricity to achieve the intended objectives of deregulation. There are various types of electricity markets that are implemented in the North America in the past few years. However, transmission congestion management becomes a key issue in the electricity market design as more bilateral transactions are traded across long distances competing for scarce transmission resources. It directly alters the traditional concept of energy pricing and impacts the bottom line, revenue and cost of electricity, of both suppliers and buyers. In this research, transmission congestion problem in a deregulated market environment is elucidated by implementing by the Locational Marginal Pricing (LMP) method. With a comprehensive understanding of the LMP method, new mathematical tools will aid electric utilities in exploring new business opportunities are developed and presented in this dissertation. The dissertation focuses on the development of concept of (LMP) forecasting and its implication to the market participants in deregulated market. Specifically, we explore methods of developing fast LMP calculation techniques that are differ from existing LMPs. We also explore and document the usefulness of the proposed LMP in determining electricity pricing of a large scale power system. The developed mathematical tools use of well-known optimization techniques such as linear programming that are support by several flow charts. The fast and practical security constrained unit commitment methods are the

  1. Deregulation and pricing in a hydro electric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoea, P.; Livik, K.; Wangensteen, I.

    1992-01-01

    In line with the current development in some European countries, notably the UK and the Netherlands, deregulation and market competition has been introduced in Norwegian electricity supply in order to improve the economic efficiency of the system. The legal basis for the introduction is the new Norwegian Energy Act that was approved in the Storting (parliament) in June 1990 and came legally into effect on January 1, 1991. This paper deals with the organizational structure, the price formation in the wholesale market, and the tariffs and metering equipment that are being developed to meet the needs of the customers and the utilities in this new situation. (author)

  2. A congestion line flow control in deregulated power system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatarajan Shanmuga Sundaram

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under open access, market-driven transactions have become the new independent decision variables defining the behavior of the power system. The possibility of transmission lines getting over-loaded is relatively more under deregulated operation because different parts of the system are owned by separate companies and in part operated under varying service charges. This paper discusses a two-tier algorithm for correcting the lone overloads in conjunction with the conventional power-flow methods. The method uses line flow sensitivities, which are computed by the East Decoupled Power-flow algorithm and can be adapted for on-line implementation.

  3. In Profile: Models of Ribosome Biogenesis Defects and Regulation of Protein Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, P.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes are the mediators of protein synthesis in the cell and therefore crucial to proper cell function. In addition, ribosomes are highly abundant, with ribosomal RNA making up 80% of the RNA in the cell. A large amount of resources go into maintaining this pool of ribosomes, so ribosome

  4. Peptide chemistry toolbox - Transforming natural peptides into peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erak, Miloš; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2018-06-01

    The development of solid phase peptide synthesis has released tremendous opportunities for using synthetic peptides in medicinal applications. In the last decades, peptide therapeutics became an emerging market in pharmaceutical industry. The need for synthetic strategies in order to improve peptidic properties, such as longer half-life, higher bioavailability, increased potency and efficiency is accordingly rising. In this mini-review, we present a toolbox of modifications in peptide chemistry for overcoming the main drawbacks during the transition from natural peptides to peptide therapeutics. Modifications at the level of the peptide backbone, amino acid side chains and higher orders of structures are described. Furthermore, we are discussing the future of peptide therapeutics development and their impact on the pharmaceutical market. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Nightmare of the Leader: The Impact of Deregulation on an Oligopoly Insurance Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer L. Wang; Larry Y. Tzeng; En-Lin Wang

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of deregulation of licensing on an oligopoly insurance market. We show that deregulation of licensing in a Stackelberg-type oligopoly market may not have any impact on the leader’s output if the number of firms increases but the market structure remains. On the other hand, if the market structure is reorganized because of the deregulation of licensing, the leader’s output could be significantly reduced after deregulation. By using the unique data of the insuranc...

  6. A computational investigation on the connection between dynamics properties of ribosomal proteins and ribosome assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Burton

    Full Text Available Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents has been studied extensively over the past 50 years, and experimental evidence suggests that prokaryotic ribosomal proteins undergo conformational changes during assembly. However, to date, no studies have attempted to elucidate these conformational changes. The present work utilizes computational methods to analyze protein dynamics and to investigate the linkage between dynamics and binding of these proteins during the assembly of the ribosome. Ribosomal proteins are known to be positively charged and we find the percentage of positive residues in r-proteins to be about twice that of the average protein: Lys+Arg is 18.7% for E. coli and 21.2% for T. thermophilus. Also, positive residues constitute a large proportion of RNA contacting residues: 39% for E. coli and 46% for T. thermophilus. This affirms the known importance of charge-charge interactions in the assembly of the ribosome. We studied the dynamics of three primary proteins from E. coli and T. thermophilus 30S subunits that bind early in the assembly (S15, S17, and S20 with atomic molecular dynamic simulations, followed by a study of all r-proteins using elastic network models. Molecular dynamics simulations show that solvent-exposed proteins (S15 and S17 tend to adopt more stable solution conformations than an RNA-embedded protein (S20. We also find protein residues that contact the 16S rRNA are generally more mobile in comparison with the other residues. This is because there is a larger proportion of contacting residues located in flexible loop regions. By the use of elastic network models, which are computationally more efficient, we show that this trend holds for most of the 30S r-proteins.

  7. New Partners in Regulation of Gene Expression: The Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto Interacts with Methylated Ribosomal Protein L12 Via Its Chromodomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coléno-Costes, Anne; Jang, Suk Min; de Vanssay, Augustin; Rougeot, Julien; Bouceba, Tahar; Randsholt, Neel B.; Gibert, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle

    2012-01-01

    Chromodomains are found in many regulators of chromatin structure, and most of them recognize methylated lysines on histones. Here, we investigate the role of the Drosophila melanogaster protein Corto's chromodomain. The Enhancer of Trithorax and Polycomb Corto is involved in both silencing and activation of gene expression. Over-expression of the Corto chromodomain (CortoCD) in transgenic flies shows that it is a chromatin-targeting module, critical for Corto function. Unexpectedly, mass spectrometry analysis reveals that polypeptides pulled down by CortoCD from nuclear extracts correspond to ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, real-time interaction analyses demonstrate that CortoCD binds with high affinity RPL12 tri-methylated on lysine 3. Corto and RPL12 co-localize with active epigenetic marks on polytene chromosomes, suggesting that both are involved in fine-tuning transcription of genes in open chromatin. RNA–seq based transcriptomes of wing imaginal discs over-expressing either CortoCD or RPL12 reveal that both factors deregulate large sets of common genes, which are enriched in heat-response and ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that they could be implicated in dynamic coordination of ribosome biogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that Corto and RPL12 bind hsp70 and are similarly recruited on gene body after heat shock. Hence, Corto and RPL12 could be involved together in regulation of gene transcription. We discuss whether pseudo-ribosomal complexes composed of various ribosomal proteins might participate in regulation of gene expression in connection with chromatin regulators. PMID:23071455

  8. Defining the bacteroides ribosomal binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Horn, Nikki; Carding, Simon R

    2013-03-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract, in particular the colon, hosts a vast number of commensal microorganisms. Representatives of the genus Bacteroides are among the most abundant bacterial species in the human colon. Bacteroidetes diverged from the common line of eubacterial descent before other eubacterial groups. As a result, they employ unique transcription initiation signals and, because of this uniqueness, they require specific genetic tools. Although some tools exist, they are not optimal for studying the roles and functions of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Focusing on translation initiation signals in Bacteroides, we created a series of expression vectors allowing for different levels of protein expression in this genus, and we describe the use of pepI from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis as a novel reporter gene for Bacteroides. Furthermore, we report the identification of the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of Bacteroides ovatus and analyze in detail its ribosomal binding site, thus defining a core region necessary for efficient translation, which we have incorporated into the design of our expression vectors. Based on the sequence logo information from the 5' untranslated region of other Bacteroidales ribosomal protein genes, we conclude that our findings are relevant to all members of this order.

  9. Today or not today: Deregulating the Russian gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryev, Yuli

    2007-01-01

    Although Russia is the world's biggest producer of natural gas, its ability to maintain timely and reliable supply to meet the growing global demand has come under question in recent months. The gas war with Ukraine notwithstanding, concern has been raised by a number of observers that underinvestment in the gas sector will lead to a systemic failure of the state monopolist OAO Gazprom to increase or even maintain current levels of production. Yet with a quarter of European gas coming from Russia, and with increasing presence of Gazprom in European downstream operations (such as Germany, Hungary, and other CIS states) as well as seemingly closer ties with Algeria, another major supplier of gas to Europe, there has been a strong reaction from Europe's policy-makers to decrease dependence on Russian gas. Deregulating and liberalising the gas sector would see the lifting of restrictions to foreign or independent investors wishing to gain access to Russian reserves, as well as the unhindered access to the pipeline infrastructure and export markets. It would also signal the unbundling of Gazprom and an end to the artificially low price of gas to the domestic consumer. This paper discusses whether deregulation is the optimal way to raise capital, attract investment and increase supply security for Russia's Western neighbours. In doing so, the paper identifies the objectives of the EU as the importer whilst trying to align them with the objectives of the Russian Federation as the exporter, in the current political context

  10. A novel approach for modeling deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Ofir D., E-mail: rubino@agri.huji.ac.i [Department of Agricultural Economics and Management, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, P.O. Box 12, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Babcock, Bruce A., E-mail: babcock@iastate.ed [Department of Economics, Iowa State University, 578F Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070 (United States); Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD), Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1070 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    The theoretical framework developed in this study allows development of a model of deregulated electricity markets that explains two familiar empirical findings; the existence of forward premiums and price-cost markups in the spot market. This is a significant contribution because electricity forward premiums have been previously explained exclusively by the assumptions of perfect competition and risk-averse behavior while spot markups are generally the outcome of a body of literature assuming oligopolistic competition. Our theoretical framework indicates that a certain premium for forward contracting is required for efficient allocation of generation capacity. However, due to the uniqueness of electricity and the design of deregulated electricity markets this premium might be substantially higher than its optimal level. - Research highlights: {yields} The state of knowledge regarding modeling electricity markets is incomplete. {yields} Electricity forward premiums are not necessarily driven by risk aversion. {yields} Efficiency in production requires a certain premium for forward contracting. {yields} It is likely that market premiums are substantially higher than their optimal level. {yields} Policy regulation should not seek to eliminate forward premium entirely.

  11. A novel approach for modeling deregulated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Ofir D.; Babcock, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical framework developed in this study allows development of a model of deregulated electricity markets that explains two familiar empirical findings; the existence of forward premiums and price-cost markups in the spot market. This is a significant contribution because electricity forward premiums have been previously explained exclusively by the assumptions of perfect competition and risk-averse behavior while spot markups are generally the outcome of a body of literature assuming oligopolistic competition. Our theoretical framework indicates that a certain premium for forward contracting is required for efficient allocation of generation capacity. However, due to the uniqueness of electricity and the design of deregulated electricity markets this premium might be substantially higher than its optimal level. - Research highlights: → The state of knowledge regarding modeling electricity markets is incomplete. → Electricity forward premiums are not necessarily driven by risk aversion. → Efficiency in production requires a certain premium for forward contracting. → It is likely that market premiums are substantially higher than their optimal level. → Policy regulation should not seek to eliminate forward premium entirely.

  12. Bluewater Power goes ERP route to address deregulation : case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broad, K. [Bluewater Power Distribution Corp., Sarnia, ON (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Bluewater Power Distribution Corporation distributes electricity to 35,000 customers in southwestern Ontario, including residential customers, large industries and commercial establishments. Their distribution system network consists of more than 344 miles of overhead wires and 125 miles of underground wires. The company employs more than 90 full-time people and is the result of a merger of six local utilities in year 2000. Ontario's energy market was preparing to deregulate at the time of the merger. Under the deregulation rules, utilities in the province were required to provide unbundled bills and exchange customer electronic business transactions with energy retailers. New rules opened up the cost of power on the wholesale side, requiring utilities to conduct wholesale settlements with the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO). The IESO manages Ontario's bulk electricity power system and operates the wholesale market. This article described the solution that Bluewater Power's information technology (IT) team found to support Ontario's local market, meet regulatory demands and adapt to future regulatory changes.

  13. Productivity growth and deregulation of Japanese electricity distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Mika; Sueyoshi, Toshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Deregulation of Japanese electric power industry began in 1995. After the amendment of Electricity Utility Industry Law in 1995, competition was partially introduced in a generation sector and retail competition started from 2000. Eligibility to choose suppliers was gradually extended from larger to smaller customers. As of 2008, almost all customers except households can choose their electricity suppliers. Based upon both previous implementation result of competition policy and review on their achievement, Japanese government will begin new policy debate in 2013 to assess further retail competition which includes household customers. To prepare for policy suggestion on the future electric power industry, this study examines the cost structure of Japanese electricity distribution. For the purpose, we estimate a multi-product translog cost function of Japanese electricity distribution from 1983 to 2003. Using the estimated cost function, we calculate several economic measures such as productivity growth, technical change and economies of scale and scope. The empirical results of this study indicate the improvement in productivity growth after deregulation.

  14. Effect of demand management on regulated and deregulated electricity sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrioglu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Our society derives a quantifiable benefit from electric power. In particular, forced outages or blackouts have enormous consequences on society, one of which is loss of economic surplus. The society relies on having a continuous supply of electrical energy. Some customers may willingly risk this continuous supply and participate in demand management programs for electrical power. If the power system grid is in trouble, electric utilities need to have demand relief. Customers willing to reduce their demand to help the system can receive an incentive fee for helping the utilities. Demand relief can be system wide or location specific. Sometimes it can be more effective to fix the electrical demand vs. supply imbalance from the demand side. The value of demand management contracts is greatly affected by customer location. Inclusion of locational attributes into the contract design procedure increases the effectiveness of the contracts by helping a utility get more value from its demand management programs. Independent System Operators and regulators, among others, can also benefit from effective demand management. This paper will investigate how this type of demand management contracts can help the electricity sector both in regulated and deregulated environments. - Highlights: • Demand management can help prevent forced electricity outages. • Both electric utilities and ISOs can use demand management. • Regulated and deregulated electricity sectors can benefit from demand management. • Demand management contracts can be effectively used in power system grids.

  15. Competition and deregulation in electricity : the national and continental dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garant, D.

    2000-01-01

    Some of the recent developments with Hydro-Quebec in terms of moving towards a deregulated competitive market were presented. In June 2000, the Quebec National Assembly passed legislation allowing for power generation and wholesale supply of electricity within Quebec will to be a deregulated business based on the gradual introduction of a competitive, contested market at the wholesale level. This legislation mitigates Hydro-Quebec's market power by legislating a long term fixed price supply contract between Hydro-Quebec's generation and distribution groups, operating as a functionally separate division within corporate Hydro-Quebec. Hydro-Quebec's market power in generation is 36,000 MW, the bulk of which will be committed to the Quebec distribution market at a fixed price of about 2.8 cents per kWh. Hydro-Quebec will maintain the rights to develop large scale hydro in Quebec if the development meets conditions of economic viability, environmental soundness and is locally acceptable. Hydro-Quebec is also expanding into new areas of generation such as wind power. The electric utility also believes it can play a role in Atlantic Canada by trading and moving off-peak and on-peak energy by using the storage capacity of their large hydro reservoirs

  16. The impact of deregulation on the US nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratta, A.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Nuclear Safety Center, University Park, PA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    In the United States, the electric utility industry is undergoing a dramatic shift away from a tightly regulated monopoly to a free market system. The impact on the nuclear utility industry of deregulation coupled with recent changes in the nuclear regulatory environment has had a dramatic impact on the future of nuclear power in the United States. Utilities have been broken up into separate generation, transmission, and distribution companies and are now allowed to sell electricity outside of their former service areas. As economic deregulation has occurred, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has also adopted a new approach to regulation -- risk informed regulation. The implementation of risk-informed regulation has resulted in the adoption of a new regulatory format that attempts to highlight those areas having greatest risk significance. This paper explores these and other changes that have resulted because of the changing economic and regulatory environment for nuclear energy and examines their impact on the future of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  17. Generation capacity adequacy in deregulated markets : options for Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) is a Calgary-based non-profit organization that conducts studies on energy and related environmental issues to help Canadian business and government organizations. This paper summarized the information in a two volume CERI study report which assessed generation capacity issues in deregulated electricity markets in Canada. The study observed the restructuring experience in several jurisdictions and described how, or if, energy-only markets are succeeding in ensuring capacity additions. Supply-side and demand-side mechanisms have been proposed as solutions to address these problems. Theoretical and practical issues of adequacy that are most relevant from a Canadian perspective were presented. In fully developed energy markets, the price of energy reflects scarcity. When generating resources are abundant prices are low. Since investment decisions are based on price expectations, it is unlikely that deregulated markets in their current state can offer adequate generation for the long term. It was concluded that long-term investment will occur with competitive markets and by adding a capacity mechanism to the market design. tabs., figs

  18. Deregulation and internationalisation - impact on the Swedish nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haukeland, Sverre R.

    2010-01-01

    The deregulation of the Swedish electricity market in 1996 was well known in advance, and the nuclear power plants in Sweden, as well as their main suppliers, made early preparations for a this new situation. In a study - performed by the author at Malardalen University in Sweden - it is concluded that the electricity industry, including the nuclear power plants, was fundamentally transformed in conjunction with market liberalisation. Two large foreign companies, E-on and Fortum, entered the Swedish market and became part-owners of the nuclear plants. After deregulation, the electricity market in Sweden is dominated by these two companies and the large national company Vattenfall. Similarly, Vattenfall has recently grown into an international energy company, acquiring generation capacity in Northern Europe outside of Sweden, including nuclear power plants in Germany. Restructuring of the nuclear industry on the supplier side started in the 1980's, when the Swedish company ASEA and BBC of Switzerland merged to become ABB. Several years later the Swedish nuclear plant supplier ABB-Atom became part of Westinghouse Electric Company, today owned by Toshiba. The Swedish experience thus confirms an international trend of mergers and consolidation in the nuclear industry. (authors)

  19. Electricity deregulation, spot price patterns and demand-side management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Flynn, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines extensive hourly or half-hourly power price data from 14 deregulated power markets. It analyzes average diurnal patterns, relationship to system load, volatility, and consistency over time. Diurnal patterns indicate the average price spread between off-peak and on-peak and weekend vs. weekday power consumption. Volatility is measured by price velocity: the average normalized hourly change in power price, calculated daily. The calculated price velocity is broken down into an expected component that arises from the diurnal pattern and an unexpected component that arises from unknown factors. The analysis reveals significant differences among markets, suggesting that demand-side management (DSM) of power consumption is far more difficult in some markets than in others. At one extreme, Spain, Britain and Scandinavia show consistent diurnal price patterns, a stable relationship between price and system load, and a low unexplained component of price volatility. A power consumer in these markets could form a reasonable expectation of a reward for DSM of elective power consumption. At the other extreme, two markets in Australia show erratic diurnal price patterns from year to year, low correlation between price and system load, and a high amount of unexpected price velocity. A power consumer in these markets would have far greater difficulty in realizing a benefit from DSM. Markets that experienced one period of very high prices without a clear external cause, such as California and Alberta, appear to have a significant longer-term erosion of public support for deregulation. (author)

  20. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrochers, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the first year of electric power industry deregulation in Alberta was presented. The way in which electricity is bought and sold in Ontario and throughout North America is changing. Costs are no longer fixed and regulated. Electricity is becoming a commodity with high levels of price volatility. The paper presented hedging options for Alberta consumers, contracting lessons, market issues and lessons for Ontario. A comparison of Alberta's deregulation schedule with that of Ontario's was included. One year after market opening in Alberta, power prices have dropped significantly. There is a greater than expected demand side response, increased development in power generation, and a decrease in natural gas prices. Issues that still need to be addressed in Alberta include billing and load settlement issues, invoicing/billing standards, the lack of competition at the retail level, and future balancing of pool charges. Energy Advantage Inc. (EA) does not foresee the same drastic increase in price as seen in Alberta market opening, but suggests that uncertainty and volatility will exist in Ontario. In Alberta, customers who did nothing and stayed on default were the ones who benefited, but took a great risk. EA suggests that customers must understand how and when they use electricity, how much is used during on- and off-peak hours, and in the summer versus the winter. When electricity is priced hourly, it is important to know consumption patterns. 7 figs

  1. The impact of deregulation on the US nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baratta, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, the electric utility industry is undergoing a dramatic shift away from a tightly regulated monopoly to a free market system. The impact on the nuclear utility industry of deregulation coupled with recent changes in the nuclear regulatory environment has had a dramatic impact on the future of nuclear power in the United States. Utilities have been broken up into separate generation, transmission, and distribution companies and are now allowed to sell electricity outside of their former service areas. As economic deregulation has occurred, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has also adopted a new approach to regulation -- risk informed regulation. The implementation of risk-informed regulation has resulted in the adoption of a new regulatory format that attempts to highlight those areas having greatest risk significance. This paper explores these and other changes that have resulted because of the changing economic and regulatory environment for nuclear energy and examines their impact on the future of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  2. Maintenance cost models in deregulated power systems under opportunity costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arfaj, K.; Dahal, K.; Azaiez, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    In a centralized power system, the operator is responsible for scheduling maintenance. There are different types of maintenance, including corrective maintenance; predictive maintenance; preventive maintenance; and reliability-centred maintenance. The main cause of power failures is poor maintenance. As such, maintenance costs play a significant role in deregulated power systems. They include direct costs associated with material and labor costs as well as indirect costs associated with spare parts inventory, shipment, test equipment, indirect labor, opportunity costs and cost of failure. In maintenance scheduling and planning, the cost function is the only component of the objective function. This paper presented the results of a study in which different components of maintenance costs were modeled. The maintenance models were formulated as an optimization problem with single and multiple objectives and a set of constraints. The maintenance costs models could be used to schedule the maintenance activities of power generators more accurately and to identify the best maintenance strategies over a period of time as they consider failure and opportunity costs in a deregulated environment. 32 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  3. Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    all pathway of ribosome recycling in eubacteria with especial reference to the important role of the initiation factor ... [Seshadri A and Varshney U 2006 Mechanism of recycling of post-termination ribosomal complexes in eubacteria: a new role of initiation factor 3 .... RRF binding results in a remarkable conformational change.

  4. Expression of protein-coding genes embedded in ribosomal DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steinar D; Haugen, Peik; Nielsen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) is a specialised chromosomal location that is dedicated to high-level transcription of ribosomal RNA genes. Interestingly, rDNAs are frequently interrupted by parasitic elements, some of which carry protein genes. These are non-LTR retrotransposons and group II introns that e...... in the nucleolus....

  5. Proto-ribosome: a theoretical approach based on RNA relics

    OpenAIRE

    Demongeot, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    We describe in this paper, based on already published articles, a contribution to the theory postulating the existence of a proto-ribosome, which could have appeared early at the origin of life and we discuss the interest of this notion in an evolutionary perspective, taking into account the existence of possible RNA relics of this proto-ribosome.

  6. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Complete Structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis 70S Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jendrik Hentschel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ribosome carries out the synthesis of proteins in every living cell. It consequently represents a frontline target in anti-microbial therapy. Tuberculosis ranks among the leading causes of death worldwide, due in large part to the combination of difficult-to-treat latency and antibiotic resistance. Here, we present the 3.3-Å cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative to the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure reveals two additional ribosomal proteins and localizes them to the vicinity of drug-target sites in both the catalytic center and the decoding site of the ribosome. Furthermore, we visualized actinobacterium-specific rRNA and protein expansions that extensively remodel the ribosomal surface with implications for polysome organization. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the idiosyncrasies of mycobacterial translation and reveal atomic details of the structure that will facilitate the design of anti-tubercular therapeutics.

  8. Macrolide antibiotic interaction and resistance on the bacterial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2003-02-01

    Our understanding of the fine structure of many antibiotic target sites has reached a new level of enlightenment in the last couple of years due to the advent, by X-ray crystallography, of high-resolution structures of the bacterial ribosome. Many classes of clinically useful antibiotics bind to the ribosome to inhibit bacterial protein synthesis. Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics form one of the largest groups, and bind to the same site on the 50S ribosomal subunit. Here, we review the molecular details of the ribosomal MLSB site to put into perspective the main points from a wealth of biochemical and genetic data that have been collected over several decades. The information is now available to understand, at atomic resolution, how macrolide antibiotics interact with their ribosomal target, how the target is altered to confer resistance, and in which directions we need to look if we are to rationally design better drugs to overcome the extant resistance mechanisms.

  9. Cis-regulatory RNA elements that regulate specialized ribosome activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shifeng; Barna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that the ribosome itself can play a highly regulatory role in the specialized translation of specific subpools of mRNAs, in particular at the level of ribosomal proteins (RP). However, the mechanism(s) by which this selection takes place has remained poorly understood. In our recent study, we discovered a combination of unique RNA elements in the 5'UTRs of mRNAs that allows for such control by the ribosome. These mRNAs contain a Translation Inhibitory Element (TIE) that inhibits general cap-dependent translation, and an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that relies on a specific RP for activation. The unique combination of an inhibitor of general translation and an activator of specialized translation is key to ribosome-mediated control of gene expression. Here we discuss how these RNA regulatory elements provide a new level of control to protein expression and their implications for gene expression, organismal development and evolution.

  10. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha...... and to estimate the transcription time for the rRNA operon under different conditions. In steady states of growth with growth rates ranging from 0.75 to 2.3 doublings/h, as well as during the transition after a shift-down, the transcription time of the rRNA operon was constant. The rate of synthesis of r......RNA correlated during this transition – in contrast to the rate of accumulation (M. T. Hansen et al., J. Bacteriol. 122: 585-591, 1975) – with the ppGpp pool in the same way as has been observed during partial amino acid starvation....

  11. Air pollution effects due to deregulation of the electric industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Khojasteh Riaz

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 introduced the concept of open-access into the electric utility industry which allows privately-owned utilities to transmit power produced by non-utility generators and independent power producers (IPPs). In April 1996, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) laid down the final rules (Orders No. 888 & No. 889), which required utilities to open their transmission lines to any power producer and charge them no more than what they pay for the use of their own lines. These rules set the stage for the retail sale of electricity to industrial, commercial and residential utility customers; non-utility generators (Nugs); and power marketers. These statutory, regulatory and administrative changes create for the electric utility industry two different forces that contradict each other. The first is the concept of competition among utility companies; this places a greater emphasis on electric power generation cost control and affects generation/fuel mix selection and demand side management (DSM) activities. The second force, which is converse to the first, is that utilities are major contributors to the air pollution burden in the United States and environmental concerns are forcing them to reduce emissions of air pollutants by using more environmentally friendly fuels and implementing energy saving programs. This study evaluates the impact of deregulation within the investor owned electric utilities and how this deregulation effects air quality by investigating the trend in demand side management programs and generation/fuel mix. A survey was conducted of investor owned utilities and independent power producers. The results of the survey were analyzed by analysis of variance and regression analysis to determine the impact to Air Pollution. An air Quality Impact model was also developed in this study. This model consists of six modules: (1) demand side management and (2) consumption of coal, (3) gas, (4) renewable, (5) oil and (6

  12. Core designs for the de-regulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, J.; Bernro, R.; Pettersson, H.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: The electricity market deregulation in the Nordic countries encourages innovations and cost reductions for power production in the Vattenfall reactors. The competition on the electricity market is strong, electricity price reductions dramatic and uncertainties about the future power demand is large. In the fuel area this situation has given increased attention to traditional areas like flexibility in power production, improved core designs, need for margins (improved fuel designs), improved surveillance, decreased lead times. At Vattenfall new fuel designs are already being implemented following the last fuel purchase, for which flexibility and margins, were given high values in the evaluations with the multipurpose task of eliminating fuel related problems and meeting the future market situation. This strategy has given Vattenfall a flying start to meeting the demands of the de-regulated market. What has been added are broad studies undertaken to investigate the various route into the future with respect to finding the most effective strategies for fuel and core design and optimization. In the present paper the Vattenfall priorities for fuel designs and margins are presented in a schematic manner summarizing the results of the last fuel purchase and also presenting the current program for LFAs. Technical limitations, licensing and R and D aspects, with respect to improving the fuel utilization will be mentioned. The main focus in the paper is on the broad study carried out in the PWR core design area. Driven by the relatively low power demand various possibilities for higher production flexibility have been investigated specifically extended coast-down, coast-up and yearly load follow. Further to reduce the costs for fuel consumption improvements in core designs have been studied: improved low leakage loading patterns, low enriched end zones, improved Gd designs etc. Main results and conclusions of the core design studies will

  13. Hierarchical recruitment of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors remodels nucleolar pre-60S ribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedka, Stephanie; Micic, Jelena; Wilson, Daniel; Brown, Hailey; Diorio-Toth, Luke; Woolford, John L

    2018-04-24

    Ribosome biogenesis involves numerous preribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) processing events to remove internal and external transcribed spacer sequences, ultimately yielding three mature rRNAs. Removal of the internal transcribed spacer 2 spacer RNA is the final step in large subunit pre-rRNA processing and begins with endonucleolytic cleavage at the C 2 site of 27SB pre-rRNA. C 2 cleavage requires the hierarchical recruitment of 11 ribosomal proteins and 14 ribosome assembly factors. However, the function of these proteins in C 2 cleavage remained unclear. In this study, we have performed a detailed analysis of the effects of depleting proteins required for C 2 cleavage and interpreted these results using cryo-electron microscopy structures of assembling 60S subunits. This work revealed that these proteins are required for remodeling of several neighborhoods, including two major functional centers of the 60S subunit, suggesting that these remodeling events form a checkpoint leading to C 2 cleavage. Interestingly, when C 2 cleavage is directly blocked by depleting or inactivating the C 2 endonuclease, assembly progresses through all other subsequent steps. © 2018 Biedka et al.

  14. Power plant operation and management in a deregulated market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraretto, Cristian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Padova, Via Venezia, 1-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2006-05-15

    This paper analyzes the influence of electricity deregulation on the design, operation and management of the power plants owned by strategic and non-strategic producers. After a sensitivity analysis aimed at finding market conditions of profitable operation for thermal and hydroelectric power plants, a Nash-equilibrium market model is used to determine producers' optimum strategies, depending on their relative market power and overall production characteristics. Attention is then focused on the operation of single thermal power plants. Their short-term management plans and consequent effects on emission levels and residual life are described. The available reserve for primary and secondary control deriving from producers' market strategies is discussed. Some design options to improve combined cycles contribution to reserve service are finally described. The paper discusses these problems with a general approach, and uses many cases and examples derived from the current Italian scenario. (author)

  15. Power plant operation and management in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraretto, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the influence of electricity deregulation on the design, operation and management of the power plants owned by strategic and non-strategic producers. After a sensitivity analysis aimed at finding market conditions of profitable operation for thermal and hydroelectric power plants, a Nash-equilibrium market model is used to determine producers' optimum strategies, depending on their relative market power and overall production characteristics. Attention is then focused on the operation of single thermal power plants. Their short-term management plans and consequent effects on emission levels and residual life are described. The available reserve for primary and secondary control deriving from producers' market strategies is discussed. Some design options to improve combined cycles contribution to reserve service are finally described. The paper discusses these problems with a general approach, and uses many cases and examples derived from the current Italian scenario. (author)

  16. Pricing and University Autonomy: Tuition Deregulation in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongeun Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates changes in tuition policies in the wake of tuition deregulation in Texas, which in 2003 transferred tuition-setting authority from the state legislature to institutions. We find that price increases accelerated, particularly at the most selective institutions. Institutions also began differentiating price by undergraduate program, raising relative prices for the most costly and lucrative majors, including engineering, business, nursing, and architecture. Price increases were particularly large for institutions with the highest initial costs and for programs with a high earnings premium within institutions, though lower for institutions with more low-income students. These distinctions suggest that public postsecondary institutions respond to microeconomic incentives when given greater autonomy to set price, and take some measures to alleviate impacts on low-income students. The Texas experience suggests that decentralized price-setting generates greater price differentiation within the public higher education system, both across and within institutions.

  17. Power quality and reliability issues in a deregulated energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The challenge of maintaining power quality and reliability in Ontario's new competitive electricity market was the focus of this paper. The intention of Ontario's deregulation is to lower costs and give customers more power and choice. However, some fear that costs pressures may lead to poorer quality. This paper reviewed the causes, costs, and responsibilities, and made some suggestions concerning how customers can protect their interests as the market opens. It was suggested that in order to assure power quality, especially during the transition period, customers need to take care to design their systems and equipment to tolerate some quality variations. Conversely, utilities need to strive for at least minimum industry standards under most conditions. Contracts should be carefully crafted, with responsibilities for reliability and quality clearly stated. 2 refs

  18. Impact of electricity market deregulation on information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharabod, E.; Berrier, M.

    2005-01-01

    Electricity market deregulation is based on un-bundling of activities between generation, transmission and distribution. In a very short time, mechanisms were put in place in order to allow the new market participants to buy and sell electricity. The market operation requires to exchange information at various time horizon, from yearly to real time exchanges, between various actors geographically distributed. The recent market opening to professional customers has also increased the amount of data involved. The information system developed by RTE to manage these data is organised around referential data base, internal and external exchange tools. It must be operated respecting confidentiality of commercial data and being non discriminatory with actors. The security of this information system is now a key issue for the electricity market operation. (authors)

  19. Do cost-sharing and entry deregulation curb pharmaceutical innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Volker

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines the role of both cost-sharing schemes in health insurance systems and the regulation of entry into the pharmaceutical sector for pharmaceutical R&D expenditure and drug prices. The analysis suggests that both an increase in the coinsurance rate and stricter price regulations adversely affect R&D spending in the pharmaceutical sector. In contrast, entry deregulation may lead to higher R&D spending of pharmaceutical companies. The relationship between R&D spending per firm and the number of firms may be hump-shaped. In this case, the number of rivals which maximizes R&D expenditure per firm is decreasing in the coinsurance rate and increasing in labor productivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural gas deregulation: have the handcuffs really been removed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    The natural gas market in New York State was reviewed and characterized as being very competitive. A brief description of the New York State Electric and Gas Corp. (NYSEG) was given. As regards recent developments, in October 1993, the New York Public Service Commission (NYPSC) instituted a proceeding (93-G-0932) on the restructuring of the gas market. Several guidelines for market restructuring were established as a result. The guidelines were in respect to service to consumers, safety of distribution, environmental implications, consumer concerns, gas rates, regulation, and access for core customers. The speaker noted that these guidelines did not promote deregulation. Competitive issues faced by local gas distributors were enumerated. Among these were (1)service to core and non-core customers (2)transition costs, (3)streaming, (4)unbundling and repackaged services, (5)price differentiation, and (6)small customer aggregation. It was expected that marketers would oppose the Public Service Commission giving local gas distributors additional pricing flexibility

  1. Electricity pricing and load dispatching in deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geerli; Niioka, S.; Yokoyama, R.

    2003-01-01

    A rapid move to a market-based electric power industry will significantly alter the structure of electricity pricing and system operation. In this paper, we consider a game of negotiation in the electricity market, involving electric utilities, independent power producers (IPPs) and large-scale customers. We analyze the two-level game strategies for the negotiation process between utilities, IPPs and customers. These have been previously recognized as a way to come up with a rational decision for competitive markets, in which players intend to maximize their own profits. The derived operation rules based on competition can be viewed as an extension of the conventional equal incremental cost method for the deregulated power system. The proposed approach was applied to several systems to verify its effectiveness. (Author)

  2. Deregulation and the Alberta experience : the implications for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charach, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a 15 month assessment of Alberta's new competitive electricity market. It also presents lessons that Ontario customers could learn from Alberta's experience. The goal for restructuring is to achieve lower electricity prices, competitive retail markets, increased flexibility of contracts, and to remove investment risks from consumers. Alberta's restructured market includes power generation, high voltage transmission, low voltage transmission and retail sales. Economists agree that deregulation has brought lower prices and other consumer benefits despite some imperfections. After one year, prices in Alberta have gone down from $130/MWh to $30/MWh. Power supply has increased along with demand response, market competitiveness, liquidity, and thermal and economic efficiency. In 2001, Alberta was a net exporter of electricity. In 2001, it was ranked by the Center for Advancement of Energy Markets (CAEM) which ranks states and provinces by 22 attributes for how they are restructuring their power markets. Alberta ranked first overall in North America. Ontario ranked sixteenth. 4 tabs., 5 figs

  3. Steady state security assessment in deregulated power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjure, Durgesh Padmakar

    Power system operations are undergoing changes, brought about primarily due to deregulation and subsequent restructuring of the power industry. The primary intention of the introduction of deregulation in power systems was to bring about competition and improved customer focus. The underlying motive was increased economic benefit. Present day power system analysis is much different than what it was earlier, essentially due to the transformation of the power industry from being cost-based to one that is price-based and due to open access of transmission networks to the various market participants. Power is now treated as a commodity and is traded in an open market. The resultant interdependence of the technical criteria and the economic considerations has only accentuated the need for accurate analysis in power systems. The main impetus in security analysis studies is on efficient assessment of the post-contingency status of the system, accuracy being of secondary consideration. In most cases, given the time frame involved, it is not feasible to run a complete AC load flow for determining the post-contingency state of the system. Quite often, it is not warranted as well, as an indication of the state of the system is desired rather than the exact quantification of the various state variables. With the inception of deregulation, transmission networks are subjected to a host of multilateral transactions, which would influence physical system quantities like real power flows, security margins and voltage levels. For efficient asset utilization and maximization of the revenue, more often than not, transmission networks are operated under stressed conditions, close to security limits. Therefore, a quantitative assessment of the extent to which each transaction adversely affects the transmission network is required. This needs to be done accurately as the feasibility of the power transactions and subsequent decisions (execution, curtailment, pricing) would depend upon the

  4. Game-theoretic equilibrium analysis applications to deregulated electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Manho

    This dissertation examines game-theoretic equilibrium analysis applications to deregulated electricity markets. In particular, three specific applications are discussed: analyzing the competitive effects of ownership of financial transmission rights, developing a dynamic game model considering the ramp rate constraints of generators, and analyzing strategic behavior in electricity capacity markets. In the financial transmission right application, an investigation is made of how generators' ownership of financial transmission rights may influence the effects of the transmission lines on competition. In the second application, the ramp rate constraints of generators are explicitly modeled using a dynamic game framework, and the equilibrium is characterized as the Markov perfect equilibrium. Finally, the strategic behavior of market participants in electricity capacity markets is analyzed and it is shown that the market participants may exaggerate their available capacity in a Nash equilibrium. It is also shown that the more conservative the independent system operator's capacity procurement, the higher the risk of exaggerated capacity offers.

  5. A comparative study of ribosomal proteins: linkage between amino acid distribution and ribosomal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, Brittany Burton; Wang, Yongmei; Nakazato, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the ribosome from its protein and RNA constituents must occur quickly and efficiently in order to synthesize the proteins necessary for all cellular activity. Since the early 1960’s, certain characteristics of possible assembly pathways have been elucidated, yet the mechanisms that govern the precise recognition events remain unclear. We utilize a comparative analysis to investigate the amino acid composition of ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) with respect to their role in the assembly process. We compared small subunit (30S) r-protein sequences to those of other housekeeping proteins from 560 bacterial species and searched for correlations between r-protein amino acid content and factors such as assembly binding order, environmental growth temperature, protein size, and contact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in the 30S complex. We find r-proteins have a significantly high percent of positive residues, which are highly represented at rRNA contact sites. An inverse correlation between the percent of positive residues and r-protein size was identified and is mainly due to the content of Lysine residues, rather than Arginine. Nearly all r-proteins carry a net positive charge, but no statistical correlation between the net charge and the binding order was detected. Thermophilic (high-temperature) r-proteins contain increased Arginine, Isoleucine, and Tyrosine, and decreased Serine and Threonine compared to mesophilic (lower-temperature), reflecting a known distinction between thermophiles and mesophiles, possibly to account for protein thermostability. However, this difference in amino acid content does not extend to rRNA contact sites, as the proportions of thermophilic and mesophilic contact residues are not significantly different. Given the significantly higher level of positively charged residues in r-proteins and at contact sites, we conclude that ribosome assembly relies heavily on an electrostatic component of interaction. However, the binding order of

  6. BDI position on energy policy and energy market deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreklau, C.

    2003-01-01

    Secure energy supplies are indispensable for our modern way of life and our economy. Energy policy is a part of economic policy and must be shaped within the magic triangle of objectives, i.e. security, competitiveness, environmental compatibility. As a result of their outstanding role, electricity and natural gas, with respective shares of 70% in industrial energy use and 85% in energy costs, are in the focus of energy policy interest of the Federation of German Industries (BDI). One important development over the past few years has been the deregulation of the markets for electricity and gas. However, the markedly lower electricity rates to be paid by industry, commercial tariff consumers, and private customers are being offset by new burdens arising from government intervention and taxes. Other dirigistic interventions into the energy market by the red-green federal government since 1998, referred to as 'turning point of energy policy', are invalidating what market opening had been achieved. With a view to a sustainable energy policy for the future, BDI pleads in favor of a broad energy mix. In a mix neutral with respect to competition, this includes the classical energy sources, the renewables, and low-cost, environmentally friendly nuclear power. In principle, it is the forces of the market, coupled with responsible action, which are to steer further developments. On a European level, speedy implementation of the opening of the electricity and gas markets, as decided, should be urged. It is important that the leeway won as a result of deregulation not be constrained again by new regulations. More market, less regulation, and more direct responsibility must provide room for a powerful energy supply system under the premises of the triangle of objectives referred to above. (orig.) [de

  7. Public understanding of environmental impacts of electricity deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Branden B.; Frank, Pamela G.

    2006-01-01

    Electricity deregulation has aroused concern that environmental quality might be harmed by consumer preferences for cheap, 'dirty' (e.g., coal) electricity products, despite the perhaps stronger influence of supply side policy on environmental impacts. This outcome depends on public understanding of the environmental impacts of their decisions, which this study explored with interviews, focus groups, and surveys in New Jersey. People had thought little about the topic, were unable to articulate how electricity production might affect the environment except in very general terms, and were mostly unwilling to guess whether deregulation's impacts would be negative, neutral or positive. Those who did guess expected negative impacts less than any other kind. Reactions to specific 'reasons' for expecting no, positive or negative impacts suggested that consumers had little structure to their mental models in this area; for example, people who thought positive-impact reasons were probably true were not necessarily likely to see negative-impact reasons as probably false. However, in the aggregate, people seemed to have a fairly consistent ranking of energy sources by expected negative environmental impacts. Earlier research found that consumers comparing two electricity products on environmental impacts reached different decisions if they had energy-source-only or energy-source-plus-emissions information. Although regulator-required 'environmental labels' for electricity products provide both source and emissions data, it is not clear that they do an adequate job of both alerting consumers to the possibility of negative environmental impacts and identifying the relative life-cycle impacts of different products so as to produce informed consumer decisions

  8. The economics of energy storage in 14 deregulated power markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, F.C.; Flynn, P.C.; Cabral, E.A.

    2006-01-01

    In regulated power markets, electricity is stored to better utilize existing generation and to defer costly investment in generation. The justification is a reduction in the overall regulated price of power compared to the alternative investment in new primary generation. However, any storage of electrical power also involves a capital investment and incurs the cost of inefficiency. In deregulated energy markets, the sale of electricity or ancillary services from pumped storage can be evaluated based on each individual project. The economic basis for power storage is that power is purchased during periods of low price and resold during periods of high price. This study used historical power price data from 14 deregulated markets around the world to evaluate the economic incentive to use pumped storage for electrical energy. Each market was shown to have a unique average diurnal power price profile that results in a unique price spread for pumped storage. The diurnal price pattern and efficiency of storage was used to assess the net income potential from energy sales from pumped storage for each market. The markets were ranked in terms of the incentive to invest in pumped energy storage as well as on available revenue, and on potential return on investment. An optimal operating profile was illustrated in detail based on historical price patterns for one of the markets. The net income potential was then combined with the capital and operating cost of pumped storage. The adequacy of return on investment for pumped storage was analyzed by two different methods. The differences between markets stem from different diurnal power price patterns that reflect the generation mix, market design and participant behaviours. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs., 1 appendix

  9. Investments into plant replacements in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaesser, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    The amendment to the Power Energy Act in April 1998 marked the complete deregulation of the electricity market in Germany. The debate is now beginning about ways and means to ensure new capital investments safeguarding the continuity of supply. The present power plant park has been characterized by a broad mix of primary energy sources and, admittedly, by some overcapacity as well. However, any further reduction of generating capacity will be at the expense of the continuity of supply. Although electricity prices in Germany are on the rise again after a clear drop, they have not yet reached a level sufficient for new investments. Only subsidized power plants are recovering their full costs. The question is for how long our economy is going to sustain this state of affairs. The balance among the energy policy goals of continuity of supply, environmental performance, and economic efficiency has been upset. In the period up until 2020, Germany alone will require approx. 37,000 MW of new generating capacity. Renewable and decentralized technologies alone do not constitute a sufficient and reliable alternative. However, there is the matter also of the practical feasibility of building the new power plants required. No experience is as yet available with re-investment cycles in the deregulated electricity market. Options are needed for a diversified structure of primary energy sources. There must be neither political definition of generating technologies nor exaggerated goals of environmental protection and climate protection. We advocate the free system of market prices and free access to the market. Major players able to guarantee sufficient security of investments are needed to cope with the challenges ahead. New investments with a life of thirty to forty years require a modicum of stability and realism in political framework conditions. (orig.)

  10. Economic use of a nuclear park in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, L.

    2000-01-01

    The deregulation of the electricity market has created a new situation for plant life management. In order to be competitive it is important to cut costs. All means to cut costs have to be used while still maintaining safety and production capacity. The possibilities to invest in modernization are limited to the absolute necessary modifications. All investments must be very thoroughly questioned and the money can only be spent where most benefit is gained. This means new prerequisites for the absolute necessary long strategic planning. New safety requirements from the regulatory body have to be discussed between the industry and the regulator. The cost of new requirements must be compared to the benefit for the safety. The regulator is today requested to carry out such analyses and do so in most cases. Still the electricity market is international and the requirements of the regulator must be harmonized on the whole market. The political threat against nuclear power is serious in many countries and it is important to continue working with public and political understanding and acceptance. Especially in Sweden a lot of effort is spent on trying to get harmonized taxes and environmental fees. Nuclear power is paying for all its costs and the external costs are already internalized. Still, at the deregulated market, nuclear power is competitive, creating positive cash flow, a good object for investments and environmentally favourable. Threats have to be removed to get prerequisites for long term strategic planning and investments. Steps in that direction will be increasing electricity demand, in the near future, which will make the prices to raise creating an improved economic situation. Also the very serious worries about climate change will strengthen the competitiveness of nuclear power. (author)

  11. Ribosomal incorporation of backbone modified amino acids via an editing-deficient aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Emil S; Dods, Kara K; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2018-02-14

    The ability to incorporate non-canonical amino acids (ncAA) using translation offers researchers the ability to extend the functionality of proteins and peptides for many applications including synthetic biology, biophysical and structural studies, and discovery of novel ligands. Here we describe the high promiscuity of an editing-deficient valine-tRNA synthetase (ValRS T222P). Using this enzyme, we demonstrate ribosomal translation of 11 ncAAs including those with novel side chains, α,α-disubstitutions, and cyclic β-amino acids.

  12. On the control of ribosomal protein biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichon, J.; Marvaldi, J.; Coeroli, C.; Cozzone, A.; Marchis-Mouren, G.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of individual ribosomal protein synthesis relative to total protein synthesis has been determined in Escherichia coli rel + and rel - cells, under valyl-tRNA deprivation. These strains have a temperature-sensitive valyl-tRNA synthetase. Starvation was obtained following transfer of the cells to non-permissive temperature. Ribosomal proteins were obtained by treatment of either total lysates of freeze-thawed lysozyme spheroplasts or ammonium sulphate precipitate of ribosomes, with acetic acid. Differential labelling of the ribosomal proteins was observed in both strains: proteins from the rel + strain appear more labelled than those from the rel - strain, the rate of labelling of individual proteins being about the same in both strains. Moreover ribosomal proteins were found as stable during starvation as total protein. It is thus concluded that in starving cells individual ribosomal proteins are not synthesized at equal rates. This indicates that the synthesis of ribosomal proteins is not only under the control of the rel gene

  13. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosome biogenesis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle C. Kos-Braun

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most microorganisms are exposed to the constantly and often rapidly changing environment. As such they evolved mechanisms to balance their metabolism and energy expenditure with the resources available to them. When resources become scarce or conditions turn out to be unfavourable for growth, cells reduce their metabolism and energy usage to survive. One of the major energy consuming processes in the cell is ribosome biogenesis. Unsurprisingly, cells encountering adverse conditions immediately shut down production of new ribosomes. It is well established that nutrient depletion leads to a rapid repression of transcription of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins, ribosome biogenesis factors as well as ribosomal RNA (rRNA. However, if pre-rRNA processing and ribosome assembly are regulated post-transcriptionally remains largely unclear. We have recently uncovered that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly switches between two alternative pre-rRNA processing pathways depending on the environmental conditions. Our findings reveal a new level of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis.

  14. The Unexplored Mechanisms and Regulatory Functions of Ribosomal Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, Jose Luis

    In every cell, protein synthesis is carried out by the ribosome, a complex macromolecular RNA-protein assembly. Decades of structural and kinetic studies have increased our understanding of ribosome initiation, decoding, translocation and termination. Yet, the underlying mechanism of these fundamental processes has yet to be fully delineated. Hence, the molecular basis of regulation remains obscure. Here, single-molecule fluorescence methods are applied to decipher the mechanism and regulatory roles of the multi-step process of directional substrate translocation on the ribosome that accompanies every round of protein synthesis. In Chapter 1, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) is introduced as a tool for studying bacterial ribosome translocation. Chapter 2 details the experimental methods. In Chapter 3, the elongation factor G(EF-G)-catalyzed movement of substrates through the ribosome is examined from several perspectives or signals reporting on various degrees of freedom of ribosome dynamics. Two ribosomal states interconvert in the presence of EF-G(GDP), displaying novel head domain motions, until relocking takes place. In Chapter 4, in order to test if the mentioned fluctuations leading to relocking are correlated to the engagement of the P-site by the peptidyl-tRNA, the translocation of miscoded tRNAs is studied. Severe defects in the relocking stages of translocation reveal the correlation between this new stage of translocation and P-site tRNA engagement.

  15. Overview of the developments in the domestic airline industry in South Africa since market deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation or liberalisation of air transport has had major global impacts on the domestic air transport markets, with effects ranging from stimulation to changes in the structure and functioning of these markets. In South Africa, deregulation has had wide-reaching effects on the domestic market. The purpose of this article was to investigate the current domestic air transport market. A literature review was performed to examine the effects of deregulation in other domestic air transport markets around the world. This was followed by a review of the South African domestic air transport market prior to deregulation in order to determine the changes that were made following deregulation. The ten-year period immediately following deregulation was also examined; this period was characterised by relatively large numbers of market entries and exits. A database was obtained from the Airports Company South Africa; air traffic movements, passenger numbers and load factors were evaluated. The study showed that the market is still characterised by regular market entries and exits. Also that the entry of the low-cost carriers has stimulated the market, resulting in increased air traffic movements, higher passenger numbers, higher load factors in general and the opening of a secondary airport in Gauteng, Lanseria International. Deregulation and, more specifically, the entry of the low-cost carriers has resulted in structural changes in the market and more choice for passengers.

  16. Internet-based wide area measurement applications in deregulated power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Abdel-Rahman Amin

    Since the deregulation of power systems was started in 1989 in the UK, many countries have been motivated to undergo deregulation. The United State started deregulation in the energy sector in California back in 1996. Since that time many other states have also started the deregulation procedures in different utilities. Most of the deregulation market in the United States now is in the wholesale market area, however, the retail market is still undergoing changes. Deregulation has many impacts on power system network operation and control. The number of power transactions among the utilities has increased and many Independent Power Producers (IPPs) now have a rich market for competition especially in the green power market. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) called upon utilities to develop the Regional Transmission Organization (RTO). The RTO is a step toward the national transmission grid. RTO is an independent entity that will operate the transmission system in a large region. The main goal of forming RTOs is to increase the operation efficiency of the power network under the impact of the deregulated market. The objective of this work is to study Internet based Wide Area Information Sharing (WAIS) applications in the deregulated power system. The study is the first step toward building a national transmission grid picture using information sharing among utilities. Two main topics are covered as applications for the WAIS in the deregulated power system, state estimation and Total Transfer Capability (TTC) calculations. As a first step for building this national transmission grid picture, WAIS and the level of information sharing of the state estimation calculations have been discussed. WAIS impacts to the TTC calculations are also covered. A new technique to update the TTC using on line measurements based on WAIS created by sharing state estimation is presented.

  17. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  18. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  19. Organization of Replication of Ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Huberman, Joel A.

    1988-01-01

    Using recently developed replicon mapping techniques, we have analyzed the replication of the ribosomal DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results show that (i) the functional origin of replication colocalizes with an autonomously replicating sequence element previously mapped to the

  20. Madumycin II inhibits peptide bond formation by forcing the peptidyl transferase center into an inactive state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterman, Ilya A.; Khabibullina, Nelli F.; Komarova, Ekaterina S.; Kasatsky, Pavel; Kartsev, Victor G.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.; Konevega, Andrey L.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Polikanov, Yury S. (InterBioScreen); (UIC); (MSU-Russia); (Kurchatov)

    2017-05-13

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is limiting the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotics, which spurs a renewed interest in revisiting older and poorly studied drugs. Streptogramins A is a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that target the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the large subunit of the ribosome. In this work, we have revealed the mode of action of the PTC inhibitor madumycin II, an alanine-containing streptogramin A antibiotic, in the context of a functional 70S ribosome containing tRNA substrates. Madumycin II inhibits the ribosome prior to the first cycle of peptide bond formation. It allows binding of the tRNAs to the ribosomal A and P sites, but prevents correct positioning of their CCA-ends into the PTC thus making peptide bond formation impossible. We also revealed a previously unseen drug-induced rearrangement of nucleotides U2506 and U2585 of the 23S rRNA resulting in the formation of the U2506•G2583 wobble pair that was attributed to a catalytically inactive state of the PTC. The structural and biochemical data reported here expand our knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms by which peptidyl transferase inhibitors modulate the catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  1. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B; Vester, B

    2001-09-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs are strong inhibitors of peptidyl transferase and interact with domain V of 23S RNA, giving clear chemical footprints at nucleotides A2058-9, U2506 and U2584-5. Most of these nucleotides are highly conserved phylogenetically and functionally important, and all of them are at or near the peptidyl transferase centre and have been associated with binding of several antibiotics. Competitive footprinting shows that tiamulin and valnemulin can bind concurrently with the macrolide erythromycin but compete with the macrolide carbomycin, which is a peptidyl transferase inhibitor. We infer from these and previous results that tiamulin and valnemulin interact with the rRNA in the peptidyl transferase slot on the ribosomes in which they prevent the correct positioning of the CCA-ends of tRNAs for peptide transfer.

  2. Ribosomal synthesis of polylysine from individual lysyl-tRNA/sup Lys/ in the absence of a template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusupova, G.Z.; Remme, Y.L.; Belitsina, N.B.; Spirin, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Earlier studies showed that ribosomes of Escherichia coli, in the absence of a template, can synthesize oligolysine, using lysyl-tRNA as a substrate. The authors present results on the use of preparations of individual lysyl-tRNA/sup Lys/ and phenylalanyl-tRNA/sup Phe/ in a system of templateless peptide synthesis. For these studies, the authors used ribosomes of E. coli MRE 600, washed four times with 1 M NH 4 Cl with 10 MM MgCl 2 . The purified ribosomes were stored at -70 0 C in standard buffer, containing 20 mM Tris-HCl, 100 mM NH 4 Cl, 10 mM MgCl 2 , 0.1 mM ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and 10% glycerin, pH/sub 37 0 C/7.6. A preparation of [ 14 C]lysyl-tRNA/sup Lys/ was produced by affinity chromatography on immobilized factor EF-T/sub u/ from Thermus thermophilus HB8. The elongation factor EF-T/sub u/ from T. thermophilus and immobilized on BrCN-activated Sepharose 4B. The initial preparation of total tRNA of E. coli, enzymatically acylated by [ 14 C]lysine (348 Ci/mole, Amersham), was produced as described earlier. The degree of aminoacylation was 52-59 pmoles [ 14 C]lysine per unit of A 260 of tRNA

  3. Ribosome slowed by mutation to streptomycin resistance. [Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, D J; Branscomb, E W

    1976-08-12

    The effect of mutation to streptomycin resistance on the speed of polypeptide elongation in Escherichia coli was investigated. Translation speed was determined by measuring the time required for the first newly synthesized ..beta..-galactosidase molecules to appear after induction of the lactose operon. The results showed that ribosome speed is not a fixed parameter inherent to the protein synthetic apparatus, but a variable determined by the kinetics of translation and ultimately by the structure of the ribosome. (HLW)

  4. Decision modelling tools for utilities in the deregulated energy market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makkonen, S. [Process Vision Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    This thesis examines the impact of the deregulation of the energy market on decision making and optimisation in utilities and demonstrates how decision support applications can solve specific encountered tasks in this context. The themes of the thesis are presented in different frameworks in order to clarify the complex decision making and optimisation environment where new sources of uncertainties arise due to the convergence of energy markets, globalisation of energy business and increasing competition. This thesis reflects the changes in the decision making and planning environment of European energy companies during the period from 1995 to 2004. It also follows the development of computational performance and evolution of energy information systems during the same period. Specifically, this thesis consists of studies at several levels of the decision making hierarchy ranging from top-level strategic decision problems to specific optimisation algorithms. On the other hand, the studies also follow the progress of the liberalised energy market from the monopolistic era to the fully competitive market with new trading instruments and issues like emissions trading. This thesis suggests that there is an increasing need for optimisation and multiple criteria decision making methods, and that new approaches based on the use of operations research are welcome as the deregulation proceeds and uncertainties increase. Technically, the optimisation applications presented are based on Lagrangian relaxation techniques and the dedicated Power Simplex algorithm supplemented with stochastic scenario analysis for decision support, a heuristic method to allocate common benefits and potential losses of coalitions of power companies, and an advanced Branch- and-Bound algorithm to solve efficiently nonconvex optimisation problems. The optimisation problems are part of the operational and tactical decision making process that has become very complex in the recent years. Similarly

  5. Defective ribosome assembly in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chi C; Traynor, David; Basse, Nicolas; Kay, Robert R; Warren, Alan J

    2011-10-20

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), a recessive leukemia predisposition disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, skeletal abnormalities and poor growth, is caused by mutations in the highly conserved SBDS gene. Here, we test the hypothesis that defective ribosome biogenesis underlies the pathogenesis of SDS. We create conditional mutants in the essential SBDS ortholog of the ancient eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum using temperature-sensitive, self-splicing inteins, showing that mutant cells fail to grow at the restrictive temperature because ribosomal subunit joining is markedly impaired. Remarkably, wild type human SBDS complements the growth and ribosome assembly defects in mutant Dictyostelium cells, but disease-associated human SBDS variants are defective. SBDS directly interacts with the GTPase elongation factor-like 1 (EFL1) on nascent 60S subunits in vivo and together they catalyze eviction of the ribosome antiassociation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (eIF6), a prerequisite for the translational activation of ribosomes. Importantly, lymphoblasts from SDS patients harbor a striking defect in ribosomal subunit joining whose magnitude is inversely proportional to the level of SBDS protein. These findings in Dictyostelium and SDS patient cells provide compelling support for the hypothesis that SDS is a ribosomopathy caused by corruption of an essential cytoplasmic step in 60S subunit maturation.

  6. Emerging functions of ribosomal proteins in gene-specific transcription and translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstroem, Mikael S.

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins have remained highly conserved during evolution presumably reflecting often critical functions in ribosome biogenesis or mature ribosome function. In addition, several ribosomal proteins possess distinct extra-ribosomal functions in apoptosis, DNA repair and transcription. An increasing number of ribosomal proteins have been shown to modulate the trans-activation function of important regulatory proteins such as NF-κB, p53, c-Myc and nuclear receptors. Furthermore, a subset of ribosomal proteins can bind directly to untranslated regions of mRNA resulting in transcript-specific translational control outside of the ribosome itself. Collectively, these findings suggest that ribosomal proteins may have a wider functional repertoire within the cell than previously thought. The future challenge is to identify and validate these novel functions in the background of an often essential primary function in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth.

  7. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

  8. Deregulation and competitive power markets -- Its impact on developing economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saran, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of privatization in developed countries is to encourage competition in generation and supply of power whereas the focus of developing economies is to bridge the demand supply gap by addition of capacity. However, there needs to be a reconciliation between these two apparently having conflicting objectives even in case of developing economies. In competitive power markets it is necessary that rules of the game are identified in advance and followed uniformly by all players. Existence of a ''referee'' would be necessary to regulate the game so as to ensure fair play. The regulatory institution would serve this purpose and work as a stimulator to development of privatization and competitive power markets in developing economies. Consumer interests should be of upper-most priority in the mind while establishing power markets and regulatory institutions, particularly as market forces are unfavorable to consumer interests in power shortage conditions. As competition fosters, gradually market forces take over and the ''harsh'' regulator would convert itself to a ''silent vigil referee'' so as to ensure genuine competition. The debate of deregulation vs. regulation will continue but the show must go on for building of an increasingly sound, competitive and vibrant power sector in the interest of end use consumers. The planned and phased restructuring though a delayed process is a preferred process and India is fully determined to achieve this

  9. Reliability evaluation of deregulated electric power systems for planning applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehsani, A.; Ranjbar, A.M.; Jafari, A.; Fotuhi-Firuzabad, M.

    2008-01-01

    In a deregulated electric power utility industry in which a competitive electricity market can influence system reliability, market risks cannot be ignored. This paper (1) proposes an analytical probabilistic model for reliability evaluation of competitive electricity markets and (2) develops a methodology for incorporating the market reliability problem into HLII reliability studies. A Markov state space diagram is employed to evaluate the market reliability. Since the market is a continuously operated system, the concept of absorbing states is applied to it in order to evaluate the reliability. The market states are identified by using market performance indices and the transition rates are calculated by using historical data. The key point in the proposed method is the concept that the reliability level of a restructured electric power system can be calculated using the availability of the composite power system (HLII) and the reliability of the electricity market. Two case studies are carried out over Roy Billinton Test System (RBTS) to illustrate interesting features of the proposed methodology

  10. Commercial banking in the conditions of deregulation vs. reregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaklan Damir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines contemporary trends in commercial banking, confronting the stages of deregulation and reregulation in this field triggered by the global mortgage crisis. Under deregulatory conditions the competitive position of banks has toughened, and they reacted to it by intensifying: marketization, i.e. globalization, concentration, securitization and conglomeration, and by turning to the profit-oriented risk management of their activity. The contraction of their interest margin was thus neutralized by the reduction of operational costs and loss provisions, and by an increase in non-interest revenues, thereby maintaining banking profitability. The recent crisis has pinpointed the necessity of firmer regulation or reregulation of the banking sector, aimed at reducing its systemic risk, the most important aspect of which being the stricter international banking capital and liquidity standards, along with the requirement to adequately treat systemically important banks. Reregulation should strengthen capitalization and liquidity; mitigate the volume, concentration, internationalization and business dispersion, hence improving the supervision of the banking sector, implying its lower, yet more stable profitability. Such an impact of the adopted section of targeted regulatory measures has been indicated by higher liquidity, lower globalization, slower concentration and securitization, and stabilization-oriented risk management activities of today's banks. Their growth and profitability have shrunk.

  11. Deregulation and restructuring of the electric utility industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nixon, Hal [Utility Workers Union of America (UWUA), AFL-CIO, (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Federal and state policy makers are currently faced with the rapidly evolving issue of the restructuring and potential deregulation of the electric utility industry, a sector of the economy of huge importance through its sheer size and its impact on the daily life and livelihood of everyone. This paper describes eleven principles that must be adhered to in any restructuring of the electric industry. Adherence to the principle and positions outlined can help assure that the transition in this industry benefits all, not just a few, and that the general health and welfare of the people is protected and enhanced [Espanol] Los legisladores estatales y federales se estan enfrentando con el rapido y envolvente aspecto de la reestructuracion y desregulacion potencial de la industria electrica, un sector de la economia de enorme importancia por su tamano y su impacto en la vida diaria y los medios de vida. En esta ponencia se describen once principios y posiciones que deben ser considerados en cualquier reestructuracion de la industria electrica. El apego a los principios y posiciones comentados puede ayudar a asegurar que la transicion en esta industria deneficie a todos, no solo a unos cuantos, y que la salud general y bienestar de la gente sea protegida y mejorada

  12. Investment and deregulation in the electricity generation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peluchon, B.

    2007-12-01

    This work addresses the issue of investment in the electricity generation industry. As the analysis of many crisis which have affected electricity markets shows, there is a systematic under-investment in peak capacity. Electricity prices are not high enough to cover fixed costs of such generators, a phenomenon that has been dubbed 'missing money' in some recent papers (Stoft). The investment decisions of a duo-poly facing random demand are then compared to those of a public monopoly. The results are that no prices may be high enough to solve the 'missing money' problem, since the duo-poly is able to exercise market power in order to maximize his profit. This results systematically in fewer peak capacity in the duo-poly case than in the public monopoly case. This remains true in the case of a n-oligopoly. The necessity of designing a mechanism remunerating capacity is thus demonstrated. Capacity markets are then analysed in the light of those results. What appears is that operating reserves are a public good and, as such, prevents capacity markets to solve the 'missing money' problem. This casts a shadow on the pursuit of deregulation in the electricity industry. (author)

  13. Deregulation - precondition for distributed energy in the economies in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendow, K.

    2001-01-01

    This paper holds that deregulation, i.e. restructuring, competition and privatisation, is the main precondition for a more pronounced development of distributed power (DP) in the economies in transition in central and eastern Europe. This, then, raises the question how far the electricity, gas, steam and heat generating industries have presently moved on their way towards more market-oriented frameworks, competition and private ownership. A good benchmark for measuring progress is the existence (or lack thereof), and nature, of regulatory regimes enabling fair competition among large centralised and small decentralised power, and between wholesale generators and distributors on the one hand and customers or ''autoproducers'' or power merchants on the other. The paper describes the regulatory models applied or contemplated in the winter 2000/2001 in the various countries of central and eastern Europe and identifies fifteen general issues that require attention and solution. With regard to DP, it concludes that a major upswing is unlikely to occur before 2005-2008. While technological options abound, the institutional frameworks for customer-owned competitive DP systems are only being contemplated at present and only rarely put in place.(author)

  14. Opportunities for privatization and alliances in a deregulated marketplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erling, J.M. [KPMG, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The main implications for municipal electric utilities (MEUs) and businesses in a deregulated, open access energy market include a range of possible alternative business structures, constraints on choices, increased risks, the need to understand objectives, capabilities and capacity for bearing risks. The issue of what business MEUs are in, what services they provide and how those services should be delivered, was hotly debated. It was suggested that with increasing competition, the range of possible business structures and arrangements will widen significantly. The different public-private options available to MEUs are (1) the conventional tender process, (2) contracting out, (3) joint ventures with a private company, (4) franchising, (5) outsourcing of specific functions, (6) operating agreements, (7) lease arrangements, (8) build-operate-transfer options (BOTs), and (9) the full privatization scenario. It was noted that some forms of public-private partnerships are more suited to some businesses than others. Also, different partnership structures can be used in different parts of any business. Objectives for any partnership should include maximizing profitability, minimizing risk and promoting economic development but under competition. The ability to choose objectives will change significantly and the achievement of any of the objectives will be determined by the marketplace. Some guidelines on measuring success and on maximizing market value were offered. Global trends towards more unbundling and price transparency, more outsourcing to the private sector, more competition, less government, regulatory reform and blurring of the boundaries between utility sectors were predicted.

  15. A multi-channel stakeholder consultation process for transmission deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, Robin; Fischhoff, Baruch; Thorne, Sarah; Butte, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    Deregulating Ontario's energy market required designing a rate structure for transmission costs that previously had been bundled with other electricity services. The Ontario Hydro Networks Company (now called Hydro One Networks, or 'Hydro One') owns and operates the transmission lines. It sought input from a full spectrum of stakeholders in preparing a proposed rate structure for submission to the regulator, the Ontario Energy Board (OEB). Securing that input meant accommodating great differences in stakeholders' familiarity with the (often highly technical) issues of rate setting. Hydro One drew on recent developments in stakeholder processes, integrated assessment, and risk communication to create a multi-channel process for eliciting and responding to stakeholder input. That process included (a) detailed background documents, (b) dedicated briefings and workshops, (c) mental models interviews, (d) focused meetings, and (e) mail (and email) boxes. The process was coordinated with a formal expert model, summarizing the factors determining the multiple impacts of the rate structure and the regulatory process producing it. The model analyzed these impacts, structured communications, and organized inputs, in a comprehensive and coherent way. This process facilitated developing proposals that were both technically sound and widely accepted by stakeholders, including the OEB. The case study provides a model for addressing other problems requiring stakeholder input on complex technical issues. It contrasts with other consultative processes with a less formal structure for eliciting concerns, less ability to encourage learning, and greater emphasis on achieving consensus

  16. Natural gas market assessment ten years after deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Changes which have taken place in the Canadian natural gas market in the ten years since the gas market was de-regulated, were reviewed. A 1985 agreement created conditions for a competitive natural gas market. However, the National Energy Board ensured that the pipeline transmission sector of the gas industry would continue to be regulated because of its natural monopoly characteristics. Open non-discriminatory access was to be provided to all shippers on inter-provincial gas pipelines. One objective of this report was to provide the Board with the means of assuring itself that the market was operating in such a way that Canadian requirements for natural gas were being met at fair market prices. The report also provided a review of the major changes in the gas producing and transmission sector, and reviewed developments in gas markets and sales practices. The overall assessment was that the natural gas industry was efficient and responsive to the demands of the marketplace. 5 tabs., 30 figs

  17. Global implications of U.S. power deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschoff, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    With U.S. power deregulation remaining a topic that is dominating the entire North American energy marketplace, this paper provides an update of events occurring in U.S. electric power markets, offering some observations about changes due to increasing competition in electric power markets, and discusses some reasons why the events in U.S. electric power markets will soon transform global energy markets. How quickly is the move from local service territory to global markets proceeding? More than fifty U.S. utility companies with revenues of over $1 billion (U.S.) will soon be actively seeking and participating in global business opportunities. Using the same logic that led them to pursue utility initiatives nationally, U.S. utilities will use their core capabilities to compete in global energy services markets. In connection with these global initiatives, U.S. utilities will bring the same fuel-neutral, gas-electric perspective to international electric power and natural gas markets. (Author)

  18. Deregulation in the electricity sector: Understanding strategic and regulatory risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, E.R. [City Univ. Business School, Dept. Management Systems and Information, London (United Kingdom); Bunn, D.W. [London Business School, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    This paper is motivated by our experiences since 1990 with developing system simulation models to help UK companies in the restructured electricity industry understand the radically different market within which they must become competitive. When public utilities such as electricity have been restructured, deregulated and/or privatised, the process has often been associated with a major change in the competitive environment. As a consequence, the strategic and regulatory uncertainties ahead for these companies are unprecedented. In such a market there has been no historical evolution and all the participants including the regulatory institutions have very little understanding of how it will operate in the short term and evolve in the future. In this situation, the use of systems dynamic models appears to offer an attractive way of gaining insights into how aspects of the competitive market might evolve. In the absence of real experience and relevant analogies, learning from models assumes a key role. Such models cannot be validated empirically, but can be developed to represent how the system is designed to operate. From such a prototypical basis, sensitivity analysis can generate insights on the strategic opportunities created failings in the market design, or its potential instability to shocks and market imperfections. (au)

  19. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-05-01

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

  20. FACTS controllers and the deregulated electric utility environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, B. T.; Galiana, F. D.; McGillis, D.; Joos, G.; Marceau, R.

    1998-01-01

    The concept of Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS) is explored and the potential of power electronic converters to increase flexibility and reliability of modern power systems is explored. Power electronic controllers can reduce the required safety margin in electric power generation capacity through the use of faster controllers based on exploiting the high-power solid-state switches with gate-turn-off capabilities. The FACTS concept makes it possible to postpone the financial investment needed to build more power lines, and also offers a solution to securing the right-of-way to build new lines. Currently available FACTS controllers such as the Static var Compensator (STATCOM) and the Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) are described, including their function, structure and relevant implementation issues. Since they can produce the required amount of reactive power independently of line voltage or current, and if equipped with energy storing devices they can supply real power as required, they are a necessary element for the control of power systems in a deregulated environment. 15 refs., 3 figs

  1. Effects of the Deregulation on the Concentration of the Brazilian Air Transportation Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterres, Marcelo Xavier; Muller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of the deregulation of the Brazilian air transportation industry in terms of the concentration of the market. We will show some metrics that are commonly used to study the concentration of the industry. This paper uses the Herfindhal- Hirschman Index. This index tends to zero in the competitive scenario, with a large number of small firms, and to one in case of a monopolistic scenario. The paper analyses the dynamics of the concentration of the Brazilian domestic air transportation market, in order to evaluate the effects of deregulation. We conclude that the Brazilian market presents oligopoly characteristics and aspects in its current structure that maintain the market concentrated in spite of the Deregulation measures adopted by the aeronautical authority. Keywords: Herfindhal-Hirschman Index, concentration, Deregulation

  2. TCSC based automatic generation control of deregulated power system using quasi-oppositional harmony search algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Nandi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In present aspect, automatic generation control (AGC of deregulated power system with thyristor controlled series compensator (TCSC device is investigated. The objective is to discuss bilateral power transaction issue with the TCSC effect. A deregulated two-area power system model having two thermal units in each control area is considered for this act. A quasi-oppositional harmony search (QOHS algorithm is being applied for the constrained optimization problem. Three cases, commonly studied in deregulation, are discussed for the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Further, sensitivity analysis is studied by varying the test system parameters up to ±25% from their rated values. The obtained simulation plots are analytically discussed with the calculation of oscillatory modes, transient details and the studied performance indices. Sugeno fuzzy logic control technique is also investigated to the studied test system. The simulation results show that the proposed QOHS based TCSC controller is quite effective in deregulated environment.

  3. Regulatory Assessment of the Effects of Economic Deregulation of the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    The European Commission Nuclear Regulators Working Group (NRWG) appointed a Task Force (TF) to develop a common view among European regulators on the assessment of typical safety consequences resulting from economic pressure on operators as a result of deregulation of electricity markets. Although the report seems to imply that there are only negative aspects of deregulation, this is not the case. As the focus of the TF has been potential safety consequences we have not dealt with potential positive effects of deregulation. To provide a general background to the analyses of the safety consequences, the TF undertook a survey of the current situation within the EU and candidate countries on aspects of economic deregulation of the countries nuclear industry and the experiences so far of regulating these issues. Answers were submitted in of July 2001. 13 NRWG members with nuclear power plants took part in the survey. (author)

  4. Expansion of ribosomally produced natural products: a nitrile hydratase- and Nif11-related precursor family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Douglas A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new family of natural products has been described in which cysteine, serine and threonine from ribosomally-produced peptides are converted to thiazoles, oxazoles and methyloxazoles, respectively. These metabolites and their biosynthetic gene clusters are now referred to as thiazole/oxazole-modified microcins (TOMM. As exemplified by microcin B17 and streptolysin S, TOMM precursors contain an N-terminal leader sequence and C-terminal core peptide. The leader sequence contains binding sites for the posttranslational modifying enzymes which subsequently act upon the core peptide. TOMM peptides are small and highly variable, frequently missed by gene-finders and occasionally situated far from the thiazole/oxazole forming genes. Thus, locating a substrate for a particular TOMM pathway can be a challenging endeavor. Results Examination of candidate TOMM precursors has revealed a subclass with an uncharacteristically long leader sequence closely related to the enzyme nitrile hydratase. Members of this nitrile hydratase leader peptide (NHLP family lack the metal-binding residues required for catalysis. Instead, NHLP sequences display the classic Gly-Gly cleavage motif and have C-terminal regions rich in heterocyclizable residues. The NHLP family exhibits a correlated species distribution and local clustering with an ABC transport system. This study also provides evidence that a separate family, annotated as Nif11 nitrogen-fixing proteins, can serve as natural product precursors (N11P, but not always of the TOMM variety. Indeed, a number of cyanobacterial genomes show extensive N11P paralogous expansion, such as Nostoc, Prochlorococcus and Cyanothece, which replace the TOMM cluster with lanthionine biosynthetic machinery. Conclusions This study has united numerous TOMM gene clusters with their cognate substrates. These results suggest that two large protein families, the nitrile hydratases and Nif11, have been retailored for

  5. The limits to deregulation of entry and expansion of the US gas pipeline industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosput, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    US consumers of natural gas have enjoyed significant benefits as the pricing of the commodity has been deregulated. Thanks in large part to the success of deregulation of the natural gas commodity. US federal regulators have embarked upon a wide-ranging programme of eliminating barriers to entry and expansion of natural gas pipelines, which have traditionally been regulated as natural monopolies. As a result, there is now significant excess capacity in the natural gas transmission sector, without measurable benefits to consumers. (author)

  6. Market Power of Local Cable Television Franchises: Evidence from the Effects of Deregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Adam B. Jaffe; David M. Kanter

    1990-01-01

    The 1989 Cable Act eliminated most price regulation of cable television operators, including the right of municipalities to enforce price terms in franchise agreements. Deregulation was justified, at least partially, by the contention that competition from other entertainment media eliminated any market power of cable franchises. We examine the value at sale of existing cable systems before and after deregulation. Assuming that this value represents the expected present value of future profit...

  7. The Importance of Management in the Deregulated Retail Electricity Distribution Market in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Drago Papler; Stefan Bojnec

    2006-01-01

    This paper underlines the importance of management in the deregulated retail electricity distribution market, entrepreneurship and business behaviours toward consumers’ satisfaction with quality of services. The coefficients of concentration indicate a high concentration of electricity suppliers and users in the deregulated electricity retail market for industry. The production function reveals the importance of education and electricity infrastructure, and to a lesser extent of capital inten...

  8. DAIRY DEREGULATION AND LOW-INPUT DAIRY PRODUCTION: A BIOECONOMIC EVALUATION

    OpenAIRE

    Tozer, Peter R.; Huffaker, Ray G.

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation of the Australian dairy industry could affect the utilization of resources by milk producers and the profitability of dairy production. In this study we examine the feed mix that dairy producers use, both pastures and supplements, under partial and total deregulation. We are particularly interested in the interaction of pasture utilization and farm profitability. The results of this research demonstrate that profitable low-input dairy is constrained by the most limiting resource,...

  9. Assessing the Significance of Telecommunication Deregulation on the Growth of Japan's Mobile Phone Market

    OpenAIRE

    Yuqing Xing

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyzes the development of Japan's mobile phone market. Specifically, it focuses on the regulatory reforms of Japan's mobile communication sector and their impact on the growth of the market. The analysis based on a monopolistic competition model shows that the deregulation policies perform an essential role in fostering the rapid expansion of Japan's mobile phone market. Using quarterly data from 1991 to 1999, the paper tests the significance of the telecommunication deregulation...

  10. Effect of sodium fluoride on the amount of polyribosomes, single ribosomes and ribosomal subunits in a cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sameshima, M; Ito, K; Iwabuchi, M

    1972-01-01

    In the slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, when the rate of protein synthesis was decreased by NaF, free 80-S ribosomes accumulated at the expense of polyribosomes, while 60-S and 40-S ribosomal subunits remained almost constant. The same level of ribosomal subunits was also maintained in cells after incubation with cycloheximide or at the stationary phase of growth.

  11. Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishiba, Misao; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Kentarou; Yu, Hao-Hsin; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  12. Protecting consumer interests in Alberta's deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explains why the province of Alberta decided to deregulate its electricity sector. In the early 1990s, electricity rates were reasonable in Alberta, there was no utility debt, and electricity costs were low. In 1994 California's open access transmission system suggested that open markets would result in lower electricity rates and attract new economic activity. The government of Alberta also believed that competitive markets would set prices with no need for economic regulation. In the initial transition to competition, regulated electricity rates were offered to customers who were not ready to switch to the new competitive market. The RRO rate was set by the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB). The rates included the forecasted cost of purchasing energy from markets, cost of system access, and retail service costs. The end of the RRO rate was scheduled for 2005 when the market was expected be well developed. This paper also describes other protection mechanisms for consumers. Alberta's new electricity policy (NEP) eliminates generator participant costs related to transmission. EUB's zonal interconnection charges are also overruled along with the EUB-approved 50/50 division of transmission costs. Under the NEP, the ISO is to build transmission in anticipation of new generation. Consumers will fund the total cost to build new transmission capacity for exports and imports. This new transmission policy is a complete change from the original government policy which allocated some transmission costs to generators. The sudden change in policy was due to pressure from oil sands producers and oil sands co-generation developers. The claimed benefit to Albertans is a 25 per cent reduction in pool price and greater system reliability. However, the author cautioned that government interference with competitive electricity markets will cripple the electric power industry in the foreseeable future because it interferes with market prices

  13. The deregulation connection : utility competition creates new niche company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.

    1999-01-01

    Deregulation in Ontario's utility market has created incentives for local utilities to add new services to attract and keep customers, knowing that in a competitive energy market, only those utilities which offer the best services will survive. London Hydro, which provides power to southwestern Ontario launched a private enterprise called LondonConnect Inc. The new enterprise offers high-speed digital services to area businesses. London Hydro made this unique move to take advantage of the fact that 20 per cent of businesses communicate electronically. London Hydro believes that in the next five years, that number will increase to 80 per cent. The Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) gives businesses greater connectivity to the Internet and web services. One of the network's capabilities is realtime video conferencing between hydro locations. MAN can also be used to create a secure and private virtual community-wide area network of computers and office machines. The advantages are numerous. For example, hospitals will be able to exchange information between remote sites at incredible speeds. MAN is made up of fiber-optic cables and electronic routers. LondonConnect is expecting to provide access throughout London by the fall of 1999. A dozen clients have already signed up for the service. Installation of the system will cost $1,000 with fixed monthly rates. The cost will vary depending on the level of service. The network will cost London Hydro $3 million, but it is expected to generate $2.5 million annually in its first two years. 3 figs

  14. Deregulated Renal Calcium and Phosphate Transport during Experimental Kidney Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilco P Pulskens

    Full Text Available Impaired mineral homeostasis and inflammation are hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD, yet the underlying mechanisms of electrolyte regulation during CKD are still unclear. Here, we applied two different murine models, partial nephrectomy and adenine-enriched dietary intervention, to induce kidney failure and to investigate the subsequent impact on systemic and local renal factors involved in Ca(2+ and Pi regulation. Our results demonstrated that both experimental models induce features of CKD, as reflected by uremia, and elevated renal neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL expression. In our model kidney failure was associated with polyuria, hypercalcemia and elevated urinary Ca(2+ excretion. In accordance, CKD augmented systemic PTH and affected the FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D axis by elevating circulatory FGF23 levels and reducing renal αklotho expression. Interestingly, renal FGF23 expression was also induced by inflammatory stimuli directly. Renal expression of Cyp27b1, but not Cyp24a1, and blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 were significantly elevated in both models. Furthermore, kidney failure was characterized by enhanced renal expression of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 5 (TRPV5, calbindin-D28k, and sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2b (NaPi2b, whereas the renal expression of sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2a (NaPi2a and type 3 (PIT2 were reduced. Together, our data indicates two different models of experimental kidney failure comparably associate with disturbed FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D signalling and a deregulated electrolyte homeostasis. Moreover, this study identifies local tubular, possibly inflammation- or PTH- and/or FGF23-associated, adaptive mechanisms, impacting on Ca(2+/Pi homeostasis, hence enabling new opportunities to target electrolyte disturbances that emerge as a consequence of CKD development.

  15. The deregulation connection : utility competition creates new niche company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, C

    1999-08-01

    Deregulation in Ontario's utility market has created incentives for local utilities to add new services to attract and keep customers, knowing that in a competitive energy market, only those utilities which offer the best services will survive. London Hydro, which provides power to southwestern Ontario launched a private enterprise called LondonConnect Inc. The new enterprise offers high-speed digital services to area businesses. London Hydro made this unique move to take advantage of the fact that 20 per cent of businesses communicate electronically. London Hydro believes that in the next five years, that number will increase to 80 per cent. The Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) gives businesses greater connectivity to the Internet and web services. One of the network's capabilities is realtime video conferencing between hydro locations. MAN can also be used to create a secure and private virtual community-wide area network of computers and office machines. The advantages are numerous. For example, hospitals will be able to exchange information between remote sites at incredible speeds. MAN is made up of fiber-optic cables and electronic routers. LondonConnect is expecting to provide access throughout London by the fall of 1999. A dozen clients have already signed up for the service. Installation of the system will cost $1,000 with fixed monthly rates. The cost will vary depending on the level of service. The network will cost London Hydro $3 million, but it is expected to generate $2.5 million annually in its first two years. 3 figs.

  16. The deregulation connection : utility competition creates new niche company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, C.

    1999-08-01

    Deregulation in Ontario`s utility market has created incentives for local utilities to add new services to attract and keep customers, knowing that in a competitive energy market, only those utilities which offer the best services will survive. London Hydro, which provides power to southwestern Ontario launched a private enterprise called LondonConnect Inc. The new enterprise offers high-speed digital services to area businesses. London Hydro made this unique move to take advantage of the fact that 20 per cent of businesses communicate electronically. London Hydro believes that in the next five years, that number will increase to 80 per cent. The Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) gives businesses greater connectivity to the Internet and web services. One of the network`s capabilities is realtime video conferencing between hydro locations. MAN can also be used to create a secure and private virtual community-wide area network of computers and office machines. The advantages are numerous. For example, hospitals will be able to exchange information between remote sites at incredible speeds. MAN is made up of fiber-optic cables and electronic routers. LondonConnect is expecting to provide access throughout London by the fall of 1999. A dozen clients have already signed up for the service. Installation of the system will cost $1,000 with fixed monthly rates. The cost will vary depending on the level of service. The network will cost London Hydro $3 million, but it is expected to generate $2.5 million annually in its first two years. 3 figs.

  17. Deregulation led to record-breaking profit for SPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janoska, J.

    2004-01-01

    The state collected close to 15 bn Sk of SPP's last year profits. The income tax represents about 5,2 bn Sk and the dividends paid to state as owner of 51 percent of the stock of Slovensky plynarensky priemysel, a.s., Bratislava (SPP) amount up to 9,5 billion Sk. Investors Ruhrgas and Gaz de France will split 9 billion Sk. This was possible thank to a record-breaking net profit of 20.5 billion Sk made by the company due to deregulation of the distorted gas prices for consumers that lead to an average price increase by over 30 percent. A positive impact on the company's economy had also the dissolving of provisions and reserves but on the other hand the sales went down by close to 5 percent due to higher temperatures. Another factor that had a positive impact on the company revenues was the increase of gas volumes transported through the SPP network to Western Europe. Expenditures related to purchase of gas increased last year and not even the decrease USD exchange rates could eliminate the impact of increasing gas prices. The decrease of sales on the domestic market was one of the major factors that allowed the total cost to decrease on year-to-year basis by ten percent. A restructuring of SPP should bring along further savings but the company has not calculated the total effect of a restructuring yet. The strong positive impact the restructuring may have on the company should show in 2004 and later. Last year the company concentrated on savings in area of maintenance and repairs and this year it should be the procurement expenditures that should be decreased. The future economic result of the company would depend on several factors like exchange rates, sale volumes and price of natural gas. Oils prices have reached their new maximums and the gas prices, in general, follow the oil price

  18. Ribosome. The complete structure of the 55S mammalian mitochondrial ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J; Bieri, Philipp; Leibundgut, Marc; Leitner, Alexander; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2015-04-17

    Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) synthesize mitochondrially encoded membrane proteins that are critical for mitochondrial function. Here we present the complete atomic structure of the porcine 55S mitoribosome at 3.8 angstrom resolution by cryo-electron microscopy and chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry. The structure of the 28S subunit in the complex was resolved at 3.6 angstrom resolution by focused alignment, which allowed building of a detailed atomic structure including all of its 15 mitoribosomal-specific proteins. The structure reveals the intersubunit contacts in the 55S mitoribosome, the molecular architecture of the mitoribosomal messenger RNA (mRNA) binding channel and its interaction with transfer RNAs, and provides insight into the highly specialized mechanism of mRNA recruitment to the 28S subunit. Furthermore, the structure contributes to a mechanistic understanding of aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. The Complete Structure of the Mycobacterium smegmatis 70S Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Jendrik; Burnside, Chloe; Mignot, Ingrid; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad

    2017-07-05

    The ribosome carries out the synthesis of proteins in every living cell. It consequently represents a frontline target in anti-microbial therapy. Tuberculosis ranks among the leading causes of death worldwide, due in large part to the combination of difficult-to-treat latency and antibiotic resistance. Here, we present the 3.3-Å cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome of Mycobacterium smegmatis, a close relative to the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure reveals two additional ribosomal proteins and localizes them to the vicinity of drug-target sites in both the catalytic center and the decoding site of the ribosome. Furthermore, we visualized actinobacterium-specific rRNA and protein expansions that extensively remodel the ribosomal surface with implications for polysome organization. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the idiosyncrasies of mycobacterial translation and reveal atomic details of the structure that will facilitate the design of anti-tubercular therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutmou, Kristin S; Schuller, Anthony P; Brunelle, Julie L; Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Djuranovic, Sergej; Green, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Protein output from synonymous codons is thought to be equivalent if appropriate tRNAs are sufficiently abundant. Here we show that mRNAs encoding iterated lysine codons, AAA or AAG, differentially impact protein synthesis: insertion of iterated AAA codons into an ORF diminishes protein expression more than insertion of synonymous AAG codons. Kinetic studies in E. coli reveal that differential protein production results from pausing on consecutive AAA-lysines followed by ribosome sliding on homopolymeric A sequence. Translation in a cell-free expression system demonstrates that diminished output from AAA-codon-containing reporters results from premature translation termination on out of frame stop codons following ribosome sliding. In eukaryotes, these premature termination events target the mRNAs for Nonsense-Mediated-Decay (NMD). The finding that ribosomes slide on homopolymeric A sequences explains bioinformatic analyses indicating that consecutive AAA codons are under-represented in gene-coding sequences. Ribosome ‘sliding’ represents an unexpected type of ribosome movement possible during translation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05534.001 PMID:25695637

  1. The Phosphorylation of Ribosomal Protein in Lemna minor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewavas, A.

    1973-01-01

    Sterile cultures of Lemna minor have been labeled with 32P1, and the ribosomal proteins have been examined for radioactivity. In relatively short term labeling a radioactive protein was found which ran as a single component in both urea/acetic acid and sodium lauryl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Acid hydrolysis of the labeled protein permitted the isolation of serine phosphate. After labeling to equilibrium with 32P1, calculation indicated only 0.6 to 0.75 atom of this protein phosphorus per ribosome. The phosphorylated protein is found in both polysomes and “derived” monomers and appears to be located in the ribosomal small subunit. Its apparent molecular weight is 42,000. Addition of growth-inhibiting concentrations of abscisic acid does not alter the apparent degree of labeling of this protein in 5 hours, but after 24 hours of treatment the total protein phosphorus was reduced from 0.75 atom of phosphorus per ribosome to 0.36 atom of phosphorus per ribosome. PMID:16658405

  2. Heterologous production of non-ribosomal peptide LLD-ACV in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, Verena; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Le

    2009-01-01

    production of ACV was observed. To improve ACV synthesis, several factors were investigated. Codon optimization of the 5′ end of pcbAB did not significantly increase ACV production. However, a 30-fold enhancement was achieved by lowering the cultivation temperature from 30 to 20 °C. When ACVS and PPTase...... encoding genes were integrated into the yeast genome, a 6-fold decrease in ACV production was observed indicating that gene copy number was one of the rate-limiting factors for ACV production in yeast....

  3. Adoption of the 2A Ribosomal Skip Principle to Tobacco Mosaic Virus for Peptide Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Röder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant viruses are suitable as building blocks for nanomaterials and nanoparticles because they are easy to modify and can be expressed and purified using plants or heterologous expression systems. Plant virus nanoparticles have been utilized for epitope presentation in vaccines, for drug delivery, as nanospheres and nanowires, and for biomedical imaging applications. Fluorescent protein fusions have been instrumental for the tagging of plant virus particles. The monomeric non-oxygen-dependent fluorescent protein iLOV can be used as an alternative to green fluorescent protein. In this study, the iLOV sequence was genetically fused either directly or via a glycine-serine linker to the C-terminus of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV coat protein (CP and also carried an N-terminal Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV 2A sequence. Nicotiana benthamiana plants were inoculated with recombinant viral vectors and a systemic infection was achieved. The presence of iLOV fusion proteins and hybrid particles was confirmed by western blot analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Our data suggest that TMV-based vectors are suitable for the production of proteins at least as large as iLOV when combined with the FMDV 2A sequence. This approach allowed the simultaneous production of foreign proteins fused to the CP as well as free CP subunits.

  4. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  5. Change in consumer sensitivity to electricity prices in response to retail deregulation: A panel empirical analysis of the residential demand for electricity in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Tadahiro; Hamori, Shigeyuki

    2010-01-01

    About ten years have passed since the deregulation of the U.S. retail electricity market, and it is now generally accepted that the available data is adequate to quantitatively assess and compare conditions before and after deregulation. This study, therefore, estimates the changes in price elasticity in the residential electricity market to examine the changes, if any, in household sensitivity (as a result of retail electricity market deregulation policies) to residential electricity rates. Specifically, six types of panel data are prepared, based on three cross-sections-all states (except for Alaska and Hawaii) and the District of Columbia, deregulated states, and non-deregulated states-and two time series-the period before deregulation and the period after deregulation. The panel empirical analysis techniques are used to determine whether or not the variables are stationary, and to estimate price elasticity. We find that there is no substantial difference in the price elasticity between deregulated and non-deregulated states for both periods-before deregulation and after deregulation. Thus, it can be said that the deregulation of the retail electricity market has not made consumers more sensitive to electricity rates and that retail deregulation policies are not the cause of price elasticity differences between deregulated and non-deregulated states.

  6. Change in consumer sensitivity to electricity prices in response to retail deregulation. A panel empirical analysis of the residential demand for electricity in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Tadahiro [The Kansai Electric Power Company, Incorporated, 6-16, Nakanoshima 3-chome, Kita-Ku, Osaka 530-8270 (Japan); Hamori, Shigeyuki [Faculty of Economics, Kobe University 2-1, Rokkodai, Nada-Ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    About ten years have passed since the deregulation of the U.S. retail electricity market, and it is now generally accepted that the available data is adequate to quantitatively assess and compare conditions before and after deregulation. This study, therefore, estimates the changes in price elasticity in the residential electricity market to examine the changes, if any, in household sensitivity (as a result of retail electricity market deregulation policies) to residential electricity rates. Specifically, six types of panel data are prepared, based on three cross-sections - all states (except for Alaska and Hawaii) and the District of Columbia, deregulated states, and non-deregulated states - and two time series - the period before deregulation and the period after deregulation. The panel empirical analysis techniques are used to determine whether or not the variables are stationary, and to estimate price elasticity. We find that there is no substantial difference in the price elasticity between deregulated and non-deregulated states for both periods - before deregulation and after deregulation. Thus, it can be said that the deregulation of the retail electricity market has not made consumers more sensitive to electricity rates and that retail deregulation policies are not the cause of price elasticity differences between deregulated and non-deregulated states. (author)

  7. Label-Free Quantitation of Ribosomal Proteins from Bacillus subtilis for Antibiotic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäkermann, Sina; Prochnow, Pascal; Bandow, Julia E

    2017-01-01

    Current research is focusing on ribosome heterogeneity as a response to changing environmental conditions and stresses, such as antibiotic stress. Altered stoichiometry and composition of ribosomal proteins as well as association of additional protein factors are mechanisms for shaping the protein expression profile or hibernating ribosomes. Here, we present a method for the isolation of ribosomes to analyze antibiotic-induced changes in the composition of ribosomes in Bacillus subtilis or other bacteria. Ribosomes and associated proteins are isolated by ultracentrifugation and proteins are identified and quantified using label-free mass spectrometry.

  8. Cryo-EM structure of the archaeal 50S ribosomal subunit in complex with initiation factor 6 and implications for ribosome evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greber, Basil J; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka

    2012-01-01

    additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter...... between this archaeal ribosome and eukaryotic ribosomes but are mostly absent in bacteria and in some archaeal lineages. Furthermore, the structure reveals that, in spite of highly divergent evolutionary trajectories of the ribosomal particle and the acquisition of novel functions of IF6 in eukaryotes......, the molecular binding of IF6 on the ribosome is conserved between eukaryotes and archaea. The structure also provides a snapshot of the reductive evolution of the archaeal ribosome and offers new insights into the evolution of the translation system in archaea....

  9. Interaction of tRNA with Eukaryotic Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Graifer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of currently available data concerning interactions of tRNAs with the eukaryotic ribosome at various stages of translation. These data include the results obtained by means of cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography applied to various model ribosomal complexes, site-directed cross-linking with the use of tRNA derivatives bearing chemically or photochemically reactive groups in the CCA-terminal fragment and chemical probing of 28S rRNA in the region of the peptidyl transferase center. Similarities and differences in the interactions of tRNAs with prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes are discussed with concomitant consideration of the extent of resemblance between molecular mechanisms of translation in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  10. 5SRNAdb: an information resource for 5S ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Maciej; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Barciszewski, Jan; Erdmann, Volker A; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2016-01-04

    Ribosomal 5S RNA (5S rRNA) is the ubiquitous RNA component found in the large subunit of ribosomes in all known organisms. Due to its small size, abundance and evolutionary conservation 5S rRNA for many years now is used as a model molecule in studies on RNA structure, RNA-protein interactions and molecular phylogeny. 5SRNAdb (http://combio.pl/5srnadb/) is the first database that provides a high quality reference set of ribosomal 5S RNAs (5S rRNA) across three domains of life. Here, we give an overview of new developments in the database and associated web tools since 2002, including updates to database content, curation processes and user web interfaces. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  12. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  13. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  18. Protein-protein interactions within late pre-40S ribosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody G Campbell

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome assembly in eukaryotic organisms requires more than 200 assembly factors to facilitate and coordinate rRNA transcription, processing, and folding with the binding of the ribosomal proteins. Many of these assembly factors bind and dissociate at defined times giving rise to discrete assembly intermediates, some of which have been partially characterized with regards to their protein and RNA composition. Here, we have analyzed the protein-protein interactions between the seven assembly factors bound to late cytoplasmic pre-40S ribosomes using recombinant proteins in binding assays. Our data show that these factors form two modules: one comprising Enp1 and the export adaptor Ltv1 near the beak structure, and the second comprising the kinase Rio2, the nuclease Nob1, and a regulatory RNA binding protein Dim2/Pno1 on the front of the head. The GTPase-like Tsr1 and the universally conserved methylase Dim1 are also peripherally connected to this second module. Additionally, in an effort to further define the locations for these essential proteins, we have analyzed the interactions between these assembly factors and six ribosomal proteins: Rps0, Rps3, Rps5, Rps14, Rps15 and Rps29. Together, these results and previous RNA-protein crosslinking data allow us to propose a model for the binding sites of these seven assembly factors. Furthermore, our data show that the essential kinase Rio2 is located at the center of the pre-ribosomal particle and interacts, directly or indirectly, with every other assembly factor, as well as three ribosomal proteins required for cytoplasmic 40S maturation. These data suggest that Rio2 could play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic maturation steps.

  19. A streamlined ribosome profiling protocol for the characterization of microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latif, Haythem; Szubin, Richard; Tan, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome profiling is a powerful tool for characterizing in vivo protein translation at the genome scale, with multiple applications ranging from detailed molecular mechanisms to systems-level predictive modeling. Though highly effective, this intricate technique has yet to become widely used...... in the microbial research community. Here we present a streamlined ribosome profiling protocol with reduced barriers to entry for microbial characterization studies. Our approach provides simplified alternatives during harvest, lysis, and recovery of monosomes and also eliminates several time-consuming steps...

  20. Interaction of pleuromutilin derivatives with the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, K. S.; Hansen, L. K.; Jakobsen, L.

    2006-01-01

    Tiamulin is a pleuromutilin antibiotic that is used in veterinary medicine. The recently published crystal structure of a tiamulin-50S ribosomal subunit complex provides detailed information about how this drug targets the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. To promote rational design...... mutant strain is resistant to tiamulin and pleuromutilin, but not valnemulin, implying that valnemulin is better able to withstand an altered rRNA binding surface around the mutilin core. This is likely due to additional interactions made between the valnemulin side chain extension and the rRNA binding...

  1. Charge Segregation and Low Hydrophobicity Are Key Features of Ribosomal Proteins from Different Organisms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyukina, Daria V.; Jennaro, Theodore S.; Cavagnero, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are large and highly charged macromolecular complexes consisting of RNA and proteins. Here, we address the electrostatic and nonpolar properties of ribosomal proteins that are important for ribosome assembly and interaction with other cellular components and may influence protein folding on the ribosome. We examined 50 S ribosomal subunits from 10 species and found a clear distinction between the net charge of ribosomal proteins from halophilic and non-halophilic organisms. We found that ∼67% ribosomal proteins from halophiles are negatively charged, whereas only up to ∼15% of ribosomal proteins from non-halophiles share this property. Conversely, hydrophobicity tends to be lower for ribosomal proteins from halophiles than for the corresponding proteins from non-halophiles. Importantly, the surface electrostatic potential of ribosomal proteins from all organisms, especially halophiles, has distinct positive and negative regions across all the examined species. Positively and negatively charged residues of ribosomal proteins tend to be clustered in buried and solvent-exposed regions, respectively. Hence, the majority of ribosomal proteins is characterized by a significant degree of intramolecular charge segregation, regardless of the organism of origin. This key property enables the ribosome to accommodate proteins within its complex scaffold regardless of their overall net charge. PMID:24398678

  2. An update on sORFs.org: a repository of small ORFs identified by ribosome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olexiouk, Volodimir; Van Criekinge, Wim; Menschaert, Gerben

    2018-01-04

    sORFs.org (http://www.sorfs.org) is a public repository of small open reading frames (sORFs) identified by ribosome profiling (RIBO-seq). This update elaborates on the major improvements implemented since its initial release. sORFs.org now additionally supports three more species (zebrafish, rat and Caenorhabditis elegans) and currently includes 78 RIBO-seq datasets, a vast increase compared to the three that were processed in the initial release. Therefore, a novel pipeline was constructed that also enables sORF detection in RIBO-seq datasets comprising solely elongating RIBO-seq data while previously, matching initiating RIBO-seq data was necessary to delineate the sORFs. Furthermore, a novel noise filtering algorithm was designed, able to distinguish sORFs with true ribosomal activity from simulated noise, consequently reducing the false positive identification rate. The inclusion of other species also led to the development of an inner BLAST pipeline, assessing sequence similarity between sORFs in the repository. Building on the proof of concept model in the initial release of sORFs.org, a full PRIDE-ReSpin pipeline was now released, reprocessing publicly available MS-based proteomics PRIDE datasets, reporting on true translation events. Next to reporting those identified peptides, sORFs.org allows visual inspection of the annotated spectra within the Lorikeet MS/MS viewer, thus enabling detailed manual inspection and interpretation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Pricing behaviour of pharmacies after market deregulation for OTC drugs: the case of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stargardt, Tom; Schreyögg, Jonas; Busse, Reinhard

    2007-11-01

    To examine the price reactions of German pharmacies to changes made to OTC drug regulations in 2004. Prior to these changes, regulations guaranteed identical prices in all German pharmacies. Two years after market deregulation, 256 pharmacies were surveyed to determine the retail prices of five selected OTC drugs. A probit regression model was used to identify factors that increased the likelihood of price changes. In addition, 409 pharmacy consumers were interviewed to gather information on their knowledge of the regulatory changes and to better explain consumer behaviour. Data was collected on a total of 1215 prices. Two years after deregulation, 23.1% of the participating pharmacies had modified the price of at least one of the five OTCs included in our study. However, in total, only 7.5% of the prices differed from their pre-deregulation level. The probit model showed that population density and the geographic concentration of pharmacies were significantly associated with price changes. Interestingly, the association with the geographic concentration of pharmacies was negative. The consumer survey revealed that 47.1% of those interviewed were aware of the deregulation. Our findings indicate that, two years after deregulation, very few pharmacies had made use of individual pricing strategies; price competition between pharmacies in Germany is thus taking place only a very small scale.

  4. The deregulation of electricity and gas markets. The great economic challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirabel, Francois; Guerassimoff, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    As the process of deregulation of electricity and gas markets started in Europe ten years ago, this book aims at recalling and describing the consequences of this evolution, notably for companies which were in a monopoly situation for electricity and gas production, transport, retailing and selling, but also in terms of new entities to be created and of entities having to give up their specialty. The author first presents the economic characteristics of gas and electricity industries in terms of infrastructures and final services, scale, coordination and size of energy networks, of existence of strong externalities in networks, of commitment in public service missions. He describes the background and implementation of this deregulation. He analyses the strategies of companies and how energy markets are controlled: strategies to mitigate competition and to strengthen their market power, firm strategies and public policies, merging strategies, strategies of competition distortion. The last chapter addresses the various priority fields of deregulation: public service missions in a deregulated environment (issues of service continuity and of affordable prices), the environmental constraint in energy market organisation (limitation of CO 2 emissions, promotion of renewable energies, and reduction of energy consumption). In conclusion, the author discusses how to conciliate deregulation and sustainable development of energy

  5. A genome-wide analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene clusters and their peptides in a Planktothrix rubescens strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nederbragt Alexander J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria often produce several different oligopeptides, with unknown biological functions, by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS. Although some cyanobacterial NRPS gene cluster types are well described, the entire NRPS genomic content within a single cyanobacterial strain has never been investigated. Here we have combined a genome-wide analysis using massive parallel pyrosequencing ("454" and mass spectrometry screening of oligopeptides produced in the strain Planktothrix rubescens NIVA CYA 98 in order to identify all putative gene clusters for oligopeptides. Results Thirteen types of oligopeptides were uncovered by mass spectrometry (MS analyses. Microcystin, cyanopeptolin and aeruginosin synthetases, highly similar to already characterized NRPS, were present in the genome. Two novel NRPS gene clusters were associated with production of anabaenopeptins and microginins, respectively. Sequence-depth of the genome and real-time PCR data revealed three copies of the microginin gene cluster. Since NRPS gene cluster candidates for microviridin and oscillatorin synthesis could not be found, putative (gene encoded precursor peptide sequences to microviridin and oscillatorin were found in the genes mdnA and oscA, respectively. The genes flanking the microviridin and oscillatorin precursor genes encode putative modifying enzymes of the precursor oligopeptides. We therefore propose ribosomal pathways involving modifications and cyclisation for microviridin and oscillatorin. The microviridin, anabaenopeptin and cyanopeptolin gene clusters are situated in close proximity to each other, constituting an oligopeptide island. Conclusion Altogether seven nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters and two gene clusters putatively encoding ribosomal oligopeptide biosynthetic pathways were revealed. Our results demonstrate that whole genome shotgun sequencing combined with MS-directed determination of oligopeptides successfully

  6. Competence in Streptococcus pneumoniae is regulated by the rate of ribosomal decoding errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kathleen E; Chang, Diana; Zwack, Erin E; Sebert, Michael E

    2011-01-01

    Competence for genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae develops in response to accumulation of a secreted peptide pheromone and was one of the initial examples of bacterial quorum sensing. Activation of this signaling system induces not only expression of the proteins required for transformation but also the production of cellular chaperones and proteases. We have shown here that activity of this pathway is sensitively responsive to changes in the accuracy of protein synthesis that are triggered by either mutations in ribosomal proteins or exposure to antibiotics. Increasing the error rate during ribosomal decoding promoted competence, while reducing the error rate below the baseline level repressed the development of both spontaneous and antibiotic-induced competence. This pattern of regulation was promoted by the bacterial HtrA serine protease. Analysis of strains with the htrA (S234A) catalytic site mutation showed that the proteolytic activity of HtrA selectively repressed competence when translational fidelity was high but not when accuracy was low. These findings redefine the pneumococcal competence pathway as a response to errors during protein synthesis. This response has the capacity to address the immediate challenge of misfolded proteins through production of chaperones and proteases and may also be able to address, through genetic exchange, upstream coding errors that cause intrinsic protein folding defects. The competence pathway may thereby represent a strategy for dealing with lesions that impair proper protein coding and for maintaining the coding integrity of the genome. The signaling pathway that governs competence in the human respiratory tract pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae regulates both genetic transformation and the production of cellular chaperones and proteases. The current study shows that this pathway is sensitively controlled in response to changes in the accuracy of protein synthesis. Increasing the error rate during

  7. Cryo-EM Structure of the Archaeal 50S Ribosomal Subunit in Complex with Initiation Factor 6 and Implications for Ribosome Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Basil J.; Boehringer, Daniel; Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Crnkovic, Ana; Ibba, Michael; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana; Ban, Nenad

    2013-01-01

    Translation of mRNA into proteins by the ribosome is universally conserved in all cellular life. The composition and complexity of the translation machinery differ markedly between the three domains of life. Organisms from the domain Archaea show an intermediate level of complexity, sharing several additional components of the translation machinery with eukaryotes that are absent in bacteria. One of these translation factors is initiation factor 6 (IF6), which associates with the large ribosomal subunit. We have reconstructed the 50S ribosomal subunit from the archaeon Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in complex with archaeal IF6 at 6.6 Å resolution using cryo-electron microscopy (EM). The structure provides detailed architectural insights into the 50S ribosomal subunit from a methanogenic archaeon through identification of the rRNA expansion segments and ribosomal proteins that are shared between this archaeal ribosome and eukaryotic ribosomes but are mostly absent in bacteria and in some archaeal lineages. Furthermore, the structure reveals that, in spite of highly divergent evolutionary trajectories of the ribosomal particle and the acquisition of novel functions of IF6 in eukaryotes, the molecular binding of IF6 on the ribosome is conserved between eukaryotes and archaea. The structure also provides a snapshot of the reductive evolution of the archaeal ribosome and offers new insights into the evolution of the translation system in archaea. PMID:22306461

  8. Nuclear ribosomal DNA diversity of a cotton pest ( Rotylenchulus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) has emerged as a major cotton pest in the United States. A recent analysis of over 20 amphimictic populations of this pest from the US and three other countries has shown no sequence variation at the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) despite the region's ...

  9. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  10. Ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer 1 and internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-26

    Jul 26, 2010 ... in some East Asian countries such as China, Korea and. *Corresponding author. E-mail: soonkwan@kangwon.ac.kr. Tel: +82 33 250 6476. Fax: +82 33 250 6470. Abbreviations: nrDNA, Nuclear ribosomal DNA; ITS, internal transcribed spacer; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; BLAST, basic local alignment ...

  11. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPS16 of eukaryote is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS16 gene and is also a homolog of prokaryotic RPS9. The cDNA and genomic sequence of RPS16 was cloned successfully for the first time from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain ...

  12. (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 2. Phylogeny and biogeography of Alyssum (Brassicaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal ITS DNA sequences. Yan Li Yan Kong Zhe Zhang Yanqiang Yin Bin Liu Guanghui Lv Xiyong Wang. Research Article Volume 93 Issue 2 August 2014 pp 313-323 ...

  13. Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    mechanisms employed by a number of higher-plant species involve defensive ... of RIPs in the same plant species. ..... Lam C J, Ryals J A, Ward E R and Dixon R A 1992 Emerging ... against insect pests and diseases of plants: ribosome in-.

  14. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  15. Architecture of the E.coli 70S ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhardt, N.; Diedrich, G.; Nierhaus, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The 70S ribosome from E.coli was analysed by neutron scattering focusing on the shape and the internal protein-RNA-distribution of the complex. Measurements on selectively deuterated 70S particles and free 30S and 50S subunits applying conventional contrast variation and proton-spin contrast...

  16. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation.

  17. Effect of truck and rail economic deregulation on radioactive material transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of the effect of truck and rail economic deregulation on radioactive material transportation is presented in this document. The evaluation is based on expected market performance that would be consistent with fundamental economic theories. The issues of transport safety, commodity discrimination and rates are addressed. Relative to transport safety, deregulation should not have any significant impact. While deregulation should not change commodity acceptance and may lower rates for motor carriage, it may allow increased discrimination by rail carriers in addition to raising rates. Consequently, it is likely that the radioactive material transportation industry will continue to place greater reliance on the competitive motor carrier industry. Positive steps that shippers can take are to maintain credible options to ship by alternate modes, to address issues that result in the perceived need for special risk premiums, and to reduce the cost of handling truck shipments by improvements in technology or procedures. 28 references, 3 figures, 6 tables

  18. Natural gas retailing: writing the last chapter of natural gas deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerkelund, T.

    1995-01-01

    Under the A greement on Natural Gas Markets and Prices of October 1985, the Canadian federal government agreed to deregulate the price of natural gas and to allow a competitive gas market to develop. Several beneficial changes that have occurred as a result of the deregulation were described, including the Industrial Gas Users Association's (IGUA) view on the marketing and sale of natural gas by local gas distributor's (LDC) and the sale within the LDC franchise. IGUA's support for the separation between LDC distribution and LDC sales and marketing activities as the last step in deregulation process, was explained. Several arguments for the opposing view were also discussed. Recommendations were made for effective separation of LDC distribution and LDC sales/marketing activities

  19. U.S. Banking Deregulation and Emerging Market Loans: Potential Links and Evidence, 1984~2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Koo Cho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available How did the deregulation of U.S. bank activities affect the patterns of cross-border lending to emerging economies? Unlike bank lending from Europe or Japan, U.S. bank lending to emerging economies exhibited increasing volatility over time. Using U.S. cross-border bank exposure data, this study identifies a temporal association between important deregulation initiatives and the volatility of U.S. bank emerging market lending. This association is explained by the linkages between an important outcome of bank deregulation-earnings volatility from diversified bank activities-and the rising volatility. Together, it argues that U.S. banking deregulation had unanticipated effects of exacerbating the volatility of bank lending to emerging economies.

  20. Learning without experience: Understanding the strategic implications of deregulation and competition in the electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomi, A. [School of Economics, University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Larsen, E.R. [Dept. of Managements Systems and Information, City University Business School, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-01

    As deregulation of the electricity industry continues to gain momentum around the world, electricity companies face unprecedented challenges. Competitive complexity and intensity will increase substantially as deregulated companies find themselves competing in new industries, with new rules, against unfamiliar competitors - and without any history to learn from. We describe the different kinds of strategic issues that newly deregulated utility companies are facing, and the risks that strategic issues implicate. We identify a number of problems induced by experiential learning under conditions of competence-destroying change, and we illustrate ways in which companies can activate history-independent learning processes. We suggest that Micro worlds - a new generation of computer-based learning environments made possible by conceptual and technological progress in the fields of system dynamics and systems thinking - are particularly appropriate tools to accelerate and enhance organizational and managerial learning under conditions of increased competitive complexity. (au)

  1. A NEPOTISM AND CRONY IN A BUSINESS, CASE OF INDUSTRIAL DEREGULATION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhadjir Efendy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An industrial deregulation is a government policy in developing a state’s economic infrastructure. If a country undergoes a process of powerful personalization, its interest is identical with a powerful interest. For an economic profit, the President’s relative and crony do a business and build directly unproductive seeking activities. This study aims to examine the relation of relative to crony in realizing an industrial deregulation in the 1980s and its impact on the Indonesian economy in a view of macroeconomic policy. It focuses on a problem of the industrial deregulation from 1983 to 1990 with economic growth by the indicator of contribution to GDP and labor force. The study used an expose facto approach. The data were the secondary sources: documents, textbooks and mass media. It used a qualitative-descriptive analysis.

  2. Nuclear and global warming issues at a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesarovic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The present challenge is to develop such an energy mix that best supports industrial and societal development and improves the quality of life, while simultaneously minimizing health and environmental impacts. Although two decades ago nuclear was considered to be the energy of the future, it is often overlooked in this context and is now even being questioned in many parts of the world. But, for a world facing increased energy demand and growing concerns about global warming due to the emissions of the 'greenhouse' gasses from burning fossil fuels, nuclear power may become the first priority again, since the nuclear power plants proved to be a reliable and safe source of electricity that produce no greenhouse or acid rain gases, and have already demonstrated their economic competitiveness with alternative generating sources of electrical energy. The competitiveness of nuclear power depends essentially on capital investments which must remain low enough to secure its competitive position. However, nuclear electricity in most countries is less competitive than coal and gas, particularly so after deregulation and liberalization of electricity markets have taken place. In the European Union (EU) there are at present 151 reactor blocks and 68 more in the rest of the European continent. Nuclear power plants in EU currently generate about 35% of electricity, but with the new competitive markets, a major decline in the use of coal is compensated for by an increase in gas because of its lower carbon content, and thus almost all new power stations fully or partially use gas as fuel. However, nuclear power is expected to remain a necessary component of the EU's energy mix for the next 20 years and beyond, and in Central and Eastern Europe it is continuing its growth. While Hungary recently gave up plans to construct two more blocks in its 'Pacs' plant, the Czech government agreed to continue construction of two blocks at its 'Temelin' plant. In Rumania, the second unit of

  3. Differential antibiotic sensitivity determined by the large ribosomal subunit in thermophilic archaea.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggero, D; Londei, P

    1996-01-01

    Hybrid ribosomes obtained by mixing the ribosomal subunits of the extremely thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Desulfurococcus mobilis were tested for their sensitivity to selected antibiotics. It is shown that structural differences in the large ribosomal subunits determine qualitatively and quantitatively the patterns of response to alpha-sarcin and paromomycin in these species.

  4. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and analysis of the ribosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal protein L37A (RPL37A) is a component of 60S large ribosomal subunit encoded by the RPL37A gene, which belongs to the family of ribosomal L37AE proteins, located in the cytoplasm. The complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) and the genomic sequence of RPL37A were cloned successfully from giant ...

  5. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D.; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100–200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how “normal” copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a “normal” rDNA copy number. PMID:28915237

  6. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  7. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Devika; Bradford, William D; Freeland, Amy; Cady, Gillian; Wang, Jianmin; Pruitt, Steven C; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2017-09-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2)-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  8. DNA replication stress restricts ribosomal DNA copy number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devika Salim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs in budding yeast are encoded by ~100-200 repeats of a 9.1kb sequence arranged in tandem on chromosome XII, the ribosomal DNA (rDNA locus. Copy number of rDNA repeat units in eukaryotic cells is maintained far in excess of the requirement for ribosome biogenesis. Despite the importance of the repeats for both ribosomal and non-ribosomal functions, it is currently not known how "normal" copy number is determined or maintained. To identify essential genes involved in the maintenance of rDNA copy number, we developed a droplet digital PCR based assay to measure rDNA copy number in yeast and used it to screen a yeast conditional temperature-sensitive mutant collection of essential genes. Our screen revealed that low rDNA copy number is associated with compromised DNA replication. Further, subculturing yeast under two separate conditions of DNA replication stress selected for a contraction of the rDNA array independent of the replication fork blocking protein, Fob1. Interestingly, cells with a contracted array grew better than their counterparts with normal copy number under conditions of DNA replication stress. Our data indicate that DNA replication stresses select for a smaller rDNA array. We speculate that this liberates scarce replication factors for use by the rest of the genome, which in turn helps cells complete DNA replication and continue to propagate. Interestingly, tumors from mini chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM2-deficient mice also show a loss of rDNA repeats. Our data suggest that a reduction in rDNA copy number may indicate a history of DNA replication stress, and that rDNA array size could serve as a diagnostic marker for replication stress. Taken together, these data begin to suggest the selective pressures that combine to yield a "normal" rDNA copy number.

  9. Studies on the catalytic rate constant of ribosomal peptidyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synetos, D; Coutsogeorgopoulos, C

    1987-02-20

    A detailed kinetic analysis of a model reaction for the ribosomal peptidyltransferase is described, using fMet-tRNA or Ac-Phe-tRNA as the peptidyl donor and puromycin as the acceptor. The initiation complex (fMet-tRNA X AUG X 70 S ribosome) or (Ac-Phe-tRNA X poly(U) X 70 S ribosome) (complex C) is isolated and then reacted with excess puromycin (S) to give fMet-puromycin or Ac-Phe-puromycin. This reaction (puromycin reaction) is first order at all concentrations of S tested. An important asset of this kinetic analysis is the fact that the relationship between the first order rate constant kobs and [S] shows hyperbolic saturation and that the value of kobs at saturating [S] is a measure of the catalytic rate constant (k cat) of peptidyltransferase in the puromycin reaction. With fMet-tRNA as the donor, this kcat of peptidyltransferase is 8.3 min-1 when the 0.5 M NH4Cl ribosomal wash is present, compared to 3.8 min-1 in its absence. The kcat of peptidyltransferase is 2.0 min-1 when Ac-Phe-tRNA replaces fMet-tRNA in the presence of the ribosomal wash and decreases to 0.8 min-1 in its absence. This kinetic procedure is the best method available for evaluating changes in the activity of peptidyltransferase in vitro. The results suggest that peptidyltransferase is subjected to activation by the binding of fMet-tRNA to the 70 S initiation complex.

  10. Structure-activity relationships of an antimicrobial peptide plantaricin s from two-peptide class IIb bacteriocins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Wael; Wang, Liru; Bhattacharjee, Subir; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2011-04-14

    Class IIb bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides comprising two different peptides synergistically acting in equal amounts for optimal potency. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time potent (nanomolar) antimicrobial activity of a representative class IIb bacteriocin, plantaricin S (Pls), against four pathogenic gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria monocytogenes. The structure-activity relationships for Pls were studied using activity assays, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The two Pls peptides and five Pls derived fragments were synthesized. The CD spectra of the Pls and selected fragments revealed helical conformations in aqueous 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol. The MD simulations showed that when the two Pls peptides are in antiparallel orientation, the helical regions interact and align, mediated by strong attraction between conserved GxxxG/AxxxA motifs. The results strongly correlate with the antimicrobial activity suggesting that helix-helix alignment of the two Pls peptides and interaction between the conserved motifs are crucial for interaction with the target cell membrane.

  11. Optimal electricity price calculation model for retailers in a deregulated market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusta, J.M.; Dominguez-Navarro, J.A. [Zaragoza Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Zaragoza (Spain); Ramirez-Rosado, I.J. [La Rioja Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Logrono (Spain); Perez-Vidal, J.M. [McKinnon and Clarke, Energy Services Div., Zaragoza (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The electricity retailing, a new business in deregulated electric power systems, needs the development of efficient tools to optimize its operation. This paper defines a technical-economic model of an electric energy service provider in the environment of the deregulated electricity market in Spain. This model results in an optimization problem, for calculating the optimal electric power and energy selling prices that maximize the economic profits obtained by the provider. This problem is applied to different cases, where the impact on the profits of several factors, such as the price strategy, the discount on tariffs and the elasticity of customer demand functions, is studied. (Author)

  12. Optimal electricity price calculation model for retailers in a deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusta, J.M.; Dominguez-Navarro, J.A.; Ramirez-Rosado, I.J.; Perez-Vidal, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The electricity retailing, a new business in deregulated electric power systems, needs the development of efficient tools to optimize its operation. This paper defines a technical-economic model of an electric energy service provider in the environment of the deregulated electricity market in Spain. This model results in an optimization problem, for calculating the optimal electric power and energy selling prices that maximize the economic profits obtained by the provider. This problem is applied to different cases, where the impact on the profits of several factors, such as the price strategy, the discount on tariffs and the elasticity of customer demand functions, is studied. (Author)

  13. Deregulation and growth in China's energy sector: a review of recent development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yanrui.

    2003-01-01

    Dramatic changes have taken place in China's energy sector over the past decade. These changes have important implications for energy consumption, trade, production and regulatory policies in China and beyond. The objective of this paper is to review some of the key issues associated with deregulation and growth in China's energy sector. Specifically, the paper presents a survey of recent reforms in this sector; it also analyses the impact of deregulation on energy policy, ownership, foreign investment and trade, and sheds some lights on the sources of growth in China's energy sector

  14. Assessment for feasibility and pricing of wheeling transactions under deregulated environment of power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yog Raj Sood; Narayana Prasad Padhy; Hari Om Gupta

    2004-01-01

    Many transactions of electrical power are expected to take place due to deregulation of electrical power industry. It is important for independent power producers, independent system operator and bulk power consumers (load centers) to know and select the least cost transaction among all the feasible transactions. In this paper, selection of best possible wheeling transaction in a deregulated power system has been determined based on available transfer capability and short run marginal cost. The proposed algorithm has been tested and analyzed for IEEE-30 bus test system and hence applied to South African power industry, the results so obtained are found to be of very much practical use. (author)

  15. Impacts of Contingency Reserve on Nodal Price and Nodal Reliability Risk in Deregulated Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Peng; Goel, Lalit

    2013-01-01

    The deregulation of power systems allows customers to participate in power market operation. In deregulated power systems, nodal price and nodal reliability are adopted to represent locational operation cost and reliability performance. Since contingency reserve (CR) plays an important role...... in reliable operation, the CR commitment should be considered in operational reliability analysis. In this paper, a CR model based on customer reliability requirements has been formulated and integrated into power market settlement. A two-step market clearing process has been proposed to determine generation...

  16. Deregulation potentials in the Federal Republic of Germany. Deregulierungspotentiale in der Bundesrepublik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltwedel, R; Busch, A; Gross, A; Laaser, C F

    1986-01-01

    In December 1984 the Federal Minister of Economics commissioned the Institute of World Trade and Industry to work out an expertise on 'deregulation potentials in the Federal Republic of Germany'. The study gives access to major parts of the expertise. Analyses focus on regulations for different self-supporting occupations, retail trade, the finance markets, the communication sector, the supply industry, and the transportation sector. An examination of the grounds the regulations were based on is followed by a discussion of the pros and cons of a deregulation. The statements and arguments take into account experiences gained abroad.

  17. Changes in competitive strategies due to deregulation and privatization in the petroleum industry: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira Carneiro, J.M.; Moutinho Dos Santos, E.

    1999-01-01

    This article is part of a series of four dedicated to the study of the global oil competition game through the analytical framework proposed by Michael Porter, from the University of Harvard. By means of a questionnaire answered by top executives in ten oil companies, the authors investigate the changes in the competitive strategy of these companies in the downstream side of the oil business due to deregulation and privatization. The paper starts by establishing the relationship between Porter's generic competitive strategies and specific competitive methods. Then, it describes how companies have changes their competitive methods after privatization and major deregulation. Changes in the industry structure are also analyzed. (authors)

  18. The deregulation effects of Finnish electricity markets on district heating prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, Mikael; Peltola-Ojala, Paeivi

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates an empirical econometric panel data model in order to test deregulation and regional market structure effects on district heating prices in Finland for period 1996-2002. The data was collected from 76 district heating firms throughout Finland. Special emphasis is placed on the modeling of policy-induced competition, which began in year 1999, regional based fuel selection, local market structures, and distribution network sharing effects. The results imply that the local structures of energy production and sales have an important role to play in the formation of market prices and that the price lowering effects of energy market deregulation are permanent. (author)

  19. Electric power industry deregulation in the United States: impacts on U.S. and Canadian markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G.R. [Putnam, Hayes and Bartlett, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    An overview of the restructuring and deregulation of the United States electric power industry and the implications for the North American natural gas industry was presented. Electric power restructuring and its effect on wholesale and retail competition was discussed. It was suggested that although in the short term electric power deregulation impacts negatively on the natural gas industry, the long term impacts are favourable. The short term impact on the natural gas industry will mean increased competition and downward pressure on gas prices. In contrast, the long term impact could mean increased reliance on gas for electric power generation and convergence of the electric power and natural gas industries.

  20. Does Deregulation of Quality Standards in Telecomunications Improve Social Welfare? A Methodological Note Does Deregulation of Quality Standards in Telecomunications Improve Social Welfare? A Methodological Note

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Morandé

    1990-01-01

    Does Deregulation of Quality Standards in Telecomunications Improve Social Welfare? A Methodological Note One of the main reasons behind the bit difference observed in the per capita number of telephones between develope and developing countries is the high capital cost -a scarce resource in LDC's- of expanding telecommunications infrastructure. A reasonable question to raise in this context is the extent to which that high capital cost of investment could be diminished if international quali...

  1. DNA Binding by the Ribosomal DNA Transcription Factor Rrn3 Is Essential for Ribosomal DNA Transcription*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanchick, Ann; Zhi, Huijun; Cavanaugh, Alice H.; Rothblum, Katrina; Schneider, David A.; Rothblum, Lawrence I.

    2013-01-01

    The human homologue of yeast Rrn3 is an RNA polymerase I-associated transcription factor that is essential for ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription. The generally accepted model is that Rrn3 functions as a bridge between RNA polymerase I and the transcription factors bound to the committed template. In this model Rrn3 would mediate an interaction between the mammalian Rrn3-polymerase I complex and SL1, the rDNA transcription factor that binds to the core promoter element of the rDNA. In the course of studying the role of Rrn3 in recruitment, we found that Rrn3 was in fact a DNA-binding protein. Analysis of the sequence of Rrn3 identified a domain with sequence similarity to the DNA binding domain of heat shock transcription factor 2. Randomization, or deletion, of the amino acids in this region in Rrn3, amino acids 382–400, abrogated its ability to bind DNA, indicating that this domain was an important contributor to DNA binding by Rrn3. Control experiments demonstrated that these mutant Rrn3 constructs were capable of interacting with both rpa43 and SL1, two other activities demonstrated to be essential for Rrn3 function. However, neither of these Rrn3 mutants was capable of functioning in transcription in vitro. Moreover, although wild-type human Rrn3 complemented a yeast rrn3-ts mutant, the DNA-binding site mutant did not. These results demonstrate that DNA binding by Rrn3 is essential for transcription by RNA polymerase I. PMID:23393135

  2. DNA binding by the ribosomal DNA transcription factor rrn3 is essential for ribosomal DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanchick, Ann; Zhi, Huijun; Cavanaugh, Alice H; Rothblum, Katrina; Schneider, David A; Rothblum, Lawrence I

    2013-03-29

    The human homologue of yeast Rrn3 is an RNA polymerase I-associated transcription factor that is essential for ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription. The generally accepted model is that Rrn3 functions as a bridge between RNA polymerase I and the transcription factors bound to the committed template. In this model Rrn3 would mediate an interaction between the mammalian Rrn3-polymerase I complex and SL1, the rDNA transcription factor that binds to the core promoter element of the rDNA. In the course of studying the role of Rrn3 in recruitment, we found that Rrn3 was in fact a DNA-binding protein. Analysis of the sequence of Rrn3 identified a domain with sequence similarity to the DNA binding domain of heat shock transcription factor 2. Randomization, or deletion, of the amino acids in this region in Rrn3, amino acids 382-400, abrogated its ability to bind DNA, indicating that this domain was an important contributor to DNA binding by Rrn3. Control experiments demonstrated that these mutant Rrn3 constructs were capable of interacting with both rpa43 and SL1, two other activities demonstrated to be essential for Rrn3 function. However, neither of these Rrn3 mutants was capable of functioning in transcription in vitro. Moreover, although wild-type human Rrn3 complemented a yeast rrn3-ts mutant, the DNA-binding site mutant did not. These results demonstrate that DNA binding by Rrn3 is essential for transcription by RNA polymerase I.

  3. Peptides in melanoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Peptides derived from tumor associated antigens can be utilized to elicit a therapeutically effective immune response against melanoma in experimental models. However, patient vaccination with peptides - although it is often followed by the induction of melanoma- specific T lymphocytes - is rarely associated with tumor response of clinical relevance. In this review I summarize the principles of peptide design as well as the results so far obtained in the clinical setting while treating cutaneous melanoma by means of this active immunotherapy strategy. I also discuss some immunological and methodological issues that might be helpful for the successful development of peptide-based vaccines.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  5. Photoaffinity labeling of rat liver ribosomes by N-(2-Nitro-4-azidobenzoyl)puromycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.; Stahl, J.; Bielka, H.

    1979-01-01

    N-(2-nitro-4-azidobenzoyl)-[ 3 H]puromycin (NAB-puromycin) was synthesized as a photoreactive derivative of puromycin in order to detect ribosomal proteins located near the peptidyltransferase centre of rat liver ribosomes. Irradiation of ribosome-NAB-puromycin complexes leads to covalent attachment of the affinity label to proteins of the large ribosomal subunit, in particular to proteins L28/29, and, to a somewhat lower extent, to proteins L4, L6, L10 and L24. The results are discussed in the light of earlier studies performed with other affinity labels that attacked the peptidyltransferase region of rat liver ribosomes. (author)

  6. Translation activity of chimeric ribosomes composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Tsuji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome composition, consisting of rRNA and ribosomal proteins, is highly conserved among a broad range of organisms. However, biochemical studies focusing on ribosomal subunit exchangeability between organisms remain limited. In this study, we show that chimeric ribosomes, composed of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis or E. coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus subunits, are active for β-galactosidase translation in a highly purified E. coli translation system. Activities of the chimeric ribosomes showed only a modest decrease when using E. coli 30 S subunits, indicating functional conservation of the 50 S subunit between these bacterial species.

  7. Unstable structure of ribosomal particles synthesized in. gamma. -irradiated Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H; Morita, K [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1975-06-01

    Stability of Escherichia coli ribosomes newly synthesized after ..gamma..-irradiation was compared with that of normal ribosomes. The ribosomal particles around 70-S synthesized in irradiated cells were more sensitive to digestion by pancreatic ribonuclease A. A larger number of the salt-unstable '50-S' precursor particles existed in the extract from irradiated cells than in the extract from unirradiated cells. These facts suggest that ribosomal particles, synthesized during an earlier stage in irradiated cells, maintain an incomplete structure even though they are not distinguishable from normal ribosomes by means of sucrose density-gradient centrifugation.

  8. Inhibition by Siomycin and Thiostrepton of Both Aminoacyl-tRNA and Factor G Binding to Ribosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ll, Juan Modole; Cabrer, Bartolomé; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Azquez, David V

    1971-01-01

    Siomycin, a peptide antibiotic that interacts with the 50S ribosomal subunit and inhibits binding of factor G, is shown also to inhibit binding of aminoacyl-tRNA; however, it does not impair binding of fMet-tRNA and completion of the initiation complex. Moreover, unlike other inhibitors of aminoacyl-tRNA binding (tetracycline, sparsomycin, and streptogramin A), siomycin completely abolishes the GTPase activity associated with the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA catalyzed by factor Tu. A single-site interaction of siomycin appears to be responsible for its effect on both the binding of the aminoacyl-tRNA-Tu-GTP complex and that of factor G. PMID:4331558

  9. Using the Ribodeblur pipeline to recover A-sites from yeast ribosome profiling data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Kingsford, Carl; McManus, C Joel

    2018-03-15

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful technique to study mRNA translation. Ribosome profiling has the potential to determine the relative quantities and locations of ribosomes on mRNA genome wide. Taking full advantage of this approach requires accurate measurement of ribosome locations. However, experimental inconsistencies often obscure the positional information encoded in ribosome profiling data. Here, we describe the Ribodeblur pipeline, a computational analysis tool that uses a maximum likelihood framework to infer ribosome positions from heterogeneous datasets. Ribodeblur is simple to install, and can be run on an average modern Mac or Linux-based laptop. We detail the process of applying the pipeline to high-coverage ribosome profiling data in yeast, and discuss important considerations for potential extension to other organisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vivo labelling of functional ribosomes reveals spatial regulation during starvation in Podospora anserina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silar Philippe

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, in eukaryotes, ribosomal protein expression is known to be regulated at the transcriptional and/or translational levels. But other forms of regulation may be possible. Results Here, we report the successful tagging of functional ribosomal particles with a S7-GFP chimaeric protein, making it possible to observe in vivo ribosome dynamics in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. Microscopic observations revealed a novel kind of ribosomal protein regulation during the passage between cell growth and stationary phases, with a transient accumulation of ribosomal proteins and/or ribosome subunits in the nucleus, possibly the nucleolus, being observed at the beginning of stationary phase. Conclusion Nuclear sequestration can be another level of ribosomal protein regulation in eukaryotic cells.This may contribute to the regulation of cell growth and division.

  11. In vivo labelling of functional ribosomes reveals spatial regulation during starvation in Podospora anserina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe

    2000-01-01

    Background To date, in eukaryotes, ribosomal protein expression is known to be regulated at the transcriptional and/or translational levels. But other forms of regulation may be possible. Results Here, we report the successful tagging of functional ribosomal particles with a S7-GFP chimaeric protein, making it possible to observe in vivo ribosome dynamics in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. Microscopic observations revealed a novel kind of ribosomal protein regulation during the passage between cell growth and stationary phases, with a transient accumulation of ribosomal proteins and/or ribosome subunits in the nucleus, possibly the nucleolus, being observed at the beginning of stationary phase. Conclusion Nuclear sequestration can be another level of ribosomal protein regulation in eukaryotic cells.This may contribute to the regulation of cell growth and division. PMID:11112985

  12. Power grab : the impacts of power market deregulation on B.C.'s environment and consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.; Howard, T.; Christensen, R.

    2002-07-01

    The government of British Columbia is developing a new energy policy that will include the deregulation of the province's integrated, publicly-owned electric utilities. The BC Citizens for Public Power Society presents its views on the impact this will have on the BC environment and consumers. It argues that deregulation will result in increased pollution and environmental degradation from new coal and natural gas fired power plants. Deregulation will also result in a lack of accountability and control in the power maker, and prices will increase by a predicted minimum 30 per cent. In addition, the increased price and supply volatility will result in brownouts. This report also discussed the impact that deregulation would have on the transmission system. It was noted that if the public electricity resources are removed from public ownership and control, the province's future options will be restricted under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). The BC Citizens for Public Power Society argues that the future power needs of the province are best met by public investment and energy conservation using BC Hydro. 65 refs

  13. From public good to private exploitation : electricity deregulation, privatization and continental integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin Cohen, M.

    2002-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the initiative of the World Trade Organization (WTO) on energy taking place through negotiations on the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), which coincide with the U.S. drive for integrated continental energy policy. These negotiations will affect the nature of the electricity industry in Canada. It was noted that if the U.S. proposal for energy in GATS succeeds, it would support complete electricity deregulation, privatization of power generation, and full-scale continental pricing. This report includes several chapters. The chapter on electricity deregulation deals with changes in the electricity industry and the U.S. drive for energy. The GATS chapter describes the main features of GATS and what it covers, including general obligations, disciplines and negotiations. The chapter on the electricity industry in Canada describes major features, major electrical utilities, exports and the state of deregulation in Canada's 10 provinces. The chapter on GATS implications for electrical utilities focused on deregulation and market power, the implications for developing nations and general environmental issues. It was cautioned that if a Canadian agreement were to include electricity as a covered industry, it could erode the security of supply, drive prices up and have negative consequences for energy conservation. 137 refs., 8 tabs

  14. Improving firm performance in out-of-equilibrium, deregulated markets using feedback simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.; Larsen, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    Deregulation has reshaped the utility sector in many countries around the world. Organisations in these deregulated industries must adopt new polices which guide strategic decisions, in an uncertain and unfamiliar environment, that determine the short- and long-term fate of their companies. Traditional economic equilibrium models do not adequately address the issues facing these organisations in the shift towards deregulated market competition. Equilibrium assumptions break down in the out-of-equilibrium transition to competitive markets, and therefore different underpinning assumptions must be adopted in order to guide management in these periods. Simulation models incorporating information feedback through behavioural policies fill the void left by equilibrium models and support strategic policy analysis in out-of-equilibrium markets. As an example, we present a feedback simulation model developed to examine firm and industry level performance consequences of new generation capacity investment policies in the deregulated UK electricity sector. The model explicitly captures behavioural decision polices of boundedly rational managers and avoids equilibrium assumptions. Such models are essential to help managers evaluate the performance impact of various strategic policies in environments in which disequilibrum behaviour dominates. (Author)

  15. Big Bad Banks? The Winners and Losers From Bank Deregulation in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, T.H.L.; Levine, R.; Levkov, A.

    2009-01-01

    We assess the impact of bank deregulation on the distribution of income in the United States. From the 1970s through the 1990s, most states removed restrictions on intrastate branching, which intensified bank competition and improved bank performance. Exploiting the cross-state, cross-time variation

  16. Did rent deregulation alter tenure choice decisions in the Czech Republic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsharakyan, Ashot; Zemčík, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2016), s. 335-360 ISSN 0967-0750 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : Czech Republic * rent regulation and deregulation * real estate prices Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.479, year: 2016

  17. Did rent deregulation alter tenure choice decisions in the Czech Republic?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsharakyan, Ashot; Zemčík, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2016), s. 335-360 ISSN 0967-0750 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP404/12/1446 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : Czech Republic * rent regulation and deregulation * real estate prices Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.479, year: 2016

  18. A single oncogenic enhancer rearrangement causes concomitant EVI1 and GATA2 deregulation in leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gröschel, Stefan; Sanders, Mathijs A; Hoogenboezem, Remco; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; Erpelinck, Claudia; van der Velden, Vincent H J; Havermans, Marije; Avellino, Roberto; van Lom, Kirsten; Rombouts, Elwin J; van Duin, Mark; Döhner, Konstanze; Beverloo, H Berna; Bradner, James E; Döhner, Hartmut; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M; Bindels, Eric M J; de Laat, Wouter; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements without gene fusions have been implicated in leukemogenesis by causing deregulation of proto-oncogenes via relocation of cryptic regulatory DNA elements. AML with inv(3)/t(3;3) is associated with aberrant expression of the stem-cell regulator EVI1. Applying functional

  19. Transcriptome analysis of recurrently deregulated genes across multiple cancers identifies new pan-cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Tanaka, Yuji; Kawaji, Hideya

    2016-01-01

    Genes that are commonly deregulated in cancer are clinically attractive as candidate pan-diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. To globally identify such targets, we compared Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) profiles from 225 different cancer cell lines and 339 corresponding primary cell...

  20. Deregulation, market structure and gas prices in the Canadian Natural Gas Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhler, R.S.

    1992-01-01

    During the course of the development of the natural gas industry in Canada, gas purchase and sales markets have evolved from being relatively free of regulation to being highly regulated and back again. Though pipeline transport charges were regulated, the pipeline companies, or their subsidiaries, owned the gas that they transported and price and other provisions of purchase and sales contracts were freely negotiated with the producers at one end and distributing utilities or industrial users at the other end. The Western Accord of 1985 set the process of deregulation of the Canadian natural gas industry in motion. On November 1, 1986, natural gas prices in interprovincial trade were deregulated in that domestic natural gas prices were to be freely negotiated. Although not stated explicitly, government policy is to permit export prices to be freely negotiated so long as they do not fall below domestic prices. The deregulation process has dramatically changed the relationship between buyers and sellers. Of particular importance is that deregulation has permitted companies to negotiate gas purchase contracts directly with producers with the pipeline company acting solely as a gas transporter. The purpose of this paper is to examine the forces that have led to shorter term contracts and to examine the likely effect of these contract terms on reservoir development investment incentives. 5 refs., 3 figs

  1. Do acquisitions by electric utility companies create value? Evidence from deregulated markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Jo; Goto, Mika; Inoue, Kotaro

    2017-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the United Kingdom (the UK) initiated widespread reforms in the electricity industry through a series of market liberalization policies. Several other countries have subsequently followed the lead and restructured their electricity industry. A major outcome of the deregulation effort is the spate of takeovers, both domestic and global, by electric utility companies. With the entry of new players and increasing competition, the business environment of the electricity industry has changed dramatically. This study analyzes the economic impact of mergers and acquisitions (M&As) in the electric utility industry after deregulation. We have examined acquisitions that took place between 1998 and 2013 in the United States, Canada, the UK, Germany, and France. Although previous studies showed no evidence of a positive effect on acquiring firms through M&As, we find that acquisitions by electric utility companies increased the acquiring firms’ share value and improved their operating performance, primarily through efficiency gains after the deregulation. These results are consistent with the empirical evidence and implications presented by Andrade et al. (2001) that M&A created value for the shareholders of the acquiring and target combined firms. - Highlights: • This study examined mergers and acquisitions (M&A) in electric utility industry. • The sample covered M&A between 1998 and 2013 in North America and Europe. • We found M&A significantly increased acquiring firms’ share value and operating performance. • Deregulation policy realized gains for shareholders without incurring costs for consumers.

  2. Deregulation of the RB pathway in human testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Lukas, Claudia; Sørensen, Claus S

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation of the RB pathway is shared by most human malignancies. Components upstream of the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor (pRB), namely the INK4 family of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, the D-type cyclins, their partner kinases CDK4/CDK6, and pRB as their critical substrate...

  3. Internationalization, Deregulation and the Extension of Higher Education in Korea: A Further Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jang C.

    2015-01-01

    The Korean government implemented several educational policies to enhance internationalization of higher education such as deregulation of higher education, classroom instructions in English, and faculty publications in international refereed journals. However, the speed of globalization has been lagging behind (Green, 2015). Alternatively, this…

  4. The oil industry in Latin America: changing demand patterns and deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaler, Harald.

    1997-02-01

    The Oil Industry in Latin America: changing demand patterns and deregulation analyses the common problems faced by countries in the region in modernising and developing their oil sectors, despite the great variation in domestic natural resources between them. It highlights areas of potential, as well as clearly indicating risks and possible bureaucratic and political problems. (author)

  5. EFFECTS OF INTEREST RATE DEREGULATION ON AGRICULTURAL FINANCE AND GROWTH IN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis O. ONYISHI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the effects of interest rate deregulation on agricultural finance and growth in Nigeria. The study specifically ascertained the factors that determine the aggregate credit volume to agriculture within the periods of regulation and deregulation in the Nigerian economy, determined the effects of government finance interventions on agricultural sector performance in the Nigerian economy, determined the periodic effects of macroeconomic financial indicators on Agriculture’s gross domestic product (GDP contribution to Nigerian economy and estimated the level of real credit growth of agricultural finance in Nigeria. Descriptive statistics, Ordinary Least Squares (OLS regression technique and chow test were used for data analysis. The chow test showed that there was a significant differential effect on the aggregate credit volume to agricultural sector between the regulated and deregulated regimes. Interest rate was an important determinant of aggregate credit volume to the agricultural sector in Nigeria, especially during the deregulated period but monetary authorities should ensure appropriate determination of interest rate level that will break the double-edge effect of interest rates on savers and investors.

  6. The energy markets deregulation; L'ouverture des marches de l'energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document is devoted to the opening of the energy markets and the associated production forms. The deregulation is going to change the technology with the need of a global answer to the the energy demands of the manufacturers and the local governments. In this context, the nuclear pole in the world facing the other forms of energy is discussed. (A.L.B.)

  7. The last chapter in natural gas deregulation? I don't think so

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkby, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    The history of the deregulation of the Canadian gas market was reviewed. Both domestic consumers who did and did not participate in the open gas market, benefited from low costs which were an immediate, highly visible consequence of deregulation. The direct purchase alternative was a major influence in reducing system gas costs. Deregulation also helped to increase Canadian gas exports to the U.S. with the increase in pipeline infrastructure. Ontario's direct purchase environment, characterized by the large number of competitors, has not been without faults. There has been concern about unfair competitive advantages of regulated monopolies. Local gas distributors (LDC) and the competitive advantages they enjoy, were discussed. The LDC was characterized as a monopoly gas distributor and a gas merchant at the same time. Possible solutions to this problem were presented. It was suggested that the LDC, as a gas merchant, should be required to facilitate development of the competitive market rather than compete in it. An alternative was to separate the distribution and merchant functions. A third option was to require that LDCs relinquish their gas merchant role along the lines similar to what has taken place in the USA on interstate pipelines, and to a more limited extent, in Quebec. In the opinion of this speaker any solution in the near future would not be the last step in establishing complete deregulation. 3 figs

  8. Job Placement in Germany: Developments before and after Deregulation. IAB Labour Market Research Topics No. 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwei, Ulrich

    Since 1994, the German public employment service has not had a monopoly on placement. A new law permits private job placement as an independent activity, but only with a license from the public employment service. Since deregulation, the number of job placement licenses has increased continuously, but the number of placements made by private…

  9. Integrative Genomics Reveals Mechanisms of Copy Number Alterations Responsible for Transcriptional Deregulation in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jordi; Nguyen, Quang Tri; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Knutsen, Turid; McNeil, Nicole E.; Wangsa, Danny; Hummon, Amanda B.; Grade, Marian; Ried, Thomas; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the mechanisms and consequences of chromosomal aberrations in colorectal cancer (CRC), we used a combination of spectral karyotyping, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), and array-based global gene expression profiling on 31 primary carcinomas and 15 established cell lines. Importantly, aCGH showed that the genomic profiles of primary tumors are recapitulated in the cell lines. We revealed a preponderance of chromosome breakpoints at sites of copy number variants (CNVs) in the CRC cell lines, a novel mechanism of DNA breakage in cancer. The integration of gene expression and aCGH led to the identification of 157 genes localized within high-level copy number changes whose transcriptional deregulation was significantly affected across all of the samples, thereby suggesting that these genes play a functional role in CRC. Genomic amplification at 8q24 was the most recurrent event and led to the overexpression of MYC and FAM84B. Copy number dependent gene expression resulted in deregulation of known cancer genes such as APC, FGFR2, and ERBB2. The identification of only 36 genes whose localization near a breakpoint could account for their observed deregulated expression demonstrates that the major mechanism for transcriptional deregulation in CRC is genomic copy number changes resulting from chromosomal aberrations. PMID:19691111

  10. Systematic Analysis Reveals that Cancer Mutations Converge on Deregulated Metabolism of Arachidonate and Xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gatto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations are the basis of the clonal evolution of most cancers. Nevertheless, a systematic analysis of whether mutations are selected in cancer because they lead to the deregulation of specific biological processes independent of the type of cancer is still lacking. In this study, we correlated the genome and transcriptome of 1,082 tumors. We found that nine commonly mutated genes correlated with substantial changes in gene expression, which primarily converged on metabolism. Further network analyses circumscribed the convergence to a network of reactions, termed AraX, that involves the glutathione- and oxygen-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid and xenobiotics. In an independent cohort of 4,462 samples, all nine mutated genes were consistently correlated with the deregulation of AraX. Among all of the metabolic pathways, AraX deregulation represented the strongest predictor of patient survival. These findings suggest that oncogenic mutations drive a selection process that converges on the deregulation of the AraX network.

  11. Growth strategies of electric utilities in context of deregulation and liberalization of electricity market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Đogić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies the growth strategies adopted by the electric utilities sector in the context of changes resulting from the deregulation and liberalization of the electricity market. Strategies pursued by the electric utilities sector were rarely the subject of research in the field of strategic management despite the fact that electricity is an indispensable element of everyday life and the economy as a whole. Therefore, a case study of the largest incumbent electric utilities in the Republic of Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, and Macedonia has been conducted, and differences in the degree of market liberalization and core features of these companies have been noted. Research findings have shown that the degree of deregulation can affect the growth strategies of electric utilities. In those countries where the degree of deregulation is lower, electric utilities focus on the domestic market. On the other hand, a higher level of deregulation enables electric utilities to achieve their growth through diversification or innovation. Given the fact that the analyzed electric utilities are operating within relatively small economies, they cannot compete with electric utilities in developed countries, and, apart from international electricity trading, are mostly focused on their domestic markets.

  12. The Italian Middle School in a Deregulation Era: Modernity through Path-Dependency and Global Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincu, Monica E.

    2015-01-01

    In the current context of intensified moves towards educational deregulation, the configuration of the Italian middle school and its relationship to education governance is an interesting case. Historically, it represents a unique example of the successful "decision-making" model of the welfarist era. Despite some internal constraints,…

  13. Deregulation of the arginine deiminase (arc) operon in penicillin-tolerant mutants of Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldelari, I; Loeliger, B; Langen, H; Glauser, M P; Moreillon, P

    2000-10-01

    Penicillin tolerance is an incompletely understood phenomenon that allows bacteria to resist drug-induced killing. Tolerance was studied with independent Streptococcus gordonii mutants generated by cyclic exposure to 500 times the MIC of penicillin. Parent cultures lost 4 to 5 log(10) CFU/ml of viable counts/24 h. In contrast, each of four independent mutant cultures lost bacteria and were encoded by an operon that was >80% similar to the arginine-deiminase (arc) operon of these organisms. Partial nucleotide sequencing and insertion inactivation of the S. gordonii arc locus indicated that tolerance was not a direct consequence of arc alteration. On the other hand, genetic transformation of tolerance by Tol1 DNA always conferred arc deregulation. In nontolerant recipients, arc was repressed during exponential growth and up-regulated during postexponential growth. In tolerant transformants, arc was constitutively expressed. Tol1 DNA transformed tolerance at the same rate as transformation of a point mutation (10(-2) to 10(-3)). The tolerance mutation mapped on a specific chromosomal fragment but was physically distant from arc. Importantly, arc deregulation was observed in most (6 of 10) of additional independent penicillin-tolerant mutants. Thus, although not exclusive, the association between arc deregulation and tolerance was not fortuitous. Since penicillin selection mimicked the antibiotic pressure operating in the clinical environment, arc deregulation might be an important correlate of naturally occurring tolerance and help in understanding the mechanism(s) underlying this clinically problematic phenotype.

  14. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  15. Structure of the Human Mitochondrial Ribosome Studied In Situ by Cryoelectron Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englmeier, Robert; Pfeffer, Stefan; Förster, Friedrich

    2017-10-03

    Mitochondria maintain their own genome and its corresponding protein synthesis machine, the mitochondrial ribosome (mitoribosome). Mitoribosomes primarily synthesize highly hydrophobic proteins of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Recent studies revealed the complete structure of the isolated mammalian mitoribosome, but its mode of membrane association remained hypothetical. In this study, we used cryoelectron tomography to visualize human mitoribosomes in isolated mitochondria. The subtomogram average of the membrane-associated human mitoribosome reveals a single major contact site with the inner membrane, mediated by the mitochondria-specific protein mL45. A second rRNA-mediated contact site that is present in yeast is absent in humans, resulting in a more variable association of the human mitoribosome with the inner membrane. Despite extensive structural differences of mammalian and fungal mitoribosomal structure, the principal organization of peptide exit tunnel and the mL45 homolog remains invariant, presumably to align the mitoribosome with the membrane-embedded insertion machinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pactamycin binding site on archaebacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a photoreactive acetophenone group in the protein synthesis inhibitor pactamycin and the possibility of obtaining active iodinated derivatives that retain full biological activity allow the antibiotic binding site on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus ribosomes to be photoaffinity labeled. Four major labeled proteins have been identified in the yeast ribosomes, i.e., YS10, YS18, YS21/24, and YS30, while proteins AL1a, AS10/L8, AS18/20, and AS21/22 appeared as radioactive spots in S. solfataricus. There seems to be a correlation between some of the proteins labeled in yeast and those previously reported in Escherichia coli indicating that the pactamycin binding sites of both species, which are in the small subunit close to the initiation factors and mRNA binding sites, must have similar characteristics

  17. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. 32 P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA

  18. Ribosomal protein S14 transcripts are edited in Oenothera mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, W; Unseld, M; Wissinger, B; Brennicke, A

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding ribosomal protein S14 (rps14) in Oenothera mitochondria is located upstream of the cytochrome b gene (cob). Sequence analysis of independently derived cDNA clones covering the entire rps14 coding region shows two nucleotides edited from the genomic DNA to the mRNA derived sequences by C to U modifications. A third editing event occurs four nucleotides upstream of the AUG initiation codon and improves a potential ribosome binding site. A CGG codon specifying arginine in a position conserved in evolution between chloroplasts and E. coli as a UGG tryptophan codon is not edited in any of the cDNAs analysed. An inverted repeat 3' of an unidentified open reading frame is located upstream of the rps14 gene. The inverted repeat sequence is highly conserved at analogous regions in other Oenothera mitochondrial loci. Images PMID:2326162

  19. Why electricity deregulation is likely to fail: An explanation with an application to Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, Asher; Woo, Chi-Keung

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we contend that electricity deregulation likely fails because of a fundamental, but so far ignored, reason. In particular, a deregulated electricity market cannot have too many producers because they will not be able to recover their investment costs. Nor can it have too few producers because the resulting market price will likely exceed the regulated rate. If constrained by the financial viability of privately owned generators and an overarching goal of unregulated market price not exceeding the regulated rate, the set of feasible numbers of producers in the competitive market can be very small, and at times empty. Our theoretical prediction applies to deregulation of other industries with large fixed and sunk costs (e.g., gas transportation, electricity transmission and distribution, local telecom networks, ports, railways, etc.). We show that a large improvement in the operational efficiency of the deregulated industry is a necessary condition for a successful deregulation of the industry. Unfortunately, operation improvement in electricity generation is limited because fuel (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, and liquefied natural gas) and generation equipment (e.g., turbines, transformers, and cables), which constitute about 80% of the total cost of electricity generation, are commodities traded in a competitive world market. Thus, cost savings due to deregulation in the electricity generation market mainly come from efficiency improvement in capacity investment and variable input use of labor and O and M. Unless the regulated integrated utility has been investing inefficiently in surplus capacity, such savings, mainly in labor and O and M, are unlikely to produce more than a 10% reduction in total generation cost. For this reason and based on the experience to date, we caution against deregulation in regions that currently have a regulated electricity sector (e.g., China, India, Hong Kong, Israel, Africa, and many parts of North America). Our

  20. Why electricity deregulation is likely to fail: An explanation with an application to Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tishler, Asher; Woo, Chi-Keung

    2005-12-15

    In this paper we contend that electricity deregulation likely fails because of a fundamental, but so far ignored, reason. In particular, a deregulated electricity market cannot have too many producers because they will not be able to recover their investment costs. Nor can it have too few producers because the resulting market price will likely exceed the regulated rate. If constrained by the financial viability of privately owned generators and an overarching goal of unregulated market price not exceeding the regulated rate, the set of feasible numbers of producers in the competitive market can be very small, and at times empty. Our theoretical prediction applies to deregulation of other industries with large fixed and sunk costs (e.g., gas transportation, electricity transmission and distribution, local telecom networks, ports, railways, etc.). We show that a large improvement in the operational efficiency of the deregulated industry is a necessary condition for a successful deregulation of the industry. Unfortunately, operation improvement in electricity generation is limited because fuel (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, and liquefied natural gas) and generation equipment (e.g., turbines, transformers, and cables), which constitute about 80% of the total cost of electricity generation, are commodities traded in a competitive world market. Thus, cost savings due to deregulation in the electricity generation market mainly come from efficiency improvement in capacity investment and variable input use of labor and O and M. Unless the regulated integrated utility has been investing inefficiently in surplus capacity, such savings, mainly in labor and O and M, are unlikely to produce more than a 10% reduction in total generation cost. For this reason and based on the experience to date, we caution against deregulation in regions that currently have a regulated electricity sector (e.g., China, India, Hong Kong, Israel, Africa, and many parts of North America). Our

  1. Peptide Vaccines for Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory C. F. De Brito

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to an increase in the incidence of leishmaniases worldwide, the development of new strategies such as prophylactic vaccines to prevent infection and decrease the disease have become a high priority. Classic vaccines against leishmaniases were based on live or attenuated parasites or their subunits. Nevertheless, the use of whole parasite or their subunits for vaccine production has numerous disadvantages. Therefore, the use of Leishmania peptides to design more specific vaccines against leishmaniases seems promising. Moreover, peptides have several benefits in comparison with other kinds of antigens, for instance, good stability, absence of potentially damaging materials, antigen low complexity, and low-cost to scale up. By contrast, peptides are poor immunogenic alone, and they need to be delivered correctly. In this context, several approaches described in this review are useful to solve these drawbacks. Approaches, such as, peptides in combination with potent adjuvants, cellular vaccinations, adenovirus, polyepitopes, or DNA vaccines have been used to develop peptide-based vaccines. Recent advancements in peptide vaccine design, chimeric, or polypeptide vaccines and nanovaccines based on particles attached or formulated with antigenic components or peptides have been increasingly employed to drive a specific immune response. In this review, we briefly summarize the old, current, and future stands on peptide-based vaccines, describing the disadvantages and benefits associated with them. We also propose possible approaches to overcome the related weaknesses of synthetic vaccines and suggest future guidelines for their development.

  2. Peptide Vaccines for Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brito, Rory C F; Cardoso, Jamille M De O; Reis, Levi E S; Vieira, Joao F; Mathias, Fernando A S; Roatt, Bruno M; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian D O; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Resende, Daniela de M; Reis, Alexandre B

    2018-01-01

    Due to an increase in the incidence of leishmaniases worldwide, the development of new strategies such as prophylactic vaccines to prevent infection and decrease the disease have become a high priority. Classic vaccines against leishmaniases were based on live or attenuated parasites or their subunits. Nevertheless, the use of whole parasite or their subunits for vaccine production has numerous disadvantages. Therefore, the use of Leishmania peptides to design more specific vaccines against leishmaniases seems promising. Moreover, peptides have several benefits in comparison with other kinds of antigens, for instance, good stability, absence of potentially damaging materials, antigen low complexity, and low-cost to scale up. By contrast, peptides are poor immunogenic alone, and they need to be delivered correctly. In this context, several approaches described in this review are useful to solve these drawbacks. Approaches, such as, peptides in combination with potent adjuvants, cellular vaccinations, adenovirus, polyepitopes, or DNA vaccines have been used to develop peptide-based vaccines. Recent advancements in peptide vaccine design, chimeric, or polypeptide vaccines and nanovaccines based on particles attached or formulated with antigenic components or peptides have been increasingly employed to drive a specific immune response. In this review, we briefly summarize the old, current, and future stands on peptide-based vaccines, describing the disadvantages and benefits associated with them. We also propose possible approaches to overcome the related weaknesses of synthetic vaccines and suggest future guidelines for their development.

  3. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  4. The End of a Natural Monopoly. Deregulation and Competition in the Electric Power Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, P.Z.; Cole, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    For a hundred years, scholars and government officials understood, or thought they did, the electric power industry. Electric power, based on a single, large service provider, connected by wires to all of its customers, was thought to be an industry that could only operate efficiently as a monopoly; indeed it was something called a 'natural monopoly'. Since it had to be a monopoly, with all the attendant inefficiencies and potential market abuses monopoly entails, government regulation was necessary. These basic assumptions, which at times seemed to conflict with observed facts remained largely unquestioned for the better part of 75 years. Then, changing institutional and technological circumstances led economists to question the basis in fact of the theory of natural monopoly, and the regulatory system it entailed. Movement toward a deregulated electric power system began albeit in piece-meal fashion. Indeed, the result has been a crazy quilt of deregulation and re-regulations, which often have resulted in more costs than benefits for society as a whole. In the most infamous case, California, the entire enterprise of regulatory change has been called into question. The process of deregulation or reregulation in several other states has stopped because of fear of repeating California's mistakes. This book addresses some of the fundamental issues underlying the debate over electric power regulation and deregulation. Only by understanding these questions and exploring a variety of possible answers to them can we hope to move the debate over the proper structure of the electric power industry. Undoubtedly, electric power deregulation will be a major legal and economic concern for years to come

  5. University Staff’s Perception of Deregulation on Higher Education in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo Florence Aduke

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the university staff’s perception on deregulation of higher education in Nigeria. Descriptive research of the survey type was used for the study. The population comprised all the university staff of universities in Ekiti and Ondo states, Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 700 academic and non-academic staff from the Federal and State universities in Ekiti and Ondo states. Research instrument designated University Staff Perception of Deregulation on Higher Education (USPDHE was used in collecting data. The questionnaire was subjected to face and content validity. The reliability co-efficient of the instrument was 0.75. The results showed that deregulation improved academic standard of the universities except in the areas of curriculum innovation and collaborative research and does not guarantee job security nor improve staff development and equity in salary structure but it contributed to managerial effectiveness, efficiency and accountability, It also showed that students were affected in the area of access to higher education, class structure, admission choice and exploitation by the institutions. It equally showed that deregulation is not improving the funding of higher institutions in Nigeria instead it throws the institution into dilemma of sourcing for fund. Some of the recommendations are: using management strategies at the institutional level, autonomy should use management strategies that emphasize improved standards in terms of improved curricula, and academic excellence by all and sundry within the system. Also, to have the full gains of deregulation, climate of academic integrity should be enshrined in the operation of the university system.

  6. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached...

  7. Characterization of the regions from E. coli 16 S RNA covalently linked to ribosomal proteins S4 and S20 after ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Backendorf, C.; Ehresmann, C.; Ebel, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The use of ultraviolet irradiation to form photochemical covalent bonds between the 16 S RNA and a ribosomal protein is a reliable method to check RNA regions which are interacting with the protein. This technique was successfully used to covalently link RNA or DNA and specific proteins in several cases. In the case of ribosome, it has been shown that the irradiation of 30 S and 50 S subunits using high doses of ultraviolet light allowed the covalent binding of almost all of the ribosomal proteins to the 16 S or 23 S RNAs. Using mild conditions, only proteins S7 and L4 could be covalently linked to the 16 S and 23 S RNAs, respectively, and the 16 S RNA region linked to protein S7 has now been characterized. The specificity of the photoreaction was demonstrated earlier and the tryptic peptides from proteins S4 and S7, photochemically linked to the 16 S RNA complexes, were identified. A report is presented on the sequences of the RNA regions which can be photochemically linked to proteins S4 and S7 after ultraviolet irradiation of the specific S4-16 S RNA and 20 S-16 S RNA complexes

  8. Assembly constraints drive co-evolution among ribosomal constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Akashi, Hiroshi; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-06-23

    Ribosome biogenesis, a central and essential cellular process, occurs through sequential association and mutual co-folding of protein-RNA constituents in a well-defined assembly pathway. Here, we construct a network of co-evolving nucleotide/amino acid residues within the ribosome and demonstrate that assembly constraints are strong predictors of co-evolutionary patterns. Predictors of co-evolution include a wide spectrum of structural reconstitution events, such as cooperativity phenomenon, protein-induced rRNA reconstitutions, molecular packing of different rRNA domains, protein-rRNA recognition, etc. A correlation between folding rate of small globular proteins and their topological features is known. We have introduced an analogous topological characteristic for co-evolutionary network of ribosome, which allows us to differentiate between rRNA regions subjected to rapid reconstitutions from those hindered by kinetic traps. Furthermore, co-evolutionary patterns provide a biological basis for deleterious mutation sites and further allow prediction of potential antibiotic targeting sites. Understanding assembly pathways of multicomponent macromolecules remains a key challenge in biophysics. Our study provides a 'proof of concept' that directly relates co-evolution to biophysical interactions during multicomponent assembly and suggests predictive power to identify candidates for critical functional interactions as well as for assembly-blocking antibiotic target sites. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of [ 125 I]iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis

  10. Further characterization of ribosome binding to thylakoid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurewitz, J.; Jagendorf, A.T.

    1987-01-01

    Previous work indicated more polysomes bound to pea (Pisum sativum cv Progress No. 9) thylakoids in light than in the dark, in vivo. With isolated intact chloroplasts incubated in darkness, addition of MgATP had no effect but 24 to 74% more RNA was thylakoid-bound at pH 8.3 than at pH 7. Thus, the major effect of light on ribosome-binding in vivo may be due to higher stroma pH. In isolated pea chloroplasts, initiation inhibitors (pactamycin and kanamycin) decreased the extent of RNA binding, and elongation inhibitors (lincomycin and streptomycin) increased it. Thus, cycling of ribosomes is controlled by translation, initiation, and termination. Bound RNA accounted for 19 to 24% of the total chloroplast RNA and the incorporation of [ 3 H]leucine into thylakoids was proportional to the amount of this bound RNA. These data support the concept that stroma ribosomes are recruited into thylakoid polysomes, which are active in synthesizing thylakoid proteins

  11. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ribosome hibernation promoting factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bari, Heather; Berry, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor from V. cholerae has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The X-ray crystal structure of ribosome hibernation promoting factor (HPF) from Vibrio cholerae is presented at 2.0 Å resolution. The crystal was phased by two-wavelength MAD using cocrystallized cobalt. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of HPF linked by four Co atoms. The metal-binding sites observed in the crystal are probably not related to biological function. The structure of HPF has a typical β–α–β–β–β–α fold consistent with previous structures of YfiA and HPF from Escherichia coli. Comparison of the new structure with that of HPF from E. coli bound to the Thermus thermophilus ribosome [Polikanov et al. (2012 ▶), Science, 336, 915–918] shows that no significant structural changes are induced in HPF by binding

  12. A new version of the RDP (Ribosomal Database Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidak, B. L.; Cole, J. R.; Parker, C. T. Jr; Garrity, G. M.; Larsen, N.; Li, B.; Lilburn, T. G.; McCaughey, M. J.; Olsen, G. J.; Overbeek, R.; hide

    1999-01-01

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP-II), previously described by Maidak et al. [ Nucleic Acids Res. (1997), 25, 109-111], is now hosted by the Center for Microbial Ecology at Michigan State University. RDP-II is a curated database that offers ribosomal RNA (rRNA) nucleotide sequence data in aligned and unaligned forms, analysis services, and associated computer programs. During the past two years, data alignments have been updated and now include >9700 small subunit rRNA sequences. The recent development of an ObjectStore database will provide more rapid updating of data, better data accuracy and increased user access. RDP-II includes phylogenetically ordered alignments of rRNA sequences, derived phylogenetic trees, rRNA secondary structure diagrams, and various software programs for handling, analyzing and displaying alignments and trees. The data are available via anonymous ftp (ftp.cme.msu. edu) and WWW (http://www.cme.msu.edu/RDP). The WWW server provides ribosomal probe checking, approximate phylogenetic placement of user-submitted sequences, screening for possible chimeric rRNA sequences, automated alignment, and a suggested placement of an unknown sequence on an existing phylogenetic tree. Additional utilities also exist at RDP-II, including distance matrix, T-RFLP, and a Java-based viewer of the phylogenetic trees that can be used to create subtrees.

  13. Simulation and analysis of single-ribosome translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Ignacio Jr; Wen, Jin-Der

    2009-01-01

    In the cell, proteins are synthesized by ribosomes in a multi-step process called translation. The ribosome translocates along the messenger RNA to read the codons that encode the amino acid sequence of a protein. Elongation factors, including EF-G and EF-Tu, are used to catalyze the process. Recently, we have shown that translation can be followed at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers; this technique allows us to study the kinetics of translation by measuring the lifetime the ribosome spends at each codon. Here, we analyze the data from single-molecule experiments and fit the data with simple kinetic models. We also simulate the translation kinetics based on a multi-step mechanism from ensemble kinetic measurements. The mean lifetimes from the simulation were consistent with our experimental single-molecule measurements. We found that the calculated lifetime distributions were fit in general by equations with up to five rate-determining steps. Two rate-determining steps were only obtained at low concentrations of elongation factors. These analyses can be used to design new single-molecule experiments to better understand the kinetics and mechanism of translation

  14. Heterogeneous Ribosomes Preferentially Translate Distinct Subpools of mRNAs Genome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Fujii, Kotaro; Kovary, Kyle M; Genuth, Naomi R; Röst, Hannes L; Teruel, Mary N; Barna, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emerging studies have linked the ribosome to more selective control of gene regulation. However, an outstanding question is whether ribosome heterogeneity at the level of core ribosomal proteins (RPs) exists and enables ribosomes to preferentially translate specific mRNAs genome-wide. Here, we measured the absolute abundance of RPs in translating ribosomes and profiled transcripts that are enriched or depleted from select subsets of ribosomes within embryonic stem cells. We find that heterogeneity in RP composition endows ribosomes with differential selectivity for translating subpools of transcripts, including those controlling metabolism, cell cycle, and development. As an example, mRNAs enriched in binding to RPL10A/uL1-containing ribosomes are shown to require RPL10A/uL1 for their efficient translation. Within several of these transcripts, this level of regulation is mediated, at least in part, by internal ribosome entry sites. Together, these results reveal a critical functional link between ribosome heterogeneity and the post-transcriptional circuitry of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Engineering signal peptides for enhanced protein secretion from Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daphne T W; Sarkar, Casim A

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is an attractive vehicle for biotechnological production of proteins and clinical delivery of therapeutics. In many such applications using this host, it is desirable to maximize secretion of recombinant proteins into the extracellular space, which is typically achieved by using the native signal peptide from a major secreted lactococcal protein, Usp45. In order to further increase protein secretion from L. lactis, inherent limitations of the Usp45 signal peptide (Usp45sp) must be elucidated. Here, we performed extensive mutagenesis on Usp45sp to probe the effects of both the mRNA sequence (silent mutations) and the peptide sequence (amino acid substitutions) on secretion. We screened signal peptides based on their resulting secretion levels of Staphylococcus aureus nuclease and further evaluated them for secretion of Bacillus subtilis α-amylase. Silent mutations alone gave an increase of up to 16% in the secretion of α-amylase through a mechanism consistent with relaxed mRNA folding around the ribosome binding site and enhanced translation. Targeted amino acid mutagenesis in Usp45sp, combined with additional silent mutations from the best clone in the initial screen, yielded an increase of up to 51% in maximum secretion of α-amylase while maintaining secretion at lower induction levels. The best sequence from our screen preserves the tripartite structure of the native signal peptide but increases the positive charge of the n-region. Our study presents the first example of an engineered L. lactis signal peptide with a higher secretion yield than Usp45sp and, more generally, provides strategies for further enhancing protein secretion in bacterial hosts.

  16. Deregulation in an energy market and its impact on R and D for low-carbon energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Minoru

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of deregulation in an energy market on R and D activities for new energy technology when climate policy is implemented. A model of growth with vertical innovation is modified by including an oligopolistic energy supply sector for demonstrating to what extent deregulation in the energy supply sector will affect R and D activities for low-carbon energy technology, provided that carbon taxation is implemented. The analysis shows that, when the elasticity of substitution between input factors is less than unity, deregulation will drive energy R and D activities and reduce CO 2 accumulation if the energy market is highly concentrated in the beginning. (author)

  17. Analysis of Deregulated microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonas Juzėnas

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are widely studied non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression. MiRNAs are deregulated in different tumors including gastric cancer (GC and have potential diagnostic and prognostic implications. The aim of our study was to determine miRNA profile in GC tissues, followed by evaluation of deregulated miRNAs in plasma of GC patients. Using available databases and bioinformatics methods we also aimed to evaluate potential target genes of confirmed differentially expressed miRNA and validate these findings in GC tissues.The study included 51 GC patients and 51 controls. Initially, we screened miRNA expression profile in 13 tissue samples of GC and 12 normal gastric tissues with TaqMan low density array (TLDA. In the second stage, differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a replication cohort using qRT-PCR in tissue and plasma samples. Subsequently, we analyzed potential target genes of deregulated miRNAs using bioinformatics approach, determined their expression in GC tissues and performed correlation analysis with targeting miRNAs.Profiling with TLDA revealed 15 deregulated miRNAs in GC tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa. Replication analysis confirmed that miR-148a-3p, miR-204-5p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 were consistently deregulated in GC tissues. Analysis of GC patients' plasma samples showed significant down-regulation of miR-148a-3p, miR-375 and up-regulation of miR-223-3p compared to healthy subjects. Further, using bioinformatic tools we identified targets of replicated miRNAs and performed disease-associated gene enrichment analysis. Ultimately, we evaluated potential target gene BCL2 and DNMT3B expression by qRT-PCR in GC tissue, which correlated with targeting miRNA expression.Our study revealed miRNA profile in GC tissues and showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 are deregulated in GC plasma samples, but these circulating miRNAs showed relatively weak diagnostic performance as sole biomarkers

  18. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigeno, Yuta; Uchiumi, Toshio; Nomura, Takaomi

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  19. Involvement of ribosomal protein L6 in assembly of functional 50S ribosomal subunit in Escherichia coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigeno, Yuta [Division of Applied Biology, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan); Uchiumi, Toshio [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Nomura, Takaomi, E-mail: nomurat@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Division of Applied Biology, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Ueda 386-8567 (Japan)

    2016-04-22

    Ribosomal protein L6, an essential component of the large (50S) subunit, primarily binds to helix 97 of 23S rRNA and locates near the sarcin/ricin loop of helix 95 that directly interacts with GTPase translation factors. Although L6 is believed to play important roles in factor-dependent ribosomal function, crucial biochemical evidence for this hypothesis has not been obtained. We constructed and characterized an Escherichia coli mutant bearing a chromosomal L6 gene (rplF) disruption and carrying a plasmid with an arabinose-inducible L6 gene. Although this ΔL6 mutant grew more slowly than its wild-type parent, it proliferated in the presence of arabinose. Interestingly, cell growth in the absence of arabinose was biphasic. Early growth lasted only a few generations (LI-phase) and was followed by a suspension of growth for several hours (S-phase). This suspension was followed by a second growth phase (LII-phase). Cells harvested at both LI- and S-phases contained ribosomes with reduced factor-dependent GTPase activity and accumulated 50S subunit precursors (45S particles). The 45S particles completely lacked L6. Complete 50S subunits containing L6 were observed in all growth phases regardless of the L6-depleted condition, implying that the ΔL6 mutant escaped death because of a leaky expression of L6 from the complementing plasmid. We conclude that L6 is essential for the assembly of functional 50S subunits at the late stage. We thus established conditions for the isolation of L6-depleted 50S subunits, which are essential to study the role of L6 in translation. - Highlights: • We constructed an in vivo functional assay system for Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L6. • Growth of an E. coli ΔL6 mutant was biphasic when L6 levels were depleted. • The ΔL6 mutant accumulated 50S ribosomal subunit precursors that sedimented at 45S. • L6 is a key player in the late stage of E. coli 50S subunit assembly.

  20. Expression of multiple transgenes from a single construct using viral 2A peptides in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Daniels

    Full Text Available Expression of multiple reporter or effector transgenes in the same cell from a single construct is increasingly necessary in various experimental paradigms. The discovery of short, virus-derived peptide sequences that mediate a ribosome-skipping event enables generation of multiple separate peptide products from one mRNA. Here we describe methods and vectors to facilitate easy production of polycistronic-like sequences utilizing these 2A peptides tailored for expression in Drosophila both in vitro and in vivo. We tested the separation efficiency of different viral 2A peptides in cultured Drosophila cells and in vivo and found that the 2A peptides from porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A and Thosea asigna virus (T2A worked best. To demonstrate the utility of this approach, we used the P2A peptide to co-express the red fluorescent protein tdTomato and the genetically-encoded calcium indicator GCaMP5G in larval motorneurons. This technique enabled ratiometric calcium imaging with motion correction allowing us to record synaptic activity at the neuromuscular junction in an intact larval preparation through the cuticle. The tools presented here should greatly facilitate the generation of 2A peptide-mediated expression of multiple transgenes in Drosophila.

  1. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...

  2. gamma. radiation effect on the functional properties of the cotton ribosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibragimov, A P; Safarov, Sh

    1973-01-01

    A study is made of the action of radiation on the functional properties of ribosomes in irradiated organisms and on isolated ribosomes exposed to different doses. With increase in dose there occurs a reduction in the incorporation of labelled amino acids by the ribosomes released from irradiated sprouts and also during irradiation of isolated ribosomes. The study covered the functional activity of ribosomes irradiated at different doses with the use of synthetic poly-U and poly-A matrices synthesizing polyphenylalanine and polylysine, depending on the irradiation dose. The inhibition of the activity of the protein synthesis system at high doses is due to structural and functional changes in ribosomes and also to disturbance in the biosynthesis and functions of the messenger RNA.

  3. Computational resources for ribosome profiling: from database to Web server and software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Yan; Xie, Zhi

    2017-08-14

    Ribosome profiling is emerging as a powerful technique that enables genome-wide investigation of in vivo translation at sub-codon resolution. The increasing application of ribosome profiling in recent years has achieved remarkable progress toward understanding the composition, regulation and mechanism of translation. This benefits from not only the awesome power of ribosome profiling but also an extensive range of computational resources available for ribosome profiling. At present, however, a comprehensive review on these resources is still lacking. Here, we survey the recent computational advances guided by ribosome profiling, with a focus on databases, Web servers and software tools for storing, visualizing and analyzing ribosome profiling data. This review is intended to provide experimental and computational biologists with a reference to make appropriate choices among existing resources for the question at hand. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Senescent changes in the ribosomes of animal cells in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines RNA-ribosomal changes observed in protozoa and fixed postmitotic cells, as well as the characteristics of intermitotic cells. Attention is given to a discussion of the implications of the reported ribosomal changes as to the senescent deterioration of protein synthesis and physiological functions. A survey of the literature suggests that, while the data on ribosomal change in dividing cells both in vivo and in vitro are inconclusive, there is strong histological and biochemical evidence in favor of some degree of quantitative ribosomal loss in fixed postmitotic cells. Since these decreases in ribosomes are demonstrated in differential cells from nematodes, insects and mammals, they may represent a universal manifestation of cytoplasmic senescence in certain types of fixed postmitotic animal cells. The observed variability in ribosomal loss for cells belonging to the same type suggests that this involution phenomenon is rather related to the wear and tear suffered by a particular cell.

  5. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino...... acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby...... ribosomes by affecting the appearance of 'traffic jams' where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this 'context effect' further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated...

  6. Nascent peptide-mediated translation elongation arrest coupled with mRNA degradation in the CGS1 gene of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, Hitoshi; Nagami, Yoko; Haraguchi, Yuhi; Nakamoto, Mari; Nishimura, Yoshiko; Sakurai, Ryoko; Nagao, Nobuhiro; Kawasaki, Daisuke; Kadokura, Yoshitomo; Naito, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the Arabidopsis CGS1 gene that codes for cystathionine γ-synthase is feedback regulated at the step of mRNA stability in response to S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). A short stretch of amino acid sequence, called the MTO1 region, encoded by the first exon of CGS1 itself is involved in this regulation. Here, we demonstrate, using a cell-free system, that AdoMet induces temporal translation elongation arrest at the Ser-94 codon located immediately downstream of the MTO1 region, by analyzing a translation intermediate and performing primer extension inhibition (toeprint) analysis. This translation arrest precedes the formation of a degradation intermediate of CGS1 mRNA, which has its 5′ end points near the 5′ edge of the stalled ribosome. The position of ribosome stalling also suggests that the MTO1 region in nascent peptide resides in the ribosomal exit tunnel when translation elongation is temporarily arrested. In addition to the MTO1 region amino acid sequence, downstream Trp-93 is also important for the AdoMet-induced translation arrest. This is the first example of nascent peptide-mediated translation elongation arrest coupled with mRNA degradation in eukaryotes. Furthermore, our data suggest that the ribosome stalls at the step of translocation rather than at the step of peptidyl transfer. PMID:16027170

  7. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  8. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  9. Conference Proceedings: Effectively utilizing energy derivatives in a deregulated electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This conference was devoted to a discussion about the likely impacts of deregulation on electricity markets in North America. Many of the presentations emphasized price risk in a competitive open access energy market. It was noted that deregulation is frequently associated with the creation of larger companies, higher risks and lower costs. Some of the individual topics addressed by the speakers included discussion of : (1) how underlying physical markets will work in Ontario, (2) experiences in derivative trading in the natural gas industry, (3) how to create value through multiple commodity risk management products, (4) trading with energy derivatives in the U.S. (5) how derivatives can add value for municipal electrical utilities, and (6) risk management mechanisms for energy derivative trading. refs., tabs., figs

  10. Influence of TCSC Devices on Congestion Management in a Deregulated Power System Using Evolutionary Programming Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthichristy, A., Dr.; Elanthirayan, R.; Brindha, R., Dr.; Siddhiq, M. S.; Venkatesh, N.; Harshit, M. V.; Nikhilreddy, M.

    2018-04-01

    Congestion management is one of the technical challenges in power system deregulation. In deregulated electricity market it may always not be possible to dispatch all of the contracted power transactions due to congestion of the transmission corridors. Transmission congestion occurs when there is insufficient transmission capacity to simultaneously accommodate all constraints for transmission of a line. Flexible Alternative Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices can be an alternative to reduce the flows in the heavily loaded lines, resulting in an increased loadability, low system loss, improved stability of the network, reduced cost of production and fulfilled contractual requirement by controlling the power flow in the network. A method to determine the optimal location of FACTS has been suggested based on reduction of total system VAR power losses. The simulation was done on IEEE 14 bus system and results were obtained.

  11. Electric sector deregulation and restructuring in Latin America: lessons to be learnt and possible ways forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnick, H.; Zolezzi, J.

    2001-01-01

    The pioneering restructuring and deregulation process of the electricity industry, which started in Latin America as early as 1982, is assessed. Chile and Argentina, among others, have been at the forefront of innovation in the creation of electricity markets. The experience gained and the principal difficulties encountered in these 18 years are reviewed, highlighting the weaknesses and successes of the deregulation processes. A review is made of the challenges and prospects for development of the electrical sector in the region, where energy integration across countries flourishes and world energy players have started acquiring regional utilities. Regulations and market structures are being evaluated, and countries are introducing changes, the danger being that the remedies being considered may be worse than the disease. (Author)

  12. European Energy Markets Deregulation Observatory (EEMDO). Fourth Edition. Winter 2002/2003 data set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    In this research publication (European Energy Markets Deregulation Observatory or EEMDO) the levels of deregulation across 17 European countries are assessed. Based upon publicly available quantitative data, analysed and commented, EEMDO provides an accurate overview of European energy markets. Short-term indicators such as liquidity, market volatility, fragmentation, availability of the offer or nature of the demand as well as long-term indicators such as present and future market impacts relative to generation and physical transportation capacities have been examined to provide a clearer picture of the electricity industry across Europe. The 4th edition of EEMDO covers the winter 2002/2003 period (October 2002 - March 2003), when we saw markets entering maturity as factors other than competition start to drive prices. In this edition attention is paid to the evolution of the main indicators designed for EEMDO and for the first time, gas data are included in addition to the traditional data on the electricity market

  13. Emissions trading in the context of electricity deregulation : a case study on Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, G.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation discussed the deregulation of the electric power industry in Ontario and Alberta with particular reference to emissions trading, emissions profiles for the two provinces, and current market rules. It was noted that deregulation in Ontario is the major impetus for developing an emission trading system. Alberta is also in the process of developing an emission trading system for all industry sectors. The author discussed Ontario's Bill 210 which places a 6 year cap on prices and which offers tax incentives for renewable energy sources. It was argued that Bill 210 negates new generation and inhibits participants and competition in emissions trading market. Ontario generators face competitiveness concerns with neighbouring jurisdictions. Current market rules were outlined for emission caps, allocation for nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide allowances, credit creation, emission trading, and credit use. 6 figs

  14. Integrated control centre: Trading system for operation in a deregulated power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyland, S.; Reinertsen, T.; Gunnestad, J.; Botnan, G.O.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a trade system for operation in a deregulated power market. The trade system (ICC-Trade) is one of the application programs in the Integrated Control Centre (ICC). The Norwegian deregulated power market is briefly described in order to discuss the consequences of the new power market for the power utilities. The paper will also deal with the interconnection to other ICC application programs and how to make use of the communication with SCADA systems for support of managing market activities. Finally some future developments are presented. The trade system is developed in cooperation between a research institute, vendors of control centres, and power utilities, and is planned to be a commercial product during the spring of 1995. Before release the product will be tested in real life by a pilot customer. 4 figs

  15. A dynamic approach for the optimal electricity dispatch in the deregulated market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carraretto, Cristian; Lazzaretto, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The electricity market has been experiencing the deregulation process in many countries. Effective approaches to the management of single power plants or groups of plants are therefore becoming crucial for the competitiveness of energy utilities. A dynamic programming approach is presented in this paper for the optimal plant management in the new Italian deregulated market. A thorough description of the method is given in cases of free or fixed production over time (e.g. when the overall production is limited by bilateral contracts or cogeneration). Analysis of market characteristics, detailed thermodynamic models of plant operation and reliable price forecasts over the time period of interest are required. The suggested approach is useful for both long-term scheduling and planning daily offers in the market

  16. Genome-wide polysomal analysis of a yeast strain with mutated ribosomal protein S9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arava Yoav

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast ribosomal protein S9 (S9 is located at the entrance tunnel of the mRNA into the ribosome. It is known to play a role in accurate decoding and its bacterial homolog (S4 has recently been shown to be involved in opening RNA duplexes. Here we examined the effects of changing the C terminus of S9, which is rich in acidic amino acids and extends out of the ribosome surface. Results We performed a genome-wide analysis to reveal effects at the transcription and translation levels of all yeast genes. While negligible relative changes were observed in steady-state mRNA levels, a significant number of mRNAs appeared to have altered ribosomal density. Notably, 40% of the genes having reliable signals changed their ribosomal association by more than one ribosome. Yet, no general correlations with physical or functional features of the mRNA were observed. Ribosome Density Mapping (RDM along four of the mRNAs with increased association revealed an increase in ribosomal density towards the end of the coding region for at least two of them. Read-through analysis did not reveal any increase in read-through of a premature stop codon by the mutant strain. Conclusion The ribosomal protein rpS9 appears to be involved in the translation of many mRNAs, since altering its C terminus led to a significant change in ribosomal association of many mRNAs. We did not find strong correlations between these changes and several physical features of the mRNA, yet future studies with advanced tools may allow such correlations to be determined. Importantly, our results indicate an accumulation of ribosomes towards the end of the coding regions of some mRNAs. This suggests an involvement of S9 in ribosomal dissociation during translation termination.

  17. Human nucleolus organizers on nonhomologous chromosomes can share the same ribosomal gene variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krystal, M; D'Eustachio, P; Ruddle, F H; Arnheim, N

    1981-01-01

    The distributions of three human ribosomal gene polymorphisms among individual chromosomes containing nucleolus organizers were analyzed by using mouse--human hybrid cells. Different nucleolus organizers can contain the same variant, suggesting the occurrence of genetic exchanges among ribosomal gene clusters on nonhomologous chromosomes. Such exchanges appear to occur less frequently in mice. This difference is discussed in terms of the nucleolar organization and chromosomal location of ribosomal gene clusters in humans and mice. Images PMID:6272316

  18. Deregulated electricity markets with thermal losses and production bounds: models and optimality conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aussel, D.; Červinka, Michal; Marechal, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2016), s. 19-38 ISSN 0399-0559 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/12/1309; GA ČR GA201/09/1957 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Deregulated electricity market * production bounds * mathematical program with complementarity constraints * M-stationarity * calmness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.550, year: 2016

  19. Psychology of change: Models and implications for nuclear plants in an era of deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, W.G.; Stark, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation explores the psychology of change in the implications that it has for nuclear plants during this era of deregulation. The authors analyze models that work, models that have failed in the past, and specific findings and applications based on 2 yr of research, as well as the results regarding the impact of the psychology of change on the Fort Calhoun nuclear station in Nebraska

  20. Efficiency in the United States electric industry: Transaction costs, deregulation, and governance structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carl

    Transaction costs economics (TCE) posits that firms have an incentive to bypass the market mechanisms in situations where the cost of using the market is prohibitive. Vertical integration, among other governance mechanisms, can be used to minimize the transactions costs associated with the market mechanism. The study analyses different governance mechanisms, which range from complete vertical integration to the use of market mechanisms, for firms in the US electric sector. This sector has undergone tremendous change in the past decade including the introduction of retail competition in some jurisdictions. As a result of the push toward deregulation of the industry, vertically integration, while still significant in the sector, has steadily been replaced by alternative governance structures. Using a sample of 136 investor-owned electric utilities that reported data the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission between 1996 and 2002, this study estimates firm level efficiency using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) and relates these estimates to governance structure and public policies. The analysis finds that vertical integration is positively related to firm efficiency, although in a non-linear fashion suggesting that hybrid governance structures tend to be associated with lower efficiency scores. In addition, while some evidence is found for negative short-term effects on firm efficiency from the choice to deregulate, this result is sensitive to DEA model choice. Further, competition in retail markets is found to be positively related to firm level efficiency, but the retreat from deregulation, which occurred after 2000, is negatively associated with firm-level efficiency. These results are important in the ongoing academic and public policy debates concerning deregulation of the electric section and indicate that vertical economies remain in the industry, but that competition has provided incentives for improving firm level efficiency.

  1. Is further deregulation of the natural gas industry beneficial : discussion paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, P.J. [Anbrer Consulting, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2004-11-01

    Energy market liberalization is a world trend that has prompted the deregulation of natural gas and electricity over the past twenty years in North America. The Ontario Energy Board and the National Energy Board are conducting public hearings on natural gas regulation in response to the request by Canadian energy industries for better regulatory streamlining. The following 5 issues regarding natural gas regulation in Canada have been examined: (1) system gas in a regulated market, (2) natural gas infrastructure investments and capital renewal, (3) improving efficiency in gas regulation, (4) expectations of performance-based regulation (PBR) in the natural gas industry, and (5) the debate whether further deregulation of the natural gas industry is beneficial. This paper examines if a competitive market exists in natural gas distribution and discusses the opportunities for further deregulation of the distribution and storage aspects of the industry. It was noted that the regulatory regime in Ontario will depend on how the Ontario Energy Board deals with issues regarding natural gas storage services. This paper also examines if new storage facilities can charge cost-based or market-based prices as well as the appropriate rate of return on capital to be used to determine those rates. It also examines what the requirement for non-discriminatory access to and from new storage facilities to the Dawn Hub and access to transmission capacity on Union Gas's Dawn to Trafalger pipeline system. Alternative fuels, franchises, bypasses, gated communities, distributed generation, market power and policy issues are the main factors that are considered in assessing the competition in natural gas distribution. It was concluded that further deregulation of the natural gas distribution system in Ontario is not warranted since there is not much possibility in developing a competitive market for distribution services in the short-term. However, the development of storage facilities

  2. Deregulation of shopping hours: The impact on independent retailers and chain stores

    OpenAIRE

    Wenzel, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies shopping hour decisions by retail chains and independent competitors. We use a Salop-type model where retailers compete in prices and shopping hours. Our results depend significantly on efficiency differences between retail chain and independent retailer. If the efficiency difference is small, the independent retailer may choose longer shopping hours than the retail chain and may gain from deregulation at the expense of the retail chain. The opposite result emerges when the...

  3. Risk classification and cream skimming on the deregulated German insurance market

    OpenAIRE

    Beschorner, Patrick F. E.

    2003-01-01

    In a two-stage model insurance companies first decide upon risk classification and then compete in prices. I show that the observed heterogeneous behavior of similar firms is compatible with rational behavior. On the deregulated German insurance market individual application of classification schemes induces welfare losses due to cream skimming. Classification costs and pricing above marginal cost can be prevented by common industry-wide loss statistics which already exist to a rudimentary ex...

  4. Is further deregulation of the natural gas industry beneficial : discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, P.J.

    2004-11-01

    Energy market liberalization is a world trend that has prompted the deregulation of natural gas and electricity over the past twenty years in North America. The Ontario Energy Board and the National Energy Board are conducting public hearings on natural gas regulation in response to the request by Canadian energy industries for better regulatory streamlining. The following 5 issues regarding natural gas regulation in Canada have been examined: (1) system gas in a regulated market, (2) natural gas infrastructure investments and capital renewal, (3) improving efficiency in gas regulation, (4) expectations of performance-based regulation (PBR) in the natural gas industry, and (5) the debate whether further deregulation of the natural gas industry is beneficial. This paper examines if a competitive market exists in natural gas distribution and discusses the opportunities for further deregulation of the distribution and storage aspects of the industry. It was noted that the regulatory regime in Ontario will depend on how the Ontario Energy Board deals with issues regarding natural gas storage services. This paper also examines if new storage facilities can charge cost-based or market-based prices as well as the appropriate rate of return on capital to be used to determine those rates. It also examines what the requirement for non-discriminatory access to and from new storage facilities to the Dawn Hub and access to transmission capacity on Union Gas's Dawn to Trafalger pipeline system. Alternative fuels, franchises, bypasses, gated communities, distributed generation, market power and policy issues are the main factors that are considered in assessing the competition in natural gas distribution. It was concluded that further deregulation of the natural gas distribution system in Ontario is not warranted since there is not much possibility in developing a competitive market for distribution services in the short-term. However, the development of storage facilities in

  5. An integrated marketing approach for a medium-sized South African airline in a deregulated market

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Comm. The overall goal of this study is to provide a medium-sized South African airline with the theoretical framework and necessary research and analyses, in developing an integrated marketing approach in a deregulated environment. The objectives of the study are : to analyse the macro and market variables that could impact on the marketing efforts of a medium-sized South African airline. to assess a medium-sized South African airline's marketing efforts (in response to external variabl...

  6. Impact of electric industry deregulation on gas markets: a power marketer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahns, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of electric industry deregulation on gas markets was examined. The presentation included industry comparisons of 1994 gas total revenues versus electricity total revenues for residential, commercial, and industrial use. A chart forecasting the outlook for gas-fired generation of electric power indicated that the use of natural gas as feedstock for power generation will increase from 12% to 37% during the period 1994 to 2003. 16 figs

  7. HER2 Deregulation in Lung Cancer: Right Time to Adopt an Orphan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuzzo, Federico; Landi, Lorenza

    2018-06-01

    HER2 -deregulated non-small cell lung cancer is an orphan of any specific therapy, probably because of lack of both accurate patient selection and effective drugs. Recent evidence suggests that osimertinib could be effective in HER2 -amplified or mutated lung cancer as a single agent or in combination. Clin Cancer Res; 24(11); 2470-2. ©2018 AACR See related article by Liu et al., p. 2594 . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. The electricity customer's lot. The status of the deregulated Finnish electricity market - Consequences for the customer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.E.; Pakkanen, M.; Muroma, M.

    2004-09-01

    Since November 1998 a 'fully competitive supply market' has arguably been in operation in Finland, whereby all types of customer are able to purchase their electricity from the supplier of their choice. During the years since deregulation there has been much and increasing discussion and speculation about the consequences of competition for customers. This independent research report objectively considers the consequences of competition so far in the supply market from the point of view of the electricity customer (residential, industrial and commercial customers). The report additionally highlights successes, failures and areas for future improvement. The report combines existing data from a wide range of sources with original empirical data collected specifically for this report. Original empirical data was derived primarily from questionnaire responses from 1393 household customers and 281 I and C customers. In- depth interviews were also extensively conducted with electricity industry and consumer representatives. The report finds that although there have been achievements, and all customers may have benefited in at least some way, the overall net picture is one of disappointing neutrality and missed opportunities. In fact the report suggests that deregulation has neither led to extensive competition amongst suppliers, nor extensive benefits for customers. Customer awareness, prices, service quality, additional offerings, environmentalism, equality and fairness have apparently not fared particularly well as a result of deregulation, except perhaps for the largest or most active customers. As a result of the situation, customers are mostly rather negative towards the state of competition in Finland at present. The report nevertheless identifies the great potential within the deregulated electricity market. In particular, the report identifies a clear need for increased awareness amongst customers and points out many other known barriers to effective competition

  9. DEREGULATION, FINANCIAL CRISIS, AND BANK EFFICIENCY IN TAIWAN: AN ESTIMATION OF UNDESIRABLE OUTPUTS

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Chang-Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Purpose- This study investigates the undesirable impacts of outputson bank efficiency and contributes to the literature by assessing howregulation policies and other events impact bank efficiency in Taiwan inregards to deregulation, financial crisis, and financial reform from 1993 to2011. Methodology- In order to effectively deal with both undesirableand desirable outputs, this study follows Seiford and Zhu (2002), who recommendusing the standard data envelopment analysis model to measure per...

  10. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of bacterial peptide deformylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, D J; Gordon Green, B; O'Connell, J F; Grant, S K

    1999-07-15

    Bacterial peptide deformylases (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-formyl groups from N-blocked methionine polypeptides. Peptide aldehydes containing a methional or norleucinal inhibited recombinant peptide deformylase from gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The most potent inhibitor was calpeptin, N-CBZ-Leu-norleucinal, which was a competitive inhibitor of the zinc-containing metalloenzymes, E. coli and B. subtilis PDF with Ki values of 26.0 and 55.6 microM, respectively. Cobalt-substituted E. coli and B. subtilis deformylases were also inhibited by these aldehydes with Ki values for calpeptin of 9.5 and 12.4 microM, respectively. Distinct spectral changes were observed upon binding of calpeptin to the Co(II)-deformylases, consistent with the noncovalent binding of the inhibitor rather than the formation of a covalent complex. In contrast, the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline caused the time-dependent inhibition of B. subtilis Co(II)-PDF activity with the loss of the active site metal. The fact that calpeptin was nearly equipotent against deformylases from both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial sources lends further support to the idea that a single deformylase inhibitor might have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. 5S ribosomal RNA database Y2K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, M; Barciszewska, M Z; Barciszewski, J; Erdmann, V A

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the updated version (Y2K) of the database of ribosomal 5S ribonucleic acids (5S rRNA) and their genes (5S rDNA), http://rose.man/poznan.pl/5SData/index.html. This edition of the database contains 1985primary structures of 5S rRNA and 5S rDNA. They include 60 archaebacterial, 470 eubacterial, 63 plastid, nine mitochondrial and 1383 eukaryotic sequences. The nucleotide sequences of the 5S rRNAs or 5S rDNAs are divided according to the taxonomic position of the source organisms.

  12. mRNA decapping enzyme from ribosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.

    1980-01-01

    By use of [ 3 H]methyl-5'-capped [ 14 C]mRNA from yeast as a substrate, a decapping enzyme activity has been detected in enzyme fractions derived from a high salt wash of ribosomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The product of the decapping reaction is [ 3 H]m 7 GDP. That the enzyme is not a non-specific pyrophosphatase is suggested by the finding that the diphosphate product, m 7 GpppA(G), and UDP-glucose are not hydrolyzed

  13. Potential roles for ubiquitin and the proteasome during ribosome biogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stavreva, D. A.; Kawasaki, M.; Dundr, M.; Koberna, Karel; Müller, W. G.; Tsujimura-Takahashi, T.; Komatsu, W.; Hayano, T.; Isobe, T.; Raška, Ivan; Misteli, T.; Takahashi, N.; McNally, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 13 (2006), s. 5131-5145 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0374; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/04/0692 Grant - others:NIH(US) Intramural Research Program; Ministry of Education(JP) Pioneer Research grant Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : the role of the ubikvitin * proteasome system in ribosome biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.773, year: 2006

  14. Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similarity in recognition ability despite their relative structural simplicity. Various methods for peptide capture reagent discovery exist, including phage display, yeast display, and bacterial display. One of the primary advantages of peptide discovery by bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide capture agent, due to both rapid growth of bacteria and direct utilization of the sorted cells displaying each individual peptide for the subsequent round of biopanning. We have previously isolated peptide affinity reagents towards protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis using a commercially available automated magnetic sorting platform with improved enrichment as compared to manual magnetic sorting. In this work, we focus on adapting our automated biopanning method to a more challenging sort, to demonstrate the specificity possible with peptide capture agents. This was achieved using non-toxic, recombinant variants of ricin and abrin, RiVax and abrax, respectively, which are structurally similar Type II ribosomal inactivating proteins with significant sequence homology. After only two rounds of biopanning, enrichment of peptide capture candidates binding abrax but not RiVax was achieved as demonstrated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) studies. Further sorting optimization included negative sorting against RiVax, proper selection of autoMACS programs for specific sorting rounds, and using freshly made buffer and freshly thawed protein target for each round of biopanning for continued enrichment over all four rounds. Most of the resulting candidates from biopanning for abrax binding peptides were able to bind abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be highly specific even at this early discovery stage.

  15. γ-irradiated ribosomes from Micrococcus radiodurans in a cell-free protein synthesizing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suessmuth, R.; Widmann, A.

    1979-01-01

    γ-irradiation inactivation of isolated ribosomes of Micrococcus radiodurans was studied by examining poly U directed synthesis of polyphenylalanine. Ribosomes of M. radiodurans did not show significant γ-radiation sensitivity up to a dose of approx. 11.6 k Gy. Cells of M. radiodurans take up more magnesium than E. coli cells under the same conditions. The magnesium content of ribosomes of M. radiodurans was 18% higher than that of E.coli ribosomes. A possible relation between Mg 2+ -content and γ-resistance is discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Ribosome dynamics and tRNA movement by time-resolved electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Niels; Konevega, Andrey L; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V; Stark, Holger

    2010-07-15

    The translocation step of protein synthesis entails large-scale rearrangements of the ribosome-transfer RNA (tRNA) complex. Here we have followed tRNA movement through the ribosome during translocation by time-resolved single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Unbiased computational sorting of cryo-EM images yielded 50 distinct three-dimensional reconstructions, showing the tRNAs in classical, hybrid and various novel intermediate states that provide trajectories and kinetic information about tRNA movement through the ribosome. The structures indicate how tRNA movement is coupled with global and local conformational changes of the ribosome, in particular of the head and body of the small ribosomal subunit, and show that dynamic interactions between tRNAs and ribosomal residues confine the path of the tRNAs through the ribosome. The temperature dependence of ribosome dynamics reveals a surprisingly flat energy landscape of conformational variations at physiological temperature. The ribosome functions as a Brownian machine that couples spontaneous conformational changes driven by thermal energy to directed movement.

  17. Ribosomes: Ribozymes that Survived Evolution Pressures but Is Paralyzed by Tiny Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonath, Ada

    An impressive number of crystal structures of ribosomes, the universal cellular machines that translate the genetic code into proteins, emerged during the last decade. The determination of ribosome high resolution structure, which was widely considered formidable, led to novel insights into the ribosomal function, namely, fidelity, catalytic mechanism, and polymerize activities. They also led to suggestions concerning its origin and shed light on the action, selectivity and synergism of ribosomal antibiotics; illuminated mechanisms acquiring bacterial resistance and provided structural information for drug improvement and design. These studies required the pioneering and implementation of advanced technologies, which directly influenced the remarkable increase of the number of structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank.

  18. Expression of ribosomal genes in pea cotyledons at the initial stages of germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumilevskaya, N.A.; Chumikhina, L.V.; Akhmatova, A.T.; Kretovich, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    The time of appearance of newly synthesized rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) in the ribosomes of pea cotyledons (Pisum sativum L.) during germination was investigated. The ribosomal fraction was isolated and analyzed according to the method of germination of the embryo in the presence of labeled precursors or after pulse labeling of the embryos at different stages of germination. For the identification of newly synthesized rRNAs in the ribosomes we estimated the relative stability of labeled RNAs to the action of RNase, the sedimentation rate, the ability to be methylated in vivo in the presence of [ 14 C]CH 3 -methionine, and the localization in the subunits of dissociated ribosomes. The presence of newly synthesized r-proteins in the ribosomes was judged on the basis of the electrophoretic similarity in SDS-disc electrophoresis of labeled polypeptides of purified ribosome preparations and of genuine r-proteins, as well as according to the localization of labeled proteins in the subunits of the dissociated ribosomes. It was shown that the expression of the ribosomal genes in highly specialized cells of pea cotyledons that have completed their growth occurs at very early stages of germination

  19. Exploration of Deregulated Long Non-Coding RNAs in Association with Hepatocarcinogenesis and Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jing, E-mail: js2182@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Siegel, Abby B. [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Remotti, Helen [Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Wang, Qiao; Shen, Yueyue [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Santella, Regina M. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-10

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are larger than 200 nucleotides in length and pervasively expressed across the genome. An increasing number of studies indicate that lncRNA transcripts play integral regulatory roles in cellular growth, division, differentiation and apoptosis. Deregulated lncRNAs have been observed in a variety of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We determined the expression profiles of 90 lncRNAs for 65 paired HCC tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues, and 55 lncRNAs were expressed in over 90% of samples. Eight lncRNAs were significantly down-regulated in HCC tumor compared to non-tumor tissues (p < 0.05), but no lncRNA achieved statistical significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Within tumor tissues, carrying more aberrant lncRNAs (6–7) was associated with a borderline significant reduction in survival (HR = 8.5, 95% CI: 1.0–72.5). The predictive accuracy depicted by the AUC was 0.93 for HCC survival when using seven deregulated lncRNAs (likelihood ratio test p = 0.001), which was similar to that combining the seven lncRNAs with tumor size and treatment (AUC = 0.96, sensitivity = 87%, specificity = 87%). These data suggest the potential association of deregulated lncRNAs with hepatocarcinogenesis and HCC survival.

  20. A robust optimization based approach for microgrid operation in deregulated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.A.; Gupta, Nand Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RO based approach developed for optimal MG operation in deregulated environment. • Wind uncertainty modeled by interval forecasting through ARIMA model. • Proposed approach evaluated using two realistic case studies. • Proposed approach evaluated the impact of degree of robustness. • Proposed approach gives a significant reduction in operation cost of microgrid. - Abstract: Micro Grids (MGs) are clusters of Distributed Energy Resource (DER) units and loads. MGs are self-sustainable and generally operated in two modes: (1) grid connected and (2) grid isolated. In deregulated environment, the operation of MG is managed by the Microgrid Operator (MO) with an objective to minimize the total cost of operation. The MG management is crucial in the deregulated power system due to (i) integration of intermittent renewable sources such as wind and Photo Voltaic (PV) generation, and (ii) volatile grid prices. This paper presents robust optimization based approach for optimal MG management considering wind power uncertainty. Time series based Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model is used to characterize the wind power uncertainty through interval forecasting. The proposed approach is illustrated through a case study having both dispatchable and non-dispatchable generators through different modes of operation. Further the impact of degree of robustness is analyzed in both cases on the total cost of operation of the MG. A comparative analysis between obtained results using proposed approach and other existing approach shows the strength of proposed approach in cost minimization in MG management